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Sample records for plastic-embedded marrows provide

  1. Improved histochemical methods for the examination of plastic-embedded human marrow

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    Moosavi, H.; Lichtman, M. A.; Donnelly, J. A.; Churukian, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Improved methods for processing, sectioning, and staining plastic (glycol methacrylate) embedded human marrow biopsies are described. Marrow biopsies processed by this technique were compared with biopsies processed by the conventional paraffin embedding method. The plastic-embedded marrows provide better morphology enhancing diagnostic accuracy, permit assessment of bone as well as marrow, and allow histochemical analysis of biopsy specimen. Special stains including naphtol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, periodic acid Schiff (PAS), reticulin, and iron have been modified so that they are suitable for undecalcified, two microns thick, plastic-embedded human marrow biopsies.

  2. Relative shrinkage of adipocytes by paraffin in proportion to plastic embedding in human adipose tissue before and after weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; van Dijk, Paul; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2013-01-01

    Adipocyte size is a major modulator of endocrine functioning of adipose tissue and methods allowing accurate determination of adipocyte size are important to study energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the relative shrinkage of adipocytes before and after weight loss by comparing adipose tissue from the same subjects embedded in paraffin and plastic. 18 healthy subjects (5 males and 13 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 28-38 kg/m² followed a very low energy diet for 8 weeks. Adipose tissue biopsies were taken prior to and after weight loss and were processed for paraffin and plastic sections. Parameters of adipocyte size were determined with computer image analysis. Mean adipocyte size was smaller in paraffin compared to plastic embedded tissue both before (66 ± 4 vs. 103 ± 5 μm, P paraffin embedded tissue in proportion to plastic embedded tissue was not significantly different before and after weight loss (73 and 69%, respectively). Shrinkage due to the type of embedding of the adipose tissue can be ignored when comparing before and after weight loss. Plastic embedding of adipose tissue provides more accurate and sensitive results. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells provide an antibiotic-protective niche for persistent viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis that survive antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Gillian; Major, Samuel; Das, Bikul; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    During tuberculosis (TB), some Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli persist in the presence of an active immunity and antibiotics that are used to treat the disease. Herein, by using the Cornell model of TB persistence, we further explored our recent finding that suggested that M. tuberculosis can escape therapy by residing in the bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells. We initially showed that M. tuberculosis rapidly disseminates to the mouse BM after aerosol exposure and maintained a stable burden for at least 220 days. In contrast, in the lungs, the M. tuberculosis burden peaked at 28 days and subsequently declined approximately 10-fold. More important, treatment of the mice with the antibiotics rifampicin and isoniazid, as expected, resulted in effective clearance of M. tuberculosis from the lungs and spleen. In contrast, M. tuberculosis persisted, albeit at low numbers, in the BM of antibiotic-treated mice. Moreover, most viable M. tuberculosis was recovered from the bone marrow CD271(+)CD45(-)-enriched cell fraction, and only few viable bacteria could be isolated from the CD271(-)CD45(+) cell fraction. These results clearly show that BM mesenchymal stem cells provide an antibiotic-protective niche for M. tuberculosis and suggest that unraveling the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon will enhance our understanding of M. tuberculosis persistence in treated TB patients. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Jak2 Inhibitor, G6, Alleviates Jak2-V617F–Mediated Myeloproliferative Neoplasia by Providing Significant Therapeutic Efficacy to the Bone Marrow

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    Annet Kirabo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently developed a Janus kinase 2 (Jak2 small-molecule inhibitor called G6 and found that it inhibits Jak2-V617F– mediated pathologic cell growth in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. However, its ability to inhibit Jak2-V617F–mediated myeloproliferative neoplasia, with particular emphasis in the bone marrow, has not previously been examined. Here, we investigated the efficacy of G6 in a transgenic mouse model of Jak2-V617F–mediated myeloproliferative neoplasia. We found that G6 provided therapeutic benefit to the peripheral blood as determined by elimination of leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and erythrocytosis. G6 normalized the pathologically high plasma concentrations of interleukin 6 (IL-6. In the liver, G6 eliminated Jak2-V617F–driven extramedullary hematopoiesis. With respect to the spleen, G6 significantly reduced both the spleno-megaly and megakaryocytic hyperplasia. In the critically important bone marrow, G6 normalized the pathologically high levels of phospho-Jak2 and phospho–signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5. It significantly reduced the megakaryocytic hyperplasia in the marrow and completely normalized the M/E ratio. Most importantly, G6 selectively reduced the mutant Jak2 burden by 67% on average, with virtual elimination of mutant Jak2 cells in one third of all treated mice. Lastly, clonogenic assays using marrow stem cells from the myeloproliferative neoplasm mice revealed a time-dependent elimination of the clonogenic growth potential of these cells by G6. Collectively, these data indicate that G6 exhibits exceptional efficacy in the peripheral blood, liver, spleen, and, most importantly, in the bone marrow, thereby raising the possibility that this compound may alter the natural history of Jak2-V617F–mediated myeloproliferative neoplasia.

  5. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  6. Bone marrow dendritic cells from mice with an altered microbiota provide interleukin 17A-dependent protection against Entamoeba histolytica colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stacey L; Buonomo, Erica; Carey, Maureen; Cowardin, Carrie; Naylor, Caitlin; Noor, Zannatun; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Petri, William A

    2014-11-04

    There is an emerging paradigm that the human microbiome is central to many aspects of health and may have a role in preventing enteric infection. Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of amebic diarrhea in developing countries. It colonizes the colon lumen in close proximity to the gut microbiota. Interestingly, not all individuals are equally susceptible to E. histolytica infection. Therefore, as the microbiota is highly variable within individuals, we sought to determine if a component of the microbiota could regulate susceptibility to infection. In studies utilizing a murine model, we demonstrated that colonization of the gut with the commensal Clostridia-related bacteria known as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) is protective during E. histolytica infection. SFB colonization in this model was associated with elevated cecal levels of interleukin 17A (IL-17A), dendritic cells, and neutrophils. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from SFB-colonized mice had higher levels of IL-23 production in response to stimulation with trophozoites. Adoptive transfer of BMDCs from an SFB(+) to an SFB(-) mouse was sufficient to provide protection against E. histolytica. IL-17A induction during BMDC transfer was necessary for this protection. This work demonstrates that intestinal colonization with a specific commensal bacterium can provide protection during amebiasis in a murine model. Most importantly, this work demonstrates that the microbiome can mediate protection against an enteric infection via extraintestinal effects on bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis, an infectious disease that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality due to diarrhea in the developing world. We showed in a murine model that colonization with the commensal members of the Clostridia known as SFB provides protection against E. histolytica and that dendritic cells from SFB-colonized mice alone can recapitulate protection

  7. Bone marrow-derived myofibroblasts are the providers of pro-invasive matrix metalloproteinase 13 in primary tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecomte, Julie; Masset, Anne; Blacher, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    provide evidence that one third of BM-derived GFP(+) cells infiltrating the tumor expressed the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan NG2 (pericytic marker) or α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, myofibroblast marker), whereas almost 90% of Thy1(+) fibroblasts were originating from resident GFP-negative cells. MMP13......producing cells were exclusively α-SMA(+) cells and derived from GFP(+) BM cells. To investigate their impact on tumor invasion, we isolated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the BM of wild-type and MMP13-deficient mice. Wild-type MSC promoted cancer cell invasion in a spheroid assay, whereas MSCs obtained...... from MMP13-deficient mice failed to. Our data support the concept of fibroblast subset specialization with BM-derived α-SMA(+) cells being the main source of MMP13, a stromal mediator of cancer cell invasion....

  8. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  9. Prevalence of Prostate Cancer Metastases after Intravenous Inoculation Provides Clues into the Molecular Basis of Dormancy in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Jung

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone is the preferred metastasis site of advanced prostate cancer (PCa. Using an in vivo murine model of human PCa cell metastasis to bone, we noted that the majority of animals that develop skeletal metastasis have either spinal lesions or lesions in the bones of the hindlimb. Much less frequently, lesions develop in the bones of the forelimb. We therefore speculated whether the environment of the forelimb bones is not permissive for the growth of PCa. Consequently, data on tumor prevalence were normalized to account for the number of PCa cells arriving after intravascular injection, marrow cellularity, and number of hematopoietic stem cell niches. None of these factors were able to account for the observed differences in tumor prevalence. An analysis of differential gene and protein levels identified that growth arrest specific-6 (GAS6 levels were significantly greater in the forelimb versus hindlimb bone marrow. When murine RM1 cells were implanted into subcutaneous spaces in immune competent animals, tumor growth in the GAS6-/- animals was greater than in GAS6+/+ wild-type animals. In an osseous environment, the human PC3 cell line grew significantly better in vertebral body transplants (vossicles derived from GAS6-/- animals than in vossicles derived from GAS6+/+ animals. Together, these data suggest that the differences in tumor prevalence after intravascular inoculation are a useful model to study the molecular basis of tumor dormancy. Importantly, these data suggest that therapeutic manipulation of GAS6 levels may prove useful as a therapy for metastatic disease.

  10. Characterization of rat spermatocytes after plastic embedding.

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    Russell, L; Frank, B

    1978-01-01

    Rat testicular tissue, perfused with glutaraldehyde, post-fixed with osmium and stained with toluidine blue, was studied to obtain information which could be used to characterize spermatocytes (also type B gonia and Step 1 spermatids) with the light microscope. Measurements of relative cell, nuclear sizes and absolute nuclear size are presented in graphic form, demonstrating the progressive growth found for spermatocytes. Early prophase spermatocytes (preleptotene, leptotene, zygotene) gradually increased in size. Pachytene cells showed no growth until Stage IV, at which point a dramatic size increase began and continued until the diplotene phase. Guidelines to identify a particular phase of meiosis were established for spermatocytes using primarily nuclear traits. Examination of longitudinal sections through Stages XIII, XIV and I were useful for comparing cells from Meiotic divisions (meta-, ana-, and telophases) I and II and also for differentiating secondary spermatocytes from Step 1 spermatids.

  11. Bone Marrow Involvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalayer, Emilie; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Ninet, Jacques; Durupt, Stephane; Tebib, Jacques; Asli, Bouchra; Lambotte, Olivier; Ffrench, Martine; Vasselon, Christian; Cathébras, Pascal

    2017-05-19

    Besides peripheral cytopenias, bone marrow abnormalities, such as fibrosis, pure red cell aplasia, and aplastic anemia have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), suggesting that bone marrow may be a target organ in SLE. Our objective was to describe this bone marrow involvement. This registry is a nationwide retrospective study. Centers provided data concerning medical history, SLE manifestations, type of hematologic disorder, treatments and outcome. Bone marrow aspirations and/or biopsies were transferred for centralized review. Thirty patients from 19 centers were included. Central hematologic manifestations comprised bone marrow fibrosis (n=17; 57%), pure red cell aplasia (n=8; 27%), myelodysplastic syndrome (n=3; 10%), aplastic anemia and agranulocytosis (n=1; 3% each). Bone marrow involvement was diagnosed concomitantly with SLE in 12 patients. Bone marrow biopsies showed fibrosis in 19 cases, including one case of pure red cell aplasia and one case of agranulocytosis and variable global marrow cellularity. Treatments included corticosteroids (90%), hydroxychloroquine (87%), rituximab (33%), intravenous immunoglobulins (30%), mycophenolate mofetil (20%) and ciclosporine (20%). After a median follow-up of 27 months (range: 1-142), 24 patients manifested complete improvement. No patient died. This registry comprises the largest series of SLE patients with bone marrow involvement. It demonstrates the strong link between SLE and bone marrow fibrosis. Patients with atypical or refractory cytopenia associated with SLE should undergo bone marrow examination to enable appropriate, and often effective, treatment. Long-term prognosis is good. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases....... This enables MRI to detect differences between fatty, fibrotic, aplastic and hypercellular marrow in patients with haematological disease. MRI can evaluate the distribution of bone marrow disease because it has the potential for visualization of almost the entire bone marrow compartment. However, MRI is unable...... to establish the primary diagnosis in haematological bone marrow disease with diffuse hypercellular marrow. In case of insufficient biopsy, MRI can provide important differential diagnostic information as well as guidance for further biopsy attempts. MRI is a useful complement to morphological bone marrow...

  13. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colnot, C; Huang, S; Helms, J

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  14. Bone marrow processing for transplantation using Cobe Spectra cell separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljković, Dobrila; Nonković, Olivera Šerbić; Radonjić, Zorica; Kuzmanović, Miloš; Zečević, Zeljko

    2013-06-01

    Concentration of bone marrow aspirates is an important prerequisite prior to infusion of ABO incompatible allogeneic marrow and prior to cryopreservation and storage of autologous marrow. In this paper we present our experience in processing 15 harvested bone marrow for ABO incompatible allogeneic and autologous bone marrow (BM) transplantation using Cobe Spectra® cell separator. BM processing resulted in the median recovery of 91.5% CD34+ cells, erythrocyte depletion of 91% and volume reduction of 81%. BM processing using cell separator is safe and effective technique providing high rate of erythrocyte depletion and volume reduction, and acceptable recovery of the CD34+ cells.

  15. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

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    ... Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Examination Formal name: Bone Marrow Aspiration; Bone Marrow Biopsy Related tests: Complete Blood Count ; WBC Differential ; Reticulocyte ...

  16. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  17. Turning Marrow into Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In unexpected testimony2 to the versatility3 of the body's cells,researchers have found they can make bone marrow cells turn into muscle, causing mice with muscular dystrophy4 to produce correctly working muscle cells. The experiment suggests that a form of bone marrow transplant- - a well established surgical procedure5- - could in principle treat patients with a variety of diseases.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal marrow:Basic understanding of the normal marrow pattern and its variant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ragab Nouh; Ahmed Fathi Eid

    2015-01-01

    For now, magnetic resonance(MR) is the best noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate vertebral bone marrow thanks to its inherent soft-tissue contrast andnon-ionizing nature. A daily challenging scenario for every radiologist interpreting MR of the vertebral column is discerning the diseased from normal marrow. This requires the radiologist to be acquainted with the used MR techniques to judge the spinal marrow as well as its normal MR variants. Conventional sequences used basically to image marrow include T1 W, fat-suppressed T2 W and short tau inversion recovery(STIR) imaging provides gross morphological data. Interestingly, using non-routine MR sequences; such as opposed phase, diffusion weighted, MR spectroscopy and contrastedenhanced imaging; may elucidate the nature of bone marrow heterogeneities; by inferring cellular and chemical composition; and adding new functional prospects. Recalling the normal composition of bone marrow elements and the physiologic processes of spinal marrow conversion and reconversion eases basic understanding of spinal marrow imaging. Additionally, orientation with some common variants seen during spinal marrow MR imaging as hemangiomas and bone islands is a must. Moreover, awareness of the age-associated bone marrow changes as well as changes accompanying different variations of the subject’s health state is essential for radiologists to avoid overrating normal MR marrow patterns as pathologic states and metigate unnecessary further work-up.

  19. National Marrow Donor Program. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Transplantation FINAL REPORT December 1, 2012 – November 30, 2014 Acronym List 3 BBMT Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation BCP Business Continuity...N00014-13-1-0039 HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation FINAL REPORT December 1, 2012 – November 30, 2014 Acronym List 9 OCR /ICR Optical...manuscript submitted and accepted for publication to the Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. National Marrow Donor Program® N00014-13-1-0039

  20. Archival bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, Laeya A; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata;

    2015-01-01

    AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole...... with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP...

  1. Ex vivo expansion of CD3depleted cord blood-MNCs in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells; an appropriate strategy to provide functional NK cells applicable for cellular therapy

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    Ehteramolsadat Hosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering umbilical cord blood (UCB as a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, we introduced a cost-effective approach to expand CD3depleted UCB-MNCs into functional NK cells. CD3depleted UCB-MNCs were expanded in the presence or absence of a feeder [bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs or osteoblasts], with or without cytokines and their differentiation into NK cells was determined by flow cytometry. NK cell function was quantified by LAMP-1/CD107a expression, TNF-α/IFN-γ release, and LDH release/PI staining in targets. Higher expansion of NK cells was observed after two weeks in the presence of BMSCs and cytokines (104 ± 15 compared to osteoblasts and cytokines (84 ± 29, p < 0.05. On day 14, CD3depleted UCB-MNCs in the presence of BMSCs and cytokines showed lower expression of CD3, CD19, CD14, CD15 and CD69 as well as higher expression of CD2 and CD7, which were suggestive of cell differentiation into mature NK cell lineage. Strong cytotoxicity of expanded cells was also identified with higher LDH release and PI% in targets. Significant upregulation of LAMP-1 with decreased release of IFN-γ and TNF-α from effectors were observed. We demonstrate an effective expansion of UCB-NK cells that maintained their functional capabilities applicable for cellular therapies.

  2. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    Collection and Apheresis Centers Closed 7 IIC. Immunogenetic Studies 8 IIC.1 Objective 1 – Influence of HLA Mismatches 8 Task 1 – Donor Recipient... Apheresis Centers – This task is closed. National Marrow Donor Program® N000014-11-1-0339 QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT Development of Medical Technology

  3. Blood and Bone Marrow Evaluation for Eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Daniel F

    2016-10-01

    Evaluation of peripheral blood and bone marrow for an indication of persistent eosinophilia can be a challenging task because there are many causes of eosinophilia and the morphologic differences between reactive and neoplastic causes are often subtle or lack specificity. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the differential diagnosis for eosinophilia, to recommend specific steps for the pathologist evaluating blood and bone marrow, and to emphasize 2 important causes of eosinophilia that require specific ancillary tests for diagnosis: myeloproliferative neoplasm with PDGFRA rearrangement and lymphocyte-variant hypereosinophilic syndrome.

  4. Bone marrow oedema associated with benign and malignant bone tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steven.james@roh.nhs.uk; Panicek, D.M. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, B31 2AP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Bone marrow oedema is associated with a wide variety of pathological processes including both benign and malignant bone tumours. This imaging finding in relation to intraosseous tumours can aid in providing a more focused differential diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the MR imaging of bone marrow oedema surrounding intraosseous neoplasms. The different pulse sequences used in differentiating underlying tumour from surrounding oedema are discussed along with the role of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. Benign lesions commonly associated with bone marrow oedema include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and Langerhan's cell histiocytosis. Metastases and malignant primary bone tumours such as osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and chondrosarcoma may also be surrounded by bone marrow oedema. The imaging findings of these conditions are reviewed and illustrated. Finally, the importance of bone marrow oedema in assessment of post chemotherapeutic response is addressed.

  5. Stem cell niche failure concerns bone marrow failure--a diagnostic and therapeutic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sujata; Chaudhuri, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the bone marrow often referred to as "Bone marrow failure" have complicated pathophysiological picture with respect to hematopoietic systemic function. The reason for such bone marrow disorder is not well understood till date, although some sporadic etiological sources have been described earlier. With the advent of current investigations, hematopoietic stem cell involvement together with the failure of signaling interaction within the bone marrow niche has been found to reveal interesting correlations with the disease onset. The present review furnishes justification for bone marrow failure as a concern of stem cell niche failure and hints at providing important clues for disease diagnosis and therapeutic maneuver.

  6. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    this quarter. for Selected Donors er P iod 4 Activity: IIB 1 Task 6: Maintain a Quality Control Program – This task is closed. National Marrow...interpret incoming SBT typings and process version 3 nomenclature on incoming typings. • Code moved to production on March 30th, 2011. IIB. Rapid...as DRB3/4/5 typing intent is known. • Calculated 6-locus A~C~B~DRB3/4/5~DRB1~DQB1 haplotype frequencies for HapLogic III evaluation. In contrast

  7. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Sourbron, Steven [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Duerr, Hans-Roland [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Baur-Melnyk, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.baur@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  8. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Osgood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT, also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management.

  9. Bone marrow edema syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V.; Lykissas, Marios G.; Beris, Alexandros E. [University of Ioannina, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Ioannina (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University of Crete School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Heraklion (Greece)

    2009-05-15

    Bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) refers to transient clinical conditions with unknown pathogenic mechanism, such as transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO), and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). BMES is primarily characterized by bone marrow edema (BME) pattern. The disease mainly affects the hip, the knee, and the ankle of middle-aged males. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology of BMES remains obscure. The hallmark that separates BMES from other conditions presented with BME pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Histological examination of the lesion is unnecessary. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is mainly used for the early diagnosis and monitoring the progression of the disease. Early differentiation from other aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities, such as TOH, RMO, and RSD are spontaneously resolving, and surgical treatment is not needed. On the other hand, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment in case of osteonecrosis is of crucial importance. (orig.)

  10. Immune Cell Isolation from Mouse Femur Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Quan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow is the site of hematopoesis and contains mixed population of blood cells including erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. The following protocol provides a simple and fast method for isolation of bone marrow immune cells (no erythrocytes) from mouse femurs with a yield of approximate 8 × 107 cells in 5 ml culture media (1.6 × 104 cells/μl). Further isolation or flow cytometric analysis might be required for study of sp...

  11. [Atrophy of the bone marrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziecioł, J; Kemona, A; Sulik, M; Sulkowski, S; Brykalska, A; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Ostapiuk, H

    1990-01-01

    The authors made a quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow with particular consideration of its atrophy in the course of various diseases. The material consisted of 407 non-selected autopsy cases. For a morphometric analysis the bone marrow was sampled from the sternum, ala ossis illi and spine. In the quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue we took into account age groups as quantitative changes appear with age. Atrophy of the bone marrow was in 19.4% of the studied cases. The presence of bone marrow atrophy was found in the course of various diseases, most frequently neoplastic, particularly in patients aged from 50 to 59 years.

  12. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  13. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  14. Qualitative Aspects of Bone Marrow Adiposity in Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford J Rosen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The function of marrow adipocytes and their origin has not been defined although considerable research has centered on their presence in certain conditions such as osteoporosis. Less work has focused on the qualitative aspects of marrow fat. Bone marrow serum is composed of multiple nutrients that almost certainly relate to functional aspects of the niche. Previous studies using non-­‐invasive techniques have shown that osteoporotic individuals have more marrow fat and that the ratio of saturated: unsaturated fatty acid is high. We recently reported that bone marrow sera from osteoporotic patients with fracture showed a switch toward decreased content of total saturated versus unsaturated fatty acids, compared to patients without fracture highlighting a dynamic relationship between the composition of fatty acids in the bone microenvironment and the metabolic requirements of cells. The relative distribution of fatty acids differed considerably from that in the serum providing further evidence that energy utilization is high and that marrow adipocytes may contribute to this pool. Whether these lipids can affect osteoblast function in a positive or negative manner is still not certain but will require further investigation.

  15. Spine fusion using cell matrix composites enriched in bone marrow-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschler, George F; Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2003-02-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal fusion model and cancellous bone matrix was used to compare an enriched cellular composite bone graft alone, bone matrix plus bone marrow clot, and an enriched bone matrix composite graft plus bone marrow clot. Union score, quantitative computed tomography, and mechanical testing were used to define outcome. The union score for the enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone and the bone matrix plus bone marrow clot. The enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite also was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone in fusion volume and in fusion area. These data confirm that the addition of a bone marrow clot to an enriched cell-matrix composite graft results in significant improvement in graft performance. Enriched composite grafts prepared using this strategy provide a rapid, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for intraoperative concentration and delivery of bone marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting.

  16. Performing a Better Bone Marrow Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlis, Mayo F; Centeno, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is increasingly being used to harvest stem cells for use in regenerative medicine. The focus of BMA in interventional orthopedics is to maximize the yield of mesenchymal stem cells. The authors present an improved method for BMA that involves fluoroscope or ultrasound guidance combined with anesthesia; in the authors' experience, it produces the highest possible stem cell yield and is well tolerated by patients. The authors provide a step-by-step guide to the process, along with a discussion of technical and other considerations and quick reference guides for ultrasound- and fluoroscope-guided BMA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bone Marrow Transplants: "Another Possibility at Life"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Bone Marrow Transplants “Another Possibility at Life” Past Issues / Summer 2011 ... for 16,000 of them, a bone marrow transplant is the best treatment option, notes Susan F. ...

  18. Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement Therapy (GRT) In Sickle Cell Anemia. ... manifesting clinical disease, while the heterozygoste(AS) are clinically ... medicine, we argue here the case for Bone marrow transplantation

  19. Hemophagocytosis on Bone Marrow Aspirate Cytology: Single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causes, clinical correlation and associated features on bone marrow ... on bone marrow examination between HLH and non HLH cases showing hemophagocytosis. Materials and .... hematopoietic cell transplantation HLH.[6] It should be.

  20. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  1. Bone marrow evaluation in small cell carcinoma of the lung. [Radiographic and nuclear medical examinations also performed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaccone, G.; Ciuffreda, L.; Donadio, M.; Ferrati, P.; Risio, M.; Leria, G.; Bonardi, G.; Calciati, A.

    1987-01-01

    Bone marrow examination is commonly included in the staging of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). We reviewed marrow samples of 103 patients. Marrow examination was mainly performed by unilateral or bilateral biopsy of iliac crests, using a Jamshidi needle. Only 6 of 97 evaluable cases (6.2%) were positive for marrow metastases at staging, and in 3 cases (3%) bone marrow was the only metastatic site. No focal metastases were found in additional sections made from the blocks of negative samples. In our experience bone marrow biopsy was of little value in staging SCLC. Bilateral biopsy plus aspirate, with the addition of more sophisticated staining techniques might, however, provide a higher yield of positive marrow involvement.

  2. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations.

  3. [Gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemona, A; Dziecioł, J; Sulik, M; Brykalska, A; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Baltaziak, M

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and histopathologic picture of gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow were analysed in non-selected autopsy material. It was found that gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow occurred in terminal stages of various diseases (malignant neoplasms, chronic inflammation). Histological studies showed that gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow led to atrophy of the hematopoietic and adipose tissues of the bone marrow and accumulation of acid mucopolysaccharides. The patients with gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow exhibit hematologic disorders, most frequently anemia and thrombocytopenia.

  4. Use of gene marking in bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, H E; Rooney, C M; Rill, D R; Krance, R A; Brenner, M K

    1996-01-01

    We have used gene marking to investigate the mechanism of relapse and biology of reconstitution following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The rationale for our initial protocols was to learn if residual malignant cells in autologous marrow contribute to subsequent relapse. Marked malignant cells were found at the time of relapse in 6/8 patients relapsing after autologous BMT for AML or neuroblastoma showing the infused marrow contributed to disease recurrence. Modifications of this marker approach with two distinguishable vectors are now being used to compare the efficacy of purging techniques. We were also able to evaluate gene transfer to normal progenitors and demonstrated that the marker gene was expressed for up to 36 months. Gene marking is also being used to trace the fate of EBV-specific CTLs that we are administering to recipients of allogeneic BMT and has provided evidence of persistence of adoptively transferred CTL for up to 10 months.

  5. Bone marrow failure syndromes and refractory cytopenia of childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Aalbers (Anna Maartje)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Hematopoiesis, or blood cell production, is sustained through hematopoietic stem cells, which are self-renewing cells that reside in the bone marrow, and that are capable of producing daughter cells that proliferate and mature to provide all adult blood effector cells,

  6. Frequency and natural history of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes: the Israeli Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamary, Hannah; Nishri, Daniella; Yacobovich, Joanne; Zilber, Rama; Dgany, Orly; Krasnov, Tanya; Aviner, Shraga; Stepensky, Polina; Ravel-Vilk, Shoshana; Bitan, Menachem; Kaplinsky, Chaim; Ben Barak, Ayelet; Elhasid, Ronit; Kapelusnik, Joseph; Koren, Ariel; Levin, Carina; Attias, Dina; Laor, Ruth; Yaniv, Isaac; Rosenberg, Philip S; Alter, Blanche P

    2010-08-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are rare genetic disorders characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and cancer predisposition. Available single disease registries provide reliable information regarding natural history, efficacy and side effects of treatments, and contribute to the discovery of the causative genes. However, these registries could not shed light on the true incidence of the various syndromes. We, therefore, established an Israeli national registry in order to investigate the relative frequency of each of these syndromes and their complications. Patients were registered by their hematologists in all 16 medical centers in Israel. We included patients with Fanconi anemia, severe congenital neutropenia, Diamond-Blackfan anemia, congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, dyskeratosis congenita, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, and thrombocytopenia with absent radii. One hundred and twenty-seven patients diagnosed between 1966 and 2007 were registered. Fifty-two percent were found to have Fanconi anemia, 17% severe congenital neutropenia, 14% Diamond-Blackfan anemia, 6% congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, 5% dyskeratosis congenita, 2% Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, and 2% thrombocytopenia with absent radii. No specific diagnosis was made in only 2 patients. Of the thirty patients (24%) developing severe bone marrow failure, 80% had Fanconi anemia. Seven of 9 patients with leukemia had Fanconi anemia, as did all 6 with solid tumors. Thirty-four patients died from their disease; 25 (74%) had Fanconi anemia and 6 (17%) had severe congenital neutropenia. This is the first comprehensive population-based study evaluating the incidence and complications of the different inherited bone marrow failure syndromes. By far the most common disease was Fanconi anemia, followed by severe congenital neutropenia and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Fanconi anemia carried the worst prognosis, with severe bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility

  7. Bone marrow edema in sports: General concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M. [AZ Sint-Maarten Duffel-Mechelen, Department of Radiology, Rooienberg 25, B-2570 Duffel (Belgium) and University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium)]. E-mail: filip.vanhoenacker@telenet.be; Snoeckx, A. [AZ Sint-Maarten Duffel-Mechelen, Department of Radiology, Rooienberg 25, B-2570 Duffel (Belgium); University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium)

    2007-04-15

    This paper will discuss the value of medical imaging in the detection and follow-up of bone marrow edema (BME), resulting from acute and chronic trauma in sports. MR imaging is the only imaging technique that allows direct evaluation of bone marrow edema in sports medicine. The use of fat suppressed T2-weighted or STIR images is particularly appropriate to detect bone marrow edema. The extent of bone marrow edema reflects the biomechanics of trauma. Compressive forces between two bony structures will result in extensive areas of bone marrow edema, whereas distraction forces provoke more subtle areas of bone marrow edema at the insertion of supporting structures of joints. In most clinical situations, a combination of compression and distraction forces is present, causing a complex pattern of bone marrow edema. A meticulous pattern approach of the distribution of these bone marrow changes around a joint can reveal in most instances the underlying mechanism of trauma. This may be helpful to analyze which joint supporting structures may be at risk. In the acute setting, plain radiography and CT scan may have an additional role in the detection of small avulsion fractures occurring at the site of minor areas of bone marrow edema. The clinical significance and natural history of bone marrow edema is still a matter of debate.

  8. Perfusion Method for Intra-bone Marrow Collection and Stem Cell Transplantation: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korrapati, Narasimhulu; Nanganuru, Harikrishna Yadav

    2014-03-19

    A bone marrow transplant is a procedure to replace damaged or destroyed bone marrow with healthy bone marrow stem cells. Bone marrow is the soft, fatty tissue inside our bones. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a powerful strategy for the treatment of leukemia, aplastic anemia, congenital immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases. In humans, bone marrow cells (BMCs) have usually been collected by multiple bone marrow aspirations from the iliac crest. We have established a new "perfusion" method for collecting BMCs with minimal contamination with the peripheral blood using the long bones of cynomolgus monkeys. This method has proven to be a simple and safe method for harvesting BMCs and reduces the risk of acute graft versus host disease in allogeneic BMT. Intra-bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT) provides distinct advantages because it recruits donor-derived hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. IBM-BMT has been shown to currently be the best strategy for allogeneic BMT. Here we review the perfusion method (for harvesting BMCs) and IBM-BMT (for their transplantation) and show that this combination will become a powerful new clinical strategy for allogeneic BMT.

  9. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, G. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Shaprio, R.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Abdelwahab, I.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  10. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  11. Last marrow standing: bone marrow transplantation for acquired bone marrow failure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerds, Aaron T; Scott, Bart L

    2012-12-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, aplastic anemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome are a spectrum of acquired marrow failure, having a common pathologic thread of both immune dysregulation and the development of abnormal hematopoiesis. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation plays a critical role in the treatment of these disorders and, for many patients, is the only treatment modality with demonstrated curative potential. In recent years, there have been many breakthroughs in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these uncommon disorders. The subsequent advances in non-transplant therapies, along with concurrent improvement in outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation, necessitate continual appraisal of the indications, timing, and approaches to transplantation for acquired marrow failure syndromes. We review here contemporary and critical new findings driving current treatment decisions.

  12. Needs and experiences of family caregivers during marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, K M; McDonald, J C; Compton, K

    1996-10-01

    To determine the information needs of family members of people undergoing marrow transplantation as well as their actions to meet those needs. Descriptive, cross-sectional, qualitative design. Marrow transplant units in the Pacific Northwestern United States. 19 adult family members of people who had undergone marrow transplants. Researchers conducted four focus group interviews. Three served as data generation interviews, and the fourth served as the validation interview. A transcriptionist recorded the subjects' responses, which then were analyzed using constant comparative techniques. Themes emerged from the data in five categories: (a) Preparing for Caregiving (seeking and acquiring health care, obtaining information and materials, and evaluating the validity of information), (b) Managing the Care (providing physical care, protecting, maintaining the patient's connection with life, and advocating), (c) Facing Challenges (personal and interpersonal stress, communication barriers with healthcare professionals, and healthcare system barriers), (d) Developing Supportive Strategies (community resources, personal and self-care resources, and healthcare system facilitators), and (e) Discovering Unanticipated Rewards and Benefits (personal growth and family cohesion). Family members, as well as patients undergoing marrow transplant, experience a unique set of information needs and demands as a result of this experience. However, these demands can be mitigated by actions that provide appropriate education strategies and foster a sense of caring and a nurturing way of interacting among the family, healthcare professionals, and the healthcare system. Healthcare professionals need to acknowledge the caregiving role and actively involve and support the family caregiver throughout the transplant experience.

  13. ISSLS PRIZE IN BASIC SCIENCE 2017: Intervertebral disc/bone marrow cross-talk with Modic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudli, Stefan; Sing, David C; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd H; Burch, Shane; Deviren, Vedat; Cheng, Ivan; Tay, Bobby K B; Alamin, Todd F; Ith, Ma Agnes Martinez; Pietras, Eric M; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2017-05-01

    Cross-sectional cohort analysis of patients with Modic Changes (MC). Our goal was to characterize the molecular and cellular features of MC bone marrow and adjacent discs. We hypothesized that MC associate with biologic cross-talk between discs and bone marrow, the presence of which may have both diagnostic and therapeutic implications. MC are vertebral bone marrow lesions that can be a diagnostic indicator for discogenic low back pain. Yet, the pathobiology of MC is largely unknown. Patients with Modic type 1 or 2 changes (MC1, MC2) undergoing at least 2-level lumbar interbody fusion with one surgical level having MC and one without MC (control level). Two discs (MC, control) and two bone marrow aspirates (MC, control) were collected per patient. Marrow cellularity was analyzed using flow cytometry. Myelopoietic differentiation potential of bone marrow cells was quantified to gauge marrow function, as was the relative gene expression profiles of the marrow and disc cells. Disc/bone marrow cross-talk was assessed by comparing MC disc/bone marrow features relative to unaffected levels. Thirteen MC1 and eleven MC2 patients were included. We observed pro-osteoclastic changes in MC2 discs, an inflammatory dysmyelopoiesis with fibrogenic changes in MC1 and MC2 marrow, and up-regulation of neurotrophic receptors in MC1 and MC2 bone marrow and discs. Our data reveal a fibrogenic and pro-inflammatory cross-talk between MC bone marrow and adjacent discs. This provides insight into the pain generator at MC levels and informs novel therapeutic targets for treatment of MC-associated LBP.

  14. Editorial: T cell memory, bone marrow, and aging: the good news

    OpenAIRE

    Effros, Rita B.

    2012-01-01

    Discussion on the accumulating evidence that bone marrow in old age is not simply the place where immune cells are generated but the where certain memory cells selectively return to provide a set of distinct immune functions during old age.

  15. Effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on the proliferation of bone marrow CD34~+ cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王荣

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect on the marrow CD34+ cells by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMMSC),VarioMACS was used to sort bone marrow CD34+ cells,and then the purity of CD34+ cell was tested by FCM. Marrow mononuclear cells from abortion fetal bone marrow were isolated,and BMMSC were

  16. Neurokinin-1 receptor signalling impacts bone marrow repopulation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Berger

    Full Text Available Tachykinins are a large group of neuropeptides with both central and peripheral activity. Despite the increasing number of studies reporting a growth supportive effect of tachykinin peptides in various in vitro stem cell systems, it remains unclear whether these findings are applicable in vivo. To determine how neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R deficient hematopoietic stem cells would behave in a normal in vivo environment, we tested their reconstitution efficiency using competitive bone marrow repopulation assays. We show here that bone marrow taken from NK-1R deficient mice (Tacr1(-/- showed lineage specific B and T cell engraftment deficits compared to wild-type competitor bone marrow cells, providing evidence for an involvement of NK-1R signalling in adult hematopoiesis. Tachykinin knockout mice lacking the peptides SP and/or HK-1 (Tac1 (-/-, Tac4 (-/- and Tac1 (-/-/Tac4 (-/- mice repopulated a lethally irradiated wild-type host with similar efficiency as competing wild-type bone marrow. The difference between peptide and receptor deficient mice indicates a paracrine and/or endocrine mechanism of action rather than autocrine signalling, as tachykinin peptides are supplied by the host environment.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a severe disorder that usually begins ...

  18. Large-scale gene expression profiling data of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody; Jacobi, Angela; Vater, Corina; Schildberg, Theresa; Liebers, Cornelia; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Bretschneider, Henriette

    2016-09-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, "in vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors" [1]. Osteoarthritis (OA) represents the main indication for total joint arthroplasty and is one of the most frequent degenerative joint disorders. However, the exact etiology of OA remains unknown. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and provide an excellent source of progenitor cells. The data shows the identification of pivotal genes and pathways involved in osteoarthritis by comparing gene expression patterns of BMSCs from osteoarthritic versus healthy donors using an array-based approach.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  20. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-label

  1. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  2. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hoffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuya, Tomoo; Inoue, Tomio; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Aoki, Jun; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    To clarify the contrast-enhancement pattern of the normal hematopoietic element by isolating the signal of the water fraction in vertebral bone marrow and to investigate whether this approach can be used to characterize bone marrow pathology in several diffuse bone marrow diseases. Two groups were examined: 30 normal healthy volunteers and 19 patients with primary diffuse bone marrow disease (aplastic anemia [n=8], myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) [n=5], chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML) [n=4], polycythemia vera [n=2]). Isolation of the signal of hematopoietic tissue was done by the chemical-shift misregistration effect. Twenty consecutive T1-weighted midsagittal lumber vertebral images were obtained immediately after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, and the pattern of the time-intensity curve, the peak contrast-enhancement (CE) ratio, and the washout rate (%/min) of bone marrow in normal volunteers were compared with those in patients suffering from primary diffuse bone marrow disease. The pattern of the time-intensity curve of patients with aplastic anemia showed a low peak value followed by a slow washout. However, the pattern of time-intensity curves in patients with MDS, CML, and polycythemia vera was similar to that of normal volunteers. The peak CE ratio of the water fraction in normal marrow ranged from 0.45 to 1.26 (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.87{+-}0.18). Patients with aplastic anemia showed an abnormally lower peak CE ratio of the water fraction (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.34{+-}0.19, p<0.0001). On the other hand, the peak CE ratio of the water fraction in patients with MDS was significantly higher than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D. 1.35{+-}0.39, p<0.05). In contrast, the peak CE ratio of patients with CML or polycythemia vera did not differ significantly from that of normal volunteers. The mean washout rate of patients with aplastic anemia was significantly lower than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D.: 3.50{+-}2.51 %/min

  4. Bone marrow transplantation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, P J; Armitage, J O

    1993-08-01

    The bone marrow transplant program at UNMC is currently one of the most active programs in the country. The benefits to patients who are cured of disease by transplantation cannot be measured. The large volume of clinical and basic science research related to transplantation has enhanced the academic stature of UNMC. The combination of patient care, education, clinical research, and basic science research provides an excellent model for the operation of an academic medical institution.

  5. Neutrophils, from marrow to microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2010-01-01

    . Neutrophils circulate in the blood as dormant cells. At sites of infection, endothelial cells capture bypassing neutrophils and guide them through the endothelial cell lining whereby the neutrophils are activated and tuned for the subsequent interaction with microbes. Once in tissues, neutrophils kill......Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow from stem cells that proliferate and differentiate to mature neutrophils fully equipped with an armory of granules. These contain proteins that enable the neutrophil to deliver lethal hits against microorganisms, but also to cause great tissue damage...... microorganisms by microbicidal agents liberated from granules or generated by metabolic activation. As a final act, neutrophils can extrude stands of DNA with bactericidal proteins attached that act as extracellular traps for microorganisms....

  6. Bone marrow examination in pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, M; Prabhu; Nandini, N M; Manjunath, G V

    2012-08-01

    Pancytopenia is defined by reduction of all the three formed elements of blood below the normal reference. It may be a manifestation of a wide variety of disorders, which primarily or secondarily affect the bone marrow. Haematological investigation forms the bedrock in the management of patients with pancytopenia and therefore needs detailed study. The total number of cases studied were 100 over a period of two years in the department of pathology, JSS Hospital, Mysore. Megaloblastic anaemia (33%) was the commonest cause of pancytopenia. Other causes were nutritional anaemia (16%), aplastic anaemia (14%), hypersplenism (10%), sepsis (9%) and leukaemia (5%). Less common causes were alcoholic liver disease, haemolytic anaemia, HIV, dengue, systemic lupus erythematosus, viral hepatitis, disseminated TB and multiple myeloma. Most of the patients were in the age group of 11-30 years with a male:female ratio of 1.6:1.Generalised weakness and fatigue (88%) were the commonest presenting complaints. Haemoglobin level varied from 1-10 g/dl with majorIty (70%) of them in the range of 5.1-10 g/dI. TLC was in the range of 500-4000 cells/cmm. Most (34%) of them had 3100-4000 cells/cmm. Platelet count was in the range of 4000-1,40,000 cells/cmm. Reticulocyte count varied from 0.1%-15% with majority (82%) of them ranging from 0.1%-2%. The bone marrow cellularity was hypocellular in 14%, hypercellular in 75%, and normocellular in 11% of the patients. Pancytopenia is a relatively common entity with inadequate attention in Indian subcontinent. A comprehensive clinical and haematological study of patients with pancytopenia will usually help in the identification of the underlying cause. However in view of wide array of aetiologies, pancytopenia continues to be a diagnostic challenge for haematologists.

  7. Therapy Effect: Impact on Bone Marrow Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K David; Salama, Mohamed E

    2016-03-01

    This article highlights the most common morphologic features identified in the bone marrow after chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies, growth-stimulating agents, and specific targeted therapies. The key is to be aware of these changes while reviewing post-therapeutic bone marrow biopsies and to not mistake reactive patterns for neoplastic processes. In addition, given the development and prevalent use of targeted therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immune modulators, knowledge of drug-specific morphologic changes is required for proper bone marrow interpretation and diagnosis.

  8. Bone marrow transplantation. [Mice, gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storb, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1979-03-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been increasingly used to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency diseases, severe aplastic anemia, and malignant hematologic diseases, especially leukemia. At the Workshop a number of problems were discussed, e.g., conditioning regimens aimed at overcoming the problem of marrow graft rejection and reducing the incidence of recurrent leukemia, prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), possible mechanisms involved in stable graft-host tolerance, graft-versus-leukemia effect in mice, and finally, the possible use of autologous marrow transplantation.

