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Sample records for plasticity neuronal development

  1. MicroRNA networks direct neuronal development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Loohuis, N F M; Kos, A; Martens, G J M; Van Bokhoven, H; Nadif Kasri, N; Aschrafi, A

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In neurons, the functions of individual miRNAs are just beginning to emerge, and recent studies have elucidated roles for neural miRNAs at various stages of neuronal development and maturation, including neurite outgrowth, dendritogenesis, and spine formation. Notably, miRNAs regulate mRNA translation locally in the axosomal and synaptodendritic compartments, and thereby contribute to the dynamic spatial organization of axonal and dendritic structures and their function. Given the critical role for miRNAs in regulating early brain development and in mediating synaptic plasticity later in life, it is tempting to speculate that the pathology of neurological disorders is affected by altered expression or functioning of miRNAs. Here we provide an overview of recently identified mechanisms of neuronal development and plasticity involving miRNAs, and the consequences of miRNA dysregulation.

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics in neuronal injury, development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kyle H; Strack, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Mitochondria fulfill numerous cellular functions including ATP production, Ca(2+) buffering, neurotransmitter synthesis and degradation, ROS production and sequestration, apoptosis and intermediate metabolism. Mitochondrial dynamics, a collective term for the processes of mitochondrial fission, fusion and transport, governs mitochondrial function and localization within the cell. Correct balance of mitochondrial dynamics is especially important in neurons as mutations in fission and fusion enzymes cause peripheral neuropathies and impaired development of the nervous system in humans. Regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is partly accomplished through post-translational modification of mitochondrial fission and fusion enzymes, in turn influencing mitochondrial bioenergetics and transport. The importance of post-translational regulation is highlighted by numerous neurodegenerative disorders associated with post-translational modification of the mitochondrial fission enzyme Drp1. Not surprisingly, mitochondrial dynamics also play an important physiological role in the development of the nervous system and synaptic plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings underlying the mechanisms and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in relation to neurological disease, as well as the development and plasticity of the nervous system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Neuronal stathmins: a family of phosphoproteins cooperating for neuronal development, plasticity and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Stéphanie; Sobel, André

    2015-03-01

    Nervous system development, plasticity and regeneration require numerous, coordinated and finely tuned subcellular mechanisms. Phosphoproteins of the stathmin family, originally identified as intracellular signal relay proteins, are mostly or exclusively expressed in the nervous system with a high level of expression during brain development. Vertebrate stathmins 1-4 all possess a C-terminal "stathmin-like domain" that binds or releases tubulin in a phosphorylation dependent way, and hence participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, an essential process for neuronal differentiation. Contrary to stathmin 1, stathmins 2-4 possess an N-terminal extension whose reversible palmitoylation specifically targets them to the Golgi and intracellular membranes. Regulation of stathmins 2-4 palmitoylation is therefore an important regulatory mechanism that controls their shuttling to various neuronal compartments where they can then act locally. Expression of stathmins is upregulated during neuronal differentiation and plasticity, and altered in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental perturbation of stathmins expression in Drosophila or in neurons in culture revealed their importance in neuronal growth and differentiation, each stathmin fulfilling at least partially distinct and likely complementary roles. On the other hand, knock-out of stathmins in mice, with the exception of stathmin 2, resulted in mostly mild or no detected phenotype, revealing likely compensations among stathmins. Altogether, through their combinatorial expression and regulation by phosphorylation and by palmitoylation, and through their interactions with tubulin and other neuronal protein targets, the various stathmins appear as essential regulators of neuronal differentiation at the various stages during development and plasticity of the nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Editing the Neuronal Genome: a CRISPR View of Chromatin Regulation in Neuronal Development, Function, and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Marty G.; West, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic orchestration of gene expression is crucial for the proper differentiation, function, and adaptation of cells. In the brain, transcriptional regulation underlies the incredible diversity of neuronal cell types and contributes to the ability of neurons to adapt their function to the environment. Recently, novel methods for genome and epigenome editing have begun to revolutionize our understanding of gene regulatory mechanisms. In particular, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has proven to be a particularly accessible and adaptable technique for genome engineering. Here, we review the use of CRISPR/Cas9 in neurobiology and discuss how these studies have advanced understanding of nervous system development and plasticity. We cover four especially salient applications of CRISPR/Cas9: testing the consequences of enhancer mutations, tagging genes and gene products for visualization in live cells, directly activating or repressing enhancers in vivo, and manipulating the epigenome. In each case, we summarize findings from recent studies and discuss evolving adaptations of the method. PMID:28018138

  5. MicroRNA networks direct neuronal development and plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Loohuis, N.F.; Kos, A.; Martens, G.J.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Nadif Kasri, N.; Aschrafi, A.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In neurons, the functions of individual miRNAs are just beginning to emerge, and recent studies have elucidated roles for neural miRNAs at various stages of neuronal develo

  6. Sugar-dependent modulation of neuronal development, regeneration, and plasticity by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gregory M; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) play important roles in the developing and mature nervous system, where they guide axons, maintain stable connections, restrict synaptic plasticity, and prevent axon regeneration following CNS injury. The chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS GAG) chains that decorate CSPGs are essential for their functions. Through these sugar chains, CSPGs are able to bind and regulate the activity of a diverse range of proteins. CSPGs have been found both to promote and inhibit neuronal growth. They can promote neurite outgrowth by binding to various growth factors such as midkine (MK), pleiotrophin (PTN), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophin family members. CSPGs can also inhibit neuronal growth and limit plasticity by interacting with transmembrane receptors such as protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ), leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, and the Nogo receptors 1 and 3 (NgR1 and NgR3). These CS-protein interactions depend on specific sulfation patterns within the CS GAG chains, and accordingly, particular CS sulfation motifs are upregulated during development, in the mature nervous system, and in response to CNS injury. Thus, spatiotemporal regulation of CS GAG biosynthesis may provide an important mechanism to control the functions of CSPGs and to modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we will discuss these sulfation-dependent processes and highlight how the CS sugars on CSPGs contribute to neuronal growth, axon guidance, and plasticity in the nervous system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential neuronal plasticity in mouse hippocampus associated with various periods of enriched environment during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseiny, Salma; Pietri, Mariel; Petit-Paitel, Agnès; Zarif, Hadi; Heurteaux, Catherine; Chabry, Joëlle; Guyon, Alice

    2015-11-01

    Enriched environment (EE) is characterized by improved conditions for enhanced exploration, cognitive activity, social interaction and physical exercise. It has been shown that EE positively regulates the remodeling of neural circuits, memory consolidation, long-term changes in synaptic strength and neurogenesis. However, the fine mechanisms by which environment shapes the brain at different postnatal developmental stages and the duration required to induce such changes are still a matter of debate. In EE, large groups of mice were housed in bigger cages and were given toys, nesting materials and other equipment that promote physical activity to provide a stimulating environment. Weaned mice were housed in EE for 4, 6 or 8 weeks and compared with matched control mice that were raised in a standard environment. To investigate the differential effects of EE on immature and mature brains, we also housed young adult mice (8 weeks old) for 4 weeks in EE. We studied the influence of onset and duration of EE housing on the structure and function of hippocampal neurons. We found that: (1) EE enhances neurogenesis in juvenile, but not young adult mice; (2) EE increases the number of synaptic contacts at every stage; (3) long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous and miniature activity at the glutamatergic synapses are affected differently by EE depending on its onset and duration. Our study provides an integrative view of the role of EE during postnatal development in various mechanisms of plasticity in the hippocampus including neurogenesis, synaptic morphology and electrophysiological parameters of synaptic connectivity. This work provides an explanation for discrepancies found in the literature about the effects of EE on LTP and emphasizes the importance of environment on hippocampal plasticity.

  8. Epigenetic Basis of Neuronal and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Nina N; Sales, Amanda J; Joca, Samia R

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal network and plasticity change as a function of experience. Altered neural connectivity leads to distinct transcriptional programs of neuronal plasticity-related genes. The environmental challenges throughout life may promote long-lasting reprogramming of gene expression and the development of brain disorders. The modifications in neuronal epigenome mediate gene-environmental interactions and are required for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal differentiation, maturation and plasticity. Here, we highlight the latest advances in understanding the role of the main players of epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation and demethylation, histone modifications, chromatin-remodeling enzymes, transposons, and non-coding RNAs) in activity-dependent and long- term neural and synaptic plasticity. The review focuses on both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression levels, including the processes of promoter activation, alternative splicing, regulation of stability of gene transcripts by natural antisense RNAs, and alternative polyadenylation. Further, we discuss the epigenetic aspects of impaired neuronal plasticity and the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental (Rett syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, genomic imprinting disorders, schizophrenia, and others), stressrelated (mood disorders) and neurodegenerative Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disorders. The review also highlights the pharmacological compounds that modulate epigenetic programming of gene expression, the potential treatment strategies of discussed brain disorders, and the questions that should be addressed during the development of effective and safe approaches for the treatment of brain disorders.

  9. Microglia in neuronal plasticity: Influence of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnes; Joffre, Corinne; Wohleb, Eric S; Layé, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has previously been regarded as an immune-privileged site with the absence of immune cell responses but this dogma was not entirely true. Microglia are the brain innate immune cells and recent findings indicate that they participate both in CNS disease and infection as well as facilitate normal CNS function. Microglia are highly plastic and play integral roles in sculpting the structure of the CNS, refining neuronal circuitry and connectivity, and contribute actively to neuronal plasticity in the healthy brain. Interestingly, psychological stress can perturb the function of microglia in association with an impaired neuronal plasticity and the development of emotional behavior alterations. As a result it seemed important to describe in this review some findings indicating that the stress-induced microglia dysfunction may underlie neuroplasticity deficits associated to many mood disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'.

  10. Xenopus laevis neuronal cell adhesion molecule (nrcam): plasticity of a CAM in the developing nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokapally, Ashwin; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Hollemann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Neuron-glial-related cell adhesion molecule (NRCAM) is a neuronal cell adhesion molecule of the L1 immunoglobulin superfamily, which plays diverse roles during nervous system development including axon growth and guidance, synapse formation, and formation of the myelinated nerve. Perturbations in NRCAM function cause a wide variety of disorders, which can affect wiring and targeting of neurons, or cause psychiatric disorders as well as cancers through abnormal modulation of signaling events. In the present study, we characterize the Xenopus laevis homolog of nrcam. Expression of Xenopus nrcam is most abundant along the dorsal midline throughout the developing brain and in the outer nuclear layer of the retina.

  11. Neuronal cytoskeleton in synaptic plasticity and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Weeks, Phillip R; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-04-01

    During development, dynamic changes in the axonal growth cone and dendrite are necessary for exploratory movements underlying initial axo-dendritic contact and ultimately the formation of a functional synapse. In the adult central nervous system, an impressive degree of plasticity is retained through morphological and molecular rearrangements in the pre- and post-synaptic compartments that underlie the strengthening or weakening of synaptic pathways. Plasticity is regulated by the interplay of permissive and inhibitory extracellular cues, which signal through receptors at the synapse to regulate the closure of critical periods of developmental plasticity as well as by acute changes in plasticity in response to experience and activity in the adult. The molecular underpinnings of synaptic plasticity are actively studied and it is clear that the cytoskeleton is a key substrate for many cues that affect plasticity. Many of the cues that restrict synaptic plasticity exhibit residual activity in the injured adult CNS and restrict regenerative growth by targeting the cytoskeleton. Here, we review some of the latest insights into how cytoskeletal remodeling affects neuronal plasticity and discuss how the cytoskeleton is being targeted in an effort to promote plasticity and repair following traumatic injury in the central nervous system. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Cell Death, Neuronal Plasticity and Functional Loading in the Development of the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research on the precise timing and regulation of neuron production and maturation in the vestibular and visual systems of Wistar rats and several inbred strains of mice (C57B16 and Pallid mutant) concentrated upon establishing a timing baseline for mitotic development of the neurons of the vestibular nuclei and the peripheral vestibular sensory structures (maculae, cristae). This involved studies of the timing and site of neuronal cell birth and preliminary studies of neuronal cell death in both central and peripheral elements of the mammalian vestibular system. Studies on neuronal generation and maturation in the retina were recently added to provide a mechanism for more properly defining the in utero' developmental age of the individual fetal subject and to closely monitor potential transplacental effects of environmentally stressed maternal systems. Information is given on current efforts concentrating upon the (1) perinatal period of development (E18 thru P14) and (2) the role of cell death in response to variation in the functional loading of the vestibular and proprioreceptive systems in developing mammalian organisms.

  13. Neuronal network plasticity and recovery from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Eero

    2013-09-01

    The brain processes sensory information in neuronal networks that are shaped by experience, particularly during early life, to optimally represent the internal and external milieu. Recent surprising findings have revealed that antidepressant drugs reactivate a window of juvenile-like plasticity in the adult cortex. When antidepressant-induced plasticity was combined with appropriate rehabilitation, it brought about a functional recovery of abnormally wired neuronal networks. These observations suggest that antidepressants act permissively to facilitate environmental influence on neuronal network reorganization and so provide a plausible neurobiological explanation for the enhanced effect of combining antidepressant treatment with psychotherapy. The results emphasize that pharmacological and psychological treatments of mood disorders are closely entwined: the effect of antidepressant-induced plasticity is facilitated by rehabilitation, such as psychotherapy, that guides the plastic networks, and psychotherapy benefits from the enhanced plasticity provided by the drug treatment. Optimized combinations of pharmacological and psychological treatments might help make best use of existing antidepressant drugs and reduce the number of treatment-resistant patients. The network hypothesis of antidepressant action presented here proposes that recovery from depression and related mood disorders is a gradual process that develops slowly and is facilitated by structured guidance and rehabilitation.

  14. Anti-homeostatic synaptic plasticity of glycine receptor function after chronic strychnine in developing cultured mouse spinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, M A; Castro, P A; Sepulveda, F J; Cuevas, M; Tapia, J C; Izaurieta, P; van Zundert, B; Aguayo, L G

    2007-03-01

    In this study, we describe a novel form of anti-homeostatic plasticity produced after culturing spinal neurons with strychnine, but not bicuculline or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Strychnine caused a large increase in network excitability, detected as spontaneous synaptic currents and calcium transients. The calcium transients were associated with action potential firing and activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors as they were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX), bicuculline, and CNQX. After chronic blockade of glycine receptors (GlyRs), the frequency of synaptic transmission showed a significant enhancement demonstrating the phenomenon of anti-homeostatic plasticity. Spontaneous inhibitory glycinergic currents in treated cells showed a fourfold increase in frequency (from 0.55 to 2.4 Hz) and a 184% increase in average peak amplitude compared with control. Furthermore, the augmentation in excitability accelerated the decay time constant of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents. Strychnine caused an increase in GlyR current density, without changes in the apparent affinity. These findings support the idea of a post-synaptic action that partly explains the increase in synaptic transmission. This phenomenon of synaptic plasticity was blocked by TTX, an antibody against brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and K252a suggesting the involvement of the neuronal activity-dependent BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway. These results show that the properties of GlyRs are regulated by the degree of neuronal activity in the developing network.

  15. Linking neuronal ensembles by associative synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan

    Full Text Available Synchronized activity in ensembles of neurons recruited by excitatory afferents is thought to contribute to the coding information in the brain. However, the mechanisms by which neuronal ensembles are generated and modified are not known. Here we show that in rat hippocampal slices associative synaptic plasticity enables ensembles of neurons to change by incorporating neurons belonging to different ensembles. Associative synaptic plasticity redistributes the composition of different ensembles recruited by distinct inputs such as to specifically increase the similarity between the ensembles. These results show that in the hippocampus, the ensemble of neurons recruited by a given afferent projection is fluid and can be rapidly and persistently modified to specifically include neurons from different ensembles. This linking of ensembles may contribute to the formation of associative memories.

  16. Neuronal plasticity and thalamocortical sleep and waking oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Throughout life, thalamocortical (TC) network alternates between activated states (wake or rapid eye movement sleep) and slow oscillatory state dominating slow-wave sleep. The patterns of neuronal firing are different during these distinct states. I propose that due to relatively regular firing, the activated states preset some steady state synaptic plasticity and that the silent periods of slow-wave sleep contribute to a release from this steady state synaptic plasticity. In this respect, I discuss how states of vigilance affect short-, mid-, and long-term synaptic plasticity, intrinsic neuronal plasticity, as well as homeostatic plasticity. Finally, I suggest that slow oscillation is intrinsic property of cortical network and brain homeostatic mechanisms are tuned to use all forms of plasticity to bring cortical network to the state of slow oscillation. However, prolonged and profound shift from this homeostatic balance could lead to development of paroxysmal hyperexcitability and seizures as in the case of brain trauma. PMID:21854960

  17. Neuronal plasticity: beyond the critical period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Mark; Bonhoeffer, Tobias

    2014-11-06

    Neuronal plasticity in the brain is greatly enhanced during critical periods early in life and was long thought to be rather limited thereafter. Studies in primary sensory areas of the neocortex have revealed a substantial degree of plasticity in the mature brain, too. Often, plasticity in the adult neocortex lies dormant but can be reactivated by modifications of sensory input or sensory-motor interactions, which alter the level and pattern of activity in cortical circuits. Such interventions, potentially in combination with drugs targeting molecular brakes on plasticity present in the adult brain, might help recovery of function in the injured or diseased brain.

  18. S-nitrosation and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A I; Martínez-Ruiz, A; Araújo, I M

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has long been recognized as a multifaceted participant in brain physiology. Despite the knowledge that was gathered over many years regarding the contribution of NO to neuronal plasticity, for example the ability of the brain to change in response to new stimuli, only in recent years have we begun to understand how NO acts on the molecular and cellular level to orchestrate such important phenomena as synaptic plasticity (modification of the strength of existing synapses) or the formation of new synapses (synaptogenesis) and new neurons (neurogenesis). Post-translational modification of proteins by NO derivatives or reactive nitrogen species is a non-classical mechanism for signalling by NO. S-nitrosation is a reversible post-translational modification of thiol groups (mainly on cysteines) that may result in a change of function of the modified protein. S-nitrosation of key target proteins has emerged as a main regulatory mechanism by which NO can influence several levels of brain plasticity, which are reviewed in this work. Understanding how S-nitrosation contributes to neural plasticity can help us to better understand the physiology of these processes, and to better address pathological changes in plasticity that are involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Decoding the Epigenetic Language of Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Emiliana; Nestler, Eric J.; Allis, C. David; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Neurons are submitted to an exceptional variety of stimuli and are able to convert these into high-order functions, such as storing memories, controlling behavior, and governing consciousness. These unique properties are based on the highly flexible nature of neurons, a characteristic that can be regulated by the complex molecular machinery that controls gene expression. Epigenetic control, which largely involves events of chromatin remodeling, appears to be one way in which transcriptional regulation of gene expression can be modified in neurons. This review will focus on how epigenetic control in the mature nervous system may guide dynamic plasticity processes and long-lasting cellular neuronal responses. We outline the molecular pathways underlying chromatin transitions, propose the presence of an “epigenetic indexing code,” and discuss how central findings accumulating at an exponential pace in the field of epigenetics are conceptually changing our perspective of adult brain function. PMID:19109904

  20. Human mirror neuron system and its plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Tifei Yuan; Yin Wang; Jun Ding

    2008-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) was first discovered in non-human primates; these neurons fire when a monkey performs an action or observes another monkey (or even some people) performing that same action. Recent findings have suggested that neural rehabilitation might be achieved through the activation of the MNS in patients after stroke. We propose two major mechanisms (one involving adult neurogenesis and another involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor) that may underlie the activation, modulation and expe-rience-dependent plasticity in the MNS, for further study on promoting central nerve functional reconstruc-tion and rehabilitation of patients with central nervous system injury.

  1. Cellular and molecular neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Hovda, David A

    2015-01-01

    The brain has the capability to adapt to function when tissue is compromised. This capability of adaptation paves the road to recovery and allows for rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This chapter addresses neuroplasticity within the context of TBI. Here neuroplasticity is defined as changes in neuronal structure and function, including synaptic changes as well as modifications in neural pathways. First, the influence of TBI pathology on neuroplasticity is addressed. Here, proteins that are important in neuroplasticity are introduced and a description given of how these are affected in a temporal and severity-dependent manner. Secondly, given that we are becoming increasingly aware that the brain's response to injury is highly influenced by the environmental milieu, the manner in which behavioral manipulations have an effect on TBI-associated neuroplasticity is addressed. A description is given of how specific environmental qualities may facilitate or hinder neuroplasticity. Finally, the long-term effects of neuroplasticity and the relevance it has to rehabilitation are described.

  2. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity allows the central nervous system to learn skills and remember information, to reorganize neuronal networks in response to environmental stimulation, and to recover from brain and spinal cord injuries. Neuronal plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and it is usually adaptive and beneficial but can also be maladaptive…

  3. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity allows the central nervous system to learn skills and remember information, to reorganize neuronal networks in response to environmental stimulation, and to recover from brain and spinal cord injuries. Neuronal plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and it is usually adaptive and beneficial but can also be maladaptive…

  4. Kainate receptors: multiple roles in neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihra, Talvinder S; Flores, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)- and AMPA-type, as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors have been extensively invoked in plasticity. Until relatively recently, however, kainate-type receptors (KARs) had been the most elusive to study because of the lack of appropriate pharmacological tools to specifically address their roles. With the development of selective glutamate receptor antagonists, and knockout mice with specific KAR subunits deleted, the functions of KARs in neuromodulation and synaptic transmission, together with their involvement in some types of plasticity, have been extensively probed in the central nervous system. In this review, we summarize the findings related to the roles of KARs in short- and long-term forms of plasticity, primarily in the hippocampus, where KAR function and synaptic plasticity have received avid attention.

  5. Synaptic Plasticity onto Dopamine Neurons Shapes Fear Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Marco; Umanah, George Kwabena Essien; Ribeiro, Sissi Palma; Chen, Rong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar Senthil; Yau, Hau-Jie; Eacker, Stephen; Dawson, Valina Lynn; Dawson, Ted Murray; Bonci, Antonello

    2017-01-18

    Fear learning is a fundamental behavioral process that requires dopamine (DA) release. Experience-dependent synaptic plasticity occurs on DA neurons while an organism is engaged in aversive experiences. However, whether synaptic plasticity onto DA neurons is causally involved in aversion learning is unknown. Here, we show that a stress priming procedure enhances fear learning by engaging VTA synaptic plasticity. Moreover, we took advantage of the ability of the ATPase Thorase to regulate the internalization of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in order to selectively manipulate glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on DA neurons. Genetic ablation of Thorase in DAT(+) neurons produced increased AMPAR surface expression and function that lead to impaired induction of both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP). Strikingly, animals lacking Thorase in DAT(+) neurons expressed greater associative learning in a fear conditioning paradigm. In conclusion, our data provide a novel, causal link between synaptic plasticity onto DA neurons and fear learning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Development of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećanac Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient Times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern Era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  7. Error correction and fast detectors implemented by ultrafast neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Marmari, Hagar; Kanter, Ido

    2014-04-01

    We experimentally show that the neuron functions as a precise time integrator, where the accumulated changes in neuronal response latencies, under complex and random stimulation patterns, are solely a function of a global quantity, the average time lag between stimulations. In contrast, momentary leaps in the neuronal response latency follow trends of consecutive stimulations, indicating ultrafast neuronal plasticity. On a circuit level, this ultrafast neuronal plasticity phenomenon implements error-correction mechanisms and fast detectors for misplaced stimulations. Additionally, at moderate (high) stimulation rates this phenomenon destabilizes (stabilizes) a periodic neuronal activity disrupted by misplaced stimulations.

  8. Astrocyte and Neuronal Plasticity in the Somatosensory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Robert E; Butcher, John B; Parri, H Rheinallt; Glazewski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Changing the whisker complement on a rodent's snout can lead to two forms of experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) in the neurons of the barrel cortex, where whiskers are somatotopically represented. One form, termed coding plasticity, concerns changes in synaptic transmission and connectivity between neurons. This is thought to underlie learning and memory processes and so adaptation to a changing environment. The second, called homeostatic plasticity, serves to maintain a restricted dynamic range of neuronal activity thus preventing its saturation or total downregulation. Current explanatory models of cortical EDP are almost exclusively neurocentric. However, in recent years, increasing evidence has emerged on the role of astrocytes in brain function, including plasticity. Indeed, astrocytes appear as necessary partners of neurons at the core of the mechanisms of coding and homeostatic plasticity recorded in neurons. In addition to neuronal plasticity, several different forms of astrocytic plasticity have recently been discovered. They extend from changes in receptor expression and dynamic changes in morphology to alteration in gliotransmitter release. It is however unclear how astrocytic plasticity contributes to the neuronal EDP. Here, we review the known and possible roles for astrocytes in the barrel cortex, including its plasticity.

  9. Astrocyte and Neuronal Plasticity in the Somatosensory System

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Robert E.; Butcher, John B.; Parri, H. Rheinallt; Glazewski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Changing the whisker complement on a rodent's snout can lead to two forms of experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) in the neurons of the barrel cortex, where whiskers are somatotopically represented. One form, termed coding plasticity, concerns changes in synaptic transmission and connectivity between neurons. This is thought to underlie learning and memory processes and so adaptation to a changing environment. The second, called homeostatic plasticity, serves to maintain a restricted dynamic...

  10. Role of BDNF epigenetics in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Nina N

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator of the activity-dependent processes in the brain that have a major impact on neuronal development and plasticity. Impaired control of neuronal activity-induced BDNF expression mediates the pathogenesis of various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Different environmental stimuli, such as the use of pharmacological compounds, physical and learning exercises or stress exposure, lead to activation of specific neuronal networks. These processes entail tight temporal and spatial transcriptional control of numerous BDNF splice variants through epigenetic mechanisms. The present review highlights recent findings on the dynamic and long-term epigenetic programming of BDNF gene expression by the DNA methylation, histone-modifying and microRNA machineries. The review also summarizes the current knowledge on the activity-dependent BDNF mRNA trafficking critical for rapid local regulation of BDNF levels and synaptic plasticity. Current data open novel directions for discovery of new promising therapeutic targets for treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. microRNAs and the regulation of neuronal plasticity under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, M; Aschrafi, A; Bielefeld, P; Doxakis, E; Fitzsimons, C P

    2013-06-25

    In the brain, the connection between sensory information triggered by the presence of a stressor and the organism's reaction involves limbic areas such as the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Consequently, these brain regions are the most sensitive to stress-induced changes in neuronal plasticity. However, the specific effects of stress on neuronal plasticity in these regions largely differ. Despite these regional differences, in many cases the steps leading to brain adaptation to stress involve highly coordinated changes in gene expression affecting cell metabolism, neuronal plasticity and synaptic transmission. In adult life the effects of stress on neuronal plasticity are largely reversible but stress in early life induces persistent changes in neuronal plasticity that increases vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and aging-related cognitive decline, suggesting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microRNAs (miRs) are key players in epigenetic regulation. In this forefront review we present a critical look on the literature demonstrating the regulation of neuronal plasticity by miRs and the molecular mechanisms of target specificity in neurons. We propose that further progress in the identification of miR's function beyond single target identification would require a combination of developmental expression studies, bioinformatics and a deeper understanding of large networks of targets involved in epigenetic regulation. This will help to extend our understanding of the role miRs play in the regulation of stress-induced neuronal plasticity. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Homeostatic Plasticity of Subcellular Neuronal Structures: From Inputs to Outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefelmeyer, Winnie; Puhl, Christopher J; Burrone, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Neurons in the brain are highly plastic, allowing an organism to learn and adapt to its environment. However, this ongoing plasticity is also inherently unstable, potentially leading to aberrant levels of circuit activity. Homeostatic forms of plasticity are thought to provide a means of controlling neuronal activity by avoiding extremes and allowing network stability. Recent work has shown that many of these homeostatic modifications change the structure of subcellular neuronal compartments, ranging from changes to synaptic inputs at both excitatory and inhibitory compartments to modulation of neuronal output through changes at the axon initial segment (AIS) and presynaptic terminals. Here we review these different forms of structural plasticity in neurons and the effects they may have on network function. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and abnormal neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alexandre E

    2011-06-01

    The ingestion of alcohol during pregnancy can result in a group of neurobehavioral abnormalities collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). During the past decade, studies using animal models indicated that early alcohol exposure can dramatically affect neuronal plasticity, an essential property of the central nervous system responsible for the normal wiring of the brain and involved in processes such as learning and memory. The abnormalities in neuronal plasticity caused by alcohol can explain many of the neurobehavioral deficits observed in FASD. Conversely, improving neuronal plasticity may have important therapeutic benefits. In this review, the author discuss the mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities and comment on recent pharmacological approaches that have been showing promising results in improving neuronal plasticity in FASD.

  14. Neonatal Treatment with a Pegylated Leptin Antagonist Induces Sexually Dimorphic Effects on Neurones and Glial Cells, and on Markers of Synaptic Plasticity in the Developing Rat Hippocampal Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gallardo, M; Antón-Fernández, A; Llorente, R; Mela, V; Llorente-Berzal, A; Prada, C; Viveros, M P

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to better understand the role of the neonatal leptin surge, which peaks on postnatal day (PND)9-10, on the development of the hippocampal formation. Accordingly, male and female rats were administered with a pegylated leptin antagonist on PND9 and the expression of neurones, glial cells and diverse markers of synaptic plasticity was then analysed by immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal formation. Antagonism of the actions of leptin at this specific postnatal stage altered the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein positive cells, and also affected type 1 cannabinoid receptors, synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), with the latter effect being sexually dimorphic. The results indicate that the physiological leptin surge occurring around PND 9-10 is critical for hippocampal formation development and that the dynamics of leptin activity might be different in males and females. The data obtained also suggest that some but not all the previously reported effects of maternal deprivation on hippocampal formation development (which markedly reduces leptin levels at PND 9-10) might be mediated by leptin deficiency in these animals.

  15. Actin Tyrosine-53-Phosphorylation in Neuronal Maturation and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Enni; Englund, Jonas; Minkeviciene, Rimante; Koskinen, Mikko; Segerstråle, Mikael; Castrén, Eero; Taira, Tomi; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2016-05-11

    Rapid reorganization and stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton in dendritic spines enables cellular processes underlying learning, such as long-term potentiation (LTP). Dendritic spines are enriched in exceptionally short and dynamic actin filaments, but the studies so far have not revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying the high actin dynamics in dendritic spines. Here, we show that actin in dendritic spines is dynamically phosphorylated at tyrosine-53 (Y53) in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. Our findings show that actin phosphorylation increases the turnover rate of actin filaments and promotes the short-term dynamics of dendritic spines. During neuronal maturation, actin phosphorylation peaks at the first weeks of morphogenesis, when dendritic spines form, and the amount of Y53-phosphorylated actin decreases when spines mature and stabilize. Induction of LTP transiently increases the amount of phosphorylated actin and LTP induction is deficient in neurons expressing mutant actin that mimics phosphorylation. Actin phosphorylation provides a molecular mechanism to maintain the high actin dynamics in dendritic spines during neuronal development and to induce fast reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in synaptic plasticity. In turn, dephosphorylation of actin is required for the stabilization of actin filaments that is necessary for proper dendritic spine maturation and LTP maintenance. Dendritic spines are small protrusions from neuronal dendrites where the postsynaptic components of most excitatory synapses reside. Precise control of dendritic spine morphology and density is critical for normal brain function. Accordingly, aberrant spine morphology is linked to many neurological diseases. The actin cytoskeleton is a structural element underlying the proper morphology of dendritic spines. Therefore, defects in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons have been implicated in neurological diseases. Here, we revealed a novel mechanism for

  16. Adult myelination:wrapping up neuronal plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Megan ORourke; Robert Gasperini; Kaylene M.Young

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we outline the major neural plasticity mechanisms that have been identiifed in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and offer a perspective on how they regulate CNS function. In particular we examine how myelin plasticity can operate alongside neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity to inlfuence information processing and transfer in the mature CNS.

  17. Dendritic spine actin dynamics in neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushchenko, Iryna; Koskinen, Mikko; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the postsynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system exist on small bulbous structures on dendrites known as dendritic spines. The actin cytoskeleton is a structural element underlying the proper development and morphology of dendritic spines. Synaptic activity patterns rapidly change actin dynamics, leading to morphological changes in dendritic spines. In this mini-review, we will discuss recent findings on neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity-induced changes in the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We propose that actin dynamics in dendritic spines decrease through actin filament crosslinking during neuronal maturation. In long-term potentiation, we evaluate the model of fast breakdown of actin filaments through severing and rebuilding through polymerization and later stabilization through crosslinking. We will discuss the role of Ca(2+) in long-term depression, and suggest that actin filaments are dissolved through actin filament severing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neuronal plasticity and neurotrophic factors in drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, E; Antila, H

    2017-08-01

    Neurotrophic factors, particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other members of the neurotrophin family, are central mediators of the activity-dependent plasticity through which environmental experiences, such as sensory information are translated into the structure and function of neuronal networks. Synthesis, release and action of BDNF is regulated by neuronal activity and BDNF in turn leads to trophic effects such as formation, stabilization and potentiation of synapses through its high-affinity TrkB receptors. Several clinically available drugs activate neurotrophin signaling and neuronal plasticity. In particular, antidepressant drugs rapidly activate TrkB signaling and gradually increase BDNF expression, and the behavioral effects of antidepressants are mediated by and dependent on BDNF signaling through TrkB at least in rodents. These findings indicate that antidepressants, widely used drugs, effectively act as TrkB activators. They further imply that neuronal plasticity is a central mechanism in the action of antidepressant drugs. Indeed, it was recently discovered that antidepressants reactivate a state of plasticity in the adult cerebral cortex that closely resembles the enhanced plasticity normally observed during postnatal critical periods. This state of induced plasticity, known as iPlasticity, allows environmental stimuli to beneficially reorganize networks abnormally wired during early life. iPlasticity has been observed in cortical as well as subcortical networks and is induced by several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. iPlasticity is a new pharmacological principle where drug treatment and rehabilitation cooperate; the drug acts permissively to enhance plasticity and rehabilitation provides activity to guide the appropriate wiring of the plastic network. Optimization of iPlastic drug treatment with novel means of rehabilitation may help improve the efficacy of available drug treatments and expand the use of

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal synaptic plasticity: systems biology meets computational neuroscience in the wilds of synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Kim T; Jedrzejewska-Szmek, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among signaling pathways that are activated by transmembrane receptors produce complex networks and emergent dynamical behaviors that are implicated in synaptic plasticity. Temporal dynamics and spatial aspects are critical determinants of cell responses such as synaptic plasticity, although the mapping between spatiotemporal activity pattern and direction of synaptic plasticity is not completely understood. Computational modeling of neuronal signaling pathways has significantly contributed to understanding signaling pathways underlying synaptic plasticity. Spatial models of signaling pathways in hippocampal neurons have revealed mechanisms underlying the spatial distribution of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) activation in hippocampal neurons. Other spatial models have demonstrated that the major role of anchoring proteins in striatal and hippocampal synaptic plasticity is to place molecules near their activators. Simulations of yet other models have revealed that the spatial distribution of synaptic plasticity may differ for potentiation versus depression. In general, the most significant advances have been made by interactive modeling and experiments; thus, an interdisciplinary approach should be applied to investigate critical issues in neuronal signaling pathways. These issues include identifying which transmembrane receptors are key for activating ERK in neurons, and the crucial targets of kinases that produce long-lasting synaptic plasticity. Although the number of computer programs for computationally efficient simulation of large reaction-diffusion networks is increasing, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis in these spatial models remain more difficult than in single compartment models. Advances in live cell imaging coupled with further software development will continue to accelerate the development of spatial models of synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Astrocyte plasticity: implications for synaptic and neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttimaki, Tiina M; Parri, H Rheinallt

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytes are increasingly implicated in a range of functions in the brain, many of which were previously ascribed to neurons. Much of the prevailing interest centers on the role of astrocytes in the modulation of synaptic transmission and their involvement in the induction of forms of plasticity such as long-term potentiation and long-term depression. However, there is also an increasing realization that astrocytes themselves can undergo plasticity. This plasticity may be manifest as changes in protein expression which may modify calcium activity within the cells, changes in morphology that affect the environment of the synapse and the extracellular space, or changes in gap junction astrocyte coupling that modify the transfer of ions and metabolites through astrocyte networks. Plasticity in the way that astrocytes release gliotransmitters can also have direct effects on synaptic activity and neuronal excitability. Astrocyte plasticity can potentially have profound effects on neuronal network activity and be recruited in pathological conditions. An emerging principle of astrocyte plasticity is that it is often induced by neuronal activity, reinforcing our emerging understanding of the working brain as a constant interaction between neurons and glial cells.

  1. Synaptic plasticity in inhibitory neurons of the auditory brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kevin J; Trussell, Laurence O

    2011-04-01

    There is a growing appreciation of synaptic plasticity in the early levels of auditory processing, and particularly of its role in inhibitory circuits. Synaptic strength in auditory brainstem and midbrain is sensitive to standard protocols for induction of long-term depression, potentiation, and spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Differential forms of plasticity are operative at synapses onto inhibitory versus excitatory neurons within a circuit, and together these could serve to tune circuits involved in sound localization or multisensory integration. Such activity-dependent control of synaptic function in inhibitory neurons may also be expressed after hearing loss and could underlie persistent neuronal activity in patients with tinnitus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  2. Diet and cognition: interplay between cell metabolism and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Tyagi, Ethika

    2013-11-01

    To discuss studies in humans and animals revealing the ability of foods to benefit the brain: new information with regards to mechanisms of action and the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Dietary factors exert their effects on the brain by affecting molecular events related to the management of energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity. Energy metabolism influences neuronal function, neuronal signaling, and synaptic plasticity, ultimately affecting mental health. Epigenetic regulation of neuronal plasticity appears as an important mechanism by which foods can prolong their effects on long-term neuronal plasticity. The prime focus of the discussion is to emphasize the role of cell metabolism as a mediator for the action of foods on the brain. Oxidative stress promotes damage to phospholipids present in the plasma membrane such as the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexenoic acid, disrupting neuronal signaling. Thus, dietary docosahexenoic acid seems crucial for supporting plasma membrane function, interneuronal signaling, and cognition. The dual action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in neuronal metabolism and synaptic plasticity is crucial for activating signaling cascades under the action of diet and other environmental factors, using mechanisms of epigenetic regulation.

  3. Mechanisms of Gravity-Evoked Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The grant focuses on a gene we identified called, serum and glucocorticoid- induced kinase (SGK), during a previously funded NASA project. The abundance of SGK messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein is increased in CNS tissues from animals reared in microgravity in comparison with 1G reared animals. In the funded proposal we had three aims: 1) characterize the distribution of SGK mRNA in the developing and adult rat CNS, 2) determine if expression of enzymatically active or inactive forms of SGK in cells influenced cell morphology (neurite growth), and 2) determine if SGK is a CREB kinase - that is, a protein kinase that adds phosphate groups to the transcription factor CREB. Over the past year we have made strong progress in the two most difficult parts of the project, namely specific aims 2 and 3. In specific aim #2 we planned to express a dominant negative or a constitutively active form of SGK in PC12 cells and assay the effects on neurite growth. Several methods are available for examining the effects of a transgene on PC12 neurite growth. Relevant variables include the performance of the assay +/- serum, +/- NGF, substratum for growth, timing between transfection and assay. Over the past 8 months we have customized the assay to enable us to most readily determine the effects of transgene expression on neurite growth. We have also compared the relative utility of transfecting DNA as opposed to protein itself. We are now well positioned to study the effects of SGK on neurite growth. We have also made progress in parallel studies in primary neurons. We have made constructs which will lead to transgene expression in cultures of spinal cord neurons. Co-transfection of a reporter and the SGK constructs can now be performed.

  4. Receptive field plasticity of neurons in rat auditory cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wenwei; GAO Lixia; SUN Xinde

    2004-01-01

    Using conventional electrophysiological technique, we investigated the plasticity of the frequency receptive fields (RF) of auditory cortex (AC) neurons in rats. In the AC, when the frequency difference between conditioning stimulus frequency (CSF) and the best frequency (BF) was in the range of 1-4 kHz, the frequency RF of AC neurons shifted. The smaller the differences between CSF and BF, the higher the probability of the RF shift and the greater the degree of the RF shift. To some extent, the plasticity of RF was dependent on the duration of the session of conditioning stimulus (CS). When the frequency difference between CSF and BF was bigger, the duration of the CS session needed to induce the plasticity was longer. The recovery time course of the frequency RF showed opposite changes after CS cessation.The RF shift could be induced by the frequency that was either higher or lower than the control BF, demonstrating no clear directional preference. The frequency RF of some neurons showed bidirectional shift, and the RF of other neurons showed single directional shift. The results suggest that the frequency RF plasticity of AC neurons could be considered as an ideal model for studying plasticity mechanism. The present study also provides important evidence for further study of learning and memory in auditory system.

  5. Bursting and synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Networks of neonatal cortical neurons, cultured on multi electrode arrays (MEAs) exhibit spontaneous action potential firings. The electrodes embedded in the glass surface of a MEA can be used to record and stimulate activity at 60 sites in a network of ~50.000 neurons. Such in-vitro networks enable

  6. The plastic brain: neoliberalism and the neuronal self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts-Taylor, Victoria

    2010-11-01

    Neuroscience-based representations and practices of the brain aimed at lay populations present the brain in ways that both affirm biological determinism and also celebrate plasticity, or the brain's ability to change structure and function. Popular uses of neuroscientific theories of brain plasticity are saturated with a neoliberal vision of the subject. Against more optimistic readings of plasticity, I view the popular deployment of plasticity through the framework of governmentality. I describe how popular brain discourse on plasticity opens up the brain to personal techniques of enhancement and risk avoidance, and how it promotes a neuronal self. I situate brain plasticity in a context of biomedical neoliberalism, where the engineering and modification of biological life is positioned as essential to selfhood and citizenship.

  7. Mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics in neurodegeneration and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, A M; Delerue, T; Millet, A M; Moulis, M F; David, C; Daloyau, M; Arnauné-Pelloquin, L; Davezac, N; Mils, V; Miquel, M C; Rojo, M; Belenguer, P

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that continually move, fuse and divide. The dynamic balance of fusion and fission of mitochondria determines their morphology and allows their immediate adaptation to energetic needs, keeps mitochondria in good health by restoring or removing damaged organelles or precipitates cells in apoptosis in cases of severe defects. Mitochondrial fusion and fission are essential in mammals and their disturbances are associated with several diseases. However, while mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics, and the proteins that control these processes, are ubiquitous, associated diseases are primarily neurological disorders. Accordingly, inactivation of the main actors of mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics is associated with defects in neuronal development, plasticity and functioning, both ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we present the central actors of mitochondrial fusion and fission and review the role of mitochondrial dynamics in neuronal physiology and pathophysiology. Particular emphasis is placed on the three main actors of these processes i.e. DRP1,MFN1-2, and OPA1 as well as on GDAP1, a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane preferentially expressed in neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondria & Brain.

  8. Opposing Effects of Neuronal Activity on Structural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Michael; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The connectivity of the brain is continuously adjusted to new environmental influences by several activity-dependent adaptive processes. The most investigated adaptive mechanism is activity-dependent functional or synaptic plasticity regulating the transmission efficacy of existing synapses. Another important but less prominently discussed adaptive process is structural plasticity, which changes the connectivity by the formation and deletion of synapses. In this review, we show, based on experimental evidence, that structural plasticity can be classified similar to synaptic plasticity into two categories: (i) Hebbian structural plasticity, which leads to an increase (decrease) of the number of synapses during phases of high (low) neuronal activity and (ii) homeostatic structural plasticity, which balances these changes by removing and adding synapses. Furthermore, based on experimental and theoretical insights, we argue that each type of structural plasticity fulfills a different function. While Hebbian structural changes enhance memory lifetime, storage capacity, and memory robustness, homeostatic structural plasticity self-organizes the connectivity of the neural network to assure stability. However, the link between functional synaptic and structural plasticity as well as the detailed interactions between Hebbian and homeostatic structural plasticity are more complex. This implies even richer dynamics requiring further experimental and theoretical investigations.

  9. The neuronal identity bias behind neocortical GABAergic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allene, Camille; Lourenço, Joana; Bacci, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    In the neocortex, different types of excitatory and inhibitory neurons connect to one another following a detailed blueprint, defining functionally-distinct subnetworks, whose activity and modulation underlie complex cognitive functions. We review the cell-autonomous plasticity of perisomatic inhibition onto principal excitatory neurons. We propose that the tendency of different cortical layers to exhibit depression or potentiation of perisomatic inhibition is dictated by the specific identities of principal neurons (PNs). These are mainly defined by their projection targets and by their preference to be innervated by specific perisomatic-targeting basket cell types. Therefore, principal neurons responsible for relaying information to subcortical nuclei are differentially inhibited and show specific forms of plasticity compared to other PNs that are specialized in more associative functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuronal plasticity: adaptation and readaptation to the environment of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    While there have been few documented permanent neurological changes resulting from space travel, there is a growing literature which suggests that neural plasticity sometimes occurs within peripheral and central vestibular pathways during and following spaceflight. This plasticity probably has adaptive value within the context of the space environment, but it can be maladaptive upon return to the terrestrial environment. Fortunately, the maladaptive responses resulting from neuronal plasticity diminish following return to earth. However, the literature suggests that the longer the space travel, the more difficult the readaptation. With the possibility of extended space voyages and extended stays on board the international space station, it seems worthwhile to review examples of plastic vestibular responses and changes in the underlying neural substrates. Studies and facilities needed for space station investigation of plastic changes in the neural substrates are suggested. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. CREB: a multifaceted regulator of neuronal plasticity and protection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Karelina, Kate; Obrietan, Karl

    2011-01-01

    ... changes in neuronal plasticity, which is thought to underlie learning and memory. We also discuss work showing that CREB is a critical component of the neuroprotective transcriptional network, and data indicating that CREB dysregulation contributes to an array of neuropathological conditions.

  12. Behavioral plasticity through the modulation of switch neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliades, Vassilis; Christodoulou, Chris

    2016-02-01

    A central question in artificial intelligence is how to design agents capable of switching between different behaviors in response to environmental changes. Taking inspiration from neuroscience, we address this problem by utilizing artificial neural networks (NNs) as agent controllers, and mechanisms such as neuromodulation and synaptic gating. The novel aspect of this work is the introduction of a type of artificial neuron we call "switch neuron". A switch neuron regulates the flow of information in NNs by selectively gating all but one of its incoming synaptic connections, effectively allowing only one signal to propagate forward. The allowed connection is determined by the switch neuron's level of modulatory activation which is affected by modulatory signals, such as signals that encode some information about the reward received by the agent. An important aspect of the switch neuron is that it can be used in appropriate "switch modules" in order to modulate other switch neurons. As we show, the introduction of the switch modules enables the creation of sequences of gating events. This is achieved through the design of a modulatory pathway capable of exploring in a principled manner all permutations of the connections arriving on the switch neurons. We test the model by presenting appropriate architectures in nonstationary binary association problems and T-maze tasks. The results show that for all tasks, the switch neuron architectures generate optimal adaptive behaviors, providing evidence that the switch neuron model could be a valuable tool in simulations where behavioral plasticity is required.

  13. Neuronal plasticity of trigeminal ganglia in mice following nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynds, Randi; Lyu, Chuang; Lyu, Gong-Wei; Shi, Xie-Qi; Rosén, Annika; Mustafa, Kamal; Shi, Tie-Jun Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background Nerve injury may induce neuropathic pain. In studying the mechanisms of orofacial neuropathic pain, attention has been paid to the plastic changes that occur in the trigeminal ganglia (TGs) and nucleus in response to an injury of the trigeminal nerve branches. Previous studies have explored the impact of sciatic nerve injury on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and it has shown dramatic changes in the expression of multiple biomarkers. In large, the changes in biomarker expression in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury are similar to that in DRGs after sciatic nerve injury. However, important differences exist. Therefore, there is a need to study the plasticity of biomarkers in TGs after nerve injury in the context of the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of biomarkers associated with chronic persistent pain in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury. Materials and methods To mimic the chronic nature of the disorder, we used an intraoral procedure to access the infraorbital nerve (ION) and induced a nerve injury in mice. Immunohistochemistry and quantification were used for revealing the expression level of each biomarker in TGs after nerve injury. Results Two weeks after partial ION injury, immunohistochemistry results showed strongly upregulated expressions of activating transcription factor 3 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the ipsilateral TGs. Microglial cells were also activated after nerve injury. In regard to positive neuronal profile counting, however, no significant difference in expression was observed in galanin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylated AKT, or P2X3 in ipsilateral TGs when compared to contralateral TGs. Conclusion In this study, the expression and regulation of biomarkers in TGs have been observed in response to trigeminal nerve injury. Our results suggest that NPY and Iba1 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of

  14. Cellular and molecular bases of memory: synaptic and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J H; Ko, G Y; Kelly, P T

    1997-07-01

    Discoveries made during the past decade have greatly improved our understanding of how the nervous system functions. This review article examines the relation between memory and the cellular mechanisms of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Evidence indicating that activity-dependent short- and long-term changes in strength of synaptic transmission are important for memory processes is examined. Focus is placed on one model of synaptic plasticity called long-term potentiation, and its similarities with memory processes are illustrated. Recent studies show that the regulation of synaptic strength is bidirectional (e.g., synaptic potentiation or depression). Mechanisms involving intracellular signaling pathways that regulate synaptic strength are described, and the specific roles of calcium, protein kinases, protein phosphatases, and retrograde messengers are emphasized. Evidence suggests that changes in synaptic ultrastructure, dendritic ultrastructure, and neuronal gene expression may also contribute to mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Also discussed are recent findings about postsynaptic mechanisms that regulate short-term synaptic facilitation and neuronal burst-pattern activity, as well as evidence about the subcellular location (presynaptic or postsynaptic) of mechanisms involved in long-term synaptic plasticity.

  15. MicroRNAs regulate neuronal plasticity and are involved in pain mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eElramah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs(miRNAs are emerging as master regulators of gene expression in the nervous system where they contribute not only to brain development but also to neuronal network homeostasis and plasticity. Their function is the result of a cascade of events including miRNA biogenesis, target recognition and translation inhibition. It has been suggested that miRNAs are major switches of the genome owing to their ability to regulate multiple genes at the same time. This regulation is essential for normal neuronal activity and, when affected, can lead to drastic pathological conditions. As an example, we illustrate how deregulation of miRNAs can affect neuronal plasticity leading to chronic pain.The origin of pain and its dual role as a key physiological function and a debilitating disease has been highly debated until now. The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20-25% worldwide, thus making it a public health problem. Chronic pain can be considered as a form of maladaptive plasticity. Long-lasting modifications develop as a result of global changes in gene expression, and are thus likely to be controlled by miRNAs. Here, we review the literature on miRNAs and their targets responsible for maladaptive plasticity in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we conduct a retrospective analysis of miRNA expression data published for different pain models, taking into account recent progress in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in neuronal plasticity.

  16. MicroRNAs regulate neuronal plasticity and are involved in pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elramah, Sara; Landry, Marc; Favereaux, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as master regulators of gene expression in the nervous system where they contribute not only to brain development but also to neuronal network homeostasis and plasticity. Their function is the result of a cascade of events including miRNA biogenesis, target recognition, and translation inhibition. It has been suggested that miRNAs are major switches of the genome owing to their ability to regulate multiple genes at the same time. This regulation is essential for normal neuronal activity and, when affected, can lead to drastic pathological conditions. As an example, we illustrate how deregulation of miRNAs can affect neuronal plasticity leading to chronic pain. The origin of pain and its dual role as a key physiological function and a debilitating disease has been highly debated until now. The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20-25% worldwide, thus making it a public health problem. Chronic pain can be considered as a form of maladaptive plasticity. Long-lasting modifications develop as a result of global changes in gene expression, and are thus likely to be controlled by miRNAs. Here, we review the literature on miRNAs and their targets responsible for maladaptive plasticity in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we conduct a retrospective analysis of miRNA expression data published for different pain models, taking into account recent progress in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in neuronal plasticity.

  17. Phasic dopamine neuron activity elicits unique mesofrontal plasticity in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastwal, Surjeet; Ye, Yizhou; Ren, Ming; Jimenez, Dennisse V; Martinowich, Keri; Gerfen, Charles R; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2014-07-16

    The mesofrontal dopaminergic circuit, which connects the midbrain motivation center to the cortical executive center, is engaged in control of motivated behaviors. In addition, deficiencies in this circuit are associated with adolescent-onset psychiatric disorders in humans. Developmental studies suggest that the mesofrontal circuit exhibits a protracted maturation through adolescence. However, whether the structure and function of this circuit are modifiable by activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence remains unknown. Using optogenetic stimulation and in vivo two-photon imaging in adolescent mice, we found that phasic, but not tonic, dopamine neuron activity induces the formation of mesofrontal axonal boutons. In contrast, in adult mice, the effect of phasic activity diminishes. Furthermore, our results showed that dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission regulate this axonal plasticity in adolescence and inhibition of dopamine D2-type receptors restores this plasticity in adulthood. Finally, we found that phasic activation of dopamine neurons also induces greater changes in mesofrontal circuit activity and psychomotor response in adolescent mice than in adult mice. Together, our findings demonstrate that the structure and function of the mesofrontal circuit are modifiable by phasic activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence and suggest that the greater plasticity in adolescence may facilitate activity-dependent strengthening of dopaminergic input and improvement in behavioral control.

  18. Neuronal plasticity: a link between stress and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Francesca; Molteni, Raffaella; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2009-12-01

    Although stress represents the major environmental element of susceptibility for mood disorders, the relationship between stress and disease remains to be fully established. In the present article we review the evidence in support for a role of neuronal plasticity, and in particular of neurotrophic factors. Even though decreased levels of norepinephrine and serotonin may underlie depressive symptoms, compelling evidence now suggests that mood disorders are characterized by reduced neuronal plasticity, which can be brought about by exposure to stress at different stages of life. Indeed the expression of neurotrophic molecules, such as the neurotrophin BDNF, is reduced in depressed subjects as well as in experimental animals exposed to adverse experience at early stages of life or at adulthood. These changes show an anatomical specificity and might be sustained by epigenetic mechanisms. Pharmacological intervention may normalize such defects and improve neuronal function through the modulation of the same factors that are defective in depression. Several studies have demonstrated that chronic, but not acute, antidepressant treatment increases the expression of BDNF and may enhance its localization at synaptic level. Antidepressant treatment can normalize deficits in neurotrophin expression produced by chronic stress paradigms, but may also alter the modulation of BDNF under acute stressful conditions. In summary, there is good agreement in considering neuronal plasticity, and the expression of key proteins such as the neurotrophin BDNF, as a central player for the effects of stress on brain function and its implication for psychopathology. Accordingly, effective treatments should not limit their effects to the control of neurotransmitter and hormonal dysfunctions, but should be able to normalize defective mechanisms that sustain the impairment of neuronal plasticity.

  19. Long-term optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons to study network plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignani, Gabriele; Ferrea, Enrico; Difato, Francesco; Amarù, Jessica; Ferroni, Eleonora; Lugarà, Eleonora; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity produces changes in excitability, synaptic transmission, and network architecture in response to external stimuli. Network adaptation to environmental conditions takes place in time scales ranging from few seconds to days, and modulates the entire network dynamics. To study the network response to defined long-term experimental protocols, we setup a system that combines optical and electrophysiological tools embedded in a cell incubator. Primary hippocampal neurons transduced with lentiviruses expressing channelrhodopsin-2/H134R were subjected to various photostimulation protocols in a time window in the order of days. To monitor the effects of light-induced gating of network activity, stimulated transduced neurons were simultaneously recorded using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The developed experimental model allows discerning short-term, long-lasting, and adaptive plasticity responses of the same neuronal network to distinct stimulation frequencies applied over different temporal windows. PMID:23970852

  20. Long-term optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons to study network plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eLignani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal plasticity produces changes in excitability, synaptic transmission, and network architecture in response to external stimuli. Network adaptation to environmental conditions takes place in time scales ranging from few seconds to days, and modulates the entire network dynamics. To study the network response to defined long-term experimental protocols, we setup a system that combines optical and electrophysiological tools embedded in a cell incubator. Primary hippocampal neurons transduced with lentiviruses expressing channelrhodopsin-2/H134R were subjected to various photostimulation protocols in a time window in the order of days. To monitor the effects of light-induced gating of network activity, stimulated transduced neurons were simultaneously recorded using multi-electrode arrays. The developed experimental model allows discerning short-term, long-lasting and adaptive plasticity responses of the same neuronal network to distinct stimulation frequencies applied over different temporal windows.

  1. Upregulation of barrel GABAergic neurons is associated with cross-modal plasticity in olfactory deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of a sensory function is often followed by the hypersensitivity of other modalities in mammals, which secures them well-awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain to be documented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multidisciplinary approaches, such as electrophysiology, behavioral task and immunohistochemistry, were used to examine the involvement of specific types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity. We have established a mouse model that olfactory deficit leads to a whisking upregulation, and studied how GABAergic neurons are involved in this cross-modal plasticity. In the meantime of inducing whisker tactile hypersensitivity, the olfactory injury recruits more GABAergic neurons and their fine processes in the barrel cortex, as well as upregulates their capacity of encoding action potentials. The hyperpolarization driven by inhibitory inputs strengthens the encoding ability of their target cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The upregulation of GABAergic neurons and the functional enhancement of neuronal networks may play an important role in cross-modal sensory plasticity. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic approaches to help sensory recovery and substitution.

  2. Formation and maintenance of neuronal assemblies through synaptic plasticity.

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    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2014-11-14

    The architecture of cortex is flexible, permitting neuronal networks to store recent sensory experiences as specific synaptic connectivity patterns. However, it is unclear how these patterns are maintained in the face of the high spike time variability associated with cortex. Here we demonstrate, using a large-scale cortical network model, that realistic synaptic plasticity rules coupled with homeostatic mechanisms lead to the formation of neuronal assemblies that reflect previously experienced stimuli. Further, reverberation of past evoked states in spontaneous spiking activity stabilizes, rather than erases, this learned architecture. Spontaneous and evoked spiking activity contains a signature of learned assembly structures, leading to testable predictions about the effect of recent sensory experience on spike train statistics. Our work outlines requirements for synaptic plasticity rules capable of modifying spontaneous dynamics and shows that this modification is beneficial for stability of learned network architectures.

  3. Critical Role of Histone Turnover in Neuronal Transcription and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Ian; Wenderski, Wendy; Noh, Kyung-Min; Bagot, Rosemary C; Tzavaras, Nikos; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Elsässer, Simon J; Guo, Yin; Ionete, Carolina; Hurd, Yasmin L; Tamminga, Carol A; Halene, Tobias; Farrelly, Lorna; Soshnev, Alexey A; Wen, Duancheng; Rafii, Shahin; Birtwistle, Marc R; Akbarian, Schahram; Buchholz, Bruce A; Blitzer, Robert D; Nestler, Eric J; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shen, Li; Molina, Henrik; Allis, C David

    2015-07-01

    Turnover and exchange of nucleosomal histones and their variants, a process long believed to be static in post-replicative cells, remains largely unexplored in brain. Here, we describe a novel mechanistic role for HIRA (histone cell cycle regulator) and proteasomal degradation-associated histone dynamics in the regulation of activity-dependent transcription, synaptic connectivity, and behavior. We uncover a dramatic developmental profile of nucleosome occupancy across the lifespan of both rodents and humans, with the histone variant H3.3 accumulating to near-saturating levels throughout the neuronal genome by mid-adolescence. Despite such accumulation, H3.3-containing nucleosomes remain highly dynamic-in a modification-independent manner-to control neuronal- and glial-specific gene expression patterns throughout life. Manipulating H3.3 dynamics in both embryonic and adult neurons confirmed its essential role in neuronal plasticity and cognition. Our findings establish histone turnover as a critical and previously undocumented regulator of cell type-specific transcription and plasticity in mammalian brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

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    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  5. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  6. Microglia: Dynamic Mediators of Synapse Development and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuwen; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; MacVicar, Brian A; Stevens, Beth

    2015-10-01

    Neuronal communication underlies all brain activity and the genesis of complex behavior. Emerging research has revealed an unexpected role for immune molecules in the development and plasticity of neuronal synapses. Moreover microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, express and secrete immune-related signaling molecules that alter synaptic transmission and plasticity in the absence of inflammation. When inflammation does occur, microglia modify synaptic connections and synaptic plasticity required for learning and memory. Here we review recent findings demonstrating how the dynamic interactions between neurons and microglia shape the circuitry of the nervous system in the healthy brain and how altered neuron-microglia signaling could contribute to disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  8. Undirected compensatory plasticity contributes to neuronal dysfunction after severe spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauparlant, Janine; van den Brand, Rubia; Barraud, Quentin; Friedli, Lucia; Musienko, Pavel; Dietz, Volker; Courtine, Grégoire

    2013-11-01

    Severe spinal cord injury in humans leads to a progressive neuronal dysfunction in the chronic stage of the injury. This dysfunction is characterized by premature exhaustion of muscle activity during assisted locomotion, which is associated with the emergence of abnormal reflex responses. Here, we hypothesize that undirected compensatory plasticity within neural systems caudal to a severe spinal cord injury contributes to the development of neuronal dysfunction in the chronic stage of the injury. We evaluated alterations in functional, electrophysiological and neuromorphological properties of lumbosacral circuitries in adult rats with a staggered thoracic hemisection injury. In the chronic stage of the injury, rats exhibited significant neuronal dysfunction, which was characterized by co-activation of antagonistic muscles, exhaustion of locomotor muscle activity, and deterioration of electrochemically-enabled gait patterns. As observed in humans, neuronal dysfunction was associated with the emergence of abnormal, long-latency reflex responses in leg muscles. Analyses of circuit, fibre and synapse density in segments caudal to the spinal cord injury revealed an extensive, lamina-specific remodelling of neuronal networks in response to the interruption of supraspinal input. These plastic changes restored a near-normal level of synaptic input within denervated spinal segments in the chronic stage of injury. Syndromic analysis uncovered significant correlations between the development of neuronal dysfunction, emergence of abnormal reflexes, and anatomical remodelling of lumbosacral circuitries. Together, these results suggest that spinal neurons deprived of supraspinal input strive to re-establish their synaptic environment. However, this undirected compensatory plasticity forms aberrant neuronal circuits, which may engage inappropriate combinations of sensorimotor networks during gait execution.

  9. New findings on neuron development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A mature neuron receives inputs from multiple dendrites and sends its output to other neurons via a single axon.This polarized morphology requires proper axonal/dendritic differentiation during development.

  10. Neuronal plasticity and multisensory integration in filial imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-03-10

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus.

  11. Homeostatic plasticity of striatal neurons intrinsic excitability following dopamine depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Azdad

    Full Text Available The striatum is the major input structure of basal ganglia and is involved in adaptive control of behaviour through the selection of relevant informations. Dopaminergic neurons that innervate striatum die in Parkinson disease, leading to inefficient adaptive behaviour. Neuronal activity of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN is modulated by dopamine receptors. Although dopamine signalling had received substantial attention, consequences of dopamine depletion on MSN intrinsic excitability remain unclear. Here we show, by performing perforated patch clamp recordings on brain slices, that dopamine depletion leads to an increase in MSN intrinsic excitability through the decrease of an inactivating A-type potassium current, I(A. Despite the large decrease in their excitatory synaptic inputs determined by the decreased dendritic spines density and the increase in minimal current to evoke the first EPSP, this increase in intrinsic excitability resulted in an enhanced responsiveness to their remaining synapses, allowing them to fire similarly or more efficiently following input stimulation than in control condition. Therefore, this increase in intrinsic excitability through the regulation of I(A represents a form of homeostatic plasticity allowing neurons to compensate for perturbations in synaptic transmission and to promote stability in firing. The present observations show that this homeostatic ability to maintain firing rates within functional range also occurs in pathological conditions, allowing stabilizing neural computation within affected neuronal networks.

  12. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels van Kessenich, L.; de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal.

  13. Synaptic plasticity and neuronal refractory time cause scaling behaviour of neuronal avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels van Kessenich, L; de Arcangelis, L; Herrmann, H J

    2016-08-18

    Neuronal avalanches measured in vitro and in vivo in different cortical networks consistently exhibit power law behaviour for the size and duration distributions with exponents typical for a mean field self-organized branching process. These exponents are also recovered in neuronal network simulations implementing various neuronal dynamics on different network topologies. They can therefore be considered a very robust feature of spontaneous neuronal activity. Interestingly, this scaling behaviour is also observed on regular lattices in finite dimensions, which raises the question about the origin of the mean field behavior observed experimentally. In this study we provide an answer to this open question by investigating the effect of activity dependent plasticity in combination with the neuronal refractory time in a neuronal network. Results show that the refractory time hinders backward avalanches forcing a directed propagation. Hebbian plastic adaptation plays the role of sculpting these directed avalanche patterns into the topology of the network slowly changing it into a branched structure where loops are marginal.

  14. [Multiaxial evaluation of the pathophysiology of mood disorder and therapeutic mechanisms of clinical drugs by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Naoto; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Mitsuya, Hironori; Wada, Yuji

    2013-11-01

    Impairment of neuronal plasticity is important in the pathophysiology of mood disorder. Both zinc deficiency and social isolation impair neuronal plasticity. Both cause a depressive state. However, in experiments using animals, their combined loading induced manic-like behavior. Therefore, it was inferred that moderate impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a depressive state, and that further impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a manic state. However, some kind of load toward neuronal function through neural transmission can influence mood disorder symptoms without direct effects on neuronal plasticity. Our hypothesis is that mania is an aggravation of depression from the perspective of neuronal plasticity, and that multiaxial evaluation by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load through neural transmission is useful for understanding the pathophysiology of mood disorder. There are many clinical aspects that have been difficult to interpret in mood disorder: Why is a mood stabilizer or electric convulsive therapy useful for both mania and depression? What is the pathophysiology of the mixed state? Why does manic switching by an antidepressant occur or not? Our hypothesis is useful to understand these aspects, and using this hypothesis, it is expected that the pathophysiology of mood disorder and clinical mechanism of mood stabilizers and antidepressants can now be understood as an integrated story.

  15. Epilepsies and neuronal plasticity: for better or for worse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigations have confirmed that "seizures beget seizures." Thus, in adults, limbic seizures lead to cell loss, followed by the formation of novel excitatory synapses that contribute to generating further seizures. The triggering signal is an enhancement of synaptic efficacy, followed by a molecular cascade that triggers axonal sprouting. New synapses are aberrant, since they are formed in regions in which they are not present in controls. They also involve receptors that are not present in controls, and this facilitates the generation of seizures. Therefore, an aberrant form of reactive neuronal plasticity provides a substrate for the long-lasting sequelae of seizures. Since these events take place in brain structures involved in integrative and mnemonic functions, they will have an important impact. Reactive plasticity is documented for other insults and disorders, and may be the basis for the long-term progression of neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Calcium, synaptic plasticity and intrinsic homeostasis in Purkinje neuron models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Achard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently reproduced the complex electrical activity of a Purkinje cell (PC with very different combinations of ionic channel maximum conductances, suggesting that a large parameter space is available to homeostatic mechanisms. It has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic calcium concentrations control the homeostatic activity sensors. This raises many questions for PCs since in these neurons calcium plays an important role in the induction of synaptic plasticity. To address this question, we generated 148 new PC models. In these models the somatic membrane voltages are stable, but the somatic calcium dynamics are very variable, in agreement with experimental results. Conversely, the calcium signal in spiny dendrites shows only small variability. We demonstrate that this localized control of calcium conductances preserves the induction of long-term depression for all models. We conclude that calcium is unlikely to be the sole activity-sensor in this cell but that there is a strong relationship between activity homeostasis and synaptic plasticity.

  17. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity.

  18. Metabolic regulation of neuronal plasticity by the energy sensor AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt B Potter

    Full Text Available Long Term Potentiation (LTP is a leading candidate mechanism for learning and memory and is also thought to play a role in the progression of seizures to intractable epilepsy. Maintenance of LTP requires RNA transcription, protein translation and signaling through the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR pathway. In peripheral tissue, the energy sensor AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK negatively regulates the mTOR cascade upon glycolytic inhibition and cellular energy stress. We recently demonstrated that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG alters plasticity to retard epileptogenesis in the kindling model of epilepsy. Reduced kindling progression was associated with increased recruitment of the nuclear metabolic sensor CtBP to NRSF at the BDNF promoter. Given that energy metabolism controls mTOR through AMPK in peripheral tissue and the role of mTOR in LTP in neurons, we asked whether energy metabolism and AMPK control LTP. Using a combination of biochemical approaches and field-recordings in mouse hippocampal slices, we show that the master regulator of energy homeostasis, AMPK couples energy metabolism to LTP expression. Administration of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG or the mitochondrial toxin and anti-Type II Diabetes drug, metformin, or AMP mimetic AICAR results in activation of AMPK, repression of the mTOR pathway and prevents maintenance of Late-Phase LTP (L-LTP. Inhibition of AMPK by either compound-C or the ATP mimetic ara-A rescues the suppression of L-LTP by energy stress. We also show that enhanced LTP via AMPK inhibition requires mTOR signaling. These results directly link energy metabolism to plasticity in the mammalian brain and demonstrate that AMPK is a modulator of LTP. Our work opens up the possibility of using modulators of energy metabolism to control neuronal plasticity in diseases and conditions of aberrant plasticity such as epilepsy.

  19. Plasticity of neuronal response properties in adult cat striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J; Palmer, L A

    1998-01-01

    We have utilized an associative conditioning paradigm to induce changes in the receptive field (RF) properties of neurons in the adult cat striate cortex. During conditioning, the presentation of particular visual stimuli were repeatedly paired with the iontophoretic application of either GABA or glutamate to control postsynaptic firing rates. Similar paradigms have been used in kitten visual cortex to alter RF properties (Fregnac et al., 1988, 1992; Greuel et al., 1988; Shulz & Fregnac, 1992). Roughly half of the cells that were subjected to conditioning with stimuli differing in orientation were found to have orientation tuning curves that were significantly altered. In general, the modification in orientation tuning was not accompanied by a shift in preferred orientation, but rather, responsiveness to stimuli at or near the positively reinforced orientation was increased relative to controls, and responsiveness to stimuli at or near the negatively reinforced orientation was decreased relative to controls. A similar proportion of cells that were subjected to conditioning with stimuli differing in spatial phase were found to have spatial-phase tuning curves that were significantly modified. Conditioning stimuli typically differed by 90 deg in spatial phase, but modifications in spatial-phase angle were generally 30-40 deg. An interesting phenomenon we encountered was that during conditioning, cells often developed a modulated response to counterphased grating stimuli presented at the null spatial phase. We present an example of a simple cell for which the shift in preferred spatial phase measured with counterphased grating stimuli was comparable to the shift in spatial phase computed from a one-dimensional Gabor fit of the space-time RF profile. One of ten cells tested had a significant change in direction selectivity following associative conditioning. The specific and predictable modifications of RF properties induced by our associative conditioning procedure

  20. A distance constrained synaptic plasticity model of C. elegans neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh

    2017-03-01

    Brain research has been driven by enquiry for principles of brain structure organization and its control mechanisms. The neuronal wiring map of C. elegans, the only complete connectome available till date, presents an incredible opportunity to learn basic governing principles that drive structure and function of its neuronal architecture. Despite its apparently simple nervous system, C. elegans is known to possess complex functions. The nervous system forms an important underlying framework which specifies phenotypic features associated to sensation, movement, conditioning and memory. In this study, with the help of graph theoretical models, we investigated the C. elegans neuronal network to identify network features that are critical for its control. The 'driver neurons' are associated with important biological functions such as reproduction, signalling processes and anatomical structural development. We created 1D and 2D network models of C. elegans neuronal system to probe the role of features that confer controllability and small world nature. The simple 1D ring model is critically poised for the number of feed forward motifs, neuronal clustering and characteristic path-length in response to synaptic rewiring, indicating optimal rewiring. Using empirically observed distance constraint in the neuronal network as a guiding principle, we created a distance constrained synaptic plasticity model that simultaneously explains small world nature, saturation of feed forward motifs as well as observed number of driver neurons. The distance constrained model suggests optimum long distance synaptic connections as a key feature specifying control of the network.

  1. Mania: not the opposite of depression, but an extension? Neuronal plasticity and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Omata, Naoto; Murata, Tetsuhito; Mitsuya, Hironori; Maruoka, Nobuyuki; Mita, Kayo; Kiyono, Yasushi; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Wada, Yuji

    2013-08-01

    What underlies bipolar disorder? What pathophysiologic process can produce symptoms that are apparently polar opposites? Recent studies of neuronal plasticity suggest a mechanism. Both zinc deficiency and social isolation impair neuronal plasticity; both are associated with major depression. Yet when zinc deficiency and social isolation occur together, they are associated with aggression, not with depression. On that basis, and according to additional findings in rats reported herein, it was inferred that moderate impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a depressive state, but that further impairment of neuronal plasticity induces not more depression, but a manic state. However, not only neuronal plasticity, but also some kind of load toward neuronal function can influence polarity or symptoms of mood disorder. Our hypothesis is that mania is an extension of depression from the perspective of neuronal plasticity, and that multiaxial evaluation by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load is useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of mood disorder. Using this hypothesis, many clinical aspects that have been heretofore difficult to interpret can be understood. A mood stabilizer or electric convulsive therapy is often used for the treatment of mood disorder, but it has remained unclear why such therapies are useful for both mania and depression. This hypothesis can explain how mood stabilizers or electric convulsive therapy can improve both mania and depression through the recovery of neuronal plasticity. It is difficult to explain the pathophysiology of manic switching by antidepressants solely from the perspective of the impairment of neuronal plasticity. To interpret this phenomenon, the action of antidepressants to neuronal load should be regarded as the other axis from neuronal plasticity. Based on this hypothesis, it is expected that the pathophysiology of mood disorder and clinical mechanism of mood stabilizers and antidepressants can be understood in an

  2. Synaptic plasticity in medial vestibular nucleus neurons: comparison with computational requirements of VOR adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R W Menzies

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR gain adaptation, a longstanding experimental model of cerebellar learning, utilizes sites of plasticity in both cerebellar cortex and brainstem. However, the mechanisms by which the activity of cortical Purkinje cells may guide synaptic plasticity in brainstem vestibular neurons are unclear. Theoretical analyses indicate that vestibular plasticity should depend upon the correlation between Purkinje cell and vestibular afferent inputs, so that, in gain-down learning for example, increased cortical activity should induce long-term depression (LTD at vestibular synapses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we expressed this correlational learning rule in its simplest form, as an anti-Hebbian, heterosynaptic spike-timing dependent plasticity interaction between excitatory (vestibular and inhibitory (floccular inputs converging on medial vestibular nucleus (MVN neurons (input-spike-timing dependent plasticity, iSTDP. To test this rule, we stimulated vestibular afferents to evoke EPSCs in rat MVN neurons in vitro. Control EPSC recordings were followed by an induction protocol where membrane hyperpolarizing pulses, mimicking IPSPs evoked by flocculus inputs, were paired with single vestibular nerve stimuli. A robust LTD developed at vestibular synapses when the afferent EPSPs coincided with membrane hyperpolarization, while EPSPs occurring before or after the simulated IPSPs induced no lasting change. Furthermore, the iSTDP rule also successfully predicted the effects of a complex protocol using EPSP trains designed to mimic classical conditioning. CONCLUSIONS: These results, in strong support of theoretical predictions, suggest that the cerebellum alters the strength of vestibular synapses on MVN neurons through hetero-synaptic, anti-Hebbian iSTDP. Since the iSTDP rule does not depend on post-synaptic firing, it suggests a possible mechanism for VOR adaptation without compromising gaze-holding and VOR

  3. Innovation Promotes Development of Plastic Assistant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Driven by the rapid growth of China's plastic product sector, the development of the plastic sector has been accelerated and assistant products are now becoming more multi-function, high performance, high in molecular weight and environmentfriendly.

  4. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  5. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  6. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  7. Role of myelin plasticity in oscillations and synchrony of neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajevic, S; Basser, P J; Fields, R D

    2014-09-12

    Conduction time is typically ignored in computational models of neural network function. Here we consider the effects of conduction delays on the synchrony of neuronal activity and neural oscillators, and evaluate the consequences of allowing conduction velocity (CV) to be regulated adaptively. We propose that CV variation, mediated by myelin, could provide an important mechanism of activity-dependent nervous system plasticity. Even small changes in CV, resulting from small changes in myelin thickness or nodal structure, could have profound effects on neuronal network function in terms of spike-time arrival, oscillation frequency, oscillator coupling, and propagation of brain waves. For example, a conduction delay of 5ms could change interactions of two coupled oscillators at the upper end of the gamma frequency range (∼100Hz) from constructive to destructive interference; delays smaller than 1ms could change the phase by 30°, significantly affecting signal amplitude. Myelin plasticity, as another form of activity-dependent plasticity, is relevant not only to nervous system development but also to complex information processing tasks that involve coupling and synchrony among different brain rhythms. We use coupled oscillator models with time delays to explore the importance of adaptive time delays and adaptive synaptic strengths. The impairment of activity-dependent myelination and the loss of adaptive time delays may contribute to disorders where hyper- and hypo-synchrony of neuronal firing leads to dysfunction (e.g., dyslexia, schizophrenia, epilepsy). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Spatiotemporal computations of an excitable and plastic brain: neuronal plasticity leads to noise-robust and noise-constructive computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutounji, Hazem; Pipa, Gordon

    2014-03-01

    It is a long-established fact that neuronal plasticity occupies the central role in generating neural function and computation. Nevertheless, no unifying account exists of how neurons in a recurrent cortical network learn to compute on temporally and spatially extended stimuli. However, these stimuli constitute the norm, rather than the exception, of the brain's input. Here, we introduce a geometric theory of learning spatiotemporal computations through neuronal plasticity. To that end, we rigorously formulate the problem of neural representations as a relation in space between stimulus-induced neural activity and the asymptotic dynamics of excitable cortical networks. Backed up by computer simulations and numerical analysis, we show that two canonical and widely spread forms of neuronal plasticity, that is, spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity and intrinsic plasticity, are both necessary for creating neural representations, such that these computations become realizable. Interestingly, the effects of these forms of plasticity on the emerging neural code relate to properties necessary for both combating and utilizing noise. The neural dynamics also exhibits features of the most likely stimulus in the network's spontaneous activity. These properties of the spatiotemporal neural code resulting from plasticity, having their grounding in nature, further consolidate the biological relevance of our findings.

  9. proBDNF negatively regulates neuronal remodeling, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianmin; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C; Siao, Chia-Jen; Marinic, Tina; Clarke, Roshelle; Ma, Qian; Jing, Deqiang; Lafrancois, John J; Bath, Kevin G; Mark, Willie; Ballon, Douglas; Lee, Francis S; Scharfman, Helen E; Hempstead, Barbara L

    2014-05-08

    Experience-dependent plasticity shapes postnatal development of neural circuits, but the mechanisms that refine dendritic arbors, remodel spines, and impair synaptic activity are poorly understood. Mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) via TrkB activation. BDNF is initially translated as proBDNF, which binds p75(NTR). In vitro, recombinant proBDNF modulates neuronal structure and alters hippocampal long-term plasticity, but the actions of endogenously expressed proBDNF are unclear. Therefore, we generated a cleavage-resistant probdnf knockin mouse. Our results demonstrate that proBDNF negatively regulates hippocampal dendritic complexity and spine density through p75(NTR). Hippocampal slices from probdnf mice exhibit depressed synaptic transmission, impaired LTP, and enhanced long-term depression (LTD) in area CA1. These results suggest that proBDNF acts in vivo as a biologically active factor that regulates hippocampal structure, synaptic transmission, and plasticity, effects that are distinct from those of mature BDNF. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optogenetic Modulation of Intracellular Signalling and Transcription: Focus on Neuronal Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Cyril; Cesca, Fabrizia; Maragliano, Luca; Benfenati, Fabio; Maya-Vetencourt, Jose Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Several fields in neuroscience have been revolutionized by the advent of optogenetics, a technique that offers the possibility to modulate neuronal physiology in response to light stimulation. This innovative and far-reaching tool provided unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution to explore the activity of neural circuits underlying cognition and behaviour. With an exponential growth in the discovery and synthesis of new photosensitive actuators capable of modulating neuronal networks function, other fields in biology are experiencing a similar re-evolution. Here, we review the various optogenetic toolboxes developed to influence cellular physiology as well as the diverse ways in which these can be engineered to precisely modulate intracellular signalling and transcription. We also explore the processes required to successfully express and stimulate these photo-actuators in vivo before discussing how such tools can enlighten our understanding of neuronal plasticity at the systems level.

  11. Calcium-dependent phosphorylation regulates neuronal stability and plasticity in a highly precise pacemaker nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Andrew A; Macleod, Gregory T; Zakon, Harold H

    2011-07-01

    Specific types of neurons show stable, predictable excitability properties, while other neurons show transient adaptive plasticity of their excitability. However, little attention has been paid to how the cellular pathways underlying adaptive plasticity interact with those that maintain neuronal stability. We addressed this question in the pacemaker neurons from a weakly electric fish because these neurons show a highly stable spontaneous firing rate as well as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent form of plasticity. We found that basal firing rates were regulated by a serial interaction of conventional and atypical PKC isoforms and that this interaction establishes individual differences within the species. We observed that NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity is achieved by further activation of these kinases. Importantly, the PKC pathway is maintained in an unsaturated baseline state to allow further Ca(2+)-dependent activation during plasticity. On the other hand, the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin does not regulate baseline firing but is recruited to control the duration of the NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity and return the pacemaker firing rate back to baseline. This work illustrates how neuronal plasticity can be realized by biasing ongoing mechanisms of stability (e.g., PKC) and terminated by recruiting alternative mechanisms (e.g., calcineurin) that constrain excitability. We propose this as a general model for regulating activity-dependent change in neuronal excitability.

  12. Self-Organization of Microcircuits in Networks of Spiking Neurons with Plastic Synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Koch Ocker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The synaptic connectivity of cortical networks features an overrepresentation of certain wiring motifs compared to simple random-network models. This structure is shaped, in part, by synaptic plasticity that promotes or suppresses connections between neurons depending on their joint spiking activity. Frequently, theoretical studies focus on how feedforward inputs drive plasticity to create this network structure. We study the complementary scenario of self-organized structure in a recurrent network, with spike timing-dependent plasticity driven by spontaneous dynamics. We develop a self-consistent theory for the evolution of network structure by combining fast spiking covariance with a slow evolution of synaptic weights. Through a finite-size expansion of network dynamics we obtain a low-dimensional set of nonlinear differential equations for the evolution of two-synapse connectivity motifs. With this theory in hand, we explore how the form of the plasticity rule drives the evolution of microcircuits in cortical networks. When potentiation and depression are in approximate balance, synaptic dynamics depend on weighted divergent, convergent, and chain motifs. For additive, Hebbian STDP these motif interactions create instabilities in synaptic dynamics that either promote or suppress the initial network structure. Our work provides a consistent theoretical framework for studying how spiking activity in recurrent networks interacts with synaptic plasticity to determine network structure.

  13. Self-Organization of Microcircuits in Networks of Spiking Neurons with Plastic Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocker, Gabriel Koch; Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Doiron, Brent

    2015-08-01

    The synaptic connectivity of cortical networks features an overrepresentation of certain wiring motifs compared to simple random-network models. This structure is shaped, in part, by synaptic plasticity that promotes or suppresses connections between neurons depending on their joint spiking activity. Frequently, theoretical studies focus on how feedforward inputs drive plasticity to create this network structure. We study the complementary scenario of self-organized structure in a recurrent network, with spike timing-dependent plasticity driven by spontaneous dynamics. We develop a self-consistent theory for the evolution of network structure by combining fast spiking covariance with a slow evolution of synaptic weights. Through a finite-size expansion of network dynamics we obtain a low-dimensional set of nonlinear differential equations for the evolution of two-synapse connectivity motifs. With this theory in hand, we explore how the form of the plasticity rule drives the evolution of microcircuits in cortical networks. When potentiation and depression are in approximate balance, synaptic dynamics depend on weighted divergent, convergent, and chain motifs. For additive, Hebbian STDP these motif interactions create instabilities in synaptic dynamics that either promote or suppress the initial network structure. Our work provides a consistent theoretical framework for studying how spiking activity in recurrent networks interacts with synaptic plasticity to determine network structure.

  14. Low Concentrations of Alcohol Inhibit BDNF-Dependent GABAergic Plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel Inhibition in Developing CA3 Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent (i.e. neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of...

  15. Polarity Determinants in Dendritic Spine Development and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaye

    2016-01-01

    The asymmetric distribution of various proteins and RNAs is essential for all stages of animal development, and establishment and maintenance of this cellular polarity are regulated by a group of conserved polarity determinants. Studies over the last 10 years highlight important functions for polarity proteins, including apical-basal polarity and planar cell polarity regulators, in dendritic spine development and plasticity. Remarkably, many of the conserved polarity machineries function in similar manners in the context of spine development as they do in epithelial morphogenesis. Interestingly, some polarity proteins also utilize neuronal-specific mechanisms. Although many questions remain unanswered in our understanding of how polarity proteins regulate spine development and plasticity, current and future research will undoubtedly shed more light on how this conserved group of proteins orchestrates different pathways to shape the neuronal circuitry.

  16. Polarity Determinants in Dendritic Spine Development and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaye Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric distribution of various proteins and RNAs is essential for all stages of animal development, and establishment and maintenance of this cellular polarity are regulated by a group of conserved polarity determinants. Studies over the last 10 years highlight important functions for polarity proteins, including apical-basal polarity and planar cell polarity regulators, in dendritic spine development and plasticity. Remarkably, many of the conserved polarity machineries function in similar manners in the context of spine development as they do in epithelial morphogenesis. Interestingly, some polarity proteins also utilize neuronal-specific mechanisms. Although many questions remain unanswered in our understanding of how polarity proteins regulate spine development and plasticity, current and future research will undoubtedly shed more light on how this conserved group of proteins orchestrates different pathways to shape the neuronal circuitry.

  17. Application of FRET probes in the analysis of neuronal plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshibumi eUeda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Breakthroughs in imaging techniques and optical probes in recent years have revolutionized the field of life sciences in ways that traditional methods could never match. The spatial and temporal regulation of molecular events can now be studied with great precision. There have been several key discoveries that have made this possible. Since GFP was cloned in 1992, it has become the dominant tracer of proteins in living cells. Then the evolution of color variants of GFP opened the door to the application of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET, which is now widely recognized as a powerful tool to study complicated signal transduction events and interactions between molecules. Employment of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM allows the precise detection of FRET in small subcellular structures such as dendritic spines. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic and practical aspects of FRET imaging and discuss how different FRET probes have revealed insights into the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and enabled visualization of neuronal network activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Low concentrations of alcohol inhibit BDNF-dependent GABAergic plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-05-12

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the third trimester-equivalent (i.e., neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents (LTP-GABAA) and this mechanism is thought to play a role in GABAergic synapse maturation. Here, we show that short- and long-term exposure of neonatal male rats to low EtOH concentrations abolishes LTP-GABAA by inhibiting L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These findings support the recommendation that even light drinking should be avoided during pregnancy.

  19. New scenarios for neuronal structural plasticity in non-neurogenic brain parenchyma: the case of cortical layer II immature neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Luca; Nacher, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The mammalian central nervous system, due to its interaction with the environment, must be endowed with plasticity. Conversely, the nervous tissue must be substantially static to ensure connectional invariability. Structural plasticity can be viewed as a compromise between these requirements. In adult mammals, brain structural plasticity is strongly reduced with respect to other animal groups in the phylogenetic tree. It persists under different forms, which mainly consist of remodeling of neuronal shape and connectivity, and, to a lesser extent, the production of new neurons. Adult neurogenesis is mainly restricted within two neurogenic niches, yet some gliogenic and neurogenic processes also occur in the so-called non-neurogenic tissue, starting from parenchymal progenitors. In this review we focus on a population of immature, non-newly generated neurons in layer II of the cerebral cortex, which were previously thought to be newly generated since they heavily express the polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule and doublecortin. These unusual neurons exhibit characteristics defining an additional type of structural plasticity, different from either synaptic plasticity or adult neurogenesis. Evidences concerning their morphology, antigenic features, ultrastructure, phenotype, origin, fate, and reaction to different kind of stimulations are gathered and analyzed. Their possible role is discussed in the context of an enriched complexity and heterogeneity of mammalian brain structural plasticity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Dicer and the miRNA system in neuronal plasticity and brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Anna; Barco, Angel

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory non-coding RNAs that contribute to fine-tuning regulation of gene expression by mRNA destabilization and/or translational repression. Their abundance in the nervous system, their temporally and spatially regulated expression and their ability to respond in an activity-dependent manner make miRNAs ideal candidates for the regulation of complex processes in the brain, including neuronal plasticity, memory formation and neural development. The conditional ablation of the RNase III Dicer, which is essential for the maturation of most miRNAs, is a useful model to investigate the effect of the loss of the miRNA system, as a whole, in different tissues and cellular types. In this review, we first provide an overview of Dicer function and structure, and discuss outstanding questions concerning the role of miRNAs in the regulation of gene expression and neuronal function, to later focus on the insight derived from studies in which the genetic ablation of Dicer was used to determine the role of the miRNA system in the nervous system. In particular, we highlight the collective role of miRNAs fine-tuning plasticity-related gene expression and providing robustness to neuronal gene expression networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GABAA receptor drugs and neuronal plasticity in reward and aversion: focus on the ventral tegmental area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eVashchinkina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors are the main fast inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the mammalian brain, and targets for many clinically important drugs widely used in the treatment of anxiety disorders, insomnia and in anesthesia. Nonetheless, there are significant risks associated with the long-term use of these drugs particularly related to development of tolerance and addiction. Addictive mechanisms of GABAA receptor drugs are poorly known, but recent findings suggest that those drugs may induce aberrant neuroadaptations in the brain reward circuitry. Recently, benzodiazepines, acting on synaptic GABAA receptors, and modulators of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (THIP and neurosteroids have been found to induce plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine neurons and their main target projections. Furthermore, depending whether synaptic or extrasynaptic GABAA receptor populations are activated, the behavioral outcome of repeated administration seems to correlate with rewarding or aversive behavioral responses, respectively. The VTA dopamine neurons project to forebrain centers such as the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, and receive afferent projections from these brain regions and especially from the extended amygdala and lateral habenula, forming the major part of the reward and aversion circuitry. Both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA drugs inhibit the VTA GABAergic interneurons, thus activating the VTA DA neurons by disinhibition and this way inducing glutamatergic synaptic plasticity. However, the GABAA drugs failed to alter synaptic spine numbers as studied from Golgi-Cox-stained VTA dendrites. Since the GABAergic drugs are known to depress the brain metabolism and gene expression, their likely way of inducing neuroplasticity in mature neurons is by disinhibiting the principal neurons, which remains to be rigorously tested for a number of clinically important anxiolytics, sedatives and anesthetics in different parts of

  2. Homeostatic plasticity: single hippocampal neurons see the light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Michael A

    2010-11-04

    Neurons adapt to altered network activity through homeostatic changes in synaptic function. In this issue of Neuron, Goold and Nicoll report that chronic hyperactivation of individual CA1 pyramidal neurons drives cell-autonomous, compensatory synapse elimination via CaMKIV-dependent transcription. These findings suggest that neurons gauge their intrinsic activity to instruct homeostatic regulation of synaptic inputs.

  3. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability : Changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results

  4. Neuronal and cognitive plasticity: A neurocognitive framework for ameliorating cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela M Greenwood

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available What is the neurocognitive basis for the considerable individual differences observed in functioning of the adult mind and brain late in life? We review the evidence that in healthy old age the brain remains capable of both neuronal and cognitive plasticity, including in response to environmental and experiential factors. Neuronal plasticity (e.g. neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, cortical re-organization refers to neuron-level changes that can be stimulated by experience. Cognitive plasticity (e.g. increased dependence on executive function refers to adaptive changes in patterns of cognition related to brain activity. We hypothesize that successful cognitive aging requires interactions between these two forms of plasticity. Mechanisms of neural plasticity underpin cognitive plasticity and in turn, neural plasticity is stimulated by cognitive plasticity. We examine support for this hypothesis by considering evidence that neural plasticity is stimulated by learning and novelty and enhanced by both dietary manipulations (low-fat, dietary restriction and aerobic exercise. We also examine evidence that cognitive plasticity is affected by education and training. This is a testable hypothesis which could be assessed in humans in randomized trials comparing separate and combined effects of cognitive training, exercise, and diet on measures of cognitive and brain integrity. Greater understanding of the factors influencing the course of cognitive aging and of the mechanisms underlying those factors could provide information on which people could base choices that improve their ability to age successfully.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide can induce errors in anatomical measures of neuronal plasticity by increasing tracing efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Nina; Krajacic, Aleksandra; Fouad, Karim

    2013-11-27

    Evidence suggests that activating certain components of the immune system may increase regeneration and plasticity in the injured central nervous system. Investigating the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent endotoxin and immune activator, on neuronal plasticity in rat models of spinal cord injury, we discovered that systemic administration of LPS can increase the number of descending motor axons that transport neuronal tracers anterogradely to the spinal cord. This effect of LPS was not observed across all motor tracts traced in two different experiments, but was significant for two different tracers administered to corticospinal tract neurons. Densitometry measurement of traced corticospinal axons within the cervical gray matter revealed that normalization to the number of traced axons is crucial to avoid false-positive reports of increased plasticity following LPS injection. These findings indicate that assessments of neuronal growth based on neuronal tracing techniques should be normalized when inflammation or immune activation is an experimental variable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuronal plasticity in relation to long-duration spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Dean E.; Wolfe, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity leads to a marked reduction in sensory-motor stimuli to the vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory systems. Long-duration missions, such as those proposed for a trip to Mars, may lead to significant changes in neural function. This paper presents results based on studies of sensory deafferentation of specific brain regions and detailed changes which occur in neuronal architecture. Data from these studies emphasize the need for further research related to sensory system deprivation and the development of new unique countermeasures for long-duration space flight.

  7. Molluscan neurons in culture: shedding light on synapse formation and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmold, Nichole; Syed, Naweed I

    2012-08-01

    From genes to behaviour, the simple model system approach has played many pivotal roles in deciphering nervous system function in both invertebrates and vertebrates. However, with the advent of sophisticated imaging and recording techniques enabling the direct investigation of single vertebrate neurons, the utility of simple invertebrate organisms as model systems has been put to question. To address this subject meaningfully and comprehensively, we first review the contributions made by invertebrates in the field of neuroscience over the years, paving the way for similar breakthroughs in higher animals. In particular, we focus on molluscan (Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helisoma) and leech (Hirudo) models and the pivotal roles they have played in elucidating mechanisms of synapse formation and plasticity. While the ultimate goal in neuroscience is to understand the workings of the human brain in both its normal and diseased states, the sheer complexity of most vertebrate models still makes it difficult to define the underlying principles of nervous system function. Investigators have thus turned to invertebrate models, which are unique with respect to their simple nervous systems that are endowed with a finite number of large, individually identifiable neurons of known function. We start off by discussing in vivo and semi-intact preparations, regarding their amenability to simple circuit analysis. Despite the 'simplicity' of invertebrate nervous systems however, it is still difficult to study individual synaptic connections in detail. We therefore emphasize in the next section, the utility of studying identified invertebrate neurons in vitro, to directly examine the development, specificity, and plasticity of synaptic connections in a well-defined environment, at a resolution that it is still unapproachable in the intact brain. We conclude with a discussion of the future of invertebrates in neuroscience in elucidating mechanisms of neurological disease and developing

  8. Neurotrophic regulation of synapse development and plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are traditionally thought to be secretory proteins that regulate long-tern survival and differe, ntiation of neurons. Recent studies have revealed a previously unexpected role for these factors in synaptie de velopment ami plasticity in diverse neuronal populations. Here we review experimeuts carried oul in our own laboratory in the last few years.. We have made two important discoveries.First,we were among the first to report that brain-derived. neurotrophie faclor (BDNF) facilitates hippocampal hmg-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plaslicity believed to be involved in learning and memory. BDNF modulates LTP al CAI synapses by enhaneing synaptic responses to high frequency, tetanic slimulalion. This is achieved primafily by facilitating synaptie vesicle doeking, possibly due to an in crease in the levels of the vesicle prolein synaptobrevin and synaptoplysin in the nerve terminals. Gene knockout study demonstrates thai the effects of BDNF are primarily mediated through presynaptic mechanisms. Second, we demonstrated a form of long-term, neurotrophin-mediated synaptic regulation. We showed that long-term treatment of the neuromuscu lar synapses with neurotrophin-3 (NT3) resulted in an enhancement of both spontaneous and evoked synaptic currcuts, as well as profound changes in thc number of synaptic varicosities and syuaptic vesicle proteins in motoneurons, all of which are indicative of more mature synapses. Our current work addresses the following issues:(i) activity-dependent trafficking of neurotrophin receptors, and its role in synapse-specific modulation; (ii) signal transduction mechanisms medialing the acute enhancement of synaplic transmission by neurotrophins; (iii) acute and long-tenn synaptie actions of the GDNF family; (iv) role of BDNF in late-phase LTP and in the development of hippocampal circuit.

  9. The Role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in Activity-Dependent Neuronal Plasticity in the Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulimood, Nisha S; Rodrigues, Wandilson Dos Santos; Atkinson, Devon A; Mooney, Sandra M; Medina, Alexandre E

    2017-07-12

    The transcription factors CREB (cAMP response element binding factor), SRF (serum response factor), and MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2) play critical roles in the mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity. However, the role of the activation of these transcription factors in the different components of plasticity in vivo is not well known. In this study, we tested the role of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in ocular dominance plasticity (ODP), a paradigm of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the visual cortex. These three proteins bind to the synaptic activity response element (SARE), an enhancer sequence found upstream of many plasticity-related genes (Kawashima et al., 2009; Rodríguez-Tornos et al., 2013), and can act cooperatively to express Arc, a gene required for ODP (McCurry et al., 2010). We used viral-mediated gene transfer to block the transcription function of CREB, SRF, and MEF2 in the visual cortex, and measured visually evoked potentials in awake male and female mice before and after a 7 d monocular deprivation, which allowed us to examine both the depression component (Dc-ODP) and potentiation component (Pc-ODP) of plasticity independently. We found that CREB, SRF, and MEF2 are all required for ODP, but have differential effects on Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP. CREB is necessary for both Dc-ODP and Pc-ODP, whereas SRF and MEF2 are only needed for Dc-ODP. This finding supports previous reports implicating SRF and MEF2 in long-term depression (required for Dc-ODP), and CREB in long-term potentiation (required for Pc-ODP).SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is the cellular basis for learning and memory, and it is crucial for the refinement of neuronal circuits during development. Identifying the mechanisms of activity-dependent neuronal plasticity is crucial to finding therapeutic interventions in the myriad of disorders where it is disrupted, such as Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, epilepsy, major depressive disorder, and autism

  10. Developments in Plasticity Approach to Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with plastic methods applied to shear design of reinforced concrete beams. Emphasis is put on the recently developed crack sliding model applicable to non-shear reinforced and lightly shear reinforced beams and slabs. The model, which is an upper bound plasticity approach, takes...

  11. Scaling of brain metabolism with a fixed energy budget per neuron: implications for neuronal activity, plasticity and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2011-03-01

    It is usually considered that larger brains have larger neurons, which consume more energy individually, and are therefore accompanied by a larger number of glial cells per neuron. These notions, however, have never been tested. Based on glucose and oxygen metabolic rates in awake animals and their recently determined numbers of neurons, here I show that, contrary to the expected, the estimated glucose use per neuron is remarkably constant, varying only by 40% across the six species of rodents and primates (including humans). The estimated average glucose use per neuron does not correlate with neuronal density in any structure. This suggests that the energy budget of the whole brain per neuron is fixed across species and brain sizes, such that total glucose use by the brain as a whole, by the cerebral cortex and also by the cerebellum alone are linear functions of the number of neurons in the structures across the species (although the average glucose consumption per neuron is at least 10× higher in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum). These results indicate that the apparently remarkable use in humans of 20% of the whole body energy budget by a brain that represents only 2% of body mass is explained simply by its large number of neurons. Because synaptic activity is considered the major determinant of metabolic cost, a conserved energy budget per neuron has several profound implications for synaptic homeostasis and the regulation of firing rates, synaptic plasticity, brain imaging, pathologies, and for brain scaling in evolution.

  12. Overexpression of serum response factor in astrocytes improves neuronal plasticity in a model of early alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A P; Medina, A E

    2012-09-27

    Neuronal plasticity deficits underlie many of the cognitive problems seen in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). We have developed a ferret model showing that early alcohol exposure leads to a persistent disruption in ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. Recently, we showed that this deficit could be reversed by overexpression of serum response factor (SRF) in the primary visual cortex during the period of monocular deprivation (MD). Surprisingly, this restoration was observed throughout the extent of visual cortex and most of the cells transfected by the virus were positive for the astrocytic marker GFAP rather than the neuronal marker NeuN. Here we test whether overexpression of SRF exclusively in astrocytes is sufficient to restore OD plasticity in alcohol-exposed ferrets. To accomplish that, first we exposed cultured astrocytes to Sindbis viruses carrying either a constitutively active form of SRF (SRF+), a dominant negative (SRF-) or control Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). After 24h, these astrocytes were implanted in the visual cortex of alcohol-exposed animals or saline controls one day before MD. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals showed that alcohol-exposed animals that were implanted with astrocytes expressing SRF, but not SRF- or GFP, showed robust restoration of OD plasticity in all visual cortex. These findings suggest that overexpression of SRF exclusively in astrocytes can improve neuronal plasticity in FASD. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. DCC Expression by Neurons Regulates Synaptic Plasticity in the Adult Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Horn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmembrane protein deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC and its ligand, netrin-1, regulate synaptogenesis during development, but their function in the mature central nervous system is unknown. Given that DCC promotes cell-cell adhesion, is expressed by neurons, and activates proteins that signal at synapses, we hypothesized that DCC expression by neurons regulates synaptic function and plasticity in the adult brain. We report that DCC is enriched in dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice, and we demonstrate that selective deletion of DCC from neurons in the adult forebrain results in the loss of long-term potentiation (LTP, intact long-term depression, shorter dendritic spines, and impaired spatial and recognition memory. LTP induction requires Src activation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR function. DCC deletion severely reduced Src activation. We demonstrate that enhancing NMDAR function or activating Src rescues LTP in the absence of DCC. We conclude that DCC activation of Src is required for NMDAR-dependent LTP and certain forms of learning and memory.

  14. Exercise-induced neuronal plasticity in central autonomic networks: role in cardiovascular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Lisete C; Stern, Javier E

    2009-09-01

    It is now well established that brain plasticity is an inherent property not only of the developing but also of the adult brain. Numerous beneficial effects of exercise, including improved memory, cognitive function and neuroprotection, have been shown to involve an important neuroplastic component. However, whether major adaptive cardiovascular adjustments during exercise, needed to ensure proper blood perfusion of peripheral tissues, also require brain neuroplasticity, is presently unknown. This review will critically evaluate current knowledge on proposed mechanisms that are likely to underlie the continuous resetting of baroreflex control of heart rate during/after exercise and following exercise training. Accumulating evidence indicates that not only somatosensory afferents (conveyed by skeletal muscle receptors, baroreceptors and/or cardiopulmonary receptors) but also projections arising from central command neurons (in particular, peptidergic hypothalamic pre-autonomic neurons) converge into the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem, to co-ordinate complex cardiovascular adaptations during dynamic exercise. This review focuses in particular on a reciprocally interconnected network between the NTS and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), which is proposed to act as a pivotal anatomical and functional substrate underlying integrative feedforward and feedback cardiovascular adjustments during exercise. Recent findings supporting neuroplastic adaptive changes within the NTS-PVN reciprocal network (e.g. remodelling of afferent inputs, structural and functional neuronal plasticity and changes in neurotransmitter content) will be discussed within the context of their role as important underlying cellular mechanisms supporting the tonic activation and improved efficacy of these central pathways in response to circulatory demand at rest and during exercise, both in sedentary and in trained individuals. We hope this review will stimulate

  15. In Vitro Studies of Neuronal Networks and Synaptic Plasticity in Invertebrates and in Mammals Using Multielectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessadori, Jacopo; Ghirardi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs) that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments. PMID:25866681

  16. In Vitro Studies of Neuronal Networks and Synaptic Plasticity in Invertebrates and in Mammals Using Multielectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Massobrio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments.

  17. In vitro studies of neuronal networks and synaptic plasticity in invertebrates and in mammals using multielectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Tessadori, Jacopo; Chiappalone, Michela; Ghirardi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs) that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments.

  18. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-11-19

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal.

  19. Synaptic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus type-1-positive subjects: inflammation or impaired neuronal plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdoshina, Valeriya; Bachis, Alessia; Mocchetti, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Many people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) exhibit mild or severe neurological problems, termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), even when receiving antiretroviral therapy. Thus, novel adjunctive therapies must be developed to overcome the neurotoxic effect of HIV. New therapies require a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HIV-induced neurotoxicity and the risk factors that, besides inflammation and T cell depletion and drugs of abuse, render the central nervous system (CNS) a target of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. HIV appears to impair neuronal plasticity, which refers to the innate ability of the CNS to respond to injury and promote recovery of function. The availability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a potent neurotrophic factor that is present in abundance in the adult brain, is essential for neuronal plasticity. BDNF acts through a receptor system composed of Trk and p75NTR. Here we present experimental evidence that some of the clinical features of HIV-mediated neurological impairment could result from altered BDNF/TrkB/p75NTR regulation and function. PMID:23600400

  20. Plasticity-dependent, full detonation at hippocampal mossy fiber–CA3 pyramidal neuron synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyleta, Nicholas P; Borges-Merjane, Carolina; Jonas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mossy fiber synapses on CA3 pyramidal cells are 'conditional detonators' that reliably discharge postsynaptic targets. The 'conditional' nature implies that burst activity in dentate gyrus granule cells is required for detonation. Whether single unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) trigger spikes in CA3 neurons remains unknown. Mossy fiber synapses exhibit both pronounced short-term facilitation and uniquely large post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). We tested whether PTP could convert mossy fiber synapses from subdetonator into detonator mode, using a recently developed method to selectively and noninvasively stimulate individual presynaptic terminals in rat brain slices. Unitary EPSPs failed to initiate a spike in CA3 neurons under control conditions, but reliably discharged them after induction of presynaptic short-term plasticity. Remarkably, PTP switched mossy fiber synapses into full detonators for tens of seconds. Plasticity-dependent detonation may be critical for efficient coding, storage, and recall of information in the granule cell–CA3 cell network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17977.001 PMID:27780032

  1. Rule of neuron development in transplanted retina and the significance of its regeneration and plasticity%移植视网膜神经元的发育规律及其再生和可塑性意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锦新; 杨淑珍; 林淑冰; 何清华

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As indicated by transplantation experiments in recent years, correlative neural active substances could be synthesized in the transplanted retina(TP); however, the growth and development situation of neural active substance positive neurons in TP is unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the differentiation and development of the neuron,and the biosynthesis of neural active substance in TP and its relationship with environment and visual center to explore the rule of development of nerve tissue and its regeneration and plasticity.DESIGN: An observatory comparative study based on animals.SETTING: Department of histology and embryology of two universities.MATERIALS: The study was conducted in the Experimental Animal Center of Guangzhou Medical College between August 2002 and March 2003. Totally 96 healthy SD rats in either gender were selected.INTERVENTIONS: Embryonal 14-day SD retina was transplantedin-between the epithalamus and hypothalamus of the midbrain in P1 rat and the right eye of the P1 rat was removed simultaneously. The development time of TP on the 9th day after operation was corresponding to the normal retina on the 1st day after born, which was then recorded as TP1, and so on. The development and differentiation was shown by histochemical method.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Development and morphological observation of TP and neurons in TP.RESULTS: TP had the same structure of each layer as normal retina and its similar growth and development rule, which also could synthesize relative neural active substance. Nitricoxide synthase(NOS) -positive neuron in TP started at TP4 and reached its peak at TP12, but the number of positive neurons was kept on a relative low level after TP22.CONCLUSION: Embryonal retina could survive and remain its original growth and development rule after intracerebral transplantation, which has same structural characters as normal retina.%背景:近年的移植实验表明,移植视网膜内能合成相关的神经活性物质,但

  2. Adult plasticity of spatiotemporal receptive fields of multisensory superior colliculus neurons following early visual deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, David W.; Krueger, Juliane; Fister, Matthew C.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous work has established that the integrative capacity of multisensory neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) matures over a protracted period of postnatal life (Wallace and Stein, 1997), and that the development of normal patterns of multisensory integration depends critically on early sensory experience (Wallace et al., 2004). Although these studies demonstrated the importance of early sensory experience in the creation of mature multisensory circuits, it remains unknown whether the reestablishment of sensory experience in adulthood can reverse these effects and restore integrative capacity. Methods The current study tested this hypothesis in cats that were reared in absolute darkness until adulthood and then returned to a normal housing environment for an equivalent period of time. Single unit extracellular recordings targeted multisensory neurons in the deep layers of the SC, and analyses were focused on both conventional measures of multisensory integration and on more recently developed methods designed to characterize spatiotemporal receptive fields (STRF). Results Analysis of the STRF structure and integrative capacity of multisensory SC neurons revealed significant modifications in the temporal response dynamics of multisensory responses (e.g., discharge durations, peak firing rates, and mean firing rates), as well as significant changes in rates of spontaneous activation and degrees of multisensory integration. Conclusions These results emphasize the importance of early sensory experience in the establishment of normal multisensory processing architecture and highlight the limited plastic potential of adult multisensory circuits. PMID:20404413

  3. Role of immediate-early genes in synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensembles underlying the memory trace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro eMinatohara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, neuronal gene expression is dynamically changed in response to neuronal activity. In particular, the expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs such as egr-1, c-fos, and Arc is rapidly and selectively upregulated in subsets of neurons in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory formation. IEG expression has therefore been widely used as a molecular marker for neuronal populations that undergo plastic changes underlying formation of long-term memory. In recent years, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic studies of neurons expressing c-fos or Arc have revealed that, during learning, IEG-positive neurons encode and store information that is required for memory recall, suggesting that they may be involved in formation of the memory trace. However, despite accumulating evidence for the role of IEGs in synaptic plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with this process remain unclear. In this review, we first summarize recent literature concerning the role of IEG-expressing neuronal ensembles in organizing the memory trace. We then focus on the physiological significance of IEGs, especially Arc, in synaptic plasticity, and describe our hypotheses about the importance of Arc expression in various types of input-specific circuit reorganization. Finally, we offer perspectives on Arc function that would unveil the role of IEG-expressing neurons in the formation of memory traces in the hippocampus and other brain areas.