  9. Cystoid macular edema after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetan Vikas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cystoid macular edema in a patient who underwent bone marrow transplant for aplastic anemia. After having ruled out all the other causes of cystoid macular edema, we concluded that it was secondary to the bone marrow transplant. The patient had mild visual impairment and did not recover the lost vision. In this case report, we describe in detail the clinical presentation, follow-up, and course of medication that this patient had. It is an illustrated case report of cystoid macular edema after bone marrow transplant with mild visual impairment and no recovery.

  10. Lymphoma associated bone marrow necrosis with raised anticardiolipin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P T; Sivakumaran, M; Casey, M C; Liddicoat, A; Wood, J K

    1998-05-01

    A case of high grade B cell lymphoma presented with bone marrow necrosis, followed by development of extensive marrow fibrosis, the evolution of which was documented by serial magnetic resonance imaging and bone marrow trephine histology. A markedly raised anticardiolipin antibody titre at diagnosis suggests that lymphoma associated antiphospholipid syndrome may have contributed to the aetiology of the bone marrow necrosis.

  11. Engineering a human bone marrow model: a case study on ex vivo erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantalaris, A; Keng, P; Bourne, P; Chang, A Y; Wu, J H

    1998-01-01

    Bone marrow, with its intricate, three-dimensional tissue structure facilitating cell-cell interactions, provides a microenvironment supporting the production of hundreds of billions of multilineal blood cells everyday. We have developed a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system in which marrow cells are cultured in a reactor packed with porous microspheres. The culture supports a three-dimensional growth configuration and multilineal hemopoiesis mimicking the bone marrow in vivo. We studied ex vivo human erythropoiesis using the three-dimensional culture system. The system sustained extensive erythropoiesis at low erythropoietin concentrations (0.2 U/mL), plus stem cell factor, interleukin-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and insulin-like growth factor-I. Erythroid cell production lasted for more than 5 weeks, and the percentage of erythroid cells in the nonadherent cell population was approximately 60%. Flow cytometric analysis using cell surface markers specific for erythroid cells (CD71 and glycophorin-A) indicated that the culture produced early, intermediate, and late erythroid cells. As the culture progressed, the erythroid cell population shifted gradually toward mature cell types. When compared to the three-dimensional culture, the traditional flask cultures failed to support extensive erythropoiesis under the same conditions. This indicates that the three-dimensional bone marrow culture system provides a microenvironment conducive to erythropoiesis under more physiological conditions and is a better bone marrow model.

  12. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  13. Bone marrow scan evaluation of arthropathy in sickle cell disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.; Schumacher, H.R.; Dorwart, B.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1976-04-01

    Twelve patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and arthropathy were studied, using technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid bone marrow scans. Eight of 12 had decreased marrow radionuclide activity adjacent to painful joints, suggesting obliteration of vessels supplying bone marrow. Four patients without marrow defects on scanning had causes other than infarction for their joint symptoms, viz, small fractures, postinfectious synovitis, degenerative arthritis, and osteochondromas. Roentgenograms never showed bony abnormalities in five patients with marrow infarctions, and, in three others, showed defects several months later than did the marrow scans. Bone marrow scans offer a sensitive and early diagnostic aid in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies with arthropathy.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Porse, Bo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONBone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) are primary macrophage cells, derived from bone marrow cells in vitro in the presence of growth factors. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a lineage-specific growth factor that is responsible for the proliferation and differentiation...... of committed myeloid progenitors into cells of the macrophage/monocyte lineage. Mice lacking functional M-CSF are deficient in macrophages and osteoclasts and suffer from osteopetrosis. In this protocol, bone marrow cells are grown in culture dishes in the presence of M-CSF, which is secreted by L929 cells...... and is used in the form of L929-conditioned medium. Under these conditions, the bone marrow monocyte/macrophage progenitors will proliferate and differentiate into a homogenous population of mature BMMs. The efficiency of the differentiation is assessed using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS...

  15. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Del Grande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted.

  16. The pathology of bone marrow failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguit, Roos J; van den Tweel, Jan G

    2010-11-01

    An important indication for bone marrow investigation is the presence of bone marrow failure, which manifests itself as (pan)cytopenia. The causes of cytopenia are varied and differ considerably between childhood and adulthood. In the paediatric age group inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are important causes of bone marrow failure, but they play only a minor role in later life. This review gives a comprehensive overview of bone marrow failure disorders in children and adults. We classified the causes of bone marrow failure according to the main presenting haematological abnormality, i.e. anaemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia. The following red cell disorders are discussed: red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anaemia, congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia, haemolytic anaemia, paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, iron deficiency anaemia, anaemia of chronic disease and megaloblastic anaemia. The neutropenias occur in the context of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), severe congenital neutropenia, cyclic neutropenia, immune-related neutropenia and non-immune neutropenia. In addition, the following causes of thrombocytopenia are discussed: congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopenia with absent radii, immune-related thrombocytopenia and non-immune thrombocytopenia. Finally, we pay attention to the following pancytopenic disorders: Fanconi anaemia, dyskeratosis congenita, aplastic anaemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  17. Osterix-cre labeled progenitor cells contribute to the formation and maintenance of the bone marrow stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Liu

    Full Text Available We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma.

  18. Osterix-Cre Labeled Progenitor Cells Contribute to the Formation and Maintenance of the Bone Marrow Stroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W.; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma. PMID:23951132

  19. Bone marrow edema of the knee joint; Differenzialdiagnosen des Knochenmarkoedems am Kniegelenk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria). Institut fuer Radiologie; Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria). Abteilung Osteologie; Kramer, J. [Institut fuer CT- und MRT-Diagnostik, Linz (Austria); Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria). Abteilung Osteologie; Aigner, N. [Orthopaedisches Krankenhaus Speising, Erste Orthopaedische Abteilung, Wien (Austria); Hofmann, S. [LKH Stolzalpe (Austria). Orthopaedische Abteilung

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow edema of the knee joint is a frequent clinical picture in MR diagnostics. It can be accompanied by symptoms and pain in the joint. Diseases that are associated with bone marrow edema can be classified into different groups. Group 1 includes vascular ischemic bone marrow edema with osteonecrosis (synonyms: SONK or Ahlbaeck's disease), osteochondrosis dissecans, and bone marrow edema syndrome. Group 2 comprises traumatic or mechanical bone marrow edema. Group 3 encompasses reactive bone marrow edemas such as those occurring in gonarthrosis, postoperative bone marrow edemas, and reactive edemas in tumors or tumorlike diseases. Evidence for bone marrow edema is effectively provided by MRI, but purely morphological MR information is often unspecific so that anamnestic and clinical details are necessary in most cases for definitive disease classification. (orig.) [German] Das Knochenmarkoedem des Kniegelenks ist ein haeufiges Erscheinungsbild in der MR-Diagnostik. Es kann mit Symptomen und Schmerzen des Gelenks einhergehen. Erkrankungen, die mit einem Knochenmarkoedem vergesellschaftet sind, koennen in verschiedene Gruppen eingeteilt werden. Zur 1. Gruppe gehoeren das vaskulaer-ischaemische Knochenmarkoedem mit Osteonekrose (Synonyme SONK oder Morbus Ahlbaeck), die Osteochondrosis dissecans und das Knochenmarkoedemsyndrom, zur 2. Gruppe das traumatologische oder mechanische Knochenmarkoedem. In der 3. Gruppe werden reaktive Knochenmarkoedeme zusammengefasst wie bei Gonarthrose, postoperative Knochenmarkoedeme und reaktive Oedeme bei Tumor oder tumoraehnlichen Erkrankungen. Der Nachweis eines Knochenmarkoedems gelingt mit der MRT sehr sensitiv, die rein morphologische MR-Information ist jedoch oft unspezifisch, sodass anamnestische und klinische Informationen fuer die sichere Zuordnung einer Erkrankung in den meisten Faellen notwendig sind. (orig.)

  20. Occupational therapy and the pediatric division of bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Clemente Idemori

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bone Marrow Transplantation may cause a series of restrictions to patients. The child’s illness and hospitalization may further change daily life activities, playing and school routine; and social interaction, which will interfere in occupational roles. The occupational therapy procedures seek to provide a more accessible experience in hospital concerning the possibilities of involvement, favoring the child’s development through activities. Objective: This study aimed to describe the practice of an occupational therapist during therapeutic process with a school age child who has undergone bone marrow transplantation. Method: This is a qualitative research with a case study approach. Data was collected with a short form of personal and professional identification and characterization, and a semi-structured interview script. The interview was fully transcribed, and analyzed under the content analysis overview. Through the content obtained in the interviews, it was possible to raise four categories: occupational roles affected by illness, hospitalization; occupational therapy processes; benefits to children by the occupational therapy activities; and, successful practices: essential factors and theoretical principles. Results: The results showed that the occupational therapist took on roles as mediator between the hospital and the child’s original environment, and the relations to family, hospital team, towards the child’s needs and his/her life experience (school, family, hospital. Conclusion: It is expected that this study may contribute to the knowledge and propagation of the practice being developed by the therapists in children with bone marrow transplantation.

  1. Effects of sublethal irradiation on patterns of engraftment after murine bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jacob; Ge, Shundi; Symbatyan, Goar; Rosol, Michael S; Olch, Arthur J; Crooks, Gay M

    2011-05-01

    Attempts to reduce the toxicity of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have led to the use of various immunosuppressive, yet nonmyeloablative preparative regimens that often include low-dose irradiation. To determine the effects of low-dose irradiation on the dynamics of donor cell engraftment after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), we coupled standard endpoint flow cytometric analysis with in vivo longitudinal bioluminescence imaging performed throughout the early (bone marrow. Flow cytometric analysis showed that sublethal doses of total body irradiation (TBI) significantly increased long-term (14 weeks) donor chimerism in the bone marrow compared with nonirradiated recipients (P bone marrow, confirming that sublethal irradiation does not enhance marrow chimerism early after transplantation. Local irradiation also significantly increased late (but not early) donor chimerism in the irradiated limb. Intrafemoral injection of donor cells provided efficient early chimerism in the injected limb, but long-term systemic donor chimerism was highest with i.v. administration (P marrow space. These findings suggest that the major effect of sublethal irradiation is to enhance long-term donor chimerism by inducing proliferative signals after the initial phase of homing.

  2. Global transcriptome analysis of T-competent progenitors in the bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vionnie W.C. Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available T cells are known to develop in the thymus. However, molecular events that control the transition from hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow to T precursor cells seeded in the thymus remained poorly defined. Our recent report showed that osteocalcin (Ocn-expressing bone cells in the bone marrow have major impact on T cell immunity by regulating T progenitor development in the bone marrow (Yu et al., 2015 [1]. Selective endogenous depletion of Ocn+ cells by inducible diphtheria toxin receptor expression (OcnCre;iDTR led to reduction of T-competent common lymphoid progenitors (Ly6D− CLPs in the bone marrow and loss of T cells in the thymus. Expression of the Notch ligand DLL4 by Ocn+ cells in the bone marrow ensures the production of Ly6D− CLPs, and expression of chemotactic molecules CCR7 and PSGL1 to enable subsequent thymic seeding. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell based adaptive immunity. Here we present the transcriptome profiles of Ly6D− CLPs derived from Ocn+ cells deleted mice (OcnCre+;iDTR compared to those derived from control littermates (OcnCre−;iDTR. These data are publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE66102.

  3. Noninvasive optical measurement of bone marrow lesions: a Monte Carlo study on visible human dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow is both the main hematopoietic and important immune organ. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a series of severe complications and even myeloma. The traditional diagnosis of BMLs rely on mostly bone marrow biopsy/ puncture, and sometimes MRI, X-ray, and etc., which are either invasive and dangerous, or ionizing and costly. A diagnosis technology with advantages in noninvasive, safe, real-time continuous detection, and low cost is requested. Here we reported our preliminary exploration of feasibility verification of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in clinical diagnosis of BMLs by Monte Carlo simulation study. We simulated and visualized the light propagation in the bone marrow quantitatively with a Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media and Visible Chinese Human data set, which faithfully represents human anatomy. The results indicate that bone marrow actually has significant effects on light propagation. According to a sequence of simulation and data analysis, the optimal source-detector separation was suggested to be narrowed down to 2.8-3.2cm, at which separation the spatial sensitivity distribution of NIRS cover the most region of bone marrow with high signal-to-noise ratio. The display of the sources and detectors were optimized as well. This study investigated the light transport in spine addressing to the BMLs detection issue and reported the feasibility of NIRS detection of BMLs noninvasively in theory. The optimized probe design of the coming NIRS-based BMLs detector is also provided.

  4. Selective retention of bone marrow-derived cells to enhance spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschler, George F; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A; Valdevit, Antonio D; Kambic, Helen E; Davros, William J; Easley, Kirk A; Powell, Kimerly A

    2005-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings.

  5. Haploidentical bone marrow transplantation in leukemia and genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, M; Maximova, N; Rabusin, M; Vujic, D; Bunjevacki, G; Vidali, C; Beorchia, A

    2000-11-01

    From 1986 to June 2000, sixty children suffering from acute and chronic leukemia (n = 42, 33 of which in resistant relapse), genetic diseases (n = 11), aplastic anemia (n = 2, one of which with platelet refractoriness and bleeding), myelodysplasia (n = 5) received an haploidentical bone marrow, mismatched for 2-3 HLA loci. The donor's marrow was treated in vitro with vincristine and methylprednisolone to obtain a functional T depletion (MLC and CTL inhibition, functional blockade of Th1 and Th2). The prevalence of infectious complications and GVHD was similar to that recorded in matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplants. In situations of high risk of rejection (chronic leukemia, genetic diseases) we infused immediately one half of the harvest and then frozen aliquots from the second week. Of the 25 ALL and 8 AML in resistant relapse, 3 survived, disease-free at 14, 8 and 1 years respectively. Of the 3 ALL, transplanted during remission, 1 is surviving at 18 months. Of the 6 CML, 1 had fractionated bone marrow and is surviving at 3 years, and 5 had standard single dose infusion and died of progression of their disease after rejection of the graft (4) or blast crisis after complete engraftment (1). The 2 patients with aplastic anemia, those with myelodysplasia, and 6 of the 10 with genetic disorders died of transplant-related complications or disease progression. 4 patients with osteopetrosis (n = 2), MLD (n = 1), Wiskott Aldrich dis. (n = 1) survive at 8, 2, 5 and 1.5 years respectively. In patients transplanted with fractionated marrow GVHD > 2nd grade occurred in 15%. Only one patient rejected the graft. Compared with MUD transplantation, mismatched BMT whenever performed in patients in good conditions provides similar outcome and widens the donor availability.

  6. Usefulness of bone marrow magnetic resonance imaging and indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy in patients with various hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Umekawa, Tsunekazu; Chikayama, Satoshi [Osaka General Hospital of West Japan Railway Compapy (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and indium-111 chloride (In-111) scintigraphy to assess bone marrow in various hematological lesions. The subjects were 7 with aplastic anemia (AA), 4 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 3 with polycythemia (PC), 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 2 with multiple myeloma (MM), 2 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 3 with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), one with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and one with secondary anemia due to chronic inflammation (SA). Bone marrow cellularity was assessed on MR images and both uptake and tissue distribution were assessed on In-111 scintigraphy. Hypo-cellularity was seen in all AA patients, but not seen in any other patient in each group. On the other hand, hyper-cellularity was seen in 3 MDS, one PC, all 3 ET, one ALL, and one SA patients. In the group of MM, the vertebral body was seen as heterogenous signal intensity on MR images. Bone marrow was seen as iso-intensity in one MDS, 2 PC, all 2 MGUS, and all 3 ITP patients. In-111 scintigraphy showed decrease or disappearance of tracer uptake and decreased tissue distribution in all 7 AA, one MDS, one PC, and one ALL patients. Increased tracer uptake and enlarged tissue distribution were seen in one MDS, one PC, and one SA patients. One MDS, one ET, all 2 MM, all 2 MGUS, all 3 ITP patients had tracer uptake and tissue distribution that were equal to those in the normal tissues. Since MR imaging and In-111 scintigraphy provided qualitatively different information, the combination of both modalities would contribute to the understanding of bone marrow condition in hematopoietic diseases. (N.K.).

  7. The influence of therapeutic radiation on the patterns of bone marrow in ovary-intact and ovariectomized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Hui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The functional components of bone marrow (i.e., the hematopoietic and stromal populations and the adjacent bone have traditionally been evaluated incompletely as distinct entities rather than the integrated system. We perturbed this system in vivo using a medically relevant radiation model in the presence or absence of ovarian function to understand integrated tissue interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ovary-intact and ovariectomized mice underwent either no radiation or single fractional 16 Gy radiation to the caudal skeleton (I ± R, OVX ± R. Marrow fat, hematopoietic cellularity, and cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV % were assessed. Ovariectomy alone did not significantly reduce marrow cellularity in non-irradiated mice (OVX-R vs. I-R, p = 0.8445 after 30 days; however it impaired the hematopoietic recovery of marrow following radiation exposure (OVX+R vs. I+R, p = 0.0092. The combination of radiation and OVX dramatically increases marrow fat compared to either factor alone (p = 0.0062. The synergistic effect was also apparent in the reduction of hematopoietic marrow cellularity (p = 0.0661; however it was absent in BV/TV% changes (p = 0.2520. The expected inverse relationship between marrow adiposity vs. hematopoietic cellularity and bone volume was observed. Interestingly compared with OVX mice, intact mice demonstrated double the reduction in hematopoietic cellularity and a tenfold greater degree of bone loss for a given unit of expansion in marrow fat. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ovariectomy prior to delivery of a clinically-relevant focal radiation exposure in mice, exacerbated post-radiation adipose accumulation in the marrow space but blunted bone loss and hematopoietic suppression. In the normally coupled homeostatic relationship between the bone and marrow domains, OVX appears to alter feedback mechanisms. Confirmation of this non-linear phenomenon (presumably due to differential radiosensitivity and

  8. Shifting bone marrow edema of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moosikasuwan, Josh B.; Schultz, Elizabeth [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, NY 11030, Manhasset (United States); Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, NY 11030, Manhasset (United States); Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 825 Northern Boulevard, NY 11021, Great Neck (United States); Math, Kevin [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, First Avenue at 16th Street, NY 10003, New York (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe shifting bone marrow edema in the knee as the MR imaging feature of intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee. Five men, aged 45-73 years, were referred by orthopedic surgeons for MR imaging evaluation of knee pain, which had been present for 2 weeks to 6 months. One patient had a prior history of blunt trauma. None had risk factors for osteonecrosis. Four patients had two MR examinations and the patient with prior blunt trauma had four. Plain radiographs were obtained in all patients. In all cases, a large area of marrow edema initially involved a femoral condyle, with migration of the bone marrow edema to the other femoral condyle, tibia, and/or patella occurring over a 2- to 4-month period. Adjacent soft tissue edema was present in all five patients, while none had a joint effusion. Radiographs of two patients showed generalized osteopenia. In the absence of acute trauma or clinical suspicion of infection, a large area of bone marrow edema without a zone of demarcation may represent intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis. Demonstration of shifting bone marrow edema on follow-up examinations suggests this diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agool, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vellenga, Edo [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Hematology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, {sup 99m}Tc-sulphur colloid, {sup 111}In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells and tumor growth : Contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor micro-environments with special focus on mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berber D.; ter Elst, Arja; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Research has provided evidence that tumor growth depends on the interaction of tumor cells with stromal cells, as already suggested in 1889 by Paget. Experimental and clinical studies have revealed that tumor stromal cells can be derived from bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells, such as

  11. Bone marrow cells and myocardial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Trester, Cathy

    2004-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) plasticity and its clinical application have been studied profoundly in the past few years. Recent investigations indicate that HSC and other bone marrow stem cells can develop into other tissues. Because of the high morbidity and mortality of myocardial infarction and other heart disorders, myocardial regeneration is a good example of the clinical application of HSC plasticity in regenerative medicine. Preclinical studies in animals suggest that the use of this kind of treatment can reconstruct heart blood vessels, muscle, and function. Some clinical study results have been reported in the past 2 years. In 2003, reports of myocardial regeneration treatment increased significantly. Other studies include observations on the cell surface markers of transplanted cells and treatment efficacy. Some investigations, such as HSC testing, have focused on clinical applications using HSC plasticity and bone marrow transplantation to treat different types of disorders. In this review, we focus on the clinical application of bone marrow cells for myocardial regeneration.

  12. Composite vascularized skin/bone transplantation models for bone marrow-based tolerance studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Selahattin; Ulusal, Betul G; Ulusal, Ali E; Izycki, Dariusz; Siemionow, Maria

    2006-03-01

    There is an ongoing need to understand the mechanisms of bone marrow-based allograft tolerance. This is important in clarifying the diverse variables influencing the ultimate outcome of the solid organ and composite tissue transplants. To establish bone marrow transplantation as a routine clinical application, further experimental studies should be conducted to overcome the obstacles related to the bone marrow transplantation. These obstacles include graft versus host disease, immunocompetence, and toxicity of the conditioning regimens. For these purposes, novel experimental models are needed. In an attempt to provide a reliable research tool for bone marrow-based tolerance induction studies, we introduced different experimental models of modified vascularized skin/bone marrow (VSBM) transplantation technique for tolerance induction, monitoring, and maintenance studies. In this skin/bone transplantation model, the technical feasibility of concurrent or consecutive transplantation of the combination of bilateral vascularized skin, vascularized bone marrow, or vascularized skin/bone marrow transplants was investigated. Isograft transplantations were performed between genetically identical Lewis (LEW, RT1) rats. Five different experimental designs in 5 groups of 5 animals each were studied. Group I: Bilateral vascularized skin (VS) transplantation; group II: bilateral vascularized skin/bone transplantation; group III: vascularized skin transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group IV: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group V: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin transplantation on the contralateral side. Successful transplantations were performed in all groups. The survival of the isograft transplants was evaluated clinically and histologically. All skin flaps remained pink and pliable and grew new

  13. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids.

  14. Marrow-tumor interactions: the role of the bone marrow in controlling chemically induced tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosse, C

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes work done to evaluate the role of the bone marrow in tumor growth regulation. Work done with the MCA tumor showed that several subclasses of mononuclear bone marrow cells (e.g. natural regulatory cell, NRC) play a major role in the regulation of tumor growth. Experiments with the spontaneous CE mammary carcinoma system illustrate that a rapid growth of certain neoplasms may be due to the fact that through some as yet undefined mechanism the tumor eliminates mononuclear cells in the bone marrow of the host and stops their production. (KRM)

  15. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Nobuyuki

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  16. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  17. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  18. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  19. Improved method for assessing iron stores in the bone marrow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phiri, K.S.; Calis, J.C.J.; Kachala, D.; Borgstein, E.; Waluza, J.; Bates, I.; Brabin, B.; Boele van Hensbroek, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow iron microscopy has been the "gold standard" method of assessing iron deficiency. However, the commonly used method of grading marrow iron remains highly subjective. AIM: To improve the bone marrow grading method by developing a detailed protocol that assesses iron in fragmen

  20. Improved method for assessing iron stores in the bone marrow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phiri, K.S.; Calis, J.C.J.; Kachala, D.; Borgstein, E.; Waluza, J.; Bates, I.; Brabin, B.; Boele van Hensbroek, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow iron microscopy has been the "gold standard" method of assessing iron deficiency. However, the commonly used method of grading marrow iron remains highly subjective. AIM: To improve the bone marrow grading method by developing a detailed protocol that assesses iron in

  1. Pain and Anxiety During Bone Marrow Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanasale, Betty; Kits, Jenne; Kluin, Philip M.; Trip, Albert; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2013-01-01

    A bone marrow biopsy is considered to be painful, often causing anxiety. We observed large differences between patients and wondered which factors cause pain and anxiety. In a prospective study, 202 patients were analyzed. Experienced hematologists and fellows in training (17% of biopsies) performed

  2. Allogeneic and Autologous Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg, H. Joachim

    1988-01-01

    The author of this paper presents an overview of the current status of bone marrow transplantation, including indications, pre-transplant considerations, the transplant procedure, acute and delayed transplant-related problems, results currently attainable, and a short discussion of possible future developments.

  3. Pain and Anxiety During Bone Marrow Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanasale, Betty; Kits, Jenne; Kluin, Philip M.; Trip, Albert; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2013-01-01

    A bone marrow biopsy is considered to be painful, often causing anxiety. We observed large differences between patients and wondered which factors cause pain and anxiety. In a prospective study, 202 patients were analyzed. Experienced hematologists and fellows in training (17% of biopsies) performed

  4. Dorsal root ganglion neurons promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-xun Zhang; Xiao-rui Jiang; Lei Wang; Fang-min Chen; Lin Xu; Fei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary animal experiments have conifrmed that sensory nerve ifbers promote osteoblast differentiation, but motor nerve ifbers have no promotion effect. Whether sensory neurons pro-mote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains unclear. No results at the cellular level have been reported. In this study, dorsal root ganglion neurons (sensory neurons) from Sprague-Dawley fetal rats were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with green lfuorescent protein 3 weeks after osteo-genic differentiationin vitro, while osteoblasts derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells served as the control group. The rat dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted the prolifera-tion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts at 3 and 5 days of co-culture, as observed by lfuorescence microscopy. The levels of mRNAs for osteogenic differentiation-re-lated factors (including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone morphogenetic protein 2) in the co-culture group were higher than those in the control group, as detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Our ifndings indicate that dorsal root ganglion neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which pro-vides a theoretical basis forin vitro experiments aimed at constructing tissue-engineered bone.

  5. Effects of Ligustrazine on Expression of Bone Marrow Heparan Sulfates in Syngeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任天华; 刘文励; 孙汉英; 戴琪琳; 孙岚

    2003-01-01

    To explore the effects of ligustrazine on bone marrow heparan sulfates (HS) expression in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) mice, the syngeneic BMT mice were orally given 2 mg ligustrazine twice a day. On the 7th, 10th, 14th, 18th day after BMT, peripheral blood cells and bone marrow nuclear cells (BMNC) were counted, and the expression levels of HS in bone marrow and on the stromal cell surfaces were detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry assay respectively. In ligustrazine-treated group, the white blood cells (WBC) and BMNC on the 7th, 10th, 14th, 18th day and platelets (PLT) on the 7th, 10th day were all significantly more than those in control group (P<0.05). The bone marrow HS expression levels in ligustrazine-treated group were higher than those in control group (P<0. 05) on the 7th, 10th, 14th, 18th day. However, the HS expression levels on the stromal cell surfaces showed no significant difference between the two groups on the 18th day (P>0. 05). It was concluded that ligustrazine could up-regulate HS expression in bone marrow, which might be one of the mechanisms contributing to ligustrazine promoting hematopoietic reconstitution after BMT.

  6. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  7. Bone marrow: its contribution to heme catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mähönen, Y; Anttinen, M; Vuopio, P; Tenhunen, R

    1976-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) and biliverdin reductase (BR), the two NADPH-dependent enzymes involved in the degradation of hemoglobin and its derivatives, were measured in bone marrow aspirates from 5 hematologically normal persons, 4 patients with chronic leucemia (CL), 11 patients with acute leucemia (AL), 8 patients with refractory sideroblastic anemia (RA), 7 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IA), 5 patients with hemolytic anemia (HA), and 7 patients with secondary anemia (SA) to determine the enzymatic capacity of the bone marrow in different hematologic disorders for heme catabolism. HO activity in the bone marrow of normal persons was 0.42 +/- 0.28 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 2.15 +/- 1.34; in AL, 0.39 +/- 0.25; in RA, 0.58 +/- 0.37; in IA, 0.41 +/- 0.28; in HA, 2.56 +/- 1.40; and in SA, 1.72 +/- 1.06. BR activity, respectively, was in normal persons 8.7 +/- 2.4 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 13.6 +/- 9.1; in AL, 3.8 +/- 3.1 in RA, 5.1 +/- 2.7; in IA, 5.5 +/- 3.7; in HA, 17.0 +/- 7.2; and in SA, 10.5 +/- 4.2. On the basis of these findings it seems evident that both oxygenase and biliverdin reductase activities of the bone marrow are capable of adaptive regulation. The physiologic role of bone marrow in heme catabolism seems to be of significant importance.

  8. Cytopenia and Bone Marrow Dysplasia in a Case of Wilson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Aarathi R; Usha, M; Mallya, Pooja; Rau, A T K

    2014-09-01

    We describe a sixteen year old with Wilson's disease on copper chelation and subsequent high dose oral zinc who developed severe anemia and neutropenia. Bone marrow aspirate done to evaluate the cause of bicytopenia revealed trilineage dysplasia. Correlating the clinical context with bone marrow and biochemical parameters, copper deficiency was suspected and he was given a trial of therapy, following which the hematological parameters improved. This case highlights hypocupremia as a reversible cause of bone marrow dysplasia in patients with Wilson's disease on chelation, where serum copper levels are not useful in the diagnosis. We also believe that monitoring of the blood counts in patients on copper chelation may provide a clue to impending copper deficiency.

  9. Biological Characteristics of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA Xian'en; WANG Lixia; HOU Jianfeng; ZHANG Ruicheng; WANG Haiyong; YANG Chenyuan

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Some biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in vitro were observed. hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow and purified by density gradient centrifugation method, and then cultured in vitro. The proliferation and growth characteristics of hMSCs were observed in primary and passage culture. MSCs of passage 3 were examined for the purify by positive rate of CD29 and CD44 through flow cytometry. Human bone marrow MSCs showed active proliferation capacity in vitro. The purify of MSCs separated by our method was higher than 90 %. It was concluded that hMSCs have been successfully cultured and expanded effectively. It provided a foundation for further investigation and application of MSCs.

  10. Multiple myeloma in the marrow: pathogenesis and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Avery, Lindsey; Reagan, Michaela R.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy resulting in osteolytic lesions and fractures. In the disease state, bone healing is limited due to increased osteoclastic and decreased osteoblastic activity, as well as an MM-induced forward-feedback cycle where bone-embedded growth factors further enhance tumor progression as bone is resorbed. Recent work on somatic mutation in MM tumors has provided insight into cytogenetic changes associated with this disease; the initiating driver mutations causing MM are diverse due to the complexity and multitude of mutations inherent in MM tumor cells. This manuscript provides an overview of MM pathogenesis by summarizing cytogenic changes related to oncogenes and tumor suppressors associated with MM, reviewing risk factors, and describing the disease progression from MGUS to overt MM. It also highlights the importance of the bone marrow microenvironment (BMM) in the establishment and progression of MM, as well as associated MM-induced bone disease, and the relationship of the bone marrow to current and future therapeutics. This review highlights why understanding the basic biology of the healthy and diseased BMM is crucial in the quest for better treatments and work toward a cure for genetically diverse diseases such as MM. PMID:27002787

  11. Post chemotherapy blood and bone marrow regenerative changes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kushwaha

    2014-01-01

    chemotherapy provides information whether patient has achieved remission with regeneration of cells or still has residual leukemia. If the patient is in remission, maintenance treatment is started and if not more intensive chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation may be embarked upon.

  12. Effect of Distraction Technique and Hypnosis in Pain of Bone Marrow Aspiration in Children: a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimorad Heidari Gorji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe present review study provides specific evidence to assess the impact of distraction techniques and hypnosis on the pain of bone marrow aspiration in children.Materials and MethodsThis review study aimed to determine the effects of distraction techniques and hypnosis on the controlling pain of bone marrow aspiration in children. Internal databases (SID, Magiran, IranMedex and Irandoc, and international databases (Google-Scholar, Medline, PubMed, Elsevier, ProQuest, Springer and Web of Science, were searched by using the Mesh key words including "cancer", "bone marrow", "aspiration", "distraction", "hypnosis", "pain", "children" and "pediatric", with no time limit since the foundation of these databases until December 2016.ResultsIn overall review of the articles, based on the issues expressed, the effect of most of various distraction interventions and hypnosis on the pain severity of children under the bone marrow aspiration procedure was significant and positive (P

  13. Intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cell preparations in parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Alexander; Csoti, Ilona; Eggert, Karla

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of patients is treated with intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cells (aBMCs), but clinical data are completely lacking in movement disorders. We provide first clinical data on efficacy and safety of this highly experimental treatment approach in parkinsonian...

  14. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  15. SU-E-T-13: A Comparative Dosimetric Study On Radio-Dynamic Therapy for Pelvic Cancer Treatment: Strategies for Bone Marrow Dose and Volume Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China); Wang, B; Dong, Z; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ge, W; Xu, L [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radio-dynamic therapy (RDT) is a potentially effective modality for local and systemic cancer treatment. Using RDT, the administration of a radio-sensitizer enhances the biological effect of high-energy photons. Although the sensitizer uptake ratio of tumor to normal tissue is normally high, one cannot simply neglect its effect on critical structures. In this study, we aim to explore planning strategies to improve bone marrow sparing without compromising the plan quality for RDT treatment of pelvic cancers. Methods: Ten cervical and ten prostate cancer patients who previously received radiotherapy at our institution were selected for this study. For each patient, nine plans were created using the Varian Eclipse treatmentplanning-system (TPS) with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT delivery techniques containing various gantry angle combinations and optimization parameters (dose constraints to the bone marrow). To evaluate the plans for bone marrow sparing, the dose-volume parameters V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40 for bone marrow were examined. Effective doseenhancement factors for the sensitizer were used to weigh the dose-volume histograms for various tissues from individual fractions. Results: The planning strategies had different impacts on bone marrow sparing for the cervical and prostate cases. For the cervical cases, provided the bone marrow constraints were properly set during optimization, the dose to bone marrow sparing was found to be comparable between different IMRT and VMAT plans regardless of the gantry angle selection. For the prostate cases, however, careful selection of gantry angles could dramatically improve the bone marrow sparing, although the dose distribution in bone marrow was clinically acceptable for all prostate plans that we created. Conclusion: For intensity-modulated RDT planning for cervical cancer, planners should set bone marrow constraints properly to avoid any adverse damage, while for prostate cancer one can carefully select gantry

  16. Degradation of polysaccharide hydrogels seeded with bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Shiva H; Grover, Liam M; Paxton, Jennifer Z; Smith, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    In order to produce hydrogel cell culture substrates that are fit for the purpose, it is important that the mechanical properties are well understood not only at the point of cell seeding but throughout the culture period. In this study the change in the mechanical properties of three biopolymer hydrogels alginate, low methoxy pectin and gellan gum have been assessed in cell culture conditions. Samples of the gels were prepared encapsulating rat bone marrow stromal cells which were then cultured in osteogenic media. Acellular samples were also prepared and incubated in standard cell culture media. The rheological properties of the gels were measured over a culture period of 28 days and it was found that the gels degraded at very different rates. The degradation occurred most rapidly in the order alginate > Low methoxy pectin > gellan gum. The ability of each hydrogel to support differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to osteoblasts was also verified by evidence of mineral deposits in all three of the materials. These results highlight that the mechanical properties of biopolymer hydrogels can vary greatly during in vitro culture, and provide the potential of selecting hydrogel cell culture substrates with mechanical properties that are tissue specific.

  17. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-07-17

    Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  18. Bone Marrow Failure Secondary to Cytokinesis Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    have assessed the role of FA pathway in mitosis and confirmed that murine FA-deficient hematopoietic stem cells exhibit p53- mediated growth defects...results suggest that bone marrow failure in FA may be caused, in part, by p53- mediated cellular defects and underscore the importance of... mediated apoptosis of HSCs due to cytokinesis failure. The major goal of the project was to assess whether the p53- mediated apoptosis due to

  19. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    Institute NIH National Institutes of Health NK Natural Killer NLM National Library of Medicine NMDP National Marrow Donor Program OCR /ICR...the underlying biology and medicine of ARS. A training course, NMDP Basic Radiation Training (BRT) course, was created and distributed to physicians...Rio de Janeiro Biology : • Introduction to Radiation Biology : Michael Robbins, Ph.D. - Wake Forest University School of Medicine • Biodosimetry

  20. Acceleration of Immune Reconstitution after Bone Marrow Transplantation in Mice by Bone Marrow Stromal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦凤华; 蒋激扬; 李爱玲; 金永柱; 郝洁; 谢蜀生

    2003-01-01

    To observe potential effect of the engineered bone marrow stromal cell line QXMSC1 secreting IL-6 (QXMSCIL-6) on accelerating immnune reconstitution in syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice, QXMSC1 was transfected with the eukaryocytic expression vector pcDNAIL-6, which contained hIL-6 cDNA by liposome-mediated gene transfecting technique. G418-resistance clone was selected by limiting dilution. The highest secreting clone was selected by ELISA assay and used in animal experiments. The recipient mice (BALB/c) were lethally irradiated and cotransplanted syngeneic bone marrow (107/mice) and the QXMSCIIL-6 (5×105/mice). Lymphocyte proliferation induced by ConA and LPS, helper T lymphocyte precursor (HTLp), cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor (CTLp), plaque-forming cell (PFC), delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) were examined 30, 60 days in post transplantation respectively. The results showed that lymphocytes proliferation to ConA and LPS, HTLp, CTLp increased, DTH and PFC were improved by cografted stromal cells QXMSCIIL-6 on 30, 60 days after BMT. These results demonstrated that the bone marrow stromal cell line QXMSC1 IL-6 transfected with IL-6 (QXMSC11L-6) accelerated immnune reconstitution in syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

  1. Bone marrow contribution to eosinophilic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denburg Judah A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-induced bone marrow responses are observable in human allergic asthmatics, involving specific increases in eosinophil-basophil progenitors (Eo/B-CFU, measured either by hemopoietic assays or by flow cytometric analyses of CD34-positive, IL-3Ralpha-positive, and/or IL-5-responsive cell populations. The results are consistent with the upregulation of an IL-5-sensitive population of progenitors in allergen-induced late phase asthmatic responses. Studies in vitro on the phenotype of developing eosinophils and basophils suggest that the early acquisition of IL-5Ralpha, as well as the capacity to produce cytokines such as GM-CSF and IL-5, are features of the differentiation process. These observations are consistent with findings in animal models, indicating that allergen-induced increases in bone marrow progenitor formation depend on hemopoietic factor(s released post-allergen. The possibility that there is constitutive marrow upregulation of eosinophilopoiesis in allergic airways disease is also an area for future investigation.

  2. A clinical overview of bone marrow edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow edema (BME is a descriptive term which identifies a specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI pattern that can be observed in a number of clinical entities, which are often characterized by pain as their main symptom, but show significant differences in terms of histopathological findings, causal mechanisms and prognosis. Bone marrow lesions in the subchondral bone of subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA seem to be associated with pain and progression of cartilage damage over time. Some histopathological studies of advanced OA have shown a prevalent fibrosis and bone marrow necrosis. BME of the subchondral bone in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an infiltrate of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts and has a predictive value of further development of erosions. In spondyloarthritis, BME of the sacroiliac joints identifies an active sacroiliitis and is associated with histological inflammation and radiographic progression, whereas the relationship between BME lesions of the spine and syndesmophyte development is still controversial. BME syndromes (BMES, such as transient osteoporosis of the hip, regional migratory osteoporosis, and transient post-traumatic BMES, are characterized by a BME pattern on MRI and a self-limiting course. The potential evolution of BMES toward osteonecrosis is still controversial.

  3. Tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendra, J.R.; Halil, O.; Barrett, A.J.; Selwyn, S. (Westminster Medical School, London (UK))

    1982-11-13

    A brief report is presented of a case of tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation complicated by radiation-induced pneumonitis. A 30-year-old army sergeant received a bone-marrow transplant from his brother for the treatment of a granulocytic sarcoma after local radiotherapy to the tumour. Six years earlier he had sustained an open, compound fracture of the left tibia and fibula while on army exercise. At the time a pin and plate had been inserted and booster anti-tetanus administered. Bone-marrow transplantation was performed after total body irradiation. Cyclosporin A was given against graft-versus-host disease. Fifty four days after transplantation tetanus was diagnosed and death followed 14 days later. Necropsy disclosed radiation-induced pneumonitis, but no organisms were cultured from the lungs or the old fracture site. It is suggested that spores were incorporated into the wound site before surgery and that oxygenation around the plate became compromised after transplantation, permitting germination of dormant spores, immunosuppression allowing development of the disease.

  4. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  5. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J. (Wayne State Univ. School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients.

  6. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with co-stimulatory blockade induces macrochimerism and tolerance without cytoreductive host treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekerle, T; Kurtz, J; Ito, H; Ronquillo, J V; Dong, V; Zhao, G; Shaffer, J; Sayegh, M H; Sykes, M

    2000-04-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (in immunocompetent adults) has always required cytoreductive treatment of recipients with irradiation or cytotoxic drugs to achieve lasting engraftment at levels detectable by non-PCR-based techniques ('macrochimerism' or 'mixed chimerism'). Only syngeneic marrow engraftment at such levels has been achieved in unconditioned hosts. This requirement for potentially toxic myelosuppressive host pre-conditioning has precluded the clinical use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for many indications other than malignancies, including tolerance induction. We demonstrate here that treatment of naive mice with a high dose of fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow, followed by one injection each of monoclonal antibody against CD154 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 immunoglobulin, resulted in multi-lineage hematopoietic macrochimerism (of about 15%) that persisted for up to 34 weeks. Long-term chimeras developed donor-specific tolerance (donor skin graft survival of more than 145 days) and demonstrated ongoing intrathymic deletion of donor-reactive T cells. A protocol of high-dose bone marrow transplantation and co-stimulatory blockade can thus achieve allogeneic bone marrow engraftment without cytoreduction or T-cell depletion of the host, and eliminates a principal barrier to the more widespread use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Although efforts have been made to minimize host pre-treatment for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for tolerance induction, so far none have succeeded in eliminating pre-treatment completely. Our demonstration that this can be achieved provides the rationale for a safe approach for inducing robust transplantation tolerance in large animals and humans.

  7. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in platelet production and their implications for the treatment of thrombocytopenic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Ye, Shuang; Zhong, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Impaired platelet production has been found to be an important pathological mechanism of thrombocytopenia in many diseases. Platelet generation is a complex process that mainly occurs in the bone marrow, and thus is closely regulated by the bone marrow microenvironment. This review attempts to summarize the most current knowledge referring the role of bone marrow microenvironment in the regulation of platelet production. The effects of multiple microenvironment ingredients in regulating megakaryopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis have been discussed. Abnormalities of these components in thrombocytopenic diseases are also described. Thrombocytopenia is a common clinical manifestation of a variety of diseases. The functional importance of platelets has driven the developments of a broad range of studies. Platelet generation mainly occurs within the bone marrow, where the cells, soluble factors, and extracellular matrix proteins collaboratively form a complex regulatory network, directing megakaryocytic proliferation and differentiation. Alteration in any part of the regulating network may result in defective platelet formation, and eventually lead to thrombocytopenia. A variety of thrombocytopenic diseases have been found to be related with the disregulated bone marrow microenvironment. Identification of the variations of these niche ingredients in certain diseases has facilitated the developments of multiple therapeutic regimes. Further studies that can combine these niche factors with their downstream regulatory factors will be beneficial for developing more effective therapies. Further definition of the role of bone marrow microenvironment in platelet generation may deepen our understanding of the underlying mechanisms as well as provide new therapeutic targets for thrombocytopenic diseases.