  4. Role of Immediate-Early Genes in Synaptic Plasticity and Neuronal Ensembles Underlying the Memory Trace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatohara, Keiichiro; Akiyoshi, Mika; Okuno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, neuronal gene expression is dynamically changed in response to neuronal activity. In particular, the expression of immediate-early genes (IEGs) such as egr-1, c-fos, and Arc is rapidly and selectively upregulated in subsets of neurons in specific brain regions associated with learning and memory formation. IEG expression has therefore been widely used as a molecular marker for neuronal populations that undergo plastic changes underlying formation of long-term memory. In recent years, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic studies of neurons expressing c-fos or Arc have revealed that, during learning, IEG-positive neurons encode and store information that is required for memory recall, suggesting that they may be involved in formation of the memory trace. However, despite accumulating evidence for the role of IEGs in synaptic plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with this process remain unclear. In this review, we first summarize recent literature concerning the role of IEG-expressing neuronal ensembles in organizing the memory trace. We then focus on the physiological significance of IEGs, especially Arc, in synaptic plasticity, and describe our hypotheses about the importance of Arc expression in various types of input-specific circuit reorganization. Finally, we offer perspectives on Arc function that would unveil the role of IEG-expressing neurons in the formation of memory traces in the hippocampus and other brain areas.

  5. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Lindemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs and adult sleep spindles (ASSs show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research.

  6. Summation of connectivity strengths in the visual cortex reveals stability of neuronal microcircuits after plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachatene, Lyes; Bharmauria, Vishal; Cattan, Sarah; Chanauria, Nayan; Rouat, Jean; Molotchnikoff, Stéphane

    2015-10-09

    Within sensory systems, neurons are continuously affected by environmental stimulation. Recently, we showed that, on cell-pair basis, visual adaptation modulates the connectivity strength between similarly tuned neurons to orientation and we suggested that, on a larger scale, the connectivity strength between neurons forming sub-networks could be maintained after adaptation-induced-plasticity. In the present paper, based on the summation of the connectivity strengths, we sought to examine how, within cell-assemblies, functional connectivity is regulated during an exposure-based adaptation. Using intrinsic optical imaging combined with electrophysiological recordings following the reconfiguration of the maps of the primary visual cortex by long stimulus exposure, we found that within functionally connected cells, the summed connectivity strengths remain almost equal although connections among individual pairs are modified. Neuronal selectivity appears to be strongly associated with neuronal connectivity in a "homeodynamic" manner which maintains the stability of cortical functional relationships after experience-dependent plasticity. Our results support the "homeostatic plasticity concept" giving new perspectives on how the summation in visual cortex leads to the stability within labile neuronal ensembles, depending on the newly acquired properties by neurons.

  7. DP-b99 modulates matrix metalloproteinase activity and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghiazaryan, Marine; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Konopka, Anna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M; Melikyan, Armenuhi; Korkotian, Eduard; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Figiel, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    DP-b99 is a membrane-activated chelator of zinc and calcium ions, recently proposed as a therapeutic agent. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent extracellularly operating proteases that might contribute to synaptic plasticity, learning and memory under physiological conditions. In excessive amounts these enzymes contribute to a number of neuronal pathologies ranging from the stroke to neurodegeneration and epileptogenesis. In the present study, we report that DP-b99 delays onset and severity of PTZ-induced seizures in mice, as well as displays neuroprotective effect on kainate excitotoxicity in hippocampal organotypic slices and furthermore blocks morphological reorganization of the dendritic spines evoked by a major neuronal MMP, MMP-9. Taken together, our findings suggest that DP-b99 may inhibit neuronal plasticity driven by MMPs, in particular MMP-9, and thus may be considered as a therapeutic agent under conditions of aberrant plasticity, such as those subserving epileptogenesis.

  8. Vibrational resonance in adaptive small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of vibrational resonance is investigated in adaptive Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks, where the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is modulated based on spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Numerical results demonstrate that there exists appropriate amplitude of high-frequency driving which is able to optimize the neural ensemble response to the weak low-frequency periodic signal. The effect of networked vibrational resonance can be significantly affected by spike-timing-dependent plasticity. It is shown that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with dominant depression can always improve the efficiency of vibrational resonance, and a small adjusting rate can promote the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, the network topology plays an important role in the vibrational resonance in spike-timing-dependent plasticity-induced neural systems, where the system response to the subthreshold signal is maximized by an optimal network structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the introduction of inhibitory synapses can considerably weaken the phenomenon of vibrational resonance in the hybrid small-world neuronal networks with spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

  9. Rapid reversal of translational silencing: Emerging role of microRNA degradation pathways in neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuping; Shah, Aparna; Baraban, Jay M

    2016-09-01

    As microRNAs silence translation, rapid reversal of this process has emerged as an attractive mechanism for driving de novo protein synthesis mediating neuronal plasticity. Herein, we summarize recent studies identifying neuronal stimuli that trigger rapid decreases in microRNA levels and reverse translational silencing of plasticity transcripts. Although these findings indicate that neuronal stimulation elicits rapid degradation of selected microRNAs, we are only beginning to decipher the molecular pathways involved. Accordingly, we present an overview of several molecular pathways implicated in mediating microRNA degradation: Lin-28, translin/trax, and MCPIP1. As these degradation pathways target distinct subsets of microRNAs, they enable neurons to reverse silencing rapidly, yet selectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synchronization stability and firing transitions in two types of class I neuronal networks with short-term plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui; Wang, Qingyun; He, Xiaoyan; Chen, Guanrong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates synchronization stability and firing transition in two types of the modified canonical class I neuronal networks, where the short-term plasticity of synapse is introduced. We mainly consider both unidirectional chain and global coupling configurations. Previous studies have shown that the coupled class I neurons can spontaneously de-synchronize. Presently, the short-term plasticity of synapse is considered to check the universality of this phenomenon. Based on the theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, it is shown that unidirectionally chain coupled class I neurons can realize synchronization, whereas bidirectionally coupled chain neurons cannot synchronize, and globally coupled class I neurons de-synchronize. Furthermore, the dynamics of coupled neurons with different firing modes are also studied in numerical simulations, and interesting transitions of different firing modes can be induced by the short-term plasticity. The obtained results can be helpful to further understand important effects of the short-term synaptic plasticity on realistic neuronal systems.

  11. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  12. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz eWójtowicz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  13. Palatable Hyper-Caloric Foods Impact on Neuronal Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Ferreira, Guillaume; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity is an intrinsic and essential characteristic of the nervous system that allows animals "self-tuning" to adapt to their environment over their lifetime. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system is a form of neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory formation, as well as long-lasting, environmentally-induced maladaptive behaviors, such as drug addiction and overeating of palatable hyper-caloric (PHc) food. In western societies, the abundance of PHc foods has caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of overweight/obesity and related disorders. To this regard, it has been suggested that increased adiposity may be caused at least in part by behavioral changes in the affected individuals that are induced by the chronic consumption of PHc foods; some authors have even drawn attention to the similarity that exists between over-indulgent eating and drug addiction. Long-term misuse of certain dietary components has also been linked to chronic neuroimmune maladaptation that may predispose individuals to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In this review article, we discuss recent evidence that shows how consumption of PHc food can cause maladaptive neural plasticity that converts short-term ingestive drives into compulsive behaviors. We also discuss the neural mechanisms of how chronic consumption of PHc foods may alter brain function and lead to cognitive impairments, focusing on prenatal, childhood and adolescence as vulnerable neurodevelopmental stages to dietary environmental insults. Finally, we outline a societal agenda for harnessing permissive obesogenic environments.

  14. Simulating pancreatic neuroplasticity: in vitro dual-neuron plasticity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-04-14

    Neuroplasticity is an inherent feature of the enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal (GI) innervation under pathological conditions. However, the pathophysiological role of neuroplasticity in GI disorders remains unknown. Novel experimental models which allow simulation and modulation of GI neuroplasticity may enable enhanced appreciation of the contribution of neuroplasticity in particular GI diseases such as pancreatic cancer (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we present a protocol for simulation of pancreatic neuroplasticity under in vitro conditions using newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and myenteric plexus (MP) neurons. This dual-neuron approach not only permits monitoring of both organ-intrinsic and -extrinsic neuroplasticity, but also represents a valuable tool to assess neuronal and glial morphology and electrophysiology. Moreover, it allows functional modulation of supplied microenvironmental contents for studying their impact on neuroplasticity. Once established, the present neuroplasticity assay bears the potential of being applicable to the study of neuroplasticity in any GI organ.

  15. EEA1 restores homeostatic synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons from Rett syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2017-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis. Expression of EEA1 restored homeostatic synaptic plasticity in Mecp2-deficient neurons, providing novel targets of intervention in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Deletion of Mecp2 in mice results in an imbalance of synaptic excitation and inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' long-term synaptic plasticity. Since the excitatory-inhibitory balance is maintained by homeostatic mechanisms, we examined the role of MeCP2 in homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) at excitatory synapses. Negative feedback HSP, also known as synaptic scaling, maintains the global synaptic strength of individual neurons in response to sustained alterations in neuronal activity. Hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout (KO) mice do not show the characteristic homeostatic scaling up of the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and of synaptic levels of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors after 48 h silencing with the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin. This deficit in HSP is bidirectional because Mecp2 KO neurons also failed to scale down mEPSC amplitudes and GluA1 synaptic levels after 48 h blockade of type A GABA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated inhibition with bicuculline. Consistent with the role of synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type of glutamate receptors in HSP, Mecp2 KO neurons

  16. Mirror neurons in the tree of life: mosaic evolution, plasticity and exaptation of sensorimotor matching responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Antonella; Pievani, Telmo; Ferrari, Pier F

    2017-08-01

    Considering the properties of mirror neurons (MNs) in terms of development and phylogeny, we offer a novel, unifying, and testable account of their evolution according to the available data and try to unify apparently discordant research, including the plasticity of MNs during development, their adaptive value and their phylogenetic relationships and continuity. We hypothesize that the MN system reflects a set of interrelated traits, each with an independent natural history due to unique selective pressures, and propose that there are at least three evolutionarily significant trends that gave raise to three subtypes: hand visuomotor, mouth visuomotor, and audio-vocal. Specifically, we put forward a mosaic evolution hypothesis, which posits that different types of MNs may have evolved at different rates within and among species. This evolutionary hypothesis represents an alternative to both adaptationist and associative models. Finally, the review offers a strong heuristic potential in predicting the circumstances under which specific variations and properties of MNs are expected. Such predictive value is critical to test new hypotheses about MN activity and its plastic changes, depending on the species, the neuroanatomical substrates, and the ecological niche. © 2016 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  17. Neuroserpin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in neuroendocrine and neuronal plasticity : functional studies in (transgenic) Xenopus intermediate pituitary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, D.M. de

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal plasticity, i.e. the capacity of the brain to continuously adapt its structural organization to new situations, remain largely unknown. In this thesis, we explored functional aspects of two proteins that presumably play a role in neuronal plasticity,

  18. Role of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity in long-term associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemenes, Ildikó; Straub, Volko A; Nikitin, Eugeny S; Staras, Kevin; O'Shea, Michael; Kemenes, György; Benjamin, Paul R

    2006-07-11

    It is now well established that persistent nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity occurs after learning and, like synaptic plasticity, it can be the substrate for long-term memory. What still remains unclear, though, is how nonsynaptic plasticity contributes to the altered neural network properties on which memory depends. Understanding how nonsynaptic plasticity is translated into modified network and behavioral output therefore represents an important objective of current learning and memory research. By using behavioral single-trial classical conditioning together with electrophysiological analysis and calcium imaging, we have explored the cellular mechanisms by which experience-induced nonsynaptic electrical changes in a neuronal soma remote from the synaptic region are translated into synaptic and circuit level effects. We show that after single-trial food-reward conditioning in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, identified modulatory neurons that are extrinsic to the feeding network become persistently depolarized between 16 and 24 hr after training. This is delayed with respect to early memory formation but concomitant with the establishment and duration of long-term memory. The persistent nonsynaptic change is extrinsic to and maintained independently of synaptic effects occurring within the network directly responsible for the generation of feeding. Artificial membrane potential manipulation and calcium-imaging experiments suggest a novel mechanism whereby the somal depolarization of an extrinsic neuron recruits command-like intrinsic neurons of the circuit underlying the learned behavior. We show that nonsynaptic plasticity in an extrinsic modulatory neuron encodes information that enables the expression of long-term associative memory, and we describe how this information can be translated into modified network and behavioral output.

  19. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively) as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words) is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms. This study demonstrates the importance of cooperation of Hebbian mechanism with regulation of neurotransmitter release induced by rapid diffused retrograde

  20. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avik Roy

    Full Text Available Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline, PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification, or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen, stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3 kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1 and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD, RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  1. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  2. Palatable Hyper-Caloric Foods Impact on Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Jean-Pascal; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Perez-Cruz, Claudia; Ferreira, Guillaume; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity is an intrinsic and essential characteristic of the nervous system that allows animals “self-tuning” to adapt to their environment over their lifetime. Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system is a form of neural plasticity that underlies learning and memory formation, as well as long-lasting, environmentally-induced maladaptive behaviors, such as drug addiction and overeating of palatable hyper-caloric (PHc) food. In western societies, the abundance of PHc foods has caused a dramatic increase in the incidence of overweight/obesity and related disorders. To this regard, it has been suggested that increased adiposity may be caused at least in part by behavioral changes in the affected individuals that are induced by the chronic consumption of PHc foods; some authors have even drawn attention to the similarity that exists between over-indulgent eating and drug addiction. Long-term misuse of certain dietary components has also been linked to chronic neuroimmune maladaptation that may predispose individuals to neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. In this review article, we discuss recent evidence that shows how consumption of PHc food can cause maladaptive neural plasticity that converts short-term ingestive drives into compulsive behaviors. We also discuss the neural mechanisms of how chronic consumption of PHc foods may alter brain function and lead to cognitive impairments, focusing on prenatal, childhood and adolescence as vulnerable neurodevelopmental stages to dietary environmental insults. Finally, we outline a societal agenda for harnessing permissive obesogenic environments. PMID:28261067

  3. Circadian Rhythms in Rho1 Activity Regulate Neuronal Plasticity and Network Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsakou, Afroditi; Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Blau, Justin

    2015-08-13

    Neuronal plasticity helps animals learn from their environment. However, it is challenging to link specific changes in defined neurons to altered behavior. Here, we focus on circadian rhythms in the structure of the principal s-LNv clock neurons in Drosophila. By quantifying neuronal architecture, we observed that s-LNv structural plasticity changes the amount of axonal material in addition to cycles of fasciculation and defasciculation. We found that this is controlled by rhythmic Rho1 activity that retracts s-LNv axonal termini by increasing myosin phosphorylation and simultaneously changes the balance of pre-synaptic and dendritic markers. This plasticity is required to change clock network hierarchy and allow seasonal adaptation. Rhythms in Rho1 activity are controlled by clock-regulated transcription of Puratrophin-1-like (Pura), a Rho1 GEF. Since spinocerebellar ataxia is associated with mutations in human Puratrophin-1, our data support the idea that defective actin-related plasticity underlies this ataxia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Inhibitory Synapses of Striatal Spiny Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernandez, Ricardo; Aceves, Jose J.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Procedural memories and habits are posited to be stored in the basal ganglia, whose intrinsic circuitries possess important inhibitory connections arising from striatal spiny neurons. However, no information about long-term plasticity at these synapses is available. Therefore, this work describes a novel postsynaptically dependent long-term…

  5. Diversity in Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Inhibitory Synapses of Striatal Spiny Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernandez, Ricardo; Aceves, Jose J.; Ibanez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Procedural memories and habits are posited to be stored in the basal ganglia, whose intrinsic circuitries possess important inhibitory connections arising from striatal spiny neurons. However, no information about long-term plasticity at these synapses is available. Therefore, this work describes a novel postsynaptically dependent long-term…

  6. Contributions of Bcl-xL to acute and long term changes in bioenergetics during neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondria manufacture and release metabolites and manage calcium during neuronal activity and synaptic transmission, but whether long term alterations in mitochondrial function contribute to the neuronal plasticity underlying changes in organism behavior patterns is still poorly understood. Although normal neuronal plasticity may determine learning, in contrast a persistent decline in synaptic strength or neuronal excitability may portend neurite retraction and eventual somatic death. Anti-death proteins such as Bcl-xL not only provide neuroprotection at the neuronal soma during cell death stimuli, but also appear to enhance neurotransmitter release and synaptic growth and development. It is proposed that Bcl-xL performs these functions through its ability to regulate mitochondrial release of bioenergetic metabolites and calcium, and through its ability to rapidly alter mitochondrial positioning and morphology. Bcl-xL also interacts with proteins that directly alter synaptic vesicle recycling. Bcl-xL translocates acutely to sub-cellular membranes during neuronal activity to achieve changes in synaptic efficacy. After stressful stimuli, pro-apoptotic cleaved delta N Bcl-xL (ΔN Bcl-xL) induces mitochondrial ion channel activity leading to synaptic depression and this is regulated by caspase activation. During physiological states of decreased synaptic stimulation, loss of mitochondrial Bcl-xL and low level caspase activation occur prior to the onset of long term decline in synaptic efficacy. The degree to which Bcl-xL changes mitochondrial membrane permeability may control the direction of change in synaptic strength. The small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 has been useful in defining the role of Bcl-xL in synaptic processes. Bcl-xL is crucial to the normal health of neurons and synapses and its malfunction may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Neuronal activity causes rapid changes of lateral amygdala neuronal membrane properties and reduction of synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, J Amiel

    2011-04-20

    Neuronal membrane properties dictate neuronal responsiveness. Plasticity of membrane properties alters neuronal function and can arise in response to robust neuronal activity. Despite the potential for great impact, there is little evidence for a rapid effect of activity-dependent changes of membrane properties on many neuronal functions in vivo in mammalian brain. In this study it was tested whether periods of neuronal firing lead to a rapid change of membrane properties in neurons of a rat brain region important for some forms of learning, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, using in vivo intracellular recordings. Our results demonstrate that rapid plasticity of membrane properties occurs in vivo, in response to action potential firing. This plasticity of membrane properties leads to changes of synaptic integration and subsequent synaptic plasticity. These changes require Ca(2+) and hyperpolarization-activated ion channels, but are NMDA independent. Furthermore, the parameters and time course of these changes would not have been predicted from most in vitro studies. The plasticity of membrane properties demonstrated here may represent a basic form of in vivo short-term plasticity that modifies neuronal function.

  8. Plastic Changes in the Spinal Cord in Motor Neuron Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fornai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we analyze the cell number within lamina X at the end stage of disease in a G93A mouse model of ALS; the effects induced by lithium; the stem-cell like phenotype of lamina X cells during ALS; the differentiation of these cells towards either a glial or neuronal phenotype. In summary we found that G93A mouse model of ALS produces an increase in lamina X cells which is further augmented by lithium administration. In the absence of lithium these nestin positive stem-like cells preferentially differentiate into glia (GFAP positive, while in the presence of lithium these cells differentiate towards a neuron-like phenotype (βIII-tubulin, NeuN, and calbindin-D28K positive. These effects of lithium are observed concomitantly with attenuation in disease progression and are reminiscent of neurogenetic effects induced by lithium in the subependymal ventricular zone of the hippocampus.

  9. Plastic Changes in the Spinal Cord in Motor Neuron Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornai, Francesco; Ferrucci, Michela; Lenzi, Paola; Falleni, Alessandra; Biagioni, Francesca; Flaibani, Marina; Siciliano, Gabriele; Giannessi, Francesco; Paparelli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we analyze the cell number within lamina X at the end stage of disease in a G93A mouse model of ALS; the effects induced by lithium; the stem-cell like phenotype of lamina X cells during ALS; the differentiation of these cells towards either a glial or neuronal phenotype. In summary we found that G93A mouse model of ALS produces an increase in lamina X cells which is further augmented by lithium administration. In the absence of lithium these nestin positive stem-like cells preferentially differentiate into glia (GFAP positive), while in the presence of lithium these cells differentiate towards a neuron-like phenotype (βIII-tubulin, NeuN, and calbindin-D28K positive). These effects of lithium are observed concomitantly with attenuation in disease progression and are reminiscent of neurogenetic effects induced by lithium in the subependymal ventricular zone of the hippocampus. PMID:24829911

  10. Lactate promotes plasticity gene expression by potentiating NMDA signaling in neurons

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Jiangyan

    2014-07-28

    L-lactate is a product of aerobic glycolysis that can be used by neurons as an energy substrate. Here we report that in neurons L-lactate stimulates the expression of synaptic plasticity-related genes such as Arc, c-Fos, and Zif268 through a mechanism involving NMDA receptor activity and its downstream signaling cascade Erk1/2. L-lactate potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated currents and the ensuing increase in intracellular calcium. In parallel to this, L-lactate increases intracellular levels of NADH, thereby modulating the redox state of neurons. NADH mimics all of the effects of L-lactate on NMDA signaling, pointing to NADH increase as a primary mediator of L-lactate effects. The induction of plasticity genes is observed both in mouse primary neurons in culture and in vivo in the mouse sensory-motor cortex. These results provide insights for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the critical role of astrocyte-derived L-lactate in long-term memory and long-term potentiation in vivo. This set of data reveals a previously unidentified action of L-lactate as a signaling molecule for neuronal plasticity.

  11. Layer 4 pyramidal neurons exhibit robust dendritic spine plasticity in vivo after input deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelajauregui, Amaya; Kribakaran, Sahana; Mostany, Ricardo; Badaloni, Aurora; Consalez, G Giacomo; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos

    2015-05-06

    Pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) exhibit somewhat modest synaptic plasticity after whisker input deprivation. Whether neurons involved at earlier steps of sensory processing show more or less plasticity has not yet been examined. Here, we used longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy to investigate dendritic spine dynamics in apical tufts of GFP-expressing layer 4 (L4) pyramidal neurons of the vibrissal (barrel) S1 after unilateral whisker trimming. First, we characterize the molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological properties of identified L4 neurons in Ebf2-Cre transgenic mice. Next, we show that input deprivation results in a substantial (∼50%) increase in the rate of dendritic spine loss, acutely (4-8 d) after whisker trimming. This robust synaptic plasticity in L4 suggests that primary thalamic recipient pyramidal neurons in S1 may be particularly sensitive to changes in sensory experience. Ebf2-Cre mice thus provide a useful tool for future assessment of initial steps of sensory processing in S1.

  12. The dependence of neuronal encoding efficiency on Hebbian plasticity and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synapses act as information filters by different molecular mechanisms including retrograde messenger that affect neuronal spiking activity. One of the well-known effects of retrograde messenger in presynaptic neurons is a change of the probability of neurotransmitter release. Hebbian learning describe a strengthening of a synapse between a presynaptic input onto a postsynaptic neuron when both pre- and postsynaptic neurons are coactive. In this work, a theory of homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release by retrograde messenger and Hebbian plasticity in neuronal encoding is presented. Encoding efficiency was measured for different synaptic conditions. In order to gain high encoding efficiency, the spiking pattern of a neuron should be dependent on the intensity of the input and show low levels of noise. In this work, we represent spiking trains as zeros and ones (corresponding to non-spike or spike in a time bin, respectively as words with length equal to three. Then the frequency of each word (here eight words is measured using spiking trains. These frequencies are used to measure neuronal efficiency in different conditions and for different parameter values. Results show that neurons that have synapses acting as band-pass filters show the highest efficiency to encode their input when both Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release exist in synapses. Specifically, the integration of homeostatic regulation of feedback inhibition with Hebbian mechanism and homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release in the synapses leads to even higher efficiency when high stimulus intensity is presented to the neurons. However, neurons with synapses acting as high-pass filters show no remarkable increase in encoding efficiency for all simulated synaptic plasticity mechanisms.

  13. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - emerging roles in neuronal memory, learning, synaptic plasticity and neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed.

  14. Wnt/Ryk signaling contributes to neuropathic pain by regulating sensory neuron excitability and spinal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Liu, Yue-Peng; Huang, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Song, Angela A; Ma, Ping-Chuan; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Treating neuropathic pain continues to be a major clinical challenge and underlying mechanisms of neuropathic pain remain elusive. We have recently demonstrated that Wnt signaling, which is important in developmental processes of the nervous systems, plays critical roles in the development of neuropathic pain through the β-catenin-dependent pathway in the spinal cord and the β-catenin-independent pathway in primary sensory neurons after nerve injury. Here, we report that Wnt signaling may contribute to neuropathic pain through the atypical Wnt/Ryk signaling pathway in rats. Sciatic nerve injury causes a rapid-onset and long-lasting expression of Wnt3a, Wnt5b, and Ryk receptors in primary sensory neurons, and dorsal horn neurons and astrocytes. Spinal blocking of the Wnt/Ryk receptor signaling inhibits the induction and persistence of neuropathic pain without affecting normal pain sensitivity and locomotor activity. Blocking activation of the Ryk receptor with anti-Ryk antibody, in vivo or in vitro, greatly suppresses nerve injury-induced increased intracellular Ca and hyperexcitability of the sensory neurons, and also the enhanced plasticity of synapses between afferent C-fibers and the dorsal horn neurons, and activation of the NR2B receptor and the subsequent Ca-dependent signals CaMKII, Src, ERK, PKCγ, and CREB in sensory neurons and the spinal cord. These findings indicate a critical mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and suggest that targeting the Wnt/Ryk signaling may be an effective approach for treating neuropathic pain.

  15. Two aspects of ASIC function: Synaptic plasticity and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Li, Jun; Ji, Yong-Hua; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Zha, Xiang-ming

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular brain pH fluctuates in both physiological and disease conditions. The main postsynaptic proton receptor is the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). During the past decade, much progress has been made on protons, ASICs, and neurological disease. This review summarizes the recent progress on synaptic role of protons and our current understanding of how ASICs contribute to various types of neuronal injury in the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential Neuronal Plasticity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells From Exfoliated Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Towards Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Debanjana; Kanafi, Mohammad; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan; Datta, Indrani

    2016-09-01

    Based on early occurrence in chronological age, stem-cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) has been reported to possess better differentiation-potential toward certain cell-lineage in comparison to stem-cells from adult teeth (DPSCs). Whether this same property between them extends for the yield of functional central nervous system neurons is still not evaluated. Hence, we aim to assess the neuronal plasticity of SHED in comparison to DPSCs toward dopaminergic-neurons and further, if the difference is reflected in a differential expression of sonic-hedgehog (SHH)-receptors and basal-expressions of tyrosine-hydroxylase [TH; through cAMP levels]. Human SHED and DPSCs were exposed to midbrain-cues [SHH, fibroblast growth-factor8, and basic fibroblast growth-factor], and their molecular, immunophenotypical, and functional characterization was performed at different time-points of induction. Though SHED and DPSCs spontaneously expressed early-neuronal and neural-crest marker in their naïve state, only SHED expressed a high basal-expression of TH. The upregulation of dopaminergic transcription-factors Nurr1, Engrailed1, and Pitx3 was more pronounced in DPSCs. The yield of TH-expressing cells decreased from 49.8% to 32.16% in SHED while it increased from 8.09% to 77.47% in DPSCs. Dopamine release and intracellular-Ca(2+) influx upon stimulation (KCl and ATP) was higher in induced DPSCs. Significantly lower-expression of SHH-receptors was noted in naïve SHED than DPSCs, which may explain the differential neuronal plasticity. In addition, unlike DPSCs, SHED showed a down-regulation of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) upon exposure to SHH; possibly another contributor to the lesser differentiation-potential. Our data clearly demonstrates for the first time that DPSCs possess superior neuronal plasticity toward dopaminergic-neurons than SHED; influenced by higher SHH-receptor and lower basal TH expression. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2048-2063, 2016. © 2016

  17. Neuronal pentraxin 1 negatively regulates excitatory synapse density and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro-Silva, Joana; Gruart, Agnès; Clayton, Kevin Bernard; Podlesniy, Petar; Abad, Maria Alba; Gasull, Xavier; Delgado-García, José María; Trullas, Ramon

    2015-04-08

    In mature neurons, the number of synapses is determined by a neuronal activity-dependent dynamic equilibrium between positive and negative regulatory factors. We hypothesized that neuronal pentraxin (NP1), a proapoptotic protein induced by low neuronal activity, could be a negative regulator of synapse density because it is found in dystrophic neurites in Alzheimer's disease-affected brains. Here, we report that knockdown of NP1 increases the number of excitatory synapses and neuronal excitability in cultured rat cortical neurons and enhances excitatory drive and long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of behaving mice. Moreover, we found that NP1 regulates the surface expression of the Kv7.2 subunit of the Kv7 family of potassium channels that control neuronal excitability. Furthermore, pharmacological activation of Kv7 channels prevents, whereas inhibition mimics, the increase in synaptic proteins evoked by the knockdown of NP1. These results indicate that NP1 negatively regulates excitatory synapse number by modulating neuronal excitability and show that NP1 restricts excitatory synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355504-18$15.00/0.

  18. Diverse impact of neuronal activity at θ frequency on hippocampal long-term plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillatory activity is considered an essential aspect of brain function, and its frequency can vary from 200 Hz, depending on the brain states and projection. Episodes of rhythmic activity accompany hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in vivo. Therefore, long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, which are considered viable substrates of learning and memory, are often experimentally studied in paradigms of patterned high-frequency (>50 Hz) and low-frequency (neuronal plasticity remains less well understood. In particular, hippocampal neurons are specifically tuned for activity at θ frequency (4-8 Hz); this band contributes significantly to electroencephalographic signals, and it is likely to be involved in shaping synaptic strength in hippocampal circuits. Here, we review in vitro and in vivo studies showing that variation of θ-activity duration may affect long-term modification of synaptic strength and neuronal excitability in the hippocampus. Such θ-pulse-induced neuronal plasticity 1) is long-lasting, 2) may be built on previously stabilized potentiation in the synapse, 3) may produce opposite changes in synaptic strength, and 4) requires complex molecular machinery. Apparently innocuous episodes of low-frequency synaptic activity may have a profound impact on network signaling, thereby contributing to information processing in the hippocampus and beyond. In addition, θ-pulse-induced LTP might be an advantageous protocol in studies of specific molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pain-related synaptic plasticity in spinal dorsal horn neurons: role of CGRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis William D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The synaptic and cellular mechanisms of pain-related central sensitization in the spinal cord are not fully understood yet. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP has been identified as an important molecule in spinal nociceptive processing and ensuing behavioral responses, but its contribution to synaptic plasticity, cellular mechanisms and site of action in the spinal cord remain to be determined. Here we address the role of CGRP in synaptic plasticity in the spinal dorsal horn in a model of arthritic pain. Results Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings were made from substantia gelatinosa (SG neurons in spinal cord slices from control rats and arthritic rats (> 6 h postinjection of kaolin/carrageenan into the knee. Monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were evoked by electrical stimulation of afferents in the dorsal root near the dorsal root entry zone. Neurons in slices from arthritic rats showed increased synaptic transmission and excitability compared to controls. A selective CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 reversed synaptic plasticity in neurons from arthritic rats but had no significant effect on normal transmission. CGRP facilitated synaptic transmission in the arthritis pain model more strongly than under normal conditions where both facilitatory and inhibitory effects were observed. CGRP also increased neuronal excitability. Miniature EPSC analysis suggested a post- rather than pre-synaptic mechanism of CGRP action. Conclusion This study is the first to show synaptic plasticity in the spinal dorsal horn in a model of arthritic pain that involves a postsynaptic action of CGRP on SG neurons.

  20. Dynamic regulation of midbrain dopamine neuron activity: intrinsic, synaptic, and plasticity mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, H; Paladini, C A

    2011-12-15

    Although the roles of dopaminergic signaling in learning and behavior are well established, it is not fully understood how the activity of dopaminergic neurons is dynamically regulated under different conditions in a constantly changing environment. Dopamine neurons must integrate sensory, motor, and cognitive information online to inform the organism to pursue outcomes with the highest reward probability. In this article, we provide an overview of recent advances on the intrinsic, extrinsic (i.e., synaptic), and plasticity mechanisms controlling dopamine neuron activity, mostly focusing on mechanistic studies conducted using ex vivo brain slice preparations. We also hope to highlight some unresolved questions regarding information processing that takes place at dopamine neurons, thereby stimulating further investigations at different levels of analysis.

  1. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity.

  2. Polymers from plants to develop biodegradable plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Udo

    2005-11-01

    Katrin Neumann et al. have recently shown that transgenic tobacco and potato plants can accumulate high levels of cyanophycin, a possible source for poly-aspartate. This work opens the way to the future production of biodegradable plastics using a plant-based production system. Several problems need to be overcome first, such as growth retardation as a result of cyanophycin accumulating in the cytosol, and a co-production system needs to be developed for economical reasons.

  3. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation in Injury-Mediated Neuronal Dendritic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Li, Wen-Yuan; Li, Zhi-Gang; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    Injury to the nervous system induces localized damage in neural structures and neuronal death through the primary insult, as well as delayed atrophy and impaired plasticity of the delicate dendritic fields necessary for interneuronal communication. Excitotoxicity and other secondary biochemical events contribute to morphological changes in neurons following injury. Evidence suggests that various transcription factors are involved in the dendritic response to injury and potential therapies. Transcription factors play critical roles in the intracellular regulation of neuronal morphological plasticity and dendritic growth and patterning. Mounting evidence supports a crucial role for epigenetic modifications via histone deacetylases, histone acetyltransferases, and DNA methyltransferases that modify gene expression in neuronal injury and repair processes. Gene regulation through epigenetic modification is of great interest in neurotrauma research, and an early picture is beginning to emerge concerning how injury triggers intracellular events that modulate such responses. This review provides an overview of injury-mediated influences on transcriptional regulation through epigenetic modification, the intracellular processes involved in the morphological consequences of such changes, and potential approaches to the therapeutic manipulation of neuronal epigenetics for regulating gene expression to facilitate growth and signaling through dendritic arborization following injury.

  4. Isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in developing hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai; Weitao Guo

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the P2X7 receptor may be the target of isoflurane, so we investigated the roles of the P2X7 receptor and inositol triphosphate receptor in calcium overload and neuronal apoptosis induced by isoflurane in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. Results showed that isoflurane induced widespread neuronal apoptosis and significantly increased cytoplasmic Ca2+. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or removal of extracellular Ca2+ combined with blockade of inositol triphosphate receptors completely inhibited apoptosis or increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or blockade of inositol triphosphate receptor alone could partly inhibit these effects of isoflurane. Isoflurane could directly activate P2X7-gated channels and induce inward currents, but did not affect the expression of P2X7 receptor protein in neurons. These findings indicate that the mechanism by which isoflurane induced neuronal apoptosis in rat developing brain was mediated by intracellular calcium overload, which was caused by P2X7 receptor mediated calcium influx and inositol triphosphate receptor mediated calcium release.

  5. Sequential steps underlying neuronal plasticity induced by a transient exposure to gabazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Silvia; Broccard, Frédéric D; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Bianchini, Daniele; Avossa, Daniela; Pastore, Giada; Bisson, Giacomo; Altafini, Claudio; Torre, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Periods of intense electrical activity can initiate neuronal plasticity leading to long lasting changes of network properties. By combining multielectrode extracellular recordings with DNA microarrays, we have investigated in rat hippocampal cultures the temporal sequence of events of neuronal plasticity triggered by a transient exposure to the GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GabT). GabT induced a synchronous bursting pattern of activity. The analysis of electrical activity identified three main phases during neuronal plasticity induced by GabT: (i) immediately after termination of GabT, an early synchronization (E-Sync) of the spontaneous electrical activity appears that progressively decay after 3-6 h. E-Sync is abolished by inhibitors of the ERK1/2 pathway but not by inhibitors of gene transcription; (ii) the evoked response (induced by a single pulse of extracellular electrical stimulation) was maximally potentiated 3-10 h after GabT (M-LTP); and (iii) at 24 h the spontaneous electrical activity became more synchronous (L-Sync). The genome-wide analysis identified three clusters of genes: (i) an early rise of transcription factors (Cluster 1), primarily composed by members of the EGR and Nr4a families, maximally up-regulated 1.5 h after GabT; (ii) a successive up-regulation of some hundred genes, many of which known to be involved in LTP (Cluster 2), 3 h after GabT likely underlying M-LTP. Moreover, in Cluster 2 several genes coding for K(+) channels are down-regulated at 24 h. (iii) Genes in Cluster 3 are up-regulated at 24 h and are involved in cellular homeostasis. This approach allows relating different steps of neuronal plasticity to specific transcriptional profiles.

  6. LOTUS overexpression accelerates neuronal plasticity after focal brain ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Hajime; Kurihara, Yuji; Yokoyama, Taka-Akira; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Takei, Kohtaro

    2017-01-01

    Nogo receptor-1 (NgR1) and its ligands inhibit neuronal plasticity and limit functional recovery after brain damage such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that lateral olfactory tract usher substance (LOTUS) antagonizes NgR1-mediated signaling. Here, we investigated whether LOTUS enhances neuronal plasticity and functional recovery after brain focal ischemia in adult mice. Focal ischemic infarcts were induced in wild-type and LOTUS-overexpressing transgenic mice via middle cerebral artery occlusion. Endogenous LOTUS expression was increased in brain and cervical spinal cord of the contralateral side of ischemia in the chronic phase after brain ischemia. LOTUS overexpression accelerated midline-crossing axonal sprouting from the contralateral side to the ipsilateral side of ischemia in the medullar reticular formation and gray matter of denervated cervical spinal cord. Importantly, LOTUS overexpression improved neurological score highly correlated with laterality ratio of corticoreticular fibers of the medulla oblongata, indicating that LOTUS overexpression may overcome the inhibitory environment induced by NgR1 signaling for damaged motor pathway reconstruction after ischemic stroke. Thus, our data suggest that LOTUS overexpression accelerates neuronal plasticity in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord after stroke and LOTUS administration is useful for future therapeutic strategies.

  7. Dysregulated Expression of Neuregulin-1 by Cortical Pyramidal Neurons Disrupts Synaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin-1 (NRG1 gene variants are associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia. It is unclear whether risk haplotypes cause elevated or decreased expression of NRG1 in the brains of schizophrenia patients, given that both findings have been reported from autopsy studies. To study NRG1 functions in vivo, we generated mouse mutants with reduced and elevated NRG1 levels and analyzed the impact on cortical functions. Loss of NRG1 from cortical projection neurons resulted in increased inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, and hypoactivity. Neuronal overexpression of cysteine-rich domain (CRD-NRG1, the major brain isoform, caused unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, abnormal spine growth, altered steady-state levels of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, and impaired sensorimotor gating. We conclude that an “optimal” level of NRG1 signaling balances excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cortex. Our data provide a potential pathomechanism for impaired synaptic plasticity and suggest that human NRG1 risk haplotypes exert a gain-of-function effect.

  8. Effects of the spike timing-dependent plasticity on the synchronisation in a random Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, R. R.; Borges, F. S.; Lameu, E. L.; Batista, A. M.; Iarosz, K. C.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of spike timing-dependent plasticity on synchronisation in a network of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. Neuron plasticity is a flexible property of a neuron and its network to change temporarily or permanently their biochemical, physiological, and morphological characteristics, in order to adapt to the environment. Regarding the plasticity, we consider Hebbian rules, specifically for spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), and with regard to network, we consider that the connections are randomly distributed. We analyse the synchronisation and desynchronisation according to an input level and probability of connections. Moreover, we verify that the transition for synchronisation depends on the neuronal network architecture, and the external perturbation level.

  9. Short-term plasticity in turtle dorsal horn neurons mediated by L-type Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1994-01-01

    Windup--the gradual increase of the response--of dorsal horn neurons to repeated activation of primary afferents is an elementary form of short-term plasticity that may mediate central sensitization to pain. In deep dorsal horn neurons of the turtle spinal cord in vitro we report windup...... for intrinsic postsynaptic properties in nociceptive plasticity and for L-type Ca2+ channels as a promising target for therapeutic intervention....

  10. Inducing plasticity of astrocytic receptors by manipulation of neuronal firing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Alison X; Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Myers, Timothy L; Fiacco, Todd A

    2014-03-20

    Close to two decades of research has established that astrocytes in situ and in vivo express numerous G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be stimulated by neuronally-released transmitter. However, the ability of astrocytic receptors to exhibit plasticity in response to changes in neuronal activity has received little attention. Here we describe a model system that can be used to globally scale up or down astrocytic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in acute brain slices. Included are methods on how to prepare parasagittal hippocampal slices, construct chambers suitable for long-term slice incubation, bidirectionally manipulate neuronal action potential frequency, load astrocytes and astrocyte processes with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator, and measure changes in astrocytic Gq GPCR activity by recording spontaneous and evoked astrocyte Ca(2+) events using confocal microscopy. In essence, a "calcium roadmap" is provided for how to measure plasticity of astrocytic Gq GPCRs. Applications of the technique for study of astrocytes are discussed. Having an understanding of how astrocytic receptor signaling is affected by changes in neuronal activity has important implications for both normal synaptic function as well as processes underlying neurological disorders and neurodegenerative disease.

  11. MIRNAS in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lafourcade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system.

  12. Shp2 in forebrain neurons regulates synaptic plasticity, locomotion, and memory formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K(+)-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation.

  13. Role of NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons for Plasticity and Addictive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Larry S.; Argilli, Emanuela; Bonci, Antonello; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A single exposure to drugs of abuse produces an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) currents in DA neurons; however, the importance of LTP for various aspects of drug addiction is unclear. To test the role of NMDAR-dependent plasticity in addictive behavior, we genetically inactivated functional NMDAR signaling exclusively in DA neurons (KO mice). Inactivation of NMDARs results in increased AMPAR-mediated transmission that is indistinguishable from the increases associated with a single cocaine exposure, yet locomotor responses to multiple drugs of abuse were unaltered in the KO mice. The initial phase of locomotor sensitization to cocaine is intact; however, the delayed sensitization that occurs with prolonged cocaine withdrawal did not occur. Conditioned behavioral responses for cocaine-testing environment were also absent in the KO mice. These findings provide evidence for a role of NMDAR signaling in DA neurons for specific behavioral modifications associated with drug seeking behaviors. PMID:18701073

  14. Simultaneous imaging of structural plasticity and calcium dynamics in developing dendrites and axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-11-01

    During nervous system development, the formation of synapses between pre- and postsynaptic neurons is a remarkably specific process. Both structural and functional plasticity are critical for the selection of synaptic partners and for the establishment and maturation of synapses. To unravel the respective contributions of structural and functional mechanisms as well as their interactions during synaptogenesis, it is important to directly observe structural changes and functional signaling simultaneously. Here, we present an imaging approach to simultaneously follow changes in structure and function. Differential labeling of individual cells and the neuronal network with distinct dyes allows the study of structural plasticity and changes in calcium signaling associated with neural activity at the same time and with high resolution. This is achieved by bulk loading of neuronal populations with a calcium-sensitive indicator in combination with electroporation of individual cells with a calcium indicator and an additional noncalcium-sensitive dye with a different excitation spectrum. Recordings of the two differently labeled structures can be acquired simultaneously using confocal microscopy. Thus, structural plasticity and calcium dynamics of the individually labeled neuron and the surrounding network can be related to each other. This combined imaging approach can be applied to virtually all systems of neuronal networks to study structure and function. We provide a comprehensive description of the labeling procedure, the imaging parameters, and the important aspects of analysis for simultaneous recordings of structure and function in individual neurons.

  15. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric γ-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their

  16. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability: changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-11-19

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results in learning and memory impairments. Interestingly, such impairments appear to occur particularly when these learning and memory processes require the hippocampus, suggesting that this brain region may be particularly sensitive to the consequences of sleep loss. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying sleep and memory formation remain to be investigated, available evidence suggests that SD may impair hippocampal neuronal plasticity and memory processes by attenuating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling which may lead to alterations in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene transcription, neurotrophic signaling, and glutamate receptor expression. When restricted sleep becomes a chronic condition, it causes a reduction of hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, which may eventually lead to a reduction in hippocampal volume. Ultimately, by impairing hippocampal plasticity and function, chronically restricted and disrupted sleep contributes to cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  17. Intersectin 1 is a component of the Reelin pathway to regulate neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Burkhard; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Jäpel, Maria; Gauhar, Aziz; Bock, Hans H; Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker

    2017-05-23

    Brain development and function depend on the directed and coordinated migration of neurons from proliferative zones to their final position. The secreted glycoprotein Reelin is an important factor directing neuronal migration. Loss of Reelin function results in the severe developmental disorder lissencephaly and is associated with neurological diseases in humans. Reelin signals via the lipoprotein receptors very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) and apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2), but the exact mechanism by which these receptors control cellular function is poorly understood. We report that loss of the signaling scaffold intersectin 1 (ITSN1) in mice leads to defective neuronal migration and ablates Reelin stimulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Knockout (KO) mice lacking ITSN1 suffer from dispersion of pyramidal neurons and malformation of the radial glial scaffold, akin to the hippocampal lamination defects observed in VLDLR or ApoER2 mutants. ITSN1 genetically interacts with Reelin receptors, as evidenced by the prominent neuronal migration and radial glial defects in hippocampus and cortex seen in double-KO mice lacking ITSN1 and ApoER2. These defects were similar to, albeit less severe than, those observed in Reelin-deficient or VLDLR/ ApoER2 double-KO mice. Molecularly, ITSN1 associates with the VLDLR and its downstream signaling adaptor Dab1 to facilitate Reelin signaling. Collectively, these data identify ITSN1 as a component of Reelin signaling that acts predominantly by facilitating the VLDLR-Dab1 axis to direct neuronal migration in the cortex and hippocampus and to augment synaptic plasticity.

  18. Bidirectional synaptic plasticity in intercalated amygdala neurons and the extinction of conditioned fear responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, S; Paré, D

    2002-01-01

    Classical fear conditioning is believed to result from potentiation of conditioned synaptic inputs in the basolateral amygdala. That is, the conditioned stimulus would excite more neurons in the central nucleus and, via their projections to the brainstem and hypothalamus, evoke fear responses. However, much data suggests that extinction of fear responses does not depend on the reversal of these changes but on a parallel NMDA-dependent learning that competes with the first one. Because they control impulse traffic from the basolateral amygdala to the central nucleus, GABAergic neurons of the intercalated cell masses are ideally located to implement this second learning. Consistent with this hypothesis, the present study shows that low- and high-frequency stimulation of basolateral afferents respectively induce long-term depression (LTD) and potentiation (LTP) of responses in intercalated cells. Moreover, induction of LTP and LTD is prevented by application of an NMDA antagonist. To determine how these activity-dependent changes are expressed, we tested whether LTD and LTP induction are associated with modifications in paired-pulse facilitation, an index of transmitter release probability. Only LTP induction was associated with a change in paired-pulse facilitation. Depotentiation of previously potentiated synapses did not revert the modification in paired pulse facilitation, suggesting that LTP is associated with presynaptic alterations, but that LTD and depotentiation depend on postsynaptic changes. Taken together, our results suggest that basolateral synapses onto intercalated neurons can express NMDA-dependent LTP and LTD, consistent with the possibility that intercalated neurons are a critical locus of plasticity for the extinction of conditioned fear responses. Ultimately, these plastic events may prevent conditioned amygdala responses from exciting neurons of the central nucleus, and thus from evoking conditioned fear responses.

  19. Hypocretin/orexin neurons contribute to hippocampus-dependent social memory and synaptic plasticity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liya; Zou, Bende; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Pascual, Conrado; Xie, James; Malik, Adam; Xie, Julian; Sakurai, Takeshi; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2013-03-20

    Hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt)-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus project throughout the brain, including to the hippocampus, where Hcrt receptors are widely expressed. Hcrt neurons activate these targets to orchestrate global arousal state, wake-sleep architecture, energy homeostasis, stress adaptation, and reward behaviors. Recently, Hcrt has been implicated in cognitive functions and social interaction. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Hcrt neurons are critical to social interaction, particularly social memory, using neurobehavioral assessment and electrophysiological approaches. The validated "two-enclosure homecage test" devices and procedure were used to test sociability, preference for social novelty (social novelty), and recognition memory. A conventional direct contact social test was conducted to corroborate the findings. We found that adult orexin/ataxin-3-transgenic (AT) mice, in which Hcrt neurons degenerate by 3 months of age, displayed normal sociability and social novelty with respect to their wild-type littermates. However, AT mice displayed deficits in long-term social memory. Nasal administration of exogenous Hcrt-1 restored social memory to an extent in AT mice. Hippocampal slices taken from AT mice exhibited decreases in degree of paired-pulse facilitation and magnitude of long-term potentiation, despite displaying normal basal synaptic neurotransmission in the CA1 area compared to wild-type hippocampal slices. AT hippocampi had lower levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB), an activity-dependent transcription factor important for synaptic plasticity and long-term memory storage. Our studies demonstrate that Hcrt neurons play an important role in the consolidation of social recognition memory, at least in part through enhancements of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation.

  20. Neurotrophic-priming of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is essential for neuronal plasticity to stress and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Lambert, W Marcus; Bath, Kevin G; Garabedian, Michael J; Chao, Moses V; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2015-12-22

    Neurotrophins and glucocorticoids are robust synaptic modifiers, and deregulation of their activities is a risk factor for developing stress-related disorders. Low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the desensitization of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and vulnerability to stress, whereas higher levels of BDNF facilitate GR-mediated signaling and the response to antidepressants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying neurotrophic-priming of GR function is poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that activation of a TrkB-MAPK pathway, when paired with the deactivation of a GR-protein phosphatase 5 pathway, resulted in sustained GR phosphorylation at BDNF-sensitive sites that is essential for the transcription of neuronal plasticity genes. Genetic strategies that disrupted GR phosphorylation or TrkB signaling in vivo impaired the neuroplasticity to chronic stress and the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine. Our findings reveal that the coordinated actions of BDNF and glucocorticoids promote neuronal plasticity and that disruption in either pathway could set the stage for the development of stress-induced psychiatric diseases.

  1. Age- and location-dependent differences in store depletion-induced h-channel plasticity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Ann M; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Disruptions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) homeostasis are heavily linked to neuronal pathology. Depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores can result in cellular dysfunction and potentially cell death, although adaptive processes exist to aid in survival. We examined the age and region dependence of one postulated, adaptive response to ER store-depletion (SD), hyperpolarization-activated cation-nonspecific (h)-channel plasticity in neurons of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (DHC and VHC, respectively) from adolescent and adult rats. With the use of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the soma and dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, we observed a change in h-sensitive measurements in response to SD, induced by treatment with cyclopiazonic acid, a sarcoplasmic reticulum/ER Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker. We found that whereas DHC and VHC neurons in adolescent animals respond to SD with a perisomatic expression of SD h plasticity, adult animals express SD h plasticity with a dendritic and somatodendritic locus of plasticity in DHC and VHC neurons, respectively. Furthermore, SD h plasticity in adults was dependent on membrane potential and on the activation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. These results suggest that cellular responses to the impairment of ER function, or ER stress, are dependent on brain region and age and that the differential expression of SD h plasticity could provide a neural basis for region- and age-dependent disease vulnerabilities.

  2. The Emergence of Synaesthesia in a Neuronal Network Model via Changes in Perceptual Sensitivity and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Synaesthesia is an unusual perceptual experience in which an inducer stimulus triggers a percept in a different domain in addition to its own. To explore the conditions under which synaesthesia evolves, we studied a neuronal network model that represents two recurrently connected neural systems. The interactions in the network evolve according to learning rules that optimize sensory sensitivity. We demonstrate several scenarios, such as sensory deprivation or heightened plasticity, under which synaesthesia can evolve even though the inputs to the two systems are statistically independent and the initial cross-talk interactions are zero. Sensory deprivation is the known causal mechanism for acquired synaesthesia and increased plasticity is implicated in developmental synaesthesia. The model unifies different causes of synaesthesia within a single theoretical framework and repositions synaesthesia not as some quirk of aberrant connectivity, but rather as a functional brain state that can emerge as a consequence of optimising sensory information processing. PMID:27392215

  3. The Emergence of Synaesthesia in a Neuronal Network Model via Changes in Perceptual Sensitivity and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriki, Oren; Sadeh, Yaniv; Ward, Jamie

    2016-07-01

    Synaesthesia is an unusual perceptual experience in which an inducer stimulus triggers a percept in a different domain in addition to its own. To explore the conditions under which synaesthesia evolves, we studied a neuronal network model that represents two recurrently connected neural systems. The interactions in the network evolve according to learning rules that optimize sensory sensitivity. We demonstrate several scenarios, such as sensory deprivation or heightened plasticity, under which synaesthesia can evolve even though the inputs to the two systems are statistically independent and the initial cross-talk interactions are zero. Sensory deprivation is the known causal mechanism for acquired synaesthesia and increased plasticity is implicated in developmental synaesthesia. The model unifies different causes of synaesthesia within a single theoretical framework and repositions synaesthesia not as some quirk of aberrant connectivity, but rather as a functional brain state that can emerge as a consequence of optimising sensory information processing.

  4. The Emergence of Synaesthesia in a Neuronal Network Model via Changes in Perceptual Sensitivity and Plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Shriki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaesthesia is an unusual perceptual experience in which an inducer stimulus triggers a percept in a different domain in addition to its own. To explore the conditions under which synaesthesia evolves, we studied a neuronal network model that represents two recurrently connected neural systems. The interactions in the network evolve according to learning rules that optimize sensory sensitivity. We demonstrate several scenarios, such as sensory deprivation or heightened plasticity, under which synaesthesia can evolve even though the inputs to the two systems are statistically independent and the initial cross-talk interactions are zero. Sensory deprivation is the known causal mechanism for acquired synaesthesia and increased plasticity is implicated in developmental synaesthesia. The model unifies different causes of synaesthesia within a single theoretical framework and repositions synaesthesia not as some quirk of aberrant connectivity, but rather as a functional brain state that can emerge as a consequence of optimising sensory information processing.

  5. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eWallner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor.

  6. Methods for the analysis of neuronal plasticity and brain connectivity during neurological recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo H.Sanchez-Mendoza; Tayana Silva de Carvalho; Dirk M.Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The study of neuronal plasticity under pathological conditions is now a major point of focus on the ifeld of neurological recovery. Atfer the repeated failure of acute neuroprotection strategies for stroke treatment, the design of studies aimed at promoting the reconstruction of neuronal networks has become essential. Methods for the delivery of therapeutic agents on a steady dosage, thus preventing pharmacological peaks or excessive manipulation of experimental animals, are thus required. Additionally, methods that allow the visualization of neurological remodeling processes are fundamental to the understanding of how a thera-peutic agent exerts its function. Here we describe how the use of miniosmotic pumps for the steady delivery of such agents, together with tract tracer injections, can be combined to unveil important information on how the brain changes atfer stroke and how therapeutic agents promote brain remodeling recovery.

  7. Downstream Effect of Ramping Neuronal Activity through Synapses with Short-Term Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-04-01

    Ramping neuronal activity refers to spiking activity with a rate that increases quasi-linearly over time. It has been observed in multiple cortical areas and is correlated with evidence accumulation processes or timing. In this work, we investigated the downstream effect of ramping neuronal activity through synapses that display short-term facilitation (STF) or depression (STD). We obtained an analytical result for a synapse driven by deterministic linear ramping input that exhibits pure STF or STD and numerically investigated the general case when a synapse displays both STF and STD. We show that the analytical deterministic solution gives an accurate description of the averaging synaptic activation of many inputs converging onto a postsynaptic neuron, even when fluctuations in the ramping input are strong. Activation of a synapse with STF shows an initial cubical increase with time, followed by a linear ramping similar to a synapse without STF. Activation of a synapse with STD grows in time to a maximum before falling and reaching a plateau, and this steady state is independent of the slope of the ramping input. For a synapse displaying both STF and STD, an increase in the depression time constant from a value much smaller than the facilitation time constant τ(F) to a value much larger than τ(F) leads to a transition from facilitation dominance to depression dominance. Therefore, our work provides insights into the impact of ramping neuronal activity on downstream neurons through synapses that display short-term plasticity. In a perceptual decision-making process, ramping activity has been observed in the parietal and prefrontal cortices, with a slope that decreases with task difficulty. Our work predicts that neurons downstream from such a decision circuit could instead display a firing plateau independent of the task difficulty, provided that the synaptic connection is endowed with short-term depression.

  8. Neuronal plasticity after a human spinal cord injury: positive and negative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Volker

    2012-05-01

    In patients suffering an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) an improvement in walking function can be achieved by providing a functional training with an appropriate afferent input. In contrast, in immobilized incomplete and complete subjects a negative neuroplasticity leads to a neuronal dysfunction. After an SCI, neuronal centers below the level of lesion exhibit plasticity that either can be exploited by specific training paradigms or undergo a degradation of function due to the loss of appropriate input. Load- and hip-joint-related afferent inputs seem to be of crucial importance for the generation of a locomotor pattern and, consequently, the effectiveness of the locomotor training. In severely affected SCI subjects rehabilitation robots allow for a longer and more intensive training and can provide feedback information. Conversely, in severely affected chronic SCI individuals without functional training the locomotor activity in the leg muscles exhausts rapidly during assisted locomotion. This is accompanied by a shift from early to dominant late spinal reflex components. The exhaustion of locomotor activity is also observed in non-ambulatory patients with an incomplete SCI. It is assumed that in chronic SCI the patient's immobility results in a reduced input from supraspinal and peripheral sources and leads to a dominance of inhibitory drive within spinal neuronal circuitries underlying locomotor pattern and spinal reflex generation. A training with an enhancement of an appropriate proprioceptive input early after an SCI might serve as an intervention to prevent neuronal dysfunction.

  9. Activation of InsP3 receptors is sufficient for inducing graded intrinsic plasticity in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The synaptic plasticity literature has focused on establishing necessity and sufficiency as two essential and distinct features in causally relating a signaling molecule to plasticity induction, an approach that has been surprisingly lacking in the intrinsic plasticity literature. In this study, we complemented the recently established necessity of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3R) in a form of intrinsic plasticity by asking if InsP3R activation was sufficient to induce intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Specifically, incorporation of d-myo-InsP3 in the recording pipette reduced input resistance, maximal impedance amplitude, and temporal summation but increased resonance frequency, resonance strength, sag ratio, and impedance phase lead. Strikingly, the magnitude of plasticity in all these measurements was dependent on InsP3 concentration, emphasizing the graded dependence of such plasticity on InsP3R activation. Mechanistically, we found that this InsP3-induced plasticity depended on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Moreover, this calcium-dependent form of plasticity was critically reliant on the release of calcium through InsP3Rs, the influx of calcium through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels, and on the protein kinase A pathway. Our results delineate a causal role for InsP3Rs in graded adaptation of neuronal response dynamics, revealing novel regulatory roles for the endoplasmic reticulum in neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:25552640

  10. Free D-aspartate regulates neuronal dendritic morphology, synaptic plasticity, gray matter volume and brain activity in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, F; Nisticò, R; Di Giorgio, A; Squillace, M; Vitucci, D; Galbusera, A; Piccinin, S; Mango, D; Fazio, L; Middei, S; Trizio, S; Mercuri, N B; Teule, M A; Centonze, D; Gozzi, A; Blasi, G; Bertolino, A; Usiello, A

    2014-01-01

    D-aspartate (D-Asp) is an atypical amino acid, which is especially abundant in the developing mammalian brain, and can bind to and activate N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In line with its pharmacological features, we find that mice chronically treated with D-Asp show enhanced NMDAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and basal cerebral blood volume in fronto-hippocampal areas. In addition, we show that both chronic administration of D-Asp and deletion of the gene coding for the catabolic enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO) trigger plastic modifications of neuronal cytoarchitecture in the prefrontal cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and promote a cytochalasin D-sensitive form of synaptic plasticity in adult mouse brains. To translate these findings in humans and consistent with the experiments using Ddo gene targeting in animals, we performed a hierarchical stepwise translational genetic approach. Specifically, we investigated the association of variation in the gene coding for DDO with complex human prefrontal phenotypes. We demonstrate that genetic variation predicting reduced expression of DDO in postmortem human prefrontal cortex is mapped on greater prefrontal gray matter and activity during working memory as measured with MRI. In conclusion our results identify novel NMDAR-dependent effects of D-Asp on plasticity and physiology in rodents, which also map to prefrontal phenotypes in humans.

  11. Nutritional n-3 PUFAs deficiency during perinatal periods alters brain innate immune system and neuronal plasticity-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnès; Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Sere, A; Aubert, A; Portal, Céline; Joffre, Corinne; Layé, Sophie

    2014-10-01

    Low dietary intake of the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is a causative factor of neurodevelopmental disorders. However the mechanisms linking n-3 PUFAs low dietary intake and neurodevelopmental disorders are poorly understood. Microglia, known mainly for their immune function in the injured or infected brain, have recently been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in regulating maturation of neuronal circuits during normal brain development. Disruption of this role during the perinatal period therefore could significantly contribute to psychopathologies with a neurodevelopmental neurodevelopmental component. N-3 PUFAs, essential lipids and key structural components of neuronal membrane phospholipids, are highly incorporated in cell membranes during the gestation and lactation phase. We previously showed that in a context of perinatal n-3 PUFAs deficiency, accretion of these latter is decreased and this is correlated to an alteration of endotoxin-induced inflammatory response. We thus postulated that dietary n-3 PUFAs imbalance alters the activity of microglia in the developing brain, leading to abnormal formation of neuronal networks. We first confirmed that mice fed with a n-3 PUFAs deficient diet displayed decreased n-3 PUFAs levels in the brain at post-natal days (PND)0 and PND21. We then demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency altered microglia phenotype and motility in the post-natal developing brain. This was paralleled by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines expression at PND21 and to modification of neuronal plasticity-related genes expression. Overall, our findings show for the first time that a dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency from the first day of gestation leads to the development of a pro-inflammatory condition in the central nervous system that may contribute to neurodevelopmental alterations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A role for caveolin-1 in post-injury reactive neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Sophie B; Blain, Jean-François; Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Poirier, Judes

    2005-02-01

    Remodeling and plasticity in the adult brain require cholesterol redistribution and synthesis for the formation of new membrane components. Caveolin-1 is a cholesterol-binding membrane protein involved in cellular cholesterol transport and homeostasis. Evidence presented here demonstrates an up-regulation of caveolin-1 in the hippocampus, which was temporally correlated with an increase in synaptophysin during the reinnervation phase in a mouse model of hippocampal deafferentation. Using an in vitro model of neuronal reactive plasticity, we examined the effect of virally mediated overexpression of caveolin-1 on injured differentiated PC12 cells undergoing terminal remodeling. Three days post lesion, caveolin-1-overexpressing cells revealed increases in synaptophysin and GAP-43, two markers of neurite sprouting and synaptogenesis. Morphologically, caveolin-1-overexpressing cells showed a decrease in primary neurite outgrowth and branching as well as an increase in neurite density. Caveolin-1-overexpressing cells also revealed the presence of terminal swelling and beading along processes, consistent with a possible alteration of microtubules stability. Moreover, a focal enrichment of caveolin-1 immunofluorescence was observed at the bases of axonal and dendritic terminals of mouse primary hippocampal neurons. Altogether, these results indicate that caveolin-1 plays an active role in the regulation of injury-induced synaptic and terminal remodeling in the adult CNS.

  13. Research Team for Neural Development and Plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The brain consists of billions of nerve cells, called neurons, which make specific connections (called synapses) among them to form many neural circuits to perform various brain functions, including processing, storage, and retrieval of information. Each neuron is a polarized cell. It sends out many highly arborized dendrites on one end for receiving input signals and a single long axon oll the other end for delivery of output signals to distant target neurons.

  14. PRENATAL HYPOXIA IN DIFFERENT PERIODS OF EMBRYOGENESIS DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS CELL MIGRATION, NEURONAL PLASTICITY AND RAT BEHAVIOR IN POSTNATAL ONTOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii S Vasilev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term effects of prenatal hypoxia on embryonic days E14 or E18 on the number, type and localization of cortical neurons, density of labile synaptopodin-positive dendritic spines and parietal cortex-dependent behavioral tasks were examined in the postnatal ontogenesis of rats. An injection of 5’ethynyl-2’deoxyuridine to pregnant rats was used to label neurons generated on E14 or E18 in the fetuses. In control rat pups a majority of cells labeled on E14 were localized in the lower cortical layers V-VI while the cells labeled on E18 were mainly found in the superficial cortical layers II-III. It was shown that hypoxia both on E14 and E18 results in disruption of neuroblast generation and migration but affects different cell populations. In rat pups subjected to hypoxia on E14, the total number of labeled cells in the parietal cortex was decreased while the number of labeled neurons scattered within the superficial cortical layers was increased. In rat pups subjected to hypoxia on E18, the total number of labeled cells in the parietal cortex was also decreased but the number of scattered labeled neurons was higher in the lower cortical layers. It can be suggested that prenatal hypoxia both on E14 and E18 causes a disruption in neuroblast migration but with a different outcome. Only in rats subjected to hypoxia on E14 did we observe a reduction in the total number of pyramidal cortical neurons and the density of labile synaptopodin-positive dendritic spines in the molecular cortical layer during the first month after birth which affected development of the cortical functions. As a result, rats subjected to hypoxia on E14, but not on E18, had impaired development of the whisker-placing reaction and reduced ability to learn reaching by a forepaw. The data obtained suggest that hypoxia on E14 in the period of generation of the cells, which later differentiate into the pyramidal cortical neurons of the V-VI layers and form cortical minicolumns

  15. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

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    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  16. Specification of excitatory neurons in the developing cerebral cortex: progenitor diversity and and environmental influences

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    Marcos R Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mature cerebral cortex harbors a heterogeneous population of glutamatergic neurons, organized into a highly intricate histological architecture. Classically, this mixed population of neurons was thought to be generated sequentially from a seemingly homogenous group of progenitors under the influence of external cues. This view, however, has been challenged in the last decade by evidences pointing to the existence of fate-restricted neuronal progenitors in the developing neocortex. Here, we review classical studies using cell transplantation, retroviral labeling and cell culture, as well as new data from genetic fate-mapping analysis, to discuss the lineage relationships between neocortical progenitors and subclasses of excitatory neurons. We also propose a temporal model to conciliate the existence of fate-restricted progenitors alongside multipotent progenitors in the neocortex. Finally, we discuss evidences for a critical period of plasticity among post mitotic excitatory cortical neurons when environmental influences could change neuronal cell fate.

  17. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; Lopez, Ana V; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T

    2013-04-24

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) rectification, and intrinsic excitability in IL pyramidal neurons in slices from trained rats using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We observed that fear extinction increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio, consistent with insertion of AMPARs into IL synapses. In addition, extinction training increased inward rectification, suggesting that extinction induces the insertion of calcium-permeable (GluA2-lacking) AMPARs into IL synapses. Consistent with this, selectively blocking calcium-permeable AMPARs with Naspm reduced the AMPA EPSCs in IL neurons to a larger degree after extinction. Extinction-induced changes in AMPA/NMDA ratio, rectification, and intrinsic excitability were blocked with an mGluR5 antagonist. These findings suggest that mGluR5 activation leads to consolidation of fear extinction by regulating the intrinsic excitability of IL neurons and modifying the composition of AMPARs in IL synapses. Therefore, impaired mGluR5 activity in IL synapses could be one factor that causes inappropriate modulation of fear expression leading to anxiety disorders.

  18. Disruption of Slc4a10 augments neuronal excitability and modulates synaptic short-term plasticity

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    Anne eSinning

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Slc4a10 is a Na+-coupled Cl--HCO3- exchanger, which is expressed in principal and inhibitory neurons as well as in choroid plexus epithelial cells of the brain. Slc4a10 knockout mice have collapsed brain ventricles and display an increased seizure threshold, while heterozygous deletions in man have been associated with idiopathic epilepsy and other neurological symptoms. To further characterize the role of Slc4a10 for network excitability, we compared input-output relations as well as short and long term changes of evoked field potentials in Slc4a10 knockout and wildtype mice. While responses of CA1 pyramidal neurons to stimulation of Schaffer collaterals were increased in Slc4a10 knockout mice, evoked field potentials did not differ between genotypes in the stratum radiatum or the neocortical areas analyzed. Paired pulse facilitation was diminished in the hippocampus upon disruption of Slc4a10 and paired pulse depression was increased in the neocortex. Though short term plasticity is modulated via Slc4a10, long term potentiation appears independent of Slc4a10. Our data support that Slc4a10 dampens neuronal excitability and thus sheds light on the pathophysiology of SLC4A10 associated pathologies.

  19. A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor family member promotes neuronal outgrowth and synaptic plasticity in aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Daniela D; Minh, Bui Quang; Cicvaric, Ana; Monje, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptors (FGFRs) regulate essential biological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, cellular growth and memory-related long-term synaptic plasticity. Whereas canonical FGFRs depend exclusively on extracellular Immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains for ligand binding, other receptor types, including members of the tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (Trk) family, use either Ig-like or Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) motifs, or both. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events leading to the differential incorporation of LRR domains into Ig-containing tyrosine kinase receptors. Moreover, although FGFRs have been identified in many vertebrate species, few reports describe their existence in invertebrates. Information about the biological relevance of invertebrate FGFRs and evolutionary divergences between them and their vertebrate counterparts is therefore limited. Here, we characterized ApLRRTK, a neuronal cell-surface protein recently identified in Aplysia. We unveiled ApLRRTK as the first member of the FGFRs family deprived of Ig-like domains that instead contains extracellular LRR domains. We describe that ApLRRTK exhibits properties typical of canonical vertebrate FGFRs, including promotion of FGF activity, enhancement of neuritic outgrowth and signaling via MAPK and the transcription factor CREB. ApLRRTK also enhanced the synaptic efficiency of neurons known to mediate in vivo memory-related defensive behaviors. These data reveal a novel molecular regulator of neuronal function in invertebrates, provide the first evolutionary linkage between LRR proteins and FGFRs and unveil an unprecedented mechanism of FGFR gene diversification in primeval central nervous systems.

  20. PLCγ-activated signalling is essential for TrkB mediated sensory neuron structural plasticity

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    Rocha-Sanchez Sonia M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vestibular system provides the primary input of our sense of balance and spatial orientation. Dysfunction of the vestibular system can severely affect a person's quality of life. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of vestibular neuron survival, maintenance, and innervation of the target sensory epithelia is fundamental. Results Here we report that a point mutation at the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ docking site in the mouse neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB (Ntrk2 specifically impairs fiber guidance inside the vestibular sensory epithelia, but has limited effects on the survival of vestibular sensory neurons and growth of afferent processes toward the sensory epithelia. We also show that expression of the TRPC3 cation calcium channel, whose activity is known to be required for nerve-growth cone guidance induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is altered in these animals. In addition, we find that absence of the PLCγ mediated TrkB signalling interferes with the transformation of bouton type afferent terminals of vestibular dendrites into calyces (the largest synaptic contact of dendrites known in the mammalian nervous system on type I vestibular hair cells; the latter are normally distributed in these mutants as revealed by an unaltered expression pattern of the potassium channel KCNQ4 in these cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate a crucial involvement of the TrkB/PLCγ-mediated intracellular signalling in structural aspects of sensory neuron plasticity.

  1. A VLSI array of low-power spiking neurons and bistable synapses with spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Chicca, Elisabetta; Douglas, Rodney

    2006-01-01

    We present a mixed-mode analog/digital VLSI device comprising an array of leaky integrate-and-fire (I&F) neurons, adaptive synapses with spike-timing dependent plasticity, and an asynchronous event based communication infrastructure that allows the user to (re)configure networks of spiking neurons with arbitrary topologies. The asynchronous communication protocol used by the silicon neurons to transmit spikes (events) off-chip and the silicon synapses to receive spikes from the outside is based on the "address-event representation" (AER). We describe the analog circuits designed to implement the silicon neurons and synapses and present experimental data showing the neuron's response properties and the synapses characteristics, in response to AER input spike trains. Our results indicate that these circuits can be used in massively parallel VLSI networks of I&F neurons to simulate real-time complex spike-based learning algorithms.

  2. Age- and location-dependent differences in store depletion-induced h-channel plasticity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens, Ann M.; Johnston, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Disruptions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ homeostasis are heavily linked to neuronal pathology. Depletion of ER Ca2+ stores can result in cellular dysfunction and potentially cell death, although adaptive processes exist to aid in survival. We examined the age and region dependence of one postulated, adaptive response to ER store-depletion (SD), hyperpolarization-activated cation-nonspecific (h)-channel plasticity in neurons of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (DHC and VHC, respectivel...

  3. Copying the development: mirror neurons in child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Morban, Demian Arturo; Montero Cruz, Nathalia Caridad

    2016-06-10

    Since intrauterine life, our brain is exposed to diverse internal and external factors that generate epigenetic changes affecting the neural networks and thus modifying the properties of the mirror neurons of the developing infant. We consider that changes on the mirror neurons may play a role on the neuro-developmental pathologies of an infant where no structural brain lesion is observed.

  4. Spine formation pattern of adult-born neurons is differentially modulated by the induction timing and location of hippocampal plasticity.

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    Noriaki Ohkawa

    Full Text Available In the adult hippocampus dentate gyrus (DG, newly born neurons are functionally integrated into existing circuits and play important roles in hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it remains unclear how neural plasticity regulates the integration pattern of new neurons into preexisting circuits. Because dendritic spines are major postsynaptic sites for excitatory inputs, spines of new neurons were visualized by retrovirus-mediated labeling to evaluate integration. Long-term potentiation (LTP was induced at 12, 16, or 21 days postinfection (dpi, at which time new neurons have no, few, or many spines, respectively. The spine expression patterns were investigated at one or two weeks after LTP induction. Induction at 12 dpi increased later spinogenesis, although the new neurons at 12 dpi didn't respond to the stimulus for LTP induction. Induction at 21 dpi transiently mediated spine enlargement. Surprisingly, LTP induction at 16 dpi reduced the spine density of new neurons. All LTP-mediated changes specifically appeared within the LTP-induced layer. Therefore, neural plasticity differentially regulates the integration of new neurons into the activated circuit, dependent on their developmental stage. Consequently, new neurons at different developmental stages may play distinct roles in processing the acquired information by modulating the connectivity of activated circuits via their integration.

  5. Adaptive behavior of neighboring neurons during adaptation-induced plasticity of orientation tuning in V1

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    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory neurons display transient changes of their response properties following prolonged exposure to an appropriate stimulus (adaptation. In adult cat primary visual cortex, orientation-selective neurons shift their preferred orientation after being adapted to a non-preferred orientation. The direction of those shifts, towards (attractive or away (repulsive from the adapter depends mostly on adaptation duration. How the adaptive behavior of a neuron is related to that of its neighbors remains unclear. Results Here we show that in most cases (75%, cells shift their preferred orientation in the same direction as their neighbors. We also found that cells shifting preferred orientation differently from their neighbors (25% display three interesting properties: (i larger variance of absolute shift amplitude, (ii wider tuning bandwidth and (iii larger range of preferred orientations among the cluster of cells. Several response properties of V1 neurons depend on their location within the cortical orientation map. Our results suggest that recording sites with both attractive and repulsive shifts following adaptation may be located in close proximity to iso-orientation domain boundaries or pinwheel centers. Indeed, those regions have a more diverse orientation distribution of local inputs that could account for the three properties above. On the other hand, sites with all cells shifting their preferred orientation in the same direction could be located within iso-orientation domains. Conclusions Our results suggest that the direction and amplitude of orientation preference shifts in V1 depend on location within the orientation map. This anisotropy of adaptation-induced plasticity, comparable to that of the visual cortex itself, could have important implications for our understanding of visual adaptation at the psychophysical level.

  6. Myenteric neuronal plasticity induced by Toxoplasma gondii (genotype III on the duodenum of rats

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    Rodrigo M. Papazian-Cabanas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acute and chronic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii on duodenal myenteric neurons were analyzed. Eighteen rats were assigned into four groups: Acute Control Group (ACG, n=4; Acute Experimental Group (AEG, n=4; Chronic Control Group (CCG, n=5; and Chronic Experimental Group (CEG, n=5. Rats from the AEG and CEG were inoculated orally with 105 genotype III (BTU-II strain tachyzoites of T. gondii isolated from a dog with neurological signs. Acute groups were killed after 24 hours after the inoculation and the chronic groups after 30 days. Whole-mount from the duodenum were stained with Giemsa. The population density of myenteric neurons, as well the body cell, nuclear and cytoplasmic area were analyzed. Both acute and chronic toxoplasmic infection did not provoke neuronal loss. On the other hand, plastic alterations were observed: decreasing of the nuclear and cytoplasmic area during the acute phase and neuronal hypertrophy during the chronic phase.Foram analisados os efeitos da infecção aguda e crônica provocada pelo Toxoplasma gondii sobre os neurônios mientéricos do duodeno. Dezoito ratos foram divididos em quatro grupos: Grupo Controle Agudo (GCA, n= 4, Grupo Experimental Agudo (GEA, n=4, Grupo Controle Crônico (GCC, n=5 e Grupo Experimental Crônico (GEC, n=5. Os animais do GEA e GEC receberam por via oral 10 5 taquizoítos de Toxoplasma gondii da cepa BTUII (genótipo III isolada de um cão com sintomatologia neurológica. Os grupos agudos foram submetidos à eutanásia após 24 horas e os crônicos após 30 dias da inoculação. Preparados totais do duodeno foram corados com Giemsa. A densidade populacional dos neurônios mientéricos, bem como a área do corpo celular, núcleo e citoplasma foram analisados. Ambas, as infecções toxoplásmicas aguda e crônica não provocaram a perda neuronal. Por outro lado, alterações plásticas foram observadas: diminuição da área nuclear e citoplasmática durante a fase

  7. Failure of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity underlies age-associated long-term associative memory impairment

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    Watson Shawn N

    2012-08-01

    learning and memory impairment in Lymnaea and buttress the hypothesis that lipid peroxidation-dependent depression of intrinsic excitability is a hallmark of normal neuronal aging. The data implicate both lipid peroxidation-dependent non-synaptic as well as apparently lipid peroxidation-independent synaptic mechanisms in the age-dependent decline in behavioural plasticity in this model system.

  8. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akane, Hirotoshi [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Shiraki, Ayako [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Itahashi, Megu [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Murakami, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Veterinary Toxicology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc{sup +} neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos{sup +} neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues

  9. MicroRNA132 Modulates Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity but Not Basal Release Probability in Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Talley J.; Storm, Daniel R.; Sullivan, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important regulatory roles in a broad range of cellular processes including neuronal morphology and long-term synaptic plasticity. MicroRNA-132 (miR132) is a CREB-regulated miRNA that is induced by neuronal activity and neurotrophins, and plays a role in regulating neuronal morphology and cellular excitability. Little is known about the effects of miR132 expression on synaptic function. Here we show that overexpression of miR132 increases the paired-pulse ratio and decreases sy...

  10. IQGAP1: A microtubule-microfilament scaffolding protein with multiple roles in nerve cell development and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausoro, Ignacio; Mestres, Iván; Remedi, Mónica; Sanchez, Mónica; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we review our current understanding of the biology of IQ domain-containing GTPase-Activating Protein 1, IQGAP1, a scaffolding protein with multiple binding partners, which is widely expressed among different cell types, including neurons, and capable of linking Rho-GTPase signaling with cytosleletal elements and environmental cues. Interestingly, a series of recent studies suggest that IQGAP family members have an important role in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and nervous system disorders involving alterations in spine density.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during brain maturation reduces neuronal and behavioral plasticity in adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsharan Singh Bhatia

    Full Text Available Omega-3-fatty acid DHA is a structural component of brain plasma membranes, thereby crucial for neuronal signaling; however, the brain is inefficient at synthesizing DHA. We have asked how levels of dietary n-3 fatty acids during brain growth would affect brain function and plasticity during adult life. Pregnant rats and their male offspring were fed an n-3 adequate diet or n-3 deficient diets for 15 weeks. Results showed that the n-3 deficiency increased parameters of anxiety-like behavior using open field and elevated plus maze tests in the male offspring. Behavioral changes were accompanied by a level reduction in the anxiolytic-related neuropeptide Y-1 receptor, and an increase in the anxiogenic-related glucocorticoid receptor in the cognitive related frontal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus. The n-3 deficiency reduced brain levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and increased the ratio n-6/n-3 assessed by gas chromatography. The n-3 deficiency reduced the levels of BDNF and signaling through the BDNF receptor TrkB, in proportion to brain DHA levels, and reduced the activation of the BDNF-related signaling molecule CREB in selected brain regions. The n-3 deficiency also disrupted the insulin signaling pathways as evidenced by changes in insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate (IRS. DHA deficiency during brain maturation reduces plasticity and compromises brain function in adulthood. Adequate levels of dietary DHA seem crucial for building long-term neuronal resilience for optimal brain performance and aiding in the battle against neurological disorders.

  12. Neuronal Kmt2a/Mll1 histone methyltransferase is essential for prefrontal synaptic plasticity and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Ruan, Hongyu; Shen, Erica Y; Dincer, Aslihan; Javidfar, Behnam; Ma, Qi; Peter, Cyril J; Cheung, Iris; Mitchell, Amanda C; Jiang, Yan; Lin, Cong L; Pothula, Venu; Stewart, A Francis; Ernst, Patricia; Yao, Wei-Dong; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal histone H3-lysine 4 methylation landscapes are defined by sharp peaks at gene promoters and other cis-regulatory sequences, but molecular and cellular phenotypes after neuron-specific deletion of H3K4 methyl-regulators remain largely unexplored. We report that neuronal ablation of the H3K4-specific methyltransferase, Kmt2a/Mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (Mll1), in mouse postnatal forebrain and adult prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increased anxiety and robust cognitive deficits without locomotor dysfunction. In contrast, only mild behavioral phenotypes were observed after ablation of the Mll1 ortholog Kmt2b/Mll2 in PFC. Impaired working memory after Kmt2a/Mll1 ablation in PFC neurons was associated with loss of training-induced transient waves of Arc immediate early gene expression critical for synaptic plasticity. Medial prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons, a major output relay of the cortex, demonstrated severely impaired synaptic facilitation and temporal summation, two forms of short-term plasticity essential for working memory. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing in Mll1-deficient cortical neurons revealed downregulated expression and loss of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-H3K4, at neurons critically depend on maintenance of Mll1-regulated H3K4 methylation at a subset of genes with an essential role in cognition and emotion. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355097-12$15.00/0.

  13. Synchrony between orientation-selective neurons is modulated during adaptation-induced plasticity in cat visual cortex

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    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual neurons respond essentially to luminance variations occurring within their receptive fields. In primary visual cortex, each neuron is a filter for stimulus features such as orientation, motion direction and velocity, with the appropriate combination of features eliciting maximal firing rate. Temporal correlation of spike trains was proposed as a potential code for linking the neuronal responses evoked by various features of a same object. In the present study, synchrony strength was measured between cells following an adaptation protocol (prolonged exposure to a non-preferred stimulus which induce plasticity of neurons' orientation preference. Results Multi-unit activity from area 17 of anesthetized adult cats was recorded. Single cells were sorted out and (1 orientation tuning curves were measured before and following 12 min adaptation and 60 min after adaptation (2 pairwise synchrony was measured by an index that was normalized in relation to the cells' firing rate. We first observed that the prolonged presentation of a non-preferred stimulus produces attractive (58% and repulsive (42% shifts of cell's tuning curves. It follows that the adaptation-induced plasticity leads to changes in preferred orientation difference, i.e. increase or decrease in tuning properties between neurons. We report here that, after adaptation, the neuron pairs that shared closer tuning properties display a significant increase of synchronization. Recovery from adaptation was accompanied by a return to the initial synchrony level. Conclusion We conclude that synchrony reflects the similarity in neurons' response properties, and varies accordingly when these properties change.

  14. Cortical overexpression of neuronal calcium sensor-1 induces functional plasticity in spinal cord following unilateral pyramidal tract injury in rat.

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    Ping K Yip

    Full Text Available Following trauma of the adult brain or spinal cord the injured axons of central neurons fail to regenerate or if intact display only limited anatomical plasticity through sprouting. Adult cortical neurons forming the corticospinal tract (CST normally have low levels of the neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS1 protein. In primary cultured adult cortical neurons, the lentivector-induced overexpression of NCS1 induces neurite sprouting associated with increased phospho-Akt levels. When the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway was pharmacologically inhibited the NCS1-induced neurite sprouting was abolished. The overexpression of NCS1 in uninjured corticospinal neurons exhibited axonal sprouting across the midline into the CST-denervated side of the spinal cord following unilateral pyramidotomy. Improved forelimb function was demonstrated behaviourally and electrophysiologically. In injured corticospinal neurons, overexpression of NCS1 induced axonal sprouting and regeneration and also neuroprotection. These findings demonstrate that increasing the levels of intracellular NCS1 in injured and uninjured central neurons enhances their intrinsic anatomical plasticity within the injured adult central nervous system.

  15. New Opportunities in Developing Engineering Plastics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Weicai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Owing to their excellent mechanical property, electric behavior, chemical resistance, heat resistance, abrasion resistance, size stability, weather resistance, lighter weight than metal materials and small energy consumption in molding, engineering plastics are extensively used in the sectors-electronic/electric, automobile, construction and office equipment.

  16. Structural plasticity in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons produced by drugs of abuse: critical role of BDNF and dopamine.

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    Ginetta eCollo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons were suggested to be a critical physiopathology substrate for addiction disorders. Among neuroadaptive processes to addictive drugs, structural plasticity has attracted attention. While structural plasticity occurs at both pre- and post-synaptic levels in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, the present review focuses only on dopaminergic neurons. Exposures to addictive drugs determine two opposite structural responses, hypothrophic plasticity produced by opioids and cannabinoids (in particular during the early withdrawal phase and hypertrophic plasticity, mostly driven by psychostimulants and nicotine. In vitro and in vivo studies indentified BDNF and extracellular dopamine as two critical factors in determining structural plasticity, the two molecules sharing similar intracellular pathways involved in cell soma and dendrite growth, the MEK-ERK1/2 and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR, via preferential activation of TrkB and dopamine D3 receptors, respectively. At present information regarding specific structural changes associated to the various stages of the addiction cycle is incomplete. Encouraging neuroimaging data in humans indirectly support the preclinical evidence of hypotrophic and hypertrophic effects, suggesting a possible differential engagement of dopamine neurons in parallel and partially converging circuits controlling motivation, stress and emotions.

  17. Coordinated Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity at Striatopallidal and Striatonigral Neurons Orchestrates Motor Control

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    Massimo Trusel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a critical role in shaping motor behavior. For this function, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the striatonigral and striatopallidal pathways must be integrated. It remains unclear whether the activity of the two pathways is primarily coordinated by synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Using a model of Parkinson’s disease, we determined the circuit and behavioral effects of concurrently regulating cell-type-specific forms of corticostriatal long-term synaptic depression (LTD by inhibiting small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SKs of the dorsolateral striatum. At striatopallidal synapses, SK channel inhibition rescued the disease-linked deficits in endocannabinoid (eCB-dependent LTD. At striatonigral cells, inhibition of these channels counteracted a form of adenosine-mediated LTD by activating the ERK cascade. Interfering with eCB-, adenosine-, and ERK signaling in vivo alleviated motor abnormalities, which supports that synaptic modulation of striatal pathways affects behavior. Thus, our results establish a central role of coordinated synaptic plasticity at MSN subpopulations in motor control.

  18. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Agata; Gorostiza, E Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  19. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Depetris-Chauvin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2 are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  20. AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Synaptic Colocalization on Motor Neurons Drive Maladaptive Plasticity below Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Huie, J Russell; Stuck, Ellen D; Lee, Kuan H; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Grau, James W; Ferguson, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical spinal cord injury (SCI) is accompanied by comorbid peripheral injury in 47% of patients. Human and animal modeling data have shown that painful peripheral injuries undermine long-term recovery of locomotion through unknown mechanisms. Peripheral nociceptive stimuli induce maladaptive synaptic plasticity in dorsal horn sensory systems through AMPA receptor (AMPAR) phosphorylation and trafficking to synapses. Here we test whether ventral horn motor neurons in rats demonstrate similar experience-dependent maladaptive plasticity below a complete SCI in vivo. Quantitative biochemistry demonstrated that intermittent nociceptive stimulation (INS) rapidly and selectively increases AMPAR subunit GluA1 serine 831 phosphorylation and localization to synapses in the injured spinal cord, while reducing synaptic GluA2. These changes predict motor dysfunction in the absence of cell death signaling, suggesting an opportunity for therapeutic reversal. Automated confocal time-course analysis of lumbar ventral horn motor neurons confirmed a time-dependent increase in synaptic GluA1 with concurrent decrease in synaptic GluA2. Optical fractionation of neuronal plasma membranes revealed GluA2 removal from extrasynaptic sites on motor neurons early after INS followed by removal from synapses 2 h later. As GluA2-lacking AMPARs are canonical calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), their stimulus- and time-dependent insertion provides a therapeutic target for limiting calcium-dependent dynamic maladaptive plasticity after SCI. Confirming this, a selective CP-AMPAR antagonist protected against INS-induced maladaptive spinal plasticity, restoring adaptive motor responses on a sensorimotor spinal training task. These findings highlight the critical involvement of AMPARs in experience-dependent spinal cord plasticity after injury and provide a pharmacologically targetable synaptic mechanism by which early postinjury experience shapes motor plasticity.

  1. [The study on the relationship between hippocampus neuronal apoptosis and hippocampus synaptic plasticity in rats exposed to aluminum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaohan; Qin, Xiujun; Zhang, Huifang; Kang, Pan; Li, Zhaoyang; Niu, Qiao

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of aluminum exposure on neuronal apoptosis of rats hippocampus and the correlation of and synaptic plasticity. There were 40 SPF grade SD rats which were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, the low dose group, the medium dose group and the high dose group, 10 rats in each group. The rats were daily gavaged with aluminum lactate for 30 days. The hippocampal fEPSPs in rat was measured by electrophysiological grapher and the neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus was detected by Flow cytometer. In addition, the relative expression of gene which includes caspase-3, 8, 9 was measured by Real-time PCR. Compared to the control group, the average of fEPSPs which after HFS 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 min was decreased at different time point in the low dose group, the medium dose group and the high dose group (P neuronal apoptosis in rats, and then affect hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

  2. Differences in the regenerative response of neuronal cell populations and indications for plasticity in intraspinal neurons after spinal cord transection in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; Lieberoth, Bettina C; Becker, Catherina G; Schachner, Melitta

    2005-10-01

    In zebrafish, the capacity to regenerate long axons varies among different populations of axotomized neurons after spinal cord transection. In specific brain nuclei, 84-92% of axotomized neurons upregulate expression of the growth-related genes GAP-43 and L1.1 and 32-51% of these neurons regrow their descending axons. In contrast, 16-31% of spinal neurons with axons ascending to the brainstem upregulate these genes and only 2-4% regrow their axons. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were not observed to regrow their ascending axons or to increase expression of GAP-43 mRNA. Expression of L1.1 mRNA is high in unlesioned and axotomized DRG neurons. In the lesioned spinal cord, expression of growth-related molecules is increased in a substantial population of non-axotomized neurons, suggesting morphological plasticity in the spinal-intrinsic circuitry. We propose that locomotor recovery in spinal-transected adult zebrafish is influenced less by recovery of ascending pathways, but more by regrowth of descending tracts and rearrangement of intraspinal circuitry.

  3. Development trends and market analysis of China's plastics industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Zheng-Pin

    2008-01-01

    @@ China's plastics industry has witnessed the leap-forward development with the stable and sound growth of national economy,having increased its economic and technical indicators stably and greatly for consecutive ten years.

  4. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits.

  5. Medial prefrontal cortex inversely regulates toluene-induced changes in markers of synaptic plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T.; Evins, Caitlin E.; Fedarovich, Hleb; Gilstrap, Meghin J.; Woodward, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Toluene is a volatile solvent that is intentionally inhaled by children, adolescents and adults for its intoxicating effects. While voluntary use of toluene suggests that it possesses rewarding properties and abuse potential, it is unknown whether toluene alters excitatory synaptic transmission in reward sensitive dopamine neurons like other drugs of abuse. Here, using a combination of retrograde labeling and slice electrophysiology, we show that a brief in vivo exposure of rats to a behaviorally relevant concentration of toluene vapor enhances glutamatergic synaptic strength of dopamine (DA) neurons projecting to nucleus accumbens core and medial shell neurons. This effect persisted for up to 3 days in mesoaccumbens core DA neurons and for at least 21 days in those projecting to the medial shell. In contrast, toluene vapor exposure had no effect on synaptic strength of DA neurons that project to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, infusion of GABAergic modulators into the mPFC prior to vapor exposure to pharmacologically manipulate output, inhibited or potentiated toluene's action on mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Taken together, the results of these studies indicate that toluene induces a target-selective increase in mesolimbic DA neuron synaptic transmission and strongly implicates the mPFC as an important regulator of drug-induced plasticity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons. PMID:23303956

  6. Development of a Prototype Automated Sorting System for Plastic Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Wahab

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated sorting for plastic recyclables has been seen as the way forward in the plastic recycling industry. Automated sorting provides significant improvements in terms of efficiency and consistency in the sorting process. In the case of macro sorting, which is the most common type of automated sorting, efficiency is determined by the mechanical details of the material handling system as well as the detection system. This paper provides a review on the state of-the-art technologies that have been deployed by some of the recycling facilities abroad. The design and development of a cost effective prototype automated system for sorting plastic recyclables is proposed and discussed.

  7. Research on plastic fender development and key technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hao; Li Li; Liu Qiang; Yang Anzhi; Ma Fangwu; Zhao Fuquan; Guo Yihui; Song Leifeng

    2012-01-01

    Automotive lightweight and safety performance come into play as key technologies to promote competiveness, and average applied amount of automotive plastics has become a significant sign for automotive industrial development level of a country. Various performances of a vehicle with plastic automotive fenders are analyzed in the paper. The re- search is emphasized on sinking-resistance and pedestrian protection performance of the plastic fenders by studying plas- tics characteristics and simulation analysis. It offers references for engineering design in which both automotive light- weight and safety performance are achieved and well balanced.

  8. The role of human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morise, Jyoji; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2017-10-01

    The human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, a unique trisaccharide possessing sulfated glucuronic acid in a non-reducing terminus (HSO3-3GlcAß1-3Galß1-4GlcNAc-), is highly expressed in the nervous system and its spatiotemporal expression is strictly regulated. Mice deficient in the gene encoding a key enzyme, GlcAT-P, of the HNK-1 biosynthetic pathway exhibit almost complete disappearance of the HNK-1 epitope in the brain, significant reduction of long-term potentiation, and aberration of spatial learning and memory formation. In addition to its physiological roles in higher brain function, the HNK-1 carbohydrate has attracted considerable attention as an autoantigen associated with peripheral demyelinative neuropathy, which relates to IgM paraproteinemia, because of high immunogenicity. It has been suggested, however, that serum autoantibodies in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibody-associated neuropathy patients show heterogeneous reactivity to the HNK-1 epitope. We have found that structurally distinct HNK-1 epitopes are expressed in specific proteins in the nervous system. Here, we overview the current knowledge of the involvement of these HNK-1 epitopes in the regulation of neural plasticity and discuss the impact of different HNK-1 antigens of anti-MAG neuropathy patients. We identified the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2 and aggrecan as HNK-1 carrier proteins. The HNK-1 epitope on GluA2 and aggrecan regulates neural plasticity in different ways. Furthermore, we found the clinical relationship between reactivity of autoantibodies to the different HNK-1 epitopes and progression of anti-MAG neuropathy. The HNK-1 epitope is indispensable for the acquisition of normal neuronal function and can be a good target for the establishment of diagnostic criteria for anti-MAG neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stress-induced structural plasticity of medial amygdala stellate neurons and rapid prevention by a candidate antidepressant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, T.; Bigio, B.; Zelli, D.; McEwen, BS.; Nasca, C.

    2016-01-01

    The adult brain is capable of adapting to internal and external stressors by undergoing structural plasticity, and failure to be resilient and preserve normal structure and function is likely to contribute to depression and anxiety disorders. While the hippocampus has provided the gateway for understanding stress effects on the brain, less is known about the amygdala, a key brain area involved in the neural circuitry of fear and anxiety. Here, in mice more vulnerable to stressors, we demonstrate structural plasticity within the medial and basolateral regions of the amygdala in response to prolonged 21day chronic restraint stress (CRS). Three days before the end of CRS, treatment with the putative, rapidly acting antidepressant, acetyl-L-carnitine (LAC) in the drinking water opposed the direction of these changes. Behaviorally, the LAC treatment during the last part of CRS enhanced resilience, opposing the effects of CRS, as shown by an increased social interaction and reduced passive behavior in a forced swim test. Furthermore, CRS mice treated with LAC show resilience of the CRS-induced structural remodeling of medial amygdala (MeA) stellate neurons. Within the basolateral (BLA) amygdala, LAC did not reduce, but slightly enhanced, the CRS-increased length and number of intersections of pyramidal neurons. No structural changes were observed in MeA bipolar neurons, BLA stellate neurons, or in lateral amygdala (LA) stellate neurons. Our findings identify MeA stellate neurons as an important component in the responses to stress and LAC action and show that LAC can promote structural plasticity of the MeA. This may be useful as a model for increasing resilience to stressors in at risk populations. PMID:27240534

  10. Plasticity of marrow mesenchymal stem cells from human first-trimester fetus: from single-cell clone to neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Sun, Bingjie; Lv, Changrong; Dou, Zhongying

    2011-02-01

    Recent results have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from human first-trimester abortus (hfBMSCs) are closer to embryonic stem cells and perform greater telomerase activity and faster propagation than mid- and late-prophase fetal and adult BMSCs. However, no research has been done on the plasticity of hfBMSCs into neuronal cells using single-cell cloned strains without cell contamination. In this study, we isolated five single cells from hfBMSCs and obtained five single-cell cloned strains, and investigated their biological property and neuronal differentiation potential. We found that four of the five strains showed similar expression profile of surface antigen markers to hfBMSCs, and most of them differentiated into neuron-like cells expressing Nestin, Pax6, Sox1, β-III Tubulin, NF-L, and NSE under induction. One strain showed different expression profile of surface antigen markers from the four strains and hfBMSCs, and did not differentiate toward neuronal cells. We demonstrated for the first time that some of single-cell cloned strains from hfBMSCs can differentiate into nerve tissue-like cell clusters under induction in vitro, and that the plasticity of each single-cell cloned strain into neuronal cells is different.

  11. Phenotypic plasticity in development and evolution: facts and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Giuseppe; Minelli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    This theme issue pursues an exploration of the potential of taking into account the environmental sensitivity of development to explaining the evolution of metazoan life cycles, with special focus on complex life cycles and the role of developmental plasticity. The evolution of switches between alternative phenotypes as a response to different environmental cues and the evolution of the control of the temporal expression of alternative phenotypes within an organism's life cycle are here treated together as different dimensions of the complex relationships between genotype and phenotype, fostering the emergence of a more general and comprehensive picture of phenotypic evolution through a quite diverse sample of case studies. This introductory article reviews fundamental facts and concepts about phenotypic plasticity, adopting the most authoritative terminology in use in the current literature. The main topics are types and components of phenotypic variation, the evolution of organismal traits through plasticity, the origin and evolution of phenotypic plasticity and its adaptive value. PMID:20083631

  12. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling.

  13. Biphasic somatic A-type K channel downregulation mediates intrinsic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Cherl Jung

    Full Text Available Since its original description, the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP has been known to be accompanied by a lasting increase in the intrinsic excitability (intrinsic plasticity of hippocampal neurons. Recent evidence shows that dendritic excitability can be enhanced by an activity-dependent decrease in the activity of A-type K(+ channels. In the present manuscript, we examined the role of A-type K(+ channels in regulating intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus after synapse-specific LTP induction. In electrophysiological recordings we found that LTP induced a potentiation of excitability which was accompanied by a two-phased change in A-type K(+ channel activity recorded in nucleated patches from organotypic slices of rat hippocampus. Induction of LTP resulted in an immediate but short lasting hyperpolarization of the voltage-dependence of steady-state A-type K(+ channel inactivation along with a progressive, long-lasting decrease in peak A-current density. Blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis prevented the A-current decrease and most measures of intrinsic plasticity. These results suggest that two temporally distinct but overlapping mechanisms of A-channel downregulation together contribute to the plasticity of intrinsic excitability. Finally we show that intrinsic plasticity resulted in a global enhancement of EPSP-spike coupling.

  14. Hormone signaling and phenotypic plasticity in nematode development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ralf J; Ogawa, Akira

    2011-09-27

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the ability of an organism to adopt different phenotypes depending on environmental conditions. In animals and plants, the progression of juvenile development and the formation of dormant stages are often associated with phenotypic plasticity, indicating the importance of phenotypic plasticity for life-history theory. Phenotypic plasticity has long been emphasized as a crucial principle in ecology and as facilitator of phenotypic evolution. In nematodes, several examples of phenotypic plasticity have been studied at the genetic and developmental level. In addition, the influence of different environmental factors has been investigated under laboratory conditions. These studies have provided detailed insight into the molecular basis of phenotypic plasticity and its ecological and evolutionary implications. Here, we review recent studies on the formation of dauer larvae in Caenorhabditis elegans, the evolution of nematode parasitism and the generation of a novel feeding trait in Pristionchus pacificus. These examples reveal a conserved and co-opted role of an endocrine signaling module involving the steroid hormone dafachronic acid. We will discuss how hormone signaling might facilitate life-history and morphological evolution.

  15. Emerging Roles of BAI Adhesion-GPCRs in Synapse Development and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G. Duman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synapses mediate communication between neurons and enable the brain to change in response to experience, which is essential for learning and memory. The sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, dendritic spines, undergo rapid remodeling that is important for neural circuit formation and synaptic plasticity. Abnormalities in synapse and spine formation and plasticity are associated with a broad range of brain disorders, including intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders (ASD, and schizophrenia. Thus, elucidating the mechanisms that regulate these neuronal processes is critical for understanding brain function and disease. The brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor (BAI subfamily of adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (adhesion-GPCRs has recently emerged as central regulators of synapse development and plasticity. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of BAIs at synapses, highlighting their regulation, downstream signaling, and physiological functions, while noting the roles of other adhesion-GPCRs at synapses. We will also discuss the relevance of BAIs in various neurological and psychiatric disorders and consider their potential importance as pharmacological targets in the treatment of these diseases.

  16. Epibranchial placode-derived neurons produce BDNF required for early sensory neuron development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle E; Yang, Hui; Williams, Trevor; Barlow, Linda A

    2011-02-01

    In mice, BDNF provided by the developing taste epithelium is required for gustatory neuron survival following target innervation. However, we find that expression of BDNF, as detected by BDNF-driven β-galactosidase, begins in the cranial ganglia before its expression in the central (hindbrain) or peripheral (taste papillae) targets of these sensory neurons, and before gustatory ganglion cells innervate either target. To test early BDNF function, we examined the ganglia of bdnf null mice before target innervation, and found that while initial neuron survival is unaltered, early neuron development is disrupted. In addition, fate mapping analysis in mice demonstrates that murine cranial ganglia arise from two embryonic populations, i.e., epibranchial placodes and neural crest, as has been described for these ganglia in non-mammalian vertebrates. Only placodal neurons produce BDNF, however, which indicates that prior to innervation, early ganglionic BDNF produced by placode-derived cells promotes gustatory neuron development.

  17. Notch is required in adult Drosophila sensory neurons for morphological and functional plasticity of the olfactory circuit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Kidd

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs convey odor information to the central brain, but like other sensory neurons were thought to play a passive role in memory formation and storage. Here we show that Notch, part of an evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathway, is required in adult Drosophila ORNs for the structural and functional plasticity of olfactory glomeruli that is induced by chronic odor exposure. Specifically, we show that Notch activity in ORNs is necessary for the odor specific increase in the volume of glomeruli that occurs as a consequence of prolonged odor exposure. Calcium imaging experiments indicate that Notch in ORNs is also required for the chronic odor induced changes in the physiology of ORNs and the ensuing changes in the physiological response of their second order projection neurons (PNs. We further show that Notch in ORNs acts by both canonical cleavage-dependent and non-canonical cleavage-independent pathways. The Notch ligand Delta (Dl in PNs switches the balance between the pathways. These data define a circuit whereby, in conjunction with odor, N activity in the periphery regulates the activity of neurons in the central brain and Dl in the central brain regulates N activity in the periphery. Our work highlights the importance of experience dependent plasticity at the first olfactory synapse.

  18. Sensory representation and learning-related plasticity in mushroom body extrinsic feedback neurons of the protocerebral tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haehnel, Melanie; Menzel, Randolf

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactive feedback neurons of the protocerebral tract are a major component of the honeybee mushroom body. They have been shown to be subject to learning-related plasticity and provide putative inhibitory input to Kenyon cells and the pedunculus extrinsic neuron, PE1. We hypothesize, that learning-related modulation in these neurons is mediated by varying the amount of inhibition provided by feedback neurons. We performed Ca(2+) imaging recordings of populations of neurons of the protocerebral-calycal tract (PCT) while the bees were conditioned in an appetitive olfactory paradigm and their behavioral responses were quantified using electromyographic recordings from M17, the muscle which controls the proboscis extension response. The results corroborate findings from electrophysiological studies showing that PCT neurons respond to sucrose and odor stimuli. The odor responses are concentration dependent. Odor and sucrose responses are modulated by repeated stimulus presentations. Furthermore, animals that learned to associate an odor with sucrose reward responded to the repeated presentations of the rewarded odor with less depression than they did to an unrewarded and a control odor.