  8. Therapeutic angiogenesis in Buerger's disease (thromboangiitis obliterans) patients with critical limb ischemia by autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motukuru, Vishnu; Suresh, Kalkunte R; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Raj, Sumanth; Girija, K R

    2008-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a significant problem worldwide. In developing countries such as India, the increased incidence of smoking and other forms of nicotine intake has resulted in a large proportion of young individuals with Buerger's disease. The results of surgical and endovascular treatment for this condition have not been very rewarding. Hence, we focused on providing alternative therapies. Neovascularization by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation is being tried as an alternative therapeutic option. We have reviewed our series of patients who underwent autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation during the last 2 years. We enrolled 38 patients who were chosen to undergo autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation for nonreconstructible Buerger's disease. We injected the bone marrow mononuclear cells into the calf muscles of the affected limbs in 36 patients. We monitored ulcer healing, ankle-brachial index (ABI), and transcutaneous oximetry (TcPo(2)) level. No procedurally related complications occurred, although one injected sample of bone marrow aspirate later revealed infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis. Two patients were seropositive on the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test and were not injected with the bone marrow mononuclear cells. Three patients (12%) underwent major amputations disease who have critical limb ischemia.

  9. BONE MARROW EXAMINATION IN PANCYTOPENIA: A STUDY OF SIX YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Shailaja; Jayashankar; Pavani; Swamy; Ramamurti

    2014-01-01

    : INTRODUCTION: Pancytopenia is reduction in all the three hematopoietic cell lines as seen in the peripheral blood. As hematopoietic cells are produced in the marrow, its examination forms an important tool in assessing the etiology of pancytopenia. AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify the etiology of pancytopenia using bone marrow examination and to correlate it with iron stores in the marrow. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This retrospective study was carried out over a p...

  10. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelofibrosis: pathogenesis, prognosis and targeted strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahr, Abdallah Abou; Salama, Mohamed E.; Carreau, Nicole; Tremblay, Douglas; Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben; Hoffman, Ronald; Mascarenhas, John

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow fibrosis is a central pathological feature and World Health Organization major diagnostic criterion of myelofibrosis. Although bone marrow fibrosis is seen in a variety of malignant and non-malignant disease states, the deposition of reticulin and collagen fibrosis in the bone marrow of patients with myelofibrosis is believed to be mediated by the myelofibrosis hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, contributing to an impaired microenvironment favoring malignant over normal hematopoiesis. Increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, lysyl oxidase, transforming growth factor-β, impaired megakaryocyte function, and aberrant JAK-STAT signaling have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. A number of studies indicate that bone marrow fibrosis is an adverse prognostic variable in myeloproliferative neoplasms. However, modern myelofibrosis prognostication systems utilized in risk-adapted treatment approaches do not include bone marrow fibrosis as a prognostic variable. The specific effect on bone marrow fibrosis of JAK2 inhibition, and other rationally based therapies currently being evaluated in myelofibrosis, has yet to be fully elucidated. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic approach that reliably results in resolution of bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelofibrosis. Here we review the pathogenesis, biological consequences, and prognostic impact of bone marrow fibrosis. We discuss the rationale of various anti-fibrogenic treatment strategies targeting the clonal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell, aberrant signaling pathways, fibrogenic cytokines, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27252511

  11. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  12. Autologous bone marrow transplantation by photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.

    1992-06-01

    Simultaneous exposure of Merocyanine 540 dye containing cultured tumor cells to 514-nm laser light (93.6 J/cm2) results in virtually complete cell destruction. Under identical conditions, 40% of the normal progenitor (CFU-GM) cells survive the treatment. Laser- photoradiation treated, cultured breast cancer cells also were killed, and living tumor cells could not be detected by clonogenic assays or by anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody method. Thus, laser photoradiation therapy could be useful for purging of contaminating tumor cells from autologous bone marrow.

  13. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage...... and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance...

  14. MR analysis of sternal bone marrow using STIR in hematologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozawa, Eito [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity pattern of sternal bone marrow was examined in 21 normal volunteers and 10 patients with aplastic anemia (n=4), multiple myeloma (2), AML (2), gammaglobulinemia (1) and MDS (1) using a sagittal STIR sequence. Double Echo STIR images (TR/TI/TE/NEX=2000/180/20, 100/1) were obtained with a CP body array coil. Craniocaudal phase-encoding with a handmade positioning device effectively avoided overlapping artifacts due to cardiac pulsation. In the normal volunteers, age showed a significant inverse correlation with the calculated SIR (signal intensity ratio of bone marrow relative to subcutaneous fat) using STIR with short TE. The SIR in the sternal body was significantly higher than that in the manubrium (p<0.05). Knowledge of the sternal bone marrow distribution according to age is useful for evaluating hematologic diseases. The proposed method provided high spatial resolution and an excellent bone marrow signal, and may be useful for determining site for aspiration. (author)

  15. An alternative model of vascularized bone marrow transplant: partial femur transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Wu; Chen, Chen; Su, Ying-Jun; Yan, Lun; Wang, Shi-Ping; Guo, Shu-Zhong

    2014-12-01

    The vascularized whole femur transplantation model is one of the commonly used vascularized bone marrow transplant models. It involves technical complexity and morbidities. To optimize this model, we took 2/3 femur as the carrier of bone marrow cells, and developed a vascularized partial femur model. Four experimental groups were carried out, namely, the syngeneic partial femur transplantation, allogeneic partial femur transplantation with or without cyclosporine A, and allogeneic whole femur transplantation with cyclosporine A. The results showed that the partial femur model was technically simpler and shortened the operative and ischemia time compared to the whole femur model. Gross and histologic appearance confirmed the viability of femur, and its bone marrow inside the bone could also maintain normal morphologically at 60-day posttransplant. Besides, donor multilineage chimerism could be continuously detected in immunosuppressed allogeneic partial femur recipients at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-week posttransplant, and it showed no significant differences when compared with whole femur transplantation. Meanwhile, long-term engraftment of donor-origin cells was also confirmed in recipients' bone marrow, lymph nodes, and spleen, but not in thymus. Therefore, the vascularized partial femur can serve as a continuous resource of bone morrow cells and may provide a useful tool for the study of immune tolerance in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

  16. Age-related changes in the bone marrow and spleen of SAS/4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggle, J E; Gordon, M Y; Proukakis, C; Bogg, C E

    1975-01-01

    The total number of nucleated cells in the bone marrow of SAS/4 mice increase some twofold between 1 and 24 months of age but when related to body weight remains essentially constant over a wide range of ages. The concentration of CFU-S in femoral marrow is also constant with age and since other bones containing marrow appear, at least in young mice, to have the same CFU-S concentration as the femur it is concluded that the CFU-S compartment size of the whole bone marrow is independent of age when expressed on a body weight basis, In contrast, both the absolute number and the concentration of exogenous CFU-S in the spleen decline markedly in old mice. Smilary there is a decline in the number of endogenous colony-forming cells and the spleens of 24-month-old mice seem virtually devoid of such colonies. Not only were older mice less capable of supporting the growth of endogenous colonies, but their spleens also appear to provide a poorer environment for exogenous colony growth when compared with growth in younger recipient spleens.

  17. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge.

  18. Aerobic nitroreduction of dehydrochloramphenicol by bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isildar, M; Abou-Khalil, W H; Jimenez, J J; Abou-Khalil, S; Yunis, A A

    1988-06-30

    It has been previously demonstrated that dehydrochloramphenicol (DH-CAP), a bacterial metabolite of chloramphenicol, induces DNA single strand breaks in intact cells and is profoundly more cytotoxic than chloramphenicol (CAP). In view of previous observations relating genotoxicity of nitrocompounds to their nitroreduction by the target tissue, we studied the nitroreduction of DH-CAP by human and rabbit bone marrow. Nitroreduction by tissue homogenates was determined by the Bratton Marshall colorimetric assay and by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Nitroreduction of DH-CAP by bone marrow cell homogenates was observed under aerobic conditions and the reduction was both cell concentration- and time-dependent. The formation of the amino product aminodehydrochloramphenicol was confirmed by HPLC. Reduction by other tissues including human liver, Raji cells, and HL-60 tumors was also observed. These results suggest that genotoxicity of DH-CAP may be related to its nitroreduction by the target tissue with in situ production of toxic intermediates. Together with previous studies, these observations lend support to the thesis that the p-NO2 group may be the structural feature underlying aplastic anemia from CAP.

  19. Glutamine supplementation in bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Thomas R

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical investigations have focused on supplementation of specialized enteral and parenteral nutrition with the amino acid glutamine. This interest derives from strong evidence in animal models and emerging clinical data on the efficacy of glutamine administration following chemotherapy, trauma, sepsis and other catabolic conditions. Glutamine has protein-anabolic effects in stressed patients and, among many key metabolic functions, is used as a major fuel/substrate by cells of the gastrointestinal epithelium and the immune system. These effects may be particularly advantageous in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT), who exhibit post-transplant body protein wasting, gut mucosal injury and immunodeficiency. Studies to date indicate that enteral and parenteral glutamine supplementation is well tolerated and potentially efficacious after high-dose chemotherapy or BMT for cancer treatment. Although not all studies demonstrate benefits, sufficient positive data have been published to suggest that this nutrient should be considered as adjunctive metabolic support of some individuals undergoing marrow transplant. However, BMT is a rapidly evolving clinical procedure with regard to the conditioning and supportive protocols utilized. Thus, additional randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials are indicated to define the efficacy of glutamine with current BMT regimens.

  20. Natural suppressor cells in spleens of irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted mice and normal bone marrow: Lack of Sca-1 expression and enrichment by depletion of Mac1-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, M.; Sharabi, Y.; Sachs, D.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    We have recently reported the development of natural suppressor (NS) cells in lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted mice during the early weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). These cells were shown to be derived primarily from the syngeneic marrow component in recipients of mixed allogeneic plus syngeneic (host type) marrow, and it was speculated that they might be responsible for the anti-GVHD effect previously described for T-cell-depleted syngeneic marrow. It was therefore of interest to look for such suppressive activity in normal adult bone marrow, which might serve as an obtainable source of such cells if they were to be isolated and used clinically. Such activity has indeed been found in normal adult bone marrow and its characteristics compared to that in spleens of early BMT recipients. Suppressive cells from both sources were similar in their specificity patterns and radiosensitivity, and were of the null (i.e., non-T, non-B, nonmacrophage) cell phenotype. Suppression from either source can be enriched by removal of Mac1-positive cells, providing a possible approach to obtaining NS-enriched populations for in vitro expansion and adoptive transfer studies. Such depletion of Mac1-positive cells was associated with a threefold enrichment of Thy1-positive cells, of which one half were CD4- and CD8-negative, similar to the reported phenotype of cultured NS cell lines. Even when enriched in this manner, the contribution of Thy1-positive cell populations did not reach statistical significance. A recent report has suggested that NS cells might actually be pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In contrast, we report here that depletion of Sca1-positive pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells with monoclonal antibody plus immunomagnetic beads does not remove NS activity.

  1. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  2. Prospective study of bone marrow in haematological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagya Lakshmi Atla

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: The present study showed the usefulness of bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy in evaluation of the bone marrow in routine haematological disorders and also for understanding disease progression, for diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. These are also helpful in planning further investigation and management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1917-1921

  3. Neuroamines — regulators of local processes at bone marrow autotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobyova O.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the content of neuroamines (histamine, serotonin, catecholamines in bioamine structures of bone marrow after autotransplantation. Material and methods. Animals were injected into the tail vein of bone marrow suspension obtained from the femur of the same mouse. It was taken from the femoral bone marrow of 1 ml and placed in 2 ml of physiological saline and thoroughly stirred. 1 ml of bone marrow suspension was injected into the tail vein. Cryostat sections were treated with luminescent-histochemical methods. Results. After bone marrow autotransplantation marked changes were observed in the neurotransmitters of the bone marrow — an increasing number of granular luminescent cells decrease in the amount of granules in them, and a decrease in the number of mast cells because of their degranulation. A weak luminescence was determined in nuclei in neutrophils. Perhaps this proves the activation of the immune response. Conclusion. The bone marrow autotransplantation leads to a redistribution of the structures of the bone marrow of histamine, catecholamines and serotonin, which changes the direction of cytodifferentiation, the content of neuroamines in granular luminescent cells and mast cells (cells of autonomic regulation.

  4. Marrow fat cell: response to x-ray induced aplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathija, A.; Ohanian, M.; Davis, S.; Trubowitz, S.

    1979-09-11

    Adipose tissue is an integral structural component of normal rabbit marrow and is believed to behave primarily as a cushion in response to hemopoietic proliferation, accommodating to changes in hemopoiesis by change in either size or number or both of the fat cells in order to maintain constancy of the marrow volume. To test this hypothesis, aplasia of the right femur of New Zealand white rabbits was induced by x irradiation with 8000 rads; the left unirradiated limb served as control. Twenty-four hours before sacrifice 50 ..mu..Ci of palmitate-114C was administered intravenously and the marrow of both femurs removed. Samples of perinephric fat were taken for comparison. Fat cell volume, C14 palmitate turnover and fatty acid composition were determined. The total number of fat cells in the entire marrow of both femurs was calculated. The measurements showed no difference in size or fatty acid turnover of the fat cells in the irradiated aplastic marrow from the cells of the control marrow. The number of fat cells in both the irradiated and the unirradiated control femurs was essentially the same. These findings do not support the view that marrow fat cells respond to diminished hematopoiesis by either increase in their volume or number. In addition, the findings suggest that both marrow and subcutaneous fat cells are fairly resistant to high doses of x-ray irradiation.

  5. A dose response analysis of a specific bone marrow concentrate treatment protocol for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Christopher J; Al-Sayegh, Hasan; Bashir, Jamil; Goodyear, Shaun; Freeman, Michael D

    2015-09-18

    Prior studies describing the treatment of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis with injections of bone marrow concentrate have provided encouraging results. The relationship between the cellular dose contained within the bone marrow concentrate and efficacy of the treatment, however, is unclear. In the present study we describe clinical outcomes for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in relation to higher and lower cell concentrations contained within a bone marrow concentrate treatment protocol. Data from an ongoing patient registry was culled to identify 373 patients that received bone marrow concentrate injections for the treatment of 424 osteoarthritic knee joints. The clinical scales for these patients were assessed at baseline and then tracked post-procedure at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, and annually thereafter. Tracked outcomes included the numeric pain scale; a lower extremity functional questionnaire; an International Knee Documentation Committee scale; and a subjective improvement rating scale. Using pain and functional outcome measures, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to define an optimal clinical outcome threshold at which bone marrow nucleated cell count could be divided into either a lower or higher cell count group within a treatment protocol. The lower and higher cell count groups were defined using a threshold of 4 × 10(8) cells. There were 224 and 185 knee joints treated in the lower (≤4 × 10(8)) and higher (>4 × 10(8)) cell count groups respectively. Most joints were diagnosed with early stage knee osteoarthritis. Both the lower and higher cell count groups demonstrated significant positive results with the treatment for all of the pain and functional metrics. The higher cell count group reported lower post treatment numeric pain scale values, in comparison with the lower cell count group (1.6 vs. 3.2; P < 0.001). No significant differences were detected for the other metrics, however. Improved function and reduced

  6. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis.

  7. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Werner-Klein

    Full Text Available Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null (NSG and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  8. Organ-on-a-chip: development and clinical prospects toward toxicity assessment with an emphasis on bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehye; Lee, Hanna; Selimović, Šeila; Gauvin, Robert; Bae, Hojae

    2015-05-01

    Conventional approaches for toxicity evaluation of drugs and chemicals, such as animal tests, can be impractical due to the large experimental scale and the immunological differences between species. Organ-on-a-chip models have recently been recognized as a prominent alternative to conventional toxicity tests aiming to simulate the human in vivo physiology. This review focuses on the organ-on-a-chip applications for high-throughput screening of candidate drugs against toxicity, with a particular emphasis on bone-marrow-on-a-chip. Studies in which organ-on-a-chip models have been developed and utilized to maximize the efficiency and predictability in toxicity assessment are introduced. The potential of these devices to replace tests of acute systemic toxicity in animals, and the challenges that are inherent in simulating the human immune system are also discussed. As a promising approach to overcome the limitations, we further focus on an in-depth analysis of the development of bone-marrow-on-a-chip that is capable of simulating human immune responses against external stimuli due to the key roles of marrow in immune systems with hematopoietic activities. Owing to the complex interactions between hematopoietic stem cells and marrow microenvironments, precise control of both biochemical and physical niches that are critical in maintenance of hematopoiesis remains a key challenge. Thus, recently developed bone-marrow-on-a-chip models support immunogenicity and immunotoxicity testing in long-term cultivation with repeated antigen stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of clinical studies that have been carried out on bone marrow transplants in patients with immune-related diseases and future aspects of clinical and pharmaceutical application of bone-marrow-on-a-chip.

  9. Automated morphological analysis of bone marrow cells in microscopic images for diagnosis of leukemia: nucleus-plasma separation and cell classification using a hierarchical tree model of hematopoesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappe, Sebastian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Haferlach, Torsten; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The morphological differentiation of bone marrow is fundamental for the diagnosis of leukemia. Currently, the counting and classification of the different types of bone marrow cells is done manually under the use of bright field microscopy. This is a time-consuming, subjective, tedious and error-prone process. Furthermore, repeated examinations of a slide may yield intra- and inter-observer variances. For that reason a computer assisted diagnosis system for bone marrow differentiation is pursued. In this work we focus (a) on a new method for the separation of nucleus and plasma parts and (b) on a knowledge-based hierarchical tree classifier for the differentiation of bone marrow cells in 16 different classes. Classification trees are easily interpretable and understandable and provide a classification together with an explanation. Using classification trees, expert knowledge (i.e. knowledge about similar classes and cell lines in the tree model of hematopoiesis) is integrated in the structure of the tree. The proposed segmentation method is evaluated with more than 10,000 manually segmented cells. For the evaluation of the proposed hierarchical classifier more than 140,000 automatically segmented bone marrow cells are used. Future automated solutions for the morphological analysis of bone marrow smears could potentially apply such an approach for the pre-classification of bone marrow cells and thereby shortening the examination time.

  10. Pediatric cervical spine marrow T2 hyperintensity: a systematic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gefen, Ron [Cooper University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Candem, NJ (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Shabshin, Nogah [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel); Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Hyperintense areas of vertebral bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences are at times seen on pediatric MRI of the cervical spine in children without suspicious clinical conditions to explain marrow pathology. Although these likely have no clinical significance they may be mistaken for pathology. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the locations and patterns of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the pediatric cervical spine, with respect to age. At 1.5 T, the C2 through T3 vertebrae of 82 children aged 0-17 years without clinically suspicious marrow abnormality were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to patients' age. The frequency, intensity, and location of the foci of marrow T2 hyperintensity were recorded for each vertebra on a 12-point scoring system and were correlated with the patients' age. Foci of marrow hyperintensity were seen in 46/82 (56.1%) patients and in 241/734 (32.8%) vertebrae. Foci were most common in C4 (42% of patients), C5 (45.7%), and C6 (37.8%). The foci of T2 hyperintensity were more common inferiorly (188 foci) and adjacent to the anterior cortex (123). Analysis revealed no significant correlation between age and marrow score (Spearman = -0.147, P = 0.19), but did find a trend towards increased presence of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the ages of most rapid growth, 8-14 years (81.5% of patients). Vertebral body marrow T2 hyperintensity was most common endosteally and in the mid-cervical spine with a slight peak in adolescence. We therefore believe that these pediatric cervical marrow changes may be related to rapid bone growth at the point of maximal kyphotic stress. (orig.)

  11. Role of whole bone marrow, whole bone marrow cultured cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Shareef, Shahjahan; Salgado, Marcela; Shabbir, Arsalan; Van Badiavas, Evangelos

    2015-03-13

    Recent evidence has shown that bone marrow cells play critical roles during the inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Among the bone marrow cells delivered to wounds are stem cells, which can differentiate into multiple tissue-forming cell lineages to effect, healing. Gaining insight into which lineages are most important in accelerating wound healing would be quite valuable in designing therapeutic approaches for difficult to heal wounds. In this report we compared the effect of different bone marrow preparations on established in vitro wound healing assays. The preparations examined were whole bone marrow (WBM), whole bone marrow (long term initiating/hematopoietic based) cultured cells (BMC), and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). We also applied these bone marrow preparations in two murine models of radiation induced delayed wound healing to determine which had a greater effect on healing. Angiogenesis assays demonstrated that tube formation was stimulated by both WBM and BMC, with WBM having the greatest effect. Scratch wound assays showed higher fibroblast migration at 24, 48, and 72 hours in presence of WBM as compared to BM-MSC. WBM also appeared to stimulate a greater healing response than BMC and BM-MSC in a radiation induced delayed wound healing animal model. These studies promise to help elucidate the role of stem cells during repair of chronic wounds and reveal which cells present in bone marrow might contribute most to the wound healing process.

  12. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M.; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone – a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk – mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  13. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M Pagnotti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell pool (MSC that gives rise also to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally-supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot, or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone - a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk - mice demonstrate a 5-fold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  14. AI-05IMPACT OF GBM MICROENVIRONMENT ON EXPRESSION PROFILE OF BONE MARROW DERIVED PROGENITOR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Kelly; Singh, Sanjay; Agnihotri, Sameer; Hill, Richard; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) provide a distinct tumor region dependent contribution to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) neovascularization. The influence of GBM microenvironment on differentiation and modulation of expression factors by BMDC however remains unknown. In this study we establish the differential expression profile of BMDC as a consequence of recruitment and interaction with the GBM microenvironment and in response to radiation (RTx) and anti-angiogen...

  15. Cytokine production by bone marrow mononuclear cells in inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Ken; Giri, Neelam; Alter, Blanche P; Pinto, Ligia A

    2013-10-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA), and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) are characterized by the progressive development of bone marrow failure. Overproduction of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from activated bone marrow T-cells has been proposed as a mechanism of FA-related aplasia. Whether such overproduction occurs in the other syndromes is unknown. We conducted a comparative study on bone marrow mononuclear cells to examine the cellular subset composition and cytokine production. We found lower proportions of haematopoietic stem cells in FA, DC, and SDS, and a lower proportion of monocytes in FA, DC, and DBA compared with controls. The T- and B-lymphocyte proportions were similar to controls, except for low B-cells in DC. We did not observe overproduction of TNF-α or IFN-γ by T-cells in any patients. Induction levels of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-10, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in monocytes stimulated with high-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were similar at 4 h but lower at 24 h when compared to controls. Unexpectedly, patient samples showed a trend toward higher cytokine level in response to low-dose (0·001 μg/ml) LPS. Increased sensitivity to LPS may have clinical implications and could contribute to the development of pancytopenia by creating a chronic subclinical inflammatory micro-environment in the bone marrow. © Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  16. Transient Bone Marrow Edema Syndrome (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilnur Konuralp

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES is accepted as a possible cause of acute disabling hip pain. This syndrome is defined as local osteoporosis in hip in radiographies, BME in MRI which can be rarely seen and has a self-limiting course. Although the disease generally has a self-limiting course, surgical treatment by early core decompression of the femoral head has proven effective in rapidly relieving the symptoms. Although BMES is relatively rare and probably underdiagnosed when compared to nontraumatic osteonecrosis, both conditions are associated with known osteonecrosis risk factors in middle aged men and especially with late (thirdhad trimester pregnancy in women. We have reported three cases with BMES that had different etiology and followed up presented the differential diagnosis to nontraumatic avascular osteonecrosis. These three cases were treated in early stage very succesfully.

  17. Hemolytic uremic syndrome after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Ayako; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Tanikawa, Shu [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1998-06-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated for the subsequent development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS developed in seven patients (four males and three females, five acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), one acute myelogenous leukemia, one non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma) between 36-196 days after BMT. Four patients were recipients of autologous BMT and three were those of allogeneic BMT. Six patients were preconditioned with the regimens including fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). ALL and preconditioning regimen with TBI were suspected to be the risk factors for the development of HUS. Cyclosporin A (CSP) administration was discontinued in three patients who had been given CSP for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Predonisolone was given to the three patients and plasma exchange was performed in one patient. Both hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia were resolved in virtually all patients, while creatinine elevation has persisted along with hypertension in one patient. (author)

  18. Silencing of RB1 and RB2/P130 during adipogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells results in dysregulated differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Cipollaro, Marilena; Melone, Mariarosa Ab; Peluso, Gianfranco; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is different from fat found elsewhere in the body, and only recently have some of its functions been investigated. BMAT may regulate bone marrow stem cell niche and plays a role in energy storage and thermogenesis. BMAT may be involved also in obesity and osteoporosis onset. Given the paramount functions of BMAT, we decided to better clarify the human bone marrow adipogenesis by analyzing the role of the retinoblastoma gene family, which are key players in cell cycle regulation. Our data provide evidence that the inactivation of RB1 or RB2/P130 in uncommitted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) facilitates the first steps of adipogenesis. In cultures with silenced RB1 or RB2/P130, we observed an increase of clones with adipogenic potential and a higher percentage of cells accumulating lipid droplets. Nevertheless, the absence of RB1 or RB2/P130 impaired the terminal adipocyte differentiation and gave rise to dysregulated adipose cells, with alteration in lipid uptake and release. For the first time, we evidenced that RB2/P130 plays a role in bone marrow adipogenesis. Our data suggest that while the inactivation of retinoblastoma proteins may delay the onset of last cell division and allow more BMSC to be committed to adipocyte, it did not allow a permanent cell cycle exit, which is a prerequisite for adipocyte terminal maturation.

  19. A method for generation of bone marrow-derived macrophages from cryopreserved mouse bone marrow cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Marim

    Full Text Available The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L. amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells.

  20. No narcosis for bone marrow harvest in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, E G; Vriesendorp, R; Meinesz, A F; Mulder, N H; Postmus, P E; Sleijfer, D T

    1984-11-01

    A prospective study with mild general analgesia and sedation together with local anesthesia during bone marrow harvest was performed. Thirty-one patients underwent 33 bone marrow collections. Pretreatment consisted of 100 mg meperidine i.m. and 20 mg diazepam i.m. 1 h before start of procedure. Eight patients got additional meperidine and diazepam during the procedure, all patients got lidocaine 1% locally. A mean volume of 1.321 was obtained with 42.5 punctures. Twenty-two patients had no complications, 4 vomited, 4 had easily correctable hypotension of short duration, one got oxygen for cyanosis of short duration. Acceptance was good in 23 patients, in 6 reasonably well, in two bad. Only one patient experienced pain problems, due to suction. Anxiety was no major problem due to good information before the procedure and mild sedation. This form of anesthesia for bone marrow collection is a safe procedure, it is generally well accepted by the patient and it can be performed on an out-patient basis.

  1. Diffuse Hypermetabolism at Bone Marrow in F-18 FDG PET/CT: Correlation with Bone Marrow Biopsy and Complete Blood Cell Counts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yun Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Increased FDG uptake in the bone marrow has been reported in patients taking erythropoietin or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between F-18 FDG uptake in the bone marrow and bone marrow finding, hematological parameters. Twenty patients who had diffuse FDG uptake at the bone marrow and received hematological examinations, bone marrow biopsy within 10 days before or after PET/CT were enrolled in this study. Among them, 11 patients were excluded; 4 patients received G-CSF or erythropoietin before PET/CT. Seven patients showed definite pathology in a bone marrow biopsy. The parameters included the measurement of WBC, hemoglobin, platelet and cellularity of the bone marrow. Bone marrow FDG uptake was correlated with a low hemoglobin but not WBC, platelet. Histopathologic findings in marrow biopsies were various: normal finding (n=3), hyperplasia of granulocytic cells (n=2), eosinophilic hyperplasia (n=1), reactive lymphoid nodules (n=1), hypercelluar marrow (n=1), hypocelluar marrow (n=1). All patients except two, showed normal marrow celluarity. FDG uptake by bone marrow correlated with anemia but not WBC, platelet, bone marrow cellularity.

  2. MR imaging findings of the femoral marrow in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Takagi, Shojiro; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Ichikawa, Tamaki; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Nagai, Jun [Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    MR imaging of the femoral marrow was performed in 30 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 11 cases of which evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The MRI appearance was classified into five patterns: fatty marrow; faint signal; nodular pattern; heterogeneous infiltration; and diffuse infiltration. For each type of MDS, MRI patterns of the femoral marrow were evaluated and compared with those in normal subjects as well as in patients with aplastic anemia. Signal intensity alteration, a low signal on T1-weighted SE image and a high signal on STIR image, began in the proximal femoral marrow almost symmetrically in patients with MDS. The area of abnormal signal intensity tended to gradually extend towards the distal portion of the femur as the disease progressed. MRI patterns of the femoral marrow correlated with marrow cellularity, and diffuse marrow infiltration was noted in patients with a more advanced type of MDS or with severe anemia. There were limitations to making an accurate diagnosis of the MDS type on the basis of the MRI pattern. Progression of the MRI appearance in the course of MDS was thought to be a sign suggesting evolution to AML. It was difficult to differentiate hypoplastic MDS from aplastic anemia, although the nodular pattern was commonly seen in the latter disease. (author).

  3. Iron overload following bone marrow transplantation in children: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L.; Horev, G.; Grunebaum, M. [Department of Imaging, Schneider Children`s Medical Center of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, 49202 Petah Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Yaniv, I.; Stein, J.; Zaizov, R. [Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Schneider Children`s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tikva, and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University (Israel)

    1997-11-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of post-transfusional iron overload in children after bone marrow transplantation by reviewing their magnetic resonance imaging (MR) findings. Materials and methods. We reviewed the abdominal MR studies of 13 children after autologous bone marrow transplantation. Nine of the children had also undergone MR prior to transplantation. Iron deposition in the liver, spleen and bone marrow was graded semi-quantitatively on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Serum ferritin levels and number of blood units given after bone marrow transplantation were recorded. Results. None of the pre-transplantation MR studies revealed iron overload. After bone marrow transplantation, three children showed normal liver and spleen. Iron overload in the liver was noted in ten patients (77 %), six of whom also showed iron overload in the spleen (46 %) and five in the bone marrow (38.5 %). The degree of hepatic iron overload was correlated significantly and splenic iron overload was correlated weakly with the number of blood transfusions (P = 0.01 and P > 0.01, respectively), but neither was correlated with the serum ferritin level. Conclusion. Iron overload commonly accompanies bone marrow transplantation. The observed pattern of iron deposition, in which the spleen was uninvolved in 40 % of patients demonstrating iron overload, is not typical of post-transfusional hemochromatosis. (orig.) With 1 fig., 2 tabs., 15 refs.

  4. Bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy in Gaucher disease type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikosch, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Dept. of Internal Medicine II, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Zitter, F. [Dept. of Internal Medicine II, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Gallowitsch, H.J.; Lind, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Wuertz, F. [Dept. of Pathology, State Hospital Klagenfurt (Austria); Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A. [Lysosomal Storage Disorder Unit, Dept. of Academic Haematology, Royal Free and Univ. Coll. Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    Scintigraphy is a method for imaging metabolism and should be viewed as complimentary to morphological imaging. Bone and bone marrow scintigraphy can particularly contribute to the detection of focal disease in Gaucher disease. In bone crises it can discriminate within three days after pain onset between local infection and aseptic necrosis. A further advantage of bone- and bone marrow scintigraphy is the visualization of the whole skeleton within one setting. Whole body imaging for focal lesions might thus be an objective in GD, in particular in patients complaining of several painful sites. Direct imaging of bone marrow deposits in GD by MIBI scintigraphy might be of special interest in children in whom bone marrow undergoes a developmental conversion from red to yellow marrow in the ap-pendicular skeleton. MRI interpretation in young GD patients is thus difficult in order to estimate the exact amount and extent of bone marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy with its direct visualization of lipid storage could thus add interesting additional information not shown with other methods including MRI. Although MRI is the most accepted imaging modality in assessing the skeletal status in GD, a selective use of scintigraphy for imaging bone and bone marrow may add information in the evaluation of patients with Gaucher disease.

  5. Bone marrow evaluation in patients with fever of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow examination is commonly requested investigations in cases of fever of unknown origin, irrespective of alteration in hematological parameters. More than 200 etiologies are associated with fever of unknown origin, and they are broadly divided into infectious, neoplastic, collagen vascular diseases, miscellaneous and undiagnosed. Many of these conditions directly or indirectly affect bone marrow. Marrow may show changes in cellular components, interstitium or in the blood vessels depending on the underlying local or systemic conditions. The three main hematopoietic cell lines may show variable hyperplasia, hypoplasia or aplasia of one or more than one cell lines, and occasionally dyspoiesis. Interstitium may show fibrosis, gelatinous transformation, or infiltration by abnormal cells. Amyloid deposits may be seen around blood vessels. Marrow may also show granulomas, infectious agents or neoplastic cells. Various reactive changes can be seen in the bone marrow in neoplastic, infectious and in connective tissue diseases. Infectious agents can be cultured from the marrow aspirate or can be demonstrated in marrow. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6029 JPN 2012; 2(3: 231-240

  6. [Toxic complications of high-dose polychemotherapy in the transplantation of bone marrow and of peripheral blood stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uss, A L; Milanovich, N F; Skriagin, A E; Zmachinskiĭ, V A; Snegir', V M; Batan, Z E; Komarovskaia, M E; Mitskevich, P B; Levin, V I

    1997-01-01

    The authors propose their own system of assessment of high-dose polychemotherapy toxicity. The system was applied to toxic complications of high-dose polychemotherapy in 31 patients with hematological malignancies subjected to allogenic, autologous bone marrow transplantation and transplantation of stem cells from peripheral blood within the scope of different protocols of high-dose polychemotherapy in conditioning regimen. A special scale developed in the Belarus Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation basing on the above system provides prediction of survival in early post-transplantation period.

  7. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of erythropoietin-stimulated bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblond, P.F. (Hospital of St. Sacrement, Quebec); Chamberlain, J.K.; Weed, R.I.

    1975-01-01

    This work describes and illustrates the scanning electron microscopic modifications observed in the femoral bone marrow of normal mice 72 hours after a single injection of partly purified sheep erythropoietin and of mice afflicted with a chronic congenital hemolytic anemia analogous to the disease Hereditary Spherocytosis in man. In acordance with previous transmission electron microscopic studies, the observations are consistent with an effect of erythropoietin both on the frequency of cell migration across the normally intact marrow sinus endothelium and on the morphology of sinus adventitial cells. It is suggested that these ultrastructural modifications may be responsible for the greater patency of the marrow-blood barrier under erythropoietin stimulation.

  9. Maxillary sinus marrow hyperplasia in sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M. [Dept. of Imaging, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Slovis, T.L. [Dept. of Imaging, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Whitten-Shurney, W. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Marrow hyperplasia is a sequela of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and may be seen in the skull in children after 5 years of age. The facial bones, except for the mandible and orbits, are usually not involved. We report an unusual case of a 28-month-old black boy with SCA who presented with extensive marrow hyperplasia of the maxillary sinuses in addition to severe calvarial and mandibular changes. The imaging characteristics on CT (similar to other sites of marrow hyperplasia) and MR (low signal on both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} sequences) should aid in making the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xue; Er-jun Wu; Pei-xun Zhang; Li-ya A; Yu-hui Kou; Xiao-feng Yin; Na Han

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modiifed biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantationin vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial ifbrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve ifbers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our ifndings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvi-ronment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  11. Bone marrow micrometastasis detected by flow cytometry is associated bone, bone marrow, lung macrometastasis in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Salih Akin

    2014-04-01

    Material and Methods: Bone marrow samples were obtained from 52 breast cancer patients and 16 control patients via aspiration from the iliac spine at the time of first diagnosis after the surgery. Epithelial cells were identified with anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody, and double-staining with propidium iodide and CD45using flow cytometry. Results: In all, 2 (12.5% of the 16 control patients and 11 (21% of the 52 breast cancer patients had cytokeratin-18 positive cells in their bone marrow. A relationship between the presence of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow, and the presence/absence of lymph node metastases, tumor size, stage, menopausal status, hormone receptor status, histological grade, c-erb-B2 expression, tumor subtype, lymphovascular invasion, Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS component, and gender was not observed. Significant positive relationships were observed between bone marrow micrometastasis, and age, and bone, bone marrow, lung, and liver metastases. Conclusion: Bone marrow micrometastasis was associated with age, bone, bone marrow, lung, and liver metastases at the time of diagnosis.. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 305-314

  12. PET/CT versus bone marrow biopsy in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in various pediatric malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Claudia P; Cuglievan, Branko; Zapata, Catalina M; Olavarrieta, Raquel; Raskin, Scott; Desai, Kavita; De Angulo, Guillermo

    2017-09-13

    Accurate staging is essential in the prognosis and management of pediatric malignancies. Current protocols require screening for marrow infiltration with bone marrow biopsy (BMB) as the gold standard. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is commonly used to complete the staging process and can also be used to evaluate marrow infiltration. To compare PET-CT and BMB in the initial evaluation of bone marrow infiltration in pediatric cancers. We retrospectively reviewed new cases of EWS, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, and lymphoma diagnosed between January 2009 and October 2014. Each case had undergone both PET-CT and BMB within 4 weeks without treatment in the interval between screening modalities. We reviewed 69 cases. Bone marrow infiltration was demonstrated in 34 cases by PET-CT and in 18 cases by BMB. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of PET-CT were both 100%. Interestingly, the cases in which infiltration was not detected on BMB had an abnormal marrow signal on PET-CT focal or distant to iliac crest. PET-CT has a high sensitivity when assessing marrow infiltration in pediatric malignancies. Advances in radiologic modalities may obviate the use of invasive, painful, and costly procedures like BMB. Furthermore, biopsy results are limited by insufficient tissue or the degree of marrow infiltration (diffuse vs. focal disease). PET-CT can improve the precision of biopsy when used as a guiding tool. This study proposes the use of PET-CT as first-line screening for bone marrow infiltration to improve the accuracy of staging in new diagnoses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The prostate cancer bone marrow niche: more than just ‘fertile soil’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabeth A Pedersen; Yusuke Shiozawa; Kenneth J Pienta; Russell S Taichman

    2012-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow has been studied extensively over the past few decades,yet the bone marrow micmenvironment that supports the growth of metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) has only been recently considered to be a specialized ‘niche' as well.New evidence supports the fact that disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) of PCa actually target the HSC niche,displace the occupant HSCs and take up residence in the pre-existing niche space.This review describes some of the evidence and mechanisms by which DTCs act as molecular parasites of the HSC niche.Furthermore,the interactions between DTCs,HSCs and the niche may provide new targets for niche-directed therapy,as well as insight into the perplexing clinical manifestations of metastatic PCa disease.

  14. Nutritional issues in adolescents after bone marrow transplant: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Cheryl; Walsh, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation and related complications can cause gastrointestinal (GI) side effects that can lead to poor nutrition, which has been associated with several morbidity and mortality issues. Adolescents require adequate nutrition not only to maintain health but to advance with normal growth and development. This article synthesizes the bone marrow transplant (BMT) literature regarding adolescents' nutritional needs, etiologies of altered oral intake, GI symptoms, nutritional assessments, nutritional interventions, and quality of life associated with poor nutrition. In addition, gaps in knowledge in the literature are identified. To provide effective and thorough care to patients during their BMT recovery, the knowledge base of nutritional and eating issues after transplant needs to become more comprehensive. Nurses play an important role in gathering and reporting clinical information. By anticipating potential risk factors, assessing and identifying symptoms, and initiating appropriate interventions promptly, patients can experience a more positive BMT experience.

  15. Data on bone marrow stem cells delivery using porous polymer scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasatyaveni Geesala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Low bioavailability and/or survival at the injury site of transplanted stem cells necessitate its delivery using a biocompatible, biodegradable cell delivery vehicle. In this dataset, we report the application of a porous biocompatible, biodegradable polymer network that successfully delivers bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs at the wound site of a murine excisional splint wound model. In this data article, we are providing the additional data of the reference article “Porous polymer scaffold for on-site delivery of stem cells – protects from oxidative stress and potentiates wound tissue repair” (Ramasatyaveni et al., 2016 [1]. This data consists of the characterization of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs showing the pluripotency and stem cell-specific surface markers. Image analysis of the cellular penetration into PEG–PU polymer network and the mechanism via enzymatic activation of MMP-2 and MMP-13 are reported. In addition, we provide a comparison of various routes of transplantation-mediated BMSCs engraftment in the murine model using bone marrow transplantation chimeras. Furthermore, we included in this dataset the engraftment of BMSCs expressing Sca-1+Lin−CD133+CD90.2+ in post-surgery day 10.

  16. Analysis of fatty acid composition in human bone marrow aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, Ryota; Ishitani, Ken; Makita, Kazuya; Horiguchi, Fumi; Nozawa, Shiro

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, the fatty acid composition of bone marrow aspirates and serum phospholipids in nine patients with hematologic diseases was investigated, and the effect of fatty acids on osteoblast differentiation in ST2 cells was examined. The concentrations of oleic acid and palmitic acid were significantly higher in bone marrow aspirates than in serum phospholipids, but the concentrations of other fatty acids did not differ. The rate of alkaline phosphatase positive ST2 cells induced by BMP2 was significantly increased by oleic acid, but was unaffected by the presence or absence of palmitic acid. We conclude that the fatty acid composition of bone marrow aspirates differs from that of serum phospholipids. This difference may affect osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  17. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  18. Bone marrow hypoplasia in a cat treated with griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, J B; English, R V; Breitschwerdt, E B; Duncan, D E

    1991-02-01

    Three weeks after initiation of griseofulvin treatment for dermatophytosis (40 mg/kg of body weight, q 12 h), an 8-yr-old domestic shorthair cat developed depression, vomiting, and pyrexia. Abnormalities found during physical examination included bilateral mydriasis, visual impairment, grade-II/V systolic murmur and multiple areas of alopecia. The cat was pancytopenic; serum biochemical abnormalities included hyperbilirubinemia, hyperglycemia, hyponatremia, and hypokalemia, and urinalysis revealed proteinuria, glycosuria, and bilirubinuria. Examination of a bone marrow aspirate revealed profound hypoplasia of all precursors. Griseofulvin toxicosis was diagnosed on the basis of the temporal relationship of drug administration with onset of clinical, hematologic, and biochemical abnormalities and failure to identify an infective or neoplastic cause for the bone marrow hypoplasia. The condition was refractory to treatment and the cat was euthanatized. Pathologic changes in the bone marrow were consistent with severe hypoplasia of all bone marrow precursors.

  19. Advances in bone marrow stem cell therapy for retinal dysfunction.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, SS; Moisseiev, E; Bauer, G.; Anderson, JD; Grant, MB; Zam, A; Zawadzki, RJ; Werner., JS; Nolta, JA

    2017-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic ret...

  20. ROLE OF BONE MARROW ASPIRATION IN DIAGNOSIS OF HAEMATOLOGICAL DISORDER

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    Poonam Nanwani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The bone marrow examination is an essential investigation for the diagnosis of disorders of the blood and bone marrow. This simple and relatively safe procedure is important, particularly in resource poor centres since access to adjuvant diagnostic techniques are often lacking or absent. MATERIALS AND METHODS 189 patients of all age groups were studied for haematological and non-haematological disorders by bone marrow aspiration in the Department of Pathology, MGM Medical College during the period of 2014 to 2016. RESULTS Majority of the patients who had bone marrow aspiration were aged 0-15 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.03. Most (97% of the marrow aspirate examined had definitive pathologic features, while 14 (7% were normal marrow elements. Out of 189 cases of bone marrow aspiration, acute leukaemia was the most common haematological disease diagnosed using this procedure. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was more common than acute myeloid leukaemia. Aplastic anaemia was seen in 16% cases. Megaloblastic anaemia occurred more commonly than other anaemias. Megaloblastic anaemia was seen in 13 cases (7% and microcytic anaemia was seen in 5 cases (3%. There were 10 cases (5% of Idiopathic Thrombocypenic Purpura. Myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma was seen in 7% and 2% cases respectively. Storage disorder was seen in 3 cases (2%, out of this 02 cases were Gaucher’s disease and one case was Niemann-Pick’s disease. CONCLUSION Bone marrow examination is an important step to arrive at the confirmatory diagnosis of many haematological disorders. This procedure remains a veritable tool in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of haematological diseases, especially in a resource poor centre.