  19. Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown. Results In this study, we explored the role of nicotine in the progression of HAND using SK-N-MC, a neuronal cell line. SK-N-MC cells were infected with HIV-1 in the presence or absence of nicotine for 7 days. We observed significant increase in HIV infectivity in SK-N-MC treated with nicotine compared to untreated HIV-infected neuronal cells. HIV and nicotine synergize to significantly dysregulate the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and spine density; with a concomitant increase of HDAC2 levels in SK-N-MC cells. In addition, inhibition of HDAC2 up-regulation with the use of vorinostat resulted in HIV latency breakdown and recovery of synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in nicotine/HIV alone and in co-treated SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, increased eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translational process, was observed in HIV alone and in co-treatment with nicotine compared to untreated control and nicotine alone treated SK-N-MC cells. Conclusions These results suggest that nicotine and HIV synergize to negatively regulate the synaptic plasticity gene expression and spine density and this may contribute to the increased risk of HAND in HIV infected smokers. Apart from disrupting latency, vorinostat may be a useful therapeutic to inhibit the negative regulatory effects on synaptic plasticity in HIV infected nicotine abusers. PMID:24886748

  20. Age-related deficits in synaptic plasticity rescued by activating PKA or PKC in sensory neurons of Aplysia californica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kempsell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging is associated with declines in synaptic function that contribute to memory loss, including reduced postsynaptic response to neurotransmitters and decreased neuronal excitability. To understand how aging affects memory in a simple neural circuit, we studied neuronal proxies of memory for sensitization in mature versus advanced age Aplysia. Glutamate- (L-Glu- evoked excitatory currents were facilitated by the neuromodulator serotonin (5-HT in sensory neurons (SN isolated from mature but not aged animals. Activation of PKA and PKC signaling rescued facilitation of L-Glu currents in aged SN. Similarly, PKA and PKC activators restored increased excitability in aged tail SN. These results suggest that altered synaptic plasticity during aging involves defects in second messenger systems

  1. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akane, Hirotoshi; Saito, Fumiyo; Shiraki, Ayako; Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Itahashi, Megu; Murakami, Tomoaki; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc(+) neurons at 1000ppm and Fos(+) neurons at ≥300ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure.

  2. Presenilin1 regulates histamine neuron development and behavior in zebrafish, danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundvik, Maria; Chen, Yu-Chia; Panula, Pertti

    2013-01-23

    Modulatory neurotransmitters, including the histaminergic system, are essential in mediating cognitive functions affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The roles of disease genes associated with AD, most importantly the presenilin1 gene (psen1), are poorly understood. We studied the role of psen1 in plasticity of the brain histaminergic system using a novel psen1 mutant zebrafish, Danio rerio. We found that in psen1(-/-) zebrafish, the histaminergic system is altered throughout life. At 7 d postfertilization (dpf) the histamine neuron number was reduced in psen1(-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) fish; at 2 months of age the histamine neuron number was at the same level as that in WT fish. In 1-year-old zebrafish, the histamine neuron number was significantly increased in psen1(-/-) fish compared with WT fish. These changes in histamine neuron number were accompanied by changes in histamine-driven behaviors. Treatment with DAPT, a γ-secretase inhibitor, similarly interfered with the development of the histaminergic neurons. We also assessed the expression of γ-secretase-regulated Notch1a mRNA and β-catenin at different time points. Notch1a mRNA level was reduced in psen1(-/-) compared with WT fish, whereas β-catenin was slightly upregulated in the hypothalamus of psen1(-/-) compared with WT fish at 7 dpf. The results reveal a life-long brain plasticity in both the structure of the histaminergic system and its functions induced by altered Notch1a activity as a consequence of psen1 mutation. The new histaminergic neurons in aging zebrafish brain may arise as a result of phenotypic plasticity or represent newly differentiated stem cells.

  3. Neuronal migration mechanisms in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Marín, Oscar

    2010-02-01

    Neuronal migration is a fundamental process that determines the final allocation of neurons in the nervous system, establishing the basis for the subsequent wiring of neural circuitry. From cell polarization to target identification, neuronal migration integrates multiple cellular and molecular events that enable neuronal precursors to move across the brain to reach their final destination. In this review we summarize novel findings on the key processes that govern the cell biology of migrating neurons, describing recent advances in their molecular regulation in different migratory pathways of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system. We will also review how this basic knowledge is contributing to a better understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of multiple neurological syndromes in which neuronal migration is disrupted.

  4. A VLSI recurrent network of integrate-and-fire neurons connected by plastic synapses with long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicca, E; Badoni, D; Dante, V; D'Andreagiovanni, M; Salina, G; Carota, L; Fusi, S; Del Giudice, P

    2003-01-01

    Electronic neuromorphic devices with on-chip, on-line learning should be able to modify quickly the synaptic couplings to acquire information about new patterns to be stored (synaptic plasticity) and, at the same time, preserve this information on very long time scales (synaptic stability). Here, we illustrate the electronic implementation of a simple solution to this stability-plasticity problem, recently proposed and studied in various contexts. It is based on the observation that reducing the analog depth of the synapses to the extreme (bistable synapses) does not necessarily disrupt the performance of the device as an associative memory, provided that 1) the number of neurons is large enough; 2) the transitions between stable synaptic states are stochastic; and 3) learning is slow. The drastic reduction of the analog depth of the synaptic variable also makes this solution appealing from the point of view of electronic implementation and offers a simple methodological alternative to the technological solution based on floating gates. We describe the full custom analog very large-scale integration (VLSI) realization of a small network of integrate-and-fire neurons connected by bistable deterministic plastic synapses which can implement the idea of stochastic learning. In the absence of stimuli, the memory is preserved indefinitely. During the stimulation the synapse undergoes quick temporary changes through the activities of the pre- and postsynaptic neurons; those changes stochastically result in a long-term modification of the synaptic efficacy. The intentionally disordered pattern of connectivity allows the system to generate a randomness suited to drive the stochastic selection mechanism. We check by a suitable stimulation protocol that the stochastic synaptic plasticity produces the expected pattern of potentiation and depression in the electronic network.

  5. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  6. Molecular and Neuronal Plasticity Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit: Implications for Opiate Addiction Memory Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G Rosen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of associative memories linked to the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse is a core underlying feature of the addiction process. Opiate class drugs in particular, possess potent euphorigenic effects which, when linked to environmental cues, can produce drug-related ‘trigger’ memories that may persist for lengthy periods of time, even during abstinence, in both humans and other animals. Furthermore, the transitional switch from the drug-naïve, non-dependent state to states of dependence and withdrawal, represents a critical boundary between distinct neuronal and molecular substrates associated with opiate-reward memory formation. Identifying the functional molecular and neuronal mechanisms related to the acquisition, consolidation, recall and extinction phases of opiate-related reward memories is critical for understanding, and potentially reversing, addiction-related memory plasticity characteristic of compulsive drug-seeking behaviors. The mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA share important functional and anatomical connections that are involved importantly in the processing of associative memories linked to drug reward. In addition, both regions share interconnections with the mesolimbic pathway’s ventral tegmental area (VTA and nucleus accumbens (NAc and can modulate dopamine (DA transmission and neuronal activity associated with drug-related DAergic signaling dynamics. In this review, we will summarize research from both human and animal modelling studies highlighting the importance of neuronal and molecular plasticity mechanisms within this circuitry during critical phases of opiate addiction-related learning and memory processing. Specifically, we will focus on two molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in both drug-related neuroadaptations and in memory-related plasticity mechanisms; the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase system (ERK and the Ca2+/calmodulin

  7. Molecular and neuronal plasticity mechanisms in the amygdala-prefrontal cortical circuit: implications for opiate addiction memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Laura G; Sun, Ninglei; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of associative memories linked to the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse is a core underlying feature of the addiction process. Opiate class drugs in particular, possess potent euphorigenic effects which, when linked to environmental cues, can produce drug-related "trigger" memories that may persist for lengthy periods of time, even during abstinence, in both humans, and other animals. Furthermore, the transitional switch from the drug-naïve, non-dependent state to states of dependence and withdrawal, represents a critical boundary between distinct neuronal and molecular substrates associated with opiate-reward memory formation. Identifying the functional molecular and neuronal mechanisms related to the acquisition, consolidation, recall, and extinction phases of opiate-related reward memories is critical for understanding, and potentially reversing, addiction-related memory plasticity characteristic of compulsive drug-seeking behaviors. The mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC) and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) share important functional and anatomical connections that are involved importantly in the processing of associative memories linked to drug reward. In addition, both regions share interconnections with the mesolimbic pathway's ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and can modulate dopamine (DA) transmission and neuronal activity associated with drug-related DAergic signaling dynamics. In this review, we will summarize research from both human and animal modeling studies highlighting the importance of neuronal and molecular plasticity mechanisms within this circuitry during critical phases of opiate addiction-related learning and memory processing. Specifically, we will focus on two molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in both drug-related neuroadaptations and in memory-related plasticity mechanisms; the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase system (ERK) and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein

  8. Development Trend of China's Plastics Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hui-di

    2005-01-01

    @@ China's economy is at an important turning point. After more than 20 years of high-speed development, to maintain a high growth rate continuously is more difficult ,as shown by international experience.

  9. Serotonin receptor antagonists discriminate between PKA- and PKC-mediated plasticity in aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriu, Bogdan; Cohen, Jonathan E; Wan, Qin; Negroiu, Andreea M; Abrams, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Highly selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor antagonists developed for mammals are ineffective in Aplysia due to the evolutionary divergence of neurotransmitter receptors and because the higher ionic strength of physiological saline for marine invertebrates reduces antagonist affinity. It has therefore been difficult to identify antagonists that specifically block individual signaling cascades initiated by 5-HT. We studied two broad-spectrum 5-HT receptor antagonists that have been characterized biochemically in Aplysia CNS: methiothepin and spiperone. Methiothepin is highly effective in inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. Spiperone, which blocks phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in mammals, does not block AC-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. In electrophysiological studies, we explored whether methiothepin and spiperone can be used in parallel to distinguish between the AC-cAMP and PLC-protein kinase C (PKC) modulatory cascades that are initiated by 5-HT. 5-HT-induced broadening of the sensory neuron action potential in the presence of tetraethylammonium/nifedipine, which is mediated by modulation of the S-K+ currents, was used an assay for the AC-cAMP cascade. Spike broadening initiated by 5 microM 5-HT was unaffected by 100 microM spiperone, whereas it was effectively blocked by 100 microM methiothepin. Facilitation of highly depressed sensory neuron-to-motor neuron synapses by 5-HT was used as an assay for the PLC-PKC cascade. Spiperone completely blocked facilitation of highly depressed synapses by 5 microM 5-HT. In contrast, methiothepin produced a modest, nonsignificant, reduction in the facilitation of depressed synapses. Interestingly, these experiments revealed that the PLC-PKC cascade undergoes desensitization during exposure to 5-HT.

  10. Persistent changes in neuronal structure and synaptic plasticity caused by proton irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Vipan K; Pasha, Junaid; Tran, Katherine K; Craver, Brianna M; Acharya, Munjal M; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-03-01

    Cranial radiotherapy is used routinely to control the growth of primary and secondary brain tumors, but often results in serious and debilitating cognitive dysfunction. In part due to the beneficial dose depth distributions that may spare normal tissue damage, the use of protons to treat CNS and other tumor types is rapidly gaining popularity. Astronauts exposed to lower doses of protons in the space radiation environment are also at risk for developing adverse CNS complications. To explore the consequences of whole body proton irradiation, mice were subjected to 0.1 and 1 Gy and analyzed for morphometric changes in hippocampal neurons 10 and 30 days following exposure. Significant dose-dependent reductions (~33 %) in dendritic complexity were found, when dendritic length, branching and area were analyzed 30 days after exposure. At equivalent doses and times, significant reductions in the number (~30 %) and density (50-75 %) of dendritic spines along hippocampal neurons of the dentate gyrus were also observed. Immature spines (filopodia, long) exhibited the greatest sensitivity (1.5- to 3-fold) to irradiation, while more mature spines (mushroom) were more resistant to changes over a 1-month post-irradiation timeframe. Irradiated granule cell neurons spanning the subfields of the dentate gyrus showed significant and dose-responsive reductions in synaptophysin expression, while the expression of postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) was increased significantly. These findings corroborate our past work using photon irradiation, and demonstrate for the first time, dose-responsive changes in dendritic complexity, spine density and morphology and synaptic protein levels following exposure to low-dose whole body proton irradiation.

  11. Development and growth in synanthropic species: plasticity and constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj-Fišer, Simona; Čelik, Tatjana; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Šuen, Klavdija; Šiling, Rebeka; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2014-07-01

    Urbanization poses serious extinction risks, yet some species thrive in urban environments. This may be due to a pronounced developmental plasticity in these taxa, since phenotypically, plastic organisms may better adjust to unpredictable urban food resources. We studied phenotypic plasticity in Nuctenea umbratica, a common European forest and urban vegetation spider. We subjected spiderlings to low (LF), medium (MF) and high (HF) food treatments and documented their growth and developmental trajectories into adulthood. Spiders from the three treatments had comparable numbers of instars and growth ratios, but differed in developmental periods. Longest developing LF spiders (♀ = 390, ♂ = 320 days) had the smallest adults, but MF (♀ = 300, ♂ = 240 days) and HF (♀ = 240, ♂ = 210 days) spiders reached comparable adult sizes through shorter development. While males and females had comparable instar numbers, females had longer development, higher growth ratios, adult sizes and mass; and while males adjusted their moulting to food availability, female moulting depended on specific mass, not food treatment. We discussed the patterns of Nuctenea sex-specific development and compared our results with published data on two other Holarctic urban colonizers ( Larinioides sclopetarius, Zygiella x- notata) exhibiting high plasticity and fast generation turn-over. We conclude that despite relatively unconstrained developmental time in the laboratory enabling Nuctenea to achieve maximal mass and size—main female fitness proxies—their relatively fixed growth ratio and long generation turn-over may explain their lower success in urban environments.

  12. Plasticity and response to action observation: a longitudinal FMRI study of potential mirror neurons in patients with subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Iris C; Skouen, Jan Sture; Ersland, Lars; Grüner, Renate

    2014-01-01

    Action observation has been suggested as a possible gateway to retraining arm motor function post stroke. However, it is unclear if the neuronal response to action observation is affected by stroke and if it changes during the course of recovery. To examine longitudinal changes in neuronal activity in a group of patients with subacute stroke when observing and executing a bimanual movement task. Eighteen patients were examined twice using 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging; 1 to 2 weeks and 3 months post stroke symptom onset. Eighteen control participants were examined once. Image time series were analyzed (SPM8) and correlated with clinical motor function scores. During action observation and execution, an overlap of neuronal activation was observed in the superior and inferior parietal lobe, precentral gyrus, insula, and inferior temporal gyrus in both control participants and patients (P neuronal response in the observation task increased from 1 to 2 weeks to 3 months after stroke. Most activated clusters were observed in the inferior temporal gyrus, the thalamus and movement-related areas, such as the premotor, supplementary and motor cortex (BA4, BA6). Increased activation of cerebellum and premotor area correlated with improved arm motor function. Most patients had regained full movement ability. Plastic changes in neurons responding to action observation and action execution occurred in accordance with clinical recovery. The involvement of motor areas when observing actions early and later after stroke may constitute a possible access to the motor system. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Plasticity of Scarpa’s ganglion neurons as a possible basis for functional restoration within vestibular endorgans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eTravo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study (Brugeaud et al., 2007, we observed spontaneous restoration of the vestibular function in young adult rodents following excitotoxic injury of the neuronal network of vestibular endorgans. The functional restoration was supported by a repair of synaptic contacts between hair cells and primary vestibular neurons. This process was observed in 2/3 of the animals studied and occurred within five days following the synapse insult. To assess whether structural plasticity is a fundamental trait of altered vestibular endorgans and to decipher the cellular mechanisms that support such a repair process, we studied the neuronal regeneration and synaptogenesis in co-cultures of vestibular epithelia and Scarpa’s ganglion from young and adult rodents. We demonstrate that under specific culture conditions, primary vestibular neurons from young mice or rats exhibit robust ability to regenerate nervous processes. When co-cultured with vestibular epithelia, primary vestibular neurons were able to establish de novo contacts with hair cells. Under the present paradigm, these contacts displayed morphological features of immature synaptic contacts. This reparative capacity remained in older mice although to a lesser extent. Identifying the basic mechanisms underlying the repair process may provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies to restore mature and functional vestibular synaptic contacts following damage or loss.

  14. Neural plasticity in hypocretin neurons: the basis of hypocretinergic regulation of physiological and behavioral functions in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal system that resides in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus (Pf/LH and synthesizes the neuropeptide hypocretin/orexin participates in critical brain functions across species from fish to human. The hypocretin system regulates neural activity responsible for daily functions (such as sleep/wake homeostasis, energy balance, appetite, etc and long-term behavioral changes (such as reward seeking and addiction, stress response, etc in animals. The most recent evidence suggests that the hypocretin system undergoes substantial plastic changes in response to both daily fluctuations (such as food intake and sleep-wake regulation and long-term changes (such as cocaine seeking in neuronal activity in the brain. The understanding of these changes in the hypocretin system is essential in addressing the role of the hypocretin system in normal physiological functions and pathological conditions in animals and humans. In this review, the evidence demonstrating that neural plasticity occurs in hypocretin-containing neurons in the Pf/LH will be presented and possible physiological behavioral, and mental health implications of these findings will be discussed.

  15. The plasticity of intellectual development: insights from preventive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, C T; Yeates, K O; Short, E J

    1984-10-01

    Debates regarding the plasticity of intelligence are often fired by a confusion between 2 distinct realms of development, that is, between developmental functions (e.g., a group's average IQ over time) and individual differences (e.g., the relative rank ordering of individual IQs within a group). Questions concerning the stability of these 2 realms are statistically independent. Thus there are 2 kinds of intellectual plasticity, and there may be no developmental convergences between them. In the present study, data from an early intervention program were used to investigate the 2 kinds of plasticity separately and to examine certain possible convergences between them. The program involved children at risk for developmental retardation who were randomly assigned at birth to 2 rearing conditions (i.e., educational daycare vs. no educational intervention) and whose intellectual development was then studied longitudinally to 4 years of age. Our findings indicate that developmental functions are moderately alterable through systemic early education, particularly after infancy, whereas individual differences are moderately stable, again particularly after infancy. They also indicate that the 2 kinds of plasticity are independent; the alteration of developmental functions through daycare affects neither the stability nor the determinants of individual differences. We discuss the implications that these findings have for current models of mental development, for the nature-nurture debate, and for arguments concerning the efficacy of early intervention programs.

  16. Operant behavior to obtain palatable food modifies neuronal plasticity in the brain reward circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Thomas; Cutando, Laura; Ayuso, Eduard; Santini, Emanuela; Fisone, Gilberto; Bosch, Fatima; Martinez, Albert; Valjent, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Rafael; Martin, Miquel

    2013-02-01

    Palatability enhances food intake by hedonic mechanisms that prevail over caloric necessities. Different studies have demonstrated the role of endogenous cannabinoids in the mesocorticolimbic system in controlling food hedonic value and consumption. We hypothesize that the endogenous cannabinoid system could also be involved in the development of food-induced behavioral alterations, such as food-seeking and binge-eating, by a mechanism that requires neuroplastic changes in the brain reward pathway. For this purpose, we evaluated the role of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) in the behavioral and neuroplastic changes induced by operant training for standard, highly caloric or highly palatable isocaloric food using different genetics, viral and pharmacological approaches. Neuroplasticity was evaluated by measuring changes in dendritic spine density in neurons previously labeled with the dye DiI. Only operant training to obtain highly palatable isocaloric food induced neuroplastic changes in neurons of the nucleus accumbens shell and prefrontal cortex that were associated to changes in food-seeking behavior. These behavioral and neuroplastic modifications induced by highly palatable isocaloric food were dependent on the activity of the CB1-R. Neuroplastic changes induced by highly palatable isocaloric food are similar to those produced by some drugs of abuse and may be crucial in the alteration of food-seeking behavior leading to overweight and obesity.

  17. EFFECT OF UNEQUAL DEFORMATION IN DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PLASTIC PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An effect of unequal deformation in development of advanced plastic processing technologies is researched by studying an in-plane bending process of strip metal under unequal compressing. The research results show the following: If appropriately controlled, unequal plastic deformation can play an important role not only in the improvement of quality of parts obtained by plastic processing technologies, but also in the development of new processes for advanced plastic working technologies. A coordinated growth of unequal plastic deformation can develop the deformation potentiality of material to the full. The degree of unequal plastic deformation can be used as bases for optimization design of processes and dies of plastic forming.

  18. Differential contributions of microglial and neuronal IKKβ to synaptic plasticity and associative learning in alert behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrargyri, Vasiliki; Vega-Flores, Germán; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M; Probert, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are CNS resident immune cells and a rich source of neuroactive mediators, but their contribution to physiological brain processes such as synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory is not fully understood. In this study, we used mice with partial depletion of IκB kinase β, the main activating kinase in the inducible NF-κB pathway, selectively in myeloid lineage cells (mIKKβKO) or excitatory neurons (nIKKβKO) to measure synaptic strength at hippocampal Schaffer collaterals during long-term potentiation (LTP) and instrumental conditioning in alert behaving individuals. Resting microglial cells in mIKKβKO mice showed less Iba1-immunoreactivity, and brain IL-1β mRNA levels were selectively reduced compared with controls. Measurement of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by stimulation of the CA3-CA1 synapse in mIKKβKO mice showed higher facilitation in response to paired pulses and enhanced LTP following high frequency stimulation. In contrast, nIKKβKO mice showed normal basic synaptic transmission and LTP induction but impairments in late LTP. To understand the consequences of such impairments in synaptic plasticity for learning and memory, we measured CA1 fEPSPs in behaving mice during instrumental conditioning. IKKβ was not necessary in either microglia or neurons for mice to learn lever-pressing (appetitive behavior) to obtain food (consummatory behavior) but was required in both for modification of their hippocampus-dependent appetitive, not consummatory behavior. Our results show that microglia, through IKKβ and therefore NF-κB activity, regulate hippocampal synaptic plasticity and that both microglia and neurons, through IKKβ, are necessary for animals to modify hippocampus-driven behavior during associative learning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hoeber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity.

  20. Erythropoietin Restores Long-Term Neurocognitive Function Involving Mechanisms of Neuronal Plasticity in a Model of Hyperoxia-Induced Preterm Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeber, Daniela; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Herz, Josephine; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Kempe, Karina; Serdar, Meray; Palasz, Joanna; Hadamitzky, Martin; Endesfelder, Stefanie; Fandrey, Joachim; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral white and grey matter injury is the leading cause of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants. High oxygen concentrations have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal brain damage. Here, we focused on motor-cognitive outcome up to the adolescent and adult age in an experimental model of preterm brain injury. In search of the putative mechanisms of action we evaluated oligodendrocyte degeneration, myelination, and modulation of synaptic plasticity-related molecules. A single dose of erythropoietin (20,000 IU/kg) at the onset of hyperoxia (24 hours, 80% oxygen) in 6-day-old Wistar rats improved long-lasting neurocognitive development up to the adolescent and adult stage. Analysis of white matter structures revealed a reduction of acute oligodendrocyte degeneration. However, erythropoietin did not influence hypomyelination occurring a few days after injury or long-term microstructural white matter abnormalities detected in adult animals. Erythropoietin administration reverted hyperoxia-induced reduction of neuronal plasticity-related mRNA expression up to four months after injury. Thus, our findings highlight the importance of erythropoietin as a neuroregenerative treatment option in neonatal brain injury, leading to improved memory function in adolescent and adult rats which may be linked to increased neuronal network connectivity.

  1. A period of structural plasticity at the axon initial segment in developing visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eGutzmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical networks are shaped by sensory experience and are most susceptible to modifications during critical periods characterized by enhanced plasticity at the structural and functional level. A system particularly well-studied in this context is the mammalian visual system. Plasticity has been documented for the somatodendritic compartment of neurons in detail. A neuronal microdomain not yet studied in this context is the axon initial segment (AIS located at the proximal axon segment. It is a specific electrogenic axonal domain and the site of action potential generation. Recent studies showed that structure and function of the AIS can be dynamically regulated. Here we hypothesize that the AIS shows a dynamic regulation during maturation of the visual cortex. We therefore analyzed AIS length development from embryonic day (E 12.5 to adulthood in mice. A tri-phasic time course of AIS length remodeling during development was observed. AIS first appeared at E14.5 and increased in length throughout the postnatal period to a peak between postnatal day (P 10 to P15 (eyes open P13-14. Then, AIS length was reduced significantly around the beginning of the critical period for ocular dominance plasticity (CP, P21. Shortest AIS were observed at the peak of the CP (P28, followed by a moderate elongation towards the end of the CP (P35. To test if the dynamic maturation of the AIS is influenced by eye opening (onset of activity, animals were deprived of visual input before and during the CP. Deprivation for 1 week prior to eye opening did not affect AIS length development. However, deprivation from P0-P28 and P14-P28 resulted in AIS length distribution similar to the peak at P15. In other words, deprivation from birth prevents the transient shortening of the AIS and maintains an immature AIS length. These results are the first to suggest a dynamic maturation of the AIS in cortical neurons and point to novel mechanisms in the development of neuronal

  2. Classification of correlated patterns with a configurable analog VLSI neural network of spiking neurons and self-regulating plastic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulioni, Massimilian; Pannunzi, Mario; Badoni, Davide; Dante, Vittorio; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    We describe the implementation and illustrate the learning performance of an analog VLSI network of 32 integrate-and-fire neurons with spike-frequency adaptation and 2016 Hebbian bistable spike-driven stochastic synapses, endowed with a self-regulating plasticity mechanism, which avoids unnecessary synaptic changes. The synaptic matrix can be flexibly configured and provides both recurrent and external connectivity with address-event representation compliant devices. We demonstrate a marked improvement in the efficiency of the network in classifying correlated patterns, owing to the self-regulating mechanism.

  3. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Persistently Alters Endocannabinoid Signaling and Endocannabinoid-Mediated Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, Kathryn; Shen, Ying-Ling; Wang, Rui-Xiang; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Shen, Roh-Yu

    2017-06-14

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) leads to increased addiction risk which could be mediated by enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Previous studies have shown that PE enhances excitatory synaptic strength by facilitating an anti-Hebbian form of long-term potentiation (LTP). In this study, we investigated the effect of PE on endocannabinoid-mediated long-term depression (eCB-LTD) in VTA DA neurons. Rats were exposed to moderate (3 g/kg/d) or high (6 g/kg/d) levels of ethanol during gestation. Whole-cell recordings were conducted in male offspring between 4 and 10 weeks old.We found that PE led to increased amphetamine self-administration. Both moderate and high levels of PE persistently reduced low-frequency stimulation-induced eCB-LTD. Furthermore, action potential-independent glutamate release was regulated by tonic eCB signaling in PE animals. Mechanistic studies for impaired eCB-LTD revealed that PE downregulated CB1 receptor function. Interestingly, eCB-LTD in PE animals was rescued by metabotropic glutamate receptor I activation, suggesting that PE did not impair the synthesis/release of eCBs. In contrast, eCB-LTD in PE animals was not rescued by increasing presynaptic activity, which actually led to LTP in PE animals, whereas LTD was still observed in controls. This result shows that the regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity is fundamentally altered in PE animals. Together, PE leads to impaired eCB-LTD at the excitatory synapses of VTA DA neurons primarily due to CB1 receptor downregulation. This effect could contribute to enhanced LTP and the maintenance of augmented excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons and increased addiction risk after PE.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prenatal ethanol exposure (PE) is among many adverse developmental factors known to increase drug addiction risk. Increased excitatory synaptic strength in VTA DA neurons is a critical cellular mechanism for addiction risk. Our

  4. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  5. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autapses in adaptive Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yubing; Wang, Baoying; Xie, Huijuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on synchronization transitions induced by autaptic activity in adaptive Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay vary with the adjusting rate Ap of STDP and become strongest at a certain Ap value, and the Ap value increases when network randomness or network size increases. It is also found that the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay become strongest at a certain network randomness and network size, and the values increase and related synchronization transitions are enhanced when Ap increases. These results show that there is optimal STDP that can enhance the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into the roles of STDP and autapses for the information transmission in neural systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and Plasticity of Intra- and Intersensory Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, Daniel B.; Hillock, Andrea R.; Spankovich, Christopher; Popescu, Maria V.; Royal, David W.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The functional architecture of sensory brain regions reflects an ingenious biological solution to the competing demands of a continually changing sensory environment. While they are malleable, they have the constancy necessary to support a stable sensory percept. How does the functional organization of sensory brain regions contend with these antithetical demands? Here we describe the functional organization of auditory and multisensory (i.e., auditory-visual) information processing in three sensory brain structures: (1) a low-level unisensory cortical region, the primary auditory cortex (A1); (2) a higher-order multisensory cortical region, the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES); and (3) a multisensory subcortical structure, the superior colliculus (SC), We then present a body of work that characterizes the ontogenic expression of experience-dependent influences on the operations performed by the functional circuits contained within these regions. We will present data to support the hypothesis that the competing demands for plasticity and stability are addressed through a developmental transition in operational properties of functional circuits from an initially labile mode in the early stages of postnatal development to a more stable mode in the mature brain that retains the capacity for plasticity under specific experiential conditions. Finally, we discuss parallels between the central tenets of functional organization and plasticity of sensory brain structures drawn from animal studies and a growing literature on human brain plasticity and the potential applicability of these principles to the audiology clinic. PMID:19358458

  7. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang, E-mail: jiangwang@tju.edu.cn; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  8. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  9. Neuronal plasticity in chronic pancreatitis is mediated via the neurturin/GFRα2 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Wang, Kun; Tieftrunk, Elke; Giese, Nathalia A; Xing, Baocai; Friess, Helmut; Kehl, Timo; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2012-11-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family member neurturin (NRTN) and its receptor GFRα2 play a deciding role in the normal development of pancreatic parasympathetic innervation. In this study, we aimed at investigating the role of NRTN/GFRα2 axis in pancreatic neuropathy in human chronic pancreatitis (CP). Expression of NRTN/GFRα2 was compared between normal human pancreas (NP) and CP tissues via immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and quantitative RT-PCR and correlated to abdominal pain sensation. To elucidate the impact of NRTN in pancreatic neuroplasticity, neuronal phenotype and glial density were quantified via an in vitro neuroplasticity assay in dissociated newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultured 1) in CP tissue extracts depleted from NRTN, 2) in NP, 3) in untreated CP tissue extracts, and 4) CP extracts in which nerve growth factor, glial cell derived-neurotrophic factor, or TGF-β(1) was depleted. NRTN and GFRα2 were highly upregulated in CP, especially in intrapancreatic nerves and the extracellular matrix. CP tissue demonstrated increased amounts of mature multimeric NRTN and elevated levels of GFRα2. The noticeable neurotrophic effect of CP tissue extracts on DRG neurons was diminished upon blockade of NRTN from these extracts. However, blockade of NRTN from CP extracts did not influence the density of DRG glia cells. In conclusion, the NRTN/GFRα2 axis is activated during the course of CP and represents a major key player in the reactive neural alterations in CP. This is the first study to provide functional evidence for the contribution of neurotrophic factors to neuroplasticity in CP.

  10. The development and characterisation of complex ovine neuron cultures from fresh and frozen foetal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Graham W; Oswald, Manfred J; Palmer, David N

    2006-07-15

    Cultures of ovine cerebral and cerebellar neurons from mid-term sheep foetal brains, 9-15 weeks old, have been established for the first time. These foetal brains are relatively mature, being at similar stages of development as peri and post-natal rodent brains. Cultures were routinely maintained for 3-4 weeks, and longer. Nearly all the cells from the younger foetuses adhered as neurons. The proportion of glial cells increased with age, as did the risk of cultures being overtaken by glial cells. Cultured neurons were bipolar, tripolar and multipolar, similar to the morphologies of neurons in vivo. Older foetuses also yield more complex neurons, notably giant cells. Other properties of the cultured neurons also mimic in vivo observations, including neurite beading, complexity in neurotransmitter class (GABAergic and glutamatergic) and calcium binding protein (calbindin and calretinin) content. Single cell divisions of neurons were observed in younger cultures by time-lapse photography and the occurrence of telophase nuclei. The advantage of the high yield of genetically identical cells obtained from a single sheep foetus, 150 million, was extended by cryopreservation of neurons after snap freezing, and later culture. These cultures showed the same characteristics as cultures from the freshly plated cells.

  11. Neuronal Plasticity Associated with Burn Injury and Its Relevance for Perception and Management of Pain in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence J Coderre

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the introduction of the gate control theory and various subsequent works, Ronald Melzack has inspired many investigators worldwide to realize two important facts about pain. First, incoming pain messages are subject to both negative and positive modulation, which significantly affect its perception. Second, the progression of knowledge about the basic mechanisms underlying persistent and chronic pain is critically dependent on the increased understanding of the complexity of the symptoms experienced by pain patients. The present paper examines these two very important issues in an effort to understand better the mechanisms that underlie the pain suffered by burn patients. The physiological responses to burn injury involve many different mediators and mechanisms, all of which contribute to pain perception and development of neuronal plasticity underlying short and long term changes in pain sensitivity. While experimental burn injuries in humans and animals are typically well controlled and mild, in burn victims, the severity is much more variable, and clinical care involves repeated traumas and manipulations of the injured sites. Recurrent inputs from damaged and redamaged tissue impinge on a nervous system that becomes an active participant in the initiation of changes in sensory perception and maintenance of long term sensory disturbances. Recently acquired experimental evidence on postburn hyperalgesia, central hyperexcitability and changes in opioid sensitivity provides strong support that burn patients need an analgesic approach aimed at preventing or reducing the 'neural' memory of pain, including the use of more than one treatment modality. Burn injuries offer a unique opportunity to combine experimental and clinical research to understand pain mechanisms better. Over the years, Ronald Melzack has insisted that one of the most laudable enterprises in research is to span the gap between these two often separate worlds.

  12. Visualization of Plasticity in Fear-Evoked Calcium Signals in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Bryan B.; Soden, Marta E.; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is broadly implicated in fear-related processes, yet we know very little about signaling dynamics in these neurons during active fear conditioning. We describe the direct imaging of calcium signals of dopamine neurons during Pavlovian fear conditioning using fiber-optic confocal microscopy coupled with the genetically encoded calcium…

  13. Visualization of Plasticity in Fear-Evoked Calcium Signals in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Bryan B.; Soden, Marta E.; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is broadly implicated in fear-related processes, yet we know very little about signaling dynamics in these neurons during active fear conditioning. We describe the direct imaging of calcium signals of dopamine neurons during Pavlovian fear conditioning using fiber-optic confocal microscopy coupled with the genetically encoded calcium…

  14. Plasticity of lung development in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Rose

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to previous studies, we found that Xenopus laevis tadpoles raised in normoxic water without access to air can routinely complete metamorphosis with lungs that are either severely stunted and uninflated or absent altogether. This is the first demonstration that lung development in a tetrapod can be inhibited by environmental factors and that a tetrapod that relies significantly on lung respiration under unstressed conditions can be raised to forego this function without adverse effects. This study compared lung development in untreated, air-deprived (AD and air-restored (AR tadpoles and frogs using whole mounts, histology, BrdU labeling of cell division and antibody staining of smooth muscle actin. We also examined the relationship of swimming and breathing behaviors to lung recovery in AR animals. Inhibition and recovery of lung development occurred at the stage of lung inflation. Lung recovery in AR tadpoles occurred at a predictable and rapid rate and correlated with changes in swimming and breathing behavior. It thus presents a new experimental model for investigating the role of mechanical forces in lung development. Lung recovery in AR frogs was unpredictable and did not correlate with behavioral changes. Its low frequency of occurrence could be attributed to developmental, physical and behavioral changes, the effects of which increase with size and age. Plasticity of lung inflation at tadpole stages and loss of plasticity at postmetamorphic stages offer new insights into the role of developmental plasticity in amphibian lung loss and life history evolution.

  15. SIRT1 regulates dendritic development in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Codocedo

    Full Text Available Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway.

  16. SIRT1 Regulates Dendritic Development in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Juan A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:23056585

  17. Test Plan Development for Plastic Ammunition Containers. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-15

    122 xii TEST PLAN DEVELOPMENT FOR PLASTIC AM4MINITION CONTAINERS - VOLUME I 1.0 INTRODUCTION The purpose of this project...11 LA 00 Li C:0 z CP -0 133 0( LIE r r ’ D2 U)~ E C IP a g 0- L) LaLn 4’ MOIAIV3H-Q3.~f-trCYin, 20o Tabla 6-D Performance Prediction Model 155ram

  18. Mechanisms involved in systemic nicotine-induced glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Jin, Yu; Yang, Kechun; Zhang, Die; Lukas, Ronald J; Wu, Jie

    2010-10-13

    Systemic exposure to nicotine induces glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that single, systemic exposure in rats to nicotine (0.17 mg/kg free base) increases the ratio of DA neuronal currents mediated by AMPA relative to NMDA receptors (AMPA/NMDA ratio) assessed 24 h later, based on slice-patch recording. The AMPA/NMDA ratio increase is evident within 1 h and lasts for at least 72 h after nicotine exposure (and up to 8 d after repeated nicotine administration). This effect cannot be prevented by systemic injection of either α7-nAChR (nicotinic ACh receptor)-selective [methyllycaconitine (MLA)] or β2*-nAChR-selective [mecamylamine (MEC)] antagonists but is prevented by coinjection of MLA and MEC. In either nAChR α7 or β2 subunit knock-out mice, systemic exposure to nicotine still increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio. Preinjection in rats of a NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate), but neither DA receptor antagonists [SCH-23390 (R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) plus haloperidol] nor a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine), prevents the nicotine-induced increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio. After systemic exposure to nicotine, glutamatergic (but not GABAergic) transmission onto rat VTA DA neuronal inputs is enhanced. Correspondingly, DA neuronal firing measured 24 h after nicotine exposure using extracellular single-unit recording in vivo is significantly faster, and there is conversion of silent to active DA neurons. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that systemic nicotine acting via either α7- or β2*-nAChRs increases presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic function, and consequently initiates glutamatergic synaptic plasticity, which may be an important, early neuronal adaptation in nicotine reward and reinforcement.

  19. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of excitatory postsynapses on proximal dendrites of cultured mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Platschek, Steffen; Priesemann, Viola; Becker, Denise; Willems, Laurent M; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Jedlicka, Peter; Vlachos, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human brain can lead to long-lasting changes in cortical excitability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie rTMS-induced plasticity remain incompletely understood. Here, we used repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) of mouse entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures to study rMS-induced plasticity of excitatory postsynapses. By employing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons, local electrical stimulations, immunostainings for the glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 and compartmental modeling, we found evidence for a preferential potentiation of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites of CA1 neurons (2-4 h after stimulation). This rMS-induced synaptic potentiation required the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptors. In view of these findings we propose a cellular model for the preferential strengthening of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites following rMS in vitro, which is based on a cooperative effect of synaptic glutamatergic transmission and postsynaptic depolarization.

  20. Persistent sodium current is a target for cAMP-induced neuronal plasticity in a state-setting modulatory interneuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, E S; Kiss, T; Staras, K; O'shea, M; Benjamin, P R; Kemenes, G

    2006-01-01

    We have identified a TTX-resistant low-threshold persistent inward sodium current in the cerebral giant cells (CGCs) of Lymnaea, an important state-setting modulatory cell type of molluscan feeding networks. This current has slow voltage-dependent activation and de-activation kinetics, ultra-slow inactivation kinetics and fast de-inactivation kinetics. It activates at approximately -90 mV, peaks at approximately -30 mV, reverses at approximately +35 mV and does not show full voltage-dependent inactivation even at positive voltage steps. Lithium-sodium replacement experiments indicate that the persistent sodium current makes a significant contribution to the CGC membrane potential. Injection of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) into the CGC cell body produces a large increase in the persistent sodium current that lasts for several hours. cAMP injection also leads to increased bursting, a significant decrease in the resistance and a significant depolarization of the soma membrane, indicating that cAMP-dependent mechanisms induce prolonged neuronal plasticity in the CGCs. Our observations provide the first link between cAMP-mediated modulation of a TTX-resistant persistent sodium current and prolonged neuronal plasticity in an identified modulatory cell type that plays an important role in behavioral state setting.

  1. Scale invariant disordered nanotopography promotes hippocampal neuron development and maturation with involvement of mechanotransductive pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schulte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signalling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM. Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterised by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation.

  2. Scale Invariant Disordered Nanotopography Promotes Hippocampal Neuron Development and Maturation with Involvement of Mechanotransductive Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Carsten; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Maffioli, Elisa; Cappelluti, Martino A.; Nonnis, Simona; Puricelli, Luca; Lamanna, Jacopo; Piazzoni, Claudio; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Malgaroli, Antonio; Milani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signaling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterized by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation. PMID:27917111

  3. Emotion Processing by ERP Combined with Development and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotions important for survival and social interaction have received wide and deep investigations. The application of the fMRI technique into emotion processing has obtained overwhelming achievements with respect to the localization of emotion processes. The ERP method, which possesses highly temporal resolution compared to fMRI, can be employed to investigate the time course of emotion processing. The emotional modulation of the ERP component has been verified across numerous researches. Emotions, described as dynamically developing along with the growing age, have the possibility to be enhanced through learning (or training or to be damaged due to disturbances in growth, which is underlain by the neural plasticity of emotion-relevant nervous systems. And mood disorders with typical symptoms of emotion discordance probably have been caused by the dysfunctional neural plasticity.

  4. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity Induced by Low-Frequency Stimulation in Basal Dendrites of Rat Barrel Cortex Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-García, Andrea; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Núñez, Ángel; Buño, Washington; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-01-01

    According to Hebb's original hypothesis (Hebb, 1949), synapses are reinforced when presynaptic activity triggers postsynaptic firing, resulting in long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy. Long-term depression (LTD) is a use-dependent decrease in synaptic strength that is thought to be due to synaptic input causing a weak postsynaptic effect. Although the mechanisms that mediate long-term synaptic plasticity have been investigated for at least three decades not all question have as yet been answered. Therefore, we aimed at determining the mechanisms that generate LTP or LTD with the simplest possible protocol. Low-frequency stimulation of basal dendrite inputs in Layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat barrel cortex induces LTP. This stimulation triggered an EPSP, an action potential (AP) burst, and a Ca2+ spike. The same stimulation induced LTD following manipulations that reduced the Ca2+ spike and Ca2+ signal or the AP burst. Low-frequency whisker deflections induced similar bidirectional plasticity of action potential evoked responses in anesthetized rats. These results suggest that both in vitro and in vivo similar mechanisms regulate the balance between LTP and LTD. This simple induction form of bidirectional hebbian plasticity could be present in the natural conditions to regulate the detection, flow, and storage of sensorimotor information. PMID:28203145

  5. Development and test of a plastic deep-well pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Gao, X. F.; Xu, Y.; Shi, W. D.; Lu, W. G.; Liu, W.

    2013-12-01

    To develop a plastic deep-well pump, three methods are proposed on structural and forming technique. First, the major hydraulic components are constructed by plastics, and the connection component is constructed by steel. Thus the pump structure is more concise and slim, greatly reducing its weight and easing its transportation, installation, and maintenance. Second, the impeller is designed by maximum diameter method. Using same pump casing, the stage head is greatly increased. Third, a sealing is formed by impeller front end face and steel end face, and two slots are designed on the impeller front end face, thus when the two end faces approach, a lubricating pair is formed, leading to an effective sealing. With above methods, the pump's axial length is greatly reduced, and its stage head is larger and more efficient. Especially, the pump's axial force is effectively balanced. To examine the above proposals, a prototype pump is constructed, and its testing results show that the pump efficiency exceeds the national standard by 6%, and the stage head is improved by 41%, meanwhile, its structure is more concise and ease of transportation. Development of this pump would provide useful experiences for further popularity of plastic deep-well pumps.

  6. Development of layer 1 neurons in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Yao, Xing-Hua; Fu, Yinghui; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Layer 1 of the neocortex harbors a unique group of neurons that play crucial roles in synaptic integration and information processing. Although extensive studies have characterized the properties of layer 1 neurons in the mature neocortex, it remains unclear how these neurons progressively acquire their distinct morphological, neurochemical, and physiological traits. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamic development of Cajal-Retzius cells and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in layer 1 during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Cajal-Retzius cells underwent morphological degeneration after birth and gradually disappeared from layer 1. The majority of GABAergic interneurons showed clear expression of at least 1 of the 6 distinct neurochemical markers, including Reelin, GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ), neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calretinin, and somatostatin from postnatal day 8. Furthermore, according to firing pattern, layer 1 interneurons can be divided into 2 groups: late-spiking (LS) and burst-spiking (BS) neurons. LS neurons preferentially expressed GABAARδ, whereas BS neurons preferentially expressed VIP. Interestingly, both LS and BS neurons exhibited a rapid electrophysiological and morphological development during the first postnatal week. Our results provide new insights into the molecular, morphological, and functional developments of the neurons in layer 1 of the neocortex.

  7. Direct and crossed effects of somatosensory electrical stimulation on motor learning and neuronal plasticity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M. P.; Zijdewind, I.; Solnik, S.; Maffiuletti, N. A.; Berghuis, K. M. M.; Javet, M.; Negyesi, J.; Hortobagyi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sensory input can modify voluntary motor function. We examined whether somatosensory electrical stimulation (SES) added to motor practice (MP) could augment motor learning, interlimb transfer, and whether physiological changes in neuronal excitability underlie these changes. Methods Particip

  8. Ras and Rab interactor 1 controls neuronal plasticity by coordinating dendritic filopodial motility and AMPA receptor turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szíber, Zsófia; Liliom, Hanna; Morales, Carlos O Oueslati; Ignácz, Attila; Rátkai, Anikó Erika; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Link, Gisela; Szűcs, Attila; Hausser, Angelika; Schlett, Katalin

    2017-01-15

    Ras and Rab interactor 1 (RIN1) is predominantly expressed in the nervous system. RIN1-knockout animals have deficits in latent inhibition and fear extinction in the amygdala, suggesting a critical role for RIN1 in preventing the persistence of unpleasant memories. At the molecular level, RIN1 signals through Rab5 GTPases that control endocytosis of cell-surface receptors and Abl nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that participate in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we report that RIN1 controls the plasticity of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Our results show that RIN1 affects the morphology of dendritic protrusions and accelerates dendritic filopodial motility through an Abl kinase-dependent pathway. Lack of RIN1 results in enhanced mEPSC amplitudes, indicating an increase in surface AMPA receptor levels compared with wild-type neurons. We further provide evidence that the Rab5 GEF activity of RIN1 regulates surface GluA1 subunit endocytosis. Consequently loss of RIN1 blocks surface AMPA receptor down-regulation evoked by chemically induced long-term depression. Our findings indicate that RIN1 destabilizes synaptic connections and is a key player in postsynaptic AMPA receptor endocytosis, providing multiple ways of negatively regulating memory stabilization during neuronal plasticity. © 2017 Szíber et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses using Structural Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista eHussain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule for multiclass classification is proposed which modifies a connectivity matrix of binary synaptic connections by choosing the best k out of d inputs to make connections on every dendritic branch (k<neurons for each class followed by the theoretical capacity calculations used to convert each neuronal dendritic tree to its optimal topology.We show that for the classification of handwritten digits from the benchmark MNIST dataset, our system can achieve accuracy within 1-2% of other reported spike-based classifiers while using much less synaptic resources (only 7% compared to that used by other methods. Further, an ensemble classifier created with adaptively learned sizes can attain accuracy of 96.4% which is at par with the best reported performance of spike-based classifiers. We also present results of applying our algorithm to classify the MNIST-DVS dataset

  10. Characterization of the time course of changes of the evoked electrical activity in a model of a chemically-induced neuronal plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruaro Maria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal plasticity is initiated by transient elevations of neuronal networks activity leading to changes of synaptic properties and providing the basis for memory and learning 1. An increase of electrical activity can be caused by electrical stimulation 2 or by pharmacological manipulations: elevation of extracellular K+ 3, blockage of inhibitory pathways 4 or by an increase of second messengers intracellular concentrations 5. Neuronal plasticity is mediated by several biochemical pathways leading to the modulation of synaptic strength, density of ionic channels and morphological changes of neuronal arborisation 6. On a time scale of a few minutes, neuronal plasticity is mediated by local protein trafficking 7 while, in order to sustain modifications beyond 2–3 h, changes of gene expression are required 8. Findings In the present manuscript we analysed the time course of changes of the evoked electrical activity during neuronal plasticity and we correlated it with a transcriptional analysis of the underlying changes of gene expression. Our investigation shows that treatment for 30 min. with the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine (GabT causes a potentiation of the evoked electrical activity occurring 2–4 hours after GabT and the concomitant up-regulation of 342 genes. Inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway reduced but did not abolish the potentiation of the evoked response caused by GabT. In fact not all the genes analysed were blocked by ERK1/2 inhibitors. Conclusion These results are in agreement with the notion that neuronal plasticity is mediated by several distinct pathways working in unison.

  11. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Vertebrate Neural Stem Cells: Development, Plasticity, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Natural recovery from disease and damage in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is limited compared with that in lower vertebrate species, including fish and salamanders. Species-specific differences in the plasticity of the CNS reflect these differences in regenerative capacity. Despite numerous extensive studies in the field of CNS regeneration, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining the regenerative capacity of the CNS is still relatively poor. The discovery of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in mammals, including humans, in the early 1990s has opened up new possibilities for the treatment of CNS disorders via self-regeneration through the mobilization of these cells. However, we now know that aNSCs in mammals are not plastic enough to induce significant regeneration. In contrast, aNSCs in some regenerative species have been found to be as highly plastic as early embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). We must expand our knowledge of NSCs and of regenerative processes in lower vertebrates in an effort to develop effective regenerative treatments for damaged CNS in humans.

  13. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T.; Lopez, Ana V.; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, A...

  14. Amygdalar neuronal plasticity and the interactions of alcohol, sex, and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retson, T A; Hoek, J B; Sterling, R C; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are major medical problems affecting both men and women. Previous animal studies reported a difference in c-Fos neuronal activation after chronic alcohol exposure; however, females remain an understudied population. To model chronic alcohol exposure match-pair fed adult male and female rats were administered 14 days of a liquid ethanol containing diet. Analysis focused on the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a region integral to stress sensitivity and substance abuse. Immunocytochemical approaches identified cells containing ΔFosB, a marker of sustained neuronal activation, and activity patterns within the CeA were mapped by subdivision and rostral-caudal extent. Significant interactions were present between all groups, with gender differences noted among control groups, and ethanol exposed animals having the greatest number of ΔFosB immunoreactive cells indicating baseline dysregulation. Compared with c-Fos, a marker of recent neuronal activation, male ethanol treated animals had similar activity to controls, indicating a neuronal habituation not seen in females. Next, a cohort of animals were exposed to the forced swim test (FST), and c-Fos was examined in addition to FST behavior. Neuronal activity was increased in ethanol exposed animals compared to controls, and control females compared to males, indicating a potentiated stress response. Further, a population of activated neurons were shown to contain either corticotropin releasing factor or enkephalin. The present data suggest that dysregulation in the CeA neuronal activity may underlie some of the negative sequelae of alcohol abuse, and may, in part, underlie the distinctive response seen between genders to alcohol use.

  15. Neuronal plasticity in hibernation and the proposed role of the microtubule-associated protein tau as a "master switch" regulating synaptic gain in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Thomas; Bullmann, Torsten

    2013-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of adaptive changes in brain structure and learning abilities during hibernation as a behavioral strategy used by several mammalian species to minimize energy expenditure under current or anticipated inhospitable environmental conditions. One cellular mechanism that contributes to the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during hibernation is reversible phosphorylation of enzymes and proteins, which limits rates of flux through metabolic pathways. Reversible phosphorylation during hibernation also affects synaptic membrane proteins, a process known to be involved in synaptic plasticity. This mechanism of reversible protein phosphorylation also affects the microtubule-associated protein tau, thereby generating a condition that in the adult human brain is associated with aggregation of tau protein to paired helical filaments (PHFs), as observed in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we put forward the concept that phosphorylation of tau is a neuroprotective mechanism to escape NMDA-mediated hyperexcitability of neurons that would otherwise occur during slow gradual cooling of the brain. Phosphorylation of tau and its subsequent targeting to subsynaptic sites might, thus, work as a kind of "master switch," regulating NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic gain in a wide array of neuronal networks, thereby enabling entry into torpor. If this condition lasts too long, however, it may eventually turn into a pathological trigger, driving a cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, as in Alzheimer's disease or other "tauopathies".

  16. Inhibitory short-term plasticity modulates neuronal activity in the rat entopeduncular nucleus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavian, Hagar; Korngreen, Alon

    2016-04-01

    The entopeduncular nucleus (EP) is one of the basal ganglia output nuclei integrating synaptic information from several pathways within the basal ganglia. The firing of EP neurons is modulated by two streams of inhibitory synaptic transmission, the direct pathway from the striatum and the indirect pathway from the globus pallidus. These two inhibitory pathways continuously modulate the firing of EP neurons. However, the link between these synaptic inputs to neuronal firing in the EP is unclear. To investigate this input-output transformation we performed whole-cell and perforated-patch recordings from single neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus in rat brain slices during repetitive stimulation of the striatum and the globus pallidus at frequencies within the in vivo activity range of these neurons. These recordings, supplemented by compartmental modelling, showed that GABAergic synapses from the striatum, converging on EP dendrites, display short-term facilitation and that somatic or proximal GABAergic synapses from the globus pallidus show short-term depression. Activation of striatal synapses during low presynaptic activity decreased postsynaptic firing rate by continuously increasing the inter-spike interval. Conversely, activation of pallidal synapses significantly affected postsynaptic firing during high presynaptic activity. Our data thus suggest that low-frequency striatal output may be encoded as progressive phase shifts in downstream nuclei of the basal ganglia while high-frequency pallidal output may continuously modulate EP firing.

  17. The Role of Short Term Synaptic Plasticity in Temporal Coding of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Short term synaptic plasticity is a phenomenon which is commonly found in the central nervous system. It could contribute to functions of signal processing namely, temporal integration and coincidence detection by modulating the input synaptic strength. This dissertation has two parts. First, we study the effects of short term synaptic plasticity…

  18. The Role of Short Term Synaptic Plasticity in Temporal Coding of Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Short term synaptic plasticity is a phenomenon which is commonly found in the central nervous system. It could contribute to functions of signal processing namely, temporal integration and coincidence detection by modulating the input synaptic strength. This dissertation has two parts. First, we study the effects of short term synaptic plasticity…

  19. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses Using Structural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaista; Basu, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule for multiclass classification is proposed which modifies a connectivity matrix of binary synaptic connections by choosing the best "k" out of "d" inputs to make connections on every dendritic branch (k learning only modifies connectivity, the model is well suited for implementation in neuromorphic systems using address-event representation (AER). We develop an ensemble method which combines several dendritic classifiers to achieve enhanced generalization over individual classifiers. We have two major findings: (1) Our results demonstrate that an ensemble created with classifiers comprising moderate number of dendrites performs better than both ensembles of perceptrons and of complex dendritic trees. (2) In order to determine the moderate number of dendrites required for a specific classification problem, a two-step solution is proposed. First, an adaptive approach is proposed which scales the relative size of the dendritic trees of neurons for each class. It works by progressively adding dendrites with fixed number of synapses to the network, thereby allocating synaptic resources as per the complexity of the given problem. As a second step, theoretical capacity calculations are used to convert each neuronal dendritic tree to its optimal topology where dendrites of each class are assigned different number of synapses. The performance of the model is evaluated on classification of handwritten digits from the benchmark MNIST dataset and compared with other spike classifiers. We

  20. Plastic and stable electrophysiological properties of adult avian forebrain song-control neurons across changing breeding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitzen, John; Weaver, Adam L; Brenowitz, Eliot A; Perkel, David J

    2009-05-20

    Steroid sex hormones drive changes in the nervous system and behavior in many animal taxa, but integrating the former with the latter remains challenging. One useful model system for meeting this challenge is seasonally breeding songbirds. In these species, plasma testosterone levels rise and fall across the seasons, altering song behavior and causing dramatic growth and regression of the song-control system, a discrete set of nuclei that control song behavior. Whereas the cellular mechanisms underlying changes in nucleus volume have been studied as a model for neural growth and degeneration, it is unknown whether these changes in neural structure are accompanied by changes in electrophysiological properties other than spontaneous firing rate. Here we test the hypothesis that passive and active neuronal properties in the forebrain song-control nuclei HVC and RA change across breeding conditions. We exposed adult male Gambel's white-crowned sparrows to either short-day photoperiod or long-day photoperiod and systemic testosterone to simulate nonbreeding and breeding conditions, respectively. We made whole-cell recordings from RA and HVC neurons in acute brain slices. We found that RA projection neuron membrane time constant, capacitance, and evoked and spontaneous firing rates were all increased in the breeding condition; the measured electrophysiological properties of HVC interneurons and projection neurons were stable across breeding conditions. This combination of plastic and stable intrinsic properties could directly impact the song-control system's motor control across seasons, underlying changes in song stereotypy. These results provide a valuable framework for integrating how steroid hormones modulate cellular physiology to change behavior.

  1. Role of GABAA-Mediated Inhibition and Functional Assortment of Synapses onto Individual Layer 4 Neurons in Regulating Plasticity Expression in Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Ignacio; Friedlander, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Layer 4 (L4) of primary visual cortex (V1) is the main recipient of thalamocortical fibers from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd). Thus, it is considered the main entry point of visual information into the neocortex and the first anatomical opportunity for intracortical visual processing before information leaves L4 and reaches supra- and infragranular cortical layers. The strength of monosynaptic connections from individual L4 excitatory cells onto adjacent L4 cells (unitary connections) is highly malleable, demonstrating that the initial stage of intracortical synaptic transmission of thalamocortical information can be altered by previous activity. However, the inhibitory network within L4 of V1 may act as an internal gate for induction of excitatory synaptic plasticity, thus providing either high fidelity throughput to supragranular layers or transmittal of a modified signal subject to recent activity-dependent plasticity. To evaluate this possibility, we compared the induction of synaptic plasticity using classical extracellular stimulation protocols that recruit a combination of excitatory and inhibitory synapses with stimulation of a single excitatory neuron onto a L4 cell. In order to induce plasticity, we paired pre- and postsynaptic activity (with the onset of postsynaptic spiking leading the presynaptic activation by 10ms) using extracellular stimulation (ECS) in acute slices of primary visual cortex and comparing the outcomes with our previously published results in which an identical protocol was used to induce synaptic plasticity between individual pre- and postsynaptic L4 excitatory neurons. Our results indicate that pairing of ECS with spiking in a L4 neuron fails to induce plasticity in L4-L4 connections if synaptic inhibition is intact. However, application of a similar pairing protocol under GABAARs inhibition by bath application of 2μM bicuculline does induce robust synaptic plasticity, long term potentiation (LTP) or long term

  2. Neuronal intermediate filaments in the developing tongue of the frog Rana esculenta

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    K Zuwala

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of several neuronal intermediate filament (NIF proteins was investigated in the tongue of metamorphosing tadpoles (stage 38-45 of Gosner and in adult individuals of the frog, Rana esculenta by means of immunohistochemistry. Results showed that nerve fibres at early stages of tongue development expressed peripherin (a NIF protein usually found in differentiating neurones as well as the light- and medium molecular weight NIF polypeptide subunits (NF-L and NF-M, respectively; in the adult frog, peripherin was still found in nerve fibres reaching the fungiform papilla together with NF-M, but NF-L immunoreactivity was absent therein. Clusters of epithelial cells expressing peripherin were found in the early developing tongue before differentiation of taste organs, and NF-L and NF-H immunoreactivities were present in basal (Merkel cells of the adult frog taste disc. Results indicate that neurones innervating the adult frog’s taste disc maintain a certain plasticity in their cytoskeleton and that neuronal-like cells are present in the undifferentiated and differentiated tongue epithelium possibly playing a role in the developing and mature taste organ.

  3. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scena

  4. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  5. microRNAs and the regulation of neuronal plasticity under stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.; Aschrafi, A.; Bielefeld, P.; Doxakis, E.; Fitzsimons, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    In the brain, the connection between sensory information triggered by the presence of a stressor and the organism's reaction involves limbic areas such as the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Consequently, these brain regions are the most sensitive to stress-induced changes in neuronal

  6. The Role of Plastic Surgeons in Advancing Development Global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, P Niclas; Jenny, Hillary E; Ng-Kamstra, Joshua S; Juran, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    In September 2015, the international community came together to agree on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a plan of action for people, the planet, and prosperity. Ambitious and far-reaching as they are, they are built on three keystones: the elimination of extreme poverty, fighting climate change, and a commitment to fighting injustice and inequality. Critical to the achievement of the Agenda is the global realization of access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed. The landmark report by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery estimated that between 28 and 32 percent of the global burden of disease is amenable to surgical treatment. However, as many as five billion people lack access to safe, timely, and affordable surgical care, a burden felt most severely in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Surgery, and specifically plastic surgery, should be incorporated into the international development and humanitarian agenda. As a community of care providers dedicated to the restoration of the form and function of the human body, plastics surgeons have a collective opportunity to contribute to global development, making the world more equitable and helping to reduce extreme poverty. As surgical disease comprises a significant burden of disease and surgery can be delivered in a cost-effective manner, surgery must be considered a public health priority.

  7. Sleep oscillations in the thalamocortical system induce long-term neuronal plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Summary Long-term plasticity contributes to memory formation and sleep plays a critical role in memory consolidation. However, it is unclear whether sleep slow oscillation by itself induces long-term plasticity that contributes to memory retention. Using in vivo pre-thalamic electrical stimulation at 1 Hz which itself does not induce immediate potentiation of evoked responses, we investigated how the cortical evoked response was modulated by different states of vigilance. We found that somatosensory evoked potentials during wake were enhanced after a slow-wave sleep episode (with or without stimulation during sleep) as compared to a previous wake episode. In vitro, we determined that this enhancement has a postsynaptic mechanism that is calcium-dependent, requires hyperpolarization periods (slow waves), and requires a co-activation of both AMPA and NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that long-term potentiation occurs during slow-wave sleep supporting its contribution to memory. PMID:22998877

  8. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  9. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and developmental regulation. Although interesting findings emerged, showing that different subunits are specifically regulated during development, or that excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks exhibit various electrical connectivity patterns, gap junctions did not receive much further interest. Originally, it was believed that gap junctions represent simple passageways for electrical and biochemical coordination early in development. Today, we know that gap junction connectivity is tightly regulated, following independent developmental patterns for excitatory and inhibitory networks. Electrical connections are important for many specific functions of neurons, and are, for example, required for the development of neuronal stimulus tuning in the visual system. Here, we integrate the available data on neuronal connectivity and gap junction properties, as well as the most recent findings concerning the functional implications of electrical connections in the developing thalamus and neocortex.

  10. Insm1a Regulates Motor Neuron Development in Zebrafish

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    Jie Gong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Insulinoma-associated1a (insm1a is a zinc-finger transcription factor playing a series of functions in cell formation and differentiation of vertebrate central and peripheral nervous systems and neuroendocrine system. However, its roles on the development of motor neuron have still remained uncovered. Here, we provided evidences that insm1a was a vital regulator of motor neuron development, and provided a mechanistic understanding of how it contributes to this process. Firstly, we showed the localization of insm1a in spinal cord, and primary motor neurons (PMNs of zebrafish embryos by in situ hybridization, and imaging analysis of transgenic reporter line Tg(insm1a: mCherryntu805. Then we demonstrated that the deficiency of insm1a in zebrafish larvae lead to the defects of PMNs development, including the reduction of caudal primary motor neurons (CaP, and middle primary motor neurons (MiP, the excessive branching of motor axons, and the disorganized distance between adjacent CaPs. Additionally, knockout of insm1 impaired motor neuron differentiation in the spinal cord. Locomotion analysis showed that swimming activity was significantly reduced in the insm1a-null zebrafish. Furthermore, we showed that the insm1a loss of function significantly decreased the transcript levels of both olig2 and nkx6.1. Microinjection of olig2 and nkx6.1 mRNA rescued the motor neuron defects in insm1a deficient embryos. Taken together, these data indicated that insm1a regulated the motor neuron development, at least in part, through modulation of the expressions of olig2 and nkx6.1.

  11. Early constraint-induced movement therapy promotes functional recovery and neuronal plasticity in a subcortical hemorrhage model rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Akimasa; Misumi, Sachiyo; Ueda, Yoshitomo; Shimizu, Yuko; Cha-Gyun, Jung; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Ishida, Kazuto; Hida, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) promotes functional recovery of impaired forelimbs after hemiplegic strokes, including intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We used a rat model of subcortical hemorrhage to compare the effects of delivering early or late CIMT after ICH. The rat model was made by injecting collagenase into the globus pallidus near the internal capsule, and then forcing rats to use the affected forelimb for 7 days starting either 1 day (early CIMT) or 17 days (late CIMT) after the lesion. Recovery of forelimb function in the skilled reaching test and the ladder stepping test was found after early-CIMT, while no significant recovery was shown after late CIMT or in the non-CIMT controls. Early CIMT was associated with greater numbers of ΔFosB-positive cells in the ipsi-lesional sensorimotor cortex layers II-III and V. Additionally, we found expression of the growth-related genes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-related protein 43 (GAP-43), and abundant dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons in the sensorimotor area. Similar results were not detected in the contra-lesional cortex. In contrast to early CIMT, late CIMT failed to induce any changes in plasticity. We conclude that CIMT induces molecular and morphological plasticity in the ipsi-lesional sensorimotor cortex and facilitates better functional recovery when initiated immediately after hemorrhage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms regulating neuronal excitability and seizure development following mTOR pathway hyperactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candi L LaSarge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K/PTEN-mTOR pathway regulates a variety of neuronal functions, including cell proliferation, survival, growth and plasticity. Dysregulation of the pathway is implicated in the development of both genetic and acquired epilepsies. Indeed, several causal mutations have been identified in patients with epilepsy, the most prominent of these being mutations in phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN and tuberal sclerosis complexes 1 and 2 (TSC1, TSC2. These genes act as negative regulators of mTOR signaling, and mutations lead to hyperactivation of the pathway. Animal models deleting PTEN, TSC1 and TSC2 consistently produce epilepsy phenotypes, demonstrating that increased mTOR signaling can provoke neuronal hyperexcitability. Given the broad range of changes induced by altered mTOR signaling, however, the mechanisms underlying seizure development in these animals remain uncertain. In transgenic mice, cell populations with hyperactive mTOR have many structural abnormalities that support recurrent circuit formation, including somatic and dendritic hypertrophy, aberrant basal dendrites, and enlargement of axon tracts. At the functional level, mTOR hyperactivation is commonly, but not always, associated with enhanced synaptic transmission and plasticity. Moreover, these populations of abnormal neurons can affect the larger network, inducing secondary changes that may explain paradoxical findings reported between cell and network functioning in different models or at different developmental time points. Here, we review the animal literature examining the link between mTOR hyperactivation and epileptogenesis, emphasizing the impact of enhanced mTOR signaling on neuronal form and function.

  13. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  14. Developing neuronal networks: self-organized criticality predicts the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiangbo; Gong, Hui; Li, Xiangning; Luo, Qingming

    2013-01-01

    Self-organized criticality emerged in neural activity is one of the key concepts to describe the formation and the function of developing neuronal networks. The relationship between critical dynamics and neural development is both theoretically and experimentally appealing. However, whereas it is well-known that cortical networks exhibit a rich repertoire of activity patterns at different stages during in vitro maturation, dynamical activity patterns through the entire neural development still remains unclear. Here we show that a series of metastable network states emerged in the developing and "aging" process of hippocampal networks cultured from dissociated rat neurons. The unidirectional sequence of state transitions could be only observed in networks showing power-law scaling of distributed neuronal avalanches. Our data suggest that self-organized criticality may guide spontaneous activity into a sequential succession of homeostatically-regulated transient patterns during development, which may help to predict the tendency of neural development at early ages in the future.

  15. How neurons migrate: a dynamic in-silico model of neuronal migration in the developing cortex

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Setty, Yaki

    2011-09-30

    Abstract Background Neuronal migration, the process by which neurons migrate from their place of origin to their final position in the brain, is a central process for normal brain development and function. Advances in experimental techniques have revealed much about many of the molecular components involved in this process. Notwithstanding these advances, how the molecular machinery works together to govern the migration process has yet to be fully understood. Here we present a computational model of neuronal migration, in which four key molecular entities, Lis1, DCX, Reelin and GABA, form a molecular program that mediates the migration process. Results The model simulated the dynamic migration process, consistent with in-vivo observations of morphological, cellular and population-level phenomena. Specifically, the model reproduced migration phases, cellular dynamics and population distributions that concur with experimental observations in normal neuronal development. We tested the model under reduced activity of Lis1 and DCX and found an aberrant development similar to observations in Lis1 and DCX silencing expression experiments. Analysis of the model gave rise to unforeseen insights that could guide future experimental study. Specifically: (1) the model revealed the possibility that under conditions of Lis1 reduced expression, neurons experience an oscillatory neuron-glial association prior to the multipolar stage; and (2) we hypothesized that observed morphology variations in rats and mice may be explained by a single difference in the way that Lis1 and DCX stimulate bipolar motility. From this we make the following predictions: (1) under reduced Lis1 and enhanced DCX expression, we predict a reduced bipolar migration in rats, and (2) under enhanced DCX expression in mice we predict a normal or a higher bipolar migration. Conclusions We present here a system-wide computational model of neuronal migration that integrates theory and data within a precise

  16. [Development of intellect, emotion, and intentions, and their neuronal systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Masaya

    2008-09-01

    Intellect, emotion and intentions, the major components of the human mentality, are neurologically correlated to memory and sensorimotor integration, the neuronal system consisting of the amygdale and hypothalamus, and motivation and learning, respectively. Development of these neuronal processes was evaluated by correlating the pathophysiologies of idiopathic developmental neuropsychiatric disorders and developmental courses of sleep parameters, sleep-wake rhythm (SWR), and locomotion. The memory system and sensory pathways develop by the 9th gestational months. Habituation or dorsal bundle extinction (DBE) develop after the 34th gestational week. In the first 4 months after birth, DBE is consolidated and fine tuning of the primary sensory cortex and its neuronal connection to the unimodal sensory association area along with functional lateralization of the cortex are accomplished. After 4 months, restriction of atonia in the REM stage enables the integrative function of the brain and induces synaptogenesis of the cortex around 6 months and locomotion in late infancy by activating the dopaminergic (DA) neurons induces synaptogenesis of the frontal cortex. Locomotion in early infancy involves functional specialization of the cortex and in childhood with development of biphasic SWR activation of the areas of the prefrontal cortex. Development of emotions reflects in the development of personal communication and the arousal function of the hypothalamus. The former is shown in the mother-child relationship in the first 4 months, in communication with adults and playmates in late infancy to early childhood, and in development of social relationships with sympathy by the early school age with functional maturation of the orbitofrontal cortex. The latter is demonstrated in the secretion of melatonin during night time by 4 months, in the circadian rhythm of body temperature by 8 months, and in the secretion of the growth hormone by 4-5 years with synchronization to the

  17. Modeling the Development of Goal-Specificity in Mirror Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thill, Serge; Svensson, Henrik; Ziemke, Tom

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological studies have shown that parietal mirror neurons encode not only actions but also the goal of these actions. Although some mirror neurons will fire whenever a certain action is perceived (goal-independently), most will only fire if the motion is perceived as part of an action with a specific goal. This result is important for the action-understanding hypothesis as it provides a potential neurological basis for such a cognitive ability. It is also relevant for the design of artificial cognitive systems, in particular robotic systems that rely on computational models of the mirror system in their interaction with other agents. Yet, to date, no computational model has explicitly addressed the mechanisms that give rise to both goal-specific and goal-independent parietal mirror neurons. In the present paper, we present a computational model based on a self-organizing map, which receives artificial inputs representing information about both the observed or executed actions and the context in which they were executed. We show that the map develops a biologically plausible organization in which goal-specific mirror neurons emerge. We further show that the fundamental cause for both the appearance and the number of goal-specific neurons can be found in geometric relationships between the different inputs to the map. The results are important to the action-understanding hypothesis as they provide a mechanism for the emergence of goal-specific parietal mirror neurons and lead to a number of predictions: (1) Learning of new goals may mostly reassign existing goal-specific neurons rather than recruit new ones; (2) input differences between executed and observed actions can explain observed corresponding differences in the number of goal-specific neurons; and (3) the percentage of goal-specific neurons may differ between motion primitives.

  18. Is the human mirror neuron system plastic? Evidence from a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Urvakhsh Meherwan; Waghmare, Avinash V; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2015-10-01

    Virtual lesions in the mirror neuron network using inhibitory low-frequency (1Hz) transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have been employed to understand its spatio-functional properties. However, no studies have examined the influence of neuro-enhancement by using excitatory high-frequency (20Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) on these networks. We used three forms of TMS stimulation (HF-rTMS, single and paired pulse) to investigate whether the mirror neuron system facilitates the motor system during goal-directed action observation relative to inanimate motion (motor resonance), a marker of putative mirror neuron activity. 31 healthy individuals were randomized to receive single-sessions of true or sham HF-rTMS delivered to the left inferior frontal gyrus - a component of the human mirror system. Motor resonance was assessed before and after HF-rTMS using three TMS cortical reactivity paradigms: (a) 120% of resting motor threshold (RMT), (b) stimulus intensity set to evoke motor evoked potential of 1-millivolt amplitude (SI1mV) and (c) a short latency paired pulse paradigm. Two-way RMANOVA showed a significant group (true versus sham) X occasion (pre- and post-HF-rTMS motor resonance) interaction effect for SI1mV [F(df)=6.26 (1, 29), p=0.018] and 120% RMT stimuli [F(df)=7.01 (1, 29), p=0.013] indicating greater enhancement of motor resonance in the true HF-rTMS group than the sham-group. This suggests that HF-rTMS could adaptively modulate properties of the mirror neuron system. This neuro-enhancement effect is a preliminary step that can open translational avenues for novel brain stimulation therapeutics targeting social-cognition deficits in schizophrenia and autism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A transcription-dependent increase in miniature EPSC frequency accompanies late-phase plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Frank

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnitude and longevity of synaptic activity-induced changes in synaptic efficacy is quantified by measuring evoked responses whose potentiation requires gene transcription to persist for more than 2-3 hours. While miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs are also increased in amplitude and/or frequency during long-term potentiation (LTP, it is not known how long such changes persist or whether gene transcription is required. Results We use whole-cell patch clamp recordings from dissociated hippocampal cultures to characterise for the first time the persistence and transcription dependency of mEPSC upregulation during synaptic potentiation. The persistence of recurrent action potential bursting in these cultures is transcription-, translation- and NMDA receptor-dependent thus providing an accessible model for long-lasting plasticity. Blockade of GABAA-receptors with bicuculline for 15 minutes induced action potential bursting in all neurons and was maintained in 50-60% of neurons for more than 6 hours. Throughout this period, the frequency but neither the amplitude of mEPSCs nor whole-cell AMPA currents was markedly increased. The transcription blocker actinomycin D abrogated, within 2 hours of burst induction, both action potential bursting and the increase in mEPSCs. Reversible blockade of action potentials during, but not after this 2 hour transcription period suppressed the increase in mEPSC frequency and the recovery of burst activity at a time point 6 hours after induction. Conclusion These results indicate that increased mEPSC frequency persists well beyond the 2 hour transcription-independent phase of plasticity in this model. This long-lasting mEPSC upregulation is transcription-dependent and requires ongoing action potential activity during the initial 2 hour period but not thereafter. Thus mEPSC upregulation may underlie the long term, transcription-dependent persistence of action potential bursting. This provides mechanistic

  20. Texture developed during deformation of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, M.; Shanta, C.; Asim, T.; Sushil, M.

    2015-04-01

    Automotive industry is currently focusing on using advanced high strength steels (AHSS) due to its high strength and formability for closure applications. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel is promising material for this application among other AHSS. The present work is focused on the microstructure development during deformation of TRIP steel sheets. To mimic complex strain path condition during forming of automotive body, Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests were conducted and samples were deformed in servo hydraulic press to find the different strain path. FEM Simulations were done to predict different strain path diagrams and compared with experimental results. There is a significant difference between experimental and simulation results as the existing material models are not applicable for TRIP steels. Micro texture studies were performed on the samples using EBSD and X-RD techniques. It was observed that austenite is transformed to martensite and texture developed during deformation had strong impact on limit strain and strain path.

  1. Recent developments in plastic optical fiber components for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, James R.; Jennings, Kurt L.; Lynn, Mark A.; Steele, Robert E.

    1993-02-01

    The majority of production applications using plastic optical fiber (POF) have been for illumination applications. These applications continue to be refined and new illumination applications continue to be introduced. Point-to-point data communication applications of POF are beginning to appear in production vehicles. New developments in connection systems and networking components are occurring rapidly. This paper discusses recently developed components for illumination and data communications. The illumination components were designed for three different applications: lamp monitoring, keyhole illumination, and PRNDL indication (gear shift). Components for data communications include two connection systems and two passive stars designed for networking. The two connections systems are a 16 electrical/1 optical system for point-to-point links and a 5 electrical/2 optical for two-way optical communications. The two stars are a 16 node star and 7 node star. Performance characteristics and design advantages are described for all components.

  2. Evolution, development, and plasticity of the human brain: from molecules to bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka eHrvoj-Mihic

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroanatomical, molecular, and paleontological evidence is examined in light of human brain evolution. The brain of extant humans differs from the brains of other primates in its overall size and organization, and differences in size and organization of specific cortical areas and subcortical structures implicated into complex cognition and social and emotional processing. The human brain is also characterized by functional lateralizations, reflecting specializations of the cerebral hemispheres in humans for different types of processing, facilitating fast and reliable communication between neural cells in an enlarged brain. The features observed in the adult brain reflect human-specific patterns of brain development. Compared to the brains of other primates, the human brain takes longer to mature, promoting an extended period for establishing cortical microcircuitry and its modifications. Together, these features may underlie the prolonged period of learning and acquisition of technical and social skills necessary for survival, creating a unique cognitive and behavioral niche typical of our species.The neuroanatomical findings are in concordance with molecular analyses, which suggest a trend toward heterochrony in the expression of genes implicated in different functions. These include synaptogenesis, neuronal maturation and plasticity in humans, mutations in genes implicated in neurite outgrowth and plasticity, and an increased role of regulatory mechanisms, potentially promoting fast modification of neuronal morphologies in response to new computational demands. At the same time, endocranial casts of fossil hominins provide an insight into the timing of the emergence of uniquely human features in the course of evolution. We conclude by proposing several ways of combining comparative neuroanatomy, molecular biology and insights gained from fossil endocasts in future research.

  3. Evolution, development, and plasticity of the human brain: from molecules to bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Bienvenu, Thibault; Stefanacci, Lisa; Muotri, Alysson R; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2013-10-30

    Neuroanatomical, molecular, and paleontological evidence is examined in light of human brain evolution. The brain of extant humans differs from the brains of other primates in its overall size and organization, and differences in size and organization of specific cortical areas and subcortical structures implicated into complex cognition and social and emotional processing. The human brain is also characterized by functional lateralizations, reflecting specializations of the cerebral hemispheres in humans for different types of processing, facilitating fast and reliable communication between neural cells in an enlarged brain. The features observed in the adult brain reflect human-specific patterns of brain development. Compared to the brains of other primates, the human brain takes longer to mature, promoting an extended period for establishing cortical microcircuitry and its modifications. Together, these features may underlie the prolonged period of learning and acquisition of technical and social skills necessary for survival, creating a unique cognitive and behavioral niche typical of our species. The neuroanatomical findings are in concordance with molecular analyses, which suggest a trend toward heterochrony in the expression of genes implicated in different functions. These include synaptogenesis, neuronal maturation, and plasticity in humans, mutations in genes implicated in neurite outgrowth and plasticity, and an increased role of regulatory mechanisms, potentially promoting fast modification of neuronal morphologies in response to new computational demands. At the same time, endocranial casts of fossil hominins provide an insight into the timing of the emergence of uniquely human features in the course of evolution. We conclude by proposing several ways of combining comparative neuroanatomy, molecular biology and insights gained from fossil endocasts in future research.

  4. Luoyutong Treatment Promotes Functional Recovery and Neuronal Plasticity after Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-qun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luoyutong (LYT capsule has been used to treat cerebrovascular diseases clinically in China and is now patented and approved by the State Food and Drug Administration. In this retrospective validation study we investigated the ability of LYT to protect against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. Capsule containing LYT (high dose and medium dose as treatment group and Citicoline Sodium as positive control treatment group were administered daily to rats 30 min after reperfusion. Treatment was continued for either 3 days or 14 days. A saline solution was administered to control animals. Behavior tests were performed after 3 and 14 days of treatment. Our findings revealed that LYT treatment improved the neurological outcome, decreased cerebral infarction volume, and reduced apoptosis. Additionally, LYT improved neural plasticity, as the expression of synaptophysin, microtubule associated protein, and myelin basic protein was upregulated by LYT treatment, while neurofilament 200 expression was reduced. Moreover, levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor and basic fibroblast growth factor were increased. Our results suggest that LYT treatment may protect against ischemic injury and improve neural plasticity.

  5. Development of Biodegradable Plastic as Mango Fruit Bag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M Tuates jr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plastics have achieved a dominant position in agriculture because of their transparency, lightness in weight, impermeability to water and their resistance to microbial attack. It is use as food and fruits packaging, fruit bag, food container, seedling bag, mulching film, protective for greenhouse, dryer shed and among others. However, this generates higher quantity of wastes that are difficult to dispose by farmers. The plastic residues remain on the soil for some years as large pieces and they are impediment to plant growth and also a potential hazard to animals if the land is subsequently put down to grass. To address these problems, the project aim to develop and evaluate the biodegradable film for mango fruit bag during development. Cassava starch and polybutylene succinate (PBS was used in the development biodegradable film. The PBS and starch was melt-blended in a twin-screw extruder and then blown into film extrusion machine. The physic-chemical-mechanical properties of biodegradable fruit bag were done following standard methods of test. Field testing of fruit bag was also conducted to evaluate its durability and efficiency field condition.  The PHilMech-FiC fruit bag is made of biodegradable material measuring 6 x 8 inches with a thickness of 150 microns. The tensile strength is within the range of LDPE while the elongation is within the range of HDPE. However, it has higher density, thickness swelling and absorbed more water. It is projected that after thirty six (36 weeks, the film will be totally degraded. Results of field testing shows that the quality of harvested fruits using PHilMech-FiC biodegradable fruit bag in terms of percent marketable, non-marketable and export, peel color at ripe stage, flesh color, TSS, oBrix, percent edible portion is comparable with the existing bagging materials such as Chinese brown paper bag  and old newspaper.  

  6. A synaptically controlled, associative signal for Hebbian plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, J C; Johnston, D

    1997-01-10

    The role of back-propagating dendritic action potentials in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was investigated in CA1 neurons by means of dendritic patch recordings and simultaneous calcium imaging. Pairing of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) with back-propagating action potentials resulted in an amplification of dendritic action potentials and evoked calcium influx near the site of synaptic input. This pairing also induced a robust LTP, which was reduced when EPSPs were paired with non-back-propagating action potentials or when stimuli were unpaired. Action potentials thus provide a synaptically controlled, associative signal to the dendrites for Hebbian modifications of synaptic strength.

  7. Plasticity of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons mediating autonomic dysreflexia following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M Ramer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI triggers profound changes in visceral and somatic targets of sensory neurons below the level of injury. Despite this, little is known about the influence of injury to the spinal cord on sensory ganglia. One of the defining characteristics of sensory neurons is the size of their cell body: for example, nociceptors are smaller in size than mechanoreceptors or proprioceptors. In these experiments, we first used a comprehensive immunohistochemical approach to characterize the size distribution of sensory neurons after high- and low-thoracic SCI. Male Wistar rats (300g received a spinal cord transection (T3 or T10 or sham injury. At 30 days post-injury, dorsal root ganglia (DRGs and spinal cords were harvested and analyzed immunohistochemically. In a wide survey of primary afferents, only those expressing the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1 exhibited somal hypertrophy after T3 SCI. Hypertrophy only occurred caudal to SCI and was pronounced in ganglia far distal to SCI (i.e., in L4-S1 DRGs. Injury-induced hypertrophy was accompanied by a small expansion of central territory in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and by evidence of TRPV1 upregulation. Importantly, hypertrophy of TRPV1-positive neurons was modest after T10 SCI. Given the specific effects of T3 SCI on TRPV1-positive afferents, we hypothesized that these afferents contribute to autonomic dysreflexia (AD. Rats with T3 SCI received vehicle or capsaicin via intrathecal injection at 2 or 28 days post-SCI; at 30 days, AD was assessed by recording intra-arterial blood pressure during colo-rectal distension. In both groups of capsaicin-treated animals, the severity of AD was dramatically reduced. While AD is multi-factorial in origin, TRPV1-positive afferents are clearly involved in AD elicited by colo-rectal distension. These findings implicate TRPV1-positive afferents in the initiation of AD and suggest that TRPV1 may be a therapeutic target for amelioration or prevention of AD

  8. Neuronal plasticity and astrocytic reaction in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Brooksbank, B W; Balázs, R

    1990-01-01

    Proteins relatively enriched in neurons (neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and D3-protein) or in glia (glutamine synthetase, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100) were measured by quantitative immunochemical methods in autopsy samples of the cerebral cortex of subjects with Alzheimer...... disease (AD) and adults with Down syndrome (DS), the latter also presenting manifest signs of Alzheimer type of neuropathology. The trend of changes was similar in AD and DS, but more marked in the latter. The biochemical make-up of astrocytes was differentially affected: in both the frontal and DS...

  9. Studying neuronal biomechanics and its role in CNS development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franze, Kristian; Svoboda, Hanno; da F. Costa, Luciano; Guck, Jochen; Holt, Christine

    2013-03-01

    During the development of the nervous system, neurons migrate and grow over great distances. Currently, our understanding of nervous tissue development is, in large part, based on studies of biochemical signaling. Despite the fact that forces are involved in any kind of cell motion, mechanical aspects have so far rarely been considered. Here we used deformable cell culture substrates, traction force microscopy and calcium imaging to investigate how neurons probe and respond to their mechanical environment. While the growth rate of retinal ganglion cell axons was increased on stiffer substrates, their tendency to grow in bundles, which they show in vivo, was significantly enhanced on more compliant substrates. Moreover, if grown on substrates incorporating linear stiffness gradients, neuronal axons were repelled by stiff substrates. Mechanosensing involved the application of forces driven by the interaction of actin and myosin II, and the activation of stretch-activated ion channels leading to calcium influxes into the cells. Applying a modified atomic force microscopy techniquein vivo, we found mechanical gradients in developing brain tissue along which neurons grow. The application of chondroitin sulfate, which is a major extracellular matrix component in the developing brain, changed tissue mechanics and disrupted axonal pathfinding. Hence, our data suggest that neuronal growth is not only guided by chemical signals - as it is currently assumed - but also by the nervous tissue's mechanical properties.

  10. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Impact on Neuronal Survival and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Regensburger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD and other synucleinopathies, chronic neurodegeneration occurs within different areas of the central nervous system leading to progressive motor and nonmotor symptoms. The symptomatic treatment options that are currently available do not slow or halt disease progression. This highlights the need of a better understanding of disease mechanisms and disease models. The generation of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampus and in the subventricular zone/olfactory bulb system is affected by many different regulators and possibly involved in memory processing, depression, and olfaction, symptoms which commonly occur in PD. The pathology of the adult neurogenic niches in human PD patients is still mostly elusive, but different preclinical models have shown profound alterations of adult neurogenesis. Alterations in stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival as well as neurite outgrowth and spine formation have been related to different aspects in PD pathogenesis. Therefore, neurogenesis in the adult brain provides an ideal model to study disease mechanisms and compounds. In addition, adult newborn neurons have been proposed as a source of endogenous repair. Herein, we review current knowledge about the adult neurogenic niches in PD and highlight areas of future research.

  11. Role of DOR in neuronal plasticity changes promoted by food-seeking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Samantha; Mendonça-Netto, Sueli; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2016-04-21

    Several lines of evidence support that food overconsumption may be related to the role of the endogenous opioid system in the control of food palatability. The opioid system, and particularly the delta opioid receptor (DOR), plays a crucial role in the regulation of food rewarding properties. In our study, we used operant conditioning maintained by chocolate-flavoured pellets to investigate the role of DOR in the motivation for palatable food and the structural plasticity changes promoted by this behaviour. For this purpose, we evaluated the specific role of this receptor in the behavioural and neuroplastic changes induced by palatable food in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HCP) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in constitutive knockout (KO) mice deficient in DOR. Mutant mice and their wild-type littermates were trained to obtain chocolate-flavoured pellets on fixed ratio 1 (FR1), FR5 and progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. No significant differences between genotypes were revealed on operant behaviour acquisition in FR1. DOR knockout mice displayed lower number of active lever-presses than wild-type mice on FR5, and a similar decrease was revealed in DOR KO mice in the breaking point during the PR. This operant training to obtain palatable food increased dendritic spine density in the PFC, HCP and NAc shell of wild-type, but these plasticity changes were abolished in DOR KO mice. Our results support the hypothesis that DOR regulates the reinforcing effects and motivation for palatable food through neuroplastic changes in specific brain reward areas.

  12. Anatomic and Molecular Development of Corticostriatal Projection Neurons in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohur, U. Shivraj; Padmanabhan, Hari K.; Kotchetkov, Ivan S.; Menezes, Joao R.L.; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Corticostriatal projection neurons (CStrPN) project from the neocortex to ipsilateral and contralateral striata to control and coordinate motor programs and movement. They are clinically important as the predominant cortical population that degenerates in Huntington's disease and corticobasal ganglionic degeneration, and their injury contributes to multiple forms of cerebral palsy. Together with their well-studied functions in motor control, these clinical connections make them a functionally, behaviorally, and clinically important population of neocortical neurons. Little is known about their development. “Intratelencephalic” CStrPN (CStrPNi), projecting to the contralateral striatum, with their axons fully within the telencephalon (intratelencephalic), are a major population of CStrPN. CStrPNi are of particular interest developmentally because they share hodological and axon guidance characteristics of both callosal projection neurons (CPN) and corticofugal projection neurons (CFuPN); CStrPNi send axons contralaterally before descending into the contralateral striatum. The relationship of CStrPNi development to that of broader CPN and CFuPN populations remains unclear; evidence suggests that CStrPNi might be evolutionary “hybrids” between CFuPN and deep layer CPN—in a sense “chimeric” with both callosal and corticofugal features. Here, we investigated the development of CStrPNi in mice—their birth, maturation, projections, and expression of molecular developmental controls over projection neuron subtype identity. PMID:23118198

  13. The wiring of developing sensory circuits - from patterned spontaneous activity to mechanisms of synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Helen Leighton

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately process incoming sensory stimuli, neurons must be organized into functional networks, with both genetic and environmental factors influencing the precise arrangement of connections between cells. Teasing apart the relative contributions of molecular guidance cues, spontaneous activity and visual experience during this maturation is on-going. During development of the sensory system, the first, rough organization of connections is created by molecular factors. These connections are then modulated by the intrinsically generated activity of neurons, even before the senses have become operational. Spontaneous waves of depolarisations sweep across the nervous system, placing them in a prime position to strengthen correct connections and weaken others, shaping synapses into a useful network. A large body of work now supports the idea that, rather than being a mere side-effect of the system, spontaneous activity actually contains information which readies the nervous system so that, as soon as the senses become active, sensory information can be utilized by the animal. An example is the neonatal mouse. As soon as the eyelids first open, neurons in the cortex respond to visual information without the animal having previously encountered structured sensory input (Cang et al., 2005a; Ko et al., 2013; Rochefort et al., 2011; Zhang et al., 2012. In vivo imaging techniques have advanced considerably, allowing observation of the natural activity in the brain of living animals down to the level of the individual synapse. New (optogenetic methods make it possible to subtly modulate the spatio-temporal properties of activity, aiding our understanding of how these characteristics relate to the function of spontaneous activity. Such experiments have had a huge impact on our knowledge by permitting direct testing of ideas about the plasticity mechanisms at play in the intact system, opening up a provocative range of fresh questions. Here, we

  14. The Chemorepulsive Protein Semaphorin 3A and Perineuronal Net-Mediated Plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, F; Kwok, J C F; Fawcett, J W; Vo, T T; Carulli, D; Verhaagen, J

    2016-01-01

    During postnatal development, closure of critical periods coincides with the appearance of extracellular matrix structures, called perineuronal nets (PNN), around various neuronal populations throughout the brain. The absence or presence of PNN strongly correlates with neuronal plasticity. It is not

  15. Role of nitric oxide in neuronal plasticity in the mammal central and peripheral nervous systems

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    La lesión de un nervio periférico induce la sobre-expresión de la enzima óxido nítrico sintasa (Nos) en el nervio afectado. Este tipo de lesión, así como ciertas enfermedades neurodegenerativas, cursan con una disminución de la densidad sínáptica central junto con la expresión de novo y/o sobre-expresión de NOS neuronal (nNOS) en las motoneuronas. Dado que el óxido nítrico (NO) participa en numerosos fenómenos de plasticidad sináptica, se podría sugerir un papel del NO en procesos de El princ...

  16. Interplay of two signals in a neuron with heterogeneous synaptic short-term plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eDroste

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Signals from different sensory modalities may converge on a single neuron. We study theoretically a setup in which one signal is transmitted via facilitating synapses (F signal and another via depressing synapses (D signal. When both signals are present, the postsynaptic cell preferentially encodes information about slow components of the F signal and fast components of the D signal, whereas for a single signal, transmission is broadband. We also show that, in the fluctuation-driven regime, the rate of information transmission may be increased through stochastic resonance. Remarkably, the role of the beneficial noise is played by another signal, which is itself represented in the spike train of the postsynaptic cell.

  17. Acute Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity of Pyramidal Neurons by Activin in Adult Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka eHasegawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Activin A is known as a neuroprotective factor produced upon acute excitotoxic injury of the hippocampus (in pathological states. We attempt to reveal the role of activin as a neuromodulator in the adult male hippocampus under physiological conditions (in healthy states, which remains largely unknown. We showed endogenous/basal expression of activin in the hippocampal neurons. Localization of activin receptors in dendritic spines (= postsynapses was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy. The incubation of hippocampal acute slices with activin A (10 ng/mL, 0.4 nM for 2 h altered the density and morphology of spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The total spine density increased by 1.2-fold upon activin treatments. Activin selectively increased the density of large-head spines, without affecting middle-head and small-head spines. Blocking of Erk/MAPK, PKA or PKC prevented the activin-induced spinogenesis by reducing the density of large-head spines, independent of Smad-induced gene transcription which usually takes more than several hours. Incubation of acute slices with activin for 2 h induced the moderate early long-term potentiation (moderate LTP upon weak theta burst stimuli. This moderate LTP induction was blocked by follistatin, MAPK inhibitor (PD98059 and inhibitor of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors (Ro25-6981. It should be noted that the weak theta burst stimuli alone cannot induce moderate LTP. These results suggest that MAPK-induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptors (including NR2B may play an important role for activin-induced moderate LTP. Taken together, the current results reveal interesting physiological roles of endogenous activin as a synaptic modulator in the adult hippocampus.

  18. Bidirectional regulation of eEF2 phosphorylation controls synaptic plasticity by decoding neuronal activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamphill, Patrick K; Farah, Carole A; Anadolu, Mina N; Hoque, Sanjida; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-03-11

    At the sensory-motor neuron synapse of Aplysia, either spaced or continuous (massed) exposure to serotonin (5-HT) induces a form of intermediate-term facilitation (ITF) that requires new protein synthesis but not gene transcription. However, spaced and massed ITF use distinct molecular mechanisms to maintain increased synaptic strength. Synapses activated by spaced applications of 5-HT generate an ITF that depends on persistent protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas an ITF produced by massed 5-HT depends on persistent protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In this study, we demonstrate that eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which catalyzes the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome during protein synthesis, acts as a biochemical sensor that is tuned to the pattern of neuronal stimulation. Specifically, we find that massed training leads to a PKC-dependent increase in phosphorylation of eEF2, whereas spaced training results in a PKA-dependent decrease in phosphorylation of eEF2. Importantly, by using either pharmacological or dominant-negative strategies to inhibit eEF2 kinase (eEF2K), we were able to block massed 5-HT-dependent increases in eEF2 phosphorylation and subsequent PKC-dependent ITF. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of eEF2K during the longer period of time required for spaced training was sufficient to reduce eEF2 phosphorylation and induce ITF. Finally, we find that the massed 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength requires translation elongation, but not translation initiation, whereas the spaced 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength is partially dependent on translation initiation. Thus, bidirectional regulation of eEF2 is critical for decoding distinct activity patterns at synapses by activating distinct modes of translation regulation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354403-15$15.00/0.

  19. Interactions between mitochondria and the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) regulate neuronal structural and functional plasticity and metaplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Janaina; Haas, Kurt

    2015-08-15

    The classical view of mitochondria as housekeeping organelles acting in the background to simply maintain cellular energy demands has been challenged by mounting evidence of their direct and active participation in synaptic plasticity in neurons. Time-lapse imaging has revealed that mitochondria are motile in dendrites, with their localization and fusion and fission events regulated by synaptic activity. The positioning of mitochondria directly influences function of nearby synapses through multiple pathways including control over local concentrations of ATP, Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have also shown that mitochondrial protein cascades, classically associated with apoptosis, are involved in neural plasticity in healthy cells. These findings link mitochondria to the plasticity- and metaplasticity-associated activity-dependent transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), further repositioning mitochondria as potential command centres for regulation of synaptic plasticity. Intriguingly, MEF2 and mitochondrial functions appear to be intricately intertwined, as MEF2 is a target of mitochondrial apoptotic caspases and, in turn, MEF2 regulates mitochondrial genome transcription essential for production of superoxidase and hydrogen peroxidase. Here, we review evidence supporting mitochondria as central organelles controlling the spatiotemporal expression of neuronal plasticity, and attempt to disentangle the MEF2-mitochondria relationship mediating these functions. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  20. Present and future development in plastics from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Biobased plastics have experienced fast growth in the past decade thanks to the public concerns over the environment, climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels. This perspective provides an overview of the current global market of biobased plastics, their material properties, technical substi

  1. Present and future development in plastics from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Biobased plastics have experienced fast growth in the past decade thanks to the public concerns over the environment, climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels. This perspective provides an overview of the current global market of biobased plastics, their material properties, technical

  2. Regulatory gene networks that shape the development of adaptive phenotypic plasticity in a cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ralf F; Li, Yuanhao; Meyer, Axel; Gunter, Helen M

    2014-09-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of organisms with a given genotype to develop different phenotypes according to environmental stimuli, resulting in individuals that are better adapted to local conditions. In spite of their ecological importance, the developmental regulatory networks underlying plastic phenotypes often remain uncharacterized. We examined the regulatory basis of diet-induced plasticity in the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ) of the cichlid fish Astatoreochromis alluaudi, a model species in the study of adaptive plasticity. Through raising juvenile A. alluaudi on either a hard or soft diet (hard-shelled or pulverized snails) for between 1 and 8 months, we gained insight into the temporal regulation of 19 previously identified candidate genes during the early stages of plasticity development. Plasticity in LPJ morphology was first detected between 3 and 5 months of diet treatment. The candidate genes, belonging to various functional categories, displayed dynamic expression patterns that consistently preceded the onset of morphological divergence and putatively contribute to the initiation of the plastic phenotypes. Within functional categories, we observed striking co-expression, and transcription factor binding site analysis was used to examine the prospective basis of their coregulation. We propose a regulatory network of LPJ plasticity in cichlids, presenting evidence for regulatory crosstalk between bone and muscle tissues, which putatively facilitates the development of this highly integrated trait. Through incorporating a developmental time-course into a phenotypic plasticity study, we have identified an interconnected, environmentally responsive regulatory network that shapes the development of plasticity in a key innovation of East African cichlids.

  3. Cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jean-Luc; Finsterwald, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Ample evidence supports a role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the survival and differentiation of selective populations of neurons in the peripheral and central nervous systems. In addition to its trophic actions, BDNF exerts acute effects on synaptic transmission and plasticity. In particular, BDNF enhances excitatory synaptic transmission through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In this regard, BDNF enhances glutamate release, the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), NMDA receptor activity and the phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits. Our recent studies revealed a novel cooperative interaction between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of dendritic development. Indeed, we found that the effects of BDNF on dendritic growth of cortical neurons require both the stimulation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation by BDNF and the activation of the CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by glutamate. Together, these studies highlight the importance of the cooperation between BDNF and glutamate in the regulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal development.

  4. Artificial neuron synapse transistor based on silicon nanomembrane on plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minjie; Huang, Gaoshan; Feng, Ping; Guo, Qinglei; Shao, Feng; Tian, Ziao; Li, Gongjin; Wan, Qing; Mei, Yongfeng

    2017-06-01

    Silicon nanomembrane (SiNM) transistors gated by chitosan membrane were fabricated on plastic substrate to mimic synapse behaviors. The device has both a bottom proton gate (BG) and multiple side gates (SG). Electrical transfer properties of BG show hysteresis curves different from those of typical SiO2 gate dielectric. Synaptic behaviors and functions by linear accumulation and release of protons have been mimicked on this device: excitatory post-synaptic current (EPSC) and paired pulse facilitation behavior of biological synapses were mimicked and the paired-pulse facilitation index could be effectively tuned by the spike interval applied on the BG. Synaptic behaviors and functions, including short-term memory and long-term memory, were also experimentally demonstrated in BG mode. Meanwhile, spiking logic operation and logic modulation were realized in SG mode. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51322201), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120071110025), and Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (No. 14JC1400200).

  5. The Role of p38 MAPK and Its Substrates in Neuronal Plasticity and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. L. Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant amount of evidence suggests that the p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling cascade plays a crucial role in synaptic plasticity and in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review we will discuss the cellular localisation and activation of p38 MAPK and the recent advances on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of its substrates: MAPKAPK 2 (MK2 and tau protein. In particular we will focus our attention on the understanding of the p38 MAPK-MK2 and p38 MAPK-tau activation axis in controlling neuroinflammation, actin remodelling and tau hyperphosphorylation, processes that are thought to be involved in normal ageing as well as in neurodegenerative diseases. We will also give some insight into how elucidating the precise role of p38 MAPK-MK2 and p38 MAPK-tau signalling cascades may help to identify novel therapeutic targets to slow down the symptoms observed in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  6. Development of Improved Chemicals and Plastics from Oilseeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Patricia A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2006-11-09

    The overall objective of this program was to develop technology that can be applied to the production of various chemicals and plastics from seed oils. This research and development program included activities in all four key barrier areas identified in the US DOE Technology Roadmap for Plant/Crop-Based Renewable Resources, namely Plant Science, Production, Processing, and Utilization. Participants in the project included The Dow Chemical Company, Castor Oil, Inc., and the USDA Western Regional Research Center (WRRC). The objective of this production task was to evaluate and develop metathesis catalyst technology as a means of utilizing seed oils as feedstocks for the chemical industry. Specifically, ethenolysis of fatty acid methyl esters, FAME’s, leads to functionalized derivatives. These serve as valuable starting points for materials which cascade into a variety of applications, many of which have a current market presence. The relatively recent discovery and commercial availability of a family of metathesis catalysts which are tolerant of polar functional groups and the acquisition and implementation of high throughput synthesis and screening infrastructure led to a prime opportunity to investigate this project area.

  7. Aberrant development and plasticity of excitatory visual cortical networks in the absence of cpg15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Nathalie; Leslie, Jennifer H; Trowbridge, Sara K; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; Fagiolini, Michela

    2014-03-05

    During development, experience plays a crucial role in sculpting neuronal connections. Patterned neural activity guides formation of functional neural circuits through the selective stabilization of some synapses and the pruning of others. Activity-regulated factors are fundamental to this process, but their roles in synapse stabilization and maturation is still poorly understood. CPG15, encoded by the activity-regulated gene candidate plasticity gene 15, is a small, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked, extracellular protein that promotes synapse stabilization. Here we show that global knock-out of cpg15 results in abnormal postnatal development of the excitatory network in visual cortex and an associated disruption in development of visual receptive field properties. In addition, whereas repeated stimulation induced potentiation and depression in wild-type mice, the depression was slower in cpg15 knock-out mice, suggesting impairment in short-term depression-like mechanisms. These findings establish the requirement for cpg15 in activity-dependent development of the visual system and demonstrate the importance of timely excitatory network development for normal visual function.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SMALL INJECTION MOULDING MACHINE FOR FORMING SMALL PLASTIC ARTICLES FOR SMALL-SCALE INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    OYETUNJI, A.

    2010-01-01

    Development of small injection moulding machine for forming small plastic articles in small-scale industries was studied. This work which entailed design, construction and test small injection moulding machine that was capable of forming small plastic articles by injecting molten resins into a closed, cooled mould, where it solidifies to give the desired products was developed. The machine was designed and constructed to work as a prototype for producing very small plastic components. Design ...

  9. Intrinsic plasticity induced by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors via enhancement of high-threshold KV currents in sound localizing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, W R; Lu, Y

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic plasticity has emerged as an important mechanism regulating neuronal excitability and output under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we report a novel form of intrinsic plasticity. Using perforated patch clamp recordings, we examined the modulatory effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) on voltage-gated potassium (KV) currents and the firing properties of neurons in the chicken nucleus laminaris (NL), the first central auditory station where interaural time cues are analyzed for sound localization. We found that activation of mGluR II by synthetic agonists resulted in a selective increase of the high-threshold KV currents. More importantly, synaptically released glutamate (with reuptake blocked) also enhanced the high-threshold KV currents. The enhancement was frequency-coding region dependent, being more pronounced in low-frequency neurons compared to middle- and high-frequency neurons. The intracellular mechanism involved the Gβγ signaling pathway associated with phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The modulation strengthened membrane outward rectification, sharpened action potentials, and improved the ability of NL neurons to follow high-frequency inputs. These data suggest that mGluR II provides a feedforward modulatory mechanism that may regulate temporal processing under the condition of heightened synaptic inputs.

  10. Mirror Neurons, the Development of Empathy, and Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of work in media education, religious education, concerns about digital cultures' impact on human relationality, and the possible role that mirror neurons might play in the development of empathy. Digital story telling--particularly as embodied in the work of the Center for Digital Storytelling…

  11. Mirror Neurons, the Development of Empathy, and Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of work in media education, religious education, concerns about digital cultures' impact on human relationality, and the possible role that mirror neurons might play in the development of empathy. Digital story telling--particularly as embodied in the work of the Center for Digital Storytelling…

  12. Protective Effect of Antioxidants on Neuronal Dysfunction and Plasticity in Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Panneerselvam, Archana S.; Purushottam, Meera; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterised by movement disorders, cognitive impairments, and psychiatric problems. The abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in neurons upon CAG mutations in the HTT gene have been hypothesized as the contributing factors of neurodegeneration in HD. The potential use of antioxidants against free radical toxicity has been an emerging field in the management of ageing and many neurodegenerative disorders. Neural stem cells derived adult neurogenesis represents the regenerative capacity of the adult brain. The process of adult neurogenesis has been implicated in the cognitive functions of the brain and is highly modulated positively by different factors including antioxidants. The supportive role of antioxidants to reduce the severity of HD via promoting the functional neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the pathological adult brain has great promise. This review comprehends the recent studies describing the therapeutic roles of antioxidants in HD and other neurologic disorders and highlights the scope of using antioxidants to promote adult neurogenesis in HD. It also advocates a new line of research to delineate the mechanisms by which antioxidants promote adult neurogenesis in HD. PMID:28168008

  13. Protective Effect of Antioxidants on Neuronal Dysfunction and Plasticity in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Panneerselvam, Archana S; Purushottam, Meera; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Jain, Sanjeev; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Guillemin, Gilles J; Kandasamy, Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterised by movement disorders, cognitive impairments, and psychiatric problems. The abnormal generation of reactive oxygen species and the resulting oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage in neurons upon CAG mutations in the HTT gene have been hypothesized as the contributing factors of neurodegeneration in HD. The potential use of antioxidants against free radical toxicity has been an emerging field in the management of ageing and many neurodegenerative disorders. Neural stem cells derived adult neurogenesis represents the regenerative capacity of the adult brain. The process of adult neurogenesis has been implicated in the cognitive functions of the brain and is highly modulated positively by different factors including antioxidants. The supportive role of antioxidants to reduce the severity of HD via promoting the functional neurogenesis and neuroprotection in the pathological adult brain has great promise. This review comprehends the recent studies describing the therapeutic roles of antioxidants in HD and other neurologic disorders and highlights the scope of using antioxidants to promote adult neurogenesis in HD. It also advocates a new line of research to delineate the mechanisms by which antioxidants promote adult neurogenesis in HD.