  1. Bone marrow and nonbone marrow Toll like receptor 4 regulate acute hepatic injury induced by endotoxemia.

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    Edith Hochhauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are expressed in immune cells and hepatocytes. We examined whether hepatic Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is involved in the acute hepatic injury caused by the administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (septic shock model. METHODS: Wild type (WT, TLR4-deficient and chimera mice underwent myeloablative bone marrow transplantation to dissociate between TLR4 expression in the liver or in the immune-hematopoietic system. Mice were injected with LPS and sacrificed 4 hours later. RESULTS: Compared to TLR4 deficient mice, WT mice challenged with LPS displayed increased serum liver enzymes and hepatic cellular inflammatory infiltrate together with increased serum and hepatic levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα ,Up-regulation of hepatic mRNA encoding TLR4, IκB and c-jun expressions. TLR4 mutant mice transplanted with WT bone marrow were more protected than WT chimeric mice bearing TLR4 mutant hemopoietic cells from LPS, as seen by IL-1β and TNFα levels. We then used hepatocytes (Huh7 and macrophages from monocytic cell lines to detect TLR mRNA expression. Macrophages expressed a significantly higher level of TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 (more than 3000- and 8000-fold respectively compared with the hepatocyte cell line. LPS administration induced TLR4 activation in a hepatocyte cell line in a dose dependent manner while TLR2 mRNA hardly changed. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that TLR4 activation of hepatocytes participate in the immediate response to LPS induced hepatic injury. However, in this response, the contribution of TLR4 on bone marrow derived cells is more significant than those of the hepatocytes. The absence of the TLR4 gene plays a pivotal role in reducing hepatic LPS induced injury.

  2. Etiological Profile of Plasmacytosis on Bone Marrow Aspirates

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    Monika Gupta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In recent years, during routine examination of bone marrow aspirates, an increased plasma cell per­centage has been noted in a good number of cases which included both neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. An attempt has been made to observe the spectra of condi­tions with plasmacytosis in bone marrow. Methods: The present study was conducted in the de­partment of pathology over a period of one year. A total of 114 bone marrow aspirates that showed increased plas­ma cells (>3.5% constitute the study material. A detailed relevant clinical examination followed by complete blood count, peripheral smear examination and bone marrow aspiration was done in all cases. Results: There was slight female predominance with male to female ratio of 1:1.1. The majority of patients were in 4th decade. The plasma cell concentration ranged from 5% to 36%. As far as the etiology is concerned, 96 cases (84.2% were non-neoplastic and 18 cases (15.7% had neoplastic etiology. Conclusion: Bone marrow plasmacytosis can present as diagnostic dilemma and some time can be challenging to differentiate reactive from neoplastic condition as there is an overlap both in counts and morphology. Each case with plasmacytosis especially in the overlap range requires complete clinical evaluation, individualized investigations and more specific tests like immunoelectrophoresis and bone marrow biopsy with immunohistochemistry to arrive at a final diagnosis for patient management.

  3. Antibody formation by bone marrow cells in irradiated mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playfair, J. H. L.; Purves, Elizabeth C.

    1971-01-01

    Bone marrow-thymus cooperation experiments were carried out in lethally irradiated mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as the antigen and direct plaque-forming cells (PFC) as the end point. Various parameters were altered, with the following results: (1) Above 800 rad, the response by marrow cells alone, as well as the increase due to added thymus cells, was independent of irradiation dose. (2) The response of marrow cells was greatest at high SRBC concentrations, but the co-operative effect of thymus cells was most evident at lower SRBC levels, and completely absent at high levels. (3) Increasing the number of marrow cells, without thymus, gave increasing numbers of PFC, but the dose-response curve did not suggest cell synergism. (4) Thymectomy and antithymocyte serum treatment of host or donor did not prevent the response by marrow cells alone. It was concluded that this was a true IgM response by antibody-forming precursors from the marrow, unaided by thymus-derived cells. PMID:4934135

  4. Bone marrow fiariasis presenting as aplastic anemia: A case report

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    Sanjay Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 40-year old male who presented with complaints of generalized weakness, lethargy, breathlessness on exertion, easy fatigability for a 2-month duration. He also had the history of mild bleeding from gums and nose since 2 days ago and had pallor on general physical examination. The peripheral smear revealed pancytopenia with several microfilariae in the buffy coat. Bone marrow aspiration showed hypocellular marrow with microfilariasis and increase in mature plasma cells. The patient was starting on diethylcarbamazine. However, his bone marrow aspirate done 2 weeks later showed hypocellular marrow with no parasites and biopsy showed picture that was suggestive of aplastic anemia. He was later referred to higher center for further investigation and management. Pancytopenia as a presenting feature of filariasis is rare, but a few case reports have been published. Yet a causal relationship of filariasis and pancytopenia, hypoplasia or aplasia of bone marrow has not been determined. It has also not been proved that a treatment of filariasis has led to a reversal of bone marrow hypoplasia or aplasia.

  5. Opportunistic infections after blood and marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, J R

    1999-03-01

    Opportunistic infections are major causes of morbidity and mortality following bone marrow transplantation. Technological advances in stem cell procurement, the introduction of hematologic growth factors to speed engraftment, the development of new immunosuppressive regimens to control graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the development of technology to perform graft engineering with removal of T lymphocytes in toto or subpopulations of T lymphocytes, the use of molecular techniques to optimize donor and recipient matching, advances in blood banking, and development of international donor registries, are among the various factors that have led to tremendous changes in transplant practices. Because of such changes in transplant practices, along with the advent of new antimicrobial agents, and development of infection control measures affecting pathogen exposure, alterations in the interplay between host and potential pathogens have occurred. Shifts in the incidence and types of opportunistic pathogens are taking place. Several historically important infectious syndromes are today well controlled; others have diminished in importance early after transplant but are more problematic at a later time; new emerging pathogens are being recognized due to selection pressures from antimicrobial usage and new hosts, such as recipients of alternate donor allogeneic transplant procedures, with even more profound and prolonged immune suppression. Such shifts and new syndromes pose continuing new challenges to the transplant clinician.

  6. Pulmonary fungal infections after bone marrow transplantation

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    Allan, B.T.; Patton, D.; Ramsey, N.K.C.; Day, D.L.

    1988-02-01

    Of 319 pediatric patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) during a 10-year period, 27 developed pulmonary fungal infections (PFI). Only 2 patients (7%) survived. Twenty-three patients (85%) had been treated with systemic anti-fungal therapy immediately before or at the time of diagnosis. Nineteen patients (70%) were neutropenic, and 4 of the 8 patients who were not neutropenic were being treated with systemic steroids for graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Seven patients (26%) died within 7 days of diagnosis. The diagnosis was made ante-mortem in 9 patients (33%). Radiographic abnormalities were variable. At the onset of chest X-ray (CXR) change, the pulmonary infiltrates were unilateral in 14 patients (52%) and, at diagnosis, bilateral in 18 (66%). At diagnosis the infiltrates were interstitial in 3 patients (11%), alveolar in 20 (74%) and mixed in 4 (15%). Six patients (22%) developed cavitary lesions. The infecting agents were Aspergillus in 21 patients (78%), Candida in 7 (26%), Mucormycosis in 3 (11%), and Fusarium in 1 (4%). Five patients (19%) had mixed fungal infections and 7 (26%) had concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) pulmonary infections. Although the radiographic changes are often nonspecific in PFI, alveolar or nodular infiltrates in neutropenic patients or in those being treated for GVHD should strongly suggest a fungal etiology.

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Thalassemia (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zakerinia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades conventional therapy has improvedthe prognosis of thalassemia. However, despite such improvementit still remains a progressive disease with treatment-related complicationssuch as hepatitis, liver fibrosis, and cardiac disease.Bone marrow transplantation (BMT can prevent or delay progressionof the aforementioned complications. The importance ofclinical research in the field of BMT was recognized with theaward of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine to E.Donnall Thomas, one of the pioneers of BMT in humans. GeorgeMathe' was a pioneer in the early development of clinical BMT.Mathe' et al. were the first to describe graft-versus-host-disease(GVHD and its treatment, and the graft-versus- leukemia (GVLeffect in human. The first BMT for β-thalassemia major was performedsuccessfully by Thomas et al. in Seattle, in 1981. In thesame year another patient with β-thalassemia major underwentBMT in Pesaro, Italy, by Lucarelli et al. Since then, several hundredtransplantations have been performed worldwide, the majorityof these in Italy. From 1991 through 2007 BMT have beenperformed on 497 (Tehran=342, Shiraz=155 blood transfusiondependent patients with thalassemia major in Iran, with diseasefreesurvival of 71-77% respectively. Due to high graft failureand GVHD rates, BMT from alternative donors should be restrictedto patients who have poor life expectancies because theycannot receive adequate conventional treatment or because of alloimmunizationto minor blood antigens. Beginning in the early1980s, it was shown that umbilical cord blood contained high levelsof hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  8. Diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, T; Masutani, K; Yokoyama, M; Tokumoto, M; Tsuruya, K; Fukuda, K; Kanai, H; Katafuchi, R; Nagatoshi, Y; Hirakata, H

    2002-09-01

    A 15-year-old boy developed nephrotic syndrome and acute renal failure 4 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for lymphoid crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. On admission, he presented with clinical features of chronic GVHD including transient exacerbation of cholestatic liver injury. Renal biopsy showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with cellular crescents. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (1 g/day, for 3 days) followed by oral prednisolone. Renal function gradually improved but nephrotic state was persistent. A second renal biopsy showed improvement of acute tubular necrosis and endocapillary proliferation and transformation of crescents into a fibrous form. After tapering of oral prednisolone, cyclophosphamide was started, which resulted in a gradual improvement of proteinuria. Several cases of nephrotic syndrome occurring after BMT have already been reported, but most cases had membranous nephropathy. In our case, renal biopsy revealed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis with findings of active cellular immunity, and aggressive treatment resulted in attenuation of these findings. Moreover, chronic GVHD-related liver injury was noted at the time of this episode. Our findings suggest that chronic GVHD may be complicated with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis through unknown cellular immune mechanism.

  9. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Belinda A., E-mail: Belinda.Campbell@petermac.org [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Centre for Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Simoens, Nathalie [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Everitt, Sarah [Radiotherapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Burbury, Kate [Department of Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); MacManus, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  10. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Belinda A; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)-positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

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    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras were made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage.

  12. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  13. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

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    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of

  14. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Mansour; Adrienne Anginot; Stéphane J C Mancini; Claudine Schiff; Georges F Carle; Abdelilah Wakkach; Claudine Blin-Wakkach

    2011-01-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  15. Effects of Platelet Factor 4 on Expression of Bone Marrow Heparan Sulfate in Syngenic Bone Marrow Transplantation Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡凯; 孙汉英; 刘文励; 袁慧玲; 徐惠珍; 孙岚; 周银莉; 任天华

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To explore the effects of platelet factor 4(PF4) on hematopoietic reconstitution and its mechanism in syngenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The syngenic BMT mice models were established. 20 and 26 h before irradiation, the mice were injected 20 μg/kg PF4 or PBS twice into abdominal cavity, then the donor bone marrow nuclear cells (BMNC) were transplanted. On the 7th day, spleen clone forming units (CFU-S) were counted. On the 7th, 14th and 21st day after BMT, the BMNC and megakaryoryocytes in bone marrow tissue were counted and the percentage of hematopoietic tissue and expression level of heparan sulfate in bone marrow tissue were assessed. In PF4-treated groups, the CFU-S counts on the 7th day were higher than those in BMT groups after BMT. The BMNC and megakaryoryocyte counts and the percentage of hematopoietic tissue and heparan sulfate expression level were higher than those in BMT group on the 7th, 14th and 21st day after BMT (P<0. 01 or P<0. 05). PF4 could accelerate hematopoietic reconstitution of syngenic bone marrow transplantation. The promotion of the heparan sulfate expression in bone marrow may be one of mechanisms of PF4.

  16. The bone marrow microenvironment - Home of the leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafat, Manar S; Gnaneswaran, Bruno; Bowles, Kristian M; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2017-09-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is a genetically, biologically and clinically heterogeneous set of diseases, which are characterised by an increased growth of abnormal myeloid progenitor cells within the bone marrow (BM). Ex-vivo AML exhibits a high level of spontaneous apoptosis. Furthermore, relapse for patients achieving remission occurs from minimal residual disease harboured within the BM microenvironment. Taken together, these observations illustrate the importance of the BM microenvironment in sustaining AML. While significant progress has been made elaborating the small-scale genetic mutations and larger-scale chromosomal translocations that contribute to the development of AML and its prognosis in response to treatment, less is understood about the complex microenvironment of the BM, which is known to be a key player in the pathogenesis of the disease. As we look towards future therapies, the consideration that the BM microenvironment is uniquely important as a niche for AML - coupled with the idea that leukaemic blasts are more likely to be genetically unstable and therefore evolve resistance to conventional chemotherapies - make the functions of the non-malignant cells of the BM attractive targets for therapy. In this review, we discuss the microanatomy of the BM and provide an overview of the evidence supporting the role of the BM microenvironment in creating conditions conducive to the survival and proliferation of AML blasts. Ultimately, we examine the therapeutic potential of uncoupling AML from the BM microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The malignant clone and the bone-marrow environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Richardson, Paul G; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the clonal expansion of monoclonal immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells within the bone marrow (BM). It has become clear that the intimate reciprocal relationship between the tumor cell clone and the niches of the BM microenvironment plays a pivotal pathophysiologic role in MM. We and others have identified several new molecular targets and derived novel therapies which induce cytotoxicity against MM cells in the BM milieu, including thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide. Importantly, these agents induce tumor-cell death, as well as inhibit MM-cell-BM-stromal-cell (BMSC) adhesion and related tumor-cell growth, survival, and migration. Moreover, they block both constitutive and MM-cell binding-induced growth factor and cytokine secretion in BMSCs. Further, they also block tumor angiogenesis and can augment anti-MM immunity. Although all three of these agents are now FDA-approved to treat MM, patients inevitably relapse, and further improvements remain urgently needed. Here we review our current knowledge of the MM cell clone, as well as the impact of the BM microenvironment on tumor-cell growth, survival, migration and drug resistance. Delineating the mechanisms and sequelae of the reciprocal relationship between the MM cell clone, distinct BM extracellular matrix proteins, and accessory cell compartments may provide the basis for new effective therapeutic strategies to re-establish BM homeostasis and thereby improve MM patient outcome.

  18. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells drive lymphangiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Maertens

    Full Text Available It is now well accepted that multipotent Bone-Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSC contribute to cancer progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis. However, their involvement during the lymphangiogenic process is poorly described. Using BM-MSC isolated from mice of two different backgrounds, we demonstrate a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC both in vivo and in vitro. Co-injection of BM-MSC and tumor cells in mice increased the in vivo tumor growth and intratumoral lymphatic vessel density. In addition, BM-MSC or their conditioned medium stimulated the recruitment of lymphatic vessels in vivo in an ear sponge assay, and ex vivo in the lymphatic ring assay (LRA. In vitro, MSC conditioned medium also increased the proliferation rate and the migration of both primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC and an immortalized lymphatic endothelial cell line. Mechanistically, these pro-lymphangiogenic effects relied on the secretion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-A by BM-MSC that activates VEGF Receptor (VEGFR-2 pathway on LEC. Indeed, the trapping of VEGF-A in MSC conditioned medium by soluble VEGF Receptors (sVEGFR-1, -2 or the inhibition of VEGFR-2 activity by a specific inhibitor (ZM 323881 both decreased LEC proliferation, migration and the phosphorylation of their main downstream target ERK1/2. This study provides direct unprecedented evidence for a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC via the production of VEGF-A which acts on LEC VEGFR-2.

  19. Immediate bromodeoxyuridine labelling of unseparated human bone marrow cells ex vivo is superior to labelling after routine laboratory processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Mortensen, B T; Christensen, I J

    1998-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in several disease conditions and during treatment of patients with for example cytokines. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), immunocytochemical staining with anti-BrdUrd antibody and analysis by flow cytometry provides a ...... that ex vivo BrdUrd labelling of bone marrow cells should be performed immediately after aspiration and before separation, because these data are closer to values reported from in vivo labelling with BrdUrd.......It is important to evaluate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in several disease conditions and during treatment of patients with for example cytokines. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), immunocytochemical staining with anti-BrdUrd antibody and analysis by flow cytometry provides...... a reliable and reproducible technique for estimation of the fraction of cells that incorporated BrdUrd into DNA during S-phase. We have compared immediate BrdUrd labelling of unseparated bone marrow cells with the previously used labelling in the laboratory after routine separation of the mononuclear cells...

  20. Correlation of plasma FL expression with bone marrow irradiation dose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Sproull

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Ablative bone marrow irradiation is an integral part of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These treatment regimens are based on classically held models of radiation dose and the bone marrow response. Flt-3 ligand (FL has been suggested as a marker of hematopoiesis and bone marrow status but the kinetics of its response to bone marrow irradiation has yet to be fully characterized. In the current study, we examine plasma FL response to total body and partial body irradiation in mice and its relationship with irradiation dose, time of collection and pattern of bone marrow exposure. MATERIALS/METHODS: C57BL6 mice received a single whole body or partial body irradiation dose of 1-8 Gy. Plasma was collected by mandibular or cardiac puncture at 24, 48 and 72 hr post-irradiation as well as 1-3 weeks post-irradiation. FL levels were determined via ELISA assay and used to generate two models: a linear regression model and a gated values model correlating plasma FL levels with radiation dose. RESULTS: At all doses between 1-8 Gy, plasma FL levels were greater than control and the level of FL increased proportionally to the total body irradiation dose. Differences in FL levels were statistically significant at each dose and at all time points. Partial body irradiation of the trunk areas, encompassing the bulk of the hematopoietically active bone marrow, resulted in significantly increased FL levels over control but irradiation of only the head or extremities did not. FL levels were used to generate a dose prediction model for total body irradiation. In a blinded study, the model differentiated mice into dose received cohorts of 1, 4 or 8 Gy based on plasma FL levels at 24 or 72 hrs post-irradiation. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that plasma FL levels might be used as a marker of hematopoietically active bone marrow and radiation exposure in mice.

  1. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Thalassemia (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zakerinia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades conventional therapy has improvedthe prognosis of thalassemia. However, despite such improvementit still remains a progressive disease with treatment-relatedcomplications such as hepatitis, liver fibrosis, and cardiac disease.Bone marrow transplantation (BMT can prevent or delayprogression of the aforementioned complications. The importanceof clinical research in the field of BMT was recognizedwith the award of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Physiology andMedicine to E. Donnall Thomas, one of the pioneers of BMT inhumans. George Mathe' was a pioneer in the early developmentof clinical BMT. Mathe' and co-workers were the first to describegraft-versus-host-disease and its treatment, and the graftversus-leukemia effect in human. The first BMT for β-thalassemia major was performed successfully by Thomas andcolleagues in Seattle, in 1981. In the same year another patientwith β-thalassemia major underwent BMT in Pesaro, Italy, byLucarelli and others Since then, several hundred transplantationshave been performed worldwide, mostly in Italy. From 1991through 2007 BMT have been performed on 497 (Tehran=342,Shiraz=155 blood transfusion dependent patients with thalassemiamajor in Iran, with disease-free survival of 71-77% respectively.Because of high graft failure and high rates of graftversus-host-disease rates, BMT from alternative donors shouldbe restricted to patients who have poor life expectancies becausethey cannot receive adequate conventional treatment or becauseof alloimmunization to minor blood antigens. Beginning in theearly 1980s, it was shown that umbilical cord blood containedhigh levels of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  2. Recurrent Hodgkin's disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, I; Greer, J P; Beeker, T A; Wolff, S N; Collins, R D; Cousar, J B

    1997-01-01

    Histologic features of recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) after conventional therapy are well known, but few studies describe HD after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Histologic material from 63 patients who underwent BMT performed to treat recurrent nodular sclerosing HD (NSHD) between 1985 and 1994 was examined; 13 of the 63 patients had histologically proved recurrent disease after BMT. Histologic material and clinical findings from the original diagnostic biopsy specimen and pre-BMT and post-BMT specimens were available from our study population of eight patients (five male, three female; age range, 16 to 38 years; median age, 27.5 years). Seven patients had recurrent NSHD after BMT; sites of recurrence included lymph nodes only (four patients), and lymph nodes and lung, lung and liver, and lung only (one patient each). In one patient, a high-grade non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma developed in the large intestine 5 years after BMT. In another, disease progressed from grade 1 in the original biopsy specimen to grade 2 in both the pre-BMT and post-BMT recurrent HD biopsy specimens. Post-BMT biopsy specimens of recurrent HD with lung involvement revealed a substantial increase in sclerosis and fibroblastic features. Paraffin immunoperoxidase studies in seven patients demonstrated substantial change in phenotype of Reed-Stemberg cell variants in only one post-BMT recurrent HD specimen, which showed a +2 reaction with CD30 (Ki-1). No substantial differences in the reactive component were noted between the original biopsy specimen and pre-BMT and post-BMT specimens of recurrent disease. In summary, histologic findings of post-BMT recurrent NSHD do not differ significantly from those of the original diagnostic biopsy or pre-BMT recurrent HD specimens. The lung is the most common site of extranodal post-BMT recurrence. In one patient, high-grade non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma developed after BMT performed to treat recurrent HD.

  3. Transplantable NK cell progenitors in murine bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T; Bennett, M; Kumar, V

    1995-02-15

    Differentiation of NK cells from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells is a poorly understood process. Although it is known that NK cells are bone marrow derived and dependent upon an intact bone marrow microenvironment for complete maturation, it is not known if they arise from an intermediate lymphoid stem cell or from progenitors exclusively committed to the NK lineage. To determine whether phenotypically distinct committed NK progenitor cells exist in murine bone marrow, we sorted cells capable of repopulating recipient mice with mature NK cells upon i.v. transfer. We identified a rare population of bone marrow cells with the phenotype Ly6+ Lin- c-kit+ CD43high Fall-3high TSA-1- AA4.1low Rh123high that is highly enriched for the ability to generate NK cells after transplantation. Although these cells are relatively depleted of Rh123low pluripotent stem cells, they are highly enriched for both lymphoid and myeloid repopulating ability. Thus, we have found no evidence to support the existence of a phenotypically distinct transplantable progenitor population in mouse bone marrow that is either exclusively committed to the NK cell lineage or exhibits the functional characteristics of a common lymphoid stem cell.

  4. Late effects on human bone marrow after extended field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, C.; Morardet, N.; Tubiana, M.

    1983-09-01

    Thirty-two patients with lymphoma were treated by extended radiotherapy (RT) at a dose of 40 Gy and were studied by ferrokinetic studies and surface counting at various times following irradiation. Loss of hematopoietic activity in the irradiated areas is compensated by increased activity in the non-irradiated areas. Despite the return of peripheral blood counts to normal, the hyperactivity of the non-irradiated bone marrow persists over up to 13 years after RT, while the hematopoietic activity of the irradiated areas remains depressed and is only slightly higher than immediately after RT. The hypoactivity persisted even when the hemopoietic tissues had been subjected to the intense stimulation provoked by an aplasia caused by chemotherapy. However, a recovery was observed for dose of 20 Gy or lower. The hemopoietic activity of the irradiated bone marrow appears to be related to the volume of the marrow irradiated and is higher after a mantle + inverted Y field than after a mantle field. Bone marrow scintigraphies with /sup 59/Fe in 7 out of 9 patients studied revealed an extension of hematopoiesis into a normally dormant area of the marrow, such as the femora. In 2 patients an erythropoietic activity was observed in spleens which had received a dose of 40 Gy, and extra medullary erythropoiesis was found in approximately two-thirds of the patients.

  5. Neonatal Bone Marrow Transplantation in MPS IIIA Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Adeline A; Shamsani, N Jannah; Winner, Leanne K; Hassiotis, Sofia; King, Barbara M; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with some neurological lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) exhibit improved clinical signs following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The failure of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIA patients and adult mice with the condition to respond to this treatment may relate to factors such as impaired migration of donor-derived cells into the brain, insufficient enzyme production and/or secretion by the donor-derived microglial cells, or the age at which treatment is initiated. To explore these possibilities, we treated neonatal MPS IIIA mice with whole unfractionated bone marrow and observed that nucleated blood cell reconstitution occurred to a similar degree in MPS IIIA mice receiving green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing normal (treatment group) or MPS IIIA-GFP marrow (control group) and normal mice receiving normal-GFP marrow (control group). Further, similar distribution patterns of GFP(+) normal or MPS IIIA donor-derived cells were observed throughout the MPS IIIA mouse brain. We demonstrate that N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH), the enzyme deficient in MPS IIIA, is produced and secreted in a manner proportional to that of other lysosomal enzymes. However, despite this, overall brain SGSH activity was unchanged in MPS IIIA mice treated with normal marrow and the lysosomal storage burden in whole brain homogenates did not decrease, most likely due to donor-derived cells comprising MPS IIIA patients and mice to respond to BMT may occur as a result of insufficient donor-derived enzyme production and/or uptake by host brain cells.

  6. A Survey of Bacterial Infections in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Shirazi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients are prone to bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Bacterial infec­tion is considered as one of the common and serious complications in bone marrow transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of bacterial infections in bone marrow transplant recipients."nMethods: Fifty-two blood and 25 catheter samples were obtained from 23 patients who were hospitalized in bone marrow trans­plantation unit in Shariati Hospital in Tehran. Bacterial strains were isolated and identified by the standard conven­tional bacteriological methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to the guidelines from NCCLS using 18 different antibiotics."nResults:  The strains of Staphylococci, Streptococcus viridans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were isolated from 8(66.7%, 1(8.3%, 2 (16.7% and the 1(8.3% cases, respectively."nConclusion: Current study indicated that the bacterial infections particularly those caused by the Gram-positive cocci were still as important problem in bone marrow transplant.

  7. Cardiomyocyte regeneration from circulating bone marrow cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Yukio; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Migita, Makoto; Hayakawa, Jun; Hayashida, Mari; Uchikoba, Yohko; Fukumi, Daichi; Shimada, Takashi; Ogawa, Shunichi

    2003-09-01

    We investigated the role of circulating bone marrow cells (BMC) in cardiomyocyte regeneration. BMC, isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), were transplanted into lethally irradiated C57BL6 mice. Five weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), flow cytometric analysis for GFP-positive cells confirmed reconstitution of transplanted bone marrow. Bone marrow transplant mice subsequently underwent left coronary artery ligation (myocardial infarction) or sham-operation, and were killed at 1 mo or 3 mo after operation. Infarct size was similar in bone marrow transplant mice at 1 mo (47.1 +/- 5.9%) and at 3 mo (45.3 +/- 7.8%), and echocardiography at 2 and 8 wk revealed decreasing left ventricular function. In infarcted heart, GFP-positive cells that expressed desmin and troponin T-C were identified by confocal microscopy. GFP and troponin T-C double-positive cells were predominantly in the peri-infarcted region (1 mo, 365 +/- 45 cells/50 sections; 3 mo: 458 +/- 100 cells/50 sections; p infarct, and sham-operated regions). Furthermore, BMC mobilization and differentiation into cardiomyocytes was found to be complete within 1 mo after myocardial infarction. These results demonstrate that circulating BMC undergo mobilization and differentiation in cardiac cells after myocardial infarction. Future studies are required to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  8. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Frangoul, Haydar A. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, Susan A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  9. Differential gene expression profile associated with the abnormality of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in aplastic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Li

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA is generally considered as an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome with defective hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and marrow microenvironment. Previous studies have demonstrated the defective HSCs and aberrant T cellular-immunity in AA using a microarray approach. However, little is known about the overall specialty of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. In the present study, we comprehensively compared the biological features and gene expression profile of BM-MSCs between AA patients and healthy volunteers. In comparison with healthy controls, BM-MSCs from AA patients showed aberrant morphology, decreased proliferation and clonogenic potential and increased apoptosis. BM-MSCs from AA patients were susceptible to be induced to differentiate into adipocytes but more difficult to differentiate into osteoblasts. Consistent with abnormal biological features, a large number of genes implicated in cell cycle, cell division, proliferation, chemotaxis and hematopoietic cell lineage showed markedly decreased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. Conversely, more related genes with apoptosis, adipogenesis and immune response showed increased expression in BM-MSCs from AA patients. The gene expression profile of BM-MSCs further confirmed the abnormal biological properties and provided significant evidence for the possible mechanism of the destruction of the bone marrow microenvironment in AA.

  10. Association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities of the knee, the trauma mechanism and associated soft-tissue knee injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Andreisek, Gustav; Karer, Anissja T.; Manoliu, Andrei; Ulbrich, Erika J. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Bouaicha, Samy [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Naraghi, Ali [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities, the knee injury mechanism, and associated soft tissue injuries in a larger cohort than those in the published literature. Retrospective study including 220 patients with traumatic knee injuries. Knee MRIs were evaluated for trauma mechanism, soft tissue injury, and the location of bone marrow abnormalities. The locations of the abnormalities were correlated with trauma mechanisms and soft tissue injuries using the chi-square test with Bonferroni correction. One hundred and forty-four valgus injuries, 39 pivot shift injuries, 25 lateral patellar dislocations, 8 hyperextensions, and 4 dashboard injuries were included. Valgus and pivot shift injuries showed traumatic bone marrow abnormalities in the posterolateral regions of the tibia. Abnormalities after patellar dislocation were found in the anterolateral and centrolateral femur and patella. Hyperextension injuries were associated with abnormalities in almost all regions, and dashboard injuries were associated with changes in the anterior regions of the tibia and femur. Our study provides evidence of associations between traumatic bone marrow abnormality patterns and different trauma mechanisms in acute knee injury, and reveals some overlap, especially of the two most common trauma mechanisms (valgus and pivot shift), in a large patient cohort. (orig.)

  11. Transplanted bone marrow mononuclear cells and MSCs impart clinical benefit to children with osteogenesis imperfecta through different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuru, Satoru; Gordon, Patricia L; Shimono, Kengo; Jethva, Reena; Marino, Roberta; Phillips, Charlotte L; Hofmann, Ted J; Veronesi, Elena; Dominici, Massimo; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2012-08-30

    Transplantation of whole bone marrow (BMT) as well as ex vivo-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) leads to striking clinical benefits in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI); however, the underlying mechanism of these cell therapies has not been elucidated. Here, we show that non-(plastic)-adherent bone marrow cells (NABMCs) are more potent osteoprogenitors than MSCs in mice. Translating these findings to the clinic, a T cell-depleted marrow mononuclear cell boost (> 99.99% NABMC) given to children with OI who had previously undergone BMT resulted in marked growth acceleration in a subset of patients, unambiguously indicating the therapeutic potential of bone marrow cells for these patients. Then, in a murine model of OI, we demonstrated that as the donor NABMCs differentiate to osteoblasts, they contribute normal collagen to the bone matrix. In contrast, MSCs do not substantially engraft in bone, but secrete a soluble mediator that indirectly stimulates growth, data which provide the underlying mechanism of our prior clinical trial of MSC therapy for children with OI. Collectively, our data indicate that both NABMCs and MSCs constitute effective cell therapy for OI, but exert their clinical impact by different, complementary mechanisms. The study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00187018.

  12. Surgical and immune reconstitution murine models in bone marrow research: Potential for exploring mechanisms in sepsis, trauma and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Elsas, Pedro; Ferreira, Renato Nunes; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez C

    2017-08-20

    Bone marrow, the vital organ which maintains lifelong hemopoiesis, currently receives considerable attention, as a source of multiple cell types which may play important roles in repair at distant sites. This emerging function, distinct from, but closely related to, bone marrow roles in innate immunity and inflammation, has been characterized through a number of strategies. However, the use of surgical models in this endeavour has hitherto been limited. Surgical strategies allow the experimenter to predetermine the site, timing, severity and invasiveness of injury; to add or remove aggravating factors (such as infection and defects in immunity) in controlled ways; and to manipulate the context of repair, including reconstitution with selected immune cell subpopulations. This endows surgical models overall with great potential for exploring bone marrow responses to injury, inflammation and infection, and its roles in repair and regeneration. We review three different murine surgical models, which variously combine trauma with infection, antigenic stimulation, or immune reconstitution, thereby illuminating different aspects of the bone marrow response to systemic injury in sepsis, trauma and allergy. They are: (1) cecal ligation and puncture, a versatile model of polymicrobial sepsis; (2) egg white implant, an intriguing model of eosinophilia induced by a combination of trauma and sensitization to insoluble allergen; and (3) ectopic lung tissue transplantation, which allows us to dissect afferent and efferent mechanisms leading to accumulation of hemopoietic cells in the lungs. These models highlight the gain in analytical power provided by the association of surgical and immunological strategies.

  13. Use of osmium tetroxide staining with microcomputerized tomography to visualize and quantify bone marrow adipose tissue in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Erica L; Troiano, Nancy; Vanhoutan, Joshua N; Bouxsein, Mary A; Fretz, Jackie A; Xi, Yougen; Nelson, Tracy; Katz, Griffin; Berry, Ryan; Church, Christopher D; Doucette, Casey R; Rodeheffer, Matthew S; Macdougald, Ormond A; Rosen, Clifford J; Horowitz, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Adipocytes reside in discrete, well-defined depots throughout the body. In addition to mature adipocytes, white adipose tissue depots are composed of many cell types, including macrophages, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stromal cells, which together are referred to as the stromal vascular fraction (SVF). The SVF also contains adipocyte progenitors that give rise to mature adipocytes in those depots. Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) or marrow fat has long been known to be present in bone marrow (BM) but its origin, development, and function remain largely unknown. Clinically, increased MAT is associated with age, metabolic diseases, drug treatment, and marrow recovery in children receiving radiation and chemotherapy. In contrast to the other depots, MAT is unevenly distributed in the BM of long bones. Conventional quantitation relies on sectioning of the bone to overcome issues with distribution but is time-consuming, resource intensive, inconsistent between laboratories and may be unreliable as it may miss changes in MAT volume. Thus, the inability to quantitate MAT in a rapid, systematic, and reproducible manner has hampered a full understanding of its development and function. In this chapter, we describe a new technique that couples histochemical staining of lipid using osmium tetroxide with microcomputerized tomography to visualize and quantitate MAT within the medullary canal in three dimensions. Imaging of osmium staining provides a high-resolution map of existing and developing MAT in the BM. Because this method is simple, reproducible, and quantitative, we expect it will become a useful tool for the precise characterization of MAT.

  14. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  15. Primary culture of marrow core in collagen gels: modulation and transformation of endosteal cells. I. Morphologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A; Steiner, R

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that collagen gels can be used as a culture matrix for the growth and proliferation of a variety of stromal and hemopoietic cellular elements. Since collagen is a physiologic matrix and allows the simultaneous growth and proliferation of a variety of cellular elements in three dimensional fashion, we used this method to culture 2 to 3 mm segments of trephined bone marrow. The gels were constantly bathed by RPMI 1640 medium containing fetal calf serum and antibiotic. Modulation, migration and transformation of endosteal cells were apparent under phase contrast microscopy and were confirmed in histologic sections. This study demonstrates for the first time that human marrow endosteal cells - the cells which line the bony trabeculae - are inducible and capable of modulation and transformation into stromal (fibroblast-like, macrophage-like, and fat-containing cells) and hemopoietic (round or spheroidal blast-like) cells. This report provides further evidence that endosteal cells can be considered the fixed (reserve) totipotential stem cells in the human bone marrow and are the equivalent of embryonal level undifferentiated mesenchymal cells which are capable of giving rise to the many different cell types that constitute the hemopoietic organ, i.e., bone marrow.

  16. Reactivation of hepatitis B infection following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a hepatitis B-immune patient: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempinska, Anna; Kwak, Eun J; Angel, Jonathan B

    2005-11-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is a rare phenomenon. Reverse seroconversion, defined as the clearance of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAb) and the appearance of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in a patient with resolved HBV infection (i.e., a HBsAg-negative, HBsAb-positive, hepatitis B core antibody-positive patient) following receipt of a bone marrow transplant is described. A review of related cases in the literature was undertaken to identify clinical features associated with this phenomenon. We present a case of reactivation of HBV infection in a 47-year-old man after receipt of an allogeneic bone marrow transplant for acute myelogenous leukemia. Before undergoing bone marrow transplantation, the presence of HBsAb and hepatitis B core antibody and the absence of HBsAg indicated clearance of natural HBV infection. The donor was HBsAg and HBsAb negative. Twenty-nine months after bone marrow transplantation, the patient developed transaminitis and evidence of active HBV infection (the patient had test results positive for HBsAg, negative for HBsAb, and positive for HBV DNA). A total of 28 other cases of reverse seroconversion have been described in the literature, 11 of which provided adequate information to be summarized in detail together with the present case. Reactivation of HBV infection following bone marrow transplantation appears to occur almost exclusively in patients who have received marrow from an HBsAb-negative donor and have experienced graft-versus-host disease, the onset of which is associated with tapering of immunosuppressive therapy. Although HBV reverse seroconversion is an uncommon event, understanding the clinical features associated with the development of HBV reverse seroconversion may provide insight into how such a potentially fatal complication may be avoided.

  17. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  18. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases.

  19. Suppressive activity of acivicin on murine bone marrow hemopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, G; Mencoboni, M; Lerza, R; Cerruti, A; Bogliolo, G; Pannacciulli, I

    1992-01-01

    Acivicin (AVC), a L-glutamine antagonist, is an intriguing antimetabolite coupling cell growth inhibition activity with differentiating effects. In this in vivo study the influence of acivicin on mice bone marrow hemopoietic progenitors was tested. 10 mg/kg b.w./day of acivicin were i.p. injected in B6D2F1 mice for nine days. Leucocyte and reticulocyte level (in peripheral blood), CFU-S (multipotent stem cells) and GM-CFU (granulocyte-macrophage committed progenitors) content in bone marrow were determined during drug administration and for 14 days thereafter. All tested populations decreased severely during the first days of treatment. The drop was particularly striking for bone marrow CFU-S. The recovery of hemopoietic progenitors, however, began while AVC was still administered. These results suggest that the effects of acivicin on normal mouse hemopoietic system are mainly inhibitory, causing considerable myelosuppression.

  20. Multifocal bone and bone marrow lesions in children - MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raissaki, Maria; Demetriou, Stelios; Spanakis, Konstantinos; Skiadas, Christos; Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Katzilakis, Nikolaos; Stiakaki, Eftichia [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Velivassakis, Emmanouil G. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Orthopedic Clinic, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2017-03-15

    Polyostotic bone and bone marrow lesions in children may be due to various disorders. Radiographically, lytic lesions may become apparent after loss of more than 50% of the bone mineral content. Scintigraphy requires osteoblastic activity and is not specific. MRI may significantly contribute to the correct diagnosis and management. Accurate interpretation of MRI examinations requires understanding of the normal conversion pattern of bone marrow in childhood and of the appearances of red marrow rests and hyperplasia. Differential diagnosis is wide: Malignancies include metastases, multifocal primary sarcomas and hematological diseases. Benign entities include benign tumors and tumor-like lesions, histiocytosis, infectious and inflammatory diseases, multiple stress fractures/reactions and bone infarcts/ischemia. (orig.)

  1. Bone marrow edema syndrome in postpartal women: treatment with iloprost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Nicholas; Meizer, Roland; Meraner, Dominik; Becker, Stephan; Meizer, Elizabeth; Landsiedl, Franz

    2009-04-01

    Bone marrow edema syndrome of the femoral head in pregnant women is a rare disease resulting in disabling coxalgia, beginning in the last 3 months of pregnancy and persisting for several months after parturition. The parenteral administration of the vasoactive drug iloprost constitutes a new approach to the treatment of painful bone marrow edema syndrome of the hip of pregnant women. Six postpartal women (8 hips) with bone marrow edema syndrome of the femoral head were treated with iloprost followed by 3 weeks of partial weight-bearing. Relief from pain, restoration of functional capacity, and normalization of the MRI signal pattern were rapidly achieved, thus avoiding the need for surgical intervention. As the substance is contraindicated in pregnancy, therapy may begin only some days after parturition, with a short discontinuation in breastfeeding.

  2. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  3. Bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia: a global perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hamed Hussein

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Even though severe thalassemia is a preventable disease, over 100,000 new cases are born yearly, particularly in the Middle East and South-East Asia. Most of these children may not reach adulthood because long-term appropriate supportive care is either inaccessible or unaffordable. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT remains the only available definitive cure and success rates can be very high in appropriately selected patients, i.e. low-risk younger children with a matched family donor. In these circumstances BMT may be justified medically, ethically as well as financially, in fact, the cost of low-risk BMT is equivalent to that of a few years of non-curative supportive. This manuscript will briefly review the current status of bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia major with particular emphasis on a global prospective and present the experience of the Cure2Children Foundation supporting sustainable and scalable start up BMT programs in low-resource settings. The initial twelve consecutive patients managed in two start up BMT units in Pakistan (Children’s Hospital of the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad and India (South East Asia Institute for Thalassemia, Jaipur were included in this analysis. These initial six patients per each institution where purposely chosen as the focus of this report because they represent the steepest phase of the learning curve. The median age at transplant was 3.9 years, range 0.9 to 6.0, liver was no greater than 2 cm from costal margin, and all received matched related BMT. A structured on-site focused training program as well as ongoing intensive on-line cooperation was provided by the Cure2Children team of professionals. At a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range 3.5 to 33.5 months both thalassemia-free and overall survival are 92%, one patient died of encephalitis-meningitis of unknown cause. No rejections where observed. Neutrophil recovery occurred at a median of 15.5 days (range 13

  4. A study of bone marrow failure syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone marrow failure syndrome (BMFS, or aplastic anemia, includes peripheral blood single cytopenias, as well as pancytopenia due to inability of the marrow to effectively produce blood cells. Aim: To study the clinico-hematological profile and etiological factors of bone marrow failure syndrome in children. Setting and Design: This prospective study was carried out in the Department of Pediatrics of a university teaching hospital over 36 months. Materials and Methods: Children with pancytopenia (Hb < 10 g/dl, absolute neutrophil count < 1.5 x 10 9 /L, platelet count < 100 x 10 9 /L and bone marrow cellularity < 25% were included in the study. History of exposure to drugs, socioeconomic status, ethnicity and occupation of father were noted. Bone marrow aspiration; trephine biopsy; Ham test; viral studies for hepatitis A, B and C; and cytogenetic investigations were carried out. Statistical Analysis: Relative risk was estimated by odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI in matched cases and controls. Results: Of the 53 children studied, 6 (11.3% were diagnosed as Fanconi anemia. Two cases had features of myelodysplastic syndrome. Forty-five children were labeled as acquired aplastic anemia, of whom one had evidence of hepatitis B infection and two patients (5.8% had paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Aplastic anemia was more common in children from family with lower socioeconomic status; in Muslims; and where the father′s occupation was weaving, dyeing and painting. However, the number was small to make statistically significant conclusions. No correlation could be established with exposure to drugs. Conclusion: Fanconi anemia was responsible for approximately one-tenth of the cases of bone marrow failure syndrome. Majority of the patients had acquired aplastic anemia. Hepatitis B infection was an uncommon cause of acquired aplastic anemia.

  5. Marrow fat deposition and skeletal growth in caribou calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L.

    2003-01-01

    I evaluated rates of marrow fat deposition and skeletal growth of caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) calves through 20 days of age at Denali National Park, Alaska, USA. Both were negatively correlated with late winter snowfall, indicating the prolonged effects of maternal undernutrition following severe winters. Using regression analyses, I found that the rates of marrow fat deposition and hindfoot growth during the 20 days following birth declined 46% and 68%, respectively, over the range of winter severity during this study. These measures of development may indicate a broader array of effects of maternal undernutrition, influencing the vulnerability of caribou calves to predation.

  6. Successful nonsibling bone marrow transplantation in severe combined immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsøe, K; Skinhøj, P; Andersen, V

    1978-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was diagnosed in a girl immediately after birth; her older brother had SCID and was successfully reconstituted by bone marrow transplantation from his uncle. She was isolated in a laminar air flow bench and decontaminated. The father differed by one HLA......-A antigen but was HLA-Dw2 homozygous like the patient; his lymphocytes showed a slight response to the patient's cells in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). At the age of 2 1/2 months and again at 5 months, she was given a bone marrow transplant from the father. During the entire course the patient had...

  7. Methods of reducing pain during bone marrow biopsy: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow examination plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of various hematological and systemic diseases. Even though the procedure has been carried out for decades, it remains an extremely painful and uncomfortable experience for a majority of patients. This paper reviews the different strategies used to provide analgesia and summarizes the advantages and drawbacks of one strategy over the other. A literature review was carried out addressing the different approaches to providing pain relief during bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Several different methods, procedure modifications and protocols are employed at various centers but pain control and analgesia remain incomplete. Local infiltration with lidocaine or similar local analgesics is the standard at most centers. Although there is limited data, there are several studies in literature demonstrating the pain relieving effects of different methods and drugs when used with local anesthetics. Sedation, usually using benzodiazepines, reduces anticipatory anxiety, provides analgesia and also short term amnesia. Combinations of different agents not only yield potent effects but also reduce the required dose of each individual drug, minimizing adverse effects. Non-pharmacological factors also play key roles. Providing patients with complete and comprehensible information is vital to ensure the least amount of discomfort during the biopsy. Distraction techniques, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis and music therapy, may also play a role in minimizing pain.

  8. Non-hematopoietic essential functions of bone marrow cells: a review of scientific and clinical literature and rationale for treating bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Harrell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis as the only essential function of bone marrow cells has been challenged for several decades through basic science (in vitro and in vivo and clinical data. Such work has shed light on two other essential functions of bone marrow cells: osteopoiesis and angiogenesis/vasculogenesis. Clinical utility of autologous concentrated bone marrow aspirate (CBMA has demonstrated both safety and efficacy in treating bone defects. Moreover, CBMA has been shown to be comparable to the gold standard of iliac crest bone graft (ICBG, or autograft, with regard to being osteogenic and osteoinductive. ICBG is not considered an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP, but CBMA may become regulated as an ATMP. The European Medicines Agency Committee for Advanced Therapies (EMA:CAT has issued a reflection paper (20 June 2014 in which reversal of the 2013 ruling that CBMA is a non-ATMP has been proposed. We review bone marrow cell involvement in osteopoiesis and angiogenesis/vasculogenesis to examine EMA:CAT 2013 decision to use CBMA for treatment of osteonecrosis (e.g, of the femoral head should be considered a non-ATMP. This paper is intended to provide discussion on the 20 June 2014 reflection paper by reviewing two non-hematopoietic essential functions of bone marrow cells. Additionally, we provide clinical and scientific rationale for treating osteonecrosis with CBMA.

  9. EXPRESSION OF rhBMP-7 GENE IN TRANSDUCED BONE MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德宇; 杜靖远; 王洪; 刘勇; 郭晓东

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To explore the possibility of expression of exogenous gene in transduced bone marrow derived stromal cells(BMSCs). Methods. The marker gene , pbLacZ, was transferred into cultured BMSCs and the expression of transduced gene by X-gal staining was examined. Then plasmid pcDNA3-rhBMP7 was delivered to cultured BMSCs. Through immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR assay, the expression of rhBMP7 gene was detected. Results. The exogenous gene could be expressed efficiently in transduced BMSCs. Conculsion. The present study provided a theoretical basis to gene therapy on the problems of bone and cartilage tissue.

  10. Blockage of caspase-1 activation ameliorates bone marrow inflammation in mice after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Jinyan; Li, Yuanyuan; Xia, Yuan; Chu, Peipei; Qi, Kunming; Yan, Zhiling; Yao, Haina; Liu, Yun; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cause damage to bone marrow and inflammation. Whether inflammasomes are involved in bone marrow inflammation remains unclear. The study aims to evaluate the role of inflammasomes in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT. On days 7, 14, 21 and 28 after HSCT, mice were sacrificed for analysis of bone marrow inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion, inflammasomes expression and caspase-1 activation. Bone marrow inflammation with neutrophils and macrophages infiltration was observed after HSCT. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6 were elevated, with increased caspase-1 activation and inflammasomes expression. Caspase-1 inhibitor administration after HSCT significantly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into bone marrow and increased the numbers of megakaryocytes and platelets. In conclusion, inflammasomes activation is involved in bone marrow inflammation after HSCT and caspase-1 inhibition attenuates bone marrow inflammation and promoted hematopoietic reconstitution, suggesting targeting caspase-1 might be beneficial for improving HSCT outcomes.

  11. Neural Ganglioside GD2+ Cells Define a Subpopulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Adult Murine Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Due to the lack of specific markers, the isolation of pure mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from murine bone marrow remains an unsolved problem. The present study explored whether the neural ganglioside GD2 could serve as a single surface marker to uniquely distinguish murine bone marrow MSCs (mBM-MSCs from other marrow elements. Methods: Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, in combination with quantitative RT-PCR, were used to identify the expression of GD2 on culture-expanded mBM-MSCs. GD2+ and GD2- fractions from mBM-MSCs cultures were sorted by immunosorting. Flow cytometry was performed to further analyze the biomarkers of GD2-sorted and unsorted cells. Employing CFU-F assay and CCK-8 assay, we examined the clonogenic and proliferative capabilities of GD2-sorted and unsorted cells. Using oil red O and von Kossa staining assay, we also assessed the multi-lineage potential of GD2-sortedand unsorted cells. Results: We found that mBM-MSCs expressed a novel surface marker the neural ganglioside GD2. Importantly, mBM-MSCs were the only cells within bone marrow that expressed this marker. Further studies demonstrated that a homogenous population of MSCs could be obtained from bone marrow cultures in early passages by GD2 immunosorting. Compared to parental cells, GD2+-sorted cells not only possessed much higher clonogenic and proliferative capabilities but also had significantly stronger differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblasts. Furthermore, GD2+-sorted cells displayed enhanced expression of ES markers SSEA-1 and Nanog. Conclusion: Our observations provide the first demonstration that GD2 may serve as a maker for identification and purification of mBM-MSCs. Meanwhile, our study indicates that the cells selected by GD2 are a subpopulation of MSCs with features of primitive precursor cells.

  12. Alteration of hedgehog signaling by chronic exposure to different pesticide formulations and unveiling the regenerative potential of recombinant sonic hedgehog in mouse model of bone marrow aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaklader, Malay; Law, Sujata

    2015-03-01

    Chronic pesticide exposure-induced downregulation of hedgehog signaling and its subsequent degenerative effects on the mammalian hematopoietic system have not been investigated yet. However a number of concurrent studies have pointed out the positive correlation between chronic pesticide exposure induced bone marrow failure and immune suppression. Here, we have given an emphasis on the recapitulation of human marrow aplasia like condition in mice by chronic mixed pesticide exposures and simultaneously unravel the role of individual pesticides in the said event. Unlike the effect of mixed pesticide, individual pesticides differentially alter the hedgehog signaling in the bone marrow primitive hematopoietic compartment (Sca1 + compartment) and stromal compartment. Individually, hexaconazole disrupted hematopoietic as well as stromal hedgehog signaling activation through inhibiting SMO and facilitating PKC δ expression. On contrary, both chlorpyriphos and cypermethrin increased the sequestration and degradation of GLI1 by upregulating SU(FU) and βTrCP, respectively. However, cypermethrin-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling has partly shown to be circumvented by non-canonical activation of GLI1. Finally, we have tested the regenerative response of sonic hedgehog and shown that in vitro supplemented recombinant SHH protein augmented clonogenic stromal progenitors (CFU-F) as well as primitive multipotent hematopoietic clones including CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM of mixed pesticide-induced aplastic marrow. It is an indication of the marrow regeneration. Finally, our findings provide a gripping evidence that downregulated hedgehog signaling contribute to pesticide-mediated bone marrow aplasia but it could be recovered by proper supplementation of recombinant SHH along with hematopoietic base cocktail. Furthermore, SU(FU) and GLI1 can be exploited as future theradiagnostic markers for early marrow aplasia diagnosis.

  13. Rapid increase in marrow fat content and decrease in marrow perfusion in lumbar vertebra following bilateral oophorectomy: An MR imaging-based prospective longitudinal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi Xiang J.; Griffith, James F.; Deng, Min; Yeung, David KW; Yuan, Jing [Dept. of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-02-15

    Bilateral oophorectomy leads to reduced bone mineral density (BMD), and reduced BMD is associated with increased marrow fat and reduced marrow perfusion. Purpose of this study was to investigate how soon these changes occur following surgical oophorectomy. Six patients who underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were studied. At baseline, mean patient age was 49.5 years (range: 45-54 years). Third lumbar vertebral body BMD measurement using quantitative CT, marrow fat fraction (FF) using MR spectroscopy and marrow perfusion using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI were conducted immediately prior to surgery and at 3, 9, and 21 months after surgery. Reduced BMD, increased marrow FF, and reduced marrow perfusion occurred synchronously post-oophorectomy. There was a sharp decrease of 12.5 +/- 7.2% in BMD (n = 6), a sharp increase of 92.2 +/- 46.3% (n = 6) in FF, a sharp decrease of 23.6 +/- 3.9% in maximum contrast enhancement (n = 5), and of 45.4 +/- 7.7% for enhancement slope (n = 5) during the initial 3 months post surgery. BMD and marrow perfusion continued to decrease, and marrow FF continued to increase at a slower rate during the following 18 months. Friedman test showed a significant trend for these changes (p < 0.05). Bilateral oophorectomy leads to a rapid decrease in lumbar BMD, an increase in marrow fat content, and a decrease in marrow blood perfusion.

  14. Rapid increase in marrow fat content and decrease in marrow perfusion in lumbar vertebra following bilateral oophorectomy: an MR imaging-based prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yi-Xiáng J; Griffith, James F; Deng, Min; Yeung, David K W; Yuan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral oophorectomy leads to reduced bone mineral density (BMD), and reduced BMD is associated with increased marrow fat and reduced marrow perfusion. Purpose of this study was to investigate how soon these changes occur following surgical oophorectomy. Six patients who underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were studied. At baseline, mean patient age was 49.5 years (range: 45-54 years). Third lumbar vertebral body BMD measurement using quantitative CT, marrow fat fraction (FF) using MR spectroscopy and marrow perfusion using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI were conducted immediately prior to surgery and at 3, 9, and 21 months after surgery. Reduced BMD, increased marrow FF, and reduced marrow perfusion occurred synchronously post-oophorectomy. There was a sharp decrease of 12.5 ± 7.2% in BMD (n = 6), a sharp increase of 92.2 ± 46.3% (n = 6) in FF, a sharp decrease of 23.6 ± 3.9% in maximum contrast enhancement (n = 5), and of 45.4 ± 7.7% for enhancement slope (n = 5) during the initial 3 months post surgery. BMD and marrow perfusion continued to decrease, and marrow FF continued to increase at a slower rate during the following 18 months. Friedman test showed a significant trend for these changes (p decrease in lumbar BMD, an increase in marrow fat content, and a decrease in marrow blood perfusion.

  15. Endocrine dysfunction after bone marrow transplantation during childhood and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Young Jin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Several complications can occur in patients who received bone marrow transplantation (BMT during childhood and adolescence. This study aims to investigate endocrine dysfunctions after BMT so that better care can be provided to care for long-term survivors of BMT. Methods : One hundred patients (61 males, 39 females were included in this study. Clinical parameters such as initial diagnosis, age at BMT, conditioning regimen, presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, growth pattern, thyroid function, and pubertal status were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate risk factors associated with endocrine dysfunction. Results : Height standard deviation score (SDS at BMT, after 1 year of BMT, and at the last visit were 0.08¡?#?.04;, -0.09¡?#?1.0;2, and -0.27¡?#?.18;, respectively (P=0.001. Height SDS significantly decreased in patients who received total body irradiation (TBI (P=0.017. One of the patients who received TBI demonstrated growth hormone deficiency. Thirty (31.9% of 94 patients had compensated hypothyroidism. Incidence of compensated hypothyroidism was higher among those who had GVHD (odds ratio 2.82, P=0.025. Of the 32 patients (17 males, 15 females who were over 14 years in male and 13 years in female at the last visit, 16 (3 males, 13 females had increased luteinizing hormone (LH or follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH. Abnormal elevation of LH or FSH was more common in females (odds ratio 30.3, P=0.001. Conclusion : The most common endocrine dysfunction was ovarian insufficiency. Regular check-up for endocrine function needs to be required due to high incidence of endocrine dysfunction in patients with BMT.

  16. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  17. Bone Marrow Granuloma in Typhoid Fever: A Morphological Approach and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha Muniraj; Somanath Padhi; Manjiri Phansalkar; Periyasami Sivakumar; Renu G’Boy Varghese; Reba Kanungo

    2015-01-01

    Typhoid fever is one of the few bacterial infections in humans where bone marrow evaluation is routinely recommended. However, the morphological aspect of typhoid fever in bone marrow has been rarely described in the literature. We describe a 25-year-old male patient who presented with prolonged fever suspected to be of tubercular etiology. Bone marrow examination showed well-formed histiocytic and epithelioid granulomas and erythrophagocytosis; and the bone marrow aspirate culture grew Salmo...

  18. Are bone marrow regenerative cells ideal seed cells for the treatment of cerebral ischemia?★

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yi; Hua, Xuming; Hua, Fang; Mao, Wenwei; Wan, Liang; Li, Shiting

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow cells for the treatment of ischemic brain injury may depend on the secretion of a large number of neurotrophic factors. Bone marrow regenerative cells are capable of increasing the secretion of neurotrophic factors. In this study, after tail vein injection of 5-fluorouracil for 7 days, bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells were isolated from the tibias and femurs of rats, and then administered intravenously via the tail vein after focal cerebral ischemia. Immunohist...

  19. Bone marrow aplasia in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: successful treatment with antithymocyte globulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Singal, R; Winfield, D A; Greaves, M.

    1991-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is a rare but well known association of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Pancytopenia due to bone marrow aplasia has not been previously described in CLL. A 42 year old man with B cell CLL became severely pancytopenic with bone marrow aplasia. Bone marrow culture resulted in a greatly reduced colony formation. High dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment were unsuccessful. Prompt and complete marrow recovery ensued after administration of antith...

  20. Role of staging bone marrow examination in children with Hodgkin disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahoney, DH; Schreuders, LC; Gresik, MV; McClain, KL

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the value of bone marrow trephine biopsy as part of the clinical staging for children presenting with Hodgkin disease. Patients and Methods, A retrospective study of pre-treatment bone marrow examinations was undertaken to examine the value of bone marrow staging in children wi

  1. Primary bone marrow lymphoma: an uncommon extranodal presentation of aggressive non-hodgkin lymphomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, A.; Ponzoni, M.; Agostinelli, C.; Hebeda, K.M.; Matutes, E.; Peccatori, J.; Campidelli, C.; Espinet, B.; Perea, G.; Acevedo, A.; Mehrjardi, A.Z.; Martinez-Bernal, M.; Gelemur, M.; Zucca, E.; Pileri, S.; Campo, E.; Lopez-Guillermo, A.; Rozman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow involvement by lymphoma is considered a systemic dissemination of the disease arising elsewhere, although some tumors may arise primarily in the bone marrow microenvironment. Primary bone marrow lymphoma (PBML) is a rare entity whose real boundaries and clinicobiological significance are

  2. Role of staging bone marrow examination in children with Hodgkin disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahoney, DH; Schreuders, LC; Gresik, MV; McClain, KL

    Purpose. To determine the value of bone marrow trephine biopsy as part of the clinical staging for children presenting with Hodgkin disease. Patients and Methods, A retrospective study of pre-treatment bone marrow examinations was undertaken to examine the value of bone marrow staging in children

  3. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Bone marrow transplantation reverses new-onset immunoinflammatory diabetes in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cheng-Lan; Wang, Jing; Xie, Ting; Ouyang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation might be an effective method to cure type 1 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate whether bone marrow transplantation could reverse hyperglycemia in diabetic mice and whether high-dose total body irradiation followed by high-dose bone marrow mononuclear cell infusion could improve the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation in treating diabetic mice. Diabetic mice after multiple low doses of streptozotocin injection were irradiated followed by infusion with approximately 1×10(7) bone marrow mononuclear cells intravenously. Before and after bone marrow transplantation, fasting blood glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, serum insulin, pancreatic histology, and the examination of insulin and glucagon in islets were processed. All recipients returned to near euglycemic within 1 week after undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No mice became hyperglycemia again during investigation period. The change of serum insulin, glucose tolerance test, pancreatic histology and the expression of insulin and glucagon in recipient islets after bone marrow transplantation all revealed islets regeneration and significant amelioration when compared respectively with those of diabetic mice without bone marrow transplantation. Bone marrow transplantation contributed to reduce blood glucose, prevent further blood glucose hike in diabetic recipients, and promote islets regeneration. High-dose total body irradiation in combination with high-dose bone marrow monoclear cell infusion could improve the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation in treating streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

  17. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemic_bone_marrow [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Bone_Marrow_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Blast counts in bone marrow aspirate smears: analysis using the poisson probability function, bayes theorem, and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Robin T

    2009-02-01

    Counts of cells or other phenomena observed through a microscope are numeric observations and, as such, are subject to mathematical and statistical analyses. For example, the Poisson probability function provides the probability of observing a particular number of blasts in a bone marrow aspirate, given an underlying true fraction of blasts present and a particular number of cells evaluated. Furthermore, using the Poisson function, Bayes theorem can provide the probabilities of specific categories of refractory anemia, given a number of observed blasts in a specific total of cells evaluated. Herein, I introduce and demonstrate these mathematical functions for the analysis of counts of blasts in marrow aspirates and explore the uncertainty that naturally arises when counts of blasts are near cut points used to separate the categories of refractory anemia without excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts, and acute leukemia.

  4. Isolation, expansion and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells from rabbits' bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato B. Eleotério

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tissue engineering has been a fundamental technique in the regenerative medicine field, once it permits to build tri-dimensional tissue constructs associating undifferentiated mesenchymal cells (or mesenchymal stromal cells - MSCs and scaffolds in vitro. Therefore, many studies have been carried out using these cells from different animal species, and rabbits are often used as animal model for in vivo tissue repair studies. However, most of the information available about MSCs harvesting and characterization is about human and murine cells, which brings some doubts to researchers who desire to work with a rabbit model in tissue repair studies based on MSCs. In this context, this study aimed to add and improve the information available in the scientific literature providing a complete technique for isolation, expansion and differentiation of MSCs from rabbits. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs from humerus and femur of rabbits were obtained and to evaluate their proliferation rate, three different culture media were tested, here referred as DMEM-P, DMEM´S and α-MEM. The BMMCs were also cultured in osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic induction media to prove their multipotentiality. It was concluded that the techniques suggested in this study can provide a guideline to harvest and isolate MSCs from bone marrow of rabbits in enough amount to allow their expansion and, based on the laboratory experience where the study was developed, it is also suggested a culture media formulation to provide a better cell proliferation rate with multipotentiality preservation.

  5. Bone Marrow Pathology Predicts Mortality in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hao Weng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A bone marrow biopsy is a useful procedure for the diagnosis and staging of various hematologic and systemic diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the findings of bone marrow studies can predict mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods. Seventy-eight end-stage renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis underwent bone marrow biopsies between 2000 and 2011, with the most common indication being unexplained anemia followed by unexplained leukocytosis and leukopenia. Results. The survivors had a higher incidence of abnormal megakaryocyte distribution P=0.001, band and segmented cells P=0.021, and lymphoid cells P=0.029 than the nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 38.5% (30/78, and the most common cause of mortality was sepsis (83.3% followed by respiratory failure (10%. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, both decreased (OR 3.714, 95% CI 1.671–8.253, P=0.001 and absent (OR 9.751, 95% CI 2.030–45.115, P=0.004 megakaryocyte distribution (normal megakaryocyte distribution as the reference group, as well as myeloid/erythroid ratio (OR 1.054, CI 1.012–1.098, P=0.011, were predictive of mortality. Conclusion. The results of a bone marrow biopsy can be used to assess the pathology, and, in addition, myeloid/erythroid ratio and abnormal megakaryocyte distribution can predict mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

  6. Increased rejection of murine allogeneic bone marrow in presensitized recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanOs, R; deWitte, T; Dillingh, JH; Mauch, PM; Down, JD

    1997-01-01

    The role of presensitizing murine recipients with donor spleen cells prior to T cell-depleted or -repleted H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was investigated at two different doses of total body irradiation (TBI). Recipients that were presensitized with 2 x 10(7) irradiated

  7. Successful nonsibling bone marrow transplantation in severe combined immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsøe, K; Skinhøj, P; Andersen, V

    1978-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was diagnosed in a girl immediately after birth; her older brother had SCID and was successfully reconstituted by bone marrow transplantation from his uncle. She was isolated in a laminar air flow bench and decontaminated. The father differed by one HLA...

  8. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Xinchun Ye; Jinxia Hu; Guiyun Cui

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke.

  9. Pain During Bone Marrow Aspiration: Prevalence and Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhelleputte, P.; Nijs, K.A.N.D.; Delforge, M.; Evers, G.; Vanderschueren, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Prevalence, intensity, determinants and prevention of pain during bone marrow aspiration (BMA) in adults are not well defined. In the first part of this prospective study (observational phase), 132 adult hematological patients undergoing BMA after local anesthesia scored the procedural pain by

  10. Archival bone marrow samples: suitable for multiple biomarker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, Laeya A; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Landsem, Veslemøy M; Rasmussen, Kirsten K; Borst, Louise; Gupta, Ramneek; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Klungland, Helge

    2015-01-01

    AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole genome amplification (WGA), multiple marker analysis including 10 short tandem repeats, and finally a comprehensive genotyping of 33,683 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with multiplexed targeted next-generation sequencing. A total of 73 samples from 21 bone marrow smears and 13 bone marrow biopsies from 18 Danish and Norwegian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were included and compared with corresponding blood samples. Samples were grouped according to the age of sample and whether WGA was performed or not. We found that measurements of DNA concentration after DNA extraction was dependent on detection method and that spectrophotometry overestimated DNA amount compared with fluorometry. In the short tandem repeat analysis, detection rate dropped slightly with longer fragments. After WGA, this drop was more pronounced. Samples stored for 0 to 3 years showed better results compared with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP analysis seems feasible, but the method has to be further optimized.

  11. A Role For Photodynamic Therapy In Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Fritz

    1988-02-01

    Simultaneous exposure to the amphipathic fluorescent dye merocyanine 540 (MC 540) and light of a suitable wavelength rapidly kills leukemia, lymphoma, and neuroblastoma cells but spares normal pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Tests in several preclinical models and early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that MC 540-mediated photosensitization may be useful for the extracorporeal purging of autologous remission bone marrow grafts.

  12. Pain During Bone Marrow Aspiration: Prevalence and Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhelleputte, P.; Nijs, K.A.N.D.; Delforge, M.; Evers, G.; Vanderschueren, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Prevalence, intensity, determinants and prevention of pain during bone marrow aspiration (BMA) in adults are not well defined. In the first part of this prospective study (observational phase), 132 adult hematological patients undergoing BMA after local anesthesia scored the procedural pain by m

  13. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...

  14. Bone marrow dysfunction in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Voors, Adriaan A.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schuringa, Jan J.; Klinkenberg, Theo; van der Harst, Pim; Vellenga, Edo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a general dysfunction of the haematopoietic compartment. Bone marrow was obtained during coronary artery bypass graft surgery from 20 patients with CHF (age 67 +/- 6 years, 75% NYHA class >= III, LVEF 32 +/- 6%), and 20 age- and g

  15. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitya Shree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow.

  16. BONE MARROW AND KIDNEY FAT INDEX IN MALE AND FEMALE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    been developed to quantify the condition of dead animals. ... weight of the fat tissue around the kidney was expressed as percentage of kidney ... values for males, non-gravid and gravid females indicate that the specimens within each ... Kidney fat and marrow fat indices of the sika deer population at Mount Goyo, northern.

  17. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. (Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals, Milwaukee (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  18. Atypical diabetes mellitus associated with bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Ozlem; Garg, Rajesh K

    2010-01-01

    To describe 3 cases of atypical diabetes mellitus following bone marrow transplantation. We describe the clinical presentation and relevant laboratory findings of 3 patients who presented with new-onset diabetes mellitus after bone marrow transplantation and discuss the possible mechanisms. A 52-year-old white man with chronic myelogenous leukemia, a 51-year-old white woman with acute myelogenous leukemia, and a 38-year-old Hispanic woman with acute myelogenous leukemia presented with acute onset of diabetes mellitus after bone marrow transplantation. Although blood glucose levels were initially very high, the patients required only small insulin dosages for glycemic control. Both the acute onset and requirement of relatively small insulin dosages were characteristic of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Onset of diabetes appeared to be unrelated to immunosuppressive drug therapy because it happened several months after starting these drugs. C-peptide was detectable, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies were absent. Diabetes mellitus remitted spontaneously after a few months while the immunosuppressive drugs were continued. Although the underlying mechanisms are unknown, cytokine changes after bone marrow transplantation may have led to temporary beta-cell dysfunction in these patients.

  19. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shree, Nitya; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding and Targeting Epigenetic Alterations in Acquired Bone Marrow Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    who achieved either complete remission , marrow complete remission , partial remission , or HI, as defined by the 2006 International Working Group...activation pathway. J Leukoc Biol. 2005;78(1):202–209. 58. Pillai MM, Iwata M, Awaya N, Graf L, Torok- Storb B. Monocyte-derived CXCL7 peptides in the

  1. SPONTANEOUS TRANSFORMATION OF CULTURED PORCINE BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng;

    INTRODUCTION Recently, the possibility that tumors originate from cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been proposed. Stem cells and CSCs share certain features such as self-renewal and differentiation potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) after long-te...

  2. Dependent rational providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kyle B

    2011-04-01

    Provider claims to conscientious objection have generated a great deal of heated debate in recent years. However, the conflicts that arise when providers make claims to the "conscience" are only a subset of the more fundamental challenges that arise in health care practice when patients and providers come into conflict. In this piece, the author provides an account of patient-provider conflict from within the moral tradition of St. Thomas Aquinas. He argues that the practice of health care providers should be understood as a form of practical reasoning and that this practical reasoning must necessarily incorporate both "moral" and "professional" commitments. In order to understand how the practical reasoning of provider should account for the needs and commitments of the patient and vice versa, he explores the account of dependence provided by Alasdair MacIntyre in his book Dependent Rational Animals. MacIntyre argues that St. Thomas' account of practical reasoning should be extended and adapted to account for the embodied vulnerability of all humans. In light of this insight, providers must view patients not only as the subjects of their moral reflection but also as fellow humans upon whom the provider depends for feedback on the effectiveness and relevance of her practical reasoning. The author argues that this account precludes responsive providers from adopting either moral or professional conclusions on the appropriateness of interventions outside the individual circumstances that arise in particular situations. The adoption of this orientation toward patients will neither eradicate provider-patient conflict nor compel providers to perform interventions to which they object. But this account does require that providers attend meaningfully to the suffering of patients and seek feedback on whether their intervention has effectively addressed that suffering.

  3. Loss of c-Kit and bone marrow failure upon conditional removal of the GATA-2 C-terminal zinc finger domain in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan S; Jin, Jin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Matatall, Katie A; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ullrich, Stephen E; King, Katherine Y; Sun, Shao-Cong; Watowich, Stephanie S

    2016-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the transcriptional regulator GATA-2 associate with multilineage immunodeficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The majority of these mutations localize in the zinc finger (ZnF) domains, which mediate GATA-2 DNA binding. Deregulated hematopoiesis with GATA-2 mutation frequently develops in adulthood, yet GATA-2 function in the bone marrow remains unresolved. To investigate this, we conditionally deleted the GATA-2 C-terminal ZnF (C-ZnF) coding sequences in adult mice. Upon Gata2 C-ZnF deletion, we observed rapid peripheral cytopenia, bone marrow failure, and decreased c-Kit expression on hematopoietic progenitors. Transplant studies indicated GATA-2 has a cell-autonomous role in bone marrow hematopoiesis. Moreover, myeloid lineage populations were particularly sensitive to Gata2 hemizygosity, while molecular assays indicated GATA-2 regulates c-Kit expression in multilineage progenitor cells. Enforced c-Kit expression in Gata2 C-ZnF-deficient hematopoietic progenitors enhanced myeloid colony activity, suggesting GATA-2 sustains myelopoiesis via a cell intrinsic role involving maintenance of c-Kit expression. Our results provide insight into mechanisms regulating hematopoiesis in bone marrow and may contribute to a better understanding of immunodeficiency and bone marrow failure associated with GATA-2 mutation.

  4. Removing financial barriers to organ and bone marrow donation: the effect of leave and tax legislation in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacetera, Nicola; Macis, Mario; Stith, Sarah S

    2014-01-01

    Many U.S. states have passed legislation providing leave to organ and bone marrow donors and/or tax benefits for live and deceased organ and bone marrow donations and to employers of donors. We exploit cross-state variation in the timing of such legislation to analyze its impact on organ donations by living and deceased persons, on measures of the quality of the transplants, and on the number of bone marrow donations. We find that these provisions do not have a significant impact on the quantity of organs donated. The leave laws, however, do have a positive impact on bone marrow donations, and the effect increases with the size of the population of beneficiaries and with the generosity of the legislative provisions. Our results suggest that this legislation works for moderately invasive procedures such as bone marrow donation, but these incentives may be too low for organ donation, which is riskier and more burdensome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Blasts-more than meets the eye: evaluation of post-induction day 21 bone marrow in CBFB rearranged acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangdong; Duncavage, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy is often the first therapeutic intervention for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Evaluation of post induction bone marrow provides critical information for clinical management; in general increased blast countsor increased marrow cellularity is an ominous sign, suggestive of ineffective therapy, and may warrant additional rounds of chemotherapy. However, increased blasts alone are not necessarily predictive of recurrent/persistent disease. Here we report a very unusual observation in a case of AML with a core binding factor beta (CBFB) rearrangement. In this case the day 21 post-induction marrow biopsy showed a high blast count (approximately 20%), however,subsequent fluorescence in-situ hybridization studies were negative for CBFB rearrangement. We compared this finding to post-induction marrows from a series of 6 AML cases with CBFB rearrangements, none of which showed an increased blast count. This case illustrates that increased blast counts, even those comprising 20% of cells, are not de facto evidence of induction failure, and that correlation with ancillary studies such as fluorescence in-situhybridization should be used to distinguish a persistent neoplastic clone, from a brisk marrow recovery.

  6. Immunoenhancing properties of the anti-tumor effects of adoptively transferred T cells with chemotherapeutic cyclophosphamide by co-administration of bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed L. Salem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we aimed to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of co-treatment of adoptively transferred T cells with bone marrow either harvested from naïve mice or G-CSF activated after treatment with the anti-cancer drug cyclophosphamide (CTX as a source enriched in stem cells. CTX-treated Swiss Albino (CD-1 mice were injected with 2 × 105 Ehrlich ascetic carcinoma (EAC cell line and then adoptively transferred with in vitro co-activated T cells with or without bone marrow one day post CTX treatment. All mice were vaccinated with tumor lysate and Hiltonol®. The results showed that co-transfer of activated T cells with bone marrow provided the highest antitumor effect and induced marked increase in numbers of splenocytes, leucocytes and bone marrow cells. Interestingly, T cells derived from EAC tumor-bearing host induced higher effects than those from normal mice. In sum, our data suggest that combination of CTX and activated transferred T cells with bone marrow induces proliferation and expansion of immune cells, which are functional and can be exploited in vivo to foster more effective antitumor adoptive immunotherapy strategies.

  7. Investigation into Variation of Endogenous Metabolites in Bone Marrow Cells and Plasma in C3H/He Mice Exposed to Benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongli Sun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Benzene is identified as a carcinogen. Continued exposure of benzene may eventually lead to damage to the bone marrow, accompanied by pancytopenia, aplastic anemia or leukemia. This paper explores the variations of endogenous metabolites to provide possible clues for the molecular mechanism of benzene-induced hematotoxicity. Liquid chromatography coupled with time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS and principal component analysis (PCA was applied to investigate the variation of endogenous metabolites in bone marrow cells and plasma of male C3H/He mice. The mice were injected subcutaneously with benzene (0, 300, 600 mg/day once daily for seven days. The body weights, relative organ weights, blood parameters and bone marrow smears were also analyzed. The results indicated that benzene caused disturbances in the metabolism of oxidation of fatty acids and essential amino acids (lysine, phenylalanine and tyrosine in bone marrow cells. Moreover, fatty acid oxidation was also disturbed in plasma and thus might be a common disturbed metabolic pathway induced by benzene in multiple organs. This study aims to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in benzene hematotoxicity, especially in bone marrow cells.

  8. Development of a cyclosporin-A-induced immune tolerant rat model to test marrow allograft cell type effects on bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitalier, Florent; Durand, Nicolas; Rémy, Séverine; Corre, Pierre; Sourice, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Weiss, Pierre; Guicheux, Jérôme; Malard, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Bone repair is an important concept in tissue engineering, and the ability to repair bone in hypotrophic conditions such as that of irradiated bone, represents a challenge for this field. Previous studies have shown that a combination of bone marrow and (BCP) was effective to repair irradiated bone. However, the origin and role played by each cell type in bone healing still remains unclear. In order to track the grafted cells, the development of an animal model that is immunotolerant to an allograft of bone marrow would be useful. Furthermore, because the immune system interacts with bone turnover, it is of critical importance to demonstrate that immunosuppressive drugs do not interfere with bone repair. After a preliminary study of immunotolerance, cyclosporin-A was chosen to be used in immunosuppressive therapy. Ten rats were included to observe qualitative and quantitative bone repair 8 days and 6 weeks after the creation of bone defects. The defects were filled with an allograft of bone marrow alone or in association with BCP under immunosuppressive treatment (cyclosporin-A). The results showed that there was no significant interaction of cyclosporin-A with osseous regeneration. The use of this new immunotolerant rat model of bone marrow allograft in future studies will provide insight on how the cells within the bone marrow graft contribute to bone healing, especially in irradiated conditions.

  9. Interpretation of bone marrow aspiration in hematological disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematological disorders are quite frequent in all age group. Most of this hematological disorder first present as anemia. Bone Marrow Aspiration plays a major role in the diagnosis of its underlying cause. The aim of this study was to analyze the causes of hematological disorders, its spectrum and to interprete the bone marrow aspiration findings.Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective and prospective study carried out in the department of Pathology of Nepal Medical College in a period of two years. (July 2010 - June 2012. Bone marrow examination of 57 cases of suspected hematological disorders was carried out. All details of the patients were obtained from the record file in the department of pathology.Results: Out of 57 cases of bone marrow aspiration, erythroid hyperplasia was seen in 12 cases (21%. Megaloblastic anemia was seen in 7 cases (12.3% and microcytic anemia was seen in 4 cases (7%. There were 6 cases (10.5% of Idiopathic Thrombocypenic Purpura. Acute leukemia was diagnosed in 7 cases (12.3% and among this acute myeloid leukemia (10.5% was more common than acute lymphoid leukemia (1.8%. Myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma was seen in 3.5 % cases each. Aplastic anemia and kalaazar was seen in 5.3% and 1.8% cases respectively.Conclusion: Bone marrow examination is an important step to arrive at the confirmatory diagnosis of many hematological disorders.Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2012 Vol. 2, 309-312DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i4.6885

  10. Utilization of chemical shift MRI in the diagnosis of disorders affecting pediatric bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfeld, Matthew; Ahlawat, Shivani; Safdar, Nabile

    2016-09-01

    MRI signal intensity of pediatric bone marrow can be difficult to interpret using conventional methods. Chemical shift imaging (CSI), which can quantitatively assess relative fat content, may improve the ability to accurately diagnose bone marrow abnormalities in children. Consecutive pelvis and extremity MRI at a children's hospital over three months were retrospectively reviewed for inclusion of CSI. Medical records were reviewed for final pathological and/or clinical diagnosis. Cases were classified as normal or abnormal, and if abnormal, subclassified as marrow-replacing or non-marrow-replacing entities. Regions of interest (ROI) were then drawn on corresponding in and out-of-phase sequences over the marrow abnormality or over a metaphysis and epiphysis in normal studies. Relative signal intensity ratio for each case was then calculated to determine the degree of fat content in the ROI. In all, 241 MRI were reviewed and 105 met inclusion criteria. Of these, 61 had normal marrow, 37 had non-marrow-replacing entities (osteomyelitis without abscess n = 17, trauma n = 9, bone infarction n = 8, inflammatory arthropathy n = 3), and 7 had marrow-replacing entities (malignant neoplasm n = 4, bone cyst n = 1, fibrous dysplasia n = 1, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis n = 1). RSIR averages were: normal metaphyseal marrow 0.442 (0.352-0.533), normal epiphyseal marrow 0.632 (0.566-698), non-marrow-replacing diagnoses 0.715 (0.630-0.799), and marrow-replacing diagnoses 1.06 (0.867-1.26). RSIR for marrow-replacing entities proved significantly different from all other groups (p < 0.05). ROC analysis demonstrated an AUC of 0.89 for RSIR in distinguishing marrow-replacing entities. CSI techniques can help to differentiate pathologic processes that replace marrow in children from those that do not.

  11. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with DNA ligase IV deficiency and bone marrow failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechtold Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA Ligase IV deficiency syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations in the DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4. The clinical phenotype shows overlap with a number of other rare syndromes, including Seckel syndrome, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and Fanconi anemia. Thus the clinical diagnosis is often delayed and established by exclusion. Methods We describe a patient with pre- and postnatal growth retardation and dysmorphic facial features in whom the diagnoses of Seckel-, Dubowitz-, and Nijmegen breakage syndrome were variably considered. Cellular radiosensitivity in the absence of clinical manifestations of Ataxia telangiectasia lead to the diagnosis of DNA ligase IV (LIG4 deficiency syndrome, confirmed by compound heterozygous mutations in the LIG4 gene. At age 11, after a six year history of progressive bone marrow failure and increasing transfusion dependency the patient was treated with matched sibling donor hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT using a fludarabine-based conditioning regimen without irradiation. Results The post-transplantation course was uneventful with rapid engraftment leading to complete and stable chimerism. Now at age 16, the patient has gained weight and is in good clinical condition. Conclusion HSCT using mild conditioning without irradiation qualifies as treatment of choice in LIG4-deficient patients who have a matched sibling donor.

  12. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for vascu

  13. Bone marrow cells produce nerve growth factor and promote angiogenesis around transplanted islets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoaki; Sakata; Nathaniel; K; Chan; John; Chrisler; Andre; Obenaus; Eba; Hathout

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the mechanism by which bone marrow cells promote angiogenesis around transplanted islets.METHODS: Streptozotocin induced diabetic BALB/ c mice were transplanted syngeneically under the kidney capsule with the following: (1) 200 islets (islet group: n=12), (2) 1-5×106 bone marrow cells (bone marrow group: n=11), (3) 200 islets and 1-5×106 bone marrow cells (islet + bone marrow group: n= 13), or (4) no cells (sham group:n=5). All mice were evaluated for blood glucose, serum insulin, serum nerve...

  14. Adenovirus-mediated human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsheng Wang; Jianhua Lin; Chaoyang Wu; Rongsheng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor were successfully obtained using a gene transfection method, then intravenously transplanted into rats with spinal cord injury. At 1, 3, and 5 weeks after transplantation, the expression of ??brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurofilament-200 was upregulated in the injured spinal cord, spinal cord injury was alleviated, and Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores of hindlimb motor function were significantly increased. This evidence suggested that intravenous transplantation of adenovirus- mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells could play a dual role, simultaneously providing neural stem cells and neurotrophic factors.

  15. Role of Immunotherapy in Targeting the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in Multiple Myeloma: An Evolving Therapeutic Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Clement

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (referred to henceforth as myeloma) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by unregulated growth of plasma cells in the bone marrow. The treatment paradigm for myeloma underwent significant evolution in the last decade, with an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease as well as the development of therapeutic agents that target not only the tumor cells but also their microenvironment. Despite these therapeutic advances, the prognosis of patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma remains poor. Accordingly, a need exists for new therapeutic avenues that can overcome resistance to current therapies and improve survival outcomes. In addition, myeloma is associated with progressive immune dysregulation, with defects in T-cell immunity, natural killer cell function, and the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells, resulting in a tumor microenvironment that promotes disease tolerance and progression. Together, the immunosuppressive microenvironment and oncogenic mutations activate signaling networks that promote myeloma cell survival. Immunotherapy incorporates novel treatment options (e.g., monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, bispecific antibodies, and tumor vaccines) either alone or in combination with existing lines of therapies (e.g., immunomodulatory agents, proteasome inhibitors, and histone deacetylase inhibitors) to enhance the host anti myeloma immunity within the bone marrow microenvironment and improve clinical response. Following the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of daratumumab and elotuzumab in 2015, more immunotherapeutic agents are expected to be become available as valuable treatment options in the near future. This review provides a basic understanding of the role of immunotherapy in modulating the bone marrow tumor microenvironment and its role in the treatment of myeloma. Clinical efficacy and safety of recently

  16. Abnormal humoral immune responses in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of bone marrow transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, S G; Pahwa, R N; Friedrich, W; O'Reilly, R J; Good, R A

    1982-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating recovery of humoral immunity in vitro after bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia and severe aplastic anemia. Hemolytic plaque assays were utilized to quantitate pokeweed mitogen-stimulated polyclonal immunoglobulin production and sheep erythrocyte antigen-specific antibody responses in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 39 patients beginning at 1 month, for variable periods up to a maximum of 4 years after marrow transplantation. Three phases were identified: an early period of primary B cell dysfunction with concomitant immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities--i.e., decreased helper and increased suppressor activities; an intermediate phase in which B cell dysfunction could be attributed in large measure to immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities; and a late phase of normal B and T lymphocyte functions. Patients with graft-versus-host disease differed from those without it in that they often did not manifest increased T cell suppressor activity in the early period, and they were noted to have prolonged and profound B and T cell abnormalities in the chronic phase of their disease. In selected patients, simultaneous assessment of ratios of Leu-2 to Leu-3 antigens on T cells by monoclonal antibodies and of immunoregulatory T cell functions revealed a correlation between the two only late in the post-transplant period. These studies provide an insight into the ontogeny of B cell function in the post-transplant period and indicate that in certain situations phenotypic alterations in T cell subsets cannot reliably be used to predict abnormalities in their function in recipients of marrow transplantation. Images PMID:6211673

  17. Passage of bone-marrow-derived liver stem cells in a proliferating culture system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Feng Cai; Ji-Sheng Chen; Shu-Ying Su; Zuo-Jun Zhen; Huan-Wei Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of passage of bonemarrow-derived liver stem cells (BDLSCs) in culture systems that contain cholestatic serum. METHODS: Whole bone marrow cells of rats were purified with conditioning selection media that contained 50 mL/L cholestatic serum. The selected BDLSCs were grown in a proliferating culture system and a differentiating culture system. The culture systems contained factors that stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of BDLSCs. Each passage of the proliferated stem cells was subjected to flow cytometry to detect stem cell markers. The morphology and phenotypic markers of BDLSCs were characterized using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and electron microscopy. The metabolic functions of differentiated cells were also determined by glycogen staining and urea assay. RESULTS: The conditioning selection medium isolated BDLSCs directly from cultured bone marrow cells. The selected BDLSCs could be proliferated for six passages and maintained stable markers in our proliferating system. When the culture system was changed to a differentiating system, hepatocyte-like colony-forming units (H-CFUs) were formed. H-CFUs expressed markers of embryonic hepatocytes (alpha-fetoprotein, albumin and cytokeratin 8/18), biliary cells (cytokeratin 19), hepatocyte functional proteins (transthyretin and cytochrome P450-2b1), and hepatocyte nuclear factors 1α and -3β). They also had glycogen storage and urea synthesis functions, two of the critical features of hepatocytes. CONCLUSION: BDLSCs can be selected directly from bone marrow cells, and pure BDLSCs can be proliferated for six passages. The differentiated cells have hepatocyte-like phenotypes and functions. BDLSCs represent a new method to provide a readily available alternate source of cells for clinical hepatocyte therapy.

  18. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Mota, J. [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Medimagen, Barcelona (Spain); Alfonso, P. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Pocovi, M. [Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Zaragoza University (Spain); Giraldo, P. [Haematology Department, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: pgiraldo@salud.aragon.es

    2007-04-15

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r {sup 2} = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease.

  19. Bone marrow CFU-GM and human tumor xenograft efficacy of three antitumor nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Roth, Stephanie; Kurtzberg, Leslie S; Rouleau, Cecile; Yao, Min; Crawford, Jennifer; Krumbholz, Roy; Lovett, Dennis; Schmid, Steven; Teicher, Beverly A

    2009-05-01

    Nucleoside analogs are rationally designed anticancer agents that disrupt DNA and RNA synthesis. Fludarabine and cladribine have important roles in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Clofarabine is a next generation nucleoside analog which is under clinical investigation. The bone marrow toxicity, tumor cell cytotoxicity and human tumor xenograft activity of fludarabine, cladribine and clofarabine were compared. Mouse and human bone marrow were subjected to colony forming (CFU-GM) assays over a 5-log concentration range in culture. NCI-60 cell line screening data were compared. In vivo, a range of clofarabine doses was compared with fludarabine for efficacy in several human tumor xenografts. The IC90 concentrations for fludarabine and cladribine for mouse CFU-GM were >30 and 0.93 microM, and for human CFU-GM were 8 and 0.11 microM, giving mouse to human differentials of >3.8- and 8.5-fold. Clofarabine produced IC90s of 1.7 microM in mouse and 0.51 microM in human CFU-GM, thus a 3.3-fold differential between species. In the NCI-60 cell line screen, fludarabine and cladribine showed selective cytotoxicity toward leukemia cell lines while for clofarabine there was no apparent selectivity based upon origin of the tumor cells. In vivo, clofarabine produced a dose-dependent increase in tumor growth delay in the RL lymphoma, the RPMI-8226 multiple myeloma, and HT-29 colon carcinoma models. The PC3 prostate carcinoma was equally responsive to clofarabine and fludarabine. Bringing together bone marrow toxicity data, tumor cell line cytotoxicity data, and human tumor xenograft efficacy provides valuable information for the translation of preclinical findings to the clinic.

  20. Concentration of bone marrow mononuclear cells for in vitro treatment and AB0-incompatible transplantation: a rapid and reproducible procedure using the haemonetics V50 cell separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesneth, M; Hertenstein, B; Koerner, K; Heimpel, H; Heit, W

    1988-01-01

    Forty-nine allogeneic and 14 autologous bone marrow grafts were processed with the Haemonetics V50 cell separator (Haemonetics Corp., Braintree, USA) for in vitro treatment with antibodies and cryopreservation respectively. The concentration of hemopoietic progenitor cells was performed without any sedimentation or density gradient agents. The recovery is given in percent (mean +/- sd) of the original marrow values: mononuclear cells (MNC) 74 +/- 10%, polymorphonuclear cells (PMC) 48 +/- 17%, red blood cells (RBC) 12 +/- 5%, granulocyte/monocyte progenitors (CFU-GM) 83 +/- 36%, and erythroid progenitors (BFU-E) 78 +/- 38%. The recovery of nucleated cells (NC) was 90 +/- 13% and the viability 82 +/- 11% after cryopreservation. The technique described provides a simple, rapid and efficient preparation of large bone marrow volumes for in vitro treatment and AB0-incompatible transplantation.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in patients with acute leukemia during and after chemotherapy. Changes in T1 relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Grundtvig Sørensen, P; Thomsen, C

    1990-01-01

    , also showed prolongation of T1 relaxation time in relation to leukemic relapse. The results indicate that changes observed in T1 relaxation times of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with acute leukemia reflect changes in disease activity, and, that serial measurements of T1 values may provide......Twenty-seven patients with acute leukemia were examined at the time of diagnosis with MR imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the hemopoietic bone marrow. A 1.5 T whole body magnetic resonance scanner was used. Twenty of the patients had follow-up examinations in relation...... to chemotherapy. Bone marrow biopsies from the posterior iliac crest were obtained within a short time interval of all MR examinations. At the time of diagnosis, T1 relaxation times were increased significantly in all the leukemic patients, compared with 24 age-matched controls. A decrease in T1 relaxation time...

  2. Provider Health and Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Wasan, Anita; Sussman, James

    2017-07-19

    Provider health and wellness is a significant issue and can impact patient care, including patient satisfaction, quality of care, medical errors, malpractice risk, as well as provider and office staff turnover and early retirement. Health and wellness encompasses various areas including burnout, depression, divorce, and suicide and affects providers of all specialties and at all levels of training. Providers deal with many everyday stresses, including electronic health records, office politics, insurance and billing issues, dissatisfied patients, and their own personal and family issues. Approximately half of all physicians suffer from burnout, and the rate of burnout among physicians of all specialties is increasing. An important first step in dealing with burnout is recognition and then seeking assistance. Strategies to prevent and treat burnout include increasing provider resiliency as well as implementing practical changes in the everyday practice of medicine. There is currently very little data regarding health and wellness specifically in the field of allergy and immunology, and studies are necessary to determine the prevalence of burnout and related issues in this field. Many medical specialties as well as state and national medical associations have health and wellness committees and other resources, which are essential for providers. Health and wellness programs should be introduced early in a provider's training and continued throughout a provider's career. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Autologous bone marrow cell therapy for peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botti C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available C Botti, C Maione, A Coppola, V Sica, G CobellisDepartment of General Pathology, Second University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Inadequate blood supply to tissues caused by obstruction of arterioles and/or capillaries results in ischemic injuries – these injuries can range from mild (eg, leg ischemia to severe conditions (eg, myocardial infarction, stroke. Surgical and/or endovascular procedures provide cutting-edge treatment for patients with vascular disorders; however, a high percentage of patients are currently not treatable, owing to high operative risk or unfavorable vascular involvement. Therapeutic angiogenesis has recently emerged as a promising new therapy, promoting the formation of new blood vessels by the introduction of bone marrow–derived stem and progenitor cells. These cells participate in the development of new blood vessels, the enlargement of existing blood vessels, and sprouting new capillaries from existing blood vessels, providing evidence of the therapeutic utility of these cells in ischemic tissues. In this review, the authors describe peripheral arterial disease, an ischemic condition affecting the lower extremities, summarizing different aspects of vascular regeneration and discussing which and how stem cells restore the blood flow. The authors also present an overview of encouraging results from early-phase clinical trials using stem cells to treat peripheral arterial disease. The authors believe that additional research initiatives should be undertaken to better identify the nature of stem cells and that an intensive cooperation between laboratory and clinical investigators is needed to optimize the design of cell therapy trials and to maximize their scientific rigor. Only this will allow the results of these investigations to develop best clinical practices. Additionally, although a number of stem cell therapies exist, many treatments are performed outside international and national regulations and many

  4. CXCR2 modulates bone marrow vascular repair and haematopoietic recovery post-transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Sarah J M; Hale, Ashley B H; Zhang, Youyi; Sweeney, Dominic; Fisher, Nita; van der Garde, Mark; Grabowska, Rita; Pepperell, Emma; Channon, Keith; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-05-01

    Murine models of bone marrow transplantation show that pre-conditioning regimens affect the integrity of the bone marrow endothelium and that the repair of this vascular niche is an essential pre-requisite for successful haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment. Little is known about the angiogenic pathways that play a role in the repair of the human bone marrow vascular niche. We therefore established an in vitro humanized model, composed of bone marrow stromal and endothelial cells and have identified several pro-angiogenic factors, VEGFA, ANGPT1, CXCL8 and CXCL16, produced by the stromal component of this niche. We demonstrate for the first time that addition of CXCL8 or inhibition of its receptor, CXCR2, modulates blood vessel formation in our bone marrow endothelial niche model. Compared to wild type, Cxcr2(-/-) mice displayed a reduction in bone marrow cellularity and delayed platelet and leucocyte recovery following myeloablation and bone marrow transplantation. The delay in bone marrow recovery correlated with impaired bone marrow vascular repair. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CXCR2 regulates bone marrow blood vessel repair/regeneration and haematopoietic recovery, and clinically may be a therapeutic target for improving bone marrow transplantation.

  5. MRI marrow observations in thalassemia: the effects of the primary disease, transfusional therapy, and chelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Sheth, S.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Abramson, S. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Piomelli, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The magnetic resonance bone marrow patterns in thalassemia were evaluated to determine changes produced by transfusion and chelation therapy. Thirteen patients had T1- and T2-weighted images of the spine, pelvis and femurs. Three received no therapy (age range 2.5-3 years). Three were ``hypertransfused`` (transfused to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 10 g/dl) and not chelated because of age (age range 6 months-8 years). Seven were ``hypertransfused`` and chelated (age range 12-35 years). Signal characteristics of marrow were compared with those of surrounding muscle and fat. Fatty marrow (isointense with subcutaneous fat) was compared with red marrow (hypointense to fat and slightly hyperintense to muscle). Marrow hypointense to muscle was identified as iron deposition within red marrow. The untreated group demonstrated signal consistent with red marrow throughout the central and peripheral skeleton. Hypertransfused but not chelated patients demonstrated marked iron deposition in the central and peripheral skeleton. Hypertransfused and chelated patients demonstrated iron deposition in the central skeleton and a mixed appearance of marrow in the peripheral skeleton. The MR appearance of marrow in thalassemia is a reflection of the patient`s transfusion and chelation therapy. Iron deposition occurs despite chelation therapy in sites of active red marrow. As red marrow retreats centrally with age, so does the pattern of iron deposition. The long-term biological effects of this iron deposition are unknown. (orig.). With 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Assessment of MR signal intensity of cranium and cervical spine bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Min; Joh, Young Duk; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, So Sun [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    The components of bore marrow change dramatically during lifetime. To evaluate the bone marrow of cranium and upper cervical spine, the authors retrospectively evaluated 300 examinations of cranium and the second cervical bone in patients without known bone marrow abnormality. T1-weighted images were used to analyze the changes of lone marrow signal intensity according to the age and sex. The signal intensity of bone marrow of cranium increased most rapidly from birth to age of 10 years. Between 11 and 20 years of age, gradual increase of signal intensity was noted. There was minimal augment of signal intensity after age of 20 tears. The examination of signal intensity of bone marrow of the cranium revealed slightly higher score in male than in female. The synchondrosis of the second cervical vertebra was visible in 97%. These results may be useful in the detection of abnormal bone marrow signal of cranium and upper cervical spine.

  7. A novel and feasible way to cultivate and purify endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow of children with congenital heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yong-tao; LI Jing-xing; LIU Shuo; XIN Yi; WANG Zi-jian; GAO Jin; JI Bing-yang; FAN Xiang-ming; ZHOU Qi-wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are used in vascular tissue engineering and clinic therapy.Some investigators get EPCs from the peripheral blood for clinic treatment,but the number of EPCs is seldom enough.We have developed the cultivation and purification of EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,to provide enough seed cells for a small calibre vascular tissue engineering study.Methods The 0.5-ml of bone marrow was separated from the sternum bone,and 5-ml of peripheral blood was collected from children with congenital heart diseases who had undergone open thoracic surgery.CD34+ and CD34+/VEGFR+cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood were quantified by flow cytometry.CD34+NEGFR+ cells were defined as EPCs.Mononuclear cells in the bone marrow were isolated by Ficoll(R) density gradient centrifugation and cultured by the EndoCult Liquid Medium KitTM.Colony forming endothelial cells was detected.Immunohistochemistry staining for Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1 confirmed the endothelial lineage of these cells.Results CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in peripheral blood were (0.07±0.05)% and (0.05±0.02)%,respectively.The number of CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in bone marrow were significantly higher than in blood,(4.41±1.47)% and (0.98±0.65)%,respectively (P <0.0001).Many colony forming units formed in the culture.These cells also expressed high levels of Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1.Conclusion This is a novel and feasible approach that can cultivate and purify EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,and provide seed cells for small calibre vascular tissue engineering.

  8. ENRICHMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THYMUS-REPOPULATING CELLS IN STROMA-DEPENDENT CULTURES OF RAT BONE-MARROW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRAKAPAS, Z; DENOYELLE, M; DARGEMONT, C; KROESE, FGM; THIERY, JP; DEUGNIER, MA

    1993-01-01

    The bone marrow precursor cells seeding the thymus have been difficult to investigate using fresh bone marrow and in vivo thymus reconstitution assays. We have therefore designed a short-term bone marrow culture system allowing the study of thymus-repopulating cells in the marrow microenvironment. L

  9. Derivation of an equation to estimate marrow content of bovine cervical vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebault, R A; Field, R A; Means, W J; Russell, W C

    1998-08-01

    Marrow content of bovine cervical vertebrae from Choice- and Select-grade carcasses weighing 294 to 343 kg was determined so that a method to monitor the amount of marrow in meat from advanced meat/bone separation machinery and recovery (AMR) systems could be developed. The marrow determination requires cleaning and then ashing bones. Because a large difference in ash content of bone and bone marrow exists and because cartilage content of cervical vertebrae in Choice and Select beef is relatively constant, it was possible to derive the following equation: Weight of marrow = [weight of cartilage (% ash in cartilage - % ash in bone) + % ash in bone (total weight) - (total ash)]/[(% ash in bone - % ash in marrow)]. Constants for ash in fresh bone, marrow, and cartilage were 58.51, .57, and 2.14% with SD of 2.23, .15, and .30%, respectively. A cartilage content of 9.5% along with cervical vertebrae weight and total ash weight were also used to calculate 33.9% marrow in cervical vertebrae. Means for marrow pressed or centrifuged from bovine cervical vertebrae were lower than those obtained from the equation. Therefore, pressing and centrifuging left some marrow in spongy bone. Our ashing method for determining the amount of marrow in whole cervical vertebrae should be useful for determining marrow remaining in cervical vertebrae of bone cakes from AMR systems. Percentage ash in pressed bones is higher and the calculated marrow content is lower when pressed bones are compared to cervical vertebrae that are not pressed. The amount of marrow in whole cervical vertebrae minus the amount left in cervical vertebrae from bone cakes equals the amount in meat from AMR systems.

  10. Preimplantation diagnosis: efficient tool for human leukocyte antigen matched bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is among the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD to allow at risk couples reproducing without fear of having an affected child. In addition, those already having the affected child, have also the option to produce an unaffected offspring that may be also a complete human leukocyte antigen (HLA match to affected child to ensure successful bone marrow transplantation. We present here the results of retrospective analysis of 293 PGD cycles for thalassemia, including 144cases of simultaneous HLA typing, resulting in birth of 70 thalassemia-free children and 12 unaffected HLA matched ones, providing their cord blood and/or bone marrow for transplantation treatment of their affected siblings. The present overall experience includes successful cord blood or bone marrow transplantation in more than three dozens of cases with HLA matched stem cells obtained from children born after PGD, demonstrating that PGD is an efficient approach for improving success of bone marrow transplantation treatment for thalassemia.   植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是地中海贫血(地贫)最常用的疗法,该病患者夫妇无须担心孕儿受到感染。此外,如果已经怀上受到感染的宝宝,他们也可有选择性再生育一个未受感染的后代,提供完全匹配的HLA,来确保骨髓成功移植。本文将提供293个地贫病例的PGD周期诊断结果,包括144例HLA同时配型,有70例宝宝无地贫出生和12例未受感染的HLA配型宝宝出生。将这些健康宝宝的脐带血和/或骨髓取出以完成对他们同胞的移植手术,通过使用经诊断后的,出生宝宝身上取出的HLA配型干细胞,成功完成36例宝宝的脐带或骨髓移植手术。结果表明PGD能有效提高地贫患儿骨髓移植手术的成功率。

  11. Effects of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebioğlu, Ayda; Gürol, Ayşe; Yildirim, Zuhal Keskin; Büyükavci, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Cancer and its treatment are stressful and reduce the quality of life in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of massage therapy on pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration in children with cancer. We conducted a controlled pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study at a paediatric oncology unit in Turkey. Twenty-five children were enrolled in this study. Their pain and anxiety were determined using a visual analogue scale. When the pretest and posttest pain and anxiety levels of the groups were compared, no statistically significant difference was found (P > 0.05). It was determined that pain and anxiety levels in the experimental group decreased significantly. This study provides preliminary evidence for the effectiveness in children of massage in reducing pain and anxiety arising from intrathecal therapy or bone marrow aspiration.

  12. The radioprotective efficacy of the rat acute-phase protein alpha2-macroglobulin on bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailović Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The rat acute phase protein α2-macroglobulin (α2M plays an important role in the restoration of disrupted homeostasis by inhibiting different types of non-specific proteases and facilitating the transport of cytokines, growth factors and hormones. Previously, we observed that administration of α2M to experimental animals prior to the infliction of life- threatening trauma in the form of scalding or total-body irradiation, significantly improved their survival rates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the radioprotective effect on blood cells of α2M that, when administered 30 min before irradiation with 6.7 Gy (LD50/30, provides 100% survival of experimental animals where in unprotected irradiated rats the said dose results in 50% lethality. We observed that rats pretreated with α2M, after an initial decline, exhibited complete recovery of the leukocyte count due to the preservation of bone marrow cells, observed as a stable mitotic index. In untreated irradiated rats the decrease of the mitotic index reflected the significant destruction of bone marrow cells that resulted in a protracted decline in the leukocyte count. We conclude that the radioprotection provided by α2M was in part mediated through cytoprotection of new blood cells produced in the bone marrow.

  13. Differentiation of bone marrow derived Thy-1+β2M-cells into hepatocytes induced by coculture with transgenic CFSCs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yunfang; NAN Xue; ZHANG Rui; LI Yanhua; YUE Wen; YAN Fang; PEI Xuetao

    2004-01-01

    Studies of transplantation in vivo indicted that bone marrow derived stem cells had a potential to differentiate into mature hepatocytes. However, there are lots of doubts and uncertainties in the influencing factors and control agents of effectively inducing stem cell differentiation in vitro, the efficiency of stem cells' differentiation into hepatocytes and differentiated cells' life-span and functional state,etc. In this study, rat bone marrow derived Thy-1+β2M- cells (BDTCs) were induced to differentiate into hepatocytes by co-culturing with CFSC/HGF feeder layers which expressed hHGF efficiently and stably. RT-PCR and immunofluorescent texts proved induced BDTCs expressed infant and adult hepatocyte specific genes. Further more, these cells displayed functions of indocyanine green (ICG) uptake, ammonium metabolism and albumin production. It was shown that growth factors together with hepatic nonparenchyma cells provided a feasible microenvironment for differentiation of bone marrow stem cells into hepatocytes. The studies not only provided a significant biological model for going deep into the mechanism of stem cell plasticity, but also offered a theoretical and technical foundation of gene and stem cell engineering-based regenerative medicine for end-stage liver diseases.

  14. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal.

  15. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Presenting with Severe Marrow Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presenting with severely fibrotic marrow. There are four other reports of similar cases in the literature. Our patient was treated with All-Transretinoic Acid- (ATRA- containing induction chemotherapy, followed by consolidation and maintenance therapy. He achieved a complete morphologic remission with adequate count recovery in a timely fashion, and later a molecular remission was documented. The patient remains in molecular remission and demonstrates normal blood counts now more than 4 years after induction. Since the morphological appearance may not be typical and the bone marrow may not yield an aspirate for cytogenetic analysis, awareness of such entity is important to make a correct diagnosis of this potentially curable disease.

  16. Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells to Neural Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To explore the possibility and condition of differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) to neural cells in vitro, BMSCs from whole bone marrow of rats were cultured. The BMSCs of passage 3 were identified with immunocytochemical staining of CD44 ( + ), CD71 ( + )and CD45(-). There were type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ cells in BMSCs. Type Ⅰ BMSCs were spindleshaped and strong positive in immunocytochemical staining of CD44 and CD71, whereas flat and big type Ⅱ BMSCs were lightly stained. The BMSCs of same passage were induced to differentiate into neural cells by β-mercaptoethanol (BME). After induction by BME, the type Ⅰ BMSCs withdrew to form neuron-like round soma and axon-like and dendrite-like processes, and were stained positively for neurofilament (NF). The type Ⅱ BMSCs did not change in the BME medium and were negatively or slightly stained of NF.

  17. Bone Marrow Stem Cell as a Potential Treatment for Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose levels resulting from defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. The chronic hyperglycemia damages the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Curative therapies mainly include diet, insulin, and oral hypoglycemic agents. However, these therapies fail to maintain blood glucose levels in the normal range all the time. Although pancreas or islet-cell transplantation achieves better glucose control, a major obstacle is the shortage of donor organs. Recently, research has focused on stem cells which can be classified into embryonic stem cells (ESCs and tissue stem cells (TSCs to generate functional β cells. TSCs include the bone-marrow-, liver-, and pancreas-derived stem cells. In this review, we focus on treatment using bone marrow stem cells for type 1 and 2 DM.

  18. Juvenile xanthogranuloma with clonal proliferation in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mały, Ewa; Przyborska, Marta; Rybczyńska, Aleksandra; Konatkowska, Benigna; Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta

    2012-04-01

    The triple association between juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and neurofibromatosis was described in literature in about 20 cases. In this paper, the case of an 11-month-old infant boy with a disseminated JXG with unusual cytogenetic representation in the bone marrow was reported. Neurofibromatosis and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were excluded, just the same as other leukemias. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype with many rearrangements 46,XY,-6,der(12)t(6;12)(p21;p13),del(7)(p13p22),+9 once described in the literature as a B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia case. On the contrary, in our patient immunologic testing demonstrated a high activity of T lymphocytes, however, inflammation was excluded. To the best of our knowledge this is the first described case of systemic JXG with determined karyotype representing unusual chromosomal aberrations.

  19. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem.

  20. Bone marrow blood vessels: normal and neoplastic niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Shahrabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels are among the most important factors in the transport of materials such as nutrients and oxygen. This study will review the role of blood vessels in normal bone marrow hematopoiesis as well as pathological conditions like leukemia and metastasis. Relevant literature was identified by a Pubmed search (1992-2016 of English-language papers using the terms bone marrow, leukemia, metastasis, and vessel. Given that blood vessels are conduits for the transfer of nutrients, they create a favorable situation for cancer cells and cause their growth and development. On the other hand, blood vessels protect leukemia cells against chemotherapy drugs. Finally, it may be concluded that the vessels are an important factor in the development of malignant diseases.

  1. Bone marrow blood vessels: normal and neoplastic niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Shahrabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood vessels are among the most important factors in the transport of materials such as nutrients and oxygen. This study will review the role of blood vessels in normal bone marrow hematopoiesis as well as pathological conditions like leukemia and metastasis. Relevant literature was identified by a Pubmed search (1992-2016 of English-language papers using the terms bone marrow, leukemia, metastasis, and vessel. Given that blood vessels are conduits for the transfer of nutrients, they create a favorable situation for cancer cells and cause their growth and development. On the other hand, blood vessels protect leukemia cells against chemotherapy drugs. Finally, it may be concluded that the vessels are an important factor in the development of malignant diseases.

  2. Neuromyelitis optica in an adolescent after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Fiona M; Kamihara, Junne; Gorman, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system complications of bone marrow transplant are a common occurrence and the differential diagnosis is quite broad, including opportunistic infections, medications toxicities, graft versus host disease, and other autoimmune processes. We summarize previously reported cases of autoimmune myelitis in post-transplant patients and discuss a 17-year-old boy who presented with seronegative neuromyelitis optica after a bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. Our patient had a marked improvement in symptoms after plasmapheresis. Including our patient, there have been at least eight cases of post-transplant autoimmune myelitis presented in the literature, and at least three of these are suspicious for neuromyelitis optica. Several of these patients had poor outcomes with persistent symptoms after the myelitis. Autoimmune processes such as neuromyelitis optica should be carefully considered in patients after transplant as aggressive treatment like early plasmapheresis may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  4. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  5. IFITM1 increases osteogenesis through Runx2 in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Jin Seong; You, Yong-Ouk; Zadeh, Homa; Shin, Hong-In; Lee, Seung-Jin; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Takata, Takashi; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lee, Jun; You, Hyung-Keun

    2012-09-01

    The exact molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs) into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, a highly expressed protein that had a high degree of homology with interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) was identified using differentially expressed gene (DEG) screening. We sought to determine whether IFITM1 influenced osteoblast differentiation. During differentiation, IFITM1 expression gradually increased from 5 to 10days and subsequently decreased at 15 days in culture. Analysis of IFITM1 protein expression in several cell lines as well as in situ studies on human tissues revealed its selective expression in bone cells and human bone. Proliferation of human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) was significantly inhibited by IFITM1 knockdown by using short hairpin RNA, as were bone specific markers such as alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were decreased. Calcium accumulation also decreased following IFITM1 knockdown. Moreover, IFITM1 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs was associated with inhibition of Runx2 mRNA and protein expression. Collectively, the present data provide evidence for the role of IFITM1 in osteoblast differentiation. The exact mechanisms of IFITM1's involvement in osteoblast differentiation are still under investigation.

  6. Benzene-induced hematotoxicity and bone marrow compensation in B6C3F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, G M; Robinson, S N; Gaido, K W; Wong, B A; Wong, V A; Hahn, W P; Shah, R S

    1997-04-01

    Long-term inhalation exposure of benzene has been shown to cause hematotoxicity and an increased incidence of acute myelogenous leukemia in humans. The progression of benzene-induced hematotoxicity and the features of the toxicity that may play a major role in the leukemogenesis are not known. We report the hematological consequences of benzene inhalation in B6C3F1 mice exposed to 1, 5, 10, 100, and 200 ppm benzene for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 1, 2, 4, or 8 weeks and a recovery group. There were no significant effects on hematopoietic parameters from exposure to 10 ppm benzene or less. Exposure of mice to 100 and 200 ppm benzene reduced the number of total bone marrow cells, progenitor cells, differentiating hematopoietic cells, and most blood parameters. Replication of primitive progenitor cells in the bone marrow was increased during the exposure period as a compensation for the cytotoxicity induced by 100 and 200 ppm benzene. In mice exposed to 200 ppm benzene, the primitive progenitor cells maintained an increased percentage of cells in S-phase through 25 days of recovery compared with controls. The increased replication of primitive progenitor cells in concert with the reported genotoxicity induced by benzene provides the components necessary for producing an increased incidence of lymphoma in mice. Furthermore, we propose this mode of action as a biologically plausible mechanism for benzene-induced leukemia in humans exposed to high concentrations of benzene.

  7. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells in ischemic cerebrovascular accident paves way for neurorestoration: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Nagrajan, Anjana; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna; Paranjape, Amruta; Biju, Hema

    2014-01-01

    In response to acute ischemic stroke, large numbers of bone marrow stem cells mobilize spontaneously in peripheral blood that home onto the site of ischemia activating the penumbra. But with chronicity, the numbers of mobilized cells decrease, reducing the degree and rate of recovery. Cellular therapy has been explored as a new avenue to restore the repair process in the chronic stage. A 67-year-old Indian male with a chronic right middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke had residual left hemiparesis despite standard management. Recovery was slow and partial resulting in dependence to carry out activities of daily living. Our aim was to enhance the speed of recovery process by providing an increased number of stem cells to the site of injury. We administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells intrathecally alongwith rehabilitation and regular follow up. The striking fact was that the hand functions, which are the most challenging deficits, showed significant recovery. Functional Independence Measure scores and quality of life improved. This could be attributed to the neural tissue restoration. We hypothesize that cell therapy may be safe, novel and appealing treatment for chronic ischemic stroke. Further controlled trials are indicated to advance the concept of Neurorestoration.

  8. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells in Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident Paves Way for Neurorestoration: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to acute ischemic stroke, large numbers of bone marrow stem cells mobilize spontaneously in peripheral blood that home onto the site of ischemia activating the penumbra. But with chronicity, the numbers of mobilized cells decrease, reducing the degree and rate of recovery. Cellular therapy has been explored as a new avenue to restore the repair process in the chronic stage. A 67-year-old Indian male with a chronic right middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke had residual left hemiparesis despite standard management. Recovery was slow and partial resulting in dependence to carry out activities of daily living. Our aim was to enhance the speed of recovery process by providing an increased number of stem cells to the site of injury. We administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells intrathecally alongwith rehabilitation and regular follow up. The striking fact was that the hand functions, which are the most challenging deficits, showed significant recovery. Functional Independence Measure scores and quality of life improved. This could be attributed to the neural tissue restoration. We hypothesize that cell therapy may be safe, novel and appealing treatment for chronic ischemic stroke. Further controlled trials are indicated to advance the concept of Neurorestoration.

  9. TLR Stimulation of Bone Marrow Lymphoid Precursors from Childhood Acute Leukemia Modifies Their Differentiation Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dorantes-Acosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most frequent childhood malignancies worldwide and remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of relapsed patients. While remarkable progress has been made in characterizing genetic aberrations that may control these hematological disorders, it has also become clear that abnormalities in the bone marrow microenvironment might hit precursor cells and contribute to disease. However, responses of leukemic precursor cells to inflammatory conditions or microbial components upon infection are yet unexplored. Our previous work and increasing evidence indicate that Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the earliest stages of lymphoid development in mice and humans provide an important mechanism for producing cells of the innate immune system. Using highly controlled co-culture systems, we now show that lymphoid precursors from leukemic bone marrow express TLRs and respond to their ligation by changing cell differentiation patterns. While no apparent contribution of TLR signals to tumor progression was recorded for any of the investigated diseases, the replenishment of innate cells was consistently promoted upon in vitro TLR exposure, suggesting that early recognition of pathogen-associated molecules might be implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic cell fate decisions in childhood acute leukemia.

  10. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells causes accumulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Jinku; Yang, Dongki; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Lee, Dae Ho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of tissue macrophages is a significant characteristic of disease-associated chronic inflammation, and facilitates the progression of disease pathology. However, the functional roles of these bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in aging are unclear. Here, we identified age-dependent macrophage accumulation in the bone marrow, showing that aging significantly increases the number of M1 macrophages and impairs polarization of BMDMs. We found that age-related dysregulation of BMDMs is associated with abnormal overexpression of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. BMDM dysregulation in aging impairs the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in B-cell maturation and activation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by BMDMs was reduced because of low expression of phagocytic receptor CD14, indicating that increased apoptotic cells may result from defective phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in the BM of aged mice. Therefore, CD14 may represent a promising target for preventing BMDM dysregulation, and macrophage accumulation may provide diagnostic and therapeutic clues. PMID:27866511

  11. The humerus of Eusthenopteron: a puzzling organization presaging the establishment of tetrapod limb bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, S; Tafforeau, P; Ahlberg, P E

    2014-05-01

    Because of its close relationship to tetrapods, Eusthenopteron is an important taxon for understanding the establishment of the tetrapod body plan. Notably, it is one of the earliest sarcopterygians in which the humerus of the pectoral fin skeleton is preserved. The microanatomical and histological organization of this humerus provides important data for understanding the evolutionary steps that built up the distinctive architecture of tetrapod limb bones. Previous histological studies showed that Eusthenopteron's long-bone organization was established through typical tetrapod ossification modalities. Based on a three-dimensional reconstruction of the inner microstructure of Eusthenopteron's humerus, obtained from propagation phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography, we are now able to show that, despite ossification mechanisms and growth patterns similar to those of tetrapods, it also retains plesiomorphic characters such as a large medullary cavity, partly resulting from the perichondral ossification around a large cartilaginous bud as in actinopterygians. It also exhibits a distinctive tubular organization of bone-marrow processes. The connection between these processes and epiphyseal structures highlights their close functional relationship, suggesting that either bone marrow played a crucial role in the long-bone elongation processes or that trabecular bone resulting from the erosion of hypertrophied cartilage created a microenvironment for haematopoietic stem cell niches.

  12. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  13. The Comparison of Biologic Characteristics between Mice Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Liu; Zhixu He; Dong Shen; Jin Huang; Haowen Wang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This research was to induce dendritic cells (DCs)from mice embryonic stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and then compare the biologic characteristics of them.METHODS Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) suspending cultured in petri dishes were induced to generate embryonic bodies (EBs).Fourteen-day well-developed EBs were transferred to histological culture with the same medium and supplemented 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-3. In the next 2 weeks, there were numerous immature DCs outgrown. Meantime, mononuclear cells isolated from mice bone marrow were induced to derive dendritic cells by supplementing 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-4, and then the morphology, phenotype and function of both dendritic cells from different origins were examined.RESULTS Growing mature through exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both ESC-DCs and BM-DCs exhibited dramatic veils of cytoplasm and extensive dendrites on their surfaces, highly expressed CD11c, MHC-Ⅱ and CD86 with strong capacity to stimulate primary T cell responses in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR).CONCLUSION ESC-DC has the same biologic characteristics as BM-DC, and it provides a new, reliable source for the functional research of DC and next produce corresponding anti-tumor vaccine.

  14. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Paranjape, Amruta; Bhagawanani, Khushboo; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    Male, 9 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Duchenne muscular dystrophy Symptoms: Hyporeflexia • hypotonia • weaknes of lower limbs - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Neurology. Congenital defects/diseases. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, genetic, progressive, degenerating muscle disorder. Current treatment options are palliative. Newer options of cellular therapy promise to alter the disease process. Preclinical studies have successfully tested myogenic, neurogenic potential and dystrophin expression of bone marrow mononuclear cells. We treated a 9-year-old boy suffering from DMD with serial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantations followed by multidisciplinary rehabilitation. Brooke-Vignos score was 10 and he was wheelchair-bound. Over 36 months, gradual progressive improvement was noticed in muscle strength, ambulation with assistive devices, fine motor movements, Brooke-Vignos score, and functional independence measure score. Nine months after the transplantation, electromyography findings showed development of new normal motor unit potentials of the vastus medialis muscle. Magnetic resonance imaging scan of musculoskeletal systems showed no increase in fatty infiltration. This case report provides early investigative findings or the restorative effects of cellular therapy in DMD.

  15. Adipose Stem Cells as Alternatives for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral Ulcer Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Methods and Results Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Results: MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. Conclusions MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing. PMID:24298363

  16. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  17. Bone marrow MR imaging findings in disuse osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. de [Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Wesselly, Michelle; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    To demonstrate MR imaging findings in the cortical and trabecular bone as well as marrow changes in patients with disuse osteoporosis (DO). Sixteen patients (14 men, 2 women, aged 27-86 years) with clinical and radiographic evidence of DO of a lower limb joint (10 knees, 6 ankles) with MR examination of the same joint performed within a 1-month period were selected, as well as 16 healthy volunteers (7 men, 9 women, aged 25-75 years, 10 knees and 6 ankles). MR imaging findings of the bone marrow were analyzed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus regarding: diffuse or focal signal alteration, reinforcement of vertical or longitudinal trabecular lines, and presence of abnormal vascularization. All patients (100%,16/16) with DO presented MR imaging abnormalities of the bone marrow, such as: accentuation of vertical trabecular lines (50%, 8/16), presence of subchondral lobules of fat (37.5%, 6/16), presence of horizontal trabecular lines (31%, 5/16), prominence of bone vessels (25%, 4/16), and presence of dotted areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences (12.5%, 2/16). Such MR findings did not appear in the control individuals. There are several MR imaging findings in bones with DO that range from accentuation of vertical and horizontal marrow lines, presence of subchondral lobules of fat, prominent bone vascularization and the presence of dotted foci of high signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-suppressed sequences. Recognition of these signs may prove helpful in the identification of DO as well as distinguishing these findings from other entities. (orig.)

  18. Bone Marrow Transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia Secondary to Temozolomide

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, E. Brannon; Kasow, Kimberly; Reiss, Ulrike; Ellison, David; Broniscer, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) and concomitant/adjuvant therapy with temozolomide (Temodar) is a common treatment regimen for children and adults with glioma. Although temozolomide is generally well tolerated with temporary myelosuppression as the primary dose-limiting toxicity, irreversible bone-marrow aplasia after treatment with temozolomide has been reported. We report the case of an adolescent patient with a high-grade glioma who, after > 2 years of event-free survival, underwent successful bone marr...

  19. Navigating Survival: Quality of Life Following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Identification of factors which detract from survivors quality of life can enable nurses to modify or prevent morbidity to improve the outcomes for... prevent infections have focused on using various forms of protective isolation, and prophylactic antibiotic therapy. These advances have increased the...successfully treated with BMT include disorders of the bone marrow stem cells. Patient’s with aplastic anemia, Falconi’s anemia, thalassemia , and sickle

  20. Bone marrow biopsy findings in brucellosis patients with hematologic abnormalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cengiz Demir; Mustafa Kasim Karahocagil; Ramazan Esen; Murat Atmaca; Hayriye G(o)nüllü; Hayrettin Akdeniz

    2012-01-01

    Background Brucellosis can mimic various multisytem diseases,showing wide clinical polymorphism that frequently leads to misdiagnosis and treatment delay,further increasing the complication rates.In this study,we aimed to examine bone marrow biopsy findings in brucellosis cases presenting with hematologic abnormalities.Methods Forty-eight brucellosis cases were prospectively investigated.Complaints and physical examination findings of patients were recorded.Patients' complete blood count,routine biochemical tests,erythrocyte sedimentation rate,C-reactive protein and serological screenings were performed.Bone marrow biopsy and aspiration was performed in patients with cytopenia,for bone marrow examination and brucella culture,in accordance with the standard procedures from spina iliaca posterior superior region of pelvic bone.Results Of the 48 patients,35 (73%) were female and 13 (27%) were male.Mean age was (34.8±15.4) years (age range:15-70 years).Anemia,leukopenia,thrombocytopenia and pancytopenia were found in 39 (81%),28 (58%),22 (46%) and 10 patients (21%),respectively.In the examination of bone marrow,hypercellularity was found In 35 (73%) patients.Increased megacariocytic,erythroid and granulocytic series were found in 28 (58%),15 (31%) and 5 (10%) patients,respectively.In addition,hemophagocytosis was observed in 15 (31%) patients,granuloma observed in 12 (25%) and increased eosinophil and plasma cells observed in 9 (19%) patients.Conclusion According to the results of our series,hemophagocytosis,microgranuloma formation and hypersplenism may be responsible for hematologic complications of brucellosis.

  1. Bone marrow myeloid cells in regulation of multiple myeloma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Sarah E; Lin, Cindy; Nefedova, Yulia

    2017-08-01

    Survival, growth, and response to chemotherapy of cancer cells depends strongly on the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment. In multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells that localizes preferentially in the bone marrow, the microenvironment is highly enriched with myeloid cells. The majority of myeloid cells are represented by mature and immature neutrophils. The contribution of the different myeloid cell populations to tumor progression and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma is discussed.

  2. The bone marrow endosteal niche: how far from the surface?

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Taichman, Russell S; Balduino, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal takes place in the same microenvironment in which massive hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, commitment, and differentiation will occur. This is only made possible if the bone marrow microenvironment comprises different specific niches, composed by different stromal cells that work in harmony to regulate all the steps of the hematopoiesis cascade. Histological and functional assays indicated that HSC and multipotent progenitors preferentially c...

  3. Bone marrow granulomas in infiltrating lobular breast cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Kettle, P.; Allen, D C

    1997-01-01

    A 50 year old woman with a history of infiltrating lobular breast carcinoma presented with back pain. Bone scan and magnetic resonance imaging were not conclusive. A bone marrow aspirate appeared normal. A routine trephine biopsy specimen showed granulomas but no obvious infiltration by carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with epithelial markers demonstrated carcinoma cells in the trephine specimen. This case illustrates the difficulty of detecting infiltrating lobular carcinoma in bone m...

  4. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.;

    2015-01-01

    and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy......Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...

  5. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires,Mario Cezar; Kakizaki,Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente,Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection...

  6. Marrow Derived Antibody Library for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Collection of bone marrow samples: months 1-12, site 1 Patients were enrolled in NMTRC studies at clinical sites and scheduled for surgical procedures...Multiporator/Helix chamber (Eppendorf, Westbury, NY) or BTX Electro Cell Manipulator ECM 2001/microslides (Harvard Apparatus, Inc., Holliston, MA). The...pocket is made under the skin by blunt dissection with the surgical scissors. A piece of tumor specimen is inserted into the subcutaneous pocket and

  7. [Effect of aclacinomycin A on bone marrow (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, K; Shirai, M; Kiyosaki, T; Hori, S; Tone, H

    1980-04-01

    Japan White rabbits were treated with aclacinomycin A, a new anthracycline antitumor antibiotic, at a dose of 6.25 or 25.0 mg/kg by single intravenous, or 12.5 or 50.0 mg/kg by single oral administration, respectively. Beagle dogs were treated at a dose of 3.0 or 6.0 mg/kg by single intravenous injection. In rabbits in higher dose groups, RBC and WBC counts as well as lymphocyte ratio in peripheral blood decreased on day 1. Nucleated cell counts and erythroid elements in bone marrow decreased to raise M/E ratio (Myeloid/Erythroid ratio) on day 3. In a dog given at 6.0 mg/kg, WBC and platelet counts, lymphocyte and neutrocyte per cents in peripheral blood and also nucleated cells, particularly erythroid elements in bone marrow remarkably decreased on day 3 accompanied with an increase in M/E ratio. These changes were almost completely recovered by day 14 in both animals. No abnormalities were found in lower dose groups. Male Wistar rats, treated with the drug at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg by daily intraperitoneal injection for 30 days, showed slight decreases in peripheral WBC and RBC counts and M/E ratio in bone marrow. No change was observed in rats treated at 0.75 mg/kg and less for 30 days.

  8. Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courties, Gabriel; Herisson, Fanny; Sager, Hendrik B; Heidt, Timo; Ye, Yuxiang; Wei, Ying; Sun, Yuan; Severe, Nicolas; Dutta, Partha; Scharff, Jennifer; Scadden, David T; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Moskowitz, Michael A; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-30

    The mechanisms leading to an expanded neutrophil and monocyte supply after stroke are incompletely understood. To test the hypothesis that transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in mice leads to activation of hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells. Serial in vivo bioluminescence reporter gene imaging in mice with tMCAO revealed that bone marrow cell cycling peaked 4 days after stroke (Pcell cycle analysis showed activation of the entire hematopoietic tree, including myeloid progenitors. The cycling fraction of the most upstream hematopoietic stem cells increased from 3.34%±0.19% to 7.32%±0.52% after tMCAO (Pstroke. The hematopoietic system's myeloid bias was reflected by increased expression of myeloid transcription factors, including PU.1 (Pstem cell quiescence. In mice with genetic deficiency of the β3 adrenergic receptor, hematopoietic stem cells did not enter the cell cycle in increased numbers after tMCAO (naive control, 3.23±0.22; tMCAO, 3.74±0.33, P=0.51). Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic stem cells via increased sympathetic tone, leading to a myeloid bias of hematopoiesis and higher bone marrow output of inflammatory Ly6C(high) monocytes and neutrophils. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Transplantation? Peripheral Stem Cell/Bone Marrow/Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itır Sirinoglu Demiriz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of peripheral stem cell (PSC and cord blood (CB as an alternative to bone marrow (BM recently has caused important changes on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT practice. According to the CIBMTR data, there has been a significant decrease in the use of bone marrow and increase in the use of PSC and CB as the stem cell source for HSCT performed during 1997–2006 period for patients under the age of 20. On the other hand, the stem cell source in 70% of the HSCT procedures performed for patients over the age of 20 was PSC and the second most preferred stem cell source was bone marrow. CB usage is very limited for the adult population. Primary disease, stage, age, time and urgency of transplantation, HLA match between the patient and the donor, stem cell quantity, and the experience of the transplantation center are some of the associated factors for the selection of the appropriate stem cell source. Unfortunately, there is no prospective randomized study aimed to facilitate the selection of the correct source between CB, PSC, and BM. In this paper, we would like to emphasize the data on stem cell selection in light of the current knowledge for patient populations according to their age and primary disease.

  10. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Juan; Chen, Jian; Kim, Jae Chan; Yao, Ke

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and involved in its destructive and regenerative disease course, tissue specimens were collected from 3 eyes of 3 patients with Mooren's ulcer that underwent lamellar keratectomy. Three normal donor limbal corneoscleras served as controls. Immunohistochemical staining patterns were analyzed by using the following antibodies: CD34 (a marker of hematopoietic progenitor cells and endothelium), c-kit (a marker of hematopoietic and stromal progenitor cells) and STRO-1 (a differentiation antigen present on bone marrow fibroblast cells and on various nonhematopoietic progenitor cells). Strong positive CD34, c-kit and STRO-1 cells were revealed in Mooren's ulcer specimens, especially in the superficial stroma. A few weakly expressed CD34 stromal cells were seen in normal limbal cornea, but no immunoreactivity for c-kit and STRO-1 was found. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and contribute to its destructive and regeneration process by synergizing with other factors. Specific therapeutic strategies that target the role of these cells in Mooren's ulcer are anticipated.

  11. Bone marrow leishmaniasis: a review of situation in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important tropical vector-borne disease. This infection can be seen in tropical area and it is considered to be one of the most important vector-borne infections at present. The general situation of the leishmaniasis in Thailand is hereby reviewed. Although Thailand is a tropical country, the leishmaniasis is not endemic but sporadic. The imported cases are documented in some literatures. The serious form of leishmaniasis, the visceral leishmaniasis is also detectable in Thailand. Also, the author performed an in depth literature review of the reports of bone marrow leishmaniasis, a specific kind of visceral leishmaniasis, in Thailand in order to summarize the characteristics of this infection among Thai patients. According to this review, there have been at least 5 reports in the literature of 6 cases of bone marrow leishmaniasis in the Thai population, of which no case was lethal. Concerning the clinical manifestations, all except had prolonged fever with unknown origin. From physical examination, all had hepatosplenomegaly. The striking findings were active hemophagocytosis with increased proliferation of lymphoidplasma cell line in the bone marrow and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani was demonstrated. Considering the treatment, pantavalent antimony compound was used and the excellent improvement and complete recovery. Finally, the author also discussed on the importance of leishmaniasis in Thailand relating to the present globalization and good traveling system.

  12. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Organotypic culture of human bone marrow adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Aoki, Shigehisa; Shigematsu, Masamori; Kamochi, Noriyuki; Sonoda, Emiko; Soejima, Hidenobu; Fukudome, Kenji; Sugihara, Hajime; Hotokebuchi, Takao; Toda, Shuji

    2010-04-01

    The precise role of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) in the marrow remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was therefore to describe a novel method for studying BMAT using 3-D collagen gel culture of BMAT fragments, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mature adipocytes and CD45+ leukocytes were retained for >3 weeks. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) including a small number of lipid-laden preadipocytes and CD44+/CD105+ mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells, developed from BMAT. Dexamethasone (10 micromol/L), but not insulin (20 mU/mL), significantly increased the number of preadipocytes. Dexamethasone and insulin also promoted leptin production and gene expression in BMAT. Adiponectin production by BMAT was BMAT, in which adiponectin protein secretion is normally very low, and that BMAT may exhibit a different phenotype from that of the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues. BMAT-osteoblast interactions were also examined, and it was found that osteoblasts inhibited the development of BMSC and reduced leptin production, while BMAT inhibited the growth and differentiation of osteoblasts. The present novel method proved to be useful for the study of BMAT biology.

  14. Are bone marrow regenerative cells ideal seed cells for the treatment of cerebral ischemia?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Li; Xuming Hua; Fang Hua; Wenwei Mao; Liang Wan; Shiting Li

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow cells for the treatment of ischemic brain injury may depend on the secretion of a large number of neurotrophic factors. Bone marrow regenerative cells are capable of increasing the secretion of neurotrophic factors. In this study, after tail vein injection of 5-fluorouracil for 7 days, bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells were isolated from the tibias and femurs of rats, and then administered intravenously via the tail vein after focal cerebral ischemia. Immunohistological staining and reverse transcription-PCR detection showed that transplanted bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells could migrate and survive in the ischemic regions, such as the cortical and striatal infarction zone. These cells promote vascular endothelial cell growth factor mRNA expression in the ischemic marginal zone surrounding the ischemic penumbra of the cortical and striatal infarction zone, and have great advantages in promoting the recovery of neurological function, reducing infarct size and promoting angiogenesis. Bone marrow regenerative cells exhibited stronger neuroprotective effects than bone marrow cells. Our experimental findings indicate that bone marrow regenerative cells are preferable over bone marrow cells for cell therapy for neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia. Their neuroprotective effect is largely due to their ability to induce the secretion of factors that promote vascular regeneration, such as vascular endothelial growth factor.

  15. Differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells in liver after partial hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Tao Zhan; Yu Wang; Lai Wei; Bin Liu; Hong-Song Chen; Xu Cong; Ran Fei

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells in liver after partial hepatectomy.METHODS: Bone marrow cells were collected from the tibia of rat with partial hepatectomy, the medial and left hepatic lobes were excised. The bone marrow stem cells (Thy+CD3-CD45RA- cells) were enriched from the bone marrow cells by depleting red cells and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The sorted bone marrow stem cells were labeled by PKH26-GL in vitro and autotransplanted by portal vein injection. After 2wk, the transplanted bone marrow stem cells in liver were examined by the immunohistochemistry of albumin (hepatocyte-specific marker).RESULTS: The bone marrow stem cells (Thy+CD3-CD45RA- cells) accounted for 2.8% of bone marrow cells without red cells. The labeling rate of 10μM PKH26-GL on sorted bone marrow stem cells was about 95%.There were sporadic PKH26-GL-labeled cells among hepatocytes in liver tissue section, and some of the cells expressed albumin.CONCLUSION: Rat bone marrow stem cells can differentiate into hepatocytes in regenerative environment and may participate in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy.

  16. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  17. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...... of the services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....

  18. Achieving Provider Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  19. A history of bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena, M Teresa; Gatti, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    The last 40 years has seen the emergence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a therapeutic modality for fatal diseases and as a curative option for individuals born with inherited disorders that carry limited life expectancy and poor quality of life. Despite the rarity of many primary immunodeficiency diseases, these disorders have led the way toward innovative therapies and further provide insights into mechanisms of immunologic reconstitution applicable to all hematopoietic stem cell transplants. This article represents a historical perspective of the early investigators and their contributions. It also reviews the parallel work that oncologists and immunologists have undertaken to treat both primary immunodeficiencies and hematologic malignancies.

  20. Discoidin Receptor 2 Controls Bone Formation and Marrow Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunxi; Wang, Zhengyan; Zhao, Guisheng; Li, Binbin; Liao, Jinhui; Sun, Hanshi; Franceschi, Renny T

    2016-12-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play major roles in controlling progenitor cell fate and differentiation. The receptor tyrosine kinase, discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), is an important mediator of interactions between cells and fibrillar collagens. DDR2 signals through both ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase, which stimulate osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Here we show that DDR2 is critical for skeletal development and differentiation of marrow progenitor cells to osteoblasts while suppressing marrow adipogenesis. Smallie mice (Ddr2(slie/slie) ), which contain a nonfunctional Ddr2 allele, have multiple skeletal defects. A progressive decrease in tibial trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) was observed when wild-type (WT), Ddr2(wt/slie) , and Ddr2(slie/slie) mice were compared. These changes were associated with reduced trabecular number (Tb.N) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and increased trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp) in both males and females, but reduced cortical thickness only in Ddr2(slie/slie) females. Bone changes were attributed to decreased bone formation rather than increased osteoclast activity. Significantly, marrow fat and adipocyte-specific mRNA expression were significantly elevated in Ddr2(slie/slie) animals. Additional skeletal defects include widened calvarial sutures and reduced vertebral trabecular bone. To examine the role of DDR2 signaling in cell differentiation, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were grown under osteogenic and adipogenic conditions. Ddr2(slie/slie) cells exhibited defective osteoblast differentiation and accelerated adipogenesis. Changes in differentiation were related to activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and PPARγ, transcription factors that are both controlled by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation. Specifically, the defective osteoblast differentiation in calvarial cells from Ddr2(slie/slie) mice was associated with reduced ERK/MAP kinase and RUNX2-S319 phosphorylation and could

  1. Generation and Identification of GM-CSF Derived Alveolar-like Macrophages and Dendritic Cells From Mouse Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yifei; Arif, Arif A; Poon, Grace F T; Hardman, Blair; Dosanjh, Manisha; Johnson, Pauline

    2016-06-25

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are innate immune cells found in tissues and lymphoid organs that play a key role in the defense against pathogens. However, they are difficult to isolate in sufficient numbers to study them in detail, therefore, in vitro models have been developed. In vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells are well-established and valuable methods for immunological studies. Here, a method for culturing and identifying both DCs and macrophages from a single culture of primary mouse bone marrow cells using the cytokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is described. This protocol is based on the established procedure first developed by Lutz et al. in 1999 for bone marrow-derived DCs. The culture is heterogeneous, and MHCII and fluoresceinated hyaluronan (FL-HA) are used to distinguish macrophages from immature and mature DCs. These GM-CSF derived macrophages provide a convenient source of in vitro derived macrophages that closely resemble alveolar macrophages in both phenotype and function.

  2. CGH and SNP array using DNA extracted from fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon Ruth N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of nucleic acids is limited by the availability of archival specimens and the quality and amount of the extracted material. Archived cytogenetic preparations are stored in many laboratories and are a potential source of total genomic DNA for array karyotyping and other applications. Array CGH using DNA from fixed cytogenetic preparations has been described, but it is not known whether it can be used for SNP arrays. Diagnostic bone marrow specimens taken during the assessment of hematological malignancies are also a potential source of DNA, but it is generally assumed that DNA must be extracted, or the specimen frozen, within a day or two of collection, to obtain DNA suitable for further analysis. We have assessed DNA extracted from these materials for both SNP array and array CGH. Results We show that both SNP array and array CGH can be performed on genomic DNA extracted from cytogenetic specimens stored in Carnoy's fixative, and from bone marrow which has been stored unfrozen, at 4°C, for at least 36 days. We describe a procedure for extracting a usable concentration of total genomic DNA from cytogenetic suspensions of low cellularity. Conclusions The ability to use these archival specimens for DNA-based analysis increases the potential for retrospective genetic analysis of clinical specimens. Fixed cytogenetic preparations and long-term refrigerated bone marrow both provide DNA suitable for array karyotyping, and may be suitable for a wider range of analytical procedures.

  3. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  4. Characterization of spontaneous bone marrow recovery after sublethal total body irradiation: importance of the osteoblastic/adipocytic balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Poncin

    Full Text Available Many studies have already examined the hematopoietic recovery after irradiation but paid with very little attention to the bone marrow microenvironment. Nonetheless previous studies in a murine model of reversible radio-induced bone marrow aplasia have shown a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP prior to hematopoietic regeneration. This increase in ALP activity was not due to cell proliferation but could be attributed to modifications of the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. We thus undertook a study to assess the kinetics of the evolution of MSC correlated to their hematopoietic supportive capacities in mice treated with sub lethal total body irradiation. In our study, colony-forming units-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs assay showed a significant MSC rate increase in irradiated bone marrows. CFU-Fs colonies still possessed differentiation capacities of MSC but colonies from mice sacrificed 3 days after irradiation displayed high rates of ALP activity and a transient increase in osteoblastic markers expression while pparγ and neuropilin-1 decreased. Hematopoietic supportive capacities of CFU-Fs were also modified: as compared to controls, irradiated CFU-Fs significantly increased the proliferation rate of hematopoietic precursors and accelerated the differentiation toward the granulocytic lineage. Our data provide the first evidence of the key role exerted by the balance between osteoblasts and adipocytes in spontaneous bone marrow regeneration. First, (preosteoblast differentiation from MSC stimulated hematopoietic precursor's proliferation and granulopoietic regeneration. Then, in a second time (preosteoblasts progressively disappeared in favour of adipocytic cells which down regulated the proliferation and granulocytic differentiation and then contributed to a return to pre-irradiation conditions.

  5. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic; You, Hyung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway.

  6. Bone Marrow Fat Changes After Gastric Bypass Surgery Are Associated With Loss of Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tiffany Y; Schwartz, Ann V; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Kaipin; Black, Dennis M; Petrenko, Dimitry M; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Posselt, Andrew M; Carter, Jonathan T; Shoback, Dolores M; Schafer, Anne L

    2017-08-09

    Bone marrow fat is a unique fat depot that may regulate bone metabolism. Marrow fat is increased in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. However, longitudinal effects of weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis on marrow fat are unclear, as is the relationship between marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) changes. We hypothesized that after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, marrow fat changes are associated with BMD loss. We enrolled 30 obese women, stratified by diabetes status. Before and 6 months after RYGB, we measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and vertebral marrow fat content by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At baseline, those with higher marrow fat had lower BMD. Postoperatively, total body fat declined dramatically in all participants. Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (p = 0.03). Nondiabetic women showed no significant mean change in marrow fat (+1.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.8% to +5.4%, p = 0.29), although those who lost more total body fat were more likely to have marrow fat increases (r = -0.70, p = 0.01). In contrast, diabetic women demonstrated a mean marrow fat change of -6.5% (95% CI -13.1% to 0%, p = 0.05). Overall, those with greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c had decreases in marrow fat (r = 0.50, p = 0.01). Increases in IGF-1, a potential mediator of the marrow fat-bone relationship, were associated with marrow fat declines (r = -0.40, p = 0.05). Spinal volumetric BMD decreased by 6.4% ± 5.9% (p fat and BMD changes were negatively associated, such that those with marrow fat increases had more BMD loss at both spine (r = -0.58, p loss may influence marrow fat behavior, and marrow fat may be a determinant of bone metabolism. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  7. Unsaturation level decreased in bone marrow fat of postmenopausal women with low bone density using high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Shet, Keerthi; Xu, Kaipin; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Pino, Ana María; Kurhanewicz, John; Schwartz, Ann; Rosen, Clifford J

    2017-08-18

    fracture, and other bone pathologies and changes after treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between bone marrow composition and bone quality in humans may identify novel treatment targets, and provide guidance on novel interventions and therapeutic strategies for bone preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascariello Caterina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. As regards human normal bone marrow, detailed characterization of ALDH+ cells has been addressed by one single study (Gentry et al, 2007. The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors. To this aim, we used three kinds of approach: i multidimensional analytical flow cytometry, detecting ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens in normal bone marrow; ii fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation; iii detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients. Results In normal bone marrow, we identified three populations of cells, namely ALDH+CD34+, ALDH-CD34+ and ALDH+CD34- (median percentages were 0.52, 0.53 and 0.57, respectively. As compared to ALDH-CD34+ cells, ALDH+CD34+ cells expressed the phenotypic profile of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells, with brighter expression of CD117 and CD133, accompanied by lower display of CD38 and CD45RA. Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences. First of all, ALDH+CD34- cells showed a CD71bright, CD105+, CD45- phenotype. Secondly, induction of differentiation experiments evidenced a clear-cut expression of glycophorin A (CD235a. Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA. Conclusion Our study, comparing surface antigen expression of

  9. Bone marrow granuloma in typhoid Fever: a morphological approach and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraj, Kavitha; Padhi, Somanath; Phansalkar, Manjiri; Sivakumar, Periyasami; Varghese, Renu G'Boy; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Typhoid fever is one of the few bacterial infections in humans where bone marrow evaluation is routinely recommended. However, the morphological aspect of typhoid fever in bone marrow has been rarely described in the literature. We describe a 25-year-old male patient who presented with prolonged fever suspected to be of tubercular etiology. Bone marrow examination showed well-formed histiocytic and epithelioid granulomas and erythrophagocytosis; and the bone marrow aspirate culture grew Salmonella typhi A. In view of potential clinical implications, typhoid fever should be considered as a differential diagnosis to tuberculosis in the evaluation of prolonged fever; especially in high prevalent areas. We suggest that erythrophagocytosis may serve as a morphological marker in typhoid granulomas in the bone marrow; and bone marrow culture should be submitted in every suspected case for appropriate patient management.

  10. Degenerative disc disease in the lumbar spine: Another cause for focally reduced activity on marrow scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M. (Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology); Miles, K.A. (Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Wraight, E.P. (Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Dixon, A.K. (Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1992-05-01

    A patient is presented in whom a focal reduction in marrow activity in the lumbar spine on both leucocyte and nanocolloid marrow scintigraphy was subsequently shown to be due to fatty infiltration of marrow in association with disc degeneration. Degenerative disease in the lumbar spine has not been previously described as a cause of abnormal bone marrow distribution by such means and needs to be distinguished from a more serious pathology, such as malignant infiltration and vertebral infection, which it may mimic. In a retrospective review of 33 nanocolloid bone marrow and 117 leucocyte scintigrams, 8 showed a degree of reduced marrow activity in the lumbar spine consistent with that caused by degenerative changes. (orig.).

  11. The Application of Bone Marrow Transplantation to the Treatment of Genetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkman, Robertson

    1986-06-01

    Genetic diseases can be treated by transplantation of either normal allogeneic bone marrow or, potentially, autologous bone marrow into which the normal gene has been inserted in vitro (gene therapy). Histocompatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is used for the treatment of genetic diseases whose clinical expression is restricted to lymphoid or hematopoietic cells. The therapeutic role of bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of generalized genetic diseases, especially those affecting the central nervous system, is under investigation. The response of a generalized genetic disease to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation may be predicted by experiments in vitro. Gene therapy can be used only when the gene responsible for the disease has been characterized. Success of gene therapy for a specific genetic disease may be predicted by its clinical response to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

  12. MR marrow signs of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Sheth, S.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Hurlet, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Comerci, S.C. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Piomelli, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) marrow signal in the axial and appendicular skeleton of 13 transfusion-dependent and chelated pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia (SSD) was compared with marrow signal in six non-transfusion-dependent patients with SSD. Hepatic, pancreatic, and renal MR signal were also evaluated. Indication for hypertransfusion therapy was primarily prior history of stroke. Transfusion-dependent patients had evidence of iron deposition throughout the imaged marrow and the liver, despite deferoxamine chelation therapy. Non-transfusion-dependent patients did not demonstrate grossly apparent signs of iron overload. Red marrow restoration was present in the spine, pelvis, and long bones and, in some patients, within the epiphyses. Marrow edema secondary to vaso-occlusive crises was evident in the metaphyses and diaphyses of long bones in areas of both red and fatty marrow and was best seen using fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging techniques. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Provide a Supportive Niche for Early Disseminated Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Polyak K, Weinberg RA: Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition of malignant and stem cell traits. Nat Rev Cancer 2009, 9(4...distant metastases. Breast Cancer Res 5: R217– R222. 50. Polyak K, Weinberg RA (2009) Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition

  14. Bone marrow-derived myofibroblasts are the providers of pro-invasive matrix metalloproteinase 13 in primary tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecomte, Julie; Masset, Anne; Blacher, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    producing cells were exclusively α-SMA(+) cells and derived from GFP(+) BM cells. To investigate their impact on tumor invasion, we isolated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the BM of wild-type and MMP13-deficient mice. Wild-type MSC promoted cancer cell invasion in a spheroid assay, whereas MSCs obtained...... from MMP13-deficient mice failed to. Our data support the concept of fibroblast subset specialization with BM-derived α-SMA(+) cells being the main source of MMP13, a stromal mediator of cancer cell invasion....

  15. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of reactive hematopoietic bone marrow in aplastic anemia using MR spectroscopy with variable echo times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess quantitative and qualitative differences in water components between normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia using magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with variable echo times (TEs). Design: Water content, T2 value of the water component, and signal change in water related to TE were assessed in normal bone marrow and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow by a stimulated echo acquisition mode with TEs of 30, 45, 60, and 90 ms. Patients: Six patients with aplastic anemia (13-84 years) and seven normal volunteers (25-38 years) were examined. Results and conclusion: Reactive hematopoietic marrow showed significantly higher water content than normal bone marrow. The T2 value of water components tended to be longer in reactive hematopoietic marrow. Water signal ratio related to TE was significantly higher in reactive hematopoietic marrow. These results suggest a quantitative and qualitative difference in water components between normal and reactive hematopoietic bone marrow. (orig.)

  16. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically "fatless" mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation.

  17. Incorporation of bone marrow cells in pancreatic pseudoislets improves posttransplant vascularization and endocrine function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wittig

    Full Text Available Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×10(3 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×10(3 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×10(3 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation.

  18. Organotins Are Potent Activators of PPARγ and Adipocyte Differentiation in Bone Marrow Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow is potentially deleterious to both bone integrity and lymphopoiesis. Here, we examine the hypothesis that organotins, common environmental contaminants that are dual ligands for peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR) γ and its heterodimerization partner retinoid X receptor (RXR), are potent activators of bone marrow adipogenesis. A C57Bl/6-derived bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) line, BMS2, was treated with rosiglitazo...

  19. IMPACT OF IMMUNOGENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ON IMMUNE RESPONSE AND CLINICAL FEATURES IN BONE MARROW FAILURE SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Hematopietic stem cells (HSC) are responsible for the production of mature blood cells in bone marrow; peripheral pancytopenia may result from several different conditions, including hematological or extra-hematological diseases (mostly cancers) affecting the marrow function as well as primary failure of hematopoiesis. Although the clinical presentation may appear homogeneous, primary bone marrow failure syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases with specific pathogenic mechanisms, whic...

  20. [Analysis of neoplasm metastases to the bone marrow in patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziecioł, J; Kemona, A; Sulik, M; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Sulkowski, S; Ostapiuk, H; Pasztaleniec, L; Deregowski, K

    1989-04-01

    The authors analysed bone marrow metastases in lung cancer in 104 deceased patients. Trepano-biopsy was taken from the sternum, hip bone and spine. Bone marrow metastases were found in 33 cases (31.73%). Most often they were seen in small cell lung cancer (16 cases--35.56%). In 12 cases the bone marrow was the only site of lung cancer metastases.

  1. In Vivo Osteoinductive Effect and In Vitro Isolation and Cultivation Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Redžić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljičević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to iso...

  2. Peripheral blood and bone marrow cell status of white rats with long-term lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudakova, A.I.; Shevchenko, Z.H.T.; Nosova, L.I.

    Blood test and bone marrow examination in experiments with albino rats weighing 100-110 g subjected to long-term lead influence (1% lead acetate per os) showed availability of reticulocytosis with thrombocytopenia (on the 62d day) and thrombocytosis on the 92d day of the experiment) in peripheral blood. Reduction of the bone marrow neutrophil index and leuko-erythroblastic ration due to an increase of an erythroblastic radicle was recorded in the bone marrow.

  3. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  5. Evaluation of bone-marrow scanning with technetium-99m sulfur colloid in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A R; Oseas, R S; Wellman, H N; Doerr, D R; Baehner, R L

    1979-05-01

    Eighty-six technetium-99m sulfur colloid (Tc-SC) bone-marrow scans in 56 pediatric oncology patients were reviewed. The distribution of the sulfur colloid was similar to that in adult bone marrow in normal children older than 10 yr, and involved progressively more marrow of the extremities in normal children under 10 years of age. After irradiation or chemotherapy there was an extension of the Tc-SC to peripheral marrow sites. There was also diminished uptake of the tracer in sites corresponding to irradiated areas. In most patients there was recovery of these defects by 6 mo after completion of therapy. Tumor replacement of the marrow was reflected in the scans, and the extent of the scan defect paralleled the course of the disease. In four patients, despite normal bone scans and radiographs, marrow-scan abnormalities due to tumor replacement were present and confirmed by needle aspiration and/or biopsy. In two other patients, the marrow-scan abnormality preceded radiographic and histologic evidence of tumor metastasis. Two patients who responded clinically showed persistent defects; biopsy in one revealed fibrosis. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid bone-marrow scanning appears to be a sensitive monitor of marrow alteration caused by metastases, irradiation damage, or tissue fibrosis in children receiving treatment for cancer.

  6. A stepwise procedure for isolation of murine bone marrow and generation of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Madaan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived Dendritic cells (BMDCs are routinely employed in cell based assays to evaluate immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. Hence, simplified, stepwise, defined and standardized methods are required for isolation of bone marrow cells from mice, propagating them in presence of growth factors and obtaining high and reproducible yields of BMDCs. Here, we describe a detailed, stepwise protocol with pictorial representation to isolate bone marrow from mouse femur and development of dendritic cells. Mouse bone marrow cells are cultured in presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF for 6 days to generate BMDCs.

  7. Necroptosis in spontaneously-mutated hematopoietic cells induces autoimmune bone marrow failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Junping; Breslin, Peter; Wei, Wei; Li, Jing; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cannova, Joseph; Ni, Allen; Ng, Grace; Schmidt, Rachel; Chen, Haiyan; Parini, Vamsi; Kuo, Paul C.; Kini, Ameet R.; Stiff, Patrick; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an autoimmune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. The mechanism by which such an autoimmune reaction is initiated is unknown. Whether and how the genetic lesions detected in patients cause autoimmune bone marrow failure have not yet been determined. We found that mice with spontaneous deletion of the TGFβ-activated kinase-1 gene in a small subset of hematopoietic cells developed bone marrow failure which resembled the clinical manifestations of acquired aplastic anemia patients. Bone marrow failure in such mice could be reversed by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes or blocked by knockout of interferon-γ, suggesting a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism. The onset and progression of bone marrow failure in such mice were significantly accelerated by the inactivation of tumor necrosis factor-α signaling. Tumor necrosis factor-α restricts autoimmune bone marrow failure by inhibiting type-1 T-cell responses and maintaining the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Furthermore, we determined that necroptosis among a small subset of mutant hematopoietic cells is the cause of autoimmune bone marrow failure because such bone marrow failure can be prevented by deletion of receptor interacting protein kinase-3. Our study suggests a novel mechanism to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmune bone marrow failure. PMID:27634200

  8. Electrostimulation and morphologic study of the nerves to the bone marrow of the albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, D M; Webber, R H

    1975-01-01

    The innervation of the bone marrow of the albino rat was investigated by electrostimulation and morphological methods. Stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic trunks resulted in the release of reticulocytes and neutrophils into the circulating blood. The effects of stimulation on other cell types in the bone marrow could not be definitely established. It was concluded that the nerve fibers to the bone marrow were distributed to the arteries. It is postulated that the transmitter substance released at the autonomic nerve endings may have an effect upon the permeability of the venous sinusiods and the mobility of the blood cells in the marrow parenchyma resulting in their release into the circulating blood.

  9. Muscle-specific kinase antibody associated myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Zeinab; Mousavi, Seyyed-Asadollah; Ostovan, Vahid Reza; Nafissi, Shahriar

    2014-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a rare complication of bone marrow transplantation and graft versus host disease. We report a 30-year-old woman presented with oculobulbar and proximal limb weakness after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Also, she developed graft versus host disease following bone marrow transplantation. Investigations led to the diagnosis of muscle specific kinase antibody related myasthenia gravis. There have been only two case reports of muscle specific kinase antibody positive myasthenia gravis after bone marrow transplantation in the literature, but none of the previously reported cases had graft versus host disease.

  10. Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging of Epiphyseal and Metaphyseal Marrow in Normal Piglets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoming; WANG Renfa; QI Jianpin; TANG Lihua

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the appearance of normal epiphyseal and metaphyseal marrow and normal changes of marrow due to fatty conversion on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR Imaging. Unenhanced and enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging were performed in proximal and distal femoral ends of 8 healthy piglets at the ages of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks, respectively. The changes with age in signal intensity and enhancement ratio of the epiphyseal and tnetaphyseal marrow with age were examined. The correlation of MRI characteristics with histological findings was studied. Our study showed that marrow of the metaphysis and of periphery of the 2nd ossification center were well vascularized hematopoietic marrow and had great enhancements. The enhancement ratio of metaphysis was greater than that of epiphyseal marrow and both enhancement ratios degraded gradually with age. The central regions of the epiphyseal ossification center and of the diaphysis were of fatty marrow and had little enhancement. It is concluded that on Gd-enhanced MR imaging the hematopoietic marrow of metaphysis and of periphery of the 2nd ossification center had greater enhancement than that of fatty marrow of central region of the 2nd ossification center. All of their enhancements decreased gradually with age.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Optimal Bone Marrow Site for the Isolation of Porcine Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. McDaniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the most plentiful sources for MSCs is the bone marrow; however, it is unknown whether MSC yield differs among different bone marrow sites. In this study, we quantified cellular yield and evaluated resident MSC population from five bone marrow sites in the porcine model. In addition, we assessed the feasibility of a commercially available platelet concentrator (Magellan® MAR01™ Arteriocyte Medical Systems, Hopkinton, MA as a bedside stem cell concentration device. Methods. Analyses of bone marrow aspirate (BMA and concentrated bone marrow aspirate (cBMA included bone marrow volume, platelet and nucleated cell yield, colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F number, flow cytometry, and assessment of differentiation potential. Results. Following processing, the concentration of platelets and nucleated cells significantly increased but was not significantly different between sites. The iliac crest had significantly less bone marrow volume; however, it yielded significantly more CFUs compared to the other bone marrow sites. Culture-expanded cells from all tested sites expressed high levels of MSC surface markers and demonstrated adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions. All anatomical bone marrow sites contained MSCs, but the iliac crest was the most abundant source of MSCs. Additionally, the Magellan can function effectively as a bedside stem cell concentrator.

  12. Factors that influence Greeks' decision to register as potential bone marrow donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, P A; Sparos, L D; Katostaras, T; Velonakis, E; Kalokerinou, A

    2008-06-01

    Hemopoietic stem cells can be used from bone marrow or blood or umbilical cord blood of matched siblings or appropriately matched unrelated volunteers. Today, large bone marrow registries have been established to help identify volunteer unrelated bone marrow donors for patients lacking a family donor. Despite there being almost 10 million registered potential bone marrow donors (PBMD) worldwide, only 50% of white patients have a suitable bone marrow match. Growth in the number of PBMD increases the likelihood of finding a compatible donor for a patient. The attitudes and knowledge of 250 registered PBMD and 315 not registered PBMD toward bone marrow donation, tissues and organs donation, and blood donation were surveyed, using a questionnaire with 27 items. Multivariate logistic regression identified gender (females more often than males), regular blood donation, having a relative or a friend who has already been registered as PBMD, having a relative or a friend who needs bone marrow transplantation, family discussion about tissue and organ donation, knowledge about bone marrow transplantation, information about bone marrow transplantation, and trust in health professionals were independent predictive factors influencing people's decision to register as PBMD. Knowledge of these factors is important to target recruitment efforts.

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα stimulates the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rougier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports that TNF-α is a potent mitogen for human bone marrow sternal cells in vitro (assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counts. In contrast, cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, LIF, SCF, M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect. The effect of TNF-α on the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells could be of importance during inflammatory processes which take place in the marrow, for example marrow fibrosis.

  14. Effect of nephrotoxic drugs on the development of radiation nephropathy after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, C.A.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E. (Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Chronic renal failure is a significant cause of late morbidity in bone marrow transplant patients whose conditioning regimen includes total body irradiation (TBI). Radiation is a major cause of this syndrome (bone marrow transplant nephropathy), but it may not be the only cause. These studies use a rat syngeneic bone marrow transplant model to determine whether nephrotoxic agents used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be enhancing or accelerating the development of radiation nephropathy. Rats received 11-17 Gy TBI in six fractions over 3 days followed by syngeneic bone marrow transplant. In conjunction with the bone marrow transplants, animals received either no drugs, cyclosporine, amphotericin, gentamicin, or busulfan. Drugs were given in schedules analogous to their use in clinical bone marrow transplantation. Drug doses were chosen so that the drug regimen alone caused detectable acute nephrotoxicity. Animals were followed for 6 months with periodic renal function tests. Gentamicin had no apparent interactions with TBI. Amphotericin increased the incidence of engraftment failure, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Cyclosporin with TBI caused late morbidity that appeared to be due to neurological problems, but did not enhance radiation nephropathy. Busulfan resulted in a significant enhancement of radiation nephropathy. Of the nephrotoxins used in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation only radiation and busulfan were found to be risk factors for bone marrow transplant nephropathy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The adipocyte component of bone marrow in heterotopic bone induced by demineralized incisor grafts The adipocyte component of bone marrow in heterotopic bone induced by demineralized incisor grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof H. Włodarski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The relative proportion of adipocytes to hematopoietic elements in the marrow of heterotopically
    induced bone evaluated 4–42 weeks post implantation of demineralized murine incisors was estimated by histological
    analysis of hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections. Using computerized image analysis of microphotographs,
    the proportion of nuclear cells vs. adipocytes was ascertained. The percentage of adipocytes in marrow
    increases over time. Such an effect, the replacement of myelopoietic marrow by adipogenic (yellow marrow
    and the resorption of induced bone, is observed in human osteoporosis. A decline in the non-adipogenic cell
    compartments of bone marrow accompanying induced bone begins in the fourth week of induction, gradually
    progresses until the 26th week, and does not change after that. The luminosity, a parameter used in image analysis
    and proportional to the number of nuclear cells, was 124 ± 3 in hematopoietic femoral bone marrow, and
    that of bone marrow of the induced bone was of a similar value (117 ± 8 in the fourth week. An evident decline
    in luminosity of bone marrow filling the foci of heterotopic bone was observed in samples taken at nine weeks
    (82 ± 20. This process progressed until the 26th week, reaching a luminosity of 70 ± 21. At the 42nd week, the
    luminosity remained at the same level (71 ± 27. This indicates that the replacement of hematopoietic bone
    marrow of heterotopically induced bone by unilocular adipocytes begins relatively early (the fourth week and is
    persistent.The relative proportion of adipocytes to hematopoietic elements in the marrow of heterotopically
    induced bone evaluated 4–42 weeks post implantation of demineralized murine incisors was estimated by histological
    analysis of hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections. Using computerized image analysis of microphotographs,
    the proportion of nuclear cells vs

  16. The role of bone marrow-derived cells during the bone healing process in the GFP mouse bone marrow transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Katase, Naoki; Buery, Rosario Rivera; Tamamura, Ryo; Ito, Satoshi; Takagi, Shin; Iida, Seiji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Bone healing is a complex and multistep process in which the origin of the cells participating in bone repair is still unknown. The involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in tissue repair has been the subject of recent studies. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells in bone healing were traced using the GFP bone marrow transplantation model. Bone marrow cells from C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) were transplanted into C57BL/6 J wild mice. After transplantation, bone injury was created using a 1.0-mm drill. Bone healing was histologically assessed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperative days. Immunohistochemistry for GFP; double-fluorescent immunohistochemistry for GFP-F4/80, GFP-CD34, and GFP-osteocalcin; and double-staining for GFP and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were performed. Bone marrow transplantation successfully replaced the hematopoietic cells into GFP-positive donor cells. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that osteoblasts or osteocytes in the repair stage were GFP-negative, whereas osteoclasts in the repair and remodeling stages and hematopoietic cells were GFP-positive. The results indicated that bone marrow-derived cells might not differentiate into osteoblasts. The role of bone marrow-derived cells might be limited to adjustment of the microenvironment by differentiating into inflammatory cells, osteoclasts, or endothelial cells in immature blood vessels.

  17. MORPHOMETRY, DENSITOMETRY AND PATTERN-ANALYSIS OF PLASTIC-EMBEDDED HISTOLOGIC MATERIAL FROM UROTHELIAL CELL-CARCINOMA OF THE BLADDER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPOEL, HG; BOON, ME; KOK, LP; VANDERMEULEN, EA; VANCAUBERGH, RD; DEBRUIJN, WC; DEBRUYNE, FMJ

    1991-01-01

    An image analysis method of grading histologic sections of bladder carcinoma was tested. The method was new in four respects. First, fixation of the biopsies a coagulant fixative was used. Second, 2-mu-m plastic sections were used to ensure the reproductibility of nuclear imaging. Third, a new stere

  18. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte adhesi

  19. Recovery of neurological function of ischemic stroke by application of conditioned medium of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived from normal and cerebral ischemia rats

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) release bioactive factors and provide neuroprotection for CNS injury. However, it remains elusive whether BM-MSC derived from healthy donors or stroke patients provides equal therapeutic potential. The present work aims to characterize BM-MSC prepared from normal healthy rats (NormBM-MSC) and cerebral ischemia rats (IschBM-MSC), and examine the effects of their conditioned medium (C...

  20. In vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Rauh, Juliane; Bünger, Cody;

    2016-01-01

    BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, provide an excellent source of progenitor cells for regenerative therapy. To assess whether osteoarthritis (OA) affects the regenerative potential of BMSCs we compared the proliferation and differentiation potential as well......-forming-units of fibroblastsmax (CFU-F) assay. Differentiation assays included immunohistology, cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteogenic, chondrogenic as well as adipogenic marker gene qRT-PCR. Expression of BMSC-associated surface markers was analyzed using flow cytometry. No significant intergroup...... differences were observed concerning the proliferation potential, cell-specific ALP activity as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation marker gene expressions. Interestingly, SOX9 gene expression levels were significantly increased in OA-BMSCs after 14days of chondrogenic stimulation (p

  1. EXPRESSION OF rhBMP—7 GENE IN TRANSDUCED BONE MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德宇; 杜靖远

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To explore the possibility of expression of exogenous gene in transduced bone marrow derived stromal cells(BMSCs).Methods:The marker gene,pbLacZ,was transferred into cultured BMSCs and the expression of transduced gene by x-gal staining was examined.Then plasmid pcDNA3-rhBMP7 was delivered to cultured BMSCs.Through immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR assay,the expression of rhBMP7 gene was detected.Results:The exogenous gene could be expressed efficiently in transduced BMSCs.Conculsion:The present study provided a theoretical basis to gene therapy on the problems of bone and cartilage tissue.

  2. Isolation and Culture of Rabbit Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Ming ZHANG; Lin CAI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Repair of tissues like bone, cartilage, muscle,etc., is a tough problem in clinical treatment. The recent research show that there are plenty of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in myeloid tissue besides hemopoietic stem cells(HSCs). Just as the pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell can give bone marrow tissue excellent hemopoietic ability and maintain the metabolism of, MSCs can give potential repair ability to bone, cartilage tissue injury[1] . But compared with the HSCs, the content of MSCs in myeloid tissue are not abundant. We separated and purified the MSCs from myeloid tissue through in vitro cell culture,and studied the proliferation and growth characteristics under in vitro culture conditions, providing experimental foundations for further research on repair epiphyseal plate cartilage defect through MSCs tissue engineering.

  3. Characterization of stroma-dependent blast colony-forming cells in human marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, M.Y.; Dowding, C.R.; Riley, G.P.; Greaves, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Human bone marrow contains a population of haemopoietic progenitor cells that can be distinguished by their ability to adhere to preformed stromal layers (cultured in the presence of methylprednisolone (MP/sup +/) and form blast cell colonies. The stromal layers function in the colony assay after they have been heavily irradiated but not after they have been passaged. The binding of the progenitor cells to the stromal cells is complete after 2 hours of coincubation, and stromal layers of 9.6 cm/sup 2/ can provide adhesion sites for at least 2000 blast colony-forming cells. The blast colony-forming cells were shown by micromanipulation to self-renew as well as the give rise to multipotential and lineage-committed colony-forming progenitor cells.

  4. Archival Bone Marrow Samples: Suitable for Multiple Biomarker Analysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, A. Laeya; Wesolowska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole...... biopsies from 18 Danish and Norwegian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were included and compared with corresponding blood samples. Samples were grouped according to the age of sample and whether WGA was performed or not. We found that measurements of DNA concentration after DNA extraction...

  5. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role...

  6. Tuberculosis in pediatric oncology and bone marrow transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andrea T; Airewele, Gladstone; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    Five children with malignancies (3 hematologic, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 hepatoblastoma) and one bone marrow transplant patient were treated for tuberculosis over a 30-year period. Three had pulmonary disease, 3 disseminated tuberculosis, and 1 had scrofula. Four of five had positive tuberculin skin tests, cultures were positive in 5/6 children. One child died of disseminated TB after engraftment, and one child had hepatotoxicity likely related to tuberculosis therapy. All cases were potentially preventable had they been screened due to established risk factors of foreign birth (4/6) or parental foreign birth (2/6). All children should be screened for latent tuberculosis before chemotherapy.

  7. Contribution of bone marrow derived cells to pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Scarlett

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a complex, aggressive and heterogeneous malignancy driven by the multifaceted interactions within the tumor microenvironment. While it is known that the tumor microenvironment accommodates many cell types, each playing a key role in tumorigenesis, the major source of these stromal cells is not well understood. This review examines the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC to pancreatic carcinogenesis, with respect to their role in constituting the tumor microenvironment. In particular, their role in supporting fibrosis, immunosuppression and neovascularisation will be discussed.

  8. Mouse bone marrow cytogenetic damage produced by residues of tequila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Bujaidar, E; Rojas, A; Ramos, A; Rosas, E; Díaz Barriga-Arceo, S

    1990-06-01

    Five concentrations (50-860 mg/kg) of residues obtained after distillation and lyophilization of commercial tequila were injected into mice for evaluation of chromosome aberrations, sister-chromatid exchanges, and proliferation kinetics in mouse bone marrow cells. Appropriate positive and negative controls were included. Our results showed significant dose-related increases of chromosomal aberrations starting at 50 mg/kg and for sister-chromatid exchanges at 430 mg/kg. Cellular proliferation kinetics showed no alterations. With these data we demonstrated that the residues of tequila are genotoxic in vivo.

  9. A calibrated human PBPK model for benzene inhalation with urinary bladder and bone marrow compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of benzene inhalation based on a recent mouse model was adapted to include bone marrow (target organ) and urinary bladder compartments. Empirical data on human liver microsomal protein levels and linked CYP2E1 activities were incorporated into the model, and metabolite-specific conversion rate parameters were estimated by fitting to human biomonitoring data and adjusting for background levels of urinary metabolites. Human studies of benzene levels in blood and breath, and phenol levels in urine were used to validate the rate of human conversion of benzene to benzene oxide, and urinary benzene metabolites from Chinese benzene worker populations provided model validation for rates of human conversion of benzene to muconic acid (MA) and phenylmercapturic acid (PMA), phenol (PH), catechol (CA), hydroquinone (HQ), and benzenetriol (BT). The calibrated human model reveals that while liver microsomal protein and CYP2E1 activities are lower on average in humans compared to mice, the mouse also shows far lower rates of benzene conversion to MA and PMA, and far higher conversion of benzene to BO/PH, and of BO/PH to CA, HQ, and BT. The model also differed substantially from existing human PBPK models with respect to several metabolic rate parameters of importance to interpreting benzene metabolism and health risks in human populations associated with bone marrow doses. The model provides a new methodological paradigm focused on integrating linked human liver metabolism data and calibration using biomonitoring data, thus allowing for model uncertainty analysis and more rigorous validation. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Sex Differences and Bone Metastases of Breast, Lung, and Prostate Cancers: Do Bone Homing Cancers Favor Feminized Bone Marrow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Farach-Carson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sex-associated differences in bone metastasis formation from breast, lung, and prostate cancer exist in clinical studies, but have not been systematically reviewed. Differences in the bone marrow niche can be attributed to sexual dimorphism, to genetic variations that affect sex hormone levels, or to the direct effects of sex hormones, natural or exogenously delivered. This review describes the present understanding of sex-associated and sex hormone level differences in the marrow niche and in formation of bone metastasis during the transition of these three cancers from treatable disease to an often untreatable, lethal metastatic one. Our purpose is to provide insight into some underlying molecular mechanisms for hormonal influence in bone metastasis formation, and to the potential influence of sexual dimorphism, genetic differences affecting sex assignment, and sex hormone level differences on the bone niche and its favorability for metastasis formation. We reviewed publications in PubMed and EMBASE, including full length manuscripts, case reports, and clinical studies of relevance to our topic. We focused on bone metastasis formation in breast, lung, and prostate cancer because all three commonly present with bone metastases. Several clear observations emerged. For breast cancer bone metastasis formation, estrogen receptor (ER signaling pathways indicate a role for ER beta (ERβ. Estrogen influences the bone microenvironment, creating and conditioning a favorable niche for colonization and breast cancer progression. For lung cancer, studies support the hypothesis that females have a more favorable bone microenvironment for metastasis formation. For prostate cancer, a decrease in the relative androgen to estrogen balance or a “feminization” of bone marrow favors bone metastasis formation, with a potentially important role for ERβ that may be similar to that in breast cancer. Long-term estrogen administration or androgen blockade in males

  11. Targeted bone marrow irradiation in the conditioning of high-risk leukaemia prior to stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N.; Buchmann, I.; Seitz, U.; Glatting, G.; Neumaier, B.; Kotzerke, J.; Buck, A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin; Bunjes, D.; Doehner, H. [Abteilung Innere Medizin III, Haematologie und Onkologie, Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany); Martin, H.; Bergmann, L. [Klinik fuer Haematologie und Onkologie, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Disease recurrence following stem cell transplantation (SCT) remains a major problem. Despite the sensitivity of leukaemias to chemotherapy and irradiation, conventional conditioning before SCT is limited by significant organ toxicity. Targeted irradiation of bone marrow and spleen by radioimmunotherapy may provide considerable dose escalation, with limited toxicity to non-target organs. In this study, 27 patients with high-risk or relapsing leukaemia were treated with rhenium-188-labelled CD66a,b,c,e radioimmunoconjugates ({sup 188}Re-mAb) specific for normal bone marrow in addition to conventional conditioning with high-dose chemotherapy and 12 Gy total body irradiation prior to SCT. A mean activity of 10.2{+-}2.1 (range 6.9-15.8) GBq {sup 188}Re-mAb was administered intravenously. Acute side-effects were assessed according to the CTC classification and patient outcome was determined. Mean radiation doses (Gy; range in parentheses) to relevant organs and whole body were as follows: 13.1 (6.5-22) to bone marrow, 11.6 (1.7-31.1) to spleen, 5.0 (2.0-11.7) to liver, 7.0 (2.3-11.6) to kidneys, 0.7 (0.3-1.3) to lungs and 1.4 (0.8-2.1) to the whole body. Stem cells engrafted in all patients within 9-18 days post SCT. Acute organ toxicity of grade II or less was observed. During follow-up for 25.4{+-}5.3 (range 18-34) months, 4/27 (15%) patients died from relapse, and 9/27 (33%) from transplantation-related complications. Fourteen patients (52%) are still alive and in ongoing complete clinical remission. Radioimmunotherapy with the bone marrow-seeking {sup 188}Re-labelled CD66 mAb can double the dose to bone marrow and spleen without undue extramedullary acute organ toxicity, when given in addition to high-dose chemotherapy and 12 Gy TBI before allogeneic SCT. This intensified conditioning regimen may reduce the relapse rate of high-risk leukaemia. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of clival marrow in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Nishimura, Gen; Yamato, Minoru; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa [Dokkyo Univ. School of Medicine, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    Hematological abnormalities, commonly associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, are thought to be the results of serous atrophy in the bone marrow. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been utilized to ascertain T1 and T2 prolongation of marrow intensity in the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femora. The results correlate well with the severity of hematological abnormalities and body mass index. More importantly, the propensity for peripheral marrow involvement of T2 prolongation contrasts with the axial involvement in other marrow disorders. MRI undertaken in patients with AN to exclude hypothalamic tumor showed that the clival marrow was equivalent to the peripheral marrow. The signal pattern of clival marrow on sagittal T1 weighted MR images was evaluated in four teen-age female patients with AN complicated by hematological abnormalities. Although the clival marrow intensity should be uniformly high in teen-agers, three patients, two with pancytopenia and one with leukopenia and anemia, exhibited homogenous low intensity. One patient who had leukopenia only and the highest body mass index, showed inhomogeneous low intensity. The signal changes returned to normal in all patients but one, who died before examination after 6-11 months, at which time the others had almost recovered their original weight and normal hemogram. T1 prolongation in the clival marrow represents bone marrow dysfunction and the inhomogeneity of the signal change may imply relative preservation of hematopoiesis and body fat composition. Lack of knowledge of this phenomenon may lead to diagnostic confusion with other marrow disorders on cranial MRI. (author).

  13. Characterization of age-related gene expression profiling in bone marrow and epididymal adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno Masami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While an increase in bone marrow adiposity is associated with age-related bone disease, the function of bone marrow adipocytes has not been studied. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the age-related gene expression profiles in bone marrow adipocytes and epididymal adipocytes. Results A total of 3918 (13.7% genes were differentially expressed in bone marrow adipocytes compared to epididymal adipocytes. Bone marrow adipocytes revealed a distinct gene profile with low expression of adipocyte-specific genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4, perilipin (Plin1, adipsin (CFD and high expression of genes associated with early adipocyte differentiation (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ, regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2. In addition, a number of genes including secreted frizzled related protein 4 (SFRP4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, transforming growth factor beta 1(TGFβ1, G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A and interleukin 6 (IL-6, that could affect adipose-derived signaling to bone are markedly increased in bone marrow adipocytes. Age had a substantial effect on genes associated with mitochondria function and inflammation in bone marrow adipocytes. Twenty seven genes were significantly changed with age in both adipocyte depots. Among these genes, IL6 and GPR109A were significantly reduced with age in both adipocyte depots. Conclusions Overall, gene profiling reveals a unique phenotype for primary bone marrow adipocytes characterized by low adipose-specific gene expression and high expression of inflammatory response genes. Bone marrow and epididymal adipocytes share a common pathway in response to aging in mice, but age has a greater impact on global gene expression in epididymal than in bone marrow adipocytes. Genes that are differentially expressed at greater levels in the bone marrow are highly regulated with age.

  14. Evaluation of vertebral bone marrow fat content by chemical-shift MRI in osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Mutlu, Fatma Senturk; Yazici, Zeynep; Yildirim, Nalan [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    To quantitatively evaluate vertebral bone marrow fat content and investigate its association with osteoporosis with chemical-shift magnetic resonance imaging (CS-MRI). Fifty-six female patients (age range 50-65 years) with varying bone mineral densities as documented with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were prospectively included in the study. According to the DXA results, the patients were grouped as normal bone density, osteopenic, or osteoporotic. In order to calculate fat content, the lumbar region was visualized in the sagittal plane by CS-MRI sequence. ''Region of interest'' (ROI)s were placed within L3 vertebral bodies and air (our reference point) at different time points by different radiologists. Fat content was calculated through ''signal intensity (SI) suppression rate'' and ''SI Index''. The quantitative values were compared statistically with those obtained from DXA examinations. Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for comparisons between groups. The reliability of the measurements performed by two radiologists was evaluated with the ''intraclass correlation coefficient''. This study was approved by an institutional review board and all participants provided informed consent to participate in the study. Eighteen subjects with normal bone density (mean T score, 0.39 {+-} 1.3 [standard deviation]), 20 subjects with osteopenia (mean T score, -1.79 {+-} 0.38), and 18 subjects with osteoporosis (mean T score, -3 {+-} 0.5) were determined according to DXA results. The median age was 55.9 (age range 50-64 years) in the normal group, 55.5 (age range 50-64 years) in the osteopenic group, and 55.1 (age range 50-65 years) in the osteoporotic group (p = 0.872). In the CS-MRI examination, the values of ''SI suppression ratio'' and ''SI Index'' (median [min:max]) were calculated by the first and second reader, independently. There

  15. Bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from unrelated and sibling donors: single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparelli, T; Van Lint, M T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Barbanti, M; Sacchi, N; Ficai, G; Ghinatti, C; Ferrara, G B; Delfino, L; Pozzi, S; Morabito, A; Zikos, P; Vitale, V; Corvo, R; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A

    1997-12-01

    = 0.7). This study suggests that survival of CML patients after marrow transplantation from unrelated or sibling donors is currently similar, provided the former are well matched. The increased incidence of GVHD in MUD patients is possibly compensated by a lower risk of relapse.

  16. Stromal cells from human long-term marrow cultures, but not cultured marrow fibroblasts, phagocytose horse serum constituents: studies with a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a species-specific epitope common to multiple horse serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbord, P; Tippens, D; Wight, T S; Gown, A M; Singer, J W

    1987-01-01

    This report describes an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody derived after immunization of mice with washed stromal cells from human, long-term bone marrow cultures. The antigen recognized by the antibody (BMS-1) is a carbohydrate-containing prosthetic group that is common to and specific for multiple horse serum proteins. These proteins are avidly ingested by stromal cells and concentrated in endocytic vesicles. Cultured smooth muscle cells took up the horse proteins in a similar manner to marrow stromal cells while cultured marrow fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and hepatoma cells did not. These data indicate that marrow stromal cells specifically accumulate horse serum proteins which might partially explain the horse serum requirement for long-term marrow culture maintenance. The data also suggest further similarities between marrow stromal and smooth muscle cells and additional differences between marrow fibroblasts and marrow stromal cells.

  17. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  18. New approaches to graft engineering for haploidentical bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handgretinger, Rupert

    2012-12-01

    Haploidentical transplantation opens the possibility to offer this treatment to a large number of patients with an otherwise incurable disease, such as some hematologic or oncologic malignancies, inborn or acquired bone marrow failure syndromes, hemoglobinopathies, immunodeficiencies, or other genetic diseases. Initial attempts at haploidentical transplantation using unmanipulated bone marrow were associated with a high transplant-related mortality. However, recent insights into the biology of haploidentical transplantation, the availability of effective in vivo large-scale graft-manipulation technology, and improved supportive care strategies have led to and are still leading to significantly better outcomes compared to previous decades. Methods for the in vitro depletion of T lymphocytes from mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) have facilitated the wider use and acceptance of haploidentical transplantation in children and adult patients. Besides in vitro T-cell depletion techniques, other methods, such as the isolation of alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells, virus-specific T lymphocytes, and other effector or regulatory cells are nowadays available to rapidly rebuild the immune system after haploidentical transplantation for the prevention of severe infections or relapses of the underlying diseases.

  19. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following an Iliac Bone Marrow Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen-Nafarrate, Edmundo; Vega-Najera, Carlos; Leal-Contreras, Carlos; Leal-Berumen, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is a condition characterized by a raised hydraulic pressure within a closed and non expandable anatomical space. It leads to a vascular insufficiency that becomes critical once the vascular flow cannot return the fluids back to the venous system. This causes a potential irreversible damage of the contents of the compartment, especially within the muscle tissues. Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) secondary to hematomas is seldom reported. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old patient with history of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent a bone marrow aspiration from the posterior iliac crest that had excessive bleeding at the puncture zone. The patient complained of increasing pain, tenderness, and buttock swelling. Intraoperative pressure validation of the gluteal compartment was performed, and a GCS was diagnosed. The patient was treated with a gluteal region fasciotomy. The patient recovered from pain and swelling and was discharged shortly after from the hospital. We believe clotting and hematologic disorders are a primary risk factor in patients who require bone marrow aspirations or biopsies. It is important to improve awareness of GCS in order to achieve early diagnosis, avoid complications, and have a better prognosis.

  20. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J

    2016-12-21

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  2. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following an Iliac Bone Marrow Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Berumen-Nafarrate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The compartment syndrome is a condition characterized by a raised hydraulic pressure within a closed and non expandable anatomical space. It leads to a vascular insufficiency that becomes critical once the vascular flow cannot return the fluids back to the venous system. This causes a potential irreversible damage of the contents of the compartment, especially within the muscle tissues. Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS secondary to hematomas is seldom reported. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old patient with history of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent a bone marrow aspiration from the posterior iliac crest that had excessive bleeding at the puncture zone. The patient complained of increasing pain, tenderness, and buttock swelling. Intraoperative pressure validation of the gluteal compartment was performed, and a GCS was diagnosed. The patient was treated with a gluteal region fasciotomy. The patient recovered from pain and swelling and was discharged shortly after from the hospital. We believe clotting and hematologic disorders are a primary risk factor in patients who require bone marrow aspirations or biopsies. It is important to improve awareness of GCS in order to achieve early diagnosis, avoid complications, and have a better prognosis.

  3. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  4. Development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; PENG Li-pan; WU Nan; LI Le-ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the in vitro development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture (BM-MSC).Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms were “bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell" and "cell culture".Study selection Articles regarding the in vitro development of BM-MSCs culture,as well as the challenge of optimizing cell culture environment in two-dimensional (2D) vs.3D.Results Improving the culture conditions increases the proliferation and reduces the differentiation.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenging,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and large-volume production systems.Conclusions Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenges,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and scale-up to large-volume production systems.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.

  5. Gluteal Compartment Syndrome following an Iliac Bone Marrow Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Najera, Carlos; Leal-Contreras, Carlos; Leal-Berumen, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is a condition characterized by a raised hydraulic pressure within a closed and non expandable anatomical space. It leads to a vascular insufficiency that becomes critical once the vascular flow cannot return the fluids back to the venous system. This causes a potential irreversible damage of the contents of the compartment, especially within the muscle tissues. Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) secondary to hematomas is seldom reported. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old patient with history of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent a bone marrow aspiration from the posterior iliac crest that had excessive bleeding at the puncture zone. The patient complained of increasing pain, tenderness, and buttock swelling. Intraoperative pressure validation of the gluteal compartment was performed, and a GCS was diagnosed. The patient was treated with a gluteal region fasciotomy. The patient recovered from pain and swelling and was discharged shortly after from the hospital. We believe clotting and hematologic disorders are a primary risk factor in patients who require bone marrow aspirations or biopsies. It is important to improve awareness of GCS in order to achieve early diagnosis, avoid complications, and have a better prognosis. PMID:24392235

  6. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Jan; Köller, Manfred; Godry, Holger; Schildhauer, Thomas Armin; Seybold, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect of 82.4 mm and concomitant risk factors (nicotine abuse, soft-tissue defects, obesity and/or circulatory disorders) were treated with a modified Ilizarov external frame using an intramedullary cable transportation system. At the end of the distraction phase, each patient was treated with a percutaneously injection of autologous BMAC into the centre of the regenerate. The concentration factor was analysed using flow cytometry. The mean follow up after frame removal was 10 (4-15) months. With a mean healing index (HI) of 36.9 d/cm, bony consolidation of the regenerate was achieved in all eight cases. The mean concentration factor of the bone marrow aspirate was 4.6 (SD 1.23). No further operations concerning the regenerate were needed and no adverse effects were observed with the BMAC procedure. This procedure can be used for augmentation of the regenerate in cases of segmental bone transport. Further studies with a larger number of patients and control groups are needed to evaluate a possible higher success rate and accelerating effects on regenerate healing.

  7. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Jun, Jeong Su; Park, Chang Suk; Kim, Yong Sik; Kwon, Soon Yong; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Chun Choo [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To retrospectively review findings of osteonecrosis of the femoral head after bone marrow transplantation. We reviewed the clinical and MR findings of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in 23 of 1112 patients who underwent marrow transplantation during a five-year follow-up period lasting from 1996 to 2000. Mean age at the time of diagnosis was 31 (range, 20-47) years, and the mean time from transplant to diagnosis was 17 months. All patients developed variable graft-versus-host disease and seventeen were treated with high-dose prednisolone and/or cysclosporin for severe acute or extensive chronic graft versus host disease. Osteonecrosis was diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which allowed early detection of disease assessment of its stage. At the time of diagnosis, 15 hips were at stage I, 28 at stage II, two at stage III, and none at stage IV, according to the international ARCO classification system. Osteonecrosis of femoral diaphyses, the lower lumbar spine, or pelvic bones in the MR field was also found to have occurred in 11 patients. Initial treatment was conservative: 21 hips underwent surgery [core decompression (n=10), vascularized fibular bone graft (n=5), and joint replacement (n=6)]. In patients receiving high-dose steroids for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease, MR screening might help detect osteonecrosis at an early stage.

  8. Entonox as a sedative for bone marrow aspiration and biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudgin, E J; Besser, M W; Craig, J I O

    2008-02-01

    Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy can be a painful procedure. Sedation techniques may make this investigation more acceptable to patients, but have the potential to cause life-threatening complications, as well as requiring additional staff and equipment for safe administration. We assessed the use of Entonox, a 50 : 50 mix of nitrous oxide and oxygen, as a sedation and analgesic agent, and compared it to previous experience with the intravenous (i.v.) benzodiazepine midazolam. Patients' perception of pain, and both the operator and patient's views on the ease of the procedure and safety factors were recorded. Twenty-two patients who had previously required i.v. midazolam sedation (16), or who requested sedation (6) were studied. Fifteen of 16 (94%) found Entonox better or equal to midazolam, and only one patient (6%) found it worse. There were no serious adverse events due to Entonox. We have shown, in this small group of patients, that Entonox is an effective, safe alternative to intravenous midazolam for sedation during bone marrow biopsy, and is considered acceptable by both patients and staff. It has the major advantage that no additional staff or facilities are required for safe administration or monitoring the patient during or after the procedure.

  9. Mixed chimerism renders residual host dendritic cells incapable of alloimmunization of the marrow donor in the canine model of allogeneic marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Steven L; Graves, Scott S; Higginbotham, Deborah A; Storb, Rainer

    2015-10-02

    This study tested whether an alloimmune response can occur in the marrow donor when infused or injected with leukocytes from their mixed chimeric transplant recipient. Two mixed chimeras were produced after conditioning with three Gray total body irradiation, donor marrow infusion, and post-grafting immunosuppression. The marrow donors were then repeatedly infused and injected with leukocytes from their respective chimeric recipient. A donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) into their mixed chimeras had no effect, even after the experiments were repeated. The presence of blood dendritic cells (DCs) of recipient origin was confirmed in chimeric recipients, as well as the presence of microchimerism in the marrow donors. Donor sensitization did occur following placement of a recipient skin graft that was confirmed following DLI into recipients that changed the mixed chimeras into full donor chimeras. These observations suggest that mixed chimerism renders recipient peripheral blood DCs incapable of inducing a donor T cell response.

  10. Ex vivo expansion of Primate CD34+ Cells isolated from Bone Marrow and Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells using a Novel Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaprasad D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived CD34+ cells have been in clinical application in patients with haematological malignancies. One of the major problems with this treatment is the non-availability of matched donors or the necessity of multiple transfusions depending upon the pathology. Recently evidences have been accumulating to prove the safety and efficacy of autologous CD34+ cells in diseases such as myocardial dysfunction, peripheral vascular diseases and neurological certain conditions. However there are only a few reports in the literature on ex vivo expansion of the bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. We have in two different studies proven that isolated CD34+ cells from baboon bone marrow and non-isolated BMMNCs from human bone marrow could be expanded with increase in percentage of CD34+ cells using a novel scaffold.

  11. MicroRNA profiling in human neutrophils during bone marrow granulopoiesis and in vivo exudation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maria T; Hother, Christoffer; Häger, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of neutrophils and their precursors from the initiation of granulopoiesis in the bone marrow to extravasation and accumulation in skin windows. We analyzed three different cell populations from human bone marrow, p...

  12. Increased bone marrow adiposity in a context of energy deficit: the tip of the iceberg?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Ghali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elevated bone marrow adiposity is defined as an increase in the proportion of the bone marrow cavity volume occupied by adipocytes. This can be caused by an increase in the size and/or number of adipocytes. Bone marrow adiposity increases with age in a bone-site-specific manner. This increase may be linked to certain pathophysiological situations. Osteoporosis or compromised bone quality is frequently associated with high bone marrow adiposity. The involvement of bone marrow adipocytes in bone loss may be due to commitment of mesenchymal stem cells to the adipogenic pathway rather than the osteogenic pathway. However, adipocytes may also act on their microenvironment by secreting factors with harmful effects for the bone health. Here, we review evidence that in a context of energy deficit (such as anorexia nervosa and restriction rodent models bone alterations can occur in the absence of an increase in bone marrow adiposity. In severe cases, bone alterations are even associated with gelatinous bone marrow transformation. The relationship between bone marrow adiposity and energy deficit, and the potential regulators of this adiposity in this context are also discussed. On the basis of clinical studies and preliminary results on animal model we propose that competition between differentiation into osteoblasts and differentiation into adipocytes might trigger bone loss at least in moderate-to severe anorexia nervosa and in some calorie restriction models. Finally, some of the main questions resulting from this hypothesis are discussed.

  13. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  14. Bone marrow-targeted liposomal carriers: a feasibility study in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Keitaro; Goins, Beth; Leland, Michelle M; Tsuchida, Eishun; Phillips, William T

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described a novel surface-modified lipid vesicle formulation (liposome) that had very high targeting to bone marrow in normal rabbits. Because the bone marrow is the site of hematopoiesis, bone marrow-targeted drug-delivery systems have many potential applications. In this study we investigated whether these bone marrow-targeted vesicles are also similarly effective for bone marrow targeting in rhesus monkeys, a primate animal model that is more relevant to humans. The preformed vesicles encapsulating 30 mM glutathione were labeled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) for scintigraphic imaging. The vesicles were 216 +/- 21 nm in diameter with a negative surface charge composed of DPPC, cholesterol, anionic amphiphile and poly(ethylene glycol)-DSPE (1:1:0.2:0.013 molar ratio). The whole-body images of rhesus monkeys receiving intravenous (99m)Tc vesicles revealed high uptake of the (99m)Tc vesicles in bone marrow. Based on image analysis, we estimated that approximately 70% of the injected dose of the (99m)Tc vesicles was taken up by the bone marrow. This finding increases the feasibility of using this bone marrow-specific drug-delivery system for clinical applications.

  15. B cell-autonomous somatic mutation deficit following bone marrow transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The bone marrow is the major haematopoietic organ and is critically involved in the production of all formed blood elements in postnatal life. The bone marrow contains rapidly dividing cells and therefore is sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In certain types of cancers where a high dose of radiation

  16. Flow perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in titanium fiber mesh.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolder, J. van den; Bancroft, G.N.; Sikavitsas, V.I.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two cell culture techniques, static and flow perfusion, on the osteogenic expression of rat bone marrow cells seeded into titanium fiber mesh for a period up to 16 days. A cell suspension of rat bone marrow stromal osteoblasts (5 x 10(5) cell

  17. 2012478 Biological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and JAK2 mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田竑

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the biological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMSCs) and detect JAK2 mutation in BMSCs from myeloproliferative neoplasms(MPN) patients. Methods JAK2 V617F mutation and exon 12 mutation in 70 MPN patients’ blood or bone marrow samples were detected.

  18. Bone marrow stroma in idiopathic myelofibrosis and other haematological diseases. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I; Hasselbalch, H; Junker, P

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 patients with haematological diseases, mainly idiopathic myelofibrosis (n = 8) and related chronic myeloproliferative disorders (n = 14). The bone marrow from patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis and some CML patients showed marked...... and capillarization, with the development of continuous sheets of basement membrane material beneath endothelial cells....

  19. Knowledge and attitude of Lublin universities students' toward the opportunity of becoming unrelated bone marrow donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Agnieszka; Wiorkowski, Krzysztof; Szara, Paulina; Drabko, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a very important life-saving procedure to treat many disorders. In August 2014, there were more than 24.5 million donor registered in the Worldwide Bone Marrow Donor Register. In the Polish Register of Unrelated Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Blood Donors at the end of 2013 there were almost 540 thousand registered bone marrow donors. Despite increasing numbers of registered donors, the amount of requests also increased. It shows that the number of donors is still insufficient. The analysis of knowledge and attitude of Lublin universities students' toward the opportunity to become an unrelated bone marrow donor was the aim of our study. 1609 Lublin students from non-medical universities from different years and specializations of study, of both sexes, aged 19-35 took part in the survey. It consisted of 16 questions. There were knowledge-testing questions, and also personal ones. Among interviewees, 16% were registered as potential bone marrow donors. The reason for not being registered registration chosen most often was that the surveyed did not take this into consideration. Correct answers to all of the questions were given by 21% of students. The biggest number of incorrect answers was given to the question about a place from bone marrow is harvested - nearly 49%. Registered students showed a better level of knowledge than the unregistered. We noted a low level of knowledge about bone marrow donation and possibility of becoming potential bone marrow donor among Lublin universities students.

  20. Comparison of non-invasive approaches to red marrow dosimetry for radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaizier, M.A.B.D. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Roos, J.C. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Teule, G.J.J. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Dieren, E.B. van (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Hollander, W. den (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Haisma, H.J. (Dept. of Medical Oncology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); DeJager, R.L. (Organon Teknika Corp., Biotechnology Research Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)); Lingen, A. van (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-03-01

    We compared four approaches to analyse the differences in calculated red marrow doses. The data were obtained from immunoscintigraphy of two antibodies with different red marrow kinetics [iodine-131-16.88 IgM and indium-111-OV-TL-3 F(ab')[sub 2

  1. [The influence of fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) on cardiomyocytes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow ex vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanok, E S; Kvacheva, Z B; Pinchuk, S V; Volk, M V; Mezhevkina, L M; Fesenko, E E; Volotovski, I D

    2014-01-01

    The influence of FGF2 on the efficiency of cardiomyocytes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) of bone marrow induced by 5-azacetidine (5-aza) was studied. The effect of FGF2 developing by the 14th day after the combined action of a differentiating agent and growth factor was manifested in an increase in Mef2A, Mef2D and gene transcription and a rise of ionized Ca2+ concentration in cytoplasm keeping cell viability and proliferation activity. In the presence of FGF2 this approach provided cardiomyogenesis and the increase in the formation of early precursors of cardiomyocytes.

  2.  Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip/Bone Marrow Edema Syndrome with Soft Tissue Involvement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad A. Al-Tanni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH is a rare condition mainly affecting pregnant women in their third trimester and middle aged men. We report a case of TOH/Bone marrow edema syndrome in pregnancy with involvement of the surrounding soft tissues on magnetic resonance image, which has not been previously reported. The presence of such edema in the soft tissues may help to differentiate this condition from early avascular necrosis of the hip, and may also provide an insight into the pathogenesis of the condition. The reported patient was treated conservatively and fully recovered.

  3. [Method for concentrating marrow stem cells using the IBM 2991 washer. Necessary preparation before in vitro treatment of bone marrow by pharmacologic or immunologic means].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, P; Coffe, C; Peters, A

    1983-04-01

    The technique using the IBM 2991 blood cell processor is an effective technique for the concentration of mononuclear cells from large volumes of bone marrow. The marrow cells are layered on to Ficoll Metrizoate using the IBM processing set. The mononuclear cells and CFU-GM recoveries are in close relationship with the hematocrit of the cell suspension processed. Twenty two bone marrows have been collected and purified according to this protocol. The mononuclear cell recovery is an average of 78,3% (range: 44-92%) and the CFU-GM recovery is in average of 67,5% (range: 40-89%). At the end of the procedure the cell viability is satisfying (97,1% +/- 1,7 are trypan blue negatives). When it is necessary to remove from the bone marrow collected either malignant cells prior autologous bone marrow graft or T lymphocytes in an attempt to prevent GVHD in allogeneic BMT, the purity of marrow cell suspension become a fundamental parameter.

  4. Role of marrow architecture and stromal cells in the recovery process of aplastic marrow of lethally irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy litter mates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, K.; Kagawa, K.; Awai, M.; Irino, S.

    1986-01-01

    Bone marrow aplasia was induced in rats by whole body lethal irradiation (1,000 rads by x-ray), and rats died of irradiation injury within 7 days. Correlative studies at light (LM), transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated swelling of endothelial and reticular cells and hemorrhage due to detachment of sinus endothelial cells on days 1 and 2. With time, structural recovery occurred without hemopoietic recovery. Reticular cells developed small intracytoplasmic lipid droplets on days 3 and 4. This resulted in fatty aplastic marrow within 7 days. On the other hand, in the marrow of irradiated rats parabiosed with healthy mates by aortic anastomosis, hemopoiesis was initiated by adhesion of nucleated blood cells to fine cytoplasmic pseudopods of fat-stored cells on days 1 and 2 after parabiosis. On days 3 to 5, reticular cells with large lipid droplets and fine pseudopods increased, then hemopoietic foci became clear and extensive. On day 8 after parabiosis, the aplastic bone marrow recovered completely both its structure and hemopoietic activity. Thus, hemopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated marrow begins with recovery of vascular endothelial cells, re-establishment of sinusoidal structure, and morphological and functional recoveries of reticular cells from fat-storage cells by releasing intracytoplasmic lipid droplets. Marrow stromal cells, namely reticular, fat-storage and fibroblastoid cells, share a common cellular origin, and regain their structure and function when fat-storage cells and fibroid cells are placed in contact with hemopoietic precursor cells.

  5. Early MR changes in vertebral bone marrow for patients following radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, M; Savu, M; Lungu-Solomonescu, C; Harabagiu, I; Pop, T

    2001-01-01

    Our study aimed to evaluate the vertebral marrow changes in patients following radiotherapy (RT) by measuring the T2 relaxation times before and during RT. We were mostly interested in evaluating early MR marrow changes during RT. Fifteen patients treated by RT for cervical cancer were submitted to MR examination before and during RT (5-23 days of RT). T2 values were calculated for irradiated and non-irradiated tissues (lumbar and sacral vertebral bone marrow, symphysis pubis marrow, and regional muscle). Fourteen patients presented increased T2 values for irradiated vertebral bone marrow (VBM), and 3 patients showed increased T2 values even for non-irradiated VBM. We found T2 variations for VBM as early as in the fifth day of RT for an absorbed dose as small as 9 Gy. Calculated T2 values in irradiated and also in non-irradiated tissues prove very early tissue alterations.

  6. Chitosan-collagen porous scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we successfully constructed a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold in vitro, transplanted either the composite or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells alone into the ischemic area in animal models, and compared their effects. At 14 days after co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the hitosan-collagen scaffold, neurological function recovered noticeably. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and nestin-labeled neural precursor cells were detected in the ischemic area, surrounding tissue, hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Simultaneously, a high level of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and a low level of expression of neuron-specific enolase were visible in BrdU-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These findings suggest that transplantation of a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold has a neuroprotective effect following ischemic stroke.

  7. High-fidelity organic preservation of bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E.; Orr, Patrick J.; Kearns, Stuart L.; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2006-08-01

    Bone marrow in ca. 10 Ma frogs and salamanders from the Miocene of Libros, Spain, represents the first fossilized example of this extremely decay-prone tissue. The bone marrow, preserved in three dimensions as an organic residue, retains the original texture and red and yellow color of hematopoietic and fatty marrow, respectively; moldic osteoclasts and vascular structures are also present. We attribute exceptional preservation of the fossilized bone marrow to cryptic preservation: the bones of the amphibians formed protective microenvironments, and inhibited microbial infiltration. Specimens in which bone marrow is preserved vary in their completeness and articulation and in the extent to which the body outline is preserved as a thin film of organically preserved bacteria. Cryptic preservation of these labile tissues is thus to a large extent independent of, and cannot be predicted by, the taphonomic history of the remainder of the specimen.

  8. Adult Bone Marrow: Which Stem Cells for Cellular Therapy Protocols in Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Wislet-Gendebien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crests (NCSCs might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In this paper, we will review all information available concerning NCSC from adult tissues and their possible use in regenerative medicine. Moreover, as multiple recent studies showed the beneficial effect of bone marrow stromal cells in neurodegenerative diseases, we will discuss which stem cells isolated from adult bone marrow should be more suitable for cell replacement therapy.

  9. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  10. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-jing Zhou; Jian-min Liu; Shu-ming Wei; Yun-hao Zhang; Zhen-hua Qu; Shu-bo Chen

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administrationvia the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve ifbers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and lfuorogold-labeled nerve ifbers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was mark-edly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  11. Chitosan-collagen porous scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yan; Wei Yue; Yue-lin Zhang; Guo-chao Mao; Ke Gao; Zhen-xing Zuo; Ya-jing Zhang; Hui Lu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we successfully constructed a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffoldin vitro, transplanted either the composite or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells alone into the ischemic area in animal models, and compared their effects. At 14 days after co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the hi-tosan-collagen scaffold, neurological function recovered noticeably. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and nestin-labeled neural precursor cells were detected in the ischemic area, surrounding tissue, hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Simultaneously, a high level of expression of glial ifbrillary acidic protein and a low level of expression of neuron-spe-ciifc enolase were visible in BrdU-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These ifndings suggest that transplantation of a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chi-tosan-collagen scaffold has a neuroprotective effect following ischemic stroke.

  12. A comparative study of diazepam levels in bone marrow versus serum, saliva and brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, T; Tomii, S; Terazawa, K; Nagao, M; Kanamori, M; Tomaru, Y

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of diazepam in biological fluids and tissues of rats was examined 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after intraperitoneal administration by using a radioimmunoassay with specific anti-diazepam antibody. The diazepam levels in serum, saliva, brain and bone marrow decreased over a period of 2 h and levelled off 4 h after administration. The diazepam concentration in bone marrow was much higher than in serum, saliva and brain, suggesting an accumulation of diazepam in this tissue. This indicates that bone marrow could be a very useful material for the detection of diazepam in skeletonized remains. The diazepam concentrations in bone marrow, serum, saliva and brain showed a linear relationship (r = 0.860-0.997), indicating that a valid estimate of diazepam concentration in blood can be made from bone marrow samples.

  13. Multilineage potential of stable human mesenchymal stem cell line derived from fetal marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Nagai

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow contains two major cell types, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. MSCs possess self-renewal capacity and pluripotency defined by their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes and muscle cells. MSCs are also known to differentiate into neurons and glial cells in vitro, and in vivo following transplantation into the brain of animal models of neurological disorders including ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH stroke. In order to obtain sufficient number and homogeneous population of human MSCs, we have clonally isolated permanent and stable human MSC lines by transfecting primary cell cultures of fetal human bone marrow MSCs with a retroviral vector encoding v-myc gene. One of the cell lines, HM3.B10 (B10, was found to differentiate into neural cell types including neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in vitro as shown by expression of genetic markers for neural stem cells (nestin and Musashi1, neurons (neurofilament protein, synapsin and MAP2, astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP and oligodendrocytes (myelin basic protein, MBP as determined by RT-PCR assay. In addition, B10 cells were found to differentiate into neural cell types as shown by immunocytochical demonstration of nestin (for neural stem cells, neurofilament protein and beta-tubulin III (neurons GFAP (astrocytes, and galactocerebroside (oligodendrocytes. Following brain transplantation in mouse ICH stroke model, B10 human MSCs integrate into host brain, survive, differentiate into neurons and astrocytes and induce behavioral improvement in the ICH animals. B10 human MSC cell line is not only a useful tool for the studies of organogenesis and specifically for the neurogenesis, but also provides a valuable source of cells for cell therapy studies in animal models of stroke and other neurological disorders.

  14. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Tsai, Nicole [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen J. [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk.

  15. Detection of bone marrow metastases in prostate cancer: Role of trephine biopsy and Immunohistochemistry

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    Manish Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Bone marrow (BM metastases are an integral part of tumor dissemination in many malignancies. Prostate carcinoma, which has high tendency to metastasize to bone, shown to have affinity for endosteal niche as well as tendency to compete with hematopoietic cells to home in BM. This marrow dissemination can be confidently proved by histopathological examination of BM. Aims: In this study, we are trying to detect the presence of metastases and micrometastases in BM of prostate carcinoma patients with the help of immunohistochemical markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA and prostate-specific acid phosphatase and correlate the findings with American Joint Committee on Cancer Tumor, Node and Metastasis 7 th (2010 classification, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason′s score. Materials and Methods: We performed BM examination and hematological workup of 11 known prostate carcinoma patients including metastatic cases also, during our study period of 1 year. The BM biopsy sections and clot sections were used to carry out immunohistochemistry. The data were analyzed by using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 15.0 statistical analysis software. Results: We found that two patients were positive for metastases in BM out of the 11. Both of these patients already had metastases to other site with very high serum PSA levels. Anemia was common hematological alteration in both of them and one of them showed increased osteoblasts in the aspirate film. Conclusion: Taking into account our small sample size and short study duration, we conclude that further large sized future studies with long-term follow-up in to this BM dissemination by prostate cancer cells could open new horizons to understand the biology of metastasis of this common malignancy and also provide more effective therapeutic options as well as prognostic implications in these patients.

  16. BMP4 can generate primordial germ cells from bone-marrow-derived pluripotent stem cells.

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    Shirazi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Abdolvahabi, Mir Abbas; Nayernia, Karim; Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of germ cell derivation from embryonic and somatic stem cells provides an in vitro model for the study of germ cell development, associated epigenetic modification and mammalian gametogenesis. More importantly, in vitro derived gametes also represent a potential strategy for treating infertility. In mammals, male and female gametes, oocyte and sperm, are derived from a specific cell population, PGCs (primordial germ cells) that segregate early in embryogenesis. We have isolated pluripotent SSEA-1+ (stage-specific embryonic antigen-1+) cells from mice bone marrow using a MACS (magnetic-activated cell sorting) system. SSEA-1+ cells were directly separated from the suspension of MMCs (murine mononuclear cells) harvested from bone marrow of 2-4-week-old mice. Flow-cytometry assay immediately after sorting and culturing under undifferentiated condition showed 55±7% and 87±4% purity respectively. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis after differentiation of SSEA-1+ cells into derivations of three germ layers showed the pluripotency properties of isolated cells. SSEA-1+ cells were induced to differentiate along germ cell lineage by adding BMP4 (bone morphogenic factor-4) to the medium. Regarding the expression of germ cell markers (PGCs, male and female germ cell lineage), it was found that adding exogenous BMP4 to culture medium could differentiate pluripotent SSEA-1+ cells isolated from an adult tissue into gamete precursors, PGCs. Differentiated cells expressed specific molecular markers of PGCs, including Oct4, fragilis, Stella and Mvh (mouse vasa homologue). Therefore BMP4 is insufficient to induce SSEA-1+ cells derived from PGCs to develop further into late germ cells in vitro.

  17. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells incorporate into the prostate during regrowth.

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    Veronica R Placencio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer recurrence involves increased growth of cancer epithelial cells, as androgen dependent prostate cancer progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC following initial therapy. Understanding CRPC prostate regrowth will provide opportunities for new cancer therapies to treat advanced disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Elevated chemokine expression in the prostate stroma of a castrate resistant mouse model, Tgfbr2(fspKO, prompted us to look at the involvement of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs in prostate regrowth. We identified bone marrow cells recruited to the prostate in GFP-chimeric mice. A dramatic increase in BMDC recruitment for prostate regrowth occurred three days after exogenous testosterone implantation. Recruitment led to incorporation of BMDCs within the prostate epithelia. Immunofluorescence staining suggested BMDCs in the prostate coexpressed androgen receptor; p63, a basal epithelial marker; and cytokeratin 8, a luminal epithelial marker. A subset of the BMDC population, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, were specifically found to be incorporated in the prostate at its greatest time of remodeling. Rosa26 expressing MSCs injected into GFP mice supported MSC fusion with resident prostate epithelial cells through co-localization of β-galactosidase and GFP during regrowth. In a human C4-2B xenograft model of CRPC, MSCs were specifically recruited. Injection of GFP-labeled MSCs supported C4-2B tumor progression by potentiating canonical Wnt signaling. The use of MSCs as a targeted delivery vector for the exogenously expressed Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein-2 (SFRP2, reduced tumor growth, increased apoptosis and potentiated tumor necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mesenchymal stem cells fuse with prostate epithelia during the process of prostate regrowth. MSCs recruited to the regrowing prostate can be used as a vehicle for transporting genetic information with potential

  18. Fat/water separation in MRI. Detection of bone marrow reactions in patients with degenerative disc disease

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    Assheuer, J.; Lenz, G.; Lenz, W.; Gottschlich, K.W.; Schulitz, K.P.

    1987-07-01

    We examined 410 patients with lumbar disc degeneration. In 23% fat suppressing IR sequences and phase contrast techniques displayed marrow reactions in subchondral bone adjacent to the affected discs. Only in some cases conventional MRI sequences were able to depict these marrow reactions. CT, plain X-ray and scintigraphy did not show marrow changes. Bacterial infection was excluded. Histological analysis showed substitution of haematopoietic marrow by fatty tissue, necrobiosis and increase in mucoid extracellular fluid.

  19. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

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    Wang FJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT. Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs were injected via carotid artery (IA or tail vein (TV into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments.

  20. Failure to Generate Bone Marrow Adipocytes Does Not Protect Mice from Ovariectomy-Induced Osteopenia

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    Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.

    2012-01-01

    A reciprocal association between bone marrow fat and bone mass has been reported in ovariectomized rodents, suggesting that bone marrow adipogenesis has a negative effect on bone growth and turnover balance. Mice with loss of function mutations in kit receptor (kitW/W-v) have no bone marrow adipocytes in tibia or lumbar vertebra. We therefore tested the hypothesis that marrow fat contributes to development of osteopenia by comparing the skeletal response to ovariectomy (ovx) in growing wild type (WT) and bone marrow adipocyte-deficient kitW/W-v mice. Mice were ovx at 4 weeks of age and sacrificed 4 or 10 weeks post-surgery. Body composition was measured at necropsy by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cortical (tibia) and cancellous (tibia and lumbar vertebra) bone architecture were evaluated by microcomputed tomography. Bone marrow adipocyte size and density, osteoblast- and osteoclast-lined bone perimeters, and bone formation were determined by histomorphometry. Ovx resulted in an increase in total body fat mass at 10 weeks post-ovx in both genotypes, but the response was attenuated in the in kitW/W-v mice. Adipocytes were present in bone marrow of tibia and lumbar vertebra in WT mice and bone marrow adiposity increased following ovx. In contrast, marrow adipocytes were not detected in either intact or ovx kitW/W-v mice. However, ovx in WT and kitW/W-v mice resulted in statistically indistinguishable changes in cortical and cancellous bone mass, cortical and cancellous bone formation rate, and cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast-lined bone perimeters. In conclusion, our findings do not support a causal role for increased bone marrow fat as a mediator of ovx-induced osteopenia in mice. PMID:23246792