  14. Trophic actions of GABA on neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-06-01

    During brain development, transmitter-gated receptors are operative before synapse formation, suggesting that their action is not restricted to synaptic transmission. GABA, which is the principal excitatory transmitter in the developing brain, acts as an epigenetic factor to control processes including cell proliferation, neuroblast migration and dendritic maturation. These effects appear to be mediated through a paracrine, diffuse, non-synaptic mode of action that precedes the more focused, rapid mode of operation characteristic of synaptic connections. This sequential operation implies that GABA is used as an informative agent but in a unique context at an early developmental stage. This sequence also implies that by altering these effects, drugs acting on the GABA system could be pathogenic during pregnancy.

  15. Development of Ca2+ hotspots between Lymnaea neurons during synaptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhong-Ping; Grigoriev, Nikita; Munno, David; Lukowiak, Ken; MacVicar, Brian A; Goldberg, Jeffrey I; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-02-15

    Calcium (Ca2+) channel clustering at specific presynaptic sites is a hallmark of mature synapses. However, the spatial distribution patterns of Ca2+ channels at newly formed synapses have not yet been demonstrated. Similarly, it is unclear whether Ca2+ 'hotspots' often observed at the presynaptic sites are indeed target cell contact specific and represent a specialized mechanism by which Ca2+ channels are targeted to select synaptic sites. Utilizing both soma-soma paired (synapsed) and single neurons from the mollusk Lymnaea, we have tested the hypothesis that differential gradients of voltage-dependent Ca2+ signals develop in presynaptic neuron at its contact point with the postsynaptic neuron; and that these Ca2+ hotspots are target cell contact specific. Fura-2 imaging, or two-photon laser scanning microscopy of Calcium Green, was coupled with electrophysiological techniques to demonstrate that voltage-induced Ca2+ gradients (hotspots) develop in the presynaptic cell at its contact point with the postsynaptic neuron, but not in unpaired single cells. The incidence of Ca2+ hotspots coincided with the appearance of synaptic transmission between the paired cells, and these gradients were target cell contact specific. In contrast, the voltage-induced Ca2+ signal in unpaired neurons was uniformly distributed throughout the somata; a similar pattern of Ca2+ gradient was observed in the presynaptic neuron when it was soma-soma paired with a non-synaptic partner cell. Moreover, voltage clamp recording techniques, in conjunction with a fast, optical differential perfusion system, were used to demonstrate that the total whole-cell Ca2+ (or Ba2+) current density in single and paired cells was not significantly different. However, the amplitude of Ba2+ current was significantly higher in the presynaptic cell at its contact side with the postsynaptic neurons, compared with non-contacted regions. In summary, this study demonstrates that voltage-induced Ca2+ hotspots develop

  16. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Crack development through plastic shrinkage in fresh concretes and mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguanell García, M.

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The rate of water evaporation in the exposed surfaces plays an important part in the development of cracks in fresh concretes and mortars before hardening is completed. This rate of evaporation depends on the drying power of the wind sweeping such surfaces as a function of the relative humidity, temperature and speed of the air. After many studies and research work on the subject of plastic cracking, the following axiom has been established: "Plastic shrinkage and cracking of concrete surfaces take place when water evaporates from the surface quicker than it can be replaced through exudation". Once the value of weather parameters are known, the extent of the risk of crack development can be known and preventive steps taken to overcome such risk. Obviously, such steps are all oriented to reducing or stopping evaporation and go from covering surfaces with wet sackcloth or plastic foil, through sprinkling water mists or lowering the concrete temperature, to using film-forming curing products. Another additional measure can be the addition of polypropelene fibers to the concrete while in the mixer, at the rate of 0.9 kg fiber to 1 m3 of concrete.

    En la formación de grietas en morteros y hormigones frescos, antes de finalizar el fraguado, tiene una primordial importancia la velocidad de evaporación del agua de las superficies expuestas al exterior, velocidad que depende del poder desecante de los vientos que barren estas superficies y que está en función de la humedad relativa del aire, de su temperatura y de su velocidad. Después de los múltiples estudios e investigaciones sobre este tema de la formación de las grietas plásticas, se ha llegado a establecer el siguiente axioma: "La retracción plástica y las grietas se producen, en las superficies del hormigón, cuando el agua se evapora de ellas más rápidamente que la que puede ser reemplazada por exudación." Conociendo el valor de los parámetros meteorol

  18. Toxic effects of lead on neuronal development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, R. (Denver Veterans Administration Medical Center, CO (USA)); Olson, L. (Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver (USA)); Hoffer, B.J. (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of lead on the development of the nervous system are of immediate concern to human health. While it is clear that lead can affect neuronal development at levels of exposure within the range found in the environment, the particular mechanism of the disruption is not readily ascertained. The goal of the authors research is to develop a model system in which the effects of lead on central nervous system development can be demonstrated. To study neuronal development in a system that minimizes such difficulties, the authors have grafted discrete brain regions derived from rat fetuses into the anterior chamber of the eye of adult hosts. The brain pieces continue organotypic development in the eye, but are isolated from possible secondary changes due to alterations in the development of the endocrine and other somatic systems because the adult host has these systems already fully developed. Using this system, they have discovered that lead induces a hypernoradrenergic innervation of central nervous system tissue. The increased innervation is observed not only structurally, but also functionally. Since norepinephrine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, this ingrowth may explain the profound slowing of discharge of cerebellar neurons recorded in grafts of lead-treated animals. Studies in other tissues suggest that increased axonal ingrowth may be a general problem of lead intoxication that encompasses many brain areas, as well as peripheral sympathetic systems.

  19. Plastic surgery-myths and realities in developing countries: experience from eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Brijesh; Koirala, Robin; Tripathi, Nalini; Shrestha, Kajan Raj; Adhikary, Buddhinath; Shah, Surendra

    2011-01-01

    B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal, is the only tertiary care referral centre in the eastern region of Nepal. This paper discusses the author's experience of starting a plastic surgery unit in eastern Nepal regarding need and present status of plastic surgery care in Nepal. Methods. We analyzed the data of patients treated in Plastic surgery unit from July 2007 to February 2009. We did evaluation regarding type of patients, procedures, and their outcome. We also evaluated the limitations and their possible solutions to overcome the barriers to establish effective plastic surgical centers in developing countries. Results. Plastic surgery services were started as a unit in general surgery by single plastic surgeon and one general surgery resident on rotation. Total 848 patients were treated for different plastic-surgery-related conditions, which included 307 acute burn patients 541 general plastic surgery patients. Trauma constituted the major bulk 22%, followed by tumors 20%, while aesthetic surgery operations were only 10.1%. Conclusions. In developing countries, aesthetic procedures constitute very small part of plastic surgery interventions and plastic surgery units are primarily required for reconstructive needs for optimum management of patients.

  20. Zbtb20 Defines a Hippocampal Neuronal Identity Through Direct Repression of Genes That Control Projection Neuron Development in the Isocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate...... that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data...

  1. optimization of the development of a plastic recycling machine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    machine and shows that at a speed of 268 rpm the machine functions effectively ... Keywords: recycling machine, plastics-recycling, recyclability/efficiency, throughput/capacity, ...... cycling such as the sorting and cleaning should be efficient so ...

  2. Neuronal activity controls the development of interneurons in the somatosensory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuronal activity in cortical areas regulates neurodevelopment by interacting with defined genetic programs to shape the mature central nervous system. Electrical activity is conveyed to sensory cortical areas via intracortical and thalamocortical neurons, and includes oscillatory patterns that have been measured across cortical regions. OBJECTIVE In this work, we review the most recent findings about how electrical activity shapes the developmental assembly of functional circuitry in the somatosensory cortex, with an emphasis on interneuron maturation and integration. We include studies on the effect of various neurotransmitters and on the influence of thalamocortical afferent activity on circuit development. We additionally reviewed studies describing network activity patterns. METHODS We conducted an extensive literature search using both the PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. The following keywords were used in various iterations: “interneuron”, “somatosensory”, “development”, “activity”, “network patterns”, “thalamocortical”, “NMDA receptor”, “plasticity”. We additionally selected papers known to us from past reading, and those recommended to us by reviewers and members of our lab. RESULTS We reviewed a total of 132 articles that focused on the role of activity in interneuronal migration, maturation, and circuit development, as well as the source of electrical inputs and patterns of cortical activity in the somatosensory cortex. 79 of these papers included in this timely review were written between 2007 and 2016. CONCLUSIONS Neuronal activity shapes the developmental assembly of functional circuitry in the somatosensory cortical interneurons. This activity impacts nearly every aspect of development and acquisition of mature neuronal characteristics, and may contribute to changing phenotypes, altered transmitter expression, and plasticity in the adult. Progressively changing oscillatory network patterns

  3. Mechanisms of GABAergic Homeostatic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wenner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic plasticity ensures that appropriate levels of activity are maintained through compensatory adjustments in synaptic strength and cellular excitability. For instance, excitatory glutamatergic synapses are strengthened following activity blockade and weakened following increases in spiking activity. This form of plasticity has been described in a wide array of networks at several different stages of development, but most work and reviews have focussed on the excitatory inputs of excitatory neurons. Here we review homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic neurons and their synaptic connections. We propose a simplistic model for homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic components of the circuitry (GABAergic synapses onto excitatory neurons, excitatory connections onto GABAergic neurons, cellular excitability of GABAergic neurons: following chronic activity blockade there is a weakening of GABAergic inhibition, and following chronic increases in network activity there is a strengthening of GABAergic inhibition. Previous work on GABAergic homeostatic plasticity supports certain aspects of the model, but it is clear that the model cannot fully account for some results which do not appear to fit any simplistic rule. We consider potential reasons for these discrepancies.

  4. Microglia across the lifespan: from origin to function in brain development, plasticity and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Tuan Leng; Savage, Julie C; Hui, Chin Wai; Bisht, Kanchan; Tremblay, Marie-Ève

    2017-03-15

    Microglia are the only immune cells that permanently reside in the central nervous system (CNS) alongside neurons and other types of glial cells. The past decade has witnessed a revolution in our understanding of their roles during normal physiological conditions. Cutting-edge techniques revealed that these resident immune cells are critical for proper brain development, actively maintain health in the mature brain, and rapidly adapt their function to physiological or pathophysiological needs. In this review, we highlight recent studies on microglial origin (from the embryonic yolk sac) and the factors regulating their differentiation and homeostasis upon brain invasion. Elegant experiments tracking microglia in the CNS allowed studies of their unique roles compared with other types of resident macrophages. Here we review the emerging roles of microglia in brain development, plasticity and cognition, and discuss the implications of the depletion or dysfunction of microglia for our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Immune activation, inflammation and various other conditions resulting in undesirable microglial activity at different stages of life could severely impair learning, memory and other essential cognitive functions. The diversity of microglial phenotypes across the lifespan, between compartments of the CNS, and sexes, as well as their crosstalk with the body and external environment, is also emphasised. Understanding what defines particular microglial phenotypes is of major importance for future development of innovative therapies controlling their effector functions, with consequences for cognition across chronic stress, ageing, neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases.

  5. Shedding of neurexin 3β ectodomain by ADAM10 releases a soluble fragment that affects the development of newborn neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcel, Erika; Palczynska, Magda; Krzisch, Marine; Dimitrov, Mitko; Ulrich, Giorgio; Toni, Nicolas; Fraering, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Neurexins are transmembrane synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in the development and maturation of neuronal synapses. In the present study, we report that Nrxn3β is processed by the metalloproteases ADAM10, ADAM17, and by the intramembrane-cleaving protease γ-secretase, producing secreted neurexin3β (sNrxn3β) and a single intracellular domain (Nrxn3β-ICD). We further completed the full characterization of the sites at which Nrxn3β is processed by these proteases. Supporting the physiological relevance of the Nrxn3β processing, we demonstrate in vivo a significant effect of the secreted shedding product sNrxn3β on the morphological development of adult newborn neurons in the mouse hippocampus. We show that sNrxn3β produced by the cells of the dentate gyrus increases the spine density of newborn neurons whereas sNrxn3β produced by the newborn neuron itself affects the number of its mossy fiber terminal extensions. These results support a pivotal role of sNrxn3β in plasticity and network remodeling during neuronal development. PMID:27991559

  6. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  7. Neuronal plasticity of human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells to the dopaminergic cell type compared with human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Indrani; Mishra, Swati; Mohanty, Lipsa; Pulikkot, Sunitha; Joshi, Preeti G

    2011-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) derived from Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord are increasingly gaining prominence as substitutes for bone marrow (BM) MSC. While MSC isolated from different tissue sources may share common mesenchymal properties, the difference in their plasticity to individual lineages is ill-defined. Thus the focus of this study was to estimate the neuronal plasticity of WJ MSC to the dopaminergic (DA) cell type in comparison with BM MSC. For neuronal differentiation, MSC were exposed to developmentally relevant cues for midbrain DA neurons: sonic hedgehog (SHH) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8), along with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Naive MSC from both sources constitutively expressed neuronal markers. Flow cytometry data revealed that the control WJ MSC shared a signature similar to BM MSC for early neuronal markers (nestin, musashi12 and A2B5) and DA-specific markers [tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and Nuclear Receptor related protein 1 (Nurr1) but differed for mature neuronal proteins [β-tubulin III and microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2ab)]. Similar populations of cells in both sources of MSC were positive for the SHH receptors [patched (PTCH) and smoothened (SMO)]. In induced BM and WJ MSC, real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed similar levels of DA-related transcription factors Nurr1 and Engrailed (En) 1. Immunocytochemical and flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in mature neuronal marker Map2ab. Kv4.2, a K(+) channel marker, was observed only in the induced MSC. Induced MSC also expressed several DA-specific markers, TH, dopamine and cyclic AMP regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP) 32, paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PitX) 3 and vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) 2, in comparable levels between the two sources. The efficiency (c. 65%) of transdifferentiation of WJ MSC to TH-positive cells was similar to that of induced BM MSC. Constitutive and

  8. [Changes in the input resistance and membrane potential of a neuron developing a trace effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iakonova, T L; Mikhal'tsev, I E

    1983-06-01

    Trace effects in the change of spike activity, input resistance (Rinp) and membrane potential of neurons of the mollusk brain were studied in 36 "silent" brain neurons of Limnaea stagnalis in conditions of 20-min intracellular application of sinusoidal current with the threshold frequency 0.1 Hz. Some neurons revealed the effect of facilitation: the rise of activity with membrane depolarization and an increase of Rinp. Other neurons revealed the fall of activity accompanied by hyperpolarization and a decrease of Rinp. The change of Rinp as a trace effect is at its maximum at the frequency of the current used in the intracellular application. This suggests that the neuronal plasticity in "learning" is just based on the Rinp trace effects. Some of the neurons revealed no change in Rinp, membrane polarization or electrical response to applied stimulation. Possible origin of the above effects is discussed.

  9. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik Kanjhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn’s synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15 and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby, coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout, hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions.

  10. High neuronal/astroglial differentiation plasticity of adult rat hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells in response to the effects of embryonic and adult cerebrospinal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirouvi, T; Yekani, F; Azarnia, M; Massumi, M

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells (hipp-NS/PCs) of the adult mammalian brain are important sources of neuronal and gial cell production. In this study, the main goal is to investigate the plasticity of these cells in neuronal/astroglial differentiations. To this end, the differentiation of the hipp-NS/PCs isolated from 3-month-old Wistar rats was investigated in response to the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) including E13.5, E17-CSF and the adult cerebrospinal fluid (A-CSF), all extracted from rats. CSF samples were selected based on their effects on cell behavioral parameters. Primary cell culture was performed in the presence of either normal or high levels of KCL in a culture medium. High levels of KCL cause cell depolarization, and thus the activation of quiescent NSCs. Results from immunocytochemistry (ICC) and semi-quantitative RT-PCR (sRT-PCR) techniques showed that in E-CSF-treated groups, neuronal differentiation increased (E17>E13.5). In contrast, A-CSF decreased and increased neuronal and astroglial differentiations, respectively. Cell survivability and/or proliferation (S/P), evaluated by an MTT assay, increased by E13.5 CSF, but decreased by both E17 CSF and A-CSF. Based on the results, it is finally concluded that adult rat hippocampal proliferative cells are not restricted progenitors but rather show high plasticity in neuronal/astroglial differentiation according to the effects of CSF samples. In addition, using high concentrations of KCL in the primary cell culture led to an increase in the number of NSCs, which in turn resulted in the increase in neuronal or astroglial differentiations after CSF treatment.

  11. Variability in State-Dependent Plasticity of Intrinsic Properties during Cell-Autonomous Self-Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis in Hippocampal Model Neurons1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Sunandha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How do neurons reconcile the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with perpetual switches in patterns of afferent activity? Here, we assessed state-dependent evolution of calcium homeostasis in a population of hippocampal pyramidal neuron models, through an adaptation of a recent study on stomatogastric ganglion neurons. Calcium homeostasis was set to emerge through cell-autonomous updates to 12 ionic conductances, responding to different types of synaptically driven afferent activity. We first assessed the impact of theta-frequency inputs on the evolution of ionic conductances toward maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Although calcium homeostasis emerged efficaciously across all models in the population, disparate changes in ionic conductances that mediated this emergence resulted in variable plasticity to several intrinsic properties, also manifesting as significant differences in firing responses across models. Assessing the sensitivity of this form of plasticity, we noted that intrinsic neuronal properties and the firing response were sensitive to the target calcium concentration and to the strength and frequency of afferent activity. Next, we studied the evolution of calcium homeostasis when afferent activity was switched, in different temporal sequences, between two behaviorally distinct types of activity: theta-frequency inputs and sharp-wave ripples riding on largely silent periods. We found that the conductance values, intrinsic properties, and firing response of neurons exhibited differential robustness to an intervening switch in the type of afferent activity. These results unveil critical dissociations between different forms of homeostasis, and call for a systematic evaluation of the impact of state-dependent switches in afferent activity on neuronal intrinsic properties during neural coding and homeostasis. PMID:26464994

  12. Neuronal migration during development and the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Philip F; Ramaker, Jenna M

    2016-12-01

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is the source of amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease. However, members of the APP family are strongly expressed in the developing nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, where they regulate neuronal guidance, synaptic remodeling, and injury responses. In contrast to mammals, insects express only one APP ortholog (APPL), simplifying investigations into its normal functions. Recent studies have shown that APPL regulates neuronal migration in the developing insect nervous system, analogous to the roles ascribed to APP family proteins in the mammalian cortex. The comparative simplicity of insect systems offers new opportunities for deciphering the signaling mechanisms by which this enigmatic class of proteins contributes to the formation and function of the nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Operant behavior to obtain palatable food modifies neuronal plasticity in the brain reward circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Guegan, Thomas, 1983-; Cutando, Laura; Ayuso, Eduard; Santini, Emanuela; Fisone, Gilberto; Bosch, Fatima; Martínez, Albert; Valjent, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Rafael; Martín Sánchez, Miquel, 1971-

    2013-01-01

    Palatability enhances food intake by hedonic mechanisms that prevail over caloric necessities. Different studies have demonstrated the role of endogenous cannabinoids in the mesocorticolimbic system in controlling food hedonic value and consumption. We hypothesize that the endogenous cannabinoid system could also be involved in the development of food-induced behavioral alterations, such as food-seeking and binge-eating, by a mechanism that requires neuroplastic changes in the brain reward pa...

  14. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses Using Structural Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Shaista; Basu, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule f...

  15. Multiclass Classification by Adaptive Network of Dendritic Neurons with Binary Synapses using Structural Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Shaista eHussain; Arindam eBasu

    2016-01-01

    The development of power-efficient neuromorphic devices presents the challenge of designing spike pattern classification algorithms which can be implemented on low-precision hardware and can also achieve state-of-the-art performance. In our pursuit of meeting this challenge, we present a pattern classification model which uses a sparse connection matrix and exploits the mechanism of nonlinear dendritic processing to achieve high classification accuracy. A rate-based structural learning rule f...

  16. A 2D analytical multiple slip model for continuum texture development and plastic spin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen, E. van der; Houtte, P. van

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional continuum slip model is presented which accounts in an approximate way for texture development in polycrystalline metals during large strain plastic deformations. The basic kinematic model is that of a rigid-plastic laminated material deforming predominantly by slip along its conta

  17. Steady-state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer 4/5a pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Miquelajauregui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer (L 2/3 and L5B cortical pyramidal neurons have recently been assessed using in vivo two-photon microscopy (Trachtenberg et al., 2002; Zuo et al., 2005; Holtmaat et al., 2006. In contrast, not much is known about spine dynamics in L4/5a neurons, regarded as direct recipients of thalamocortical input (Constantinople and Bruno, 2013. In the adult mouse somatosensory cortex (SCx, the transcription factor Ebf2 is enriched in excitatory neurons of L4/5a, including pyramidal neurons. We assessed the molecular and electrophysiological properties of these neurons as well as the morphology of their apical tufts (Scholl analysis and cortical outputs (optogenetics within the SCx. To test the hypothesis that L4/5a pyramidal neurons play an important role in sensory processing (given their key laminar position; soma depth ~450-480 µm, we successfully labeled them in Ebf2-Cre mice with EGFP by expressing recombinant rAAV vectors in utero. Using longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy through a craniotomy (Mostany and Portera-Cailliau, 2008, we repeatedly imaged spines in apical dendritic tufts of L4/5a neurons under basal conditions and after sensory deprivation. Under steady-state conditions in adults, the morphology of the apical tufts and the mean spine density were stable at 0.39 ± 0.05 spines/μm (comparable to L5B, Mostany et al., 2011. Interestingly, spine elimination increases 4-8 days after sensory deprivation, probably due to input loss. This suggests that Ebf2+ L4/5a neurons could be involved in early steps of processing of thalamocortical information.

  18. Spatial wavelet analysis of calcium oscillations in developing neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Alessandro Ruffinatti

    Full Text Available Calcium signals play a major role in the control of all key stages of neuronal development, and in particular in the growth and orientation of neuritic processes. These signals are characterized by high spatial compartmentalization, a property which has a strong relevance in the different roles of specific neuronal regions in information coding. In this context it is therefore important to understand the structural and functional basis of this spatial compartmentalization, and in particular whether the behavior at each compartment is merely a consequence of its specific geometry or the result of the spatial segregation of specific calcium influx/efflux mechanisms. Here we have developed a novel approach to separate geometrical from functional differences, regardless on the assumptions on the actual mechanisms involved in the generation of calcium signals. First, spatial indices are derived with a wavelet-theoretic approach which define a measure of the oscillations of cytosolic calcium concentration in specific regions of interests (ROIs along a cell, in our case developing chick ciliary ganglion neurons. The resulting spatial profile demonstrates clearly that different ROIs along the neuron are characterized by specific patterns of calcium oscillations. Next we have investigated whether this inhomogeneity is due just to geometrical factors, namely the surface to volume ratio in the different subcompartments (e.g. soma vs. growth cone or it depends on their specific biophysical properties. To this aim correlation functions are computed between the activity indices and the surface/volume ratio along the cell: the data thus obtained are validated by a statistical analysis on a dataset of [Formula: see text] different cells. This analysis shows that whereas in the soma calcium dynamics is highly correlated to the surface/volume ratio, correlations drop in the growth cone-neurite region, suggesting that in this latter case the key factor is the

  19. INFLAMMATION AND NEURONAL PLASTICITY: A LINK BETWEEN CHILDHOOD TRAUMA AND DEPRESSION PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eCattaneo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in understanding and characterizing the role of inflammation in major depressive disorder. Several evidences linked inflammation to major depression, including the presence of elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, together with other mediators of inflammation both in the blood and in the brain of depressed patients.However, whether depression itself acts in an immunomodulatory fashion or whether other factors related to depression result in these immunological effects remains an open question. Regardless, major depression is often the result of the exposure to stressful events early in life, which may also act through the modulation of inflammatory responses. Indeed, subjects with a history of childhood trauma show high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increased risk to develop psychopathologies later in life. Moreover, depressed patients with a history of childhood trauma are also less responsive to antidepressant therapies, suggesting that increased inflammation or altered activation of the immune system may also be relevant for the response to antidepressant therapies. This review will provide an overview on the potential role of the inflammatory/immune system and stress related biomarkers to aid diagnosis, predict treatment response, enhance treatment matching, and prevent the onset or relapse of major depression. We will also discuss the role of early life adverse events in increasing the vulnerability to depression development by acting on the inflammatory and stress-related system. Finally, we will discuss the putative biological mechanisms underlying the transmission, from one generation to the next, of the stress signatures and thus, of the increased vulnerability for psychopathologies induced by childhood trauma events.

  20. Development of Plastic Scintillator Detector Array Based on SPMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Dan; ZHANG; Guo-guang; ZHAO; Xiao; FENG; Shu-qiang; ZHANG; Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Silicon photoelectric multiplier tuber(SPMT)is made of silicon chip,which can collect weak optical signal(Fig.1).When visible light irradiates SPMT,SPMT can change optical signal to electrical signal.The electrical signal size can be obtained through detecting optical signal size.When putting plastic scintillator before

  1. Pathological Plasticity in Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in neuronal plasticity are common hallmarks of many neurodevelopmental disorders. In the case of fragile-X syndrome (FXS, disruption in the function of a single gene, FMR1, results in a variety of neurological consequences directly related to problems with the development, maintenance, and capacity of plastic neuronal networks. In this paper, we discuss current research illustrating the mechanisms underlying plasticity deficits in FXS. These processes include synaptic, cell intrinsic, and homeostatic mechanisms both dependent on and independent of abnormal metabotropic glutamate receptor transmission. We place particular emphasis on how identified deficits may play a role in developmental critical periods to produce neuronal networks with permanently decreased capacity to dynamically respond to changes in activity central to learning, memory, and cognition in patients with FXS. Characterizing early developmental deficits in plasticity is fundamental to develop therapies that not only treat symptoms but also minimize the developmental pathology of the disease.

  2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA upregulation in rat sensory neurons after spinal nerve ligation: lack of a role in allodynia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z D; Chaplan, S R; Scott, B P; Cizkova, D; Calcutt, N A; Yaksh, T L

    1999-11-01

    Pharmacological evidence suggests a functional role for spinal nitric oxide (NO) in the modulation of thermal and/or inflammatory hyperalgesia. To assess the role of NO in nerve injury-induced tactile allodynia, we examined neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) expression in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats with tactile allodynia because of either tight ligation of the left fifth and sixth lumbar spinal nerves or streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy. RNase protection assays indicated that nNOS mRNA (1) was upregulated in DRG, but not spinal cord, neurons on the injury side beginning 1 d after nerve ligation, (2) peaked (approximately 10-fold increase) at 2 d, and (3) remained elevated for at least 13 weeks. A corresponding increase in DRG nNOS protein was also observed and localized principally to small and occasionally medium-size sensory neurons. In rats with diabetic neuropathy, there was no significant change in DRG nNOS mRNA. However, similar increases in DRG nNOS mRNA were observed in rats that did not develop allodynia after nerve ligation and in rats fully recovered from allodynia 3 months after the nerve ligation. Systemic treatment with a specific pharmacological inhibitor of nNOS failed to prevent or reverse allodynia in nerve-injured rats. Thus, regulation of nNOS may contribute to the development of neuronal plasticity after specific types of peripheral nerve injury. However, upregulation of nNOS is not responsible for the development and/or maintenance of allodynia after nerve injury.

  3. Influence of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures on the Development of Plastic Shrinkage Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Pease, Bradley Justin; Mazzotta, Guy;

    2007-01-01

    settlement of the concrete and tensile stress development in the surface of the concrete, which increase the potential for development of plastic shrinkage cracks. Specifically, this paper studies the development of plastic shrinkage cracks in mortars containing a commercially available shrinkage......-reducing admixture (SRA). Mortars containing SRA show fewer and narrower plastic shrinkage cracks than plain mortars when exposed to the same environmental conditions. It is proposed that the lower surface tension of the pore fluid in the mortars containing SRA results in less evaporation, reduced settlement......, reduced capillary tension, and lower crack-inducing stresses at the topmost layer of the mortar....

  4. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  5. Alteration of Neuronal Excitability and Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity in the Prefrontal Cortex of a Mouse Model of Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Gregg W; Sun, Ziyi; Kvajo, Mirna; Broek, Jantine A C; Fénelon, Karine; McKellar, Heather; Xiao, Lan; Xu, Bin; Bahn, Sabine; O'Donnell, James M; Gogos, Joseph A

    2017-04-12

    Using a genetic mouse model that faithfully recapitulates a DISC1 genetic alteration strongly associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, we examined the impact of this mutation within the prefrontal cortex. Although cortical layering, cytoarchitecture, and proteome were found to be largely unaffected, electrophysiological examination of the mPFC revealed both neuronal hyperexcitability and alterations in short-term synaptic plasticity consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release. Increased excitability of layer II/III pyramidal neurons was accompanied by consistent reductions in voltage-activated potassium currents near the action potential threshold as well as by enhanced recruitment of inputs arising from superficial layers to layer V. We further observed reductions in both the paired-pulse ratios and the enhanced short-term depression of layer V synapses arising from superficial layers consistent with enhanced neurotransmitter release at these synapses. Recordings from layer II/III pyramidal neurons revealed action potential widening that could account for enhanced neurotransmitter release. Significantly, we found that reduced functional expression of the voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv1.1 substantially contributes to both the excitability and short-term plasticity alterations that we observed. The underlying dysregulation of Kv1.1 expression was attributable to cAMP elevations in the PFC secondary to reduced phosphodiesterase 4 activity present in Disc1 deficiency and was rescued by pharmacological blockade of adenylate cyclase. Our results demonstrate a potentially devastating impact of Disc1 deficiency on neural circuit function, partly due to Kv1.1 dysregulation that leads to a dual dysfunction consisting of enhanced neuronal excitability and altered short-term synaptic plasticity.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Schizophrenia is a profoundly disabling psychiatric illness with a devastating impact not only upon the afflicted but

  6. From migration to settlement: the pathways, migration modes and dynamics of neurons in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Zhu, Yan; Torigoe, Makio; Kita, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Fujio

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal migration is crucial for the construction of the nervous system. To reach their correct destination, migrating neurons choose pathways using physical substrates and chemical cues of either diffusible or non-diffusible nature. Migrating neurons extend a leading and a trailing process. The leading process, which extends in the direction of migration, determines navigation, in particular when a neuron changes its direction of migration. While most neurons simply migrate radially, certain neurons switch their mode of migration between radial and tangential, with the latter allowing migration to destinations far from the neurons' site of generation. Consequently, neurons with distinct origins are intermingled, which results in intricate neuronal architectures and connectivities and provides an important basis for higher brain function. The trailing process, in contrast, contributes to the late stage of development by turning into the axon, thus contributing to the formation of neuronal circuits.

  7. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  8. The free radical scavenger Trolox dampens neuronal hyperexcitability, reinstates synaptic plasticity, and improves hypoxia tolerance in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliwia Alicja Janc

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RS causes severe cognitive impairment, loss of speech, epilepsy, and breathing disturbances with intermittent hypoxia. Also mitochondria are affected; a subunit of respiratory complex III is dysregulated, the inner mitochondrial membrane is leaking protons, and brain ATP levels seem reduced. Our recent assessment of mitochondrial function in MeCP2-deficient mouse (Mecp2-/y hippocampus, confirmed early metabolic alterations, an increased oxidative burden, and a more vulnerable cellular redox balance. As these changes may contribute to the manifestation of symptoms and disease progression, we now evaluated whether free radical scavengers are capable of improving neuronal and mitochondrial function in RS. Acute hippocampal slices of adult mice were incubated with the vitamin E derivative Trolox for 3-5 h. In Mecp2-/y slices this treatment dampened neuronal hyperexcitability, improved short-term plasticity, and fully restored synaptic long-term potentiation. Furthermore, Trolox specifically attenuated the increased hypoxia susceptibility of Mecp2-/y slices. Also, the anticonvulsive effects of Trolox were assessed, but the severity of 4-aminopyridine provoked seizure-like discharges was not significantly affected. Adverse side effects of Trolox on mitochondria can be excluded, but clear indications for an improvement of mitochondrial function were not found. Since several ion-channels and neurotransmitter receptors are redox modulated, the mitochondrial alterations and the associated oxidative burden may contribute to the neuronal dysfunction in RS. We confirmed in Mecp2-/y hippocampus that Trolox dampens neuronal hyperexcitability, reinstates synaptic plasticity, and improves hypoxia tolerance. Therefore, radical scavengers are promising compounds for the treatment of neuronal dysfunction in RS and deserve further detailed evaluation.

  9. NMDA受体与听觉发育可塑性及学习记忆研究的进展%Development of study on NMDA receptor with auditory plasticity and learning memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建红; 王淑玉; 李晓明

    2012-01-01

    Neural plasticity is one of the most important research area of developmental neurobiology. NM-DA(N-Methyl-D-aspartale) receptor is one of the glulamate receptors in nervous system, which palys an important role in many biological and pathological changes, such as development of neural network, neural plasticity, learning and memory, degeneration of the neurons and so on. The studies on NMDA receptor with auditory plasticity and learning and memory were reviewed in order to make early intervention for hearing impaired children and provide a theoretical basis.

  10. Neural development features: Spatio-temporal development of the Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network

    CERN Document Server

    Varier, Sreedevi; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1001044

    2011-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with information on neural connectivity, three-dimensional position and cell linage provides a unique system for understanding the development of neural networks. Although C. elegans has been widely studied in the past, we present the first statistical study from a developmental perspective, with findings that raise interesting suggestions on the establishment of long-distance connections and network hubs. Here, we analyze the neuro-development for temporal and spatial features, using birth times of neurons and their three-dimensional positions. Comparisons of growth in C. elegans with random spatial network growth highlight two findings relevant to neural network development. First, most neurons which are linked by long-distance connections are born around the same time and early on, suggesting the possibility of early contact or interaction between connected neurons during development. Second, early-born neurons are more highly connected (tendency to form hubs) than late...

  11. Investigating the molecular pathway through which L-Lactate interacts with synaptic NMDAR to modulate neuronal plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Engy

    2016-12-01

    In the brain, glycogen, the storage form of glucose, is exclusively localized in astrocytes (Magistretti and Allaman, 2015). Glycogenolysis leads to the production of L-lactate, which is shuttled to neurons for ATP production. Interestingly, L-lactate was recently shown to be not only a source of energy, but also a signaling molecule to neurons. This was demonstrated through the inhibition of L-lactate production or transport in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm, where the rodents developed amnesia. This inhibition of memory consolidation was rescued by L-lactate and not by equicaloric glucose emphasizing that L-lactate acts as a signaling molecule as well (Suzuki et al., 2011). A recent study in our laboratory suggests that the action of L-lactate takes place through a cascade of molecular events via the modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity (Yang et al., 2014). Since NADH produced similar results to those seen with L-lactate, it was hypothesized that the action of the latter is based on altering the redox state of the cell, in particular in view of the fact that redox-sensitive sites are present on the NMDAR. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the apparent change in the NMDAR activity is not fully elucidated. The objective of this study is to explore those mechanisms.

  12. Development and Properties of Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics Geogrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingbiao; ZHANG Cong; WEN Xiaokang; L Rongshan; LIANG Xunmei; LU Shide

    2015-01-01

    Glassfi ber reinforced plastics geogrid has a wide application in thefi eld of soil reinforcement because of its high strength, good toughness, and resistance to environmental stress, creep resistance and strong stability. In order to get high-powered glassfi ber reinforced plastics geogrid and its mechanical characteristics, the properties and physical mechanical index of geogrid have been got through the study of its raw material, production process and important quality index. The analysis and study have been made to the geogrid’s mechanical properties with loading speed, three-axial compression, temperature tensile test and FLAC3D numerical simulation, thus obtain the mechanical parameters of its displacement time curve, breaking strength and elongation at break. Some conclusions can be drawn as follows: (a) Using glassfi ber materials, knurling and coated projection process, the fracture strength and corrosion resistance of geogrid are greatly improved and the interlocking bite capability of soil is enhanced. (b) The fracture strength of geogrid is related to temperature and loading rate. When the surrounding rock pressure is fixed, the strength and anti-deformation ability of reinforced soil are significantly enhanced with increasing reinforced layers. (c) The pullout test shows the positive correlation between geogrid displacement and action time. (d) As a new reinforced material, the glass fi ber reinforced plastics geogrid is not mature enough in theoretical research and practical experience, so it has become an urgent problem both in theoretical study and practical innovation.

  13. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 control the progression of neural precursors to neurons during brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Rusty L.; Hsieh, Jenny; Barbosa, Ana C.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular mechanism by which neural progenitor cells commit to a specified lineage of the central nervous system remains unknown. We show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 redundantly control neuronal development and are required for neuronal specification. Mice lacking HDAC1 or HDAC2 in neuronal precursors show no overt histoarchitectural phenotypes, whereas deletion of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 in developing neurons results in severe hippocampal abnormalities, absence of cerebellar foliation, disorganization of cortical neurons, and lethality by postnatal day 7. These abnormalities in brain formation can be attributed to a failure of neuronal precursors to differentiate into mature neurons and to excessive cell death. These results reveal redundant and essential roles for HDAC1 and HDAC2 in the progression of neuronal precursors to mature neurons in vivo. PMID:19380719

  14. Flavonoids, derived from traditional Chinese medicines, show roles in the differentiation of neurons: possible targets in developing health food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sherry L; Zhu, Kevin Y; Bi, Cathy W C; Yan, Lu; Men, Simon W X; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids, a family of phenolic compounds, are distributed in a variety of fruits, vegetables, tea, and wine. More importantly, many flavonoids are served as the active ingredients in traditional Chinese herbal medicines, which in general do not have side effects. Several lines of evidence support that flavonoids have impacts on many aspects of human health, including anti-tumor, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Recently, there is significant attention focused on the neuronal beneficial effects of flavonoids, including the promotion of nervous system development, neuroprotection against neurotoxin stress, as well as the promotion of memory, learning, and cognitive functions. Here, the activities of flavonoids on the development of nervous system are being summarized and discussed. The flavonoids from diverse herbal medicines have significant effects in different developmental stages of nervous systems, including neuronal stem cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal plasticity. These findings imply that flavonoids are potential candidates for the development of health supplements in preventing birth defects and neuronal diseases.

  15. Establishing sustainable design and development for plastic mold under product service system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Yu-Chen; Tu, Jui-Che; Kuo, Kuo-Pin

    2017-01-01

    Face the energy recovery and environmental concerns and policy, the plastic molds design and develop have to focus on the issues of the lead-free, non-toxic, recyclable, re-manufactured, and integrate...

  16. Dendritic GIRK Channels Gate the Integration Window, Plateau Potentials, and Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Dorsal But Not Ventral CA1 Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ruchi; Johnston, Daniel

    2017-04-05

    Studies comparing neuronal activity at the dorsal and ventral poles of the hippocampus have shown that the scale of spatial information increases and the precision with which space is represented declines from the dorsal to ventral end. These dorsoventral differences in neuronal output and spatial representation could arise due to differences in computations performed by dorsal and ventral CA1 neurons. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differences in dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity between dorsal and ventral CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus. Using a combination of somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we show that the threshold for LTP induction is higher in dorsal CA1 neurons and that a G-protein-coupled inward-rectifying potassium channel mediated regulation of dendritic plateau potentials and dendritic excitability underlies this gating. By contrast, similar regulation of LTP is absent in ventral CA1 neurons. Additionally, we show that generation of plateau potentials and LTP induction in dorsal CA1 neurons depends on the coincident activation of Schaffer collateral and temporoammonic inputs at the distal apical dendrites. The ventral CA1 dendrites, however, can generate plateau potentials in response to temporally dispersed excitatory inputs. Overall, our results highlight the dorsoventral differences in dendritic computation that could account for the dorsoventral differences in spatial representation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dorsal and ventral parts of the hippocampus encode spatial information at very different scales. Whereas the place-specific firing fields are small and precise at the dorsal end of the hippocampus, neurons at the ventral end have comparatively larger place fields. Here, we show that the dorsal CA1 neurons have a higher threshold for LTP induction and require coincident timing of excitatory synaptic inputs for the generation of dendritic plateau potentials. By contrast, ventral CA1

  17. Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped Beaches.

    OpenAIRE

    Ivar do Sul, Juliana Assunção; Santos, Isaac Rodrigues dos; Friedrich, Ana Cláudia; Matthiensen, Alexandre; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. Beach debris were surveyed along the most important sea turtle nesting beaches in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped beaches were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed beaches, where cigarette butts, straws, paper fragments, soft plastic fragments, and food packaging...

  18. Learning-related plasticity in PE1 and other mushroom body-extrinsic neurons in the honeybee brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryuichi; Rybak, Jürgen; Manz, Gisela; Menzel, Randolf

    2007-10-24

    Extracellular recording were performed from mushroom body-extrinsic neurons while the animal was exposed to differential conditioning to two odors, the forward-paired conditioned stimulus (CS+; the odor that will be or has been paired with sucrose reward) and the unpaired CS- (the odor that will be or has been specifically unpaired with sucrose reward). A single neuron, the pedunculus-extrinsic neuron number 1 (PE1), was identified on the basis of its firing pattern, and other neurons were grouped together as non-PE1 neurons. PE1 reduces its response to CS+ and does not change its response to CS- after learning. Most non-PE1 neurons do not change their responses during learning, but some decrease, and one neuron increases its response to CS+. PE1 receives inhibitory synaptic inputs, and neuroanatomical studies indicate closely attached GABA-immune reactive profiles originating at least partially from neurons of the protocerebral-calycal tract (PCT). Thus, either the associative reduction of odor responses originates within the PE1 via a long-term depression (LTD)-like mechanism, or PE1 receives stronger inhibition for the learned odor from the PCT neurons or from Kenyon cells. In any event, as the decreased firing of PE1 correlates with the increased probability of behavioral responses, our data suggest that the mushroom bodies exert general inhibition over sensory-motor connections, which relaxes selectively for learned stimuli.

  19. Seasonal neuronal plasticity in song-control and auditory forebrain areas in subtropical nonmigratory and palearctic-indian migratory male songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbhi; Rastogi, Ashutosh; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-10-01

    This study examines whether differences in annual life-history states (LHSs) among the inhabitants of two latitudes would have an impact on the neuronal plasticity of the song-control system in songbirds. At the times of equinoxes and solstices during the year (n = 4 per year) corresponding to different LHSs, we measured the volumetric changes and expression of doublecortin (DCX; an endogenous marker of the neuronal recruitment) in the song-control nuclei and higher order auditory forebrain regions of the subtropical resident Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) and Palearctic-Indian migratory redheaded buntings (Emberiza bruniceps). Area X in basal ganglia, lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN), HVC (proper name), and robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) were enlarged during the breeding LHS. Both round and fusiform DCX-immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells were found in area X and HVC but not in LMAN or RA, with a significant seasonal difference. Also, as shown by increase in volume and by dense, round DCX-ir cells, the neuronal incorporation was increased in HVC alone during the breeding LHS. This suggests differences in the response of song-control nuclei to photoperiod-induced changes in LHSs. Furthermore, DCX immunoreactivity indicated participation of the cortical caudomedial nidopallium and caudomedial mesopallium in the song-control system, albeit with differences between the weaverbirds and the buntings. Overall, these results show seasonal neuronal plasticity in the song-control system closely associated with annual reproductive LHS in both of the songbirds. Differences between species probably account for the differences in the photoperiod-response system between the relative refractory weaverbirds and absolute refractory redheaded buntings. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2914-2929, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Plasticity in breathing and arterial blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia in infant rat pups with a partial loss of 5-HT neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Jennifer; Cummings, Kevin J

    2015-11-15

    The role of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in cardiovascular responses to acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) has not been studied in the neonatal period. We hypothesized that a partial loss of 5-HT neurons would reduce arterial blood pressure (BP) at rest, increase the fall in BP during hypoxia, and reduce the long-term facilitation of breathing (vLTF) and BP following AIH. We exposed 2-wk-old, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-treated and controls to AIH (10% O2; n = 13 control, 14 treated), acute intermittent hypercapnia (5% CO2; n = 12 and 11), or acute intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (AIHH; 10% O2, 5% CO2; n = 15 and 17). We gave five 5-min challenges of AIH and acute intermittent hypercapnia, and twenty ∼20-s challenges of AIHH to mimic sleep apnea. Systolic BP (sBP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, heart rate (HR), ventilation (V̇e), and metabolic rate (V̇o2) were continuously monitored. 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine induced an ∼35% loss of 5-HT neurons from the medullary raphe. Compared with controls, pups deficient in 5-HT neurons had reduced resting sBP (∼6 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (∼5 mmHg), and HR (56 beats/min), and experienced a reduced drop in BP during hypoxia. AIHH induced vLTF in both groups, reflected in increased V̇e and V̇e/V̇o2, and decreased arterial Pco2. The sBP of pups deficient in 5-HT neurons, but not controls, was increased 1 h following AIHH. Our data suggest that a relatively small loss of 5-HT neurons compromises resting BP and HR, but has no influence on ventilatory plasticity induced by AIHH. AIHH may be useful for reversing cardiorespiratory defects related to partial 5-HT system dysfunction.

  1. Cross-modal plasticity in sensory deprived animal models: From the thalamocortical development point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzera, Cecilia; López-Bendito, Guillermina

    2016-09-01

    Over recent decades, our understanding of the plasticity of the central nervous system has expanded enormously. Accordingly, it is now widely accepted that the brain can adapt to changes by reorganizing its circuitry, both in response to external stimuli and experience, as well as through intrinsic mechanisms. A clear example of this is the activation of a deprived sensory area and the expansion of spared sensory cortical regions in individuals who suffered peripheral sensory loss. Despite the efforts to understand these neuroplastic changes, the mechanisms underlying such adaptive remodeling remains poorly understood. Progress in understanding these events may be hindered by the highly varied data obtained from the distinct experimental paradigms analyzed, which include different animal models and neuronal systems, as well as studies into the onset of sensory loss. Here, we will establish the current state-of-the-art describing the principal observations made according to the time of sensory deprivation with respect to the development of the thalamocortical connectivity. We will review the experimental data obtained from animal models where sensory deprivation has been induced either before or after thalamocortical axons reach and invade their target cortical areas. The anatomical and functional effects of sensory loss on the primary sensory areas of the cortex will be presented. Indeed, we consider that the comparative approach of this review is a necessary step in order to help deciphering the processes that underlie sensory neuroplasticity, for which studies in animal models have been indispensable. Understanding these mechanisms will then help to develop restorative strategies and prostheses that will overcome the functional loss.

  2. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  3. Behavioral constraints in the development of neuronal properties: a cortical model embedded in a real-world device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almássy, N; Edelman, G M; Sporns, O

    1998-06-01

    The ability of organisms to categorize diverse and often novel stimuli depends on ongoing interactions with their environment. In a modality such as vision, categorization requires the generation of both selective and invariant responses of cortical neurons to complex visual stimuli. How does behavior contribute to shaping the responses of these neurons? Analysis of this question is made difficult by the complex multilevel interactions between many neural and behavioral variables. To mitigate this difficulty, we studied the development and ongoing plasticity of pattern-selective neuronal responses by means of synthetic neural modeling. For this purpose, we constructed Darwin V, which consists of a simulated neuronal model embedded in a real-world device that is capable of motion and autonomous behavior. The neuronal model consists of four major components: a visual system (containing cortical and subcortical networks); a taste system based on conductance; sets of motor neurons capable of triggering behavior; and a diffuse ascending (value) system. The modeled visual cortex consists of two areas: a topographic map responsive to elementary features connected to a higher-order map composed of initially non-selective neuronal units. During behavior over time in its environment, Darwin V encounters numerous objects consisting of black metal cubes displaying different patterns of white blobs and stripes. Initially, the lack of specific higher-order visual responses does not allow visual pattern discrimination, and appetitive and aversive behaviors are triggered by the 'taste' (surface conductivity of objects) alone. In the course of sensory experience, however, changes occur in visual and sensorimotor connection strengths, with two major consequences. First, units within the higher visual area acquire responses that are both pattern selective and translation invariant. Second, as a result of the operation of the value system, these responses become linked to appropriate

  4. Genetic and Molecular Approaches to Study Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudok, Jacobus J; Leonards, Pim E G; Wijnholds, Jan

    2017-05-05

    The migration of neuronal cells in the developing cerebral cortex is essential for proper development of the brain and brain networks. Disturbances in this process, due to genetic abnormalities or exogenous factors, leads to aberrant brain formation, brain network formation, and brain function. In the last decade, there has been extensive research in the field of neuronal migration. In this review, we describe different methods and approaches to assess and study neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex. First, we discuss several genetic methods, techniques and genetic models that have been used to study neuronal migration in the developing cortex. Second, we describe several molecular approaches to study aberrant neuronal migration in the cortex which can be used to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of neuronal migration. Finally, we describe model systems to investigate and assess the potential toxicity effect of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals on proper brain formation and neuronal migration.

  5. Unilateral hearing during development: hemispheric specificity in plastic reorganizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej eKral

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the hemispheric contributions of neuronal reorganization following early single-sided hearing (unilateral deafness. The experiments were performed on ten cats from our colony of deaf white cats. Two were identified in early hearing screening as unilaterally congenitally deaf. The remaining eight were bilaterally congenitally deaf, unilaterally implanted at different ages with a cochlear implant. Implanted animals were chronically stimulated using a single-channel portable signal processor for two to five months. Microelectrode recordings were performed at the primary auditory cortex under stimulation at the hearing and deaf ear with bilateral cochlear implants. Local field potentials (LFPs were compared at the cortex ipsilateral and contralateral to the hearing ear. The focus of the study was on the morphology and the onset latency of the LFPs. The data revealed that effects of hearing experience were more pronounced when stimulating the hearing ear. With respect to morphology of LFPs, pronounced hemisphere-specific effects were observed. Morphology of amplitude-normalized LFPs for stimulation of the deaf and the hearing ear was similar for responses recorded at the same hemisphere. However, when comparisons were performed between the hemispheres, the morphology was more dissimilar even though the same ear was stimulated. This demonstrates hemispheric specificity of some cortical adaptations irrespective of the ear stimulated. The results suggest a specific adaptation process at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear, involving specific (down-regulated inhibitory mechanisms not found in the contralateral hemisphere. Finally, onset latencies revealed that the sensitive period for the cortex ipsilateral to the hearing ear is shorter than that for the contralateral cortex. Unilateral hearing experience leads to a functionally-asymmetric brain with different neuronal reorganizations and different sensitive

  6. Development of Wood-Plastic Composite at Dedan Kimathi University of Technology, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madaraka F. Mwema

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Disposal of plastics and other solid wastes has been a major problem in Kenya. Most of these wastes can be recycled through various ways and methods to produce new products. Plastics can be combined with sawdust to develop composite materials for applications such as in building. In this project, a wood-plastic composite (WPC was developed from sawdust and plastic solid wastes. The composite bore the advantages of both wood and plastics which can be applied in various sectors including interior design work and in automotive among others, thereby curbing the problem of garbage accumulation in the environment. The project provides eco-friendly solutions by making best use of the available resources (wood and plastic resins thus, finding sustainable solutions to the problem of limited waste dumping sites and deforestation in the country. The composites were made from PP and HDPE thermoplastics and mahogany sawdust obtained from our wood workshop in Dedan Kimathi University. From the tests carried out and results obtained, it was found that, the composite has more advantages than the individual constituent materials. Water absorption test revealed that all the samples took up water though not as much pronounced as for plain sawdust. Additionally, the rate of water reduction was found to be excellent. They took less time to release the absorbed water to the environment meaning that they can be applied in humid or wet environ. The composite samples were easy to machine since they were easily shaped using a handsaw.

  7. Matrix Metalloprotease 3 Activity Supports Hippocampal EPSP-to-Spike Plasticity Following Patterned Neuronal Activity via the Regulation of NMDAR Function and Calcium Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzdąk, Patrycja; Włodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W; Wójtowicz, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) comprise a family of endopeptidases that are involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix and play a critical role in learning and memory. At least 24 different MMP subtypes have been identified in the human brain, but less is known about the subtype-specific actions of MMP on neuronal plasticity. The long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synaptic transmission and scaling of dendritic and somatic neuronal excitability are considered substrates of memory storage. We previously found that MMP-3 and MMP-2/9 may be differentially involved in shaping the induction and expression of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)-to-spike (E-S) potentiation in hippocampal brain slices. MMP-3 and MMP-2/9 proteolysis was previously shown to affect the integrity or mobility of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in vitro. However, the functional outcome of such MMP-NMDAR interactions remains largely unknown. The present study investigated the role of these MMP subtypes in E-S plasticity and NMDAR function in mouse hippocampal acute brain slices. The temporal requirement for MMP-3/NMDAR activity in E-S potentiation within the CA1 field largely overlapped, and MMP-3 but not MMP-2/9 activity was crucial for the gain-of-function of NMDARs following LTP induction. Functional changes in E-S plasticity following MMP-3 inhibition largely correlated with the expression of cFos protein, a marker of activity-related gene transcription. Recombinant MMP-3 promoted a gain in NMDAR-mediated field potentials and somatodendritic Ca(2+) waves. These results suggest that long-term hippocampal E-S potentiation requires transient MMP-3 activity that promotes NMDAR-mediated postsynaptic Ca(2+) entry that is vital for the activation of downstream signaling cascades and gene transcription.

  8. Retinoic acid as a survival factor in neuronal development of the grasshopper, Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukiban, Jeyathevy; Bräunig, Peter; Mey, Jörg; Bui-Göbbels, Katrin

    2014-11-01

    Based on experience with cell cultures of adult insect neurons, we develop a serum-free culture system for embryonic locust neurons. Influences of trophic substances on survival and neurite outgrowth of developing neurons are investigated. For the first time, a positive trophic effect of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA) was shown in vitro on embryonic neurons of an insect. We observed longer cell survival of 50 % developmental stage neurons in cultures supplemented with 0.3 nM 9-cis RA. Furthermore, an influence on neuron morphology was revealed, as the addition of 9-cis RA to cell culture medium led to an increase in the number of neurites per cell. Although an RA receptor gene, LmRXR (Locusta migratoria retinoid X receptor), was expressed in the central nervous system throughout development, the influence of 9-cis RA on neuronal survival and outgrowth was restricted to 50 % stage embryonic cells.

  9. The phosphodiesterase type 2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 reverses functional impairments induced by brain ischemia by decreasing hippocampal neurodegeneration and enhancing hippocampal neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ligia Mendes; Meyer, Erika; Milani, Humberto; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos; de Oliveira, Rúbia M Weffort

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive and affective impairments are the most characterized consequences following cerebral ischemia. BAY 60-7550, a selective phosphodiesterase type 2 inhibitor (PDE2-I), presents memory-enhancing and anxiolytic-like properties. The behavioral effects of BAY 60-7550 have been associated with its ability to prevent hydrolysis of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) thereby interfering with neuronal plasticity. Here, we hypothesize that PDE2-I treatment could promote functional recovery after brain ischemia. Mice C57Bl/6 were submitted to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), an experimental model of transient brain ischemia, for 20 min. During 21 days after reperfusion, the animals were tested in a battery of behavioral tests including the elevated zero maze (EZM), object location task (OLT) and forced swim test (FST). The effects of BAY 60-7550 were evaluated on neuronal nuclei (NeuN), caspase-9, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. BCCAO increased anxiety levels, impaired hippocampus-dependent cognitive function and induced despair-like behavior in mice. Hippocampal neurodegeneration was evidenced by a decrease in NeuN and increase incaspase-9 protein levels in BCCAO mice. Ischemic mice also showed low BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus. Repeated treatment with BAY 60-7550 attenuated the behavioral impairments induced by BCCAO in mice. Concomitantly, BAY 60-7550 enhanced expression of pCREB and BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of ischemic mice. The present findings suggest that chronic inhibition of PDE2 provides functional recovery in BCCAO mice possibly by augmenting hippocampal neuronal plasticity.

  10. Diverse action of repeated corticosterone treatment on synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity, and morphology in superficial and deep layers of the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Gugula, Anna; Blasiak, Anna; Bobula, Bartosz; Danielewicz, Joanna; Kania, Alan; Tylko, Grzegorz; Hess, Grzegorz

    2017-07-27

    One of the adverse effects of prolonged stress in rats is impaired performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks. The mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared the effects of twice daily repeated corticosterone injections for 7 days on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as on synaptic plasticity and morphology of layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) of male Wistar rats. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased frequency, but not amplitude, of mEPSCs in layer II/III neurons accompanied by increased complexity of the apical part of their dendritic tree, with no changes in the density of dendritic spines. The frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs as well as the parameters characterizing the complexity of the dendritic tree were not changed in layer V cells; however, their dendritic spine density was increased. While corticosterone treatment resulted in an increase in the amplitude of field potentials evoked in intralaminar connections within layer II/III, it did not influence field responses in layer V intralaminar connections, as well as the extent of chemically induced layer V long-term potentiation (chemLTP) by the application of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 25 mM). However, chemLTP induction in layer II/III was impaired in slices prepared from corticosterone-treated animals. These data indicate that repeated 7-day administration of exogenous corticosterone induces structural and functional plasticity in the M1, which occurs mainly in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These findings shed light on potential sites of action and mechanisms underlying stress-induced impairment of motor functions.

  11. Zbtb20 defines a hippocampal neuronal identity through direct repression of genes that control projection neuron development in the isocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Niels A

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which Zbtb20 suppresses the acquisition of an isocortical fate during archicortical neurogenesis to ensure commitment to a CA1 pyramidal neuron fate. We further show that the expression pattern of Zbtb20 is evolutionary conserved in the fetal human hippocampus, where it is complementary to the expression pattern of the Zbtb20 target gene Tbr1. Therefore, the disclosed Zbtb20-mediated transcriptional repressor mechanism may be involved in development of the human archicortex.

  12. Self-organized criticality in developing neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tetzlaff

    Full Text Available Recently evidence has accumulated that many neural networks exhibit self-organized criticality. In this state, activity is similar across temporal scales and this is beneficial with respect to information flow. If subcritical, activity can die out, if supercritical epileptiform patterns may occur. Little is known about how developing networks will reach and stabilize criticality. Here we monitor the development between 13 and 95 days in vitro (DIV of cortical cell cultures (n = 20 and find four different phases, related to their morphological maturation: An initial low-activity state (≈19 DIV is followed by a supercritical (≈20 DIV and then a subcritical one (≈36 DIV until the network finally reaches stable criticality (≈58 DIV. Using network modeling and mathematical analysis we describe the dynamics of the emergent connectivity in such developing systems. Based on physiological observations, the synaptic development in the model is determined by the drive of the neurons to adjust their connectivity for reaching on average firing rate homeostasis. We predict a specific time course for the maturation of inhibition, with strong onset and delayed pruning, and that total synaptic connectivity should be strongly linked to the relative levels of excitation and inhibition. These results demonstrate that the interplay between activity and connectivity guides developing networks into criticality suggesting that this may be a generic and stable state of many networks in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Self-organized criticality in developing neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Christian; Okujeni, Samora; Egert, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin; Butz, Markus

    2010-12-02

    Recently evidence has accumulated that many neural networks exhibit self-organized criticality. In this state, activity is similar across temporal scales and this is beneficial with respect to information flow. If subcritical, activity can die out, if supercritical epileptiform patterns may occur. Little is known about how developing networks will reach and stabilize criticality. Here we monitor the development between 13 and 95 days in vitro (DIV) of cortical cell cultures (n = 20) and find four different phases, related to their morphological maturation: An initial low-activity state (≈19 DIV) is followed by a supercritical (≈20 DIV) and then a subcritical one (≈36 DIV) until the network finally reaches stable criticality (≈58 DIV). Using network modeling and mathematical analysis we describe the dynamics of the emergent connectivity in such developing systems. Based on physiological observations, the synaptic development in the model is determined by the drive of the neurons to adjust their connectivity for reaching on average firing rate homeostasis. We predict a specific time course for the maturation of inhibition, with strong onset and delayed pruning, and that total synaptic connectivity should be strongly linked to the relative levels of excitation and inhibition. These results demonstrate that the interplay between activity and connectivity guides developing networks into criticality suggesting that this may be a generic and stable state of many networks in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Impact of preconditioning with retinoic acid during early development on morphological and functional characteristics of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Horschitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are a suitable tool to study basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurodevelopment. The directed differentiation of hiPSCs via the generation of a self-renewable neuronal precursor cell line allows the standardization of defined differentiation protocols. Here, we have investigated whether preconditioning with retinoic acid during early neural induction impacts on morphological and functional characteristics of the neuronal culture after terminal differentiation. For this purpose we have analyzed neuronal and glial cell markers, neuronal outgrowth, soma size, depolarization-induced distal shifts of the axon initial segment as well as glutamate-evoked calcium influx. Retinoic acid preconditioning led to a higher yield of neurons vs. glia cells and longer axons than unconditioned controls. In contrast, glutamatergic activation and depolarization induced structural plasticity were unchanged. Our results show that the treatment of neuroectodermal cells with retinoic acid during early development, i.e. during the neurulation phase, increases the yield of neuronal phenotypes, but does not impact on the functionality of terminally differentiated neuronal cells.

  15. Nicotinic mechanisms influencing synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andon Nicholas PLACZEK; Tao A ZHANG; John Anthony DANI

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed throughout the hippocampus, and nicotinic signaling plays an important role in neuronal function. In the context of learning and memory related behaviors associated with hippocampal function, a potentially significant feature of nAChR activity is the impact it has on synaptic plasticity. Synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons has long been considered a contributing cellular mechanism of learning and memory. These same kinds of cellular mechanisms are a factor in the development of nicotine addiction. Nicotinic signaling has been demonstrated by in vitro studies to affect synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons via multiple steps, and the signaling has also been shown to evoke synaptic plasticity in vivo. This review focuses on the nAChRs subtypes that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity at the cellular and circuit level. It also considers nicotinic influences over long-term changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to addiction.

  16. A Stability Formula for Plastic-Tipped Bullets Part 1: Motivation and Development of New Formula

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper describes a modification of the original Miller twist rule for computing gyroscopic bullet stability that is better suited to plastic-tipped bullets. The original Miller twist rule assumes a bullet of constant density, but it also works well for conventional copper (or gilding metal) jacketed lead bullets because the density of copper and lead are sufficiently close. However, the original Miller twist rule significantly underestimates the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets, because the density of plastic is much lower than the density of copper and lead. Here, a new amended formula is developed for the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets by substituting the length of just the metal portion for the total length in the $(1 + L^2)$ term of the original Miller twist rule. Part 2 describes experimental testing of this new formula on three plastic-tipped bullets. The new formula is relatively accurate for plastic-tipped bullets whose metal portion has nearly uniform densi...

  17. Performance Enhancement at the Cost of Potential Brain Plasticity: Neural Ramifications of Nootropic Drugs in the Healthy Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R. Urban

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive enhancement is perhaps one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in neuroscience today. Currently, the main classes of drugs used as potential cognitive enhancers include psychostimulants (methylphenidate, amphetamine, but wakefulness-promoting agents (modafinil and glutamate activators (ampakine are also frequently used. Pharmacologically, substances that enhance the components of the memory/learning circuits - dopamine, glutamate (neuronal excitation, and/or norepinephrine - stand to improve brain function in healthy individuals beyond their baseline functioning. In particular, non-medical use of prescription stimulants such as methylphenidate and illicit use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement have seen a recent rise among teens and young adults in schools and college campuses. However, this enhancement likely comes with a neuronal, as well as ethical, cost. Altering glutamate function via the use of psychostimulants may impair behavioral flexibility, leading to the development and/or potentiation of addictive behaviors. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine do not display linear effects; instead, their modulation of cognitive and neuronal function maps on an inverted-U curve. Healthy individuals run the risk of pushing themselves beyond optimal levels into hyperdopaminergic and hypernoradrenergic states, thus vitiating the very behaviors they are striving to improve. Finally, recent studies have begun to highlight potential damaging effects of stimulant exposure in healthy juveniles. This review explains how the main classes of cognitive enhancing drugs affect the learning and memory circuits, and highlights the potential risks and concerns in healthy individuals, particularly juveniles and adolescents. We emphasize the performance enhancement at the potential cost of brain plasticity that is associated with the neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain.

  18. Neuronal Logistics : Axonal Transport in Development and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van den Berg (Robert)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractBrain cells are uniquely shaped among the many cell types of the body. While most cells are more or less rounded or square-shaped, neurons grow one or more long axons that can reach lengths of a meter or more. To keep these axons alive and functional, neurons are dependent on an intr

  19. Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 regulates cortical neuronal network development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart Martens, Marijn; Frega, Monica; Classen, Jessica; Epping, Lisa; Bijvank, Elske; Benevento, Marco; van Bokhoven, Hans; Tiesinga, Paul; Schubert, Dirk; Nadif Kasri, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the human Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) gene cause Kleefstra syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by autistic-like features and severe intellectual disability (ID). Neurodevelopmental disorders including ID and autism may be related to deficits in activity-dependent wiring of brain circuits during development. Although Kleefstra syndrome has been associated with dendritic and synaptic defects in mice and Drosophila, little is known about the role of EHMT1 in the development of cortical neuronal networks. Here we used micro-electrode arrays and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of EHMT1 deficiency at the network and single cell level. We show that EHMT1 deficiency impaired neural network activity during the transition from uncorrelated background action potential firing to synchronized network bursting. Spontaneous bursting and excitatory synaptic currents were transiently reduced, whereas miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents were not affected. Finally, we show that loss of function of EHMT1 ultimately resulted in less regular network bursting patterns later in development. These data suggest that the developmental impairments observed in EHMT1-deficient networks may result in a temporal misalignment between activity-dependent developmental processes thereby contributing to the pathophysiology of Kleefstra syndrome. PMID:27767173

  20. Ethanol up-regulates nucleus accumbens neuronal activity dependent pentraxin (Narp): implications for alcohol-induced behavioral plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ary, Alexis W; Cozzoli, Debra K; Finn, Deborah A; Crabbe, John C; Dehoff, Marlin H; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal activity dependent pentraxin (Narp) interacts with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) glutamate receptors to facilitate excitatory synapse formation by aggregating them at established synapses. Alcohol is well-characterized to influence central glutamatergic transmission, including AMPA receptor function. Herein, we examined the influence of injected and ingested alcohol upon Narp protein expression, as well as basal Narp expression in mouse lines selectively bred for high blood alcohol concentrations under limited access conditions. Alcohol up-regulated accumbens Narp levels, concomitant with increases in levels of the GluR1 AMPA receptor subunit. However, accumbens Narp or GluR1 levels did not vary as a function of selectively bred genotype. We next employed a Narp knock-out (KO) strategy to begin to understand the behavioral relevance of alcohol-induced changes in protein expression in several assays of alcohol reward. Compared to wild-type mice, Narp KO animals: fail to escalate daily intake of high alcohol concentrations under free-access conditions; shift their preference away from high alcohol concentrations with repeated alcohol experience; exhibit a conditioned place-aversion in response to the repeated pairing of 3 g/kg alcohol with a distinct environment and fail to exhibit alcohol-induced locomotor hyperactivity following repeated alcohol treatment. Narp deletion did not influence the daily intake of either food or water, nor did it alter any aspect of spontaneous or alcohol-induced motor activity, including the development of tolerance to its motor-impairing effects with repeated treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that Narp induction, and presumably subsequent aggregation of AMPA receptors, may be important for neuroplasticity within limbic subcircuits mediating or maintaining the rewarding properties of alcohol.

  1. Neuronal Structural plasticity of the rodent telencephalon: Role of PSA-NCAM and modulation by the antidepressant Fluoxetine

    OpenAIRE

    Guirado Guillén, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Recientes hipótesis sugieren que alteraciones en la plasticidad estructural neuronal están implicadas en ciertos desórdenes psiquiátricos como la esquizofrenia y la depresión. En este sentido, se ha demostrado la presencia de remodelado dendrítico y de espinas en modelos animales de ansiedad y depresión, asi como en pacientes humanos de estos desórdenes. Este remodelado neuronal en el adulto puede estar mediado por cambios en la expresion de moléculas relacionadas con la di...

  2. Development of methods for predicting large crack growth in elastic-plastic work-hardening materials in fully plastic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Hugh; Turner, C. E.; Fenner, R. T.; Curr, R. M.; Ivankovic, A.

    1995-01-01

    The objects of the first, exploratory, stage of the project were listed as: (1) to make a detailed and critical review of the Boundary Element method as already published and with regard to elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, to assess its potential for handling present concepts in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases. To this was subsequently added the Finite Volume method and certain aspects of the Finite Element method for comparative purposes; (2) to assess the further steps needed to apply the methods so far developed to the general field, covering a practical range of geometries, work hardening materials, and composites: to consider their application under higher temperature conditions; (3) to re-assess the present stage of development of the energy dissipation rate, crack tip opening angle and J-integral models in relation to the possibilities of producing a unified technology with the previous two items; and (4) to report on the feasibility and promise of this combined approach and, if appropriate, make recommendations for the second stage aimed at developing a generalized crack growth technology for its application to real-life problems.

  3. Development of a highly transparent superamphiphobic plastic sheet by nanoparticle and chemical coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ten It; Wang, Hao; Wang, Fuke; Sin, Sau Leng; Quan, Cheng Gen; Wang, Shi Jie; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2016-04-01

    A highly transparent superamphiphobic plastic sheet was developed. The plastic sheet polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was spin-coated on a glass substrate. Synthesized silica nanoparticles were sprayed on PMMA, followed by fluorosilane drop-coating. The results of contact angle measurements show that the developed PMMA sheet has superamphiphobic properties with high advancing contact angles for water (154°), toluene (139°), and silicone oil (132.9°). The amphiphobicity of the plastic sheet can be tuned by the surface coverage of the silica nanoparticles distributed on the PMMA surface. The surface coverage of the nanoparticles on our PMMA sheet is about 20%, and it agrees with our contact angle calculations for the sheet with and without nanoparticles.

  4. Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kevin; Stryker, Michael

    2017-03-05

    Hebbian plasticity is widely considered to be the mechanism by which information can be coded and retained in neurons in the brain. Homeostatic plasticity moves the neuron back towards its original state following a perturbation, including perturbations produced by Hebbian plasticity. How then does homeostatic plasticity avoid erasing the Hebbian coded information? To understand how plasticity works in the brain, and therefore to understand learning, memory, sensory adaptation, development and recovery from injury, requires development of a theory of plasticity that integrates both forms of plasticity into a whole. In April 2016, a group of computational and experimental neuroscientists met in London at a discussion meeting hosted by the Royal Society to identify the critical questions in the field and to frame the research agenda for the next steps. Here, we provide a brief introduction to the papers arising from the meeting and highlight some of the themes to have emerged from the discussions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF PERMANENT MECHANICAL REPAIR SLEEVE FOR PLASTIC PIPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitesh Patadia

    2004-09-30

    The report presents a comprehensive summary of the project status related to the development of a permanent mechanical repair fitting intended to be installed on damaged PE mains under blowing gas conditions. Specifically, the product definition has been developed taking into account relevant codes and standards and industry input. A conceptual design for the mechanical repair sleeve has been developed which meets the product definition.

  6. Development of regional specificity of spinal and medullary dorsal horn neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Feng Xie; Xing-Hong Jiang; Barry J Sessle; Xian-Min Yu

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have focused on the development and regionalization of neurons in the central nervous system(CNS). Many genes, which play crucial roles in the development of CNS neurons, have been identified. By using the technique "direct reprogramming", neurons can be produced from multiple cell sources such as fibroblasts. However, understanding the region-specific regulation of neurons in the CNS is still one of the biggest challenges in the research field of neuroscience. Neurons located in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis(Vc) and in the spinal dorsal horn(SDH) play crucial roles in pain and sensorimotor functions in the orofacial and other somatic body regions, respectively. Anatomically, Vc represents the most caudal component of the trigeminal system, and is contiguous with SDH. This review is focused on recent data dealing with the regional specificity involved in the development of neurons in Vc and SDH.

  7. Plasticity of the Axon Initial Segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders Victor; Cotel, Florence; Perrier, Jean François

    2017-01-01

    of metabotropic receptors modulates the properties of ion channels expressed at the AIS within seconds and consequently produces fast adjustments of neuronal excitability. Recent results suggest that this plasticity plays important roles in physiological functions as diverse as memory formation, hearing......The axon initial segment (AIS) is a key neuronal compartment because it is responsible for action potential initiation. The local density of Na+ channels, the biophysical properties of K+ channels, as well as the length and diameter of the AIS determine the spiking of neurons. These parameters...... undergo important modifications during development. The development of the AIS is governed by intrinsic mechanisms. In addition, surrounding neuronal networks modify its maturation. As a result, neurons get tuned to particular physiological functions. Neuronal activity also influences the morphology...

  8. Developing a functional urinary bladder: a neuronal context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet R Keast

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of organs occurs in parallel with the formation of their nerve supply. The innervation of pelvic organs (lower urinary tract, hindgut, and sexual organs is complex and we know remarkably little about the mechanisms that form these neural pathways. The goal of this short review is to use the urinary bladder as an example to stimulate interest in this question. The bladder requires a healthy mature nervous system to store urine and release it at behaviourally appropriate times. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the construction of these neural circuits is not only relevant to defining the basis of developmental problems but may also suggest strategies to restore connectivity and function following injury or disease in adults. The bladder nerve supply comprises multiple classes of sensory, and parasympathetic or sympathetic autonomic effector (motor neurons. First, we define the developmental endpoint by describing this circuitry in adult rodents. Next we discuss the innervation of the developing bladder, identifying challenges posed by this area of research. Last we provide examples of genetically modified mice with bladder dysfunction and suggest potential neural contributors to this state.

  9. Transient epileptiform signaling during neuronal network development: regulation by external stimulation and bimodal GABAergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham M; Lee, Sangmook; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    A predominance of excitatory activity, with protracted appearance of inhibitory activity, accompanies cortical neuronal development. It is unclear whether or not inhibitory neuronal activity is solicited exclusively by excitatory neurons or whether the transient excitatory activity displayed by developing GABAergic neurons contributes to an excitatory threshold that fosters their conversion to inhibitory activity. We addressed this possibility by culturing murine embryonic neurons on multi-electrode arrays. A wave of individual 0.2-0.4 mV signals ("spikes") appeared between approx. 20-30 days in culture, then declined. A transient wave of high amplitude (>0.5 mV) epileptiform activity coincided with the developmental decline in spikes. Bursts (clusters of ≥3 low-amplitude spikes within 0.7s prior to returning to baseline) persisted following this decline. Addition of the GABAergic antagonist bicuculline initially had no effect on signaling, consistent with delayed development of GABAergic synapses. This was followed by a period in which bicuculline inhibited overall signaling, confirming that GABAergic neurons initially display excitatory activity in ex vivo networks. Following the transient developmental wave of epileptiform signaling, bicuculline induced a resurgence of epileptiform signaling, indicating that GABAergic neurons at this point displayed inhibitory activity. The appearance of transition after the developmental and decline of epileptiform activity, rather than immediately after the developmental decline in lower-amplitude spikes, suggests that the initial excitatory activity of GABAergic neurons contributes to their transition into inhibitory neurons, and that inhibitory GABAergic activity is essential for network development. Prior studies indicate that a minority (25%) of neurons in these cultures were GABAergic, suggesting that inhibitory neurons regulate multiple excitatory neurons. A similar robust increase in signaling following cessation of

  10. Ezh1 and Ezh2 differentially regulate PSD-95 gene transcription in developing hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Berta; Bustos, Fernando J; Aguilar, Rodrigo; Becerra, Alvaro; Simon, Felipe; Montecino, Martin; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediates transcriptional silencing by catalyzing histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), but its role in the maturation of postmitotic mammalian neurons remains largely unknown. We report that the PRC2 paralogs Ezh1 and Ezh2 are differentially expressed during hippocampal development. We show that depletion of Ezh2 leads to increased expression of PSD-95, a critical plasticity gene, and that reduced PSD-95 gene transcription is correlated with enrichment of Ezh2 at the PSD-95 gene promoter; however, the H3K27me3 epigenetic mark is not present at the PSD-95 gene promoter, likely due to the antagonizing effects of the H3S28P and H3K27Ac marks and the activity of the H3K27 demethylases JMJD3 and UTX. In contrast, increased PSD-95 gene transcription is accompanied by the presence of Ezh1 and elongation-engaged RNA Polymerase II complexes at the PSD-95 gene promoter, while knock-down of Ezh1 reduces PSD-95 transcription. These results indicate that Ezh1 and Ezh2 have antagonistic roles in regulating PSD-95 transcription. © 2013.

  11. Development of flexible plasmonic plastic sensor using nanograting textured laminating film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sudha; Mohapatra, Saswat; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2017-02-01

    The work presented in this paper describes the development of a cost-effective, flexible plasmonic plastic sensor using gold-coated nanograting nanoimprinted on a laminating plastic. The fabrication of plasmonic plastic sensor involved the transfer of nanograting pattern from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer stamp to laminating plastic via thermal nanoimprint lithography, and subsequent gold film deposition. Gold-coated nanograting sample acted as a plasmonic chip, which exhibited surface plasmon resonance (SPR) mode in reflectance spectra under the white light illumination. The theoretical calculation was performed to study and analyze the excited SPR mode on the plasmonic chip. Further, the bulk refractive index sensitivity was demonstrated with respect to changing surrounding dielectric medium giving a value about 800  ±  27 nm/RIU (refractive index unit). In addition, the surface binding sensitivity upon adsorption of bovine serum albumin protein on the sensor surface was approximately 4.605 nm/(ng/mm2).We believe that our proposed low-cost plastic based plasmonic sensing device could be a potential candidate for the label-free and high-throughput screening of biological molecules.

  12. Migration of plasticizers from PVC medical devices: Development of an infusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, L; Cueff, R; Chagnon, Mc; Abdoulouhab, F; Décaudin, B; Breysse, C; Kauffmann, S; Cosserant, B; Souweine, B; Sautou, V

    2015-10-15

    Alternatives to DEHP plasticizers are used in various PVC medical devices (MD) for infusion. As they are able to migrate from these MDs into infused solutions, they may come into contact with patient. Different and specific clinical parameters influence their migration in at-risk situations such as infusion. In contrast to the regulations for Food Contact Materials (MCDA), there is currently no acceptable migration limits for the use of these plasticizers in clinical situations. In order to assess their migration, and thus control the risks linked to these MDs, we developed a migration model for the plasticizers in MDs. To this end, we applied a cross-disciplinary methodological process similar to that used in the food-processing industry, taking into account the MDs' conditions of use in clinical practice. The simulation model is simple and includes the following conditions: MD should be tested with a dynamic method that respects our established clinical assumption (2 L of infused solutions via 13 dm(2) of plasticized PVC), at a temperature of 25 °C and during 24 h of contact, using a 50/50 (v/v) ethanol/water simulant. This model could be proposed as a tool for the safety evaluation of the patients' exposure risk to plasticizers from PVC medical devices for infusions.

  13. Control of Neuronal Migration and Aggregation by Reelin Signaling in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yuki; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral neocortex has a well-organized laminar structure, achieved by the highly coordinated control of neuronal migration. During cortical development, excitatory neurons born near the lateral ventricle migrate radially to reach their final positions to form the cortical plate. During this process, dynamic changes are observed in the morphologies and migration modes, including multipolar migration, locomotion, and terminal translocation, of the newborn neurons. Disruption of these migration processes can result in neuronal disorders such as lissencephaly and periventricular heterotopia. The extracellular protein, Reelin, mainly secreted by the Cajal-Retzius neurons in the marginal zone during development, plays a crucial role in the neuronal migration and neocortical lamination. Reelin signaling, which exerts essential roles in the formation of the layered neocortex, is triggered by the binding of Reelin to its receptors, ApoER2 and VLDLR, followed by phosphorylation of the Dab1 adaptor protein. Accumulating evidence suggests that Reelin signaling controls multiple steps of neuronal migration, including the transition from multipolar to bipolar neurons, terminal translocation, and termination of migration beneath the marginal zone. In addition, it has been shown that ectopically expressed Reelin can cause neuronal aggregation via an N-cadherin-mediated manner. This review attempts to summarize our knowledge of the roles played by Reelin in neuronal migration and the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Development of high plasticity Al-Si alloy and its casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭国文; 李元元; 陈维平; 张大童; 龙雁

    2002-01-01

    Aiming to meet the challenge of the shape complexity and high plasticity demanded for the upper connective plate(UCP) in motorcycle, a high plasticity Al-Si alloy named HGZL-02 was developed by optimizing the chemical composition and casting process. Premium UCP castings were obtained by using optimized casting process. Results show that fine and dense microstructure are obtained in the UCP castings. An average of 224MPa in ultimate tensile strength, 149MPa in yield strength and 13.2% in elongation are achieved for T6 heat-treated UPS castings.

  15. Development of a Plastic Melt Waste Compactor for Space Missions Experiments and Prototype Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Gregory; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Pisharody, Suresh; Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes development at NASA Ames Research Center of a heat melt compactor that can be used on both near term and far term missions. Experiments have been performed to characterize the behavior of composite wastes that are representative of the types of wastes produced on current and previous space missions such as International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab. Experiments were conducted to characterize the volume reduction, bonding, encapsulation and biological stability of the waste composite and also to investigate other key design issues such as plastic extrusion, noxious off-gassing and removal of the of the plastic waste product from the processor. The experiments provided the data needed to design a prototype plastic melt waste processor, a description of which is included in the paper.

  16. The role of the ETS gene PEA3 in the development of motor and sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladle, David R; Frank, Eric

    2002-12-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors includes two members, ER81 and PEA3, which are expressed in groups of sensory and motor neurons supplying individual muscles. To investigate a possible role of these genes in determining sensory and/or motor neuron phenotype, we studied mice in which each of these genes was deleted. In contrast to the deletion of ER81, which blocks the formation of projections from muscle sensory neurons to motor neurons in the spinal cord, deletion of PEA3 causes no obvious effects on sensory neurons or on their synaptic connections with motor neurons. PEA3 does play a major role in the formation of some brachial motoneurons however. Motoneurons innervating the cutaneous maximus muscle, which are normally PEA3(+), fail to develop normally so that postnatally the muscle is innervated by few motoneurons and is severely atrophic. Other studies suggest that these motoneurons initially appear during development but fail to contact their normal muscle targets.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INNOVATIVE LASER SCANNER FOR GEOMETRICAL VERIFICATION OF METALLIC AND PLASTIC PARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Fisker, Rune

    2008-01-01

    and plastic parts. A first prototype of the novel measuring system has been developed, using laser triangulation. The system, besides ensuring the automatic reconstruction of complete surface models, has been designed to guarantee user-friendliness, versatility, reliability and speed. The paper focuses mainly...... dimensional measurements with adequate accuracy for most industrial requirements....

  18. Plasticity in the Developing Brain: Intellectual, Language and Academic Functions in Children with Ischaemic Perinatal Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Angela O.; Spilkin, Amy M.; Hesselink, John; Trauner, Doris A.

    2008-01-01

    The developing brain has the capacity for a great deal of plasticity. A number of investigators have demonstrated that intellectual and language skills may be in the normal range in children following unilateral perinatal stroke. Questions have been raised, however, about whether these skills can be maintained at the same level as the brain…

  19. Development of Integrated Simulation System for Plastic Injection Molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGXue-wen; LIDe-qun; ZHOUHua-min

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulation of injection molding have had success in predicting the behavior of polymer melt in extremely complicated geometries. Most of the current numerical solutions are based on finite-element/finite-difference/boundary-element/volume-control methods and the surface model. This paper discusses the development of an integrated CAE system for injection molding in detail, and presents the mathematics for numerical simulation of filling, packing,cooling, stress and warpage in injection molding. The developed system named as HsCAE3D is introduced at the end.

  20. Mmp25β facilitates elongation of sensory neurons during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bryan D; Po, Michelle D; Saranyan, Pillai V; Forsberg, Daniel; Schulz, Richard; Pilgrim, Dave B

    2014-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a large and complex family of zinc-dependent endoproteinases widely recognized for their roles in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) during embryonic development, wound healing, and tissue homeostasis. Their misregulation is central to many pathologies, and they have therefore been the focus of biomedical research for decades. These proteases have also recently emerged as mediators of neural development and synaptic plasticity in vertebrates, however, understanding of the mechanistic basis of these roles and the molecular identities of the MMPs involved remains far from complete. We have identified a zebrafish orthologue of mmp25 (a.k.a. leukolysin; MT6-MMP), a membrane-type, furin-activated MMP associated with leukocytes and invasive carcinomas, but which we find is expressed by a subset of the sensory neurons during normal embryonic development. We detect high levels of Mmp25β expression in the trigeminal, craniofacial, and posterior lateral line ganglia in the hindbrain, and in Rohon-Beard cells in the dorsal neural tube during the first 48 h of embryonic development. Knockdown of Mmp25β expression with morpholino oligonucleotides results in larvae that are uncoordinated and insensitive to touch, and which exhibit defects in the development of sensory neural structures. Using in vivo zymography, we observe that Mmp25β morphant embryos show reduced Type IV collagen degradation in regions of the head traversed by elongating axons emanating from the trigeminal ganglion, suggesting that Mmp25β may play a pivotal role in mediating ECM remodeling in the vicinity of these elongating axons.

  1. Effect of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity on Intrinsic Coherence Resonance in Newman-Watts Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on coherence resonance (CR) induced by channel noise in adaptive Newman-Watts stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that STDP can either enhance or suppress the intrinsic CR when the adjusting rate of STDP decreases or increases. STDP can alter the effects of network randomness and network size on the intrinsic CR. Under STDP, for electrical coupling there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest, however, for chemical coupling the intrinsic CR is always enhanced as network randomness or network size increases, which are different from the results for fixed coupling. These results show that the intrinsic CR of the neuronal networks can be either enhanced or suppressed by STDP, and there are optimal network randomness and network size by which the intrinsic CR becomes strongest. These findings could provide a new insight into the role of STDP for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  2. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye, I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region.

  3. Design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matalon, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    The design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems use is described. The objective of this development was to examine the feasibility of producing lenses with a cost effectiveness superior to that of lenses made by casting of acrylic. The procedure used in executing this development, the method used in cost effectiveness evaluation, results obtained and recommendations for further work are presented.

  4. Cellular Plasticity within the Pancreas— Lessons Learned from Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sapna; Hebrok, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas has been the subject of intense research due to the debilitating diseases that result from its dysfunction. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the critical tissue interactions and intracellular regulatory events that take place during formation of the pancreas from a small cluster of cells in the foregut domain of the mouse embryo. Importantly, an understanding of principles that govern the development of this organ has equipped us with the means to manipulate both embryonic and differentiated adult cells in the context of regenerative medicine. The emerging area of lineage modulation within the adult pancreas is of particular interest, and this review summarizes recent findings that exemplify how lessons learned from development are being applied to reveal the potential of fully differentiated cells to change fate. PMID:20230744

  5. Cellular plasticity within the pancreas--lessons learned from development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sapna; Hebrok, Matthias

    2010-03-16

    The pancreas has been the subject of intense research due to the debilitating diseases that result from its dysfunction. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the critical tissue interactions and intracellular regulatory events that take place during formation of the pancreas from a small cluster of cells in the foregut domain of the mouse embryo. Importantly, an understanding of principles that govern the development of this organ has equipped us with the means to manipulate both embryonic and differentiated adult cells in the context of regenerative medicine. The emerging area of lineage modulation within the adult pancreas is of particular interest, and this review summarizes recent findings that exemplify how lessons learned from development are being applied to reveal the potential of fully differentiated cells to change fate.

  6. The Role of Neural Plasticity in Depression: From Hippocampus to Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenxiang

    2017-01-01

    Neural plasticity, a fundamental mechanism of neuronal adaptation, is disrupted in depression. The changes in neural plasticity induced by stress and other negative stimuli play a significant role in the onset and development of depression. Antidepressant treatments have also been found to exert their antidepressant effects through regulatory effects on neural plasticity. However, the detailed mechanisms of neural plasticity in depression still remain unclear. Therefore, in this review, we summarize the recent literature to elaborate the possible mechanistic role of neural plasticity in depression. Taken together, these findings may pave the way for future progress in neural plasticity studies.

  7. Selective processes in development: implications for the costs and benefits of phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C

    2012-07-01

    Adaptive phenotypic plasticity, the ability of a genotype to develop a phenotype appropriate to the local environment, allows organisms to cope with environmental variation and has implications for predicting how organisms will respond to rapid, human-induced environmental change. This review focuses on the importance of developmental selection, broadly defined as a developmental process that involves the sampling of a range of phenotypes and feedback from the environment reinforcing high-performing phenotypes. I hypothesize that understanding the degree to which developmental selection underlies plasticity is key to predicting the costs, benefits, and consequences of plasticity. First, I review examples that illustrate that elements of developmental selection are common across the development of many different traits, from physiology and immunity to circulation and behavior. Second, I argue that developmental selection, relative to a fixed strategy or determinate (switch) mechanisms of plasticity, increases the probability that an individual will develop a phenotype best matched to the local environment. However, the exploration and environmental feedback associated with developmental selection is costly in terms of time, energy, and predation risk, resulting in major changes in life history such as increased duration of development and greater investment in individual offspring. Third, I discuss implications of developmental selection as a mechanism of plasticity, from predicting adaptive responses to novel environments to understanding conditions under which genetic assimilation may fuel diversification. Finally, I outline exciting areas of future research, in particular exploring costs of selective processes in the development of traits outside of behavior and modeling developmental selection and evolution in novel environments.

  8. Effects of Age, Experience and Inter-alpha Inhibitor Proteins on Working Memory and Neuronal Plasticity after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Cynthia; Lim, Yow-Pin; Stonestreet, Barbara S.; Threlkeld, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    demanding cognitive task, beyond that of a single intervention strategy, and appears to facilitate neuronal plasticity following neonatal brain injury. PMID:26778784

  9. Crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei reveals conformational plasticity at its C-terminus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracher Andreas

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular membrane fusion processes are mediated by the spatial and temporal control of SNARE complex assembly that results in the formation of a four-helical bundle, composed of one vesicle SNARE and three target membrane SNARE polypeptide chains. Syntaxins are essential t-SNAREs and are characterized by an N-terminal Habc domain, a flexible linker region, a coiled-coil or SNARE motif and a membrane anchor. The N-terminal Habc domain fulfills important regulatory functions while the coiled-coil motif, present in all SNAREs, is sufficient for SNARE complex formation, which is thought to drive membrane fusion. Results Here we report the crystal structure of the Habc domain of neuronal syntaxin from the squid Loligo pealei, s-syntaxin. Squid Habc crystallizes as a dimer and the monomer structure consists of a three-helical bundle. One molecule is strikingly similar to mammalian syntaxin 1A while the second one shows a structural deviation from the common fold in that the C-terminal part of helix C unwinds and adopts an extended conformation. Conclusion Conservation of surface residues indicates that the cytosolic part of s-syntaxin can adopt an auto-inhibitory closed conformation that may bind squid neuronal Sec1, s-Sec1, in the same manner as observed in structure of the rat nSec1/syntaxin 1A complex. Furthermore, despite the overall structural similarity, the observed changes at the C-terminus of one molecule indicate structural plasticity in neuronal syntaxin. Implications of the structural conservation and the changes are discussed with respect to potential Habc domain binding partners such as Munc13, which facilitates the transition from the closed to the open conformation.

  10. Effects of age, experience and inter-alpha inhibitor proteins on working memory and neuronal plasticity after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Cynthia M; Lim, Yow-Pin; Stonestreet, Barbara S; Threlkeld, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    cognitive task, beyond that of a single intervention strategy, and appears to facilitate neuronal plasticity following neonatal brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptional control of GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jing; Wu Shengxi

    2008-01-01

    GABAergic neurons are the major inhibitory interneurons that powerfully control the function of spinal neuronalnet works. In recent years, tremendous progresses have been made in understanding the transcriptional control of GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord. New experimental approaches provide a relatively high throughput way to study the molecular regulation of subgroup fate determination. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms on GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord is rapidly expanding. Recent studies have defined several transcription factors that play essential roles in GABAergic neuron development in the spinal dorsal horn. Here, we review results of very recent analyses of the mechanisms that specify the GABAergic neuron development in the dorsal spinal cord, especially the progresses in the homeodomain (HD) and basic-helix-loop-helix(bHLH) containing transcription factors.

  12. Single neuron dynamics and computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-04-01

    At the single neuron level, information processing involves the transformation of input spike trains into an appropriate output spike train. Building upon the classical view of a neuron as a threshold device, models have been developed in recent years that take into account the diverse electrophysiological make-up of neurons and accurately describe their input-output relations. Here, we review these recent advances and survey the computational roles that they have uncovered for various electrophysiological properties, for dendritic arbor anatomy as well as for short-term synaptic plasticity.

  13. Plastics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  14. Self-organization of repetitive spike patterns in developing neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jyh-Jang; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2010-10-01

    The appearance of spontaneous correlated activity is a fundamental feature of developing neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. To elucidate whether the ontogeny of correlated activity is paralleled by the appearance of specific spike patterns we used a template-matching algorithm to detect repetitive spike patterns in multi-electrode array recordings from cultures of dissociated mouse neocortical neurons between 6 and 15 days in vitro (div). These experiments demonstrated that the number of spiking neurons increased significantly between 6 and 15 div, while a significantly synchronized network activity appeared at 9 div and became the main discharge pattern in the subsequent div. Repetitive spike patterns with a low complexity were first observed at 8 div. The number of repetitive spike patterns in each dataset as well as their complexity and recurrence increased during development in vitro. The number of links between neurons implicated in repetitive spike patterns, as well as their strength, showed a gradual increase during development. About 8% of the spike sequences contributed to more than one repetitive spike patterns and were classified as core patterns. These results demonstrate for the first time that defined neuronal assemblies, as represented by repetitive spike patterns, appear quite early during development in vitro, around the time synchronized network burst become the dominant network pattern. In summary, these findings suggest that dissociated neurons can self-organize into complex neuronal networks that allow reliable flow and processing of neuronal information already during early phases of development.

  15. Non-coding RNA interact to regulate neuronal development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Ravi Iyengar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The human brain is one of the most complex biological systems, and the cognitive abilities have greatly expanded compared to invertebrates without much expansion in the number of protein coding genes. This suggests that gene regulation plays a very important role in the development and function of nervous system, by acting at multiple levels such as transcription and translation. In this article we discuss the regulatory roles of three classes of ncRNAs – miRNAs, piRNAs and lncRNA, in the process of neurogenesis and nervous function including control of synaptic plasticity and potential roles in neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are involved in diverse processes including neurogenesis where they channelize the cellular physiology towards neuronal differentiation. miRNAs can also indirectly influence neurogenesis by regulating the proliferation and self renewal of neural stem cells and are dysregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are also known to regulate synaptic plasticity and are usually found to be co-expressed with their targets. The dynamics of gene regulation is thus dependent on the local architecture of the gene regulatory network around the miRNA and its targets. piRNAs had been classically known to regulate transposons in the germ cells. However, piRNAs have been, recently, found to be expressed in the brain and possibly function by imparting epigenetic changes by DNA methylation. piRNAs are known to be maternally inherited and we assume that they may play a role in early development. We also explore the possible function of piRNAs in regulating the expasnsion of transposons in the brain. Brain is known to express several lncRNA but functional roles in brain development are attributed to a few lncRNA while functions of most of the them remain unknown. We review the roles of some known lncRNA and explore the other possible functions of lncRNAs including their interaction with miRNAs.

  16. Development of chemosensitivity in neurons from the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Susan C; Nichols, Nicole L; Ritucci, Nick A; Dean, Jay B; Putnam, Robert W

    2009-03-31

    We studied the development of chemosensitivity during the neonatal period in rat nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons. We determined the percentage of neurons activated by hypercapnia (15% CO(2)) and assessed the magnitude of the response by calculating the chemosensitivity index (CI). There were no differences in the percentage of neurons that were inhibited (9%) or activated (44.8%) by hypercapnia or in the magnitude of the activated response (CI 164+/-4.9%) in NTS neurons from neonatal rats of all ages. To assess the degree of intrinsic chemosensitivity in these neurons we used chemical synaptic block medium and the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Chemical synaptic block medium slightly decreased basal firing rate but did not affect the percentage of NTS neurons that responded to hypercapnia at any neonatal age. However, in neonates aged NTS neurons activated by hypercapnia in neonatal rats of any age. In summary, the response of NTS neurons from neonatal rats appears to be intrinsic and largely unchanged throughout early development. In young neonates (NTS neurons that respond to hypercapnia or the magnitude of that response.

  17. Nitrergic neurons during early postnatal development of the prefrontal cortex in the rat: histochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvizdosova, Natalia; Tomasova, Lenka; Bolekova, Adriana; Kolesar, Dalibor; Kluchova, Darina

    2014-06-01

    The presence of nitrergic cells in the prefrontal cortex has been confirmed, however little is known about the postnatal development of these cells. Nitrergic neurons were studied histochemically by using NADPH-diaphorase staining in the prefrontal cortex of male Wistar rats from postnatal day 7-21 (P7-21). Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase is a nitric oxide synthase that provides a specific histochemical marker for neurons producing nitric oxide (NO). NO acts as a neurotransmitter and intracellular signaling molecule in the nervous system. We observed in 7 day old rats NADPH-d containing neurons that were intensely stained. These neurons were bipolar with a short dendrite with average length of 23 μm. During the second postnatal week, the neurons were mainly bipolar and were rarely multipolar. By P14 the cells were located primarily in cortical layers III-VI. Nitrergic neurons of the 21 day old rats were histochemically identified as multipolar cells with long radial extending dendrites. Dendrites of neurons in 14 and 21 day old rats were a similar length with an average of 57 μm. These results suggest that nitrergic neurons differentiate during a relatively short period of time and reach their structural maturity by the end of the second week of postnatal development.

  18. Development of Chemosensitivity in Neurons from the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii (NTS) of Neonatal Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Susan C.; Nichols, Nicole L.; Ritucci, Nick A.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the development of chemosensitivity during the neonatal period in rat Nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons. We determined the percentage of neurons activated by hypercapnia (15% CO2) and assessed the magnitude of the response by calculating the chemosensitivity index (CI). There were no differences in the percentage of neurons that were inhibited (9%) or activated (44.8%) by hypercapnia or in the magnitude of the activated response (CI 164±4.9%) in NTS neurons from neonatal rats of all ages. To assess the degree of intrinsic chemosensitivity in these neurons we used chemical synaptic block medium and the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Chemical synaptic block medium slightly decreased basal firing rate but did not affect the percentage of NTS neurons that responded to hypercapnia at any neonatal age. However, in neonates aged neurons activated by hypercapnia in neonatal rats of any age. In summary, the response of NTS neurons from neonatal rats appears to be intrinsic and largely unchanged throughout early development. In young neonates (neurons that respond to hypercapnia or the magnitude of that response. PMID:19056522

  19. Plasticity during childhood and adolescence: innovative approaches to investigating neurocognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Linden, David E J; Lau, Jennifer Y F

    2013-07-01

    Adolescence is a period of profound change, which holds substantial developmental milestones, but also unique challenges to the individual. In this opinion paper, we highlight the potential of combining two recently developed behavioural and neural training techniques (cognitive bias modification and functional magnetic neuroimaging-based neurofeedback) into a research approach that could help make the most of increased levels of plasticity during childhood and adolescence. We discuss how this powerful combination could be used to explore changing brain-behaviour relationships throughout development in the context of emotion processing, a cognitive domain that exhibits continuous development throughout the second decade of life. By targeting both behaviour and brain response, we would also be in an excellent position to define sensible time windows for enhancing plasticity, thereby allowing for targeted intervention approaches that can help improve emotion processing in both typically and atypically developing populations.

  20. Neuronal plasticity in the mushroom body calyx during adult maturation in the honeybee and possible pheromonal influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenz, Thomas S; Groh, Claudia; Maisonnasse, Alban; Le Conte, Yves; Plettner, Erika; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Honeybee workers express a pronounced age-dependent polyethism switching from various indoor duties to foraging outside the hive. This transition is accompanied by tremendous changes in the sensory environment that sensory systems and higher brain centers have to cope with. Foraging and age have earlier been shown to be associated with volume changes in the mushroom bodies (MBs). Using age- and task-controlled bees this study provides a detailed framework of neuronal maturation processes in the MB calyx during the course of natural behavioral maturation. We show that the MB calyx volume already increases during the first week of adult life. This process is mainly driven by broadening of the Kenyon cell dendritic branching pattern and then followed by pruning of projection neuron axonal boutons during the actual transition from indoor to outdoor duties. To further investigate the flexible regulation of division of labor and its neuronal correlates in a honeybee colony, we studied the modulation of the nurse-forager transition via a chemical communication system, the primer pheromone ethyl oleate (EO). EO is found at high concentrations on foragers in contrast to nurse bees and was shown to delay the onset of foraging. In this study, EO effects on colony behavior were not as robust as expected, and we found no direct correlation between EO treatment and synaptic maturation in the MB calyx. In general, we assume that the primer pheromone EO rather acts in concert with other factors influencing the onset of foraging with its effect being highly adaptive. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of the morphological development of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce P; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2006-10-30

    The morphological development of neurons is a very complex process involving both genetic and environmental components. Mathematical modelling and numerical simulation are valuable tools in helping us unravel particular aspects of how individual neurons grow their characteristic morphologies and eventually form appropriate networks with each other. A variety of mathematical models that consider (1) neurite initiation (2) neurite elongation (3) axon pathfinding, and (4) neurite branching and dendritic shape formation are reviewed. The different mathematical techniques employed are also described. Some comparison of modelling results with experimental data is made. A critique of different modelling techniques is given, leading to a proposal for a unified modelling environment for models of neuronal development. A unified mathematical and numerical simulation framework should lead to an expansion of work on models of neuronal development, as has occurred with compartmental models of neuronal electrical activity.

  2. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-02-23

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances.

  3. Antipsychotic drugs alter neuronal development including ALM neuroblast migration and PLM axonal outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Dallas R; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly being prescribed for children and adolescents, and are used in pregnant women without a clear demonstration of safety in these populations. Global effects of these drugs on neurodevelopment (e.g., decreased brain size) have been reported in rats, but detailed knowledge about neuronal effects and mechanisms of action are lacking. Here we report on the evaluation of a comprehensive panel of antipsychotic drugs in a model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans) that is widely used to study neuronal development. Specifically, we examined the effects of the drugs on neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in mechanosensory neurons visualized with green fluorescent protein expressed from the mec-3 promoter. Clozapine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol produced deficits in the development and migration of ALM neurons and axonal outgrowth in PLM neurons. The defects included failure of neuroblasts to migrate to the proper location, and excessive growth of axons past their normal termination point, together with abnormal morphological features of the processes. Although the antipsychotic drugs are potent antagonists of dopamine and serotonin receptors, the neurodevelopmental deficits were not rescued by co-incubation with serotonin or the dopaminergic agonist, quinpirole. Other antipsychotic drugs, risperidone, aripiprazole, quetiapine, trifluoperazine and olanzapine, also produced modest, but detectable, effects on neuronal development. This is the first report that antipsychotic drugs interfere with neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth in a developing nervous system.

  4. Cell type-specific plasticity of striatal projection neurons in parkinsonism and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieblinger, Tim; Graves, Steven M.; Sebel, Luke E.; Alcacer, Cristina; Plotkin, Joshua L.; Gertler, Tracy S.; Chan, C. Savio; Heiman, Myriam; Greengard, Paul; Cenci, M. Angela; Surmeier, D. James

    2015-01-01

    Summary The striatum is widely viewed as the fulcrum of pathophysiology in Parkinson's disease (PD) and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). In these disease states, the balance in activity of striatal direct pathway spiny projection neurons (dSPNs) and indirect pathway spiny projection neurons (iSPNs) is disrupted, leading to aberrant action selection. However, it is unclear whether countervailing mechanisms are engaged in these states. Here we report that iSPN intrinsic excitability and excitatory corticostriatal synaptic connectivity were lower in PD models than normal; L-DOPA treatment restored these properties. Conversely, dSPN intrinsic excitability was elevated in tissue from PD models and suppressed in LID models. Although the synaptic connectivity of dSPNs did not change in PD models, it fell with L-DOPA treatment. In neither case, however, was the strength of corticostriatal connections globally scaled. Thus, SPNs manifested homeostatic adaptations in intrinsic excitability and in the number but not strength of excitatory corticostriatal synapses. PMID:25360704

  5. 5-HT7 receptors as modulators of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and plasticity: physiological role and possible implications in autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia eCiranna; Maria Vincenza Catania

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin type 7 receptors (5-HT7) are expressed in several brain areas, regulate brain development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and therefore are involved in various brain functions such as learning and memory. A number of studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptors could be potential pharmacotherapeutic target for cognitive disorders. Several abnormalities of serotonergic system have been described in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including abnormal activity of 5-HT trans...

  6. Early expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor increase the neuronal plasticity of activated endogenous neural stem cells after focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Song; Jong-Tae Park; Joo Young Na; Man-Seok Park; Jeong-Kil Lee; Min-Cheol Lee; Hyung-Seok Kim

    2014-01-01

    vascular endothelial growth factor after ischemia made up the microenvironment to increase the neuronal plasticity of activated endogenous neural stem cells. Moreover, neural precursor cells after large-scale cortical injury could be recruited from the cortex nearby infarct core and subventricular zone.

  7. The Impact of Ultrasound on Developing Brain Neurons. Science Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study. This Brief summarizes the findings and implications of "Prenatal Exposure to Ultrasound Waves Impacts Neuronal Migration in Mice" (E. S. B. C. Ang, Jr.; V. Gluncic; A. Duque; M. E. Schafer; and P.…

  8. Effect of prenatal exposure to ethanol on the development of cerebral cortex: I. Neuronal generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol causes profound disruptions in the development of the cerebral cortex. Therefore, the effect of in utero ethanol exposure on the generation of neurons was determined. Pregnant rats were fed a liquid diet in which ethanol constituted 37.5% of the total caloric content (Et) or pair-fed an isocaloric control diet (Ct) from gestational day (GD) 6 to the day of birth. The time of origin of cortical neurons was determined in the mature pups of females injected with (3H)thymidine on one day during the period from GD 10 to the day of birth. The brains were processed by standard autoradiographic techniques. Ethanol exposure produced multiple defects in neuronal ontogeny. The period of generation was 1-2 days later for Et-treated rats than for rats exposed prenatally to either control diet. Moreover, the generation period was 1-2 days longer in Et-treated rats. The numbers of neurons generated on a specific day was altered; from GD 12-19 significantly fewer neurons were generated in Et-treated rats than in Ct-treated rats, whereas after GD 19 more neurons were born. The distribution of neurons generated on a specific day was disrupted; most notable was the distribution of late-generated neurons in deep cortex of Et-treated rats rather than in superficial cortex as they are in controls. Cortical neurons in Et-treated rats tended to be smaller than in Ct-treated rats, particularly early generated neurons in deep cortex. The late-generated neurons in Et-treated rats were of similar size to those in Ct-treated rats despite their abnormal position in deep cortex. Neurons in Ct-treated rats tended to be rounder than those in Et-treated rats which were more polarized in the radial orientation.

  9. Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE