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Sample records for plastic-embedded human marrow

  1. Endothelial cells and hematopoiesis: a light microscopic study of fetal, normal, and pathologic human bone marrow in plastic-embedded sections.

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    Islam, A; Glomski, C; Henderson, E S

    1992-07-01

    The origin and morphological identity of hematopoietic progenitor cells, as well as their precursor, the pleuripotential hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), has not been established. Our studies of 2 microns sectioned undecalcified plastic-embedded bone marrow (BM) from healthy human fetuses; normal adults; patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) in various stages (chronic, accelerated, acute blastic phase, and after autografting); and patients recovering from therapy-induced marrow hypoplasia suggest that proliferative hematopoietic zones exist near the endosteum (endosteal marrow) and the vascular endothelium (capillary and sinus-lining endothelium) and a maturational zone distal to these regions. In some of these areas, morphologically recognizable hematopoietic cells were seen and interpreted as emerging and maturing in a sequential progression, suggesting an origin from the endosteal or endothelial progenitors. In other loci, early hematopoietic cells were seen in close contact with the endosteal or vascular endothelial (VE) cells. This latter relationship suggested that these areas of cellular contact were important and represented sites of cell to cell interaction that may be associated with the liberation of growth factors by endosteal and endothelial cells and their action on hematopoietic progenitor cells. Following treatment-induced hypoplasia, the endosteal and VE cells were seen to modulate, transform, and migrate into the surrounding empty and edematous marrow space as fibroblasts. Later, as hemopoietic regeneration began, clusters of regenerating hematopoietic cells were seen adjacent to bone trabecule (BT) and near the vascular endothelium. We postulate that endosteal and VE cells are the equivalent of embryonal-stage, undifferentiated mesenchyme and, under the appropriate regulatory influence, are capable of modulation and transformation (differentiation) into stromal

  2. Relative shrinkage of adipocytes by paraffin in proportion to plastic embedding in human adipose tissue before and after weight loss.

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    Verhoef, Sanne P M; van Dijk, Paul; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2013-01-01

    Adipocyte size is a major modulator of endocrine functioning of adipose tissue and methods allowing accurate determination of adipocyte size are important to study energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the relative shrinkage of adipocytes before and after weight loss by comparing adipose tissue from the same subjects embedded in paraffin and plastic. 18 healthy subjects (5 males and 13 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 28-38 kg/m² followed a very low energy diet for 8 weeks. Adipose tissue biopsies were taken prior to and after weight loss and were processed for paraffin and plastic sections. Parameters of adipocyte size were determined with computer image analysis. Mean adipocyte size was smaller in paraffin compared to plastic embedded tissue both before (66 ± 4 vs. 103 ± 5 μm, P paraffin embedded tissue in proportion to plastic embedded tissue was not significantly different before and after weight loss (73 and 69%, respectively). Shrinkage due to the type of embedding of the adipose tissue can be ignored when comparing before and after weight loss. Plastic embedding of adipose tissue provides more accurate and sensitive results. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal human bone marrow and its variations in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.; Schmidt, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Physiology and age dependant changes of human bone marrow are described. The resulting normal distribution patterns of active and inactive bone marrow including the various contrasts on different MR-sequences are discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Immunohistochemical comparison of markers for wound healing on plastic-embedded and frozen mucosal tissue.

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    Mai, Ronald; Gedrange, Tomasz; Leonhardt, Henry; Sievers, Nicole; Lauer, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Immunohistologic investigations of wound healing in human oral mucosa require specific cell biological markers as well as consecutive small biopsies. Small specimens are ideally embedded in plastic (methylmethacrylate, MMA) resin due to their miniature size. This limits the use of antibodies for these markers. In this immunohistochemical study, the distribution of wound healing markers, e.g. cytokeratin (CK), laminin, collagen IV, vimentin, vinculin and fibronectin, were compared between semithin sections of plastic-embedded tissue and frozen sections of mucosal tissue in order to assess their use for future investigations. The antibodies against laminin, collagen IV and CK 1/2/10/11, 5/6, 13, 14, 17, 19 gave comparable staining patterns on cryostat sections of attached mucosa and on semithin sections of MMA-embedded attached mucosa. In the epithelial cell layers, the following distribution of CK immunostaining was observed: The basal cell layer was positive for CK 5/6, CK 14 and CK 19; the intermediate cell layer for CK 13, CK 17 and CK 1/2/10/11, and the superficial cell layer for CK 13 and CK 1/2/10/11. For most of these antibodies, enzyme digestion with 0.1% trypsin was adequate for demasking the antigens, except for anti-CK 14, anti-CK 17 and anti-laminin; predigestion with 0.4% pepsin in 0.01 N HCl gave similar staining results. The antibodies against vimentin, vinculin, fibronectin and CK 4 showed no affinity or a reciprocal reaction on the semithin sections. Therefore, the antibodies against CK 1/2/10/11; 5/6; 13; 14; 17, and 19, as well as the basement proteins laminin and collagen IV are deemed markers suitable on semithin sections of plastic-embedded attached oral mucosa. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Colonic complications following human bone marrow transplantation

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    Paulino Martínez Hernández-Magro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human bone marrow transplantation (BMT becomes an accepted treatment of leukemia, aplastic anemia, immunodeficiency syndromes, and hematologic malignancies. Colorectal surgeons must know how to determine and manage the main colonic complications. Objective: To review the clinical features, clinical and pathological staging of graft vs host disease (GVHD, and treatment of patients suffering with colonic complications of human bone marrow transplantation. Patients and methods: We have reviewed the records of all patients that received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant and were evaluated at our Colon and Rectal Surgery department due to gastrointestinal symptoms, between January 2007 and January 2012. The study was carried out in patients who developed colonic complications, all of them with clinical, histopathological or laboratory diagnosis. Results: The study group was constituted by 77 patients, 43 male and 34 female patients. We identified colonic complications in 30 patients (38.9%; five patients developed intestinal toxicity due to pretransplant chemotherapy (6.4%; graft vs. host disease was present in 16 patients (20%; 13 patients (16.8% developed acute colonic GVHD, and 3 (3.8% chronic GVHD. Infection was identified in 9 patients (11.6%. Conclusions: The three principal colonic complications are the chemotherapy toxicity, GVHD, and superinfection; the onset of symptoms could help to suspect the type of complication (0–20 day chemotherapy toxicity, 20 and more GVHD, and infection could appear in any time of transplantation. Resumo: Experiência: O transplante de medula óssea humana (MOH passou a ser um tratamento adotado para leucemia, anemia aplástica, síndromes de imunodeficiência e neoplasias hematológicas. Cirurgiões colorretais devem saber como determinar e tratar as principais complicações do cólon. Objetivo: Revisar as características clínicas, estadiamentos clínico e patológico da doença do enxerto

  6. Specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Møller, J; Plesner, T

    1989-01-01

    An effective method for specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) with preservation of prethymic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells is presented. The BMMC were incubated with F101.01, a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the T...

  7. Bone-marrow densitometry: Assessment of marrow space of human vertebrae by single energy high resolution-quantitative computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peña, Jaime A.; Damm, Timo; Bastgen, Jan; Barkmann, Reinhard; Glüer, Claus C.; Thomsen, Felix; Campbell, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive assessment of vertebral bone marrow fat fraction is important for diagnostic assessment of a variety of disorders and therapies known to affect marrow composition. Moreover, it provides a means to correct fat-induced bias of single energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT) based bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. The authors developed new segmentation and calibration methods to obtain quantitative surrogate measures of marrow-fat density in the axial skeleton. Methods: The authors developed and tested two high resolution-QCT (HR-QCT) based methods which permit segmentation of bone voids in between trabeculae hypothesizing that they are representative of bone marrow space. The methods permit calculation of marrow content in units of mineral equivalent marrow density (MeMD). The first method is based on global thresholding and peeling (GTP) to define a volume of interest away from the transition between trabecular bone and marrow. The second method, morphological filtering (MF), uses spherical elements of different radii (0.1–1.2 mm) and automatically places them in between trabeculae to identify regions with large trabecular interspace, the bone-void space. To determine their performance, data were compared ex vivo to high-resolution peripheral CT (HR-pQCT) images as the gold-standard. The performance of the methods was tested on a set of excised human vertebrae with intact bone marrow tissue representative of an elderly population with low BMD. Results: 86% (GTP) and 87% (MF) of the voxels identified as true marrow space on HR-pQCT images were correctly identified on HR-QCT images and thus these volumes of interest can be considered to be representative of true marrow space. Within this volume, MeMD was estimated with residual errors of 4.8 mg/cm 3 corresponding to accuracy errors in fat fraction on the order of 5% both for GTP and MF methods. Conclusions: The GTP and MF methods on HR-QCT images permit noninvasive

  8. Bone-marrow densitometry: Assessment of marrow space of human vertebrae by single energy high resolution-quantitative computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, Jaime A.; Damm, Timo; Bastgen, Jan; Barkmann, Reinhard; Glüer, Claus C., E-mail: glueer@rad.uni-kiel.de [Sektion Biomedizinische Bildgebung, Klinik für Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24118 (Germany); Thomsen, Felix [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca 8000 (Argentina); Campbell, Graeme M. [Sektion Biomedizinische Bildgebung, Klinik für Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24118, Germany and Institut für Biomechanik, Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg (TUHH), Hamburg 21073 (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive assessment of vertebral bone marrow fat fraction is important for diagnostic assessment of a variety of disorders and therapies known to affect marrow composition. Moreover, it provides a means to correct fat-induced bias of single energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT) based bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. The authors developed new segmentation and calibration methods to obtain quantitative surrogate measures of marrow-fat density in the axial skeleton. Methods: The authors developed and tested two high resolution-QCT (HR-QCT) based methods which permit segmentation of bone voids in between trabeculae hypothesizing that they are representative of bone marrow space. The methods permit calculation of marrow content in units of mineral equivalent marrow density (MeMD). The first method is based on global thresholding and peeling (GTP) to define a volume of interest away from the transition between trabecular bone and marrow. The second method, morphological filtering (MF), uses spherical elements of different radii (0.1–1.2 mm) and automatically places them in between trabeculae to identify regions with large trabecular interspace, the bone-void space. To determine their performance, data were compared ex vivo to high-resolution peripheral CT (HR-pQCT) images as the gold-standard. The performance of the methods was tested on a set of excised human vertebrae with intact bone marrow tissue representative of an elderly population with low BMD. Results: 86% (GTP) and 87% (MF) of the voxels identified as true marrow space on HR-pQCT images were correctly identified on HR-QCT images and thus these volumes of interest can be considered to be representative of true marrow space. Within this volume, MeMD was estimated with residual errors of 4.8 mg/cm{sup 3} corresponding to accuracy errors in fat fraction on the order of 5% both for GTP and MF methods. Conclusions: The GTP and MF methods on HR-QCT images permit noninvasive

  9. Use of long-term human marrow cultures to demonstrate progenitor cell precursors in marrow treated with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winton, E.F.; Colenda, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The continued retrieval of progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, CFU-E, CFU-GM) from human long-term marrow cultures (LTMC) is not uncommonly used as evidence that proliferation and differentiation are occurring in more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these cultures. Alternatively, the continued presence of progenitors in LTMC could be the result of survival and/or limited self-renewal of progenitor cells present when the culture was initiated, and such progenitors would have little relevance to the parent HSC. The following studies were designed to determine the relative contributions of precursors of progenitor cells to the total progenitor cells present in LTMC using a two-stage regeneration model. The adherent layer in LTMC was established over 3 weeks, irradiated (875 rad) to permanently eliminate resident hematopoietic cells, and recharged with autologous cryo-preserved marrow that was either treated or not treated (control) with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC, 100 micrograms/ml for 30 min). The 4-HC-treated marrow contained no progenitor cells, yet based on clinical autologous bone marrow transplant experience, has intact HSC. Within 1-3 weeks, progenitor cells reappeared in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow, and were preferentially located in the adherent layer. By 2-6 weeks, the number of progenitor cells in the adherent layer of LTMC recharged with 4-HC marrow was equivalent to control LTMC. The progenitors regenerating in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow appear to originate from precursors of progenitor cells, perhaps HSC. We propose this model may be useful in elucidating cellular and molecular correlates of progenitor cell regeneration from precursors

  10. Bone marrow contributes to epithelial cancers in mice and humans as developmental mimicry.

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    Cogle, Christopher R; Theise, Neil D; Fu, Dongtao; Ucar, Deniz; Lee, Sean; Guthrie, Steven M; Lonergan, Jean; Rybka, Witold; Krause, Diane S; Scott, Edward W

    2007-08-01

    Bone marrow cells have the capacity to contribute to distant organs. We show that marrow also contributes to epithelial neoplasias of the small bowel, colon, and lung, but not the skin. In particular, epithelial neoplasias found in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantations demonstrate that human marrow incorporates into neoplasias by adopting the phenotype of the surrounding neoplastic environment. To more rigorously evaluate marrow contribution to epithelial cancer, we employed mouse models of intestinal and lung neoplasias, which revealed specifically that the hematopoietic stem cell and its progeny incorporate within cancer. Furthermore, this marrow involvement in epithelial cancer does not appear to occur by induction of stable fusion. Whereas previous claims have been made that marrow can serve as a direct source of epithelial neoplasia, our results indicate a more cautionary note, that marrow contributes to cancer as a means of developmental mimicry. Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest is found at the end of this article.

  11. Establishing quiescence in human bone marrow stem cells leads to enhanced osteoblast marker expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Rumman, Mohammad; Kassem, Moustapha

    Human bone marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hBMSC) are cells that retain a multi-lineage differentiation potential and are thus increasingly being investigated for use in clinical applications. In vivo BMSC, which comprise approximately 0.1% of the bone marrow compartment, are thought to mai...

  12. Autologous Pancreatic Islet Transplantation in Human Bone Marrow

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    Maffi, Paola; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Nano, Rita; Sordi, Valeria; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Scavini, Marina; Esposito, Antonio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cantarelli, Elisa; Messina, Carlo; Bernardi, Massimo; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Staudacher, Carlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the current site of choice for pancreatic islet transplantation, even though it is far from being ideal. We recently have shown in mice that the bone marrow (BM) may be a valid alternative to the liver, and here we report a pilot study to test feasibility and safety of BM as a site for islet transplantation in humans. Four patients who developed diabetes after total pancreatectomy were candidates for the autologous transplantation of pancreatic islet. Because the patients had contraindications for intraportal infusion, islets were infused in the BM. In all recipients, islets engrafted successfully as shown by measurable posttransplantation C-peptide levels and histopathological evidence of insulin-producing cells or molecular markers of endocrine tissue in BM biopsy samples analyzed during follow-up. Thus far, we have recorded no adverse events related to the infusion procedure or the presence of islets in the BM. Islet function was sustained for the maximum follow-up of 944 days. The encouraging results of this pilot study provide new perspectives in identifying alternative sites for islet infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, this is the first unequivocal example of successful engraftment of endocrine tissue in the BM in humans. PMID:23733196

  13. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for retinal vascular injury.

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    Wang, Jin-Da; An, Ying; Zhang, Jing-Shang; Wan, Xiu-Hua; Jonas, Jost B; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    To examine the potential of intravitreally implanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to affect vascular repair and the blood-retina barrier in mice and rats with oxygen-induced retinopathy, diabetic retinopathy or retinal ischaemia-reperfusion damage. Three study groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 18 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received BMSCs injected intravitreally. Control groups (oxygen-induced retinopathy group: 12 C57BL/6J mice; diabetic retinopathy group: 15 rats; retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model: 18 rats) received an intravitreal injection of phosphate-buffered saline. We applied immunohistological techniques to measure retinal vascularization, spectroscopic measurements of intraretinally extravasated fluorescein-conjugated dextran to quantify the blood-retina barrier breakdown, and histomorphometry to assess retinal thickness and retinal ganglion cell count. In the oxygen-induced retinopathy model, the study group with intravitreally injected BMSCs as compared with the control group showed a significantly (p = 0.001) smaller area of retinal neovascularization. In the diabetic retinopathy model, study group and control group did not differ significantly in the amount of intraretinally extravasated dextran. In the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model, on the 7th day after retina injury, the retina was significantly thicker in the study group than in the control group (p = 0.02), with no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell count (p = 0.36). Intravitreally implanted human BMSCs were associated with a reduced retinal neovascularization in the oxygen-induced retinopathy model and with a potentially cell preserving effect in the retinal ischaemia-reperfusion model. Intravitreal BMSCs may be of potential interest for the therapy of retinal vascular disorders. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley

  14. Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by pre-exposure in human lymphocytes and marrow cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lianzhen; Deng Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    The cytogenetic adaptive response induced by pre-exposure in human lymphocytes and marrow cells of mice were studied. The results of this study showed that human lymphocytes in vitro and mouse marrow cells in vivo can become adapted to low-level irradiation from 3 H-TdR or exposure to a low dose of X-or γ-irradiation, so that they become less sensitive to the chromosomal damage effects of subsequent exposures. (4 tabs.)

  15. Is fatty acid composition of human bone marrow significant to bone health?

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    Pino, Ana María; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2017-12-16

    The bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a conserved component of the marrow microenvironment, providing storage and release of energy and stabilizing the marrow extent. Also, it is recognized both the amount and quality of BMAT are relevant to preserve the functional relationships between BMAT, bone, and blood cell production. In this article we ponder the information supporting the tenet that the quality of BMAT is relevant to bone health. In the human adult the distribution of BMAT is heterogeneous over the entire skeleton, and both BMAT accumulation and bone loss come about with aging in healthy populations. But some pathological conditions which increase BMAT formation lead to bone impairment and fragility. Analysis in vivo of the relative content of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids (FA) in BMAT indicates site-related bone marrow fat composition and an association between increased unsaturation index (UI) and bone health. With aging some impairment ensues in the regulation of bone marrow cells and systemic signals leading to local chronic inflammation. Most of the bone loss diseases which evolve altered BMAT composition have as common factors aging and/or chronic inflammation. Both saturated and unsaturated FAs originate lipid species which are active mediators in the inflammation process. Increased free saturated FAs may lead to lipotoxicity of bone marrow cells. The pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory or resolving actions of compounds derived from long chain poly unsaturated FAs (PUFA) on bone cells is varied, and depending on the metabolism of the parent n:3 or n:6 PUFAs series. Taking together the evidence substantiate that marrow adipocyte function is fundamental for an efficient link between systemic and marrow fatty acids to accomplish specific energy or regulatory needs of skeletal and marrow cells. Further, they reveal marrow requirements of PUFAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...

  17. Total lymphatic irradiation and bone marrow in human heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, D.R.; Hong, R.; Greenberg, A.J.; Gilbert, E.F.; Dacumos, G.C.; Dufek, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Six patients, aged 36 to 59 years, had heart transplants for terminal myocardial disease using total lymphatic irradiation (TLI) and donor bone marrow in addition to conventional therapy. All patients were poor candidates for transplantation because of marked pulmonary hypertension, unacceptable tissue matching, or age. Two patients are living and well more than four years after the transplants. Two patients died of infection at six and seven weeks with normal hearts. One patient, whose preoperative pulmonary hypertension was too great for an orthotopic heart transplant, died at 10 days after such a procedure. The other patient died of chronic rejection seven months postoperatively. Donor-specific tolerance developed in 2 patients. TLI and donor bone marrow can produce specific tolerance to donor antigens and allow easy control of rejection, but infection is still a major problem. We describe a new technique of administering TLI with early reduction of prednisone that may help this problem

  18. Organotypic culture of human bone marrow adipose tissue.

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    Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Aoki, Shigehisa; Shigematsu, Masamori; Kamochi, Noriyuki; Sonoda, Emiko; Soejima, Hidenobu; Fukudome, Kenji; Sugihara, Hajime; Hotokebuchi, Takao; Toda, Shuji

    2010-04-01

    The precise role of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) in the marrow remains unknown. The purpose of the present study was therefore to describe a novel method for studying BMAT using 3-D collagen gel culture of BMAT fragments, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mature adipocytes and CD45+ leukocytes were retained for >3 weeks. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) including a small number of lipid-laden preadipocytes and CD44+/CD105+ mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells, developed from BMAT. Dexamethasone (10 micromol/L), but not insulin (20 mU/mL), significantly increased the number of preadipocytes. Dexamethasone and insulin also promoted leptin production and gene expression in BMAT. Adiponectin production by BMAT was BMAT, in which adiponectin protein secretion is normally very low, and that BMAT may exhibit a different phenotype from that of the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues. BMAT-osteoblast interactions were also examined, and it was found that osteoblasts inhibited the development of BMSC and reduced leptin production, while BMAT inhibited the growth and differentiation of osteoblasts. The present novel method proved to be useful for the study of BMAT biology.

  19. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang FJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT. Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs were injected via carotid artery (IA or tail vein (TV into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments.

  20. [Progesterone Promotes Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Synthesize Fibronectin via ERK Pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yong; Chen, Jing-Li; Huang, Shu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yan; Bi, Xiao-Yun; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether the progesterone can promote fibronection (FN) synthesis by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to explore the potential underlying mechanism. The human bone marrow MSCs were cultured in a serum-free medium with progesterone for 72 hours, the MTT test was performed to observe the proliferation status and adhension ability of the treated cells. Western blot was used to detect the content of FN in MSDs with GAPDH as the internal reference, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, as well as the FN content in MSC treated by PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2. The progesterone at a range of certain doses not effect on the proliferation of human bone marrow MSCs. Progesterone (25 µg/L) treatment enhanced the FN expression and adherent ability of marrow MSCs. Progesterone could induce prompt phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and its promoting effects on FN synthesis was reversed by PD98059. The progesterone can promote FN synthesis by human bone marrow MSCs via ERK 1/2 pathway, and it might be used to culture MSCs in serum-free medium.

  1. Survival of Free and Encapsulated Human and Rat Islet Xenografts Transplanted into the Mouse Bone Marrow

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    Meier, Raphael P. H.; Seebach, Jörg D.; Morel, Philippe; Mahou, Redouan; Borot, Sophie; Giovannoni, Laurianne; Parnaud, Geraldine; Montanari, Elisa; Bosco, Domenico; Wandrey, Christine; Berney, Thierry; Bühler, Leo H.; Muller, Yannick D.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow) and 10 days (kidney capsule). Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation. PMID:24625569

  2. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  3. Automated processing of human bone marrow grafts for transplantation.

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    Zingsem, J; Zeiler, T; Zimmermanm, R; Weisbach, V; Mitschulat, H; Schmid, H; Beyer, J; Siegert, W; Eckstein, R

    1993-01-01

    Prior to purging or cryopreservation, we concentrated 21 bone marrow (BM) harvests using a modification of the 'grancollect-protocol' of the Fresenius AS 104 cell separator with the P1-Y set. Within 40-70 min, the initial marrow volume of 1,265 ml (+/- 537 ml) was processed two to three times. A mean of 47% (+/- 21%) of the initial mononuclear cells was recovered in a mean volume of 128 ml (+36 ml). The recovery of clonogenic cells, measured by CFU-GM assays, was 68% (+/- 47%). Red blood cells in the BM concentrates were reduced to 7% (+/- 4%) of the initial number. The procedure was efficient and yielded a BM cell fraction suitable for purging, cryopreservation and transplantation. At this time, 10 of the 21 patients whose BM was processed using this technique have been transplanted. Seven of these 10 patients have been grafted using the BM alone. Three of the 10 patients showed reduced cell viability and colony growth in the thawed BM samples, and therefore obtained BM and peripheral blood-derived stem cells. All transplanted patients showed an evaluable engraftment, achieving 1,000 granulocytes per microliter of peripheral blood in a mean of 18 days.

  4. Immune Humanization of Immunodeficient Mice Using Diagnostic Bone Marrow Aspirates from Carcinoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Klein, Melanie; Proske, Judith; Werno, Christian; Schneider, Katharina; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Rack, Brigitte; Buchholz, Stefan; Ganzer, Roman; Blana, Andreas; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Nitsche, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD) comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses. PMID:24830425

  5. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Werner-Klein

    Full Text Available Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null (NSG and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  6. Selective inhibition of B lymphocytes in TBTC-treated human bone marrow long-term culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carfi', M.; Bowe, G.; Pieters, R.; Gribaldo, L.

    2010-01-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTC) is well known for its immunotoxic effect, in particular towards immature thymocytes. TBTC is also known to induce adipocyte differentiation in primary human bone marrow cultures, which is reflected in the decrease in a number of adipocyte-derived cytokines, chemokines and

  7. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  8. Relative biological effectiveness of tritiated water on human chromosomes of lymphocytes and bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Sawada, Shozo; Kamada, Nanao

    1992-01-01

    One of the major toxic effluent from nuclear power industries is tritiated water (HTO), which is released into the environment in large quantities. Low dose radiation effects and dose rate effects of HTO on human lymphocytes and bone marrow cells are not well studied. The present study was performed to investigate dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies in the human lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, by HTO in-vitro exposure at low dose ranges of 0.1 to 1 Gy. Go lymphocytes and bone marrow cells were incubated for 10 - 150 minutes with HTO at 2 cGy/min. Also 60 Co γ and 137 Cs γ rays were used as controls. Dicentric chromosomes were scored in 1,000 to 2,000 cells of each experimental series. The RBE values of HTO at low dose range for the induction of dicentric chromosomes and chromatid type aberrations were 2.7 in lymphocytes and approximately 3.8 in bone marrow cells with respect to 60 Co γ ray, respectively. Also lymphocytes were chronically exposed to HTO for 24 to 72 hrs at lower dose rates (0.2 and 0.05 cGy/min). The yields of dicentrics and rings decreased with the reduction in the dose rate of HTO, presenting a clear dose rate effects of HTO. These results provide an useful information for the assessment for health risk in humans exposed to low concentration level to HTO. (author)

  9. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (pnecrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Plasma Cells in Normal Human Bone Marrow by High-Resolution Flow Cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Johnsen, Steen; Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.; Loken, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The low frequency of plasma cells and the lack of specific cell surface markers has been a major obstacle for a detailed characterization of plasma cells in normal human bone marrow. Multiparameter flow cytometry enabled the identification of plasma cells in normal bone marrow aspirates. The plasma

  11. Characterization of human erythroid burst-promoting activity derived from bone marrow conditioned media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, P.N.; Ogawa, M.

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow conditioned media (BMCM) increases burst number and the incorporation of 59 Fe into heme by bursts when peripheral blood or bone marrow cells are cultured at limiting serum concentrations. Burst-promoting activity (BPA) has now been purified approximately 300-fold from this source by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex and absorption chromatography on hydroxyapatite agarose gel. Marrow BPA increased burst number and hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. A larger increase in Hb synthesis than in burst number was consistently observed, which was probably a consequence of the increase in the number of cells per burst that occurs in the presence of BPA. The role of BPA in culture could be distinguished from erythropoietin (Ep), since no bursts grew in the absence of Ep, whether or not BPA was present, and since it had no effect on the growth of erythroid colonies scored at day 5 of culture. Our purified fraction did not support the growth of CFU-C in culture. Activity was stable at temperatures of 70 degrees C or lower for 10 min; exposure to 80 degrees C resulted in approximately 50% loss of activity. BPA was completely inactivated by treatment at 100 degrees C for 10 min. Thus, human bone marrow cells produce a heat-sensitive factor that specifically promotes the growth of early erythroid progenitors in culture

  12. Changes of the proliferation kinetics of human bone marrow in vivo through hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, E.

    1982-01-01

    A 10-hour oral continuous infusion with hydroxyurea (HU) at a non-toxic concentration was performed in 20 malignoma patients with undisturbed bone marrow. Bone marrow taken before, during and after HU-administration was examined for 3H-TdR incorporation by means of autoradiography and liquid scintimetry, for cell phase distribution by means of flow cytophotometry, morphologically and by means of CFUc. 3H-TdR incorporation into bone marrow cells dropped to 16% of the initial value under HU and rose to 156% 10 h after HU-effect terminated. Cytophotometry did not furnish any proof of a decrease of S-phase cells or increase of cells in G 1 -to-S-transition during HU. S-cells rise to 129% of the initial value 10 h after having fallen below minimum inhibition concentration. Under HU, there is an equal number of cells in S which incorporate much less 3H-thymidine; after HU more S-cells incorporate more 3H-thymidine than before HU. During HU action, DNA synthesis activity is reduced to 17% and reaches the initial value with 105% afterwards. In human bone marrow, hydroxyurea in non-toxic concentration causes a temporary DNA synthesis inhibition in terms of activity reduction and partial arrest in S. A stop-and-go of the cell cycle effected by HU does not occur; the effect is rather a slow-down of DNA synthesis. (orig./MG) [de

  13. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous hMSC...... population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone...

  14. Effect of low oxygen tension on the biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dae Seong; Ko, Young Jong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Park, Hyun Jin; Park, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong-Ik; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under ambient conditions does not replicate the low oxygen environment of normal physiological or pathological states and can result in cellular impairment during culture. To overcome these limitations, we explored the effect of hypoxia (1 % O2) on the biological characteristics of MSCs over the course of different culture periods. The following biological characteristics were examined in human bone marrow-derived MSCs cultured under hypoxia for 8 week...

  15. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ding Ding; Youtao Xie; Kai Li; Liping Huang; Xuebin Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were co...

  16. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Jafari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  17. Multiple intracellular signaling pathways orchestrate adipocytic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh Hafez Ali, Dalia; Abuelreich, Sarah; Alkeraishan, Nora

    2018-01-01

    during adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) and identified 2,589 up-regulated and 2,583 down-regulated mRNA transcripts. Pathway analysis on the up-regulated gene list untraveled enrichment in multiple signaling pathways including insulin receptor......Bone marrow adipocyte formation plays a role in bone homeostasis and whole body energy metabolism. However, the transcriptional landscape and signaling pathways associated with adipocyte lineage commitment and maturation are not fully delineated. Thus, we performed global gene expression profiling...... signaling, focal Adhesion, metapathway biotransformation, a number of metabolic pathways e.g. selenium metabolism, Benzo(a)pyrene metabolism, fatty acid, triacylglycerol, ketone body metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, and catalytic cycle of mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOs). On the other hand...

  18. Migration of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells into human bone marrow stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrynikola, V; Bianchi, A; Bradstock, K; Gottlieb, D; Hewson, J

    1994-10-01

    Most cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arise from malignant transformation of B-cell precursors in the bone marrow. Recent studies have shown that normal and leukemic B-cell precursors bind to bone marrow stromal cells through the beta-1 integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5, thereby exposing early lymphoid cells to regulatory cytokines. It has been recently reported that the pre-B cell line NALM-6 is capable of migrating under layers of murine stromal cells in vitro (Miyake et al. J Cell Biol 1992;119:653-662). We have further analyzed leukemic cell motility using human bone marrow fibroblasts (BMF) as a stromal layer. The precursor-B ALL cell line NALM-6 rapidly adhered to BMF, and underwent migration or tunneling into BMF layers within 5 h, as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, and confirmed by a chromium-labeling assay. Migration was also observed with the precursor-B ALL lines Reh and KM-3, with a T leukemia line RPMI-8402, the monocytic line U937, and the mature B line Daudi. In contrast, mature B (Raji), myeloid (K562, HL-60), and T lines (CCRF-CEM, MOLT-4) did not migrate. When cases of leukemia were analyzed, BMF migration was largely confined to precursor-B ALL, occurring in eight of 13 cases tested. Of other types of leukemia, migration was observed in one of four cases of T-ALL, but no evidence was seen in six acute myeloid leukemias and two patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Only minimal migration into BMF was observed with purified sorted CD10+ CD19+ early B cells from normal adult marrow, while normal mature B lymphocytes from peripheral blood did not migrate. ALL migration was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to the beta sub-unit of the VLA integrin family, and by a combination of antibodies to VLA-4 and VLA-5. Partial inhibition was also observed when leukemic cells were incubated with antibodies to VLA-4, VLA-5, or VLA-6 alone. In contrast, treatment of stromal cells with antibodies to vascular cell adhesion molecule or

  19. In utero transplantation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shiu-Huey; Kuo, Tom K; Liu, Ming; Lee, Oscar K

    2006-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can be isolated from human bone marrow and possess the potential to differentiate into progenies of embryonic mesoderm. However, current evidence is based predominantly on in vitro experiments. We used a murine model of in utero transplantation (IUT) to study the engraftment capabilities of human MSCs. MSCs were obtained from bone marrow by negative immunoselection and limiting dilution, and were characterized by flow cytometry and by in vitro differentiation into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. MSCs were transplanted into fetal mice at a gestational age of 14 days. Engraftment of human MSCs was determined by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). MSCs engrafted into tissues originating from all three germ layers and persisted for up to 4 months or more after delivery, as evidenced by the expression of the human-specific beta-2 microglobulin gene and by FISH for donor-derived cells. Donor-derived CD45+ cells were detectable in the peripheral blood of recipients, suggesting the participation of MSCs in hematopoiesis at the fetal stage. This model can further serve to evaluate possible applications of MSCs. Copyright 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  20. Yeast-2-Hybrid data file showing progranulin interactions in human fetal brain and bone marrow libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard Tegeder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Progranulin deficiency in humans is associated with neurodegeneration. Its mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We performed a Yeast-2-Hybrid screen using human full-length progranulin as bait to assess the interactions of progranulin. Progranulin was screened against human fetal brain and human bone marrow libraries using the standard Matchmaker technology (Clontech. This article contains the full Y2H data table, including blast results and sequences, a sorted table according to selection criteria for likely positive, putatively positive, likely false and false preys, and tables showing the gene ontology terms associated with the likely and putative preys of the brain and bone marrow libraries. The interactions with autophagy proteins were confirmed and functionally analyzed in "Progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain in mice: Role of autophagy" (C. Altmann, S. Hardt, C. Fischer, J. Heidler, H.Y. Lim, A. Haussler, B. Albuquerque, B. Zimmer, C. Moser, C. Behrends, F. Koentgen, I. Wittig, M.H. Schmidt, A.M. Clement, T. Deller, I. Tegeder, 2016 [1].

  1. Yeast-2-Hybrid data file showing progranulin interactions in human fetal brain and bone marrow libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeder, Irmgard

    2016-12-01

    Progranulin deficiency in humans is associated with neurodegeneration. Its mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We performed a Yeast-2-Hybrid screen using human full-length progranulin as bait to assess the interactions of progranulin. Progranulin was screened against human fetal brain and human bone marrow libraries using the standard Matchmaker technology (Clontech). This article contains the full Y2H data table, including blast results and sequences, a sorted table according to selection criteria for likely positive, putatively positive, likely false and false preys, and tables showing the gene ontology terms associated with the likely and putative preys of the brain and bone marrow libraries. The interactions with autophagy proteins were confirmed and functionally analyzed in "Progranulin overexpression in sensory neurons attenuates neuropathic pain in mice: Role of autophagy" (C. Altmann, S. Hardt, C. Fischer, J. Heidler, H.Y. Lim, A. Haussler, B. Albuquerque, B. Zimmer, C. Moser, C. Behrends, F. Koentgen, I. Wittig, M.H. Schmidt, A.M. Clement, T. Deller, I. Tegeder, 2016) [1].

  2. Interleukin-3 Does Not Affect the Differentiation of Mast Cells Derived from Human Bone Marrow Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Okayama, Yoshimichi; Kentaro, Sakai; Maeno, Toshitaka; Suga, Tatsuo; Miura, Toru; Takai, Shinji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Saito, Hirohisa

    2008-01-01

    Although IL-3 is commonly used for culture of human progenitor-derived mast cells together with Stem cell factor (SCF) and IL-6, the effect of IL-3 on human mast cell differentiation has not been well elucidated. Human bone marrow CD34+ progenitors were cultured for up to 12 weeks in the presence of rhSCF and rhIL-6 either with rhIL-3 (IL-3 (+)) or without rhIL-3 (IL-3 (−)) for the initial 1-week of culture. Total cell number increased at 2 weeks in IL-3 (+), as compared to IL-3 (−), but changes in the appearance of mast cells were delayed. When IL-3 was present for the initial 1-week culture, granules looked more mature with IL-3 than without IL-3. However, tryptase and chymase contents, and surface antigen expression (CD18, CD51, CD54, and CD117) were not altered by IL-3. Surface expression and mRNA level of FcεRIα and histamine release by crosslinking of FcεRIα did not differ from one preparation to the next. GeneChip analysis revealed that no significant differences were observed between IL-3 (+) and IL-3 (−) cells either when inactivated or activated by aggregation of FcεRIα. These findings indicate that initial incubation of human bone marrow CD34+ progenitors with IL-3 does not affect the differentiation of mast cells. PMID:18214796

  3. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Zach S; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V; Tamaresis, John S; Bachmann, Michael H; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J; Contag, Christopher H; King, Bonnie L

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An antigen shared by human granulocytes, monocytes, marrow granulocyte precursors and leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumak, K H; Rachkewich, R A

    1983-01-01

    An antibody to human granulocytes was raised in rabbits by immunization with granulocytes pretreated with rabbit antibody to contaminating antigens. The antibody reacted not only with granulocytes but also with monocytes and bone marrow granulocyte precursors including colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). In tests with leukemic cells, the antibody reacted with blasts from most (8 of 9) patients with acute myelomonoblastic leukemia and from some patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia, morphologically undifferentiated acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The antibody did not react with blasts from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia nor with leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  5. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  6. Regulated proliferation of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells in long-term human marrow cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashman, J.; Eaves, A.C.; Eaves, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the cycling status of various classes of erythroid and granulopoietic progenitor populations maintained for many weeks in standard normal long-term human marrow cultures. These were initiated with a single inoculum of marrow aspirate and were routinely fed by weekly removal of half of the nonadherent cells and replacement of half of the growth medium. Progenitors of large erythroid colonies (more than eight erythroblast clusters) present in the nonadherent fraction and progenitors of small granulocyte/macrophage colonies (fewer than 500 cells) present in both the nonadherent and adherent fractions were found to be actively cycling at all times examined (28% to 63% kill following a 20-minute exposure to 20 microCi/mL of high specific activity 3 H-thymidine). In contrast, progenitors of large granulocyte/macrophage colonies (more than 500 cells) and progenitors of large erythroid colonies (more than eight erythroblast clusters), present in the adherent layer, consistently alternated between a quiescent state at the time of each weekly medium change and a proliferating state two to three days later (0% to 13% kill and 21% to 49% kill, respectively). Additional experiments revealed that the activation of primitive progenitors in the adherent layer was not dependent on the addition of fresh glutamine or hydrocortisone, nor on the physical manipulations involved in changing the growth medium. These studies provide the first direct evidence that normal long-term human marrow cultures support the continued turnover of a variety of early hematopoietic progenitor cell types. Further, they indicate that the proliferative activity of the most primitive of these progenitors is regulated by stage-specific cell-cell interactions that are subject to manipulation

  7. Long-term high-level expression of human beta-globin occurs following transplantation of transgenic marrow into irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himelstein, A; Ward, M; Podda, S; de la Flor Weiss, E; Costantini, F; Bank, A

    1993-03-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transferred into the bone marrow cells of live mice, its expression is very low. To investigate the reason for this, we transferred the bone marrow of transgenic mice containing and expressing the human beta-globin into irradiated recipients. We demonstrate that long-term high level expression of the human beta-globin gene can be maintained in the marrow and blood of irradiated recipients following transplantation. Although expression decreased over time in most animals because of host marrow reconstitution, the ratio of human beta-globin transgene expression to endogenous mouse beta-globin gene expression in donor-derived erythroid cells remained constant over time. We conclude that there is no inherent limitation to efficient expression of an exogenous human beta-globin gene in mouse bone marrow cells following marrow transplantation.

  8. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xie, Youtao; Li, Kai; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2018-04-03

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta₂O₅ nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  9. ECM microenvironment unlocks brown adipogenic potential of adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle H; Goralczyk, Anna G; Kriszt, Rókus; Ang, Xiu Min; Badowski, Cedric; Li, Ying; Summers, Scott A; Toh, Sue-Anne; Yassin, M Shabeer; Shabbir, Asim; Sheppard, Allan; Raghunath, Michael

    2016-02-17

    Key to realizing the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of human brown/brite adipocytes is the identification of a renewable, easily accessible and safe tissue source of progenitor cells, and an efficacious in vitro differentiation protocol. We show that macromolecular crowding (MMC) facilitates brown adipocyte differentiation in adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs), as evidenced by substantially upregulating uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and uncoupled respiration. Moreover, MMC also induced 'browning' in bmMSC-derived white adipocytes. Mechanistically, MMC creates a 3D extracellular matrix architecture enshrouding maturing adipocytes in a collagen IV cocoon that is engaged by paxillin-positive focal adhesions also at the apical side of cells, without contact to the stiff support structure. This leads to an enhanced matrix-cell signaling, reflected by increased phosphorylation of ATF2, a key transcription factor in UCP1 regulation. Thus, tuning the dimensionality of the microenvironment in vitro can unlock a strong brown potential dormant in bone marrow.

  10. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs, a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta2O5 nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  11. HSP10 selective preference for myeloid and megakaryocytic precursors in normal human bone marrow

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    F Cappello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs constitute a heterogeneous family of proteins involved in cell homeostasis. During cell life they are involved in harmful insults, as well as in immune and inflammatory reactions. It is known that they regulate gene expression, and cell proliferation, differentiation and death. HSP60 is a mitochondrial chaperonin, highly preserved during evolution, responsible of protein folding. Its function is strictly dependent on HSP10 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements. We investigated the presence and the expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of 20 normal human bone marrow specimens (NHBM by the means of immunohistochemistry. NHBM showed no expression of HSP60, probably due to its being below the detectable threshold, as already demonstrated in other normal human tissues. By contrast, HSP10 showed a selective positivity for myeloid and megakaryocytic lineages. The positivity was restricted to precursor cells, while mature elements were constantly negative.We postulate that HSP10 plays a role in bone marrow cell differentiation other than being a mitochondrial co-chaperonin. The present data emphasize the role of HSP10 during cellular homeostasis and encourage further investigations in this field.

  12. Interleukin-1β modulates endochondral ossification by human adult bone marrow stromal cells

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    M Mumme

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cytokines present in the milieu of the fracture site are important modulators of bone healing. Here we investigated the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β on the main events of endochondral bone formation by human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC, namely cell proliferation, differentiation and maturation/remodelling of the resulting hypertrophic cartilage. Low doses of IL-1β (50 pg/mL enhanced colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-f and -osteoblastic (CFU-o number (up to 1.5-fold and size (1.2-fold in the absence of further supplements and glycosaminoglycan accumulation (1.4-fold upon BM-MSC chondrogenic induction. In osteogenically cultured BM-MSC, IL-1β enhanced calcium deposition (62.2-fold and BMP-2 mRNA expression by differential activation of NF-κB and ERK signalling. IL-1β-treatment of BM-MSC generated cartilage resulted in higher production of MMP-13 (14.0-fold in vitro, mirrored by an increased accumulation of the cryptic cleaved fragment of aggrecan, and more efficient cartilage remodelling/resorption after 5 weeks in vivo (i.e., more TRAP positive cells and bone marrow, less cartilaginous areas, resulting in the formation of mature bone and bone marrow after 12 weeks. In conclusion, IL-1β finely modulates early and late events of the endochondral bone formation by BM-MSC. Controlling the inflammatory environment could enhance the success of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of fractures by resident MSC and as well as improve the engineering of implantable tissues.

  13. Nanocrystalline diamond: In vitro biocompatibility assessment by MG63 and human bone marrow cells cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, M; Dias, A G; Gomes, P S; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Santos, J D; Fernandes, M H

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) has a great potential for prosthetic implants coating. Nevertheless, its biocompatibility still has to be better understood. To do so, we employed several materials characterization techniques (SEM, AFM, micro-Raman spectroscopy) and cell culture assays using MG63 osteoblast-like and human bone marrow cells. Biochemical routines (MTT assays, Lowry's method, ALP activity) supported by SEM and confocal microscopy characterization were carried out. We used silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates for NCD coatings based on a previous demonstration of the superior adhesion and tribological performance of these NCD coated ceramics. Results demonstrate an improved human osteoblast proliferation and the stimulation of differentiated markers, like ALP activity and matrix mineralization, compared with standard polystyrene tissue culture plates. The nanometric featuring of NCD, associated to its chemical affinity are key points for bone regeneration purposes.

  14. Bone marrow extract as a growth supplement for human iliac apophyseal chondrocyte culture

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    Balasubramanian Balakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Human bone marrow is rich in various growth factors which may support the chondrocyte growth. This study was conducted to compare the culture characteristics of human growth plate chondrocyte in foetal bovine serum (FBS and human autologous bone marrow extract (BME in monolayer culture. Methods: Iliac crest apophyseal cartilage was harvested from four donors, aged between two and nine years, undergoing hip surgery. Chondrocytes were propagated under two culture conditions, with 10 per cent FBS and 10 per cent autologous BME harvested from the same donors. Cells were harvested at 7, 14 and 21 days to assess viability, morphology, cell count and immunocytochemistry. Results: With an initial seeding density of 2500 cells/cm 2 , the average yield in monolayer cultured with FBS was 3.35 × 10 5 , 5.9 × 10 5 , 14.1 × 10 5 and BME was 0.66 × 10 5 , 1.57 × 10 5 and 3.48 × 10 5 at 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Viability was 98.21 per cent with FBS and 97.45 per cent with BME at 21 days. In BME supplemented cultures, hyaline phenotype was maintained up to 21 days. The yield was higher in the FBS supplemented group; however, the phenotype could not be maintained by the FBS group as long as BME group. Interpretation & conclusions: Autologous BME was found to be a safer alternative to FBS for human studies. BME could maintain the hyaline phenotype for a longer time. Ways to enhance the cell yield needs to be explored in future studies.

  15. Preimplantation diagnosis: efficient tool for human leukocyte antigen matched bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia

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    Anver Kuliev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is among the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD to allow at risk couples reproducing without fear of having an affected child. In addition, those already having the affected child, have also the option to produce an unaffected offspring that may be also a complete human leukocyte antigen (HLA match to affected child to ensure successful bone marrow transplantation. We present here the results of retrospective analysis of 293 PGD cycles for thalassemia, including 144cases of simultaneous HLA typing, resulting in birth of 70 thalassemia-free children and 12 unaffected HLA matched ones, providing their cord blood and/or bone marrow for transplantation treatment of their affected siblings. The present overall experience includes successful cord blood or bone marrow transplantation in more than three dozens of cases with HLA matched stem cells obtained from children born after PGD, demonstrating that PGD is an efficient approach for improving success of bone marrow transplantation treatment for thalassemia.   植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是地中海贫血(地贫)最常用的疗法,该病患者夫妇无须担心孕儿受到感染。此外,如果已经怀上受到感染的宝宝,他们也可有选择性再生育一个未受感染的后代,提供完全匹配的HLA,来确保骨髓成功移植。本文将提供293个地贫病例的PGD周期诊断结果,包括144例HLA同时配型,有70例宝宝无地贫出生和12例未受感染的HLA配型宝宝出生。将这些健康宝宝的脐带血和/或骨髓取出以完成对他们同胞的移植手术,通过使用经诊断后的,出生宝宝身上取出的HLA配型干细胞,成功完成36例宝宝的脐带或骨髓移植手术。结果表明PGD能有效提高地贫患儿骨髓移植手术的成功率。

  16. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  17. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  18. Graft versus host disease in the bone marrow, liver and thymus humanized mouse model.

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    Matthew B Greenblatt

    Full Text Available Mice bearing a "humanized" immune system are valuable tools to experimentally manipulate human cells in vivo and facilitate disease models not normally possible in laboratory animals. Here we describe a form of GVHD that develops in NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human fetal bone marrow, liver and thymus (NS BLT mice. The skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and parotid glands are affected with progressive inflammation and sclerosis. Although all mice showed involvement of at least one organ site, the incidence of overt clinical disease was approximately 35% by 22 weeks after reconstitution. The use of hosts lacking the IL2 common gamma chain (NOD/SCID/γc(-/- delayed the onset of disease, but ultimately did not affect incidence. Genetic analysis revealed that particular donor HLA class I alleles influenced the risk for the development of GVHD. At a cellular level, GVHD is associated with the infiltration of human CD4+ T cells into the skin and a shift towards Th1 cytokine production. GVHD also induced a mixed M1/M2 polarization phenotype in a dermal murine CD11b+, MHC class II+ macrophage population. The presence of xenogenic GVHD in BLT mice both presents a major obstacle in the use of humanized mice and an opportunity to conduct preclinical studies on GVHD in a humanized model.

  19. Exosomes Derived from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Tumor Growth Through Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

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    Jin Qi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are known to home to sites of tumor microenvironments where they participate in the formation of the tumor microenvironment and to interplay with tumor cells. However, the potential functional effects of MSCs on tumor cell growth are controversial. Here, we, from the view of bone marrow MSC-derived exosomes, study the molecular mechanism of MSCs on the growth of human osteosarcoma and human gastric cancer cells. Methods: MSCs derived from human bone marrow (hBMSCs were isolated and cultured in complete DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10% exosome-depleted fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin-streptomycin, cell culture supernatants containing exosomes were harvested and exosome purification was performed by ultracentrifugation. Osteosarcoma (MG63 and gastric cancer (SGC7901 cells, respectively, were treated with hBMSC-derived exosomes in the presence or absence of a small molecule inhibitor of Hedgehog pathway. Cell viability was measured by transwell invasion assay, scratch migration assay and CCK-8 test. The expression of the signaling molecules Smoothened, Patched-1, Gli1 and the ligand Shh were tested by western blot and RT-PCR. Results: In this study, we found that hBMSC-derived exosomes promoted MG63 and SGC7901 cell growth through the activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling pathway significantly suppressed the process of hBMSC-derived exosomes on tumor growth. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated the new roles of hedgehog signaling pathway in the hBMSCs-derived exosomes induced tumor progression.

  20. Effects of X-ray irradiation combined with hyperthermia on human bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huaijiang; Niu Rongjiu; Liu Xiaodong; Liu Huanqin

    1996-01-01

    The authors report on the effects of X-ray irradiation combined with hyperthermia on human bone marrow cells (BMC) in vitro. Observation was made on the morphology of treated cells under optic microscope and ultrastructural changes under electron microscope. The change was not obvious at first after treatment i,e, only the vacuolar degeneration was observed in a few cells under the EM. The survival of BMC alone after irradiation decreased with increase of the irradiation dose. The morphological changes included vacuolar degeneration of cells, swelling of mitochondria, and disintegration of nuclear membranes. The survival rate of BMC after irradiation combined with hyperthermia was significantly lower than that after treatment by either of them alone (P<0.01). The morphological changes were as follows: the cell structure was destroyed, the cell support system and cell organelles were destroyed, the cell membrane and nuclear membranes were destroyed, and the cell plasma and nuclear sap overflowed

  1. SERPINB2 is a novel TGFβ-responsive lineage fate determinant of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β1, a multifunctional regulator of cell growth and differentiation, is the most abundant bone matrix growth factor. During differentiation of human bone stromal cells (hBMSCs), which constitute bone marrow osteoblast (OS) and adipocyte (AD) progenitor cells, continuous TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treat...

  2. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and human skin......, MSC populations obtained from different tissues exhibit significant differences in their proliferation, differentiation and molecular phenotype, which should be taken into consideration when planning their use in clinical protocols....

  3. Increased bone marrow blood flow in sickle cell anemia demonstrated by thallium-201 and Tc-99m human albumin microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, J.H.; Rucknagel, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    Lower extremity vascularity in nine patients with sickle cell anemia was studied by intra-arterial /sup 99m/Tc human albumin microspheres or intravenous thallium-201. In eight patients, the normal pattern of greater muscle than bone activity was reversed with marked tracer localization in skeletal parts usually not visualized. In four cases, there were distinct focal abnormalities in the femurs and tibias which correlated with defects on /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid marrow scans. TC-99m pyrophosphate bone scans demonstrated normal uptake in the same areas. The scintigraphic findings indicate a markedly increased relative bone marrow blood flow

  4. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte

  5. Single dose total lymphoid irradiation combined with cyclophosphamide as immunosuppression for human marrow transplantation in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Kersey, J.H.; Khan, F.M.; Sewchand, W.; Ramsey, N.; Krivit, W.; Coccia, P.; Nesbit, M.E.; Levitt, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    Six patients with aplastic anemia underwent bone marrow transplantation following conditioning with high dose cyclophosphamide and single dose total lymphoid irradiation with 750 rad, 26 rad/min at the midplane of the patient. They all received bone marrow from human leukocyte antigens/mixed lymphocyte culture (HLA/MLC) matched siblings. Five of 6 patients were alive without complications at 12, 11, 7, 4 and 4 months respectively. The remaining patient died from sepis which he had prior to transplantation. There were no graft rejection, graft-vs-Host Disease (GVHD) or interstitial pneumonitis among these patients. The procedure was well tolerated with minimal side effects. The results will be compared with those of groups whose bone marrow was previously transplanted with different immunosuppressive methods

  6. Effects of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on cuprizone induced demyelination.

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    Jasmin Nessler

    Full Text Available For the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis there are no regenerative approaches to enhance remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been proposed to exert such regenerative functions. Intravenous administration of human MSC reduced the clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model mimicking some aspects of multiple sclerosis. However, it is not clear if this effect was achieved by systemic immunomodulation or if there is an active neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS. In order to investigate remyelination and regeneration in the CNS we analysed the effects of intravenously and intranasally applied murine and human bone marrow-derived MSC on cuprizone induced demyelination, a toxic animal model which allows analysis of remyelination without the influence of the peripheral immune system. In contrast to EAE no effects of MSC on de- and remyelination and glial cell reactions were found. In addition, neither murine nor human MSC entered the lesions in the CNS in this toxic model. In conclusion, MSC are not directed into CNS lesions in the cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier is intact and thus cannot provide support for regenerative processes.

  7. Nicotine-induced chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Shaowen; Nie, Pengfei; Cheng, Xiaojie; Shen, Yue; Wang, Wei; Xue, Enxing; Chen, Qingyu; Kou, Dongquan; Peng, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Chuanzhu

    2012-11-01

    Nicotine has been reported that it has a dose-dependent effect on matrix mineralization by human bone marrow cells. However, there is no relevant research concerning on chondrogenic differentiation potential of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) treated with nicotine in vitro. The aims of the study were to examine the effects of nicotine (0, 10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) M) on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs from three healthy donors in vitro. BMSCs proliferation was analyzed by CCK8 assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assay the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, type I collagen and type X collagen. The proteoglycan content was stained by Alcian blue, and the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content of BMSCs was quantified spectrofluorometrically using dimethylmethylene blue. The cell viability was not significantly impaired until up to a concentration of 10(-5) M nicotine. Nicotine promoted the proliferation and enhanced the expression of type II collagen at the level up to 10(-6) M (P < 0.05). The expression of aggrecan was reduced at the concentration of 10(-5) M nicotine at day 14 (P < 0.05), and there was no significant difference in aggrecan gene expression at 10(-7) and 10(-6) M nicotine levels compared to control group (n.s.). Also the fibroblastic and hypertrophic gene expressions were down-regulated in the chondrogenic medium with 10(-7)-10(-5) M nicotine (P < 0.05). It was implied that local application of nicotine at an appropriate concentration may be a promising approach for enhancing chondrogenic differentiation capacity of BMSCs in cell-based cartilage tissue engineering. Also these results indicate that nicotine maybe a potentially useful drug for the treatment of Osteoarthritis.

  8. Purification and ex vivo expansion of postnatal human marrow mesodermal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, M; Lund, T; Lenvik, T; Aguiar, D; Koodie, L; Verfaillie, C M

    2001-11-01

    It is here reported that mesenchymal stem cells known to give rise to limb-bud mesoderm can, at the single-cell level, also differentiate into cells of visceral mesoderm and can be expanded extensively by means of clinically applicable methods. These cells were named mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs). MPCs were selected by depleting bone marrow mononuclear cells from more than 30 healthy human donors of CD45(+)/glycophorin-A (GlyA)(+) cells. Cells were cultured on fibronectin with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor BB and 2% or less fetal calf serum. It was found that 1/5 x 10(3) CD45(-)GlyA(-) cells, or 1/10(6) bone marrow mononuclear cells, gave rise to clusters of small adherent cells. Cell-doubling time was 48 to 72 hours, and cells have been expanded in culture for more than 60 cell doublings. MPCs are CD34(-), CD44(low), CD45(-), CD117 (cKit)(-), class I-HLA(-), and HLA-DR(-). MPCs differentiated into cells of limb-bud mesoderm (osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, stroma cells, and skeletal myoblasts) as well as visceral mesoderm (endothelial cells). Retroviral marking was used to definitively prove that single MPCs can differentiate into cells of limb bud and visceral mesoderm. Thus, MPCs that proliferate without obvious senescence under clinically applicable conditions and differentiate at the single-cell level not only into mesenchymal cells but also cells of visceral mesoderm may be an ideal source of stem cells for treatment of genetic or degenerative disorders affecting cells of mesodermal origin.

  9. Bone Marrow Blood Vessel Ossification and “Microvascular Dead Space” in Rat and Human Long Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D.

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4–6 mon; n=8) and old (22–24 mon; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner’s Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via µCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and “normal” vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (p necrosis. The progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. PMID:24680721

  10. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  11. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins-2, -3 and -4 in human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Eriksen, E F

    2001-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) inhibits proliferation and stimulates differentiation of multiple cell types, including osteoblasts. Human (h) bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are a homogenous non-hematopoietic population of cells present in the bone marrow and exhibit a less differentiated...

  12. Telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated immortalization of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Teng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs were transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene with lipofection method. The hTERT transfected hMSCs of passage 100 underwent chondrogenesis induction with dexamethasone, transforming the growth factor β and vitamin C, osteogenesis induction with dexamethasone, β glycerophosphoric acid and vitamin C, and cardiomyocyte induction with 5-azacytidine. After 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of induction, immunocytochemistry was performed to detect the expressions of type I and II collagen and osteocalcin, and alizarin red staining was performed to detect the bone nodule formation in osteogenesis induction. Immunocytochemistry was carried out to detect the striated muscle actin expression in cardiomyocytes. The hMSCs undergoing successful transfection were positive for the hTERT. The hTERT transfected cells were grown in vitro successfully and passaged for 136 generations. Results showed that these cells could be induced to differentiate into chondrocytes, bone and myocardial cells. Introduction of exogenous hTERT into hMSCs could achieve immortalized hMSCs with the potential of multi-directional differentiation. Thus, these cells could be applied as seed cells in tissue engineering.

  13. Identification of senescence-associated genes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Eunsook; Hong, Su; Kang, Jaeku; Woo, Junghoon; Park, Jungjun; Lee, Jongho; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2008-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into several specialized cell types, including bone, cartilage, and fat cells. The proliferative capacity of hBMMSCs paves the way for the development of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, long-term in vitro culture of hBMMSCs leads to a reduced life span of the cells due to senescence, which leads eventually to growth arrest. To investigate the molecular mechanism behind the cellular senescence of hBMMSCs, microarray analysis was used to compare the expression profiles of early passage hBMMSCs, late passage hBMMSCs and hBMMSCs ectopically expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Using an intersection analysis of 3892 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) out of 27,171 total genes analyzed, we identified 338 senescence-related DEGs. GO term categorization and pathway network analysis revealed that the identified genes are strongly related to known senescence pathways and mechanisms. The genes identified using this approach will facilitate future studies of the mechanisms underlying the cellular senescence of hBMMSCs

  14. TBTC induces adipocyte differentiation in human bone marrow long term culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carfi, M.; Croera, C.; Ferrario, D.; Campi, V.; Bowe, G.; Pieters, R.; Gribaldo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Organotins are widely used in agriculture and the chemical industry, causing persistent and widespread pollution. Organotins may affect the brain, liver and immune system and eventually human health. Recently, it has been shown that tri-butyltin (TBT) interacts with nuclear receptors PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) and RXR (retinoid x receptor) leading to adipocyte differentiation in the 3T3 cell line. Since adipocytes are known to influence haematopoiesis, for instance through the expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules, it was considered of interest to further study the adipocyte-stimulating effect of TBTC in human bone marrow cultures. Nile Red spectrofluorimetric analysis showed a significant increase of adipocytes in TBTC-treated cultures after 14 days of long term culture. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed the high expression of the specific adipocyte differentiation marker aP2 (adipocyte-specific fatty acid binding protein). PPARγ, but not RXR, mRNA was increased after 24 h and 48 h exposure. TBTC also induced a decrease in a number of chemokines, interleukins, and growth factors. Also the expression of leptin, a hormone involved in haematopoiesis, was down regulated by TBTC treatment. It therefore appears that TBTC induced adipocyte differentiation, whilst reducing a number of haematopoietic factors. This study indicates that TBTC may interfere in the haematopoietic process through an alteration of the stromal layer and cytokine homeostasis

  15. Generation of high-yield insulin producing cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, Arefeh; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Abroun, Saeid; Pourpak, Zahra; Allahverdi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud

    2014-07-01

    Allogenic islet transplantation is a most efficient approach for treatment of diabetes mellitus. However, the scarcity of islets and long term need for an immunosuppressant limits its application. Recently, cell replacement therapies that generate of unlimited sources of β cells have been developed to overcome these limitations. In this study we have described a stage specific differentiation protocol for the generation of insulin producing islet-like clusters from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). This specific stepwise protocol induced differentiation of hMSCs into definitive endoderm, pancreatic endoderm and pancreatic endocrine cells that expressed of sox17, foxa2, pdx1, ngn3, nkx2.2, insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and glut2 transcripts respectively. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis confirmed protein expression of the above mentioned genes. Western blot analysis discriminated insulin from proinsulin in the final differentiated cells. In derived insulin producing cells (IPCs), secreted insulin and C-peptide was in a glucose dependent manner. We have developed a protocol that generates effective high-yield human IPCs from hBM-MSCs in vitro. These finding suggest that functional IPCs generated by this procedure can be used as a cell-based approach for insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

  16. Effect of boron on osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Cheng, Shaowen; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Chen, Qingyu; Zhang, Wei; Kou, Dongquan; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Rompis, Ferdinand An; Peng, Lei; Zhu Lu, Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been well established as an ideal source of cell-based therapy for bone tissue engineering applications. Boron (B) is a notable trace element in humans; so far, the effects of boron on the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs have not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of boron (0, 1, 10,100, and 1,000 ng/ml) on osteogenic differentiation of human BMSCs. In this study, BMSCs proliferation was analyzed by cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) assay, and cell osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, Von Kossa staining, and real-time PCR. The results indicated that the proliferation of BMSCs was no different from the control group when added with B at the concentration of 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml respectively (P > 0.05); in contrast, 1,000 ng/ml B inhibited the proliferation of BMSCs at days 4, 7, and 14 (P < 0.05). By ALP staining, we discovered that BMSCs treated with 10 and 100 ng/ml B presented a higher ALP activity compared with control (P < 0.05). By real-time PCR, we detected the messenger RNA expression of ALP, osteocalcin, collagen type I, and bone morphogenetic proteins 7 were also increased in 10 and 100 ng/ml B treatment groups (P < 0.05). The calcium depositions were increased in 1 and 10 ng/ml B treatment groups (P < 0.05). Taken all together, it was the first time to report that B could increase osteogenic effect by stimulating osteogenic differentiation-related marker gene synthesis during the proliferation and differentiation phase in human BMSCs and could be a promising approach for enhancing osteogenic capacity of cell-based construction in bone tissue engineering.

  17. Interleukin-17A increases leptin production in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Minsoo

    2012-03-01

    Lineage commitment of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) to adipocytes or osteoblasts has been suggested as a model system to study the relationship between type II diabetes and abnormal bone metabolism. Leptin and IL-17A inhibit adipogenesis whereas they promote osteogenesis in MSCs. Due to pathophysiologic roles of IL-17A in human metabolic diseases and bone metabolism, it was evaluated whether IL-17A-dependent inverse regulation on adipogenesis and osteogenesis was related to endogenous leptin production in hBM-MSCs. In the analysis of adiponectin and leptin secretion profiles of hBM-MSCs in response to various combinations of differentiation inducing factors, it was found that dexamethasone, a common molecule used for both adipogenesis and osteogenesis, increased leptin production in hBM-MSCs. Importantly, the level of leptin production during osteogenesis in hBM-MSCs was higher than that during adipogenesis, implicating a significant leptin production in extra-adipose tissues. IL-17A increased leptin production in hBM-MSCs and also under the condition of osteogenesis. In spite of direct inhibition on adipogenesis, IL-17A up-regulated leptin production in hBM-MSC-derived adipocytes. Anti-leptin antibody treatment partially antagonized the IL-17A dependent inhibition of adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs, suggesting a role of leptin in mediating the inverse regulation of IL-17A on osteogenesis and adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs. Therefore, the IL-17A-induced leptin production may provide a key clue to understand a molecular mechanism on the lineage commitment of hBM-MSCs into adipocytes or osteoblasts. In addition, leptin production in extra-adipose tissues like MSCs and osteoblasts should be considered in future studies on leptin-associated human diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic of distribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation into adult unconditioned mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allers, Carolina; Sierralta, Walter D; Neubauer, Sonia; Rivera, Francisco; Minguell, José J; Conget, Paulette A

    2004-08-27

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for cell therapy relies on their capacity to engraft and survive long-term in the appropriate target tissue(s). Animal models have demonstrated that the syngeneic or xenogeneic transplantation of MSC results in donor engraftment into the bone marrow and other tissues of conditioned recipients. However, there are no reliable data showing the fate of human MSC infused into conditioned or unconditioned adult recipients. In the present study, the authors investigated, by using imaging, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and in situ hybridization, the biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived MSC after intravenous infusion into unconditioned adult nude mice. As assessed by imaging (gamma camera), PCR, and in situ hybridization analysis, the authors' results demonstrate the presence of human MSC in bone marrow, spleen, and mesenchymal tissues of recipient mice. These results suggest that human MSC transplantation into unconditioned recipients represents an option for providing cellular therapy and avoids the complications associated with drugs or radiation conditioning.

  19. Alkylating chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan cause functional injury to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kevin; Morse, Ruth; Sanders, Kelly; Hows, Jill; Donaldson, Craig

    2011-07-01

    The adverse effects of melphalan and cyclophosphamide on hematopoietic stem cells are well-known; however, the effects on the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) residing in the bone marrow are less well characterised. Examining the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on patient MSCs in vivo is difficult due to variability in patients and differences in the drug combinations used, both of which could have implications on MSC function. As drugs are not commonly used as single agents during high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimens, there is a lack of data comparing the short- or long-term effects these drugs have on patients post treatment. To help address these problems, the effects of the alkylating chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide and melphalan on human bone marrow MSCs were evaluated in vitro. Within this study, the exposure of MSCs to the chemotherapeutic agents cyclophosphamide or melphalan had strong negative effects on MSC expansion and CD44 expression. In addition, changes were seen in the ability of MSCs to support hematopoietic cell migration and repopulation. These observations therefore highlight potential disadvantages in the use of autologous MSCs in chemotherapeutically pre-treated patients for future therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, this study suggests that if the damage caused by chemotherapeutic agents to marrow MSCs is substantial, it would be logical to use cultured allogeneic MSCs therapeutically to assist or repair the marrow microenvironment after HDC.

  20. Surface topography of hydroxyapatite promotes osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanlei; Han, Weiqi; He, Wei; Li, Jianlei; Wang, Jirong; Feng, Haotian; Qian, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Effective and safe induction of osteogenic differentiation is one of the key elements of bone tissue engineering. Surface topography of scaffold materials was recently found to promote osteogenic differentiation. Utilization of this topography may be a safer approach than traditional induction by growth factors or chemicals. The aim of this study is to investigate the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation by surface topography and its mechanism of action. Hydroxyapatite (HA) discs with average roughness (Ra) of surface topography ranging from 0.2 to 1.65 μm and mean distance between peaks (RSm) ranging from 89.7 to 18.6 μm were prepared, and human bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were cultured on these discs. Optimal osteogenic differentiation was observed on discs with surface topography characterized by Ra ranging from 0.77 to 1.09 μm and RSm ranging from 53.9 to 39.3 μm. On this surface configuration of HA, hBMSCs showed oriented attachment, F-actin arrangement, and a peak in the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) and PDZ binding motif (TAZ) (YAP/TAZ). These results indicated that the surface topography of HA promoted osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs, possibly by increasing cell attachment and promoting the YAP/TAZ signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pleiotrophin commits human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells towards hypertrophy during chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderlique, Thibault; Henault, Emilie; Lebouvier, Angelique; Frescaline, Guilhem; Bierling, Phillipe; Rouard, Helene; Courty, José; Albanese, Patricia; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor present in the extracellular matrix of the growth plate during bone development and in the callus during bone healing. Bone healing is a complicated process that recapitulates endochondral bone development and involves many cell types. Among those cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are able to differentiate toward chondrogenic and osteoblastic lineages. We aimed to determine PTN effects on differentiation properties of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) under chondrogenic induction using histological analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PTN dramatically potentiated chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by a strong increase of collagen 2 protein, and cartilage-related gene expression. Moreover, PTN increased transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as MMP13, collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase and enhanced calcification and the content of collagen 10 protein. These effects are dependent on PTN receptors signaling and PI3 K pathway activation. These data suggest a new role of PTN in bone regeneration as an inducer of hypertrophy during chondrogenic differentiation of hBMSC.

  2. Pleiotrophin commits human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells towards hypertrophy during chondrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Bouderlique

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a growth factor present in the extracellular matrix of the growth plate during bone development and in the callus during bone healing. Bone healing is a complicated process that recapitulates endochondral bone development and involves many cell types. Among those cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are able to differentiate toward chondrogenic and osteoblastic lineages. We aimed to determine PTN effects on differentiation properties of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC under chondrogenic induction using histological analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PTN dramatically potentiated chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by a strong increase of collagen 2 protein, and cartilage-related gene expression. Moreover, PTN increased transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as MMP13, collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase and enhanced calcification and the content of collagen 10 protein. These effects are dependent on PTN receptors signaling and PI3 K pathway activation. These data suggest a new role of PTN in bone regeneration as an inducer of hypertrophy during chondrogenic differentiation of hBMSC.

  3. Human bone marrow stem cell-encapsulating calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to its injectability and excellent osteoconductivity, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is highly promising for orthopedic applications. However, a literature search revealed no report on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) encapsulation in CPC for bone tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to encapsulate hBMSCs in alginate hydrogel beads and then incorporate them into CPC, CPC–chitosan and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds. Chitosan and degradable fibers were used to mechanically reinforce the scaffolds. After 21 days, that the percentage of live cells and the cell density of hBMSCs inside CPC-based constructs matched those in alginate without CPC, indicating that the CPC setting reaction did not harm the hBMSCs. Alkaline phosphate activity increased by 8-fold after 14 days. Mineral staining, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed that apatitic mineral was deposited by the cells. The amount of hBMSC-synthesized mineral in CPC–chitosan–fiber matched that in CPC without chitosan and fibers. Hence, adding chitosan and fibers, which reinforced the CPC, did not compromise hBMSC osteodifferentiation and mineral synthesis. In conclusion, hBMSCs were encapsulated in CPC and CPC–chitosan–fiber scaffolds for the first time. The encapsulated cells remained viable, osteodifferentiated and synthesized bone minerals. These self-setting, hBMSC-encapsulating CPC-based constructs may be promising for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20451676

  4. Cell Expansion-Dependent Inflammatory and Metabolic Profile of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Patricia; Fernández-Velasco, María; Fernández-Santos, María E; Sánchez, Pedro L; Terrón, Verónica; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new area in regenerative medicine allowing the recovery of viable tissues. Among the many sources of adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived are easy to expand in culture via plastic adherence and their multipotentiality for differentiation make them ideal for clinical applications. Interestingly, several studies have indicated that MSCs expansion in vitro may be limited mainly due to "cell aging" related to the number of cell divisions in culture. We have determined that MSCs exhibit a progressive decline across successive passages in the expression of stem cell markers, in plasticity and in the inflammatory response, presenting low immunogenicity. We have exposed human MSCs after several passages to TLRs ligands and analyzed their inflammatory response. These cells responded to pro-inflammatory stimuli (i.e., NOS-2 expression) and to anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., HO1 and Arg1) until two expansions, rapidly declining upon subculture. Moreover, in the first passages, MSCs were capable to release IL1β, IL6, and IL8, as well as to produce active MMPs allowing them to migrate. Interestingly enough, after two passages, anaerobic glycolysis was enhanced releasing high levels of lactate to the extracellular medium. All these results may have important implications for the safety and efficacy of MSCs-based cell therapies.

  5. Effect of low oxygen tension on the biological characteristics of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Seong; Ko, Young Jong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Park, Hyun Jin; Park, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong-Ik; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-11-01

    Culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) under ambient conditions does not replicate the low oxygen environment of normal physiological or pathological states and can result in cellular impairment during culture. To overcome these limitations, we explored the effect of hypoxia (1 % O 2 ) on the biological characteristics of MSCs over the course of different culture periods. The following biological characteristics were examined in human bone marrow-derived MSCs cultured under hypoxia for 8 weeks: proliferation rate, morphology, cell size, senescence, immunophenotypic characteristics, and the expression levels of stemness-associated factors and cytokine and chemokine genes. MSCs cultured under hypoxia for approximately 2 weeks showed increased proliferation and viability. During long-term culture, hypoxia delayed phenotypic changes in MSCs, such as increased cell volume, altered morphology, and the expression of senescence-associated-β-gal, without altering their characteristic immunophenotypic characteristics. Furthermore, hypoxia increased the expression of stemness and chemokine-related genes, including OCT4 and CXCR7, and did not decrease the expression of KLF4, C-MYC, CCL2, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCR4 compared with levels in cells cultured under normoxia. In conclusion, low oxygen tension improved the biological characteristics of MSCs during ex vivo expansion. These data suggest that hypoxic culture could be a useful method for increasing the efficacy of MSC cell therapies.

  6. Study on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yan; Wang Guangjun; Wang Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cells were the hBM-MSC. They were exposed to X rays at the dose of 50 mGy, 75 mGy, 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy/min). The growth curve, cell cycle and apoptosis of hBM-MSC treated by LDR were investigated. The content changes of stem cell factor(SCF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor(M-CSF) secreted by hBM-MSC after treated by LDR were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The growth rates of hBM-MSC treated by LDR obviously increase from 72 h. The cell cycle and apoptosis were examined with FORTRAN Atomatic Checkout Systom. The results show that the G 0 /G 1 stage cells decrease after exposure to LDR, the percent of G 0 /G 1 stage cells of 75 mGy at 72 h is the lowest(30.86%). However, the S stage cells percentage gradually increase at 48 h and 72 h. The most one is 75 mGy group at 72 h, which reaches to 68.88%. The apoptosis percentages have increased tendency at 24 h and 48h in all dose groups, especially in 100 mGy at 24 h(25.99%), while have decreased tendency at 72 h and the most decreased group is the 50 mGy(6.8%), transient enhancement of apoptosis in the early stage and soon being decreased. The contents of SCF have increased tendency at 24 h, 48 h. As for IL-6, the contents in different dose groups at 24 h and 48 h have up-regulation. These groups, 50 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 75 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 100 mGy at 24 h have statistical difference compared with their control groups respectively. The content of IL-6 has greatest enhancement at dose of 50 mGy. The contents of M-SCF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h have also been found increased. The greatest increased content occur in the 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: This conclusion show that LDR has hormesis effect on hBM-MSC in cell growth, cell cycle and content

  7. Maintenance of differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene despite [corrected] extensive proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Burns, Jorge S

    2005-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) represent a population of stem cells that are capable of differentiation into multiple lineages. However, these cells exhibit senescence-associated growth arrest and phenotypic changes during long-term in vitro culture. We have recently demonstrated...

  8. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  9. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  10. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhu,1 George Teel,1 Christopher M O’Brien,1 Taisen Zhuang,1 Michael Keidar,1 Lijie Grace Zhang1–3 1Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium’s osseointegration involves inducing biomimetic nanotopography to enhance cell–implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications

  11. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between

  12. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  13. Prospectively Isolated Human Bone Marrow Cell-Derived MSCs Support Primitive Human CD34-Negative Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaya; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Uemura, Yasushi; Asano, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yutaka; Inoue, Masami; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki; Hino, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a specialized bone marrow (BM) niche, which consists of osteoblasts, endothelial cells, and a variety of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). However, precisely what types of MSCs support human HSCs in the BM remain to be elucidated because of their heterogeneity. In this study, we succeeded in prospectively isolating/establishing three types of MSCs from human BM-derived lineage- and CD45-negative cells, according to their cell surface expression of CD271 and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4. Among them, the MSCs established from the Lineage(-) CD45(-) CD271(+) SSEA-4(+) fraction (DP MSC) could differentiate into osteoblasts and chondrocytes, but they lacked adipogenic differentiation potential. The DP MSCs expressed significantly higher levels of well-characterized HSC-supportive genes, including IGF-2, Wnt3a, Jagged1, TGFβ3, nestin, CXCL12, and Foxc1, compared with other MSCs. Interestingly, these osteo-chondrogenic DP MSCs possessed the ability to support cord blood-derived primitive human CD34-negative severe combined immunodeficiency-repopulating cells. The HSC-supportive actions of DP MSCs were partially carried out by soluble factors, including IGF-2, Wnt3a, and Jagged1. Moreover, contact between DP MSCs and CD34-positive (CD34(+) ) as well as CD34-negative (CD34(-) ) HSCs was important for the support/maintenance of the CD34(+/-) HSCs in vitro. These data suggest that DP MSCs might play an important role in the maintenance of human primitive HSCs in the BM niche. Therefore, the establishment of DP MSCs provides a new tool for the elucidation of the human HSC/niche interaction in vitro as well as in vivo. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Genetically modified human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Mundra

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the potential of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs as gene carriers for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation. hBMSCs were characterized for the expression of phenotypic markers and transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF and human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra. Human islets were co-cultured with hBMSCs overexpressing hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Islet viability was determined by membrane fluorescent method and glucose stimulation test. Transduced hBMSCs and human islets were co-transplanted under the kidney capsule of NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid Il2rg(tm1Wjl /SzJ (NSG diabetic mice and blood glucose levels were measured over time to demonstrate the efficacy of genetically modified hBMSCs. At the end of study, immunofluorescent staining of kidney section bearing islets was performed for insulin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF. hBMSCs were positive for the expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146 and Stro-1 surface markers as determined by flow cytometry. Transduction of hBMSCs with adenovirus did not affect their stemness and differentiation potential as confirmed by mRNA levels of stem cell markers and adipogenic differentiation of transduced hBMSCs. hBMSCs were efficiently transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Live dead cell staining and glucose stimulation test have shown that transduced hBMSCs improved the viability of islets against cytokine cocktail. Co-transplantation of human islets with genetically modified hBMSCs improved the glycemic control of diabetic NSG mice as determined by mean blood glucose levels and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Immunofluorescent staining of kidney sections was positive for human insulin and vWF. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated that hBMSCs may be used as gene carriers and nursing cells to improve the outcome of islet

  15. Effect of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) on proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Qun; Lu, Yan; Li, Hui-Juan; Cheng, Xing-Bo

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) on proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and the underlying mechanism. Bone marrow cell proliferation was determined by WST-8 assay using Cell Counting Kit-8 under the intervention of AGEs. In addition, the content of maldondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were also measured. The proliferation activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was significantly inhibited when AGEs were added to culture medium, and this effect was dose-dependent and time-dependent. As the concentration of AGEs-bovine serum albumin increased, the content of intracellular MDA was significantly increased, but the activity of SOD in cell homogenates was significantly suppressed, which also showed a dose-dependent manner. AGEs could significantly inhibit the proliferation of MSCs in vitro by improving the oxidative stress in MSCs and breaking the homeostasis of intracellular environment.

  16. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5

  17. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  18. Efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulin, X; Lizhen, L; Lifei, Z; Shan, F; Ru, L; Kaimin, H; Huang, H

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic expression of defined sets of genetic factors can reprogramme somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that closely resemble embryonic stem cells. However, the low reprogramming efficiency is a significant handicap for mechanistic studies and potential clinical application. In this study, we used human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) as target cells for reprogramming and investigated efficient iPSC generation from hBMMSCs using the compounds of p53 siRNA, valproic acid (VPA) and vitamin C (Vc) with four transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC (compound induction system). The synergetic mechanism of the compounds was studied. Our results showed that the compound induction system could efficiently reprogramme hBMMSCs to iPSCs. hBMMSC-derived iPSC populations expressed pluripotent markers and had multi-potential to differentiate into three germ layer-derived cells. p53 siRNA, VPA and Vc had a synergetic effect on cell reprogramming and the combinatorial use of these substances greatly improved the efficiency of iPSC generation by suppressing the expression of p53, decreasing cell apoptosis, up-regulating the expression of the pluripotent gene OCT4 and modifying the cell cycle. Therefore, our study highlights a straightforward method for improving the speed and efficiency of iPSC generation and provides versatile tools for investigating early developmental processes such as haemopoiesis and relevant diseases. In addition, this study provides a paradigm for the combinatorial use of genetic factors and molecules to improve the efficiency of iPSC generation.

  19. Transplantation of neuronal-primed human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hemiparkinsonian rodents.

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    Melissa L M Khoo

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs have shown promise in in vitro neuronal differentiation and in cellular therapy for neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson' disease. However, the effects of intracerebral transplantation are not well defined, and studies do not agreed on the optimal neuronal differentiation method. Here, we investigated three growth factor-based neuronal differentiation procedures (using FGF-2/EGF/PDGF/SHH/FGF-8/GDNF, and found all to be capable of eliciting an immature neural phenotype, in terms of cell morphology and gene/protein expression. The neuronal-priming (FGF-2/EGF method induced neurosphere-like formation and the highest NES and NR4A2 expression by hMSCs. Transplantation of undifferentiated and neuronal-primed hMSCs into the striatum and substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats revealed transient graft survival of 7 days, despite the reported immunosuppressive properties of MSCs and cyclosporine-immunosuppression of rats. Neither differentiation of hMSCs nor induction of host neurogenesis was observed at injection sites, and hMSCs continued producing mesodermal fibronectin. Strategies for improving engraftment and differentiation post-transplantation, such as prior in vitro neuronal-priming, nigral and striatal grafting, and co-transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells that promote neural regeneration, were unable to provide advantages. Innate inflammatory responses (Iba-1-positive microglia/macrophage and GFAP-positive astrocyte activation and accumulation were detected around grafts within 7 days. Our findings indicate that growth factor-based methods allow hMSC differentiation toward immature neuronal-like cells, and contrary to previous reports, only transient survival and engraftment of hMSCs occurs following transplantation in immunosuppressed hemiparkinsonian rats. In addition, suppression of host innate inflammatory responses may be a key factor for

  20. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  1. Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Yin, Ying; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) can be obtained from human amniotic membrane, a highly abundant and readily available tissue. HAMSC sources present fewer ethical issues, have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties, considerable advantageous characteristics, and are considered an attractive potential treatment material in the field of regenerative medicine. We used a co-culture system to determine whether HAMSCs could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). We isolated HAMSCs from discarded amnion samples and collected them using pancreatin/collagenase digestion. We cultured HAMSCs and HBMSCSs in basal medium. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an early osteogenesis marker, was increased in the co-culture system compared to the control single cultures, which we also confirmed by ALP staining. We used immunofluorescence testing to investigate the effects of co-culturing with HAMSCs on HBMSC proliferation, which revealed that the co-culturing enhanced EdU expression in HBMSCs. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that co-culturing promoted osteogenesis in HBMSCs. Furthermore, Alizarin red S staining revealed that extracellular matrix calcium levels in mineralized nodule formation produced by the co-cultures were higher than that in the controls. Using the same co-culture system, we further observed the effects of HAMSCs on osteogenic differentiation in primary osteoblasts by Western blotting, which better addressed the mechanism for HAMSCs in bone regeneration. The results showed HAMSCs are osteogenic and not only play a role in promoting HBMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but also in osteoblasts, laying the foundation for new regenerative medicine methods.

  2. Effect of human milk on blood and bone marrow cells in a malnourished mice model; comparative study with cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isabel; Salva, Susana; Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that the alterations caused by nutrient deficiency can be reverted by adequate nutritional repletion. To perform comparative studies between human and cow milks in order to evaluate the impact of both milks on the recovery of blood and bone marrow cells affected in malnourished mice. Weaned mice were malnourished after consuming a protein free diet for 21 days. Malnourished mice received cow or human milk (CM or HM) for 7 or 14 consecutive days. During the period of administration of milk, the mice consumed the protein free diet ad libitum. The malnourished control (MNC) group received only protein free diet whereas the wellnourished control (WNC) mice consumed the balanced conventional diet. Both milks normalized serum albumin levels and improved thymus weight. Human milk was less effective than cow milk to increase body weight and serum transferrin levels. In contrast, human milk was more effective than cow milk to increase the number of leukocytes (WNC: 6.90 ± 1.60a; MNC: 2.80 ± 0.90b; CM 7d: 3.74 ± 1.10b; HM 7d: 7.16 ± 1.90a; CM 14d: 4.35 ± 1.20b; HM 14d: 6.75 ± 1.20a (109/L); p milks induced an increment in mitotic pool cells in bone marrow and α-naphthyl butyrate esterase positive cells in peripheral blood. They also normalized phagocytic function in blood neutrophils and oxidative burst in peritoneal cells. Both milks were equally effective to exert favorable effects on the number of the bone marrow cells and the functions of the blood and peritoneal cells involved in immune response. However, only human milk normalized the number of leukocytes and increased the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular profile and cellular characterization of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: donor influence on chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicione, Claudia; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Muiños-López, Emma; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Blanco, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    The use of autologous or allogenic stem cells has recently been suggested as an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of cartilage defects. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are well-characterized multipotent cells that can differentiate into different cell types. Understanding the potential of these cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying their differentiation should lead to innovative protocols for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of surface antigen selection of BM-MSCs and to understand the mechanisms underlying their differentiation. MSCs were isolated from BM stroma and expanded. CD105+ subpopulation was isolated using a magnetic separator. We compared culture-expanded selected cells with non-selected cells. We analyzed the phenotypic profiles, the expression of the stem cell marker genes Nanog, Oct3/4, and Sox2 and the multi-lineage differentiation potential (adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic). The multi-lineage differentiation was confirmed using histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and/or real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques. The selected and non-selected cells displayed similar phenotypes and multi-lineage differentiation potentials. Analyzing each cell source individually, we could divide the six donors into two groups: one with a high percentage of CD29 (β1-integrin) expression (HL); one with a low percentage of CD29 (LL). These two groups had different chondrogenic capacities and different expression levels of the stem cell marker genes. This study showed that phenotypic profiles of donors were related to the chondrogenic potential of human BM-MSCs. The chondrogenic potential of donors was related to CD29 expression levels. The high expression of CD29 antigen seemed necessary for chondrogenic differentiation. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for these differences in BM-MSCs chondrogenesis is therefore warranted. Understanding the mechanisms

  4. Corneal endothelial expansion promoted by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Nakahara

    Full Text Available Healthy corneal endothelium is essential for maintaining corneal clarity, as the damage of corneal endothelial cells and loss of cell count causes severe visual impairment. Corneal transplantation is currently the only therapy for severe corneal disorders. The greatly limited proliferative ability of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs, even in vitro, has challenged researchers to establish efficient techniques for the cultivating HCECs, a pivotal issue for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate conditioned medium (CM obtained from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (MSC-CM for use as a consistent expansion protocol of HCECs. When HCECs were maintained in the presence of MSC-CM, cell morphology assumed a hexagonal shape similar to corneal endothelial cells in vivo, as opposed to the irregular cell shape observed in control cultures in the absence of MSC-CM. They also maintained the functional protein phenotypes; ZO-1 and Na(+/K(+-ATPase were localized at the intercellular adherent junctions and pump proteins of corneal endothelium were accordingly expressed. In comparison to the proliferative potential observed in the control cultures, HCECs maintained in MSC-CM were found to have more than twice as many Ki67-positive cells and a greatly increased incorporation of BrdU into DNA. MSC-CM further facilitated the cell migration of HCECs. Lastly, the mechanism of cell proliferation mediated by MSC-CM was investigated, and phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was observed in HCECs after exposure to MSC-CM. The inhibitor to PI 3-kinase maintained the level of p27(Kip1 for up to 24 hours and greatly blocked the expression of cyclin D1 and D3 during the early G1 phase, leading to the reduction of cell density. These findings indicate that MSC-CM not only stimulates the proliferation of HCECs by regulating the G1 proteins of the cell cycle but also maintains the characteristic differentiated phenotypes necessary

  5. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

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    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  6. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of a human c-fos cDNA into mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Verrier, B; Klein, B; Niccolino, M; Marty, L; Alexandre, C; Piechaczyk, M

    1991-11-01

    A cDNA encoding a complete human c-fos protein was isolated and inserted into two different murine MoMuLV-derived recombinant retroviruses allowing expression of c-fos protein in different cell types. One c-fos-expressing retrovirus, chosen for its ability to express high levels of proteins in fibroblast-like cells, was shown to potentiate long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and therefore constitutes a potential tool for immortalizing such cells. Moreover, when tested in an in vitro differentiation assay, stromal cells constitutively expressing c-fos favor the granulocyte differentiation of hematopoietic precursors. Interestingly, retroviruses expressing v-src and v-abl oncogenes, included as controls in our experiments, do not produce any detectable effects, whereas those expressing polyoma virus middle T antigen facilitate long-term growth in vitro of stromal cells that favor the macrophage differentiation pathway of bone marrow stem cells. Our observation supports the idea that constitutive expression of some oncogenes, including c-fos and polyoma virus middle T antigen, may influence cytokine production by bone marrow stromal cells.

  7. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  8. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T.; Jhaveri, Hiral M.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  9. [Effects of recombinant human alpha-2b and gamma interferons on bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Y; Dan, K; Kuriya, S; Nomura, T

    1989-10-01

    The effects of recombinant human interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and gamma on the bone marrow megakaryocyte progenitors (CFU-Meg) were compared between eight patients in the chronic phase of Ph1-positive chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and five hematologically normal patients. CFU-Meg was assayed in plasma clot culture added with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium as a source of colony stimulating activity. The average count of CFU-Meg colonies formed from the bone marrow of CML patients was 5.5 times that of normal controls. Spontaneous CFU-Meg colonies were grown in seven of eight CML patients, but in none of five controls. Colony formation by CFU-Meg in CML as well as normal bone marrow was suppressed by the two preparations of IFN in a dose dependent fashion. Their suppressive influence on colonies from CFU-Meg was comparable between CML and normal bone marrow at lower concentrations, but was less marked for CML than normal bone marrow at higher concentrations. The formation of CFU-Meg colonies from CML bone marrow was more severely suppressed by IFN-gamma than IFN-alpha-2b. Depletion of either T lymphocytes or adherent cells from the CML bone marrow cells diminished the suppressive effects of IFN-gamma, but had no influence on the effects of IFN-alpha-2b.

  10. [In vitro activity of human bone marrow cells after cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen for 21 - 25 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, You-Zhang; Shen, Jian-Liang; Gong, Li-Zhong; Zheng, Pei-Hao; Liu, Yi; Yin, Wen-Jie; Cen, Jian; Wang, Ning; Zhao, De-Feng

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the best method to preserve human bone marrow cells and the effectiveness of long term cryopreservation at -80 degrees C. The human bone marrow cells in 20 samples were firstly frozen by a programmed freezer or -80 degrees C refrigerator, and then were preserved in liquid nitrogen with DMSO-AuP (10% dimethylsulfonamide, 10% autologous plasma) or DMSO-HES-HuA (5% dimethylsulfonamide, 6% hydroxyethyl starch, 4% human serum albumin) as cryoprotectant for 21 to 25 years. They were thawed in 38 degrees C. The cell sample frozen in -80 degrees C refrigerator was frozen at a low frozen speed of 1 degrees C/min which was the same as the programmed freezer before -30 degrees C. Before detection the bone marrow cells were taken from liquid nitrogen and were thawed in 38 degrees C, then the suspension of bone marrow cells was prepared for detection. The cell morphology and recovery rate of erythrocytes, nucleocytes and platelets; the recovery rate of hematopoietic stem progenitors cells, as well as mesenchymal stem cells were determined. The results showed that the protective effectiveness of DMSO-HES-HuA was better than DMSO-AuP. The mature erythrocytes were destroyed lightly [(3.5 +/- 1.5)% versus (12.6 +/- 4.8)%], the hemolysis rate was lower [(3.3 +/- 1.6)% versus (23.1 +/- 5.1)%]. Osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in the former was not changed, but was dropped in the latter. The recovery rates of red cell, platelet, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units and long term culture-initiating cells were higher in the former than that in the latter [(96.1 +/- 1.8)%, (70.0 +/- 9.5)%, (49.2 +/- 10.9)%, (54.2 +/- 13.8)% versus (76.3 +/- 5.6)%, (52.7 +/- 8.1)%, (43.5 +/- 12.3)%, (47.2 +/- 13.6)% respectively]. With each kind of cryoprotectant or frozen method, the frozen MSC could keep the original growth properties. With the same cryoprotectant and different frozen method, the cryopreservative effectiveness was not different. The

  11. Comparison of clinical grade human platelet lysates for cultivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Morten; Tratwal, Josefine; Follin, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    be devoid of any animal derived components. We have evaluated whether human Platelet Lysate (hPL) could be an attractive alternative to animal supplements. METHODS: MSCs from bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) obtained from three donors were culture expanded in three...... culture conditions with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cell morphology, proliferation, phenotype, genomic stability, and differentiation potential were analyzed. RESULTS: Regardless of manufacturer, BMSCs and ASCs cultured in hPL media showed a significant increase in proliferation capacity compared to FBS...

  12. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyayu Belay

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP, intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4, CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions.

  13. Active bone marrow distribution as a function of age in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, M.

    1981-01-01

    In response to the need for better quantitative estimates of the regional distribution of the active bone marrow organ in infants and children, a method using various anatomical data has been developed. The method, a refinement of that of Atkinson (1962), predicts that in the newborn 27.8% of the active marrow in the body resides in the skull and 20.7% resides in the lower limbs. Atkinson's method predicts 7.0% in the skull and 38.9% in the lower limbs. According to the experimental data of Hudson (1965) involving 16 late-term foetuses and newborns, there is 29.5% (+- 4.2%) in the skull and 23.7% (+-2.2%) in the lower limbs. The values from the new method are much closer to experimental values in both bone groups. The values for the newborn and age one year predicted by the new method were adjusted after comparison with the experimental data for the newborn. Newer information on marrow cellularity was also incorporated into the method presented here, so that the distribution calculated here for the adult differs somewhat from those calculated by others. Overall, this adult distribution agrees more closely with published distributions based on 59 Fe studies than do the earlier distributions. (author)

  14. Survival of human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue after xenogenic transplantation in immunocompetent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, P; Vohrer, J; Schmal, H

    2008-01-01

    of the current paper was to evaluate the survival of undifferentiated and osteogenically induced human MSC from different origins after transplantation in immunocompetent mice. METHODS: Human MSC were isolated from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC). After cultivation on mineralized collagen, MSC were......INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purposes. As MSC are described as immunoprivileged, non-autologous applications seem possible. A basic requirement is the survival of MSC after transplantation in the host. The purpose...... transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompetent mice (n=12). Undifferentiated MSC (group A) were compared with osteogenic-induced MSC (group B). Human-specific in situ hybridization and anti-vimentin staining was used to follow MSC after transplantation. Quantitative evaluation of lymphocytes and macrophages...

  15. In vitro radiation studies on Ewing's sarcoma cell lines and human bone marrow: application to the clinical use of total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Mitchell, J.B.; McPherson, S.; Miser, J.; Triche, T.; Glatstein, E.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with Ewing's sarcoma who present with a central axis or proximal extremity primary and/or with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis despite aggressive combination chemotherapy and local irradiation. In this high risk group of patients, total body irradiation (TBI) has been proposed as a systemic adjuvant. To aid in the design of a clinical TBI protocol, the authors have studied in the in vitro radiation response of two established cell lines of Ewing's sarcoma and human bone marrow CFUc. The Ewing's lines showed a larger D 0 and anti-n compared to the bone marrow CFU. No repair of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLDR) was found after 4.5 Gy in plateau phase Ewing's sarcoma cells. A theoretical split dose survival curve for both the Ewing's sarcoma lines and human bone marrow CFUc using this TBI schedule shows a significantly lower surviving fraction (10 -4 -10 -5 ) for the bone marrow CFUc. Based on these in vitro results, two 4.0 Gy fractions separated by 24 hours is proposed as the TBI regimen. Because of the potentially irreversible damage to bone marrow, autologous bone marrow transplantation following the TBI is felt to be necessary. The details of this clinical protocol in high risk Ewing's sarcoma patients are outlined

  16. Development of a rapid culture method to induce adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, Yuichi; Sugahara-Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Okazaki, Yasushi; Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow are multipotent stem cells that can regenerate mesenchymal tissues such as adipose, bone or muscle. It is thought that hMSCs can be utilized as a cell resource for tissue engineering and as human models to study cell differentiation mechanisms, such as adipogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and so on. Since it takes 2-3 weeks for hMSCs to differentiate into adipocytes using conventional culture methods, the development of methods to induce faster differentiation into adipocytes is required. In this study we optimized the culture conditions for adipocyte induction to achieve a shorter cultivation time for the induction of adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow-derived hMSCs. Briefly, we used a cocktail of dexamethasone, insulin, methylisobutylxanthine (DIM) plus a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, rosiglitazone (DIMRo) as a new adipogenic differentiation medium. We successfully shortened the period of cultivation to 7-8 days from 2-3 weeks. We also found that rosiglitazone alone was unable to induce adipocyte differentiation from hMSCs in vitro. However, rosiglitazone appears to enhance hMSC adipogenesis in the presence of other hormones and/or compounds, such as DIM. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of TGF-β1 on adipogenesis could be investigated using DIMRo-treated hMSCs. We conclude that our rapid new culture method is very useful in measuring the effect of molecules that affect adipogenesis in hMSCs.

  17. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  18. Postradiation recovery of human bone marrow, and morphological dynamics of undifferentiated cell pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, L.A.; Vyalova, N.A.; Barabanova, A.V.; Gruzdev, G.P.

    1981-09-01

    The results of clinical follow-up of a group of subjects who had been exposed to uncontrolled radiation in accident situations were published in the Soviet literature: 1 patient was exposed to relative uniform gamma radiation, 8 to nonuniform gamma-neutron radiation in doses of the order of 2-5 Gy or more. Summarized are the hematological data referable to the same clinical observations and details on histological structural distinctions of bone marrow, using quantitative characteristics to describe the behavior of different hemopoietic stem cells.

  19. Telomerase expression extends the proliferative life-span and maintains the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Janne Lytoft; Rosada, Cecilia; Serakinci, Nedime

    2002-01-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were stably transduced by a retroviral vector containing the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT). Transduced cells (hMSC-TERTs) had telomerase activity, and the mean telomere length was increased as compared with that of control cells....... The transduced cells have now undergone more than 260 population doublings (PD) and continue to proliferate, whereas control cells underwent senescence-associated proliferation arrest after 26 PD. The cells maintained production of osteoblastic markers and differentiation potential during continuous subculturing......, did not form tumors, and had a normal karyotype. When implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice, the transduced cells formed more bone than did normal cells. These results suggest that ectopic expression of telomerase in hMSCs prevents senescence-associated impairment of osteoblast functions....

  20. Characterization of death of human fetal bone marrow CD34+ cells after different dose of γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yingsong; Yang Rujun; Tang Gusheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characterization of death of the human hematopoietic stem cells after irradiation. Methods: Human fetal bone marrow mononuclear cells were irradiated with different doses of 60 Co γ-rays at different high dose rates. Apoptosis and necrosis of CD34 + cells were analyzed by flow cytometry, following three-color labelling with PE-CD34/FITC-Annexin V/7AAD at different times after irradiation. Results: The death of CD34 + cells after 5 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation showed a continuous process of reproductive death during the first week,and the main death type was apoptosis. A majority of CD34 + cells died of necrosis during the first day after 10 Gy and 12 Gy irradiation, and all of them died within a week. Conclusion: Niches are continuously vacated every day within a week following irradiation and reproductive death of hematopoietic stem cells occurred

  1. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  2. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Papadimou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  3. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs on the synthesis of DNA and protein by human bone marrow cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, S.N.; Saunders, J.; Williams, G.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were incubated with various concentrations of phenobarbitone or phenytoin sodium for 2 h, and the effects of this incubation on the subsequent incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-leucine into DNA and protein, respectively, were studied. Both drugs caused a depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation and this phenomenon was not prevented by the addition of 100 μg of pteroylglutamic acid, folinic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate per ml of marrow culture. The lowest concentration of drug which caused a statistically significant depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation was 200μg per ml for phenobarbitone and 50 μg per ml for phenytoin sodium. Both phenobarbitone and phenytoin sodium also caused an increase in the incorporation of 3 H-leucine at concentrations of 50 and 20 μg per ml., respectively, suggesting the possibility that a stimulation of protein synthesis within erythropoietic cells may play an important role in the development of anticonvulsant-induced macrocytosis. (authod)

  4. Enhancing proliferation and optimizing the culture condition for human bone marrow stromal cells using hypoxia and fibroblast growth factor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Seok Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the cellular characteristics and behaviors of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs expanded in media in a hypoxic or normoxic condition and with or without fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 treatment. hBMSCs isolated from the vertebral body and expanded in these four groups were evaluated for cellular proliferation/migration, colony-forming units, cell-surface characterization, in vitro differentiation, in vivo transplantation, and gene expression. Culturing hBMSCs using a particular environmental factor (hypoxia and with the addition of FGF-2 increased the cellular proliferation rate while enhancing the regenerative potential, modulated the multipotency-related processes (enhanced chondrogenesis-related processes/osteogenesis, but reduced adipogenesis, and increased cellular migration and collagen formation. The gene expression levels in the experimental samples showed activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 pathway and glycolysis in the hypoxic condition, with this not being affected by the addition of FGF-2. The concurrent application of hypoxia and FGF-2 could provide a favorable condition for culturing hBMSCs to be used in clinical applications associated with bone tissue engineering, due to the enhancement of cellular proliferation and regenerative potential. Keywords: Bone marrow stromal cells, Hypoxia, Fibroblast growth factor, Tissue regeneration, Microenvironment interactions

  5. Lithium Chloride Modulates Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Tang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Lithium chloride (LiCl has long been used as a psychiatric medication; however, its role in the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of LiCl on the differentiation of BMSCs. Methods: The roles of LiCl in osteogenic and adipogenic processes were observed using alizarin red staining and oil red O staining, respectively. The effects of LiCl on the Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh pathways were investigated. Results: Our data showed that LiCl effectively promoted osteogenesis and inhibited adipogenesis by simultaneously affecting the Wnt and Hh pathways. Conclusion: These results suggest that LiCl influences the differentiation of BMSCs directly through the Wnt and Hh pathways and thus may be a candidate drug for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  6. Bone marrow and umbilical cord blood human mesenchymal stem cells: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgieri, Arianna; Kantzari, Eugenia; Patrizi, Maria Patrizia; Gambardella, Stefano

    2010-09-07

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in all tissues, as part of the perivascular population. As multipotent cells, MSCs can differentiate into different tissues originating from mesoderm ranging from bone and cartilage, to cardiac muscle. MSCs are an excellent candidate for cell therapy because they are easily accessible, their isolation is straightforward, they can be bio-preserved with minimal loss of potency, and they have shown no adverse reactions to allogeneic versus autologous MSCs transplants. Therefore, MSCs are being explored to regenerate damaged tissue and treat inflammation, resulting from cardiovascular disease and myo-cardial infarction (MI), brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, cartilage and bone injury, Crohn's disease and graft versus host disease (GvHD). Most of the application and clinical trials involve MSCs from bone marrow (BMMSCs). Transplantation of MSCs from bone marrow is considered safe and has been widely tested in clinical trials of cardiovascular, neurological, and immunological disease with encouraging results. There are examples of MSCs utilization in the repair of kidney, muscle and lung. The cells were also found to promote angiogenesis, and were used in chronic skin wound treatment. Recent studies involve also mesenchymal stem cell transplant from umbilical cord (UCMSCt). One of these demonstrate that UCMSCt may improve symptoms and biochemical values in patients with severe refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and therefore this source of MSCs need deeper studies and require more attention. However, also if there are 79 registered clinical trial sites for evaluating MSC therapy throughout the world, it is still a long way to go before using these cells as a routinely applied therapy in clinics.

  7. Low/Negative Expression of PDGFR-α Identifies the Candidate Primary Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Human Bone Marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongzhe; Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Zacharaki, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) contains a rare population of nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which are of central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise phenotypic definition of these cells in adult BM has not yet been reported. In this study, we show...... exhibited high levels of genes associated with mesenchymal lineages and HSC supportive function. Moreover, lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD271(+)/CD140a(low/-) cells effectively mediated the ex vivo expansion of transplantable CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these data indicate that CD140a is a key...... that low/negative expression of CD140a (PDGFR-α) on lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD271(+) BM cells identified a cell population with very high MSC activity, measured as fibroblastic colony-forming unit frequency and typical in vitro and in vivo stroma formation and differentiation capacities. Furthermore, these cells...

  8. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K.; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth Hauberg

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a clinical need for developing systemic transplantation protocols for use of human skeletal stem cells (also known bone marrow stromal stem cells) (hBMSC) in tissue regeneration. In systemic transplantation studies, only a limited number of hBMSC home to injured tissues...... populations derived from telomerized hBMSC (hBMSC-TERT) with variable ability to form heterotopic bone when implanted subcutaneously in immune deficient mice. In vitro transwell migration assay was used and the in vivo homing ability of transplanted hBMSC to bone fractures in mice was visualized...... suggesting that only a subpopulation of hBMSC possesses "homing" capacity. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that a subpopulation of hBMSC defined by ability to form heterotopic bone in vivo, is capable of homing to injured bone. METHODS: We tested ex vivo and in vivo homing capacity of a number of clonal cell...

  9. Space microgravity drives transdifferentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from osteogenesis to adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Jiang, Yuanda; Wang, Cuicui; Geng, Baoming; Wang, Yanqiu; Chen, Jianling; Liu, Fei; Qiu, Peng; Zhai, Guangjie; Chen, Ping; Quan, Renfu; Wang, Jinfu

    2018-03-13

    Bone formation is linked with osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the bone marrow. Microgravity in spaceflight is known to reduce bone formation. In this study, we used a real microgravity environment of the SJ-10 Recoverable Scientific Satellite to examine the effects of space microgravity on the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were induced toward osteogenic differentiation for 2 and 7 d in a cell culture device mounted on the SJ-10 Satellite. The satellite returned to Earth after going through space experiments in orbit for 12 d, and cell samples were harvested and analyzed for differentiation potentials. The results showed that space microgravity inhibited osteogenic differentiation and resulted in adipogenic differentiation, even under osteogenic induction conditions. Under space microgravity, the expression of 10 genes specific for osteogenesis decreased, including collagen family members, alkaline phosphatase ( ALP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 ( RUNX2), whereas the expression of 4 genes specific for adipogenesis increased, including adipsin ( CFD), leptin ( LEP), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β ( CEBPB), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ( PPARG). In the analysis of signaling pathways specific for osteogenesis, we found that the expression and activity of RUNX2 was inhibited, expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 ( BMP2) and activity of SMAD1/5/9 were decreased, and activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ERK-1/2 declined significantly under space microgravity. These data indicate that space microgravity plays a dual role by decreasing RUNX2 expression and activity through the BMP2/SMAD and integrin/FAK/ERK pathways. In addition, we found that space microgravity increased p38 MAPK and protein kinase B (AKT) activities, which are important for the promotion of adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Space microgravity significantly

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow following treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Stenver, D; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study vertebral bone marrow in hemodialysis patients during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). We found changes in T1 relaxation times and image contrast within 14 days after starting treatment, before any response was seen in the...

  11. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell reactions to 316L stainless steel : An in vitro study on cell viability and interleukin-6 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, I.B.; Santoso, A.; Saputra, E.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity

  12. Activation of non-canonical Wnt/JNK pathway by Wnt3a is associated with differentiation fate determination of human bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Chen, Li; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway can determine human bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation fate into osteoblast or adipocyte lineages. However, its downstream targets in MSC are not well characterized. Thus, using DNA microarrays, we compared global gene expression...

  13. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis enzyme production by bone marrow and dental pulp derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matilda; Derrick Roberts, Ainslie; Martin, Ellenore; Rout-Pitt, Nathan; Gronthos, Stan; Byers, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are inherited metabolic disorders that arise from a complete loss or a reduction in one of eleven specific lysosomal enzymes. MPS children display pathology in multiple cell types leading to tissue and organ failure and early death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to many of the cell types affected in MPS, including those that are refractory to current treatment protocols such as hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) based therapy. In this study we compared multiple MPS enzyme production by bone marrow derived (hBM) and dental pulp derived (hDP) MSCs to enzyme production by HSCs. hBM MSCs produce significantly higher levels of MPS I, II, IIIA, IVA, VI and VII enzyme than HSCs, while hDP MSCs produce significantly higher levels of MPS I, IIIA, IVA, VI and VII enzymes. Higher transfection efficiency was observed in MSCs (89%) compared to HSCs (23%) using a lentiviral vector. Over-expression of four different lysosomal enzymes resulted in up to 9303-fold and up to 5559-fold greater levels in MSC cell layer and media respectively. Stable, persistent transduction of MSCs and sustained over-expression of MPS VII enzyme was observed in vitro. Transduction of MSCs did not affect the ability of the cells to differentiate down osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic lineages, but did partially delay differentiation down the non-mesodermal neurogenic lineage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating effects of L-carnitine on human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Fukui, Yumi; Quintanilha, Luiz Fernando; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells showing potential for use in regenerative medicine. Culture techniques that are more stable and methods for the more efficient production of MSCs with therapeutic efficacy are needed. We evaluate the effects of growing bone marrow (Bm)-derived MSCs in the presence of L-carnitine, which is believed to promote lipid metabolism and to suppress apoptosis. The presence of L-carnitine decreased the degree of drug-induced apoptosis and suppressed adipogenic differentiation. Metabolomic analysis by means of the exhaustive investigation of metabolic products showed that, in addition to increased β-oxidation and the expression of all carnitine derivatives other than deoxycarnitine (an intermediate in carnitine synthesis), polysaturated and polyunsaturated acids were down-regulated. An integrated analysis incorporating both serial analysis of gene expression and metabolomics revealed increases in cell survival, suggesting the utility of carnitine. The addition of carnitine elevated the oxygen consumption rate by BmMSCs that had been cultured for only a few generations and those that had become senescent following repeated replication indicating that mitochondrial activation occurred. Our exhaustive analysis of the effects of various carnitine metabolites thus suggests that the addition of L-carnitine to BmMSCs during expansion enables efficient cell production.

  16. Low/Negative Expression of PDGFR-α Identifies the Candidate Primary Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Human Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow (BM contains a rare population of nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which are of central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise phenotypic definition of these cells in adult BM has not yet been reported. In this study, we show that low/negative expression of CD140a (PDGFR-α on lin−/CD45−/CD271+ BM cells identified a cell population with very high MSC activity, measured as fibroblastic colony-forming unit frequency and typical in vitro and in vivo stroma formation and differentiation capacities. Furthermore, these cells exhibited high levels of genes associated with mesenchymal lineages and HSC supportive function. Moreover, lin−/CD45−/CD271+/CD140alow/− cells effectively mediated the ex vivo expansion of transplantable CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these data indicate that CD140a is a key negative selection marker for adult human BM-MSCs, which enables to prospectively isolate a close to pure population of candidate human adult stroma stem/progenitor cells with potent hematopoiesis-supporting capacity.

  17. Comparison of potentials between stem cells isolated from human anterior cruciate ligament and bone marrow for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Te; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Lee, Oscar K

    2010-07-01

    We have previously isolated and identified stem cells from human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation abilities between bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and ACL-derived stem cells (LSCs) from the same donors when cultured with different growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Ligament tissues and bone marrow aspirate were obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and ACL reconstruction surgeries. Proliferation, colony formation, and population doubling capacity as well as multilineage differentiation potentials of LSCs and BMSCs were compared. Gene expression and ECM production for ligament engineering were also evaluated. It was found that BMSCs possessed better osteogenic differentiation potential than LSCs, while similar adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation abilities were observed. Proliferation rates of both LSCs and BMSCs were enhanced by bFGF and TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 treatment significantly increased the expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin in LSCs, but TGF-beta1 only upregulated type I collagen and tenascin-c in BMSCs. Protein quantification further confirmed the results of differential gene expression and suggested that LSCs and BMSCs increase ECM production upon TGF-beta1 treatment. In summary, in comparison with BMSCs, LSCs proliferate faster and maintain an undifferentiated state with bFGF treatment, whereas under TGF-beta1 treatment, LSCs upregulate major tendinous gene expression and produce a robust amount of ligament ECM protein, making LSCs a potential cell source in future applications of ACL tissue engineering.

  18. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells induce collagen production and tongue cancer invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salo

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment (TME is an active player in carcinogenesis and changes in its composition modify cancer growth. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, and inflammatory cells can all affect the composition of TME leading to changes in proliferation, invasion and metastasis formation of carcinoma cells. In this study, we confirmed an interaction between BMMSCs and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC cells by analyzing the invasion progression and gene expression pattern. In a 3-dimensional myoma organotypic invasion model the presence of BMMSCs inhibited the proliferation but increased the invasion of OTSCC cells. Furthermore, the signals originating from OTSCC cells up-regulated the expression of inflammatory chemokines by BMMSCs, whereas BMMSC products induced the expression of known invasion linked molecules by carcinoma cells. Particularly, after the cell-cell interactions, the chemokine CCL5 was abundantly secreted from BMMSCs and a function blocking antibody against CCL5 inhibited BMMSC enhanced cancer invasion area. However, CCL5 blocking antibody did not inhibit the depth of invasion. Additionally, after exposure to BMMSCs, the expression of type I collagen mRNA in OTSCC cells was markedly up-regulated. Interestingly, also high expression of type I collagen N-terminal propeptide (PINP in vivo correlated with the cancer-specific mortality of OTSCC patients, whereas there was no association between cancer tissue CCL5 levels and the clinical parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the interaction between BMMSC and carcinoma cells induce cytokine and matrix molecule expression, of which high level of type I collagen production correlates with the prognosis of OTSCC patients.

  19. Anti-leukemic therapies induce cytogenetic changes of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Su-Peng; Lo, Wen-Jyi; Lin, Chiao-Lin; Liao, Yu-Min; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Bai, Li-Yuan; Liang, Ji-An; Chiu, Chang-Fang

    2012-02-01

    Both bone marrow hematopoietic cells (BM-HCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) may have cytogenetic aberrations in leukemic patients, and anti-leukemic therapy may induce cytogenetic remission of BM-HCs. The impact of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs remains unknown. Cytogenetic studies of BM-MSCs from 15 leukemic patients with documented cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-HCs were investigated. To see the influence of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs, cytogenetic studies were carried out in seven of them after the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, including anthracycline/Ara-C-based chemotherapy in two patients, high-dose busulfan/cyclophosphamide-based allogeneic transplantation in two patients, and total body irradiation (TBI)-based allogeneic transplantation in three patients. To simulate the effect of TBI in vitro, three BM-MSCs from one leukemic patient and two normal adults were irradiated using the same dosage and dosing schedule of TBI and cytogenetics were re-examined after irradiation. At the diagnosis of leukemia, two BM-MSCs had cytogenetic aberration, which were completely different to their BM-HCs counterpart. After the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, cytogenetic aberration was no longer detectable in one patient. Unexpectedly, BM-MSCs from three patients receiving TBI-based allogeneic transplantation acquired new, clonal cytogenetic abnormalities after transplantation. Similarly, complex cytogenetic abnormalities were found in all the three BM-MSCs exposed to in vitro irradiation. In conclusion, anti-leukemic treatments induce not only "cytogenetic remission" but also new cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-MSCs. TBI especially exerts detrimental effect on the chromosomal integrity of BM-MSCs and highlights the equal importance of investigating long-term adverse effect of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs as opposed to beneficial effect on BM-HCs.

  20. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Suna; Zhou, Yifu; Andreyev, Oleg; Hoyt, Robert F.; Singh, Avneesh; Hunt, Timothy; Horvath, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative RT PCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  1. Comparative characterization of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, dental pulp, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Ryo; Nakajima, Kengo; Awada, Tetsuya; Tsuka, Yuji; Abe, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuyo; Hiraki, Tomoka; Kimura, Aya; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2018-06-18

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are used clinically in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of MSCs vary according to factors such as tissue source and cell population heterogeneity. Dental tissue has received attention as an easily accessible source of high-quality stem cells. In this study, we compared the in vitro characteristics of dental pulp stem cells from deciduous teeth (SHED), human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs), and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). SEHD and hDPSCs were isolated from dental pulp and analyzed in comparison with human bone marrow (hBM)MSCs. Proliferative capacity of cultured cells was analyzed using a bromodeoxyuridine immunoassay and cell counting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were monitored to assess osteogenic differentiation. Mineralization was evaluated by alizarin red staining. Levels of bone marker mRNA were examined by real-time PCR analysis. SHED were highly proliferative compared with hDPSCs and hBMSCs. SHED, hDPSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited dark alizarin red staining on day 21 after induction of osteogenic differentiation, and staining of hBMSCs was significantly higher than that of SHED and hDPSCs by spectrophotometry. ALP staining was stronger in hBMSCs compared with SHED and hDPSCs, and ALP activity was significantly higher in hBMSCs compared with SHED or hDPSCs. SHED showed significantly higher expression of the Runx2 and ALP genes compared with hBMSCs, based on real-time PCR analysis. In bFGF, SHED showed significantly higher expression of the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene compared with hDPSCs and hBMSCs. SHED exhibited higher proliferative activity and levels of bFGF and BMP-2 gene expression compared with BMMSCs and DPSCs. The ease of harvesting cells and ability to avoid invasive surgical procedures suggest that SHED may be a useful cell source for application in bone regeneration treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc

  2. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. → Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. → Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. → Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed a difference in the

  3. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sushmita [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Kirkham, Jennifer [Biomineralisation Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom); Wood, David [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Curran, Stephen [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, YO105DF (United Kingdom); Yang, Xuebin, E-mail: X.B.Yang@leeds.ac.uk [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  4. An in vivo model to assess magnesium alloys and their biological effect on human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Chaya, Amy; Verdelis, Kostas; Bilodeau, Elizabeth A; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have many unique qualities which make them ideal candidates for bone fixation devices, including biocompatibility and degradation in vivo. Despite a rise in Mg alloy production and research, there remains no standardized system to assess their degradation or biological effect on human stem cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel in vivo model to assess Mg alloys for craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Our model consists of a collagen sponge seeded with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) around a central Mg alloy rod. These scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice and analyzed after eight weeks. Alloy degradation and biological effect were determined by microcomputed tomography (microCT), histological staining, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). MicroCT showed greater volume loss for pure Mg compared to AZ31 after eight weeks in vivo. Histological analysis showed that hBMSCs were retained around the Mg implants after 8 weeks. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed the expression of dentin matrix protein 1 and osteopontin around both pure Mg and AZ31 with implanted hBMSCs. In addition, histological sections showed a thin mineral layer around all degrading alloys at the alloy-tissue interface. In conclusion, our data show that degrading pure Mg and AZ31 implants are cytocompatible and do not inhibit the osteogenic property of hBMSCs in vivo. These results demonstrate that this model can be used to efficiently assess the biological effect of corroding Mg alloys in vivo. Importantly, this model may be modified to accommodate additional cell types and clinical applications. Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been investigated as ideal candidates for bone fixation devices due to high biocompatibility and degradation in vivo, and there is a growing need of establishing an efficient in vivo material screening system. In this study, we assessed degradation rate and biological effect of Mg alloys by transplanting Mg alloy rod with

  5. Maintenance of osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation potential with age and osteoporosis in human marrow stromal cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Eriksen, E F

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP) is the ...

  6. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Harness Purinergenic Signaling to Tolerize Human Th1 Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Shoba; Foley, Jason E.; Farthing, Don E.; Gress, Ronald E.; Laurence, Arian; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Métais, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jeremy J.; Hakim, Frances T.; Felizardo, Tania C.; Cheng, Austin V.; Robey, Pamela G.; Stroncek, David E.; Sabatino, Marianna; Battiwalla, Minoo; Ito, Sawa; Fowler, Daniel H.; Barrett, Austin J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) in the treatment of alloimmune and autoimmune conditions has generated much interest, yet an understanding of the therapeutic mechanism remains elusive. We therefore explored immune modulation by a clinical-grade BMSC product in a model of human-into-mouse xenogeneic GVHD (x-GVHD) mediated by human CD4+ Th1 cells. BMSC reversed established, lethal x-GVHD through marked inhibition of Th1 cell effector function. Gene marking studies indicated BMSC engraftment was limited to the lung; further, there was no increase in regulatory T cells, thereby suggesting a paracrine mechanism of BMSC action. BMSC recipients had increased serum CD73 expressing exosomes that promoted adenosine accumulation ex vivo. Importantly, immune modulation mediated by BMSC was fully abrogated by pharmacologic therapy with an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. To investigate the potential clinical relevance of these mechanistic findings, patient serum samples collected pre- and post-BMSC treatment were studied for exosome content: CD73 expressing exosomes promoting adenosine accumulation were detected in post-BMSC samples. In conclusion, BMSC effectively modulate experimental GVHD through a paracrine mechanism that promotes adenosine-based immune suppression. PMID:25532725

  7. Identification of a distinct small cell population from human bone marrow reveals its multipotency in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wang

    Full Text Available Small stem cells, such as spore-like cells, blastomere-like stem cells (BLSCs, and very-small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs have been described in recent studies, although their multipotency in human tissues has not yet been confirmed. Here, we report the discovery of adult multipotent stem cells derived from human bone marrow, which we call StemBios (SB cells. These isolated SB cells are smaller than 6 ìm and are DAPI+ and Lgr5+ (Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing G Protein-Coupled Receptor 5. Because Lgr5 has been characterized as a stem cell marker in the intestine, we hypothesized that SB cells may have a similar function. In vivo cell tracking assays confirmed that SB cells give rise to three types of cells, and in vitro studies demonstrated that SB cells cultured in proprietary media are able to grow to 6-25 ìm in size. Once the SB cells have attached to the wells, they differentiate into different cell lineages upon exposure to specific differentiation media. We are the first to demonstrate that stem cells smaller than 6 ìm can differentiate both in vivo and in vitro. In the future, we hope that SB cells will be used therapeutically to cure degenerative diseases.

  8. The temporal expression of estrogen receptor alpha-36 and runx2 in human bone marrow derived stromal cells during osteogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, W.R.; Owens, S.E.; Wilde, C.; Pallister, I.; Kanamarlapudi, V.; Zou, W.; Xia, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ERα36 is the predominant ERα isoform involved in bone regulation in human BMSC. • ERα36 mRNA is significantly upregulated during the process of osteogenesis. • The pattern of ERα36 and runx2 mRNA expression is similar during osteogenesis. • ERα36 appears to be co-localised with runx2 during osteogenesis. - Abstract: During bone maintenance in vivo, estrogen signals through estrogen receptor (ER)-α. The objectives of this study were to investigate the temporal expression of ERα36 and ascertain its functional relevance during osteogenesis in human bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC). This was assessed in relation to runt-related transcription factor-2 (runx2), a main modulatory protein involved in bone formation. ERα36 and runx2 subcellular localisation was assessed using immunocytochemistry, and their mRNA expression levels by real time PCR throughout the process of osteogenesis. The osteogenically induced BMSCs demonstrated a rise in ERα36 mRNA during proliferation followed by a decline in expression at day 10, which represents a change in dynamics within the culture between the proliferative stage and the differentiative stage. The mRNA expression profile of runx2 mirrored that of ERα36 and showed a degree subcellular co-localisation with ERα36. This study suggests that ERα36 is involved in the process of osteogenesis in BMSCs, which has implications in estrogen deficient environments

  9. Response of Primary Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Dermal Keratinocytes to Thermal Printer Materials In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    Advancement in thermal three-dimensional printing techniques has greatly increased the possible applications of various materials in medical applications and tissue engineering. Yet, potential toxic effects on primary human cells have been rarely investigated. Therefore, we compared four materials commonly used in thermal printing for bioengineering, namely thermally printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, MED610, polycarbonate, and polylactic acid, and investigated their effects on primary human adult skin epidermal keratinocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in vitro. We investigated indirect effects on both cell types caused by potential liberation of soluble substances from the materials, and also analyzed BM-MSCs in direct contact with the materials. We found that even in culture without direct contact with the materials, the culture with MED610 (and to a lesser extent acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) significantly affected keratinocytes, reducing cell numbers and proliferation marker Ki67 expression, and increasing glucose consumption, lactate secretion, and expression of differentiation-associated genes. BM-MSCs had decreased metabolic activity, and exhibited increased cell death in direct culture on the materials. MED610 and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene induced the strongest expression of genes associated to differentiation and estrogen receptor activation. In conclusion, we found strong cell-type-specific effects of the materials, suggesting that materials for applications in regenerative medicine should be carefully selected not only based on their mechanical properties but also based on their cell-type-specific biological effects.

  10. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  11. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  12. Comparative study of human-induced pluripotent stem cells derived from bone marrow cells, hair keratinocytes, and skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Wolf, Frieder; Azizian, Azadeh; Stauske, Michael; Tiburcy, Malte; Wagner, Stefan; Hübscher, Daniela; Dressel, Ralf; Chen, Simin; Jende, Jörg; Wulf, Gerald; Lorenz, Verena; Schön, Michael P; Maier, Lars S; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Guan, Kaomei

    2013-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a unique opportunity for the generation of patient-specific cells for use in disease modelling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to compare human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from different somatic cell sources regarding their generation efficiency and cardiac differentiation potential, and functionalities of cardiomyocytes. We generated hiPSCs from hair keratinocytes, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and skin fibroblasts by using two different virus systems. We show that MSCs and fibroblasts are more easily reprogrammed than keratinocytes. This corresponds to higher methylation levels of minimal promoter regions of the OCT4 and NANOG genes in keratinocytes than in MSCs and fibroblasts. The success rate and reprogramming efficiency was significantly higher by using the STEMCCA system than the OSNL system. All analysed hiPSCs are pluripotent and show phenotypical characteristics similar to human embryonic stem cells. We studied the cardiac differentiation efficiency of generated hiPSC lines (n = 24) and found that MSC-derived hiPSCs exhibited a significantly higher efficiency to spontaneously differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes when compared with keratinocyte-, and fibroblast-derived hiPSCs. There was no significant difference in the functionalities of the cardiomyocytes derived from hiPSCs with different origins, showing the presence of pacemaker-, atrial-, ventricular- and Purkinje-like cardiomyocytes, and exhibiting rhythmic Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ sparks in hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, spontaneously and synchronously beating and force-developing engineered heart tissues were generated. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells can be reprogrammed from all three somatic cell types, but with different efficiency. All analysed iPSCs can differentiate into cardiomyocytes, and the functionalities of cardiomyocytes derived from different cell

  13. Curcumin-functionalized silk materials for enhancing adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Luo, Tingting; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Murphy, Amanda R.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural phenolic compound derived from the plant Curcuma longa, was physically entrapped and stabilized in silk hydrogel films and its influence on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) was assessed related to adipogenic differentiation. The presence of curcumin significantly reduced silk gelation time and changed the porous morphology of gel matrix, but did not change the formation of silk beta-sheet structure. Based on spectrofluorimetric analysis, curcumin likely interacted with hydrophobic residues in silk, interacting with the beta-sheet domains formed in the hydrogels. The antioxidant activity of silk film-associated curcumin remained functional over at least one month in both the dry and hydrated state. Negligible curcumin was released from silk hydrogel films over 48 hours incubation in aqueous solution. For hBMSCs cultured on silk films containing more than 0.25 mg/mL curcumin, cell proliferation was inhibited while adipogenesis was significantly promoted based on transcripts as well as oil red O staining. When hBMSCs were cultured in media containing free curcumin, both proliferation and adipogenesis of hBMSCs were inhibited when curcumin concentrations exceeded 5 μM, which is more than 1,000-times higher than the level of curcumin released from the films in aqueous solution. Thus, silk film-associated curcumin exhibited different effects on hBMSC proliferation and differentiation when compared to curcumin in solution. PMID:25132274

  14. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, L. A.; Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J.; Hoppe, A.; Gbureck, U.; Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30-35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/cm² (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 μg/cm², Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes.

  15. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  16. Generation of insulin-producing cells from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells: comparison of three differentiation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mahmoud M; Zakaria, Mahmoud M; Refaie, Ayman F; Khater, Sherry M; Ashamallah, Sylvia A; Ismail, Amani M; El-Badri, Nagwa; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols were utilized for directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to form insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We compared the relative efficiency of three differentiation protocols. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (HBM-MSCs) were obtained from three insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Differentiation into IPCs was carried out by three protocols: conophylline-based (one-step protocol), trichostatin-A-based (two-step protocol), and β -mercaptoethanol-based (three-step protocol). At the end of differentiation, cells were evaluated by immunolabeling for insulin production, expression of pancreatic endocrine genes, and release of insulin and c-peptide in response to increasing glucose concentrations. By immunolabeling, the proportion of generated IPCs was modest ( ≃ 3%) in all the three protocols. All relevant pancreatic endocrine genes, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, were expressed. There was a stepwise increase in insulin and c-peptide release in response to glucose challenge, but the released amounts were low when compared with those of pancreatic islets. The yield of functional IPCs following directed differentiation of HBM-MSCs was modest and was comparable among the three tested protocols. Protocols for directed differentiation of MSCs need further optimization in order to be clinically meaningful. To this end, addition of an extracellular matrix and/or a suitable template should be attempted.

  17. From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Insulin-Producing Cells: Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mahmoud M; Zakaria, Mahmoud M; Refaie, Ayman F; Abdel-Rahman, Engy A; Reda, Asmaa M; Ali, Sameh S; Khater, Sherry M; Ashamallah, Sylvia A; Ismail, Amani M; Ismail, Hossam El-Din A; El-Badri, Nagwa; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs), for their differentiation potentials to form insulin-producing cells. BM-MSCs were obtained during elective orthotopic surgery and AT-MSCs from fatty aspirates during elective cosmetics procedures. Following their expansion, cells were characterized by phenotyping, trilineage differentiation ability, and basal gene expression of pluripotency genes and for their metabolic characteristics. Cells were differentiated according to a Trichostatin-A based protocol. The differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining for insulin and c-peptide. In addition the expression of relevant pancreatic endocrine genes was determined. The release of insulin and c-peptide in response to a glucose challenge was also quantitated. There were some differences in basal gene expression and metabolic characteristics. After differentiation the proportion of the resulting insulin-producing cells (IPCs), was comparable among both cell sources. Again, there were no differences neither in the levels of gene expression nor in the amounts of insulin and c-peptide release as a function of glucose challenge. The properties, availability, and abundance of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine. Conclusion . BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs are comparable regarding their differential potential to form IPCs. The availability and properties of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine.

  18. From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Insulin-Producing Cells: Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Gabr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs, for their differentiation potentials to form insulin-producing cells. BM-MSCs were obtained during elective orthotopic surgery and AT-MSCs from fatty aspirates during elective cosmetics procedures. Following their expansion, cells were characterized by phenotyping, trilineage differentiation ability, and basal gene expression of pluripotency genes and for their metabolic characteristics. Cells were differentiated according to a Trichostatin-A based protocol. The differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining for insulin and c-peptide. In addition the expression of relevant pancreatic endocrine genes was determined. The release of insulin and c-peptide in response to a glucose challenge was also quantitated. There were some differences in basal gene expression and metabolic characteristics. After differentiation the proportion of the resulting insulin-producing cells (IPCs, was comparable among both cell sources. Again, there were no differences neither in the levels of gene expression nor in the amounts of insulin and c-peptide release as a function of glucose challenge. The properties, availability, and abundance of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs are comparable regarding their differential potential to form IPCs. The availability and properties of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine.

  19. Attachment and growth of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on regenerated antheraea pernyi silk fibroin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan Xiying [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Wang Yong [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Duan Xiang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Duan Qiaoyan [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Li Mingzhong [School of Materials Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Lu Shenzhou [School of Materials Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Zhang Huanxiang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Zhang Xueguang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Silk fibroin of the silkworm Bombyx mori has been studied extensively, while the research on Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (A. pernyi SF) in biomaterials is only at an early stage. In this study, the attachment, morphology, growth and phenotype of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films were studied in vitro. The results indicated that the attachment of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was almost the same as that on the collagen films. MTT and cell counting analyses demonstrated that the growth of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was better than that on controls. Moreover, electron scanning microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays showed that the regenerated A. pernyi SF supported hBMSCs growth and functional maintenance compared with the controls. These data suggest that the regenerated A. pernyi SF, like Bombyx mori silk fibroin (B. mori SF) and collagen, can support hBMSCs attachment, growth and phenotypic maintenance, and has better biocompatibilities for hBMSCs in vitro culture.

  20. TGFβ1-Induced Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived MSCs Is Mediated by Changes to the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Elsafadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available TGFβ is a potent regulator of several biological functions in many cell types, but its role in the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived skeletal stem cells (hMSCs is currently poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that a single dose of TGFβ1 prior to induction of osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation results in increased mineralized matrix or increased numbers of lipid-filled mature adipocytes, respectively. To identify the mechanisms underlying this TGFβ-mediated enhancement of lineage commitment, we compared the gene expression profiles of TGFβ1-treated hMSC cultures using DNA microarrays. In total, 1932 genes were upregulated, and 1298 genes were downregulated. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that TGFβl treatment was associated with an enrichment of genes in the skeletal and extracellular matrix categories and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. To investigate further, we examined the actin cytoskeleton following treatment with TGFβ1 and/or cytochalasin D. Interestingly, cytochalasin D treatment of hMSCs enhanced adipogenic differentiation but inhibited osteogenic differentiation. Global gene expression profiling revealed a significant enrichment of pathways related to osteogenesis and adipogenesis and of genes regulated by both TGFβ1 and cytochalasin D. Our study demonstrates that TGFβ1 enhances hMSC commitment to either the osteogenic or adipogenic lineages by reorganizing the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Evaluation of gene delivery strategies to efficiently overexpress functional HLA-G on human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S Boura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC constitutively express low levels of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G, which has been shown to contribute to their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HLA-G on bone marrow-derived MSC would improve their immunomodulatory function, thus increasing their therapeutic potential. Therefore, we investigated which gene transfer system is best suited for delivering this molecule while maintaining its immunomodulatory effects. We performed a side-by-side comparison between three nonviral plasmid-based platforms (pmax-HLA-G1; MC-HLA-G1; pEP-HLA-G1 and a viral system (Lv-HLA-G1 using gene transfer parameters that yielded similar levels of HLA-G1-expressing MSC. Natural killer (NK cell–mediated lysis assays and T cell proliferation assays showed that MSC modified with the HLA-G1 expressing viral vector had significantly lower susceptibility to NK-lysis and significantly reduced T cell proliferation when compared to nonmodified cells or MSC modified with plasmid. We also show that, in plasmid-modified MSC, an increase in Toll-like receptor (TLR9 expression is the mechanism responsible for the abrogation of HLA-G1's immunomodulatory effect. Although MSC can be efficiently modified to overexpress HLA-G1 using viral and nonviral strategies, only viral-based delivery of HLA-G1 is suitable for improvement of MSC's immunomodulatory properties.

  2. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, L. A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Medical Center, Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery (Germany); Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J. [ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering (Switzerland); Hoppe, A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials (Germany); Gbureck, U. [University of Wuerzburg, Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry (Germany); Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg Medical Center, Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery (Germany); Boccaccini, A. R., E-mail: aldo.boccaccini@ww.uni-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30-35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 {mu}g/cm Superscript-Two (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 {mu}g/cm Superscript-Two , Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes.

  3. Novel strontium-doped bioactive glass nanoparticles enhance proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, L. A.; Hild, N.; Mohn, D.; Stark, W. J.; Hoppe, A.; Gbureck, U.; Horch, R. E.; Kneser, U.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a new family of bioactive glass nanoparticles with and without Sr-doping focusing on the influence of the nanoparticles on human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. The bioactive glass nanoparticles were fabricated by flame spray synthesis and a particle diameter of 30–35 nm was achieved. Glass nanoparticles were undoped (BG 13-93-0Sr) or doped with 5 wt% strontium (Sr) (BG 13-93-5Sr) and used at concentrations of 10 and 100 μg/cm² (particles per culture plate area), respectively. Cells were cultured for 14 days after which the samples were analysed regarding metabolic activity and expression of various bone-specific genes. Cell growth and morphology indicated the high cytocompatibility of the nanoparticulate bioactive glass. The presence of the nanoparticles enhanced cell growth compared to the plain polystyrene control group. At a concentration of 100 μg/cm², Sr-doped particles led to significantly enhanced gene expression of osteocalcin, collagen type 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Thus, Sr-doped nanoparticles showing a dose-dependent increase of osteogenic differentiation in hBMSCs are a promising biomaterial for bone regeneration purposes

  4. Plasticity of marrow mesenchymal stem cells from human first-trimester fetus: from single-cell clone to neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Sun, Bingjie; Lv, Changrong; Dou, Zhongying

    2011-02-01

    Recent results have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) from human first-trimester abortus (hfBMSCs) are closer to embryonic stem cells and perform greater telomerase activity and faster propagation than mid- and late-prophase fetal and adult BMSCs. However, no research has been done on the plasticity of hfBMSCs into neuronal cells using single-cell cloned strains without cell contamination. In this study, we isolated five single cells from hfBMSCs and obtained five single-cell cloned strains, and investigated their biological property and neuronal differentiation potential. We found that four of the five strains showed similar expression profile of surface antigen markers to hfBMSCs, and most of them differentiated into neuron-like cells expressing Nestin, Pax6, Sox1, β-III Tubulin, NF-L, and NSE under induction. One strain showed different expression profile of surface antigen markers from the four strains and hfBMSCs, and did not differentiate toward neuronal cells. We demonstrated for the first time that some of single-cell cloned strains from hfBMSCs can differentiate into nerve tissue-like cell clusters under induction in vitro, and that the plasticity of each single-cell cloned strain into neuronal cells is different.

  5. Generation of Insulin-Producing Cells from Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Comparison of Three Differentiation Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Gabr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Many protocols were utilized for directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to form insulin-producing cells (IPCs. We compared the relative efficiency of three differentiation protocols. Methods. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (HBM-MSCs were obtained from three insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Differentiation into IPCs was carried out by three protocols: conophylline-based (one-step protocol, trichostatin-A-based (two-step protocol, and β-mercaptoethanol-based (three-step protocol. At the end of differentiation, cells were evaluated by immunolabeling for insulin production, expression of pancreatic endocrine genes, and release of insulin and c-peptide in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Results. By immunolabeling, the proportion of generated IPCs was modest (≃3% in all the three protocols. All relevant pancreatic endocrine genes, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, were expressed. There was a stepwise increase in insulin and c-peptide release in response to glucose challenge, but the released amounts were low when compared with those of pancreatic islets. Conclusion. The yield of functional IPCs following directed differentiation of HBM-MSCs was modest and was comparable among the three tested protocols. Protocols for directed differentiation of MSCs need further optimization in order to be clinically meaningful. To this end, addition of an extracellular matrix and/or a suitable template should be attempted.

  6. Attachment and growth of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on regenerated antheraea pernyi silk fibroin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Xiying; Wang Yong; Duan Xiang; Duan Qiaoyan; Li Mingzhong; Lu Shenzhou; Zhang Huanxiang; Zhang Xueguang

    2006-01-01

    Silk fibroin of the silkworm Bombyx mori has been studied extensively, while the research on Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (A. pernyi SF) in biomaterials is only at an early stage. In this study, the attachment, morphology, growth and phenotype of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films were studied in vitro. The results indicated that the attachment of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was almost the same as that on the collagen films. MTT and cell counting analyses demonstrated that the growth of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was better than that on controls. Moreover, electron scanning microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays showed that the regenerated A. pernyi SF supported hBMSCs growth and functional maintenance compared with the controls. These data suggest that the regenerated A. pernyi SF, like Bombyx mori silk fibroin (B. mori SF) and collagen, can support hBMSCs attachment, growth and phenotypic maintenance, and has better biocompatibilities for hBMSCs in vitro culture

  7. Immediate bromodeoxyuridine labelling of unseparated human bone marrow cells ex vivo is superior to labelling after routine laboratory processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Mortensen, B T; Christensen, I J

    1998-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in several disease conditions and during treatment of patients with for example cytokines. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), immunocytochemical staining with anti-BrdUrd antibody and analysis by flow cytometry provides...... a reliable and reproducible technique for estimation of the fraction of cells that incorporated BrdUrd into DNA during S-phase. We have compared immediate BrdUrd labelling of unseparated bone marrow cells with the previously used labelling in the laboratory after routine separation of the mononuclear cells....... Bone marrow aspirates from seven lymphoma patients without bone marrow involvement were studied with these two methods. We found higher BrdUrd labelling indices (LI) in the mononuclear cells, when cells were labelled immediately. A large variation in LI was found between patients. Our results suggest...

  8. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of myocardial infarction with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal...... myocardial infarction models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of myocardial infarction, using a fully...... grown non-immunecompromised rat model. Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were...

  9. Action of the poison of Apis mellifera bee and gamma radiation on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats and on lymphocytes of human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''In vivo'' and ''in vitro'' experiments are performed to determine the radioprotective action of the poison of Apis mellifera bees. The frequency of chromosome aberrations, induced by gamma radiation, is studied in two assays: ''in vivo'' in bone marrow cells from Wistar rats and ''in vitro'' in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. The sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) are studied in the ''in vitro'' assays. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Automated processing of human bone marrow can result in a population of mononuclear cells capable of achieving engraftment following transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areman, E M; Cullis, H; Spitzer, T; Sacher, R A

    1991-10-01

    A concentrate of mononuclear bone marrow cells is often desired for ex vivo treatment with pharmacologic agents, monoclonal antibodies, cytokines, and other agents prior to transplantation. A method has been developed for automated separation of mononuclear cells from large volumes of harvested bone marrow. A programmable instrument originally designed for clinical ex vivo cell separation and the plasma-pheresis of patients and blood donors was adapted to permit rapid preparation, in a closed sterile system, of a bone marrow product enriched with mononuclear cells. A mean (+/- SEM) of 53 +/- 30 percent of the original mononuclear cells was recovered in a volume of 125 +/- 42 mL containing 82 +/- 12 percent mononuclear cells. This technique removed 95 +/- 9 percent of the red cells in the original marrow. No density gradient materials or sedimenting agents were employed in this process. Of 36 marrows processed by this technique, 19 autologous (6 of which were purged with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide) and 7 allogeneic marrows have been transplanted, with all evaluable patients achieving a neutrophil count of 0.5 x 10(9) per L in a mean (+/- SEM) of 21 +/- 6 days.

  11. The use of total human bone marrow fraction in a direct three-dimensional expansion approach for bone tissue engineering applications: focus on angiogenesis and osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Julien; Oliveira, Hugo; Catros, Sylvain; Siadous, Robin; Derkaoui, Sidi-Mohammed; Bareille, Reine; Letourneur, Didier; Amédée, Joëlle

    2015-03-01

    Current approaches in bone tissue engineering have shown limited success, mostly owing to insufficient vascularization of the construct. A common approach consists of co-culture of endothelial cells and osteoblastic cells. This strategy uses cells from different sources and differentiation states, thus increasing the complexity upstream of a clinical application. The source of reparative cells is paramount for the success of bone tissue engineering applications. In this context, stem cells obtained from human bone marrow hold much promise. Here, we analyzed the potential of human whole bone marrow cells directly expanded in a three-dimensional (3D) polymer matrix and focused on the further characterization of this heterogeneous population and on their ability to promote angiogenesis and osteogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, in a subcutaneous model. Cellular aggregates were formed within 24 h and over the 12-day culture period expressed endothelial and bone-specific markers and a specific junctional protein. Ectopic implantation of the tissue-engineered constructs revealed osteoid tissue and vessel formation both at the periphery and within the implant. This work sheds light on the potential clinical use of human whole bone marrow for bone regeneration strategies, focusing on a simplified approach to develop a direct 3D culture without two-dimensional isolation or expansion.

  12. Adhesive and mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in human bone marrow and periosteum-derived progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Eyckmans

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that cell shape can influence commitment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMCs to adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and other lineages. Human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs exhibit multipotency similar to hBMCs, but hPDCs may offer enhanced potential for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis given their apparent endogenous role in bone and cartilage repair in vivo. Here, we examined whether hPDC differentiation is regulated by adhesive and mechanical cues comparable to that reported for hBMC differentiation. When cultured in the appropriate induction media, hPDCs at high cell seeding density demonstrated enhanced levels of adipogenic or chondrogenic markers as compared with hPDCs at low cell seeding density. Cell seeding density correlated inversely with projected area of cell spreading, and directly limiting cell spreading with micropatterned substrates promoted adipogenesis or chondrogenesis while substrates promoting cell spreading supported osteogenesis. Interestingly, cell seeding density influenced differentiation through both changes in cell shape and non-shape-mediated effects: density-dependent adipogenesis and chondrogenesis were regulated primarily by cell shape whereas non-shape effects strongly influenced osteogenic potential. Inhibition of cytoskeletal contractility by adding the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 further enhanced adipogenic differentiation and discouraged osteogenic differentiation of hPDCs. Together, our results suggest that multipotent lineage decisions of hPDCs are impacted by cell adhesive and mechanical cues, though to different extents than hBMCs. Thus, future studies of hPDCs and other primary stem cell populations with clinical potential should consider varying biophysical metrics for more thorough optimization of stem cell differentiation.

  13. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xin

    Full Text Available The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs into insulin-producing cells (IPCs for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations.hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 10(6 differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice.The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo.IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation.

  14. Analysis of glycoprotein E-selectin ligANDs on human and mouse marrow cells enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2011-06-09

    Although well recognized that expression of E-selectin on marrow microvessels mediates osteotropism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), our knowledge regarding the cognate E-selectin ligand(s) on HSPCs is incomplete. Flow cytometry using E-selectin-Ig chimera (E-Ig) shows that human marrow cells enriched for HSPCs (CD34+ cells) display greater E-selectin binding than those obtained from mouse (lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ [LSK] cells). To define the relevant glycoprotein E-selectin ligands, lysates from human CD34+ and KG1a cells and from mouse LSK cells were immunoprecipitated using E-Ig and resolved byWestern blot using E-Ig. In both human and mouse cells, E-selectin ligand reactivity was observed at ∼ 120- to 130-kDa region, which contained two E-selectin ligands, the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- 1 glycoform "CLA," and CD43. Human, but not mouse, cells displayed a prominent ∼ 100-kDa band, exclusively comprising the CD44 glycoform "HCELL."E-Ig reactivity was most prominent on CLA in mouse cells and on HCELL in human cells. To further assess HCELL\\'s contribution to E-selectin adherence, complementary studies were performed to silence (via CD44 siRNA) or enforce its expression (via exoglycosylation). Under physiologic shear conditions, CD44/HCELL-silenced human cells showed striking decreases (> 50%) in E-selectin binding. Conversely, enforced HCELL expression of LSK cells profoundly increased E-selectin adherence, yielding > 3-fold more marrow homing in vivo. These data define the key glycoprotein E-selectin ligands of human and mouse HSPCs, unveiling critical species-intrinsic differences in both the identity and activity of these structures. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Behavior of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Various Titanium-Based Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjuan Qu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and texture of titanium coatings can influence the growth characteristics of the adhered cells. An enhanced proliferation of the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs would be beneficial. The present study was aimed to investigate whether titanium deposited at different atmospheres would affect the cell growth properties, cellular morphology, and expression of surface markers of hMSCs. Titanium-based coatings were deposited on silicon wafers under oxygen, nitrogen, or argon atmospheres by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition using two different gas pressures followed by heating at 400 °C for 2 h. The characteristics of the coated surfaces were determined via contact angle, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Human MSCs were cultivated on differently coated silicon wafers for 48 h. Subsequently, the cell proliferation rates were analyzed with an MTT assay. The phenotype of hMSCs was checked via immunocytochemical stainings of MSC-associated markers CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the adhesion, spreading, and morphology of hMSCs on coated materials via SEM. The cell proliferation rates of the hMSCs were similar on all coated silicon wafers. The hMSCs retained the MSC phenotype by expressing MSC-associated markers and fibroblast-like morphology with cellular projections. Furthermore, no significant differences could be found in the size of the cells when cultured on all various coated surfaces. In conclusion, despite certain differences in the contact angles and the zeta potentials of various titanium-based coatings, no single coating markedly improved the growth characteristics of hMSCs.

  16. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  17. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance the Differentiation of Human Switched Memory B Lymphocytes into Plasma Cells in Serum-Free Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Bonnaure

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of human B lymphocytes into plasma cells is one of the most stirring questions with regard to adaptive immunity. However, the terminal differentiation and survival of plasma cells are still topics with much to be discovered, especially when targeting switched memory B lymphocytes. Plasma cells can migrate to the bone marrow in response to a CXCL12 gradient and survive for several years while secreting antibodies. In this study, we aimed to get closer to niches favoring plasma cell survival. We tested low oxygen concentrations and coculture with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC from human bone marrow. Besides, all cultures were performed using an animal protein-free medium. Overall, our model enables the generation of high proportions of CD38+CD138+CD31+ plasma cells (≥50% when CD40-activated switched memory B lymphocytes were cultured in direct contact with mesenchymal stem cells. In these cultures, the secretion of CXCL12 and TGF-β, usually found in the bone marrow, was linked to the presence of MSC. The level of oxygen appeared less impactful than the contact with MSC. This study shows for the first time that expanded switched memory B lymphocytes can be differentiated into plasma cells using exclusively a serum-free medium.

  18. Overview of marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references

  19. Endogenously produced Indian Hedgehog regulates TGFβ-driven chondrogenesis of human bone marrow stromal/stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handorf, Andrew M; Chamberlain, Connie S; Li, Wan-Ju

    2015-04-15

    Human bone marrow stromal/stem cells (hBMSCs) have an inherent tendency to undergo hypertrophy when induced into the chondrogenic lineage using transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ) in vitro, reminiscent of what occurs during endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, Indian Hedgehog (IHH) has received little attention for its role during hBMSC chondrogenesis despite being considered a master regulator of endochondral ossification. In this study, we investigated the role that endogenously produced IHH plays during hBMSC chondrogenesis. We began by analyzing the expression of IHH throughout differentiation using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that IHH expression was upregulated dramatically upon chondrogenic induction and peaked from days 9 to 12 of differentiation, which coincided with a concomitant increase in the expression of chondrogenesis- and hypertrophy-related markers, suggesting a potential role for endogenously produced IHH in driving hBMSC chondrogenesis. More importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Hedgehog signaling with cyclopamine or knockdown of IHH almost completely blocked TGFβ1-induced chondrogenesis in hBMSCs, demonstrating that endogenously produced IHH is necessary for hBMSC chondrogenesis. Furthermore, overexpression of IHH was sufficient to drive chondrogenic differentiation, even when TGFβ signaling was inhibited. Finally, stimulation with TGFβ1 induced a significant and sustained upregulation of IHH expression within 3 h that preceded an upregulation in all cartilage-related genes analyzed, and knockdown of IHH blocked the effects of TGFβ1 entirely, suggesting that the effects of TGFβ1 are being mediated through endogenously produced IHH. Together, our findings demonstrate that endogenously produced IHH is playing a critical role in regulating hBMSC chondrogenesis.

  20. Genetic modification of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic cells with human coagulation factor IX-expressing plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Mohammad Reza; Azadbakhsh, Azadeh Sadat; Farokhi, Farrah; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Sam, Sohrab; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Haddad-Mashadrizeh, Aliakbar; Delirezh, Nowruz; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2016-05-01

    Ex-vivo gene therapy of hemophilias requires suitable bioreactors for secretion of hFIX into the circulation and stem cells hold great potentials in this regard. Viral vectors are widely manipulated and used to transfer hFIX gene into stem cells. However, little attention has been paid to the manipulation of hFIX transgene itself. Concurrently, the efficacy of such a therapeutic approach depends on determination of which vectors give maximal transgene expression. With this in mind, TF-1 (primary hematopoietic lineage) and rat-bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected with five hFIX-expressing plasmids containing different combinations of two human β-globin (hBG) introns inside the hFIX-cDNA and Kozak element and hFIX expression was evaluated by different methods. In BMSCs and TF-1 cells, the highest hFIX level was obtained from the intron-less and hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids respectively. The highest hFIX activity was obtained from the cells that carrying the hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids. BMSCs were able to produce higher hFIX by 1.4 to 4.7-fold increase with activity by 2.4 to 4.4-fold increase compared to TF-1 cells transfected with the same constructs. BMSCs and TF-1 cells could be effectively bioengineered without the use of viral vectors and hFIX minigene containing hBG introns could represent a particular interest in stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilias. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Src inhibitor dasatinib accelerates the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Id Boufker, Hichame; Lagneaux, Laurence; Najar, Mehdi; Piccart, Martine; Ghanem, Ghanem; Body, Jean-Jacques; Journé, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Src is an important non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase involved in signaling pathways that control cell adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation. It negatively regulates osteoblast activity, and, as such, its inhibition is a potential means to prevent bone loss. Dasatinib is a new dual Src/Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor initially developed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. It has also shown promising results in preclinical studies in various solid tumors. However, its effects on the differentiation of human osteoblasts have never been examined. We evaluated the effects of dasatinib on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) differentiation into osteoblasts, in the presence or absence of a mixture of dexamethasone, ascorbic acid and β-glycerophosphate (DAG) for up to 21 days. The differentiation kinetics was assessed by evaluating mineralization of the extracellular matrix, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and expression of osteoblastic markers (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand [RANKL], bone sialoprotein [BSP], osteopontin [OPN]). Dasatinib significantly increased the activity of ALP and the level of calcium deposition in MSC cultured with DAG after, respectively, 7 and 14 days; it upregulated the expression of BSP and OPN genes independently of DAG; and it markedly downregulated the expression of RANKL gene and protein (decrease in RANKL/OPG ratio), the key factor that stimulates osteoclast differentiation and activity. Our results suggest a dual role for dasatinib in both (i) stimulating osteoblast differentiation leading to a direct increase in bone formation, and (ii) downregulating RANKL synthesis by osteoblasts leading to an indirect inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, dasatinib is a potentially interesting candidate drug for the treatment of osteolysis through its dual effect on bone metabolism

  2. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel β-tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangpeng; Zhao Li; Cui Lei; Liu Wei; Cao Yilin

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 μm in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. β-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In β-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in β-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering

  3. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate

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    Liu Guangpeng [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhao Li [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cui Lei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Liu Wei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cao Yilin [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China)

    2007-06-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 {mu}m in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. {beta}-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In {beta}-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in {beta}-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  4. MicroRNA-4739 regulates osteogenic and adipocytic differentiation of immortalized human bone marrow stromal cells via targeting LRP3

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    Mona Elsafadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulatory networks underlying lineage differentiation and fate determination of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC is a prerequisite for their therapeutic use. The goal of the current study was to unravel the novel role of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 3 (LRP3 in regulating the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of immortalized hBMSCs. Gene expression profiling revealed significantly higher LRP3 levels in the highly osteogenic hBMSC clone imCL1 than in the less osteogenic clone imCL2, as well as a significant upregulation of LRP3 during the osteogenic induction of the imCL1 clone. Data from functional and gene expression assays demonstrated the role of LRP3 as a molecular switch promoting hBMSC lineage differentiation into osteoblasts and inhibiting differentiation into adipocytes. Interestingly, microRNA (miRNA expression profiling identified miR-4739 as the most under-represented miRNA (−36.11 fold in imCL1 compared to imCL2. The TargetScan prediction algorithm, combined with functional and biochemical assays, identified LRP3 mRNA as a novel target of miR-4739, with a single potential binding site for miR-4739 located in the LRP3 3′ UTR. Regulation of LRP3 expression by miR-4739 was subsequently confirmed by qRT-PCR, western blotting, and luciferase assays. Over-expression of miR-4739 mimicked the effects of LRP3 knockdown on promoting adipogenic and suppressing osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Hence, we report for the first time a novel biological role for the LRP3/hsa-miR-4739 axis in balancing osteogenic and adipocytic differentiation of hBMSCs. Our data support the potential utilization of miRNA-based therapies in regenerative medicine.

  5. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of hematopoietic growth factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yan; Wang Guanjun; Zhu Jingyan; Wang Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hematopoietic growth factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow (BM-MSC) pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cultured P4 and P5 BM-MSCs were exposed to X rays at the doses of 50, 75 and 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy·min -1 ). The changes of levels of stem cell factor (SCF), IL-6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) secreted by BM- MSCs pretreated with LDR were determined by ELISA method. Results: As compared with control group at the same time, the levels of SCF in experimental group had a tendency of increasing after 24 h and 48 h radiation, but only in 75 mGy group the SCF level was obviously increased (P<0.05). The levels of IL-6 in 50 and 75 mGy groups at 24 h and 48 h, in 100 mGy group at 24 h were obviously increased compared with control group (P< 0.05). The levels of M-CSF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h were also increased (P<0.05), it increased markedly in 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: LDR has hormesis effect on BM-MSCs. After LDR, the BM-MSCs grow faster and in a certain phase the expression levels of hematopoietic growth factors are increased. (authors)

  6. Modified Titanium Surface-Mediated Effects on Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Response

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    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of titanium implants is used to enhance osseointegration. The study objective was to evaluate five modified titanium surfaces in terms of cytocompatibility and pro-osteogenic/pro-angiogenic properties for human mesenchymal stromal cells: amorphous microporous silica (AMS, bone morphogenetic protein-2 immobilized on AMS (AMS + BMP, bio-active glass (BAG and two titanium coatings with different porosity (T1; T2. Four surfaces served as controls: uncoated Ti (Ti, Ti functionalized with BMP-2 (Ti + BMP, Ti surface with a thickened titanium oxide layer (TiO2 and a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS. The proliferation of eGFP-fLuc (enhanced green fluorescence protein-firefly luciferase transfected cells was tracked non-invasively by fluorescence microscopy and bio-luminescence imaging. The implant surface-mediated effects on cell differentiation potential was tracked by determination of osteogenic and angiogenic parameters [alkaline phosphatase (ALP; osteocalcin (OC; osteoprotegerin (OPG; vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A]. Unrestrained cell proliferation was observed on (unfunctionalized Ti and AMS surfaces, whereas BAG and porous titanium coatings T1 and T2 did not support cell proliferation. An important pro-osteogenic and pro-angiogenic potential of the AMS + BMP surface was observed. In contrast, coating the Ti surface with BMP did not affect the osteogenic differentiation of the progenitor cells. A significantly slower BMP-2 release from AMS compared to Ti supports these findings. In the unfunctionalized state, Ti was found to be superior to AMS in terms of OPG and VEGF-A production. AMS is suggested to be a promising implant coating material for bioactive agents delivery.

  7. LIGHT (TNFSF14 Increases the Survival and Proliferation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available LIGHT (HVEM-L, TNFSF14, or CD258, an entity homologous to lymphotoxins, with inducible nature and the ability to compete with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM/tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related 2, is a member of the TNF superfamily. It is expressed as a homotrimer on activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs, and has three receptors: HVEM, LT-β receptor (LTβR, and decoy receptor 3 (DcR3. So far, three receptors with distinct cellular expression patterns are known to interact with LIGHT. Follicular DCs and stromal cells bind LIGHT through LTβR. We monitored the effects of LIGHT on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. At first, we checked the negative and positive differentiation markers of BM-MSCs. And we confirmed the quality of MSCs by staining cells undergoing adipogenesis (Oil Red O staining, chondrogenesis (Alcian blue staining, and osteogenesis (Alizarin red staining. After rhLIGHT treatment, we monitored the count, viability, and proliferation of cells and cell cycle distribution. PDGF and TGFβ production by rhLIGHT was examined by ELISA, and the underlying biological mechanisms were studied by immunoblotting by rhLIGHT treatment. LTβR was constitutively expressed on the surface of human BM-MSCs. Cell number and viability increased after rhLIGHT treatment. BM-MSC proliferation was induced by an increase in the S/G2/M phase. The expression of not only diverse cyclins such as cyclin B1, D1, D3, and E, but also CDK1 and CDK2, increased, while that of p27 decreased, after rhLIGHT treatment. RhLIGHT-induced PDGF and TGFβ production mediated by STAT3 and Smad3 activation accelerated BM-MSC proliferation. Thus, LIGHT and LTβR interaction increases the survival and proliferation of human BM-MSCs, and therefore, LIGHT might play an important role in stem cell therapy.

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates proliferation maintaining the multipotency of human adult bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoli; H'ng, Shiau-Chen; Leong, David T; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Melendez, Alirio J

    2010-08-01

    High renewal and maintenance of multipotency of human adult stem cells (hSCs), are a prerequisite for experimental analysis as well as for potential clinical usages. The most widely used strategy for hSC culture and proliferation is using serum. However, serum is poorly defined and has a considerable degree of inter-batch variation, which makes it difficult for large-scale mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expansion in homogeneous culture conditions. Moreover, it is often observed that cells grown in serum-containing media spontaneously differentiate into unknown and/or undesired phenotypes. Another way of maintaining hSC development is using cytokines and/or tissue-specific growth factors; this is a very expensive approach and can lead to early unwanted differentiation. In order to circumvent these issues, we investigated the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), in the growth and multipotency maintenance of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. We show that S1P induces growth, and in combination with reduced serum, or with the growth factors FGF and platelet-derived growth factor-AB, S1P has an enhancing effect on growth. We also show that the MSCs cultured in S1P-supplemented media are able to maintain their differentiation potential for at least as long as that for cells grown in the usual serum-containing media. This is shown by the ability of cells grown in S1P-containing media to be able to undergo osteogenic as well as adipogenic differentiation. This is of interest, since S1P is a relatively inexpensive natural product, which can be obtained in homogeneous high-purity batches: this will minimize costs and potentially reduce the unwanted side effects observed with serum. Taken together, S1P is able to induce proliferation while maintaining the multipotency of different human stem cells, suggesting a potential for S1P in developing serum-free or serum-reduced defined medium for adult stem cell cultures.

  9. Microvesicles derived from adult human bone marrow and tissue specific mesenchymal stem cells shuttle selected pattern of miRNAs.

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    Federica Collino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs have been described as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. MVs after internalization within target cells may deliver genetic information. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and liver resident stem cells (HLSCs were shown to release MVs shuttling functional mRNAs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether MVs derived from MSCs and HLSCs contained selected micro-RNAs (miRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MVs were isolated from MSCs and HLSCs. The presence in MVs of selected ribonucleoproteins involved in the traffic and stabilization of RNA was evaluated. We observed that MVs contained TIA, TIAR and HuR multifunctional proteins expressed in nuclei and stress granules, Stau1 and 2 implicated in the transport and stability of mRNA and Ago2 involved in miRNA transport and processing. RNA extracted from MVs and cells of origin was profiled for 365 known human mature miRNAs by real time PCR. Hierarchical clustering and similarity analysis of miRNAs showed 41 co-expressed miRNAs in MVs and cells. Some miRNAs were accumulated within MVs and absent in the cells after MV release; others were retained within the cells and not secreted in MVs. Gene ontology analysis of predicted and validated targets showed that the high expressed miRNAs in cells and MVs could be involved in multi-organ development, cell survival and differentiation. Few selected miRNAs shuttled by MVs were also associated with the immune system regulation. The highly expressed miRNAs in MVs were transferred to target cells after MV incorporation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that MVs contained ribonucleoproteins involved in the intracellular traffic of RNA and selected pattern of miRNAs, suggesting a dynamic regulation of RNA compartmentalization in MVs. The observation that MV-highly expressed miRNAs were transferred to target cells, rises the possibility that the biological effect of stem

  10. HLA in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kimiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    It has been well understood that human major histocompatibility antigen system, HLA is the most important role in the allo transplantation. Therefore, the structure of HLA genes was presented by the recent information (1987). Moreover, their functions in vitro and in vivo also were described. Finally, bone marrow transplantation and HLA network system in Japan against HLA mismatched case was proposed. It is eagerly expected that functional and clinical bone marrow transplantation in Japan could be succeeded. (author)

  11. Maintenance of differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene despite of extensive proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, Basem M.; Haack-Sorensen, Mandana; Burns, Jorge S.; Elsnab, Birgitte; Jakob, Franz; Hokland, Peter; Kassem, Moustapha

    2005-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) represent a population of stem cells that are capable of differentiation into multiple lineages. However, these cells exhibit senescence-associated growth arrest and phenotypic changes during long-term in vitro culture. We have recently demonstrated that overexpression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in hMSC reconstitutes telomerase activity and extends life span of the cells [Nat. Biotechnol. 20 (2002) 592]. In the present study, we have performed extensive characterization of three independent cell lines derived from the parental hMSC-TERT cell line based on different plating densities during expansion in culture: 1:2 (hMSC-TERT2), 1:4 (hMSC-TERT4), and 1:20 (hMSC-TERT20). The 3 cell lines exhibited differences in morphology and growth rates but they all maintained the characteristics of self-renewing stem cells and the ability to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages: osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and endothelial-like cells over a 3-year period in culture. Also, surface marker studies using flow cytometry showed a pattern similar to that known from normal hMSC. Thus, telomerization of hMSC by hTERT overexpression maintains the stem cell phenotype of hMSC and it may be a useful tool for obtaining enough number of cells with a stable phenotype for mechanistic studies of cell differentiation and for tissue engineering protocols

  12. Effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on cytokine production by peripheral blood naive, memory, and effector T cells.

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    Laranjeira, Paula; Pedrosa, Monia; Pedreiro, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-05

    The different distribution of T cells among activation/differentiation stages in immune disorders may condition the outcome of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. Indeed, the effect of MSCs in the different functional compartments of T cells is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of human bone marrow MSCs on naturally occurring peripheral blood functional compartments of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells: naive, central memory, effector memory, and effector compartments. For that, mononuclear cells (MNCs) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin were cultured in the absence/presence of MSCs. The percentage of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFNγ), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-17, IL-9, and IL-6 and the amount of cytokine produced were assessed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) in purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and phenotypic and mRNA expression changes induced by PMA + ionomycin stimulation in MSCs, were also evaluated. MSCs induced the reduction of the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL-2 in all functional compartments, except for naive IFNγ(+)CD4(+) T cells. This inhibitory effect differentially affected CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as the T-cell functional compartments; remarkably, different cytokines showed distinct patterns of inhibition regarding both the percentage of producing cells and the amount of cytokine produced. Likewise, the percentages of IL-17(+), IL-17(+)TNF-α(+), and IL-9(+) within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and of IL-6(+)CD4(+) T cells were decreased in MNC-MSC co-cultures. MSCs decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in stimulated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas TGF-β was reduced in CD8(+) and augmented in CD4(+) T cells, with no changes for CTLA4. Finally, PMA

  13. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-8 (rhIL-8) on the bone marrow cells of normal BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulong; Zhou Jianying; Wang Guoquan; Dai Hong; Duan Yingying; Guo Xiaokui

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe the colony formation ability of recombinant human interleukin-8 (rhIL-8) on bone marrow cells (BMCs) of normal mice in vivo. Methods: By means of cells culture and flow cytometry (FCM), the colony-stimulating activity of rhIL-8 on BMCs of normal mice was studied. Results: The experimental studies in vivo demonstrated that rhIL-8 could not changed the counts of CFU-GM and distribution of cell cycle in BMCs. Conclusion: rhIL-8 has no colony-stimulating activity to BMCs of normal mice

  14. Utilizing two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy to study human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell morphogenesis in chitosan scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping-Jung; Huang, Chi-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-You; Lee, Hsuan-Sue; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    A major goal of tissue engineering is to cultivate the cartilage in vitro. One approach is to implant the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into the three dimensional biocompatible and biodegradable material. Through the action of the chondrogenic factor TGF-β3, the stem cells can be induced to secrete collagen. In this study, mesenchymal stem cells are implanted on the chitosan scaffold and TGF-β3 was added to produce the cartilage tissue and TP autofluorescence and SHG microscopy was used to image the process of chondrogenesis. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy can be developed into an effective tool for evaluating the quality of tissue engineering products.

  15. Role of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells in promoting osteogenic differentiation by influencing p38 MAPK signaling in lipopolysaccharide -induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuli; Wu, Hongxia; Shen, Ming; Ding, Siyang; Miao, Jing; Chen, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial pathogens, which not only affect connective tissue attachments but also cause alveolar bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) under lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory conditions. Proliferation levels were measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU). Osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were investigated using chromogenic alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) activity substrate assays, Alizarin red S staining, and RT-PCR analysis of HBMSCs osteogenic marker expression. Oxidative stress induced by LPS was investigated by assaying reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Here, we demonstrated that HAMSCs increased the proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and SOD activity of LPS-induced HBMSCs, and down-regulated the ROS level. Moreover, our results suggested that the activation of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway is essential for reversing the LPS-induced bone-destructive processes. SB203580, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling, significantly suppressed the anti-inflammatory effects in HAMSCs. In conclusion, HAMSCs show a strong potential in treating inflammation-induced bone loss by influencing p38 MAPK signaling. - Highlights: • LPS inhibites osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs via suppression of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs promote LPS-induced HBMSCs osteogenic differentiation through p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs reverse LPS-induced oxidative stress in LPS-induced HBMSCs through p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  16. Production of human platelet lysate by use of ultrasound for ex vivo expansion of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Martina; Albiero, Elena; Alghisi, Alberta; Chieregato, Katia; Lievore, Chiara; Madeo, Domenico; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Astori, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    A medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) is of common use for the expansion of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, its use is discouraged by regulatory authorities because of the risk of zoonoses and immune reactions. Human platelet lysate (PL) obtained by freezing/thawing disruption of platelets has been proposed as a possible substitute of FBS. The process is time-consuming and not well standardized. A new method for obtaining PL that is based on the use of ultrasound is proposed. Platelet sonication was performed by submerging platelet-containing plastic bags in an ultrasonic bath. To evaluate platelet lysis we measured platelet-derived growth factor-AB release. PL efficiency was tested by expanding bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, measuring population doubling time, differentiation capacity and immunogenic properties. Safety was evaluated by karyotyping expanded cells. After 30 minutes of sonication, 74% of platelet derived growth factor-AB was released. PL enhanced BM-MSC proliferation rate compared with FBS. The mean cumulative population doubling (cPD) of cells growth in PL at 10%, 7.5% and 5% was better compared with cPD obtained with 10% FBS. PD time (hours) of MSCs with PL obtained by sonication was shorter than for cPD with PL obtained by freezing/thawing (18.9 versus 17.4, P < 0.01). BM mononucleated cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. When BM-MSCs and T cells were co-cultured in close contact, immunosuppressive activity of BM-MSCs was maintained. Cell karyotype showed no genetic alterations. The proposed method for the production of PL by sonication could be a safe, efficient and fast substitute of FBS, without the potential risks of FBS. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Micromass co-culture of human articular chondrocytes and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to investigate stable neocartilage tissue formation in vitro

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    S Giovannini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies for articular cartilage defects rely on expanded chondrocytes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternative cell source should their hypertrophic differentiation pathway be prevented. Possible cellular instruction between human articular chondrocytes (HAC and human bone marrow MSC was investigated in micromass pellets. HAC and MSC were mixed in different percentages or incubated individually in pellets for 3 or 6 weeks with and without TGF-beta1 and dexamethasone (±T±D as chondrogenic factors. Collagen II, collagen X and S100 protein expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated applying the Bern score and quantified using dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP was detected on cryosections and soluble ALP measured in pellet supernatants. HAC alone generated hyaline-like discs, while MSC formed spheroid pellets in ±T±D. Co-cultured pellets changed from disc to spheroid shape with decreasing number of HAC, and displayed random cell distribution. In -T-D, HAC expressed S100, produced GAG and collagen II, and formed lacunae, while MSC did not produce any cartilage-specific proteins. Based on GAG, collagen type II and S100 expression chondrogenic differentiation occurred in -T-D MSC co-cultures. However, quantitative experimental GAG and DNA values did not differ from predicted values, suggesting only HAC contribution to GAG production. MSC produced cartilage-specific matrix only in +T+D but underwent hypertrophy in all pellet cultures. In summary, influence of HAC on MSC was restricted to early signs of neochondrogenesis. However, MSC did not contribute to the proteoglycan deposition, and HAC could not prevent hypertrophy of MSC induced by chondrogenic stimuli.

  18. Granulocyte-mobilized bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcese, William; De Angelis, Gottardo; Cerretti, Raffaella

    2012-11-01

    In the last few years, mobilized peripheral blood has overcome bone marrow as a graft source, but, despite the evidence of a more rapid engraftment, the incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease is significantly higher with, consequently, more transplant-related mortality on the long follow-up. Overall, the posttransplant outcome of mobilized peripheral blood recipients is similar to that of patients who are bone marrow grafted. More recently, the use of bone marrow after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) donor priming has been introduced in the transplant practice. Herein, we review biological acquisitions and clinical results on the use of G-CSF-primed bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. G-CSF the increases the HSC compartment and exerts an intense immunoregulatory effect on marrow T-cells resulting in the shift from Th1 to Th2 phenotype with higher production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The potential advantages of these biological effects have been translated in the clinical practice by using G-CSF primed unmanipulated bone marrow in the setting of transplant from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical donor with highly encouraging results. For patients lacking an HLA-identical sibling, the transplant of G-CSF primed unmanipulated bone marrow from a haploidentical donor combined with an intense in-vivo immunosuppression is a valid alternative achieving results that are well comparable with those reported for umbilical cord blood, HLA-matched unrelated peripheral blood/bone marrow or T-cell-depleted haploidentical transplant.

  19. Forced expression of Sox2 or Nanog in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells maintains their expansion and differentiation capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Masahiro J.; Takenaka, Chiemi; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow have capability to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The cells have already been applied in various clinical situations because of their expansion and differentiation capabilities. The cells lose their capabilities after several passages, however. With the aim of conferring higher capability on human bone marrow MSCs, we introduced the Sox2 or Nanog gene into the cells. Sox2 and Nanog are not only essential for pluripotency and self-renewal of embryonic stem cells, but also expressed in somatic stem cells that have superior expansion and differentiation potentials. We found that Sox2-expressing MSCs showed consistent proliferation and osteogenic capability in culture media containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) compared to control cells. Significantly, in the presence of bFGF in culture media, most of the Sox2-expressing cells were small, whereas the control cells were elongated in shape. We also found that Nanog-expressing cells even in the absence of bFGF had much higher capabilities for expansion and osteogenesis than control cells. These results demonstrate not only an effective way to maintain proliferation and differentiation potentials of MSCs but also an important implication about the function of bFGF for self-renewal of stem cells including MSCs

  20. Differential expression of CCN-family members in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation

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    Hendrich Christian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human cysteine rich protein 61 (CYR61, CCN1 as well as the other members of the CCN family of genes play important roles in cellular processes such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and survival. These cellular events are of special importance within the complex cellular interactions ongoing in bone remodeling. Previously, we analyzed the role of CYR61/CCN1 as an extracellular signaling molecule in human osteoblasts. Since mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow are important progenitors for various differentiation pathways in bone and possess increasing potential for regenerative medicine, here we aimed to analyze the expression of CCN family members in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells and along the osteogenic, the adipogenic and the chondrogenic differentiation. Results Primary cultures of human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from the femoral head of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts was done in monolayer culture, differentiation into chondrocytes was induced in high density cell pellet cultures. For either pathway, established differentiation markers and CCN-members were analyzed at the mRNA level by RT-PCR and the CYR61/CCN1 protein was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. RT-PCR and histochemical analysis revealed the appropriate phenotype of differentiated cells (Alizarin-red S, Oil Red O, Alcian blue, alkaline phosphatase; osteocalcin, collagen types I, II, IX, X, cbfa1, PPARγ, aggrecan. Mesenchymal stem cells expressed CYR61/CCN1, CTGF/CCN2, CTGF-L/WISP2/CCN5 and WISP3/CCN6. The CYR61/CCN1 expression decreased markedly during osteogenic differentiation, adipogenic differentiation and chondrogenic differentiation. These results were confirmed by immuncytochemical analyses. WISP2/CCN5 RNA expression declined during adipogenic differentiation and WISP3/CCN6 RNA expression was markedly reduced in chondrogenic differentiation. Conclusion The

  1. Effect of daily low dose gamma irradiation on growth and differentiation of human myeloid leukaemic bone marrow in diffusion chambers

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    Greenberger, J S [Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Department of Radiation and Sidney Farber Cancer Institute; Chang, J M; King, V; Fulmer, S; Balzuno, S; Moloney, W C [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow from each of 8 untreated patients with myeloproliferative disorders was grown in diffusion chambers in 760 rad total body irradiated rats. Rats were exposed to 11.5, 57.5, or 108.5 rad daily for 14-21 and cell growth compared to that detected in unirradiated chambers. Cells from acute myelogenous leukaemia patients exposed to 11.5 rad per d grew for 11-21 d and there was no consistent stimulation of differentiation of immature granulocytic cells to mature granulocytes that was attributable to irradiation. Cells from a chronic myeloid leukaemia patient in chronic phase or blast crisis, and a polycythaemia vera patient with myeloid metaplasia showed signigicant morphologic differentiation from immature to mature granulocytes in control chambers with no additional effect of daily irradiation. Marrow specimens from 2 AML patients exposed to each of 3 daily dose fractions over 14 d revealed a dose-dependent decrease in immature granulocytes with no persistent increase in mature granulocytes. In both irradiated and control chambers, macrophages increased over 21 d. Thus, cells from patients with myeloprofilerative disorders may not necessarily differentiate to mature granulocytes following in vivo exposure to ionizing irradiation.

  2. Proteomic validation of multifunctional molecules in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumi Kim

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are one of the most attractive therapeutic resources in clinical application owing to their multipotent capability, which means that cells can differentiate into various mesenchymal tissues such as bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle and marrow stroma. Depending on the cellular source, MSCs exhibit different application potentials according to their different in vivo functions, despite similar phenotypic and cytological characteristics. To understand the different molecular conditions that govern the different application or differentiation potential of each MSC according to cellular source, we generated a proteome reference map of MSCs obtained from bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord blood (CB and peripheral blood (PB. We identified approximately 30 differentially regulated (or expressed proteins. Most up-regulated proteins show a cytoskeletal and antioxidant or detoxification role according to their functional involvement. Additionally, these proteins are involved in the increase of cell viability, engraftment and migration in pathological conditions in vivo. In summary, we examined differentially expressed key regulatory factors of MSCs obtained from several cellular sources, demonstrated their differentially expressed proteome profiles and discussed their functional role in specific pathological conditions. With respect to the field of cell therapy, it may be particularly crucial to determine the most suitable cell sources according to target disease.

  3. Generation of dendritic cells from human bone marrow mononuclear cells: advantages for clinical application in comparison to peripheral blood monocyte derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, L; Feuerer, M; Beckhove, P; Umansky, V; Schirrmacher, V

    2002-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) currently used for vaccination in clinical studies to induce immunity against malignant cells are normally generated from peripheral blood-derived monocytes. Here we studied conditions for the generation of DCs from unseparated human bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells and compared them functionally with DCs from blood. The two types of DCs, from bone marrow (BM-DC) and peripheral blood (BL-DC), were generated in parallel from the same normal healthy donors by culturing in serum-free X-VIVO 20 medium containing GM-CSF and IL-4, and then the phenotypes and functions were compared. BM-DC generation occurred in 14 days and involved proliferative expansion from CD34 stem cells and differentiation while BL-DC generation occurred in 7 days from CD14 monocytes and involved only differentiation. A 7- to 25-fold higher number of DCs could be obtained from BM than from blood. BM-DC had similar phenotypes as BL-DC. The capacity to stimulate MLR reactivity in allogeneic T lymphocytes was higher with BM-DC than that with BL-DC. Also, the capacity to stimulate autologous memory T cell responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) or tuberculin (PPD) was higher with BM-DC than with BL-DC. These results suggest that BM-DC as produced here may be a very economic and useful source of professional antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor immunotherapeutic protocols.

  4. NOTCH-Mediated Maintenance and Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Stromal/Stem Cells: A Technology Designed for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine.

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    Dong, Yufeng; Long, Teng; Wang, Cuicui; Mirando, Anthony J; Chen, Jianquan; O'Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have great therapeutic potential for treating skeletal disease and facilitating skeletal repair, although maintaining their multipotency and expanding these cells ex vivo have proven difficult. Because most stem cell-based applications to skeletal regeneration and repair in the clinic would require large numbers of functional BMSCs, recent research has focused on methods for the appropriate selection, expansion, and maintenance of BMSC populations during long-term culture. We describe here a novel biological method that entails selection of human BMSCs based on NOTCH2 expression and activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway in cultured BMSCs via a tissue culture plate coated with recombinant human JAGGED1 (JAG1) ligand. We demonstrate that transient JAG1-mediated NOTCH signaling promotes human BMSC maintenance and expansion while increasing their skeletogenic differentiation capacity, both ex vivo and in vivo. This study is the first of its kind to describe a NOTCH-mediated methodology for the maintenance and expansion of human BMSCs and will serve as a platform for future clinical or translational studies aimed at skeletal regeneration and repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  5. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Carmine; Montuori, Nunzia; Salvati, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM...... Culture (LTC)-Initiating Cells (ICs) and in the release of clonogenic progenitors from LTCs of CD34+ HSCs. Further, suPAR increases adhesion and survival of CD34+ KG1 AML cells, whereas uPAR84-95 increases their proliferation.Thus, circulating DIIDIII-suPAR, strongly increased in HSC mobilization...... microenvironment.uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88...

  6. Immunoregulatory effects on T lymphocytes by human mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, amniotic fluid, and placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareschi, Katia; Castiglia, Sara; Sanavio, Fiorella; Rustichelli, Deborah; Muraro, Michela; Defedele, Davide; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising tool in cell therapies because of their multipotent, bystander, and immunomodulatory properties. Although bone marrow represents the main source of MSCs, there remains a need to identify a stem cell source that is safe and easily accessible and yields large numbers of cells without provoking debates over ethics. In this study, MSCs isolated from amniotic fluid and placenta were compared with bone marrow MSCs. Their immunomodulatory properties were studied in total activated T cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA-PBMCs). In particular, an in vitro co-culture system was established to study: (i) the effect on T-lymphocyte proliferation; (ii) the presence of T regulatory lymphocytes (Treg); (iii) the immunophenotype of various T subsets (Th1 and Th2 naïve, memory, effector lymphocytes); (iv) cytokine release and master gene expression to verify Th1, Th2, and Th17 polarization; and (v) IDO production. Under all co-culture conditions with PHA-PBMCs and MSCs (independently of tissue origin), data revealed: (i) T proliferation inhibition; (ii) increase in naïve T and decrease in memory T cells; (iii) increase in T regulatory lymphocytes; (iv) strong Th2 polarization associated with increased interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 levels, Th1 inhibition (significant decreases in interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-12) and Th17 induction (production of high concentrations of interleukins-6 and -17); (v) indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase mRNA induction in MSCs co-cultured with PHA-PBMCs. AF-MSCs had a more potent immunomodulatory effect on T cells than BM-MSCs, only slightly higher than that of placenta MSCs. This study indicates that MSCs isolated from fetal tissues may be considered a good alternative to BM-MSCs for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Rapid Osteogenic Enhancement of Stem Cells in Human Bone Marrow Using a Glycogen-Synthease-Kinase-3-Beta Inhibitor Improves Osteogenic Efficacy In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Krause, Ulf; Chaput, Christopher D; Cross, Lauren M; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Gregory, Carl A

    2018-04-01

    Non-union defects of bone are a major problem in orthopedics, especially for patients with a low healing capacity. Fixation devices and osteoconductive materials are used to provide a stable environment for osteogenesis and an osteogenic component such as autologous human bone marrow (hBM) is then used, but robust bone formation is contingent on the healing capacity of the patients. A safe and rapid procedure for improvement of the osteoanabolic properties of hBM is, therefore, sought after in the field of orthopedics, especially if it can be performed within the temporal limitations of the surgical procedure, with minimal manipulation, and at point-of-care. One way to achieve this goal is to stimulate canonical Wingless (cWnt) signaling in bone marrow-resident human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), the presumptive precursors of osteoblasts in bone marrow. Herein, we report that the effects of cWnt stimulation can be achieved by transient (1-2 hours) exposure of osteoprogenitors to the GSK3β-inhibitor (2'Z,3'E)-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) at a concentration of 800 nM. Very-rapid-exposure-to-BIO (VRE-BIO) on either hMSCs or whole hBM resulted in the long-term establishment of an osteogenic phenotype associated with accelerated alkaline phosphatase activity and enhanced transcription of the master regulator of osteogenesis, Runx2. When VRE-BIO treated hBM was tested in a rat spinal fusion model, VRE-BIO caused the formation of a denser, stiffer, fusion mass as compared with vehicle treated hBM. Collectively, these data indicate that the VRE-BIO procedure may represent a rapid, safe, and point-of-care strategy for the osteogenic enhancement of autologous hBM for use in clinical orthopedic procedures. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:342-353. © 2018 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  8. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy in psoriatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.; Altmeyer, P.; Chilf, G.; Schlesinger, G.; Holzmann, H.; Hoer, G.

    1982-01-01

    24 psoriatics as well as 24 normal healthy adults were studied by functional bone marrow scintigraphy using Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin millimicrospheres (Tc-99m-HSA-MM). Functional bone marrow scintigraphy is an in vivo test system for the assessment of various functional properties of fixed macrophages. 58% of psoriatics who had no systemic drug treatment demonstrated peripheral extension of the bone marrow space indicating hyperplasia of bone marrow macrophages. This phenomenon could be observed only in one normal subject who was a high-performance sportsman. 83% (n=6) of psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver demonstrated bone marrow extension. The 'capacity' of bone marrow macrophages to engulf Tc-99m-HSA-MM ('uptake ratio') was diminished in 42% of non-treated as well as 66% of psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid. The phagocytic and proteolytic turnover of Tc-99m-HSA-MM in bone marrow, spleen, and liver was found to be accelerated in 66% of non-treated psoriatics, normal, accelerated or delayed in psoriatics treated with aromatic retinoid as well as considerably delayed in all of the psoriatics with cirrhosis of liver. Functional bone marrow scintigraphy proved to be an appropriate in vivo test system to reveal abnormalities of fixed macrophages in psoriatics. Furthermore, theratpeutic effects as well as influences of pre-existing disorders on different macrophage populations can be assessed. (Author)

  9. Reconstruction of limbal stem cell deficient corneal surface with induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on amniotic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohaina, Che Man; Then, Kong Yong; Ng, Angela Min Hwei; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Zahidin, Aida Zairani Mohd; Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah B H

    2014-03-01

    The cornea can be damaged by a variety of clinical disorders or chemical, mechanical, and thermal injuries. The objectives of this study were to induce bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to corneal lineage, to form a tissue engineered corneal substitute (TEC) using BMSCs, and to treat corneal surface defects in a limbal stem cell deficiency model. BMSCs were induced to corneal lineage using limbal medium for 10 days. Induced BMSCs demonstrated upregulation of corneal stem cell markers; β1-integrin, C/EBPδ, ABCG2, and p63, increased protein expression of CK3 and p63 significantly compared with the uninduced ones. For TEC formation, passage 1 BMSCs were trypsinized and seeded on amniotic membrane in a transwell co-culture system and were grown in limbal medium. Limbal stem cell deficiency models were induced by alkaline injury, and the TEC was implanted for 8 weeks. Serial slit lamp evaluation revealed remarkable improvement in corneal regeneration in terms of corneal clarity and reduced vascularization. Histologic and optical coherence tomography analyses demonstrated comparable corneal thickness and achieved stratified epithelium with a compact stromal layer resembling that of normal cornea. CK3 and p63 were expressed in the newly regenerated cornea. In conclusion, BMSCs can be induced into corneal epithelial lineage, and these cells are viable for the formation of TEC, to be used for the reconstruction of the corneal surface in the limbal stem cell deficient model. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects Of Hypoxia in Long-Term In Vitro Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Annelise; Amorin, Bruna; Laureano, Álvaro; Valim, Vanessa; Dahmer, Alice; Zambonato, Bruna; Sehn, Filipe; Wilke, Ianaê; Bruschi, Lia; Silva, Maria Aparecida Lima da; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo; Silla, Lucia

    2017-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are considered multipotent stromal, non-hematopoietic cells with properties of self-renovation and differentiation. Optimal conditions for culture of MSC have been under investigation. The oxygen tension used for cultivation has been studied and appears to play an important role in biological behavior of mesenchymal cells. The aim is characterize MSC in hypoxia and normoxia conditions comparing their morphological and functional characteristics. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells obtained from 15 healthy donors and cultured. MSC obtained from each donor were separated into two cultivation conditions normoxia (21% O 2 ) and hypoxia (three donors at 1%, three donors at 2%, five donors at 3%, and four donors at 4% O 2 ) up to second passage. MSC were evaluated for proliferation, differentiation, immunophenotyping, size and cell complexity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial activity, and autophagy. Culture conditions applied did not seem to affect immunophenotypic features and cellular plasticity. However, cells subjected to hypoxia showed smaller size and greater cellular complexity, besides lower proliferation (P cells cultured in low O 2 tension had lower mitochondrial activity (P Cell. Biochem. 118: 3072-3079, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protective mechanisms of melatonin against hydrogen-peroxide-induced toxicity in human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Safa, Majid; Kamrava, Seyed Kamran; Darabi, Radbod; Hayat, Parisa; Motevalian, Manijeh

    2017-07-01

    Many obstacles compromise the efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) by inducing apoptosis in the grafted BM-MSCs. The current study investigates the effect of melatonin on important mediators involved in survival of BM-MSCs in hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) apoptosis model. In brief, BM-MSCs were isolated, treated with melatonin, and then exposed to H 2 O 2 . Their viability was assessed by MTT assay and apoptotic fractions were evaluated through Annexin V, Hoechst staining, and ADP/ATP ratio. Oxidative stress biomarkers including ROS, total antioxidant power (TAP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity, glutathione (GSH), thiol molecules, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were determined. Secretion of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) were measured by ELISA assay. The protein expression of caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2, was also evaluated by Western blotting. Melatonin pretreatment significantly increased viability and decreased apoptotic fraction of H 2 O 2 -exposed BM-MSCs. Melatonin also decreased ROS generation, as well as increasing the activity of SOD and CAT enzymes and GSH content. Secretion of inflammatory cytokines in H 2 O 2 -exposed cells was also reduced by melatonin. Expression of caspase-3 and Bax proteins in H 2 O 2 -exposed cells was diminished by melatonin pretreatment. The findings suggest that melatonin may be an effective protective agent against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in MSC.

  12. Preclinical correction of human Fanconi anemia complementation group A bone marrow cells using a safety-modified lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P S; Taylor, J A; Trobridge, G D; Zhao, X; Beard, B C; Chien, S; Adair, J; Kohn, D B; Wagner, J E; Shimamura, A; Kiem, H-P

    2010-10-01

    One of the major hurdles for the development of gene therapy for Fanconi anemia (FA) is the increased sensitivity of FA stem cells to free radical-induced DNA damage during ex vivo culture and manipulation. To minimize this damage, we have developed a brief transduction procedure for lentivirus vector-mediated transduction of hematopoietic progenitor cells from patients with Fanconi anemia complementation group A (FANCA). The lentiviral vector FancA-sW contains the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter, the FANCA cDNA, and a synthetic, safety-modified woodchuck post transcriptional regulatory element (sW). Bone marrow mononuclear cells or purified CD34(+) cells from patients with FANCA were transduced in an overnight culture on recombinant fibronectin peptide CH-296, in low (5%) oxygen, with the reducing agent, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), and a combination of growth factors, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), Flt3 ligand, stem cell factor, and thrombopoietin. Transduced cells plated in methylcellulose in hypoxia with NAC showed increased colony formation compared with 21% oxygen without NAC (Pgene-corrected cells in patients with FANCA.

  13. Advances of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of cartilage defects: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Amirhamed, Haji Alizadeh; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies represent a new option for treating damaged cartilage. However, the outcomes following its clinical application have seldom been previously compared. The present paper presents the systematic review of current literatures on MSC-based therapy for cartilage repair in clinical applications. Ovid, Scopus, PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, which include "cartilage" and "stem cells". Only studies using bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) to treat cartilage defects clinically were included in this review. The clinical outcomes were compared, and the quality of the tissue repair was analysed where possible. Of the 996 articles, only six (n = 6) clinical studies have described the use of BM-MSC in clinical applications. Two studies were cohort observational trials, three were case series, and one was a case report. In the two comparative trials, BM-MSCs produced superior repair to cartilage treatment without cells and have comparable outcomes to autologous chondrocyte implantation. The case series and case-control studies have demonstrated that use of BM-MSCs resulted in better short- to long-term clinical outcomes with minimal complications. In addition, histological analyses in two studies have resulted in good repair tissue formation at the damaged site, composed mainly of hyaline-like cartilage. Although results of the respective studies are highly indicative that BM-MSC-based therapy is superior, due to the differences in methods and selection criteria used, it was not possible to make direct comparison between the studies. In conclusion, published studies do suggest that BM-MSCs could provide superior cartilage repair. However, due to limited number of reports, more robust studies might be required before a definitive conclusion can be drawn.

  14. [Proliferative capacity of mesenchymal stem cells from human fetal bone marrow and their ability to differentiate into the derivative cell types of three embryonic germ layers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Chun; Zhang, Yuan

    2008-06-25

    Strong proliferative capacity and the ability to differentiate into the derivative cell types of three embryonic germ layers are the two important characteristics of embryonic stem cells. To study whether the mesenchymal stem cells from human fetal bone marrow (hfBM-MSCs) possess these embryonic stem cell-like biological characteristics, hfBM-MSCs were isolated from bone barrows and further purified according to the different adherence of different kinds of cells to the wall of culture flask. The cell cycle of hfBM-MSCs and MSC-specific surface markers such as CD29, CD44, etc were identified using flow cytometry. The expressions of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the embryonic stem cell-specific antigens, such as Oct4 and SSEA-4 were detected with immunocytochemistry at the protein level and were also tested by RT-PCR at the mRNA level. Then, hfBM-MSCs were induced to differentiate toward neuron cells, adipose cells, and islet B cells under certain conditions. It was found that 92.3% passage-4 hfBM-MSCs and 96.1% passage-5 hfBM-MSCs were at G(0)/G(1) phase respectively. hfBM-MSCs expressed CD44, CD106 and adhesion molecule CD29, but not antigens of hematopoietic cells CD34 and CD45, and almost not antigens related to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), such as HLA-DR, CD40 and CD80. hfBM-MSCs expressed the embryonic stem cell-specific antigens such as Oct4, SSEA-4, and also hTERT. Exposure of these cells to various inductive agents resulted in morphological changes towards neuron-like cells, adipose-like cells, and islet B-like cells and they were tested to be positive for related characteristic markers. These results suggest that there are plenty of MSCs in human fetal bone marrow, and hfBM-MSCs possess the embryonic stem cell-like biological characteristics, moreover, they have a lower immunogenic nature. Thus, hfBM-MSCs provide an ideal source for tissue engineering and cellular therapeutics.

  15. Intraportal injection of insulin-producing cells generated from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells decreases blood glucose level in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Jiun; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lin, Chi-Hung; Weng, Zen-Chung; Chen, Tien-Hua; Shyu, Jia-Fwu

    2014-01-01

    We studied the process of trans-differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) into insulin-producing cells. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat model was used to study the effect of portal vein transplantation of these insulin-producing cells on blood sugar levels. The BM-MSCs were differentiated into insulin-producing cells under defined conditions. Real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry and glucose challenge were used to evaluate in vitro differentiation. Flow cytometry showed that hBM-MSCs were strongly positive for CD44, CD105 and CD73 and negative for hematopoietic markers CD34, CD38 and CD45. Differentiated cells expressed C-peptide as well as β-cells specific genes and hormones. Glucose stimulation increased C-peptide secretion in these cells. The insulin-producing, differentiated cells were transplanted into the portal vein of STZ-induced diabetic rats using a Port-A catheter. The insulin-producing cells were localized in the liver of the recipient rat and expressed human C-peptide. Blood glucose levels were reduced in diabetic rats transplanted with insulin-producing cells. We concluded that hBM-MSCs could be trans-differentiated into insulin-producing cells in vitro. Portal vein transplantation of insulin-producing cells alleviated hyperglycemia in diabetic rats.

  16. Insulin-producing Cells from Adult Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Could Control Chemically Induced Diabetes in Dogs: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mahmoud M; Zakaria, Mahmoud M; Refaie, Ayman F; Ismail, Amani M; Khater, Sherry M; Ashamallah, Sylvia A; Azzam, Maha M; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2018-01-01

    Ten mongrel dogs were used in this study. Diabetes was chemically induced in 7 dogs, and 3 dogs served as normal controls. For each diabetic dog, 5 million human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells/kg were differentiated to form insulin-producing cells using a trichostatin-based protocol. Cells were then loaded in 2 TheraCyte capsules which were transplanted under the rectus sheath. One dog died 4 d postoperatively from pneumonia. Six dogs were followed up with for 6 to 18 mo. Euglycemia was achieved in 4 dogs. Their glucose tolerance curves exhibited a normal pattern demonstrating that the encapsulated cells were glucose sensitive and insulin responsive. In the remaining 2 dogs, the fasting blood sugar levels were reduced but did not reach normal values. The sera of all transplanted dogs contained human insulin and C-peptide with a negligible amount of canine insulin. Removal of the transplanted capsules was followed by prompt return of diabetes. Intracytoplasmic insulin granules were seen by immunofluorescence in cells from the harvested capsules. Furthermore, all pancreatic endocrine genes were expressed. This study demonstrated that the TheraCyte capsule or a similar device can provide adequate immunoisolation, an important issue when stem cells are considered for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Phenotypical and functional characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow: comparison of culture using different media supplemented with human platelet lysate or fetal bovine serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells able to differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages, classically derived from bone marrow (BM) but potentially from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Although they are becoming a good tool for regenerative medicine, they usually need to be expanded in fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented media. Human platelet lysate (HPL) has recently been proposed as substitute for safety reasons, but it is not yet clear how this supplement influences the properties of expanded MSCs. Methods In the present study, we compared the effect of various media combining autologous HPL with or without FBS on phenotypic, proliferative and functional (differentiation, cytokine secretion profile) characteristics of human BM-derived MSCs. Results Despite less expression of adipogenic and osteogenic markers, MSCs cultured in HPL-supplemented media fully differentiated along osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic and vascular smooth muscle lineages. The analyses of particular specific proteins expressed during osteogenic differentiation (calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and parathormone receptor (PTHR)) showed their decrease at D0 before any induction for MSC cultured with HPL mostly at high percentage (10%HPL). The cytokine dosage showed a clear increase of proliferation capacity and interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion. Conclusions This study shows that MSCs can be expanded in media supplemented with HPL that can totally replace FBS. HPL-supplemented media not only preserves their phenotype as well as their differentiation capacity, but also shortens culture time by increasing their growth rate. PMID:22333342

  18. A Novel Human TGF-β1 Fusion Protein in Combination with rhBMP-2 Increases Chondro-Osteogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Claros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β is involved in processes related to the differentiation and maturation of osteoprogenitor cells into osteoblasts. Rat bone marrow (BM cells were cultured in a collagen-gel containing 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS for 10 days in the presence of rhTGF (recombinant human TGF-β1-F2, a fusion protein engineered to include a high-affinity collagen-binding decapeptide derived from von Willebrand factor. Subsequently, cells were moderately expanded in medium with 10% FBS for 4 days and treated with a short pulse of rhBMP (recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for 4 h. During the last 2 days, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate were added to potentiate osteoinduction. Concomitant with an up-regulation of cell proliferation, DNA synthesis levels were determined. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to reveal the possible stemness of these cells. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated in terms of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized matrix formation as well as by mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes. Moreover, cells were placed inside diffusion chambers and implanted subcutaneously into the backs of adult rats for 4 weeks. Histological study provided evidence of cartilage and bone-like tissue formation. This experimental procedure is capable of selecting cell populations from BM that, in the presence of rhTGF-β1-F2 and rhBMP-2, achieve skeletogenic potential in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Johanna A.; Pietilae, Mika; Salonen, Riikka J.; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Lehenkari, Petri

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-α exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-α exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-α exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-α exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-α exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  1. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhao; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Kohl, Benjamin; Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W.; Meier, Carola; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  2. Estimating the whole bone-marrow asset in humans by a computational approach to integrated PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Genova (Italy); CNR Institute of Bioimages and Molecular Physiology, Genova (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Genova (Italy); Brignone, Massimo [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Mathematics, Genoa (Italy); Marini, Cecilia [CNR Institute of Bioimages and Molecular Physiology, Genova (Italy); Massollo, Michela; Fiz, Francesco; Morbelli, Silvia; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Piva, Roberta [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Genova (Italy); Campi, Cristina [University of Helsinki, Department of Computer Science, Helsinki (Finland); Massone, Anna Maria [CNR-SPIN, Genova (Italy); Piana, Michele [University of Genoa, Department of Mathematics, Genoa (Italy); CNR-SPIN, Genova (Italy); Frassoni, Francesco [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa (Italy); Advanced Biotechnology Center, Genova (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Despite their relevance in clinical medicine, the extension and activity of the bone marrow (BM) cannot be directly evaluated in vivo. We propose a new method to estimate these variables by combining structural and functional maps provided by CT and PET. BM extension and glucose uptake were estimated in 102 patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT because of a history of nonmetastatic melanoma. Image analysis assumed that the BM is surrounded by compact bone. An iterative optimization scheme was applied to each CT slice to identify the external border of the bone. To identify compact bone, the algorithm measured the average Hounsfield coefficient within a two-pixel ring located just inside the bone contour. All intraosseous pixels with an attenuation coefficient lower than this cut-off were flagged as 1, while the remaining pixels were set at 0. Binary masks created from all CT slices were thus applied to the PET data to determine the metabolic activity of the intraosseous volume (IBV). Estimated whole-body IBV was 1,632 {+-} 587 cm{sup 3} and was higher in men than in women (2,004 {+-} 498 cm{sup 3} vs. 1,203 {+-} 354 cm{sup 3}, P < 0.001). Overall, it was strictly correlated with ideal body weight (r = 0.81, P = 0.001) but only loosely with measured body weight (r = 0.43, P = 0.01). The average FDG standardized uptake value (SUV) in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was 2.01 {+-} 0.36, Accordingly, intraosseous voxels with SUV {>=}1.11 (mean spine SUV - 2.5 x SD) were considered as active ''red'' BM and those with SUV <1.11 as ''yellow'' BM. Estimated red BM volume was 541 {+-} 195 ml, with a higher prevalence in the axial than in the appendicular skeleton (87 {+-} 8 % vs. 10 {+-} 8 %, P < 0.001). Again, red BM volume was higher in men than in women (7.8 {+-} 2.2 vs. 6.7 {+-} 2.1 ml/kg body weight, P < 0.05), but in women it occupied a greater fraction of the IBV (32 {+-} 7 % vs. 36 {+-} 10 %, P < 0.05). Patient age modestly

  3. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhao [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Nooeaid, Patcharakamon [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Kohl, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W. [Institute of Polymer Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Meier, Carola [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula, E-mail: gundula.schulze@pmu.ac.at [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  4. Pancreatic islet-like clusters from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of human first-trimester abortus can cure streptozocin-induced mouse diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Shen, Wenzheng; Hua, Jinlian; Lei, Anmin; Lv, Changrong; Wang, Huayan; Yang, Chunrong; Gao, Zhimin; Dou, Zhongying

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been reported to possess low immunogenicity and cause immunosuppression of recipients when allografted. They can differentiate into insulin-producing cells and may be a valuable source for islet formation. However, the extremely low differentiating rate of adult BMSCs toward insulin-producing cells and the insufficient insulin secretion of the differentiated BMSCs in vitro prevent their clinical use in diabetes treatment. Little is known about the potential of cell replacement therapy with human BMSCs. Previously, we isolated and identified human first-trimester fetal BMSCs (hfBMSCs). Under a novel four-step induction procedure established in this study, the hfBMSCs effectively differentiated into functional pancreatic islet-like cell clusters that contained 62 ± 14% insulin-producing cells, expressed a broad gene profile related to pancreatic islet β-cell development, and released high levels of insulin (2.245 ± 0.222 pmol/100 clusters per 30 min) and C-peptide (2.200 ± 0.468 pmol/100 clusters per 30 min) in response to 25 mmol/L glucose stimulus in vitro. The pancreatic islet-like cell clusters normalized the blood glucose level of diabetic model mice for at least 9 weeks when xenografted; blood glucose levels in these mice rose abnormally again when the grafts were removed. Examination of the grafts indicated that the transplanted cells survived in recipients and produced human insulin and C-peptide in situ. These results demonstrate that hfBMSCs derived from a human first-trimester abortus can differentiate into pancreatic islet-like cell clusters following an established four-step induction. The insulin-producing clusters present advantages in cell replacement therapy of type 1 diabetic model mice.

  5. Improving the osteogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets by microRNA-21-loaded chitosan/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles via reverse transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhongshan Wang,1 Guangsheng Wu,2,3 Mengying Wei,4 Qian Liu,1 Jian Zhou,1 Tian Qin,1 Xiaoke Feng,1 Huan Liu,1 Zhihong Feng,1 Yimin Zhao1 1State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, 2State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for Dental Materials and Advanced Manufacture, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 3Qingdao First Sanatorium, Jinan Military Region, Qingdao, Shandong Province, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cell sheet engineering has emerged as a novel approach to effectively deliver seeding cells for tissue regeneration, and developing human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMMSC sheets with high osteogenic ability is a constant requirement from clinics for faster and higher-quality bone formation. In this work, we fabricated biocompatible and safe chitosan (CS/hyaluronic acid (HA nanoparticles (NPs to deliver microRNA-21 (miR-21, which has been proved to accelerate osteogenesis in hBMMSCs; then, the CS/HA/miR-21 NPs were cross-linked onto the surfaces of culture plates with 0.2% gel solution to fabricate miR-21-functionalized culture plates for reverse transfection. hBMMSC sheets were induced continuously for 14 days using a vitamin C-rich method on the miR-21-functionalized culture plates. For the characterization of CS/HA/miR-21 NPs, the particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, and gel retardation were sequentially investigated. Then, the biological effects of hBMMSC sheets on the miR-21-functionalized culture plates were evaluated. The assay results demonstrated that the hBMMSC sheets could be successfully induced via the novel

  6. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  7. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  8. Microarc-oxidized titanium surfaces functionalized with microRNA-21-loaded chitosan/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhongshan Wang,1,* Guangsheng Wu,2,3,* Zhihong Feng,1 Shizhu Bai,1 Yan Dong,1 Guofeng Wu,1 Yimin Zhao1 1State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China; 3Qingdao First Sanatorium, Jinan Military Region, Qingdao, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Dental implants have been widely used for the replacement of missing teeth in the clinic, but further improvements are needed to meet the clinical demands for faster and tighter osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated safe and biocompatible chitosan (CS/hyaluronic acid (HA nanoparticles to deliver microRNA-21 (miR-21 and thereby accelerate osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs. The CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles were cross-linked with 0.2% gel solution onto microarc oxidation (MAO-treated titanium (Ti surfaces to fabricate the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surface, resulting in the development of a novel coating for reverse transfection. To characterize the CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles, their particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, and gel retardation ability were sequentially investigated. Their biological effects, such as cell viability, cytotoxicity, and expression of osteogenic genes by hBMMSCs on the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces, were evaluated. Finally, we explored appropriate CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles with a CS/HA ratio of 4:1 and N/P ratio 20:1 for transfection, which presented good spherical morphology, an average diameter of 160.4±10.75 nm, and a positive zeta potential. The miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces demonstrated cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell spreading comparable to those exhibited by naked MAO Ti surfaces and led to significantly higher

  9. Direct induction of hepatocyte-like cells from immortalized human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by overexpression of HNF4α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Peiyi; Li, Weiqiang; Li, Zhengran; Shan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytes from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) are expected to be a useful source for cell transplantation. However, relatively low efficiency and repeatability of hepatic differentiation of human BM-MSCs remains an obstacle for clinical translation. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α), a critical transcription factor, plays an essential role in the entire process of liver development. In this study, immortalized hBM-MSCs, UE7T-13 cells were transduced with a lentiviral vector containing HNF4α. The typical fibroblast-like morphology of the MSCs changed, and polygonal, epithelioid cells grew out after HNF4α transduction. In hepatocyte culture medium, HNF4α-transduced MSCs (E7-hHNF4α cells) strongly expressed the albumin (ALB), CYP2B6, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), and FOXA2 mRNA and exhibited morphology markedly similar to that of mature hepatocytes. The E7-hHNF4α cells showed hepatic functions such as Indocyanine green (ICG) uptake and release, glycogen storage, urea production and ALB secretion. Approximately 28% of E7-hHNF4α cells expressed both ALB and AAT. Furthermore, these E7-hHNF4α cells via superior mesenteric vein (SMV) injection expressed human ALB in mouse chronic injured liver. In conclusion, this study represents a novel strategy by directly inducing hepatocyte-like cells from MSCs. - Highlights: • We overexpressed HNF4α in immortalized BM-MSCs by lentiviral transduction. • HNF4α-transduced MSCs transdifferentiated into hepatocytes with mature hepatic metabolic functions. • Our study represents a novel strategy by direct induction of hepatocyte-like cells from MSCs.

  10. Generation of human β-thalassemia induced pluripotent cell lines by reprogramming of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using modified mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Ioanna; Karagiannidou, Angeliki; Oikonomakis, Vasilis; Tzetis, Maria; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Siapati, Elena-Konstantina; Vassilopoulos, George; Graphakos, Stelios; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Goussetis, Evgenios

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic modified mRNA molecules encoding pluripotency transcription factors have been used successfully in reprogramming human fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We have applied this method on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) obtained from a patient with β-thalassemia (β-thal) with the aim to generate trangene-free β-thal-iPSCs. Transfection of 10(4) BM-MSCs by lipofection with mRNA encoding the reprogramming factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, cMyc, and Lin28 resulted in formation of five iPSC colonies, from which three were picked up and expanded in β-thal-iPSC lines. After 10 serial passages in vitro, β-thal-iPSCs maintain genetic stability as shown by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and are capable of forming embryoid bodies in vitro and teratomas in vivo. Their gene expression profile compared to human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and BM-MSCs seems to be similar to that of ESCs, whereas it differs from the profile of the parental BM-MSCs. Differentiation cultures toward a hematopoietic lineage showed the generation of CD34(+) progenitors up to 10%, but with a decreased hematopoietic colony-forming capability. In conclusion, we report herein the generation of transgene-free β-thal-iPSCs that could be widely used for disease modeling and gene therapy applications. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the mRNA-based reprogramming method, used mainly in fibroblasts, is also suitable for reprogramming of human BM-MSCs.

  11. Feline bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show similar phenotype and functions with regards to neuronal differentiation as human MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Jessian L; Greco, Steven J; Patel, Shyam A; Sherman, Lauren S; Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha S; Shrensel, Jeffrey A; Guan, Yan-Zhong; Xie, Guiqin; Ye, Jiang-Hong; Rameshwar, Pranela; Siegel, Allan

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show promise for treatment of a variety of neurological and other disorders. Cat has a high degree of linkage with the human genome and has been used as a model for analysis of neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and motor disorders. The present study was designed to characterize bone marrow-derived MSCs from cats and to investigate the capacity to generate functional peptidergic neurons. MSCs were expanded with cells from the femurs of cats and then characterized by phenotype and function. Phenotypically, feline and human MSCs shared surface markers, and lacked hematopoietic markers, with similar morphology. As compared to a subset of human MSCs, feline MSCs showed no evidence of the major histocompatibility class II. Since the literature suggested Stro-1 as an indicator of pluripotency, we compared early and late passages feline MSCs and found its expression in >90% of the cells. However, the early passage cells showed two distinct populations of Stro-1-expressing cells. At passage 5, the MSCs were more homogeneous with regards to Stro-1 expression. The passage 5 MSCs differentiated to osteogenic and adipogenic cells, and generated neurons with electrophysiological properties. This correlated with the expression of mature neuronal markers with concomitant decrease in stem cell-associated genes. At day 12 induction, the cells were positive for MAP2, Neuronal Nuclei, tubulin βIII, Tau and synaptophysin. This correlated with electrophysiological maturity as presented by excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). The findings indicate that the cat may constitute a promising biomedical model for evaluation of novel therapies such as stem cell therapy in such neurological disorders as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant , Hematopoietic ... person, called a donor, it is an allogeneic transplant. Blood or bone marrow transplants most commonly are used to treat ...

  14. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  15. Comparative miRNA-Based Fingerprinting Reveals Biological Differences in Human Olfactory Mucosa- and Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Louise Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nestin-positive human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM enhanced CNS myelination in vitro to a greater extent than bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs. miRNA-based fingerprinting revealed the two MSCs were 64% homologous, with 26 miRNAs differentially expressed. We focused on miR-146a-5p and miR-140-5p due to their reported role in the regulation of chemokine production and myelination. The lower expression of miR-140-5p in OM-MSCs correlated with higher secretion of CXCL12 compared with BM-MSCs. Addition of CXCL12 and its pharmacological inhibitors to neural co-cultures supported these data. Studies on related miR-146a-5p targets demonstrated that OM-MSCs had lower levels of Toll-like receptors and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL2. OM-MSCs polarized microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, illustrating potential differences in their inflammatory response. Nestin-positive OM-MSCs could therefore offer a cell transplantation alternative for CNS repair, should these biological behaviors be translated in vivo.

  16. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  17. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions in novel 3D cartilage scaffolds with hydrogen treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Castro, Nathan J.; Li, Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-09-01

    Cartilage tissue is a nanostructured tissue which is notoriously hard to regenerate due to its extremely poor inherent regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Current treatment methods are highly invasive and may have many complications. Thus, the goal of this work is to use nanomaterials and nano/microfabrication methods to create novel biologically inspired tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds to facilitate human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. To this end we utilized electrospinning to design and fabricate a series of novel 3D biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds based on hydrogen (H2) treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and biocompatible poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymers. Specifically, a series of electrospun fibrous PLLA scaffolds with controlled fiber dimension were fabricated in this study. In vitro MSC studies showed that stem cells prefer to attach in the scaffolds with smaller fiber diameter. More importantly, the MWCNT embedded scaffolds showed a drastic increase in mechanical strength and a compressive Young’s modulus matching to natural cartilage. Furthermore, our MSC differentiation results demonstrated that incorporation of the H2 treated carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine coating can induce more chondrogenic differentiations of MSCs than controls. After two weeks of culture, PLLA scaffolds with H2 treated MWCNTs and poly-L-lysine can achieve the highest glycosaminoglycan synthesis, making them promising for further exploration for cartilage regeneration.

  18. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions in novel 3D cartilage scaffolds with hydrogen treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Castro, Nathan J; Li Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage tissue is a nanostructured tissue which is notoriously hard to regenerate due to its extremely poor inherent regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Current treatment methods are highly invasive and may have many complications. Thus, the goal of this work is to use nanomaterials and nano/microfabrication methods to create novel biologically inspired tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds to facilitate human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis. To this end we utilized electrospinning to design and fabricate a series of novel 3D biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds based on hydrogen (H 2 ) treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and biocompatible poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) polymers. Specifically, a series of electrospun fibrous PLLA scaffolds with controlled fiber dimension were fabricated in this study. In vitro MSC studies showed that stem cells prefer to attach in the scaffolds with smaller fiber diameter. More importantly, the MWCNT embedded scaffolds showed a drastic increase in mechanical strength and a compressive Young’s modulus matching to natural cartilage. Furthermore, our MSC differentiation results demonstrated that incorporation of the H 2 treated carbon nanotubes and poly-L-lysine coating can induce more chondrogenic differentiations of MSCs than controls. After two weeks of culture, PLLA scaffolds with H 2 treated MWCNTs and poly-L-lysine can achieve the highest glycosaminoglycan synthesis, making them promising for further exploration for cartilage regeneration. (paper)

  19. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs. Platelet concentrates (PC were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL. The PL mixtures (mPL were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS. No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke.

  20. Therapeutic doses of doxorubicin induce premature senescence of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from menstrual blood, bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhukharova, Irina; Zemelko, Victoria; Kovaleva, Zoya; Alekseenko, Larisa; Lyublinskaya, Olga; Nikolsky, Nikolay

    2018-03-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an effective anticancer drug with known activity against a wide spectrum of malignancies, hematologic malignancies in particular. Despite extensive clinical use, the mechanisms of its side effects and negative action on normal cells remain under study. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Dox on cultured human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from menstrual blood (eMSCs), bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue (AMSCs). Dox treatment in high doses decreased the survival of MSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Clinically relevant low doses of Dox induced premature senescence of eMSCs, BMSCs and AMSCs, but did not kill the cells. Dox caused cell cycle arrest and formation of γ-H2AX foci, and increased the number of SA-β-gal-positive cells. BMSCs entered premature senescence earlier than other MSCs. It has been reported that neural-like cells differentiated from MSCs of various origins are more sensitive to Dox than their parent cells. Dox-treated differentiated MSCs exhibited lower viability and earlier generation of γ-H2AX foci. Dox administration inhibited secretory activity in neural-like cells. These findings suggest that a clinically relevant Dox dose damages cultured MSCs, inducing their premature senescence. MSCs are more resistant to this damage than differentiated cells.

  1. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Cell Reactions to 316L Stainless Steel: An in Vitro Study on Cell Viability and Interleukin-6 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Santoso, Asep; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; Van der Heide, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity analysis was conducted with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay after a period of 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation. Expression of interleukin-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Cell viability measurement was performed via IC50 formula. All treatment group showed a > 50 % cell viability with a range of 56,5 - 96,9 % at 24 hours, 51,8-77,3% at 48 hours and 70,1- 120 % at 72 hours. Interleukin-6 expression was downregulated subsequent to treatment with 316L-SS compared to the control group. Conclusion: We found that 316L-SS did not exhibit toxicity towards hBMC culture. PMID:28761837

  2. Immature and maturation-resistant human dendritic cells generated from bone marrow require two stimulations to induce T cell anergy in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Berger

    Full Text Available Immature dendritic cells (DC represent potential clinical tools for tolerogenic cellular immunotherapy in both transplantation and autoimmunity. A major drawback in vivo is their potential to mature during infections or inflammation, which would convert their tolerogenicity into immunogenicity. The generation of immature DC from human bone marrow (BM by low doses of GM-CSF (lowGM in the absence of IL-4 under GMP conditions create DC resistant to maturation, detected by surface marker expression and primary stimulation by allogeneic T cells. This resistence could not be observed for BM-derived DC generated with high doses of GM-CSF plus IL-4 (highGM/4, although both DC types induced primary allogeneic T cell anergy in vitro. The estabishment of the anergic state requires two subsequent stimulations by immature DC. Anergy induction was more profound with lowGM-DC due to their maturation resistance. Together, we show the generation of immature, maturation-resistant lowGM-DC for potential clinical use in transplant rejection and propose a two-step-model of T cell anergy induction by immature DC.

  3. [Ferumoxide labeled Flk1+ CD31- CD34- human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and its in vivo tracing in the brains of Macaca Fascicularis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ming; Wang, Ren-Zhi; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Chang-Jun; Wei, Jun-Ji; Lu, Shan; Li, Qin; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Han, Qin; Ma, Wen-Bin; Qin, Chuang; Zhao, Chun-Hua; An, Yi-Hua; Kong, Yan-Guo

    2008-10-01

    To explore the method for labeling Flk1+ CD31- CD34- human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) with ferumoxide-PLL and evaluate the feasibility of its tracing after transplantation into the brains of Macaca Fascicularis. The hBMSCs were incubated with ferumoxide-PLL. Trypan blue staining, Prussian blue staining, and transmission electron microscope were performed to show intracellular iron, marking efficiency, and the vigor of the labeled cells. After the hBMSCs were transplanted into the brains of cynomolgus monkeys by stereotaxis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to trace the cells in vivo. Cell survival and differentiation were studied with immunohistochemistry, Prussian blue staining, and HE staining. The marking efficiency of the ferumoxide-PLL was 96%. Iron particles were found intracytoplasmic of the hBMSCs by Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy. The relaxation rates of labeled cells in MRI were 4.4 and 4.2 times higher than those of the unlabeled cells. Hypointensity area was found by MRI three weeks after transplantation. Many hBMSCs and new vessels were found in the transplantation zone by pathological and immunofluorescence methods. Ferumoxide-PLL can effectively label hBMSCs and thus increase its contrast in MRI results. The cells can survive in the brains of cynomolgus monkeys. The labeled hBMSCs can be traced in vivo by MRI.

  4. The r.b.e. of different-energy neutrons as determined by human bone-marrow cell-culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeyum, A.; Carsten, A.L.; Chikkappa, G.; Cook, L.; Bullis, J.; Honikel, L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of X-rays and different-energy neutrons on human bone-marrow cells was studied using two different cell-culture techniques - diffusion chamber (DC) growth and colony formation in vitro (CFU-C). Based on the survival and proliferative granulocytes in DC on day 13, the D 0 value was 80 rad with X-rays, and 117 rad as measured by the CFU-C assay. The D 0 values for neutrons depended on the radiation source and the energy level. The r.b.e. values, which dropped with increasing energy levels of mono-energetic neutrons, were (i) 0.44 MeV; DC 3.7, CFU-C 4.1; (ii) 6 MeV; DC 1.8, CFU-C 2.0; (iii) 15 MeV; DC 1.6, CFU-C 1.6; (iv) fission neutrons; DC 2.6, CFU-C 2.4. (author)

  5. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-09-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with incurable retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. In this study, 0.25×10(6) human bone marrow stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted epiretinally in the right eye of Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats at the age of 28 days. Epiretinally transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer of cells along vitreous cavity, in close proximity to the retina or attached to the lens capsule, up to 6 weeks following transplantation. Epiretinal transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration and rescued retinal function up to 20 weeks following cell transplantation. Visual functions remained close to normal levels in epiretinal transplantation rats. No inflammation or any other adverse effects were observed in transplanted eyes. Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J.; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-01-01

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34+ (hBM34+) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34+ cells (5 × 104, 5 × 105 or 1 × 106) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls’ Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34+ cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34+ cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients. PMID:29535831

  7. Hydrostatic pressure in combination with topographical cues affects the fate of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinwald, Yvonne; El Haj, Alicia J

    2018-03-01

    Topographical and mechanical cues are vital for cell fate, tissue development in vivo, and to mimic the native cell growth environment in vitro. To date, the combinatory effect of mechanical and topographical cues as not been thoroughly investigated. This study investigates the effect of PCL nanofiber alignment and hydrostatic pressure on stem cell differentiation for bone tissue regeneration. Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto standard tissue culture plastic and electrospun random and aligned nanofibers. These substrates were either cultured statically or subjected to intermittent hydrostatic pressure at 270 kPa, 1 Hz for 60 min daily over 21 days in osteogenic medium. Data revealed higher cell metabolic activities for all mechanically stimulated cell culture formats compared with non-stimulated controls; and random fibers compared with aligned fibers. Fiber orientation influenced cell morphology and patterns of calcium deposition. Significant up-regulation of Collagen-I, ALP, and Runx-2 were observed for random and aligned fibers following mechanical stimulation; highest levels of osteogenic markers were expressed when hydrostatic pressure was applied to random fibers. These results indicate that fiber alignment and hydrostatic pressure direct stem cell fate and are important stimulus for tissue regeneration. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: A: 629-640, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Biological Response of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Commercial Tantalum Coatings with Microscale and Nanoscale Surface Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Kumar, Girish; Goering, Peter L.; Williams, Brian; Stiglich, Jack; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-06-01

    Tantalum is a promising orthopaedic implant coating material due to its robust mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Previous studies have demonstrated improved biocompatibility and tissue integration of surface-treated tantalum coatings compared to untreated tantalum. Surface modification of tantalum coatings with biologically inspired microscale and nanoscale features may be used to evoke optimal tissue responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate commercial tantalum coatings with nanoscale, sub-microscale, and microscale surface topographies for orthopaedic and dental applications using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Tantalum coatings with different microscale and nanoscale surface topographies were fabricated using a diffusion process or chemical vapor deposition. Biological evaluation of the tantalum coatings using hBMSCs showed that tantalum coatings promote cellular adhesion and growth. Furthermore, hBMSC adhesion to the tantalum coatings was dependent on surface feature characteristics, with enhanced cell adhesion on sub-micrometer- and micrometer-sized surface topographies compared to hybrid nano-/microstructures. Nanostructured and microstructured tantalum coatings should be further evaluated to optimize the surface coating features to promote osteogenesis and enhance osseointegration of tantalum-based orthopaedic implants.

  9. Gangliosides as a potential new class of stem cell markers: the case of GD1a in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergante, Sonia; Torretta, Enrica; Creo, Pasquale; Sessarego, Nadia; Papini, Nadia; Piccoli, Marco; Fania, Chiara; Cirillo, Federica; Conforti, Erika; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Tringali, Cristina; Venerando, Bruno; Ibatici, Adalberto; Gelfi, Cecilia; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Owing to their exposure on the cell surface and the possibility of being directly recognized with specific antibodies, glycosphingolipids have aroused great interest in the field of stem cell biology. In the search for specific markers of the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) toward osteoblasts, we studied their glycosphingolipid pattern, with particular attention to gangliosides. After lipid extraction and fractionation, gangliosides, metabolically 3H-labeled in the sphingosine moiety, were separated by high-performance TLC and chemically characterized by MALDI MS. Upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, a 3-fold increase of ganglioside GD1a was observed. Therefore, the hypothesis of GD1a involvement in hBMSCs commitment toward the osteogenic phenotype was tested by comparison of the osteogenic propensity of GD1a-highly expressing versus GD1a-low expressing hBMSCs and direct addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium. It was found that either the high expression of GD1a in hBMSCs or the addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium favored osteogenesis, providing a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase. It was also observed that ganglioside GD2, although detectable in hBMSCs by immunohistochemistry with an anti-GD2 antibody, could not be recognized by chemical analysis, likely reflecting a case, not uncommon, of molecular mimicry. PMID:24449473

  10. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  11. Analysis of glycoprotein E-selectin ligANDs on human and mouse marrow cells enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Burdick, Monica M.; Gadhoum, Samah; Dagia, Nilesh M.; Chu, Julia T.; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C.; Sackstein, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Although well recognized that expression of E-selectin on marrow microvessels mediates osteotropism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), our knowledge regarding the cognate E-selectin ligand(s) on HSPCs is incomplete. Flow cytometry using

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Enhances Expansion of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells without Diminishing Their Immunosuppressive Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Auletta, Jeffery J.; Zale, Elizabeth A.; Welter, Jean F.; Solchaga, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the main curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies. Its potential relies on graft-versus-tumor effects which associate with graft-versus-host disease. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties that make them attractive therapeutic alternatives. We evaluated the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of medium conditioned by human MSCs from 5 donors expanded 13 passages with or without FGF-2. FGF-2 supplemen...

  13. Gillick, bone marrow and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    The Human Tissue Authority can authorise a bone marrow harvest on a child of any age if a person with parental responsibility consents to the procedure. Older children have the legal capacity to consent to medical procedures under Gillick, but it is unclear if Gillick can be applied to non-therapeutic medical procedures. The relevant donation guidelines state that the High Court shall be consulted in the event of a disagreement, but what is in the best interests of the teenage donor under s.1 of the Children Act 1989? There are no legal authorities on child bone marrow harvests in the United Kingdom. This article considers the best interests of the older saviour sibling and questions whether, for the purposes of welfare, the speculative benefits could outweigh the physical burdens. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The ERK5 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways play opposing regulatory roles during chondrogenesis of adult human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Brent E; Matsche, Alexander I; Chen, Faye H; Tuan, Rocky S

    2010-07-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs) are able to differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, including chondrocytes, and are considered a promising candidate cell source for use in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the regulation of MPC chondrogenesis by mitogen-activated protein kinases in an attempt to better understand how to generate hyaline cartilage in the laboratory that more closely resembles native tissue. Specifically, we employed the high-density pellet culture model system to assess the roles of ERK5 and ERK1/2 pathway signaling in MPC chondrogenesis. Western blotting revealed that high levels of ERK5 phosphorylation correlate with low levels of MPC chondrogenesis and that as TGF-beta 3-enhanced MPC chondrogenesis proceeds, phospho-ERK5 levels steadily decline. Conversely, levels of phospho-ERK1/2 paralleled the progression of MPC chondrogenesis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ERK5 pathway components MEK5 and ERK5 resulted in increased MPC pellet mRNA transcript levels of the cartilage-characteristic marker genes SOX9, COL2A1, AGC, L-SOX5, and SOX6, as well as enhanced accumulation of SOX9 protein, collagen type II protein, and Alcian blue-stainable proteoglycan. In contrast, knockdown of ERK1/2 pathway members MEK1 and ERK1 decreased expression of all chondrogenic markers tested. Finally, overexpression of MEK5 and ERK5 also depressed MPC chondrogenesis, as indicated by diminished activity of a co-transfected collagen II promoter-luciferase reporter construct. In conclusion, our results suggest a novel role for the ERK5 pathway as an important negative regulator of adult human MPC chondrogenesis and illustrate that the ERK5 and ERK1/2 kinase cascades play opposing roles regulating MPC cartilage formation. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation induces chondrogenesis in expanded human articular chondrocytes and marrow-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; Huey, Daniel J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-03-01

    Replacement of degenerated cartilage with cell-based cartilage products may offer a long-term solution to halt arthritis' degenerative progression. Chondrocytes are frequently used in cell-based FDA-approved cartilage products; yet human marrow-derived stromal cells (hMSCs) show significant translational potential, reducing donor site morbidity and maintaining their undifferentiated phenotype with expansion. This study sought to investigate the effects of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) during postexpansion chondrogenesis in human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and to compare chondrogenesis in passaged hACs with that of passaged hMSCs. Through serial expansion, chondrocytes dedifferentiated, decreasing expression of chondrogenic genes while increasing expression of fibroblastic genes. However, following expansion, 10 ng/mL TGF-β1, 100 ng/mL GDF-5, or 100 ng/mL BMP-2 supplementation during three-dimensional aggregate culture each upregulated one or more markers of chondrogenic gene expression in both hACs and hMSCs. Additionally, in both cell types, the combination of TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 induced the greatest upregulation of chondrogenic genes, that is, Col2A1, Col2A1/Col1A1 ratio, SOX9, and ACAN, and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix, that is, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and ratio of collagen II/I. Finally, TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation yielded mechanically robust cartilage rich in collagen II and GAGs in both cell types, following 4 weeks maturation. This study illustrates notable success in using the self-assembling method to generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage constructs using expanded hACs and hMSCs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Chromosome copy number variation in telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells; insights for monitoring safe ex-vivo expansion of adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jorge S; Harkness, Linda; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Gautier, Laurent; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-12-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) cultured for cell therapy require evaluation of potency and stability for safe use. Chromosomal aberrations upsetting genomic integrity in such cells have been contrastingly described as "Limited" or "Significant". Previously reported stepwise acquisition of a spontaneous neoplastic phenotype during three-year continuous culture of telomerized cells (hBMSC-TERT20) didn't alter a diploid karyotype measured by spectral karyotype analysis (SKY). Such screening may not adequately monitor abnormal and potentially tumorigenic hBMSC in clinical scenarios. We here used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to more stringently compare non-tumorigenic parental hBMSC-TERT strains with their tumorigenic subcloned populations. Confirmation of a known chromosome 9p21 microdeletion at locus CDKN2A/B, showed it also impinged upon the adjacent MTAP gene. Compared to reference diploid human fibroblast genomic DNA, the non-tumorigenic hBMSC-TERT4 cells had a copy number variation (CNV) in at least 14 independent loci. The pre-tumorigenic hBMSC-TERT20 cell strain had further CNV including 1q44 gain enhancing SMYD3 expression and 11q13.1 loss downregulating MUS81 expression. Bioinformatic analysis of gene products reflecting 11p15.5 CNV gain in tumorigenic hBMSC-TERT20 cells highlighted networks implicated in tumorigenic progression involving cell cycle control and mis-match repair. We provide novel biomarkers for prospective risk assessment of expanded stem cell cultures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Noriko [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miura, Yasuo, E-mail: ym58f5@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yao, Hisayuki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Sumie [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hirai, Hideyo [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ichinohe, Tatsuo [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Maekawa, Taira [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. - Highlights: • Human BM-MSCs in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) support hematopoiesis. • Adhesion- and chemotaxis-associated gene signatures are altered in e-MSCs. • Expression of CXCL12 and VCAM1 is remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. • e-MSCs are at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells. • Osteoinductive treatment

  18. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after human marrow transplantation. II. Deficient T and non-T lymphocyte function within 3-4 months of allogeneic, syngeneic, or autologous marrow grafting for hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, R.P.; Lum, L.G.; Storb, R.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Immunoglobulin secretion was studied in 37 patients between 19 and 106 days after allogeneic HLA-identical (30 patients), allogeneic one HLA-haplotype-identical (three patients), syngeneic (three patients), or autologous (one patient) marrow grafting. E rosette-positive (T) and E rosette-negative (non-T) peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cocultured with pokeweed mitogen for 6 days. Polyvalent immunoglobulin secretion was determined by counting plaque forming cells in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. The number of antibody secreting cells in cocultures of autologous T and non-T lymphocytes was low in 40 of 44 tests conducted on samples from the 37 patients. Mononuclear or non-T cells from 38 of 40 tests failed to produce antibody when cultured with normal helper T cells. T cells from 23 of 37 tests failed to help normal non-T cells secrete antibody. T lymphocytes from 23 of 41 tests suppressed antibody production greater than 80% by normal T and non-T cells. The suppressor cells were radiosensitive in 17 of the 25 tests. The abnormal function of lymphocyte subpopulations in patients during the first 3 mo after syngeneic, allogeneic or autologous marrow grafting was similar regardless of the type of graft or the presence of acute graft versus host disease

  19. Cellular function and adhesion mechanisms of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, Anthoula A; Kourkouli, Souzana N; Deligianni, Despina D

    2013-12-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are considered to be excellent reinforcements for biorelated applications, but, before being incorporated into biomedical devices, their biocompatibility need to be investigated thoroughly. We investigated the ability of films of pristine MWCNTs to influence human mesenchymal stem cells' proliferation, morphology, and differentiation into osteoblasts. Moreover, the selective integrin subunit expression and the adhesion mechanism to the substrate were evaluated on the basis of adherent cell number and adhesion strength, following the treatment of cells with blocking antibodies to a series of integrin subunits. Results indicated that MWCNTs accelerated cell differentiation to a higher extent than tissue culture plastic, even in the absence of additional biochemical inducing agents. The pre-treatment with anti-integrin antibodies decreased number of adherent cells and adhesion strength at 4-60%, depending on integrin subunit. These findings suggest that pristine MWCNTs represent a suitable reinforcement for bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of different culture media on the myogenic differentiation potential of adipose tissue- or bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bonaterra, Gabriel Alejandro; Juritz, Stephanie; Birk, Richard; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter; Schultz, Johannes; Hörmann, Karl; Kinscherf, Ralf; Faber, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The creation of functional muscles/muscle tissue from human stem cells is a major goal of skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from fat/adipose tissue (AT-MSCs), as well as bone marrow (BM-MSCs) have been shown to bear myogenic potential, which makes them candidate stem cells for skeletal muscle tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to analyse the myogenic differentiation potential of human AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured in six different cell culture media containing different mixtures of growth factors. The following cell culture media were used in our experiments: mesenchymal stem cell growth medium (MSCGM)™ as growth medium, MSCGM + 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), skeletal muscle myoblast cell growth medium (SkGM)-2 BulletKit™, and 5, 30 and 50% conditioned cell culture media, i.e., supernatant of human satellite cell cultures after three days in cell culture mixed with MSCGM. Following the incubation of human AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs for 0, 4, 8, 11, 16 or 21 days with each of the cell culture media, cell proliferation was measured using the alamarBlue® assay. Myogenic differentiation was evaluated by quantitative gene expression analyses, using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemical staining (ICC), using well-defined skeletal markers, such as desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myosin, heavy chain 8, skeletal muscle, perinatal (MYH8), myosin, heavy chain 1, skeletal muscle, adult (MYH1) and skeletal muscle actin-α1 (ACTA1). The highest proliferation rates were observed in the AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured with SkGM-2 BulletKit medium. The average proliferation rate was higher in the AT-MSCs than in the BM-MSCs, taking all six culture media into account. qRT-PCR revealed the expression levels of the myogenic markers, ACTA1, MYH1 and MYH8, in the AT-MSC cell cultures, but not in the BM-MSC cultures. The muscle-specific intermediate filament, DES, was only detected (by ICC) in the AT-MSCs, but not in the BM

  1. The separation of a mixture of bone marrow stem cells from tumor cells: an essential step for autologous bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Wheeler, K.T.; Keng, P.C.; Gregory, P.K.; Croizat, H.

    1981-01-01

    KHT tumor cells were mixed with mouse bone marrow to simulate a sample of bone marrow containing metastatic tumor cells. This mixture was separated into a bone marrow fraction and a tumor cell fraction by centrifugal elutriation. Elutriation did not change the transplantability of the bone marrow stem cells as measured by a spleen colony assay and an in vitro erythroid burst forming unit assay. The tumorogenicity of the KHT cells was similarly unaffected by elutriation. The data showed that bone marrow cells could be purified to less than 1 tumor cell in more than 10 6 bone marrow cells. Therefore, purification of bone marrow removed prior to lethal radiation-drug combined therapy for subsequent autologous transplantation appears to be feasible using modifications of this method if similar physical differences between human metastatic tumor cells and human bone marrow cells exist. This possibility is presently being explored

  2. Bone - marrow postirradiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesztakova, E.; Bilek, J.; Benova, K.; Novakova, J.; Culenova, K.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative changes in haemopoietic cells in chicken bone Marrow were investigated after acute single irradiation with doses 4.5 Gy and 5 Gy. Samples of bone marrow were obtained from proximal femoral epiphysis of decapitated chickens. Marrow smears were prepared and stained according to Pappenheim. Qualitative examination of myelogram showed proliferation of adipose tissue, hypocellularity, caryolyosis, caryorexis, disintegration of cells and proliferation of cells which could not be differentiated. Quantitative examination revealed high radiosensitivity of blast cells and lymphocytes shortly after irradiation. (authors)

  3. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been increasingly used to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency diseases, severe aplastic anemia, and malignant hematologic diseases, especially leukemia. At the Workshop a number of problems were discussed, e.g., conditioning regimens aimed at overcoming the problem of marrow graft rejection and reducing the incidence of recurrent leukemia, prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), possible mechanisms involved in stable graft-host tolerance, graft-versus-leukemia effect in mice, and finally, the possible use of autologous marrow transplantation

  4. Standardization of Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant production of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells for immunotherapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Bieback, Karen; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Bornhäuser, Martin; Müller, Lutz P; Bönig, Halvard; Wagner, Wolfgang; Meisel, Roland; Pavel, Petra; Tonn, Torsten; Lang, Peter; Müller, Ingo; Renner, Matthias; Malcherek, Georg; Saffrich, Rainer; Buss, Eike C; Horn, Patrick; Rojewski, Markus; Schmitt, Anita; Ho, Anthony D; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schmitt, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Human mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) represent a potential resource not only for regenerative medicine but also for immunomodulatory cell therapies. The application of different MSC culture protocols has significantly hampered the comparability of experimental and clinical data from different laboratories and has posed a major obstacle for multicenter clinical trials. Manufacturing of cell products for clinical application in the European Community must be conducted in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice and requires a manufacturing license. In Germany, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut as the Federal Authority for Vaccines and Biomedicines is critically involved in the approval process. This report summarizes a consensus meeting between researchers, clinicians and regulatory experts on standard quality requirements for MSC production. The strategy for quality control testing depends on the product's cell composition, the manufacturing process and the indication and target patient population. Important quality criteria in this sense are, among others, the immunophenotype of the cells, composition of the culture medium and the risk for malignant transformation, as well as aging and the immunosuppressive potential of the manufactured MSCs. This position paper intends to provide relevant information to interested parties regarding these criteria to foster the development of scientifically valid and harmonized quality standards and to support approval of MSC-based investigational medicinal products. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells display anti-cancer activity in SCID mice bearing disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multimodality treatment can induce high rate of remission in many subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, significant proportions of patients relapse with incurable disease. The effect of human bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on tumor cell growth is controversial, and no specific information is available on the effect of BM-MSC on NHL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of BM-MSC was analyzed in two in vivo models of disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with an indolent (EBV(- Burkitt-type BJAB, median survival = 46 days and an aggressive (EBV(+ B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4, median survival = 27 days behavior in nude-SCID mice. Intra-peritoneal (i.p. injection of MSC (4 days after i.p. injection of lymphoma cells significantly increased the overall survival at an optimal MSC:lymphoma ratio of 1:10 in both xenograft models (BJAB+MSC, median survival = 58.5 days; SKW6.4+MSC, median survival = 40 days. Upon MSC injection, i.p. tumor masses developed more slowly and, at the histopathological observation, exhibited a massive stromal infiltration coupled to extensive intra-tumor necrosis. In in vitro experiments, we found that: i MSC/lymphoma co-cultures modestly affected lymphoma cell survival and were characterized by increased release of pro-angiogenic cytokines with respect to the MSC, or lymphoma, cultures; ii MSC induce the migration of endothelial cells in transwell assays, but promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in direct MSC/endothelial cell co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that BM-MSC exhibit anti-lymphoma activity in two distinct xenograft SCID mouse models of disseminated NHL.

  6. Regeneration of rat corpora cavernosa tissue by transplantation of CD133+ cells derived from human bone marrow and placement of biodegradable gel sponge sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Inoue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to develop an easier technique for regenerating corpora cavernosa tissue through transplantation of human bone marrow-derived CD133 + cells into a rat corpora cavernosa defect model. We excised 2 mm × 2 mm squares of the right corpora cavernosa of twenty-three 8-week-old male nude rats. Alginate gel sponge sheets supplemented with 1 × 10 4 CD133 + cells were then placed over the excised area of nine rats. Functional and histological evaluations were carried out 8 weeks later. The mean intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure ratio for the nine rats (0.34258 ± 0.0831 was significantly higher than that for eight rats with only the excision (0.0580 ± 0.0831, P = 0.0238 and similar to that for five rats for which the penis was exposed, and there was no excision (0.37228 ± 0.1051, P = 0.8266. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the nine fully treated rats had venous sinus-like structures and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of extracts from their alginate gel sponge sheets revealed that the amounts of mRNA encoding the nerve growth factor (NGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were significantly higher than those for rats treated with alginate gel sheets without cell supplementation (NGF: P = 0.0309; VEGF: P < 0.0001. These findings show that transplantation of CD133 + cells accelerates functional and histological recovery in the corpora cavernosa defect model.

  7. Microarc-oxidized titanium surfaces functionalized with microRNA-21-loaded chitosan/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Wu, Guangsheng; Feng, Zhihong; Bai, Shizhu; Dong, Yan; Wu, Guofeng; Zhao, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been widely used for the replacement of missing teeth in the clinic, but further improvements are needed to meet the clinical demands for faster and tighter osseointegration. In this study, we fabricated safe and biocompatible chitosan (CS)/hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles to deliver microRNA-21 (miR-21) and thereby accelerate osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs). The CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles were cross-linked with 0.2% gel solution onto microarc oxidation (MAO)-treated titanium (Ti) surfaces to fabricate the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surface, resulting in the development of a novel coating for reverse transfection. To characterize the CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles, their particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, and gel retardation ability were sequentially investigated. Their biological effects, such as cell viability, cytotoxicity, and expression of osteogenic genes by hBMMSCs on the miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces, were evaluated. Finally, we explored appropriate CS/HA/miR-21 nanoparticles with a CS/HA ratio of 4:1 and N/P ratio 20:1 for transfection, which presented good spherical morphology, an average diameter of 160.4±10.75 nm, and a positive zeta potential. The miR-21-functionalized MAO Ti surfaces demonstrated cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell spreading comparable to those exhibited by naked MAO Ti surfaces and led to significantly higher expression of osteogenic genes. This novel miR-21-functionalized Ti implant may be used in the clinic to allow more effective and robust osseointegration.

  8. Probability of Finding Marrow Unrelated Donor (MUD) for an Indian patient in a Multi-national Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Bhati-Kushwaha, Himakshi; Kukreja, Pooja; Mishra, Vikash C; Tyagi, Neetu; Sharma, Ashish; Raina, Vimarsh

    2015-06-01

    With an increase in the number of transplants happening globally, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplantation from matched unrelated donor (MUD) has begun. The increasing trend of MUD transplants across countries has been largely facilitated with the conspicuous growth of volunteer HSC donor noted in the last decade i.e. 8 million HSC donors in 2002 to more than 22 million in 2013 registered in 71 member registries of the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide (BMDW). Some populations of the world are still very poorly represented in these registries. Since, the chances of successful engraftment and disease free survival are directly proportional to the HLA compatibility between the recipient and the prospective donor, the diversity of the HLA system at the antigenic and allelic level and the heterogeneity of HLA data of the registered donors has a bearing on the probability of finding a volunteer unrelated HSC donor for patients from such populations. In the present study 126 patients were identified suffering from hematological diseases requiring MUD transplant. Their HLA typing was performed and search was done using BMDW database. The search results for these Indian patients in the multinational registry as well as in the Indian Registries were analyzed using mean, range, standard deviation and finally evaluated in terms of probability for finding matched donor (MUD). Total Asian population is only 11 % in the BMDW making it difficult to find a MUD for an Asian patient. The current study supports this, experimentally; revealing that the probability of finding an allele match for an Indian patient in the multinational Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) registries is 16 % and a dismal 0.008 % in the Indian registries (donors in Indian registries is just 33,678 as compared to 22.5 million in BMDW). This greatly, emphasizes on enhancing the number of Indian donors in Indian and multi-national registries.

  9. N-glycosylation profile of undifferentiated and adipogenically differentiated human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: towards a next generation of stem cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Houda; Ullah, Mujib; Berger, Markus; Sittinger, Michael; Tauber, Rudolf; Ringe, Jochen; Blanchard, Véronique

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are easy to isolate and expand, develop into several tissues, including fat, migrate to diseased organs, have immunosuppressive properties and secrete regenerative factors. This makes MSCs ideal for regenerative medicine. For application and regulatory purposes, knowledge of (bio)markers characterizing MSCs and their development stages is of paramount importance. The cell surface is coated with glycans that possess lineage-specific nature, which makes glycans to be promising candidate markers. In the context of soft tissue generation, we aimed to identify glycans that could be markers for MSCs and their adipogenically differentiated progeny. MSCs were isolated from human bone marrow, adipogenically stimulated for 15 days and adipogenesis was verified by staining the lipid droplets and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction of the marker genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4). Using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry combined with exoglycosidase digestions, we report for the first time the N-glycome of MSCs during adipogenic differentiation. We were able to detect more than 100 different N-glycans, including high-mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans, as well as poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains. Adipogenesis was accompanied by an increased amount of biantennary fucosylated structures, decreased amount of fucosylated, afucosylated tri- and tetraantennary structures and increased sialylation. N-glycans H6N5F1 and H7N6F1 were significantly overexpressed in undifferentiated MSCs while H3N4F1 and H5N4F3 were upregulated in adipogenically differentiated MSCs. These glycan structures are promising candidate markers to detect and distinguish MSCs and their adipogenic progeny.

  10. Synthesis of embryonic tendon-like tissue by human marrow stromal/mesenchymal stem cells requires a three-dimensional environment and transforming growth factor β3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapacee, Zoher; Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Lu, Yinhui; Crabtree, David; Holmes, David F; Kadler, Karl E

    2010-10-01

    Tendon-like tissue generated from stem cells in vitro has the potential to replace tendons and ligaments lost through injury and disease. However, thus far, no information has been available on the mechanism of tendon formation in vitro and how to accelerate the process. We show here that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) can generate tendon-like tissue in 7days mediated by transforming growth factor (TGF) β3. MSCs cultured in fixed-length fibrin gels spontaneously synthesized narrow-diameter collagen fibrils and exhibited fibripositors (actin-rich, collagen fibril-containing plasma membrane protrusions) identical to those that occur in embryonic tendon. In contrast, BM-MNCs did not synthesize tendon-like tissue under these conditions. We performed real-time PCR analysis of MSCs and BM-MNCs. MSCs upregulated genes encoding type I collagen, TGFβ3, and Smad2 at the time of maximum contraction of the tendon-like tissue (7days). Western blot analysis showed phosphorylation of Smad2 at maximum contraction. The TGFβ inhibitor SB-431542, blocked the phosphorylation of Smad2 and stopped the formation of tendon-like tissue. Quantitative PCR showed that BM-MNCs expressed very low levels of TGFβ3 compared to MSCs. Therefore we added exogenous TGFβ3 protein to BM-MNCs in fibrin gels, which resulted in phosphorylation of Smad2, synthesis of collagen fibrils, the appearance of fibripositors at the plasma membrane, and the formation of tendon-like tissue. In conclusion, MSCs that self-generate TGFβ signaling or the addition of TGFβ3 protein to BM-MNCs in fixed-length fibrin gels spontaneously make embryonic tendon-like tissue in vitro within 7days. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of neural differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields incorporated with MNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Park, Jung-Keug; Cho, Hyunjin

    2014-10-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) have been investigated as a new cell-therapeutic solution due to their capacity that could differentiate into neural-like cells. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) therapy has emerged as a novel technique, using mechanical stimulus to differentiate hBM-MSCs and significantly enhance neuronal differentiation to affect cellular and molecular reactions. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) have recently achieved widespread use for biomedical applications and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-labeled nanoparticles are used to increase their circulation time, aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and nonspecific cellular uptake as well as to decrease immunogenicity. Many studies have used MNP-labeled cells for differentiation, but there have been no reports of MNP-labeled neural differentiation combined with EMFs. In this study, synthesized PEG-phospholipid encapsulated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are used on hBM-MSCs to improve their intracellular uptake. The PEGylated nanoparticles were exposed to the cells under 50 Hz of EMFs to improve neural differentiation. First, we measured cell viability and intracellular iron content in hBM-MSCs after treatment with MNPs. Analysis was conducted by RT-PCR, and immunohistological analysis using neural cell type-specific genes and antibodies after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields. These results suggest that electromagnetic fields enhance neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs incorporated with MNPs and would be an effective method for differentiating neural cells.

  12. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Regulates MicroRNA 21 Expression to Activate TGF-β Signaling in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Enhance Osteoblast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Selvamurugan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs have been documented to promote bone fracture healing in nonunions and increase lumbar spinal fusion rates. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PEMF stimulates differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs into osteoblasts are not well understood. In this study the PEMF effects on hBMSCs were studied by microarray analysis. PEMF stimulation of hBMSCs’ cell numbers mainly affected genes of cell cycle regulation, cell structure, and growth receptors or kinase pathways. In the differentiation and mineralization stages, PEMF regulated preosteoblast gene expression and notably, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling pathway and microRNA 21 (miR21 were most highly regulated. PEMF stimulated activation of Smad2 and miR21-5p expression in differentiated osteoblasts, and TGF-β signaling was essential for PEMF stimulation of alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression. Smad7, an antagonist of the TGF-β signaling pathway, was found to be miR21-5p’s putative target gene and PEMF caused a decrease in Smad7 expression. Expression of Runx2 was increased by PEMF treatment and the miR21-5p inhibitor prevented the PEMF stimulation of Runx2 expression in differentiating cells. Thus, PEMF could mediate its effects on bone metabolism by activation of the TGF-β signaling pathway and stimulation of expression of miR21-5p in hBMSCs.

  13. Caspase-8 regulates the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Siv H; Westhrin, Marita; Zahoor, Muhammad; Nørgaard, Nikolai N; Hella, Hanne; Størdal, Berit; Sundan, Anders; Nilsen, Nadra J; Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Standal, Therese

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, also called mesenchymal stromal cells, MSCs, have great potential in stem cell therapy partly due to their immunosuppressive properties. How these cells respond to chronic inflammatory stimuli is therefore of importance. Toll-like receptors (TLR)s are innate immune receptors that mediate inflammatory signals in response to infection, stress, and damage. Caspase-8 is involved in activation of NF-kB downstream of TLRs in immune cells. Here we investigated the role of caspase-8 in regulating TLR-induced cytokine production from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Cytokine expression in hBMCs in response to poly(I:C) and LPS was evaluated by PCR, multiplex cytokine assay, and ELISA. TLR3, TRIF, and caspase-8 were silenced using siRNA. Caspase-8 was also inhibited using a caspase-8 inhibitor, z-IEDT. We found that TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) and TLR4 agonist LPS induced secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in a TLR-dependent manner which required the TLR signaling adaptor molecule TRIF. Further, poly(I:C) reduced the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines HGF and TGFβ whereas LPS reduced HGF expression only. Notably, caspase-8 was involved in the induction of IL- IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL10, and in the inhibition of HGF and TGFβ. Caspase-8 appears to modulate hBMSCs into gaining a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Therefore, inhibiting caspase-8 in hBMSCs might promote an immunosuppressive phenotype which could be useful in clinical applications to treat inflammatory disorders.

  14. Combined cord blood and bone marrow transplantation from the same human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor for children with malignant and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucunduva, Luciana; Volt, Fernanda; Cunha, Renato; Locatelli, Franco; Zecca, Marco; Yesilipek, Akif; Caniglia, Maurizio; Güngör, Tayfun; Aksoylar, Serap; Fagioli, Franca; Bertrand, Yves; Addari, Maria Carmen; de la Fuente, Josu; Winiarski, Jacek; Biondi, Andrea; Sengeloev, Henrik; Badell, Isabel; Mellgren, Karin; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Sedlacek, Petr; Vora, Ajay; Rocha, Vanderson; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) from an human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling can be used for transplantation of patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, the low cellular content of most UCB units represents a limitation to this approach. An option to increase cell dose is to harvest bone marrow (BM) cells from the same donor and infuse them along with the UCB. We studied 156 children who received such a combined graft between 1992 and 2011. Median age was 7 years and 78% of patients (n = 122) were transplanted for non-malignant diseases, mainly haemoglobinopathies. Acute leukaemia (n = 26) was the most frequent malignant diagnosis. Most patients (91%) received myeloablative conditioning. Median donor age was 1·7 years, median infused nucleated cell dose was 24·4 × 10(7) /kg and median follow-up was 41 months. Sixty-days neutrophil recovery occurred in 96% of patients at a median of 17 d. The probabilities of grade-II-IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 19% and 10%, respectively. Four-year overall survival was 90% (68% malignant; 97% non-malignant diseases) with 3% probability of death. In conclusion, combined UCB and BM transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling donor is an effective treatment for children with malignant and non-malignant disorders with high overall survival and low incidence of GVHD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reduction of microhemorrhages in the spinal cord of symptomatic ALS mice after intravenous human bone marrow stem cell transplantation accompanies repair of the blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Steiner, George; Mahendrasah, Ajay; Sanberg, Paul R; Kurien, Crupa; Thomson, Avery; Borlongan, Cesar V; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2018-02-13

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) alterations, including capillary rupture, have been demonstrated in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS patients. To date, treatment to restore BSCB in ALS is underexplored. Here, we evaluated whether intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow CD34 + (hBM34 + ) cells into symptomatic ALS mice leads to restoration of capillary integrity in the spinal cord as determined by detection of microhemorrhages. Three different doses of hBM34 + cells (5 × 10 4 , 5 × 10 5 or 1 × 10 6 ) or media were intravenously injected into symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice at 13 weeks of age. Microhemorrhages were determined in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords of mice at 4 weeks post-treatment, as revealed by Perls' Prussian blue staining for ferric iron. Numerous microhemorrhages were observed in the gray and white matter of the spinal cords in media-treated mice, with a greater number of capillary ruptures within the ventral horn of both segments. In cell-treated mice, microhemorrhage numbers in the cervical and lumbar spinal cords were inversely related to administered cell doses. In particular, the pervasive microvascular ruptures determined in the spinal cords in late symptomatic ALS mice were significantly decreased by the highest cell dose, suggestive of BSCB repair by grafted hBM34 + cells. The study results provide translational outcomes supporting transplantation of hBM34 + cells at an optimal dose as a potential therapeutic strategy for BSCB repair in ALS patients.

  16. Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 promotes the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into keratinocyte-like cells in xeno-free conditioned medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenzhen; Han, Shichao; Wang, Xingqin; Han, Fu; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Hongtao; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Yunchuan; Su, Linlin; Shi, Jihong; Tang, Chaowu; Hu, Dahai

    2015-03-11

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), which have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell types, have recently become a novel strategy for cell-based therapies. The differentiation of BMSCs into keratinocytes may be beneficial for patients with burns, disease, or trauma. However, the currently available cells are exposed to animal materials during their cultivation and induction. These xeno-contaminations severely limit their clinical outcomes. Previous studies have shown that the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 can promote induction efficiency and regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In the present study, we attempted to establish a xeno-free system for the differentiation of BMSCs into keratinocytes and to investigate whether Y-27632 can facilitate this differentiation. BMSCs isolated from patients were cultured by using a xeno-free system and characterised by using flow cytometric analysis and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation assays. Human primary keratinocytes were also isolated from patients. Then, the morphology, population doubling time, and β-galactosidase staining level of these cells were evaluated in the presence or absence of Y-27632 to determine the effects of Y-27632 on the state of the keratinocytes. Keratinocyte-like cells (KLCs) were detected at different time points by immunocytofluorescence analysis. Moreover, the efficiency of BMSC differentiation under different conditions was measured by quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analyses. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 promoted the proliferation and lifespan of human primary keratinocytes. In addition, we showed that keratinocyte-specific markers could be detected in BMSCs cultured in a xeno-free system using keratinocyte-conditioned medium (KCM) independent of the presence of Y-27632. However, the efficiency of the differentiation of BMSCs into KLCs was significantly higher in the presence of Y

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta1 stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 in human bone marrow stromal osteoblast progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Eriksen, E F

    2001-01-01

    While transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) regulates proliferation and differentiation of human osteoblast precursor cells, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. Several hormones and locally acting growth factors regulate osteoblast functions through changes in the insulin......-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). Thus, we studied the effects of TGF-beta1 on IGFs and IGFBPs in human marrow stromal (hMS) osteoblast precursor cells. TGF-beta1 increased the steady-state mRNA level of IGF-I up to 8.5+/-0.6-fold (P...

  18. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrange medical leave from work Take care of bank or financial statements Arrange care of pets Arrange ... Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - dressing change Central venous catheter - flushing ...

  19. Bone marrow transplantation immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentin, J.J.; Kiessling, R.; Wigzell, H.; Gallagher, M.T.; Datta, S.K.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were made to determine whether genetic resistance (GR) to bone marrow transplantation represents a natural lymphoma-leukemia defense mechanism, as follows: (C57 x AKR) F 1 hybrid mice show GR to C57 parental bone marrow cells, but not to AKR parental bone marrow cells (C3H x AKR) F 1 hybrids show no GR to bone marrow transplantation from either parental strain. However, transplantation of AKR lymphoma cells into lethally irradiated ''resistant'' (C57 x AKR) F 1 and ''nonresistant'' (C3H x AKR) F 1 hybrids produced lymphomatous spleen colonies in ''nonresistant'' hybrids but not in ''resistant'' hybrids. Thus ''resistant'' (C57 x AKR) F 1 hybrids can recognize and reject AKR lymphoma cells, but not normal AKR bone marrow cells. A normal biologic role of leukemia-lymphoma surveillance was postulated for genetic resistance to marrow transplantation, directed at antigens which, like TL, are expressed on normal hemopoietic cells of some strains, but only on leukemic cells of other strains

  20. Intrapancreatic injection of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells alleviates hyperglycemia and modulates the macrophage state in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu Murai

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease caused by the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, resulting in insulin dependency and hyperglycemia. While transplanted bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BMMSCs have been explored as an alternative therapeutic approach for diseases, the choice of delivery route may be a critical factor determining their sustainability. This study evaluated the effects of intrapancreatic and intravenous injection of human BMMSCs (hBMMSCs in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mouse model. C57/BL6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 115 mg/kg STZ on day 0. hBMMSCs (1 × 106 cells or vehicle were injected into the pancreas or jugular vein on day 7. Intrapancreatic, but not intravenous, hBMMSC injection significantly reduced blood glucose levels on day 28 compared with vehicle injection by the same route. This glucose-lowering effect was not induced by intrapancreatic injection of human fibroblasts as the xenograft control. Intrapancreatically injected fluorescence-labeled hBMMSCs were observed in the intra- and extra-lobular spaces of the pancreas, and intravenously injected cells were in the lung region, although the number of cells mostly decreased within 2 weeks of injection. For hBMMSCs injected twice into the pancreatic region on days 7 and 28, the injected mice had further reduced blood glucose to borderline diabetic levels on day 56. Animals injected with hBMMSCs twice exhibited increases in the plasma insulin level, number and size of islets, insulin-positive proportion of the total pancreas area, and intensity of insulin staining compared with vehicle-injected animals. We found a decrease of Iba1-positive cells in islets and an increase of CD206-positive cells in both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The hBMMSC injection also reduced the number of CD40-positive cells merged with glucagon immunoreactions in the islets. These results suggest that intrapancreatic injection

  1. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M.; de Winther, M. P.; Herijgers, N.; Havekes, L. M.; Hofker, M. H.; Groot, P. H.; van Berkel, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the arterial wall, scavenger receptor class A (SRA) is implicated in pathological lipid deposition. In contrast, in the liver, SRA is suggested to remove modified lipoproteins from the circulation, thereby protecting the body from their pathological action. The role of SRA on bone marrow-derived

  2. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, M. van; Winther, M.P.J. de; Herijgers, N.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Groot, P.H.E.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    2000-01-01

    In the arterial wall, scavenger receptor class A (SRA) is implicated in pathological lipid deposition. In contrast, in the liver, SRA is suggested to remove modified lipoproteins from the circulation, thereby protecting the body from their pathological action. The role of SRA on bone marrow-derived

  3. Marrow transfusions into normal recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brecher, G.

    1983-01-01

    During the past several years we have explored the transfusion of bone marrow into normal nonirradiated mice. While transfused marrow proliferates readily in irradiated animals, only minimal proliferation takes place in nonirradiated recipients. It has generally been assumed that this was due to the lack of available proliferative sites in recipients with normal marrow. Last year we were able to report that the transfusion of 200 million bone marrow cells (about 2/3 of the total complement of marrow cells of a normal mouse) resulted in 20% to 25% of the recipient's marrow being replaced by donor marrow. Thus we can now study the behavior of animals that have been transfused (donor) and endogenous (recipient) marrow cells, although none of the tissues of either donor or recipient have been irradiated. With these animals we hope to investigate the nature of the peculiar phenomenon of serial exhaustion of marrow, also referred to as the limited self-replicability of stem cells

  4. Repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks in human bone marrow cells. Analysis of unfractionated and CD34+ cells using single-cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankinen, Maarit H.; Vilpo, Juhani A.

    1997-01-01

    Human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were separated by density gradient centrifugation, and a subpopulation of progenitor cells was further isolated using anti-CD34-coated magnetic beads. The cells were irradiated with γ-rays (0.93-5.43 Gy) from a 137 Cs source. The extent of DNA damage, i.e., single-strand breaks (SSBs) and alkali-labile lesions of individual cells, was investigated using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique. The irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent increase in DNA migration, reflecting the number of detectable DNA lesions. An approximately similar extent of SSB formation was observed in BMMNCs and CD34+ cells. Damage was repaired when the cells were incubated at 37C: a fast initial repair phase was followed by a slower rejoining of SSBs in both BMMNC and CD34+ cell populations. A significantly longer time was required to repair the lesions caused by 5.43 Gy than those caused by 0.93 Gy. In the present work we report, for the first time, the induction and repair of DNA SSBs at the level of single human bone marrow cells when exposed to ionizing radiation at clinically relevant doses. These data, together with our previous results with human blood granulocytes and lymphocytes, indicate an approximately similar extent of formation and repair of γ-irradiation-induced DNA SSBs in immature and mature human hematopoietic cells

  5. Comparative Analyses of Immunosuppressive Characteristics of Bone-Marrow, Wharton’s Jelly, and Adipose Tissue-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Karaöz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which possess immunosuppressive characteristics on induced T-cells, were shown to be applicable in prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. However, knowledge of effective cell sources is still limited. In this study, MSCs from different human tissues, i.e. bone marrow (BM, Wharton’s jelly (WJ, and adipose tissue, were isolated, and the immune suppression of stimulated T cells was analyzed comparatively. Materials and Methods: MSCs were co-cultured with phytohemagglutinin-induced T-cells with co-culture techniques with and without cell-to-cell contact. After co-culture for 24 and 96 h, the proliferation rate of T cells was estimated by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester and apoptosis by annexin V/PI methods. Both T cells and MSCs were analyzed with respect to gene expressions by real-time polymerase chain reaction and their specific protein levels by ELISA. Results: The results showed that all three MSC lines significantly suppressed T-cell proliferation; BM-MSCs were most effective. Similarly, T-cell apoptosis was induced most strongly by BM-MSCs in indirect culture. In T cells, the genes in NFkB and tumor necrosis factor pathways were silenced and the caspase pathway was induced after co-culture. These results were confirmed with the measurement of protein levels, like transforming growth factor β1, IL-6, interferon-γ, interleukin (IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Additionally, IL-17A was detected in high levels in WJ-MSC co-cultures. We showed that IL-17A-producing Tregs are the key mediators in the treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Conclusion: BM-MSCs, which have been used in clinical applications for a while, showed the greatest immunosuppressive effect compared to other MSCs. However, a promising cell source could also be WJ, which is also effective in suppression with fewer ethical concerns. We described the molecular mechanism of WJ-MSCs in allogenic transplants for

  6. Plasmid-based genetic modification of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells: analysis of cell survival and transgene expression after transplantation in rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsyn, Mark W; Daans, Jasmijn; Spaepen, Gie; Chatterjee, Shyama; Vermeulen, Katrien; D'Haese, Patrick; Van Tendeloo, Viggo Fi; Van Marck, Eric; Ysebaert, Dirk; Berneman, Zwi N; Jorens, Philippe G; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2007-12-14

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSC) are attractive targets for ex vivo cell and gene therapy. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of a plasmid-based strategy for genetic modification of human (h)MSC with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neurotrophin (NT)3. Three genetically modified hMSC lines (EGFP, NT3, NT3-EGFP) were established and used to study cell survival and transgene expression following transplantation in rat spinal cord. First, we demonstrate long-term survival of transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells in rat spinal cord under, but not without, appropriate immune suppression. Next, we examined the stability of EGFP or NT3 transgene expression following transplantation of hMSC-EGFP, hMSC-NT3 and hMSC-NT3-EGFP in rat spinal cord. While in vivo EGFP mRNA and protein expression by transplanted hMSC-EGFP cells was readily detectable at different time points post-transplantation, in vivo NT3 mRNA expression by hMSC-NT3 cells and in vivo EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells was, respectively, undetectable or declined rapidly between day 1 and 7 post-transplantation. Further investigation revealed that the observed in vivo decline of EGFP protein expression by hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells: (i) was associated with a decrease in transgenic NT3-EGFP mRNA expression as suggested following laser capture micro-dissection analysis of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell transplants at day 1 and day 7 post-transplantation, (ii) did not occur when hMSC-NT3-EGFP cells were transplanted subcutaneously, and (iii) was reversed upon re-establishment of hMSC-NT3-EGFP cell cultures at 2 weeks post-transplantation. Finally, because we observed a slowly progressing tumour growth following transplantation of all our hMSC cell transplants, we here demonstrate that omitting immune suppressive therapy is sufficient to prevent further tumour growth and to eradicate malignant xenogeneic cell transplants. In this study, we demonstrate that genetically modified hMSC lines can survive

  7. Effects of radiations on bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Frindel, E.; Croizat, H.; Parmentier, C.

    1979-01-01

    After total body irradiation for kidney transplant, the initial decrease of circulating blood cells is more rapid, the nadir is reached sooner and the regeneration occurs earlier when the doses are higher than a few hundred rads. The LD 50 in man seems to be higher than 450 rads. The in vivo and in vitro assays of hemopoietic stem cells have greatly increasedd the understanding of acute and late effects. Multipotential stem cells are very radiosensitive, furthermore the differentiation of the surviving stem cells is accelerated after irradiation. This results in a severe depletion of the stem cell compartment. When this stem cell number falls below a critical value, the stem cell no longer differentiates till the completion of the regeneration of the stem cell compartment. Stem cell proliferation is regulated by inhibitors and stimulators. Release of stimulators by irradiated bone marrow has been demonstrated. Severe sequellae are observed after irradiation of animal and human bone marrow. They seem to be due either to the damage of the stromal cell or to the stem cell population. In patients, four compensating mechanisms are observed after a regional bone marrow irradiation: stimulation of non irradiated bone marrow, extension of hemopoietic areas, regeneration of irradiated bone marrow when the irradiated volume is large and increase in the amplification factor resulting in an increase in the output of mature cells for one stem cell input. Assay of progenitor cells provides useful information and a reduction in their number is still observed many years after a large regional irradiation

  8. Human bone marrow-derived and umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells for alleviating neuropathic pain in a spinal cord injury model

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Shardi Manaheji, Homa; Janzadeh, Atousa; Hosseini, Mostafa; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy can be used for alleviating the neuropathic pain induced by spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, survival and differentiation of stem cells following their transplantation vary depending on the host and intrinsic factors of the cell. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of stem cells derived from bone marrow (BM-MSC) and umbilical cord (UC-MSC) on neuropathic pain relief. Methods A compression model was used to induce SCI in a rat model. A w...

  9. High-sensitivity virus and mycoplasma screening test reveals high prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection in human synovial tissues and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Otabe, Koji; Shimizu, Norio; Komori, Keiichirou; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Katano, Hisako; Koga, Hideyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2018-03-27

    Latent microorganism infection is a safety concern for the clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The aim of this study is to investigate the frequencies and sensitivities of the latent virus and mycoplasma infections in synovium, bone marrow, peripheral blood cells, and blood plasma and cultured synovial MSCs. Total DNA and RNA of the synovium (n = 124), bone marrow (n = 123), peripheral blood cells (n = 121), plasma (n = 121), and 14-day cultured synovial MSCs (n = 63) were collected from patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty or anterior ligament reconstruction after written informed consents were obtained. The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed to quantitatively measure the representative genomes of 13 DNA viruses, 6 RNA viruses, and 9 mycoplasmas. Multi-spliced mRNA detection and virus spike test were also performed to demonstrate the sensitivity of synovial MSCs to the candidate pathogens. In synovium and bone marrow, the positive rates of parvovirus B19 genome were significantly higher than in peripheral blood cells (18.7% and 22% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Multi-alignment analysis of amplified and sequenced viral target genes showed the proximity of the parvovirus B19 gene from different tissue in the same patients. Synovial MSCs cultured for 14 days were positive for virus infection only in two patients (2/62 = 3%). Parvovirus B19 multi-spliced mRNAs were not detected in these two samples. Virus spike test demonstrated the sensitivity of synovial MSCs to herpes simplex virus (HSV)1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV), but not to parvovirus B19. This study revealed a relatively high incidence of latent parvovirus B19 in synovium and bone marrow tissue.

  10. The effects of cyclic hydrostatic pressure on chondrogenesis and viability of human adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional agarose constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer; Williams, John; Gillies, Allison; Bernacki, Susan; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of cyclic hydrostatic pressure (CHP) on chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in three-dimensional (3-D) agarose constructs maintained in a complete growth medium without soluble chondrogenic inducing factors. hASCs were seeded in 2% agarose hydrogels and exposed to 7.5 MPa CHP for 4 h per day at a frequency of 1 Hz for up to 21 days. On days 0, 7, 14, and 21, the expression levels of collagen II, Sox9, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Gene expression analysis found collagen II mRNA expression in only the CHP-loaded construct at day 14 and at no other time during the study. CHP-loaded hASCs exhibited upregulated mRNA expression of Sox9, aggrecan, and COMP at day 7 relative to unloaded controls, suggesting that CHP initiated chondrogenic differentiation of hASCs in a manner similar to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). By day 14, however, loaded hASC constructs exhibited significantly lower mRNA expression of the chondrogenic markers than unloaded controls. Additionally, by day 21, the samples exhibited little measurable mRNA expression at all, suggesting a decreased viability. Histological analysis validated the lack of mRNA expression at day 21 for both the loaded and unloaded control samples with a visible decrease in the cell number and change in morphology. A comparative study with hASCs and hMSCs further examined long-term cell viability in 3-D agarose constructs of both cell types. Decreased cell metabolic activity was observed throughout the 21-day experimental period in both the CHP-loaded and control constructs of both hMSCs and hASCs, suggesting a decrease in cell metabolic activity, alluding to a decrease in cell viability. This suggests that a 2% agarose hydrogel may not optimally support hASC or hMSC viability in a complete growth medium in the

  11. The Protein Content of Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Expanded Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD133+ and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Partially Explains Why both Sources are Advantageous for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulski, Addeli B B; Capriglione, Luiz G; Batista, Michel; Marcon, Bruna H; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Correa, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    Adult stem cells have beneficial effects when exposed to damaged tissue due, at least in part, to their paracrine activity, which includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles (EVs). Given the multiplicity of signals carried by these vesicles through the horizontal transfer of functional molecules, human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) and CD133 + cell-derived EVs have been tested in various disease models and shown to recover damaged tissues. In this study, we profiled the protein content of EVs derived from expanded human CD133 + cells and bone marrow-derived hMSCs with the intention of better understanding the functions performed by these vesicles/cells and delineating the most appropriate use of each EV in future therapeutic procedures. Using LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 623 proteins for expanded CD133 + -EVs and 797 proteins for hMSCs-EVs. Although the EVs from both origins were qualitatively similar, when protein abundance was considered, hMSCs-EVs and CD133 + -EVs were different. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis in CD133 + -EVs revealed proteins involved in a variety of angiogenesis-related functions as well proteins related to the cytoskeleton and highly implicated in cell motility and cellular activation. In contrast, when overrepresented proteins in hMSCs-EVs were analyzed, a GO cluster of immune response-related genes involved with immune response-regulating factors acting on phagocytosis and innate immunity was identified. Together our data demonstrate that from the point of view of protein content, expanded CD133 + -EVs and hMSCs-EVs are in part similar but also sufficiently different to reflect the main beneficial paracrine effects widely reported in pre-clinical studies using expanded CD133 + cells and/or hBM-MSCs.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen-A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in a Subset of 237 Donors in the South African Bone Marrow Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen- (HLA- A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 allele and haplotype frequencies were studied in a subset of 237 volunteer bone marrow donors registered at the South African Bone Marrow Registry (SABMR. Hapl-o-Mat software was used to compute allele and haplotype frequencies from individuals typed at various resolutions, with some alleles in multiple allele code (MAC format. Four hundred and thirty-eight HLA-A, 235 HLA-B, 234 HLA-DRB1, 41 HLA-DQB1, and 29 HLA-C alleles are reported. The most frequent alleles were A∗02:02g (0.096, B∗07:02g (0.082, C∗07:02g (0.180, DQB1∗06:02 (0.157, and DRB1∗15:01 (0.072. The most common haplotype was A∗03:01g~B∗07:02g~C∗07:02g~DQB1∗06:02~DRB1∗15:01 (0.067, which has also been reported in other populations. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in A, B, and DRB1 loci, with C~DQB1 being the only locus pair in linkage disequilibrium. This study describes allele and haplotype frequencies from a subset of donors registered at SABMR, the only active bone marrow donor registry in Africa. Although the sample size was small, our results form a key resource for future population studies, disease association studies, and donor recruitment strategies.

  13. Modification of pH in the preparation of nano-coloidex of human albumin for the radio localization of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo Rios, Gabriela del Rosario

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to produce of a radiopharmaceutical, nano-coloide of albumin to be used in scintiscanning the bone marrow. A comparison was made of the two methods for the preparation of it, having as a difference in the method the modification of the pH nano-coloide by adding a alkaline substance very fast, avoiding that the albumin was denaturalized; and determining in these way if the reformulation of the radiopharmaceutical meet with the quality control and if there is or not variability in the biodistribution of the preparation. For these there carried out microbiological, physics control, radiochemical purity and biodistribution in rats

  14. Continuous Lymphoid Cell Lines with Characteristics of B Cells (Bone-Marrow-Derived), Lacking the Epstein-Barr Virus Genome and Derived from Three Human Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, George; Lindahl, Tomas; Jondal, Mikael; Leibold, Wolfgang; Menézes, José; Nilsson, Kenneth; Sundström, Christer

    1974-01-01

    Three exceptional cell lines have been tested for the presence of the Epstein-Barr virus genome by nucleic acid hybridization (complementary RNA·DNA) and Epstein-Barr virus-determined nuclear antigen tests. Two lines were derived from Swedish lymphoma cases and one from an African Burkitt-like lymphoma biopsy that was negative for Epstein-Barr virus DNA and the virus-determined nuclear antigen. All three lines apparently lacked the viral genome. Two of the three lines clearly had characteristics of B-cells (bone-marrow-derived). PMID:4369887

  15. Marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-05-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy.

  16. Different culture media affect growth characteristics, surface marker distribution and chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Sebastien; Moradi, Babak; Frank, Sebastian; Dreher, Thomas; Kämmerer, Peer Wolfgang; Richter, Wiltrud; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2013-07-30

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play an important role in modern tissue engineering, while distinct variations of culture media compositions and supplements have been reported. Because MSCs are heterogeneous regarding their regenerative potential and their surface markers, these parameters were compared in four widely used culture media compositions. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow and expanded in four established cell culture media. MSC yield/1000 MNCs, passage time and growth index were observed. In P4, typical MSC surface markers were analysed by fluorescence cytometry. Additionally, chondrogenic, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential were evaluated. Growth index and P0 cell yield varied importantly between the media. The different expansion media had a significant influence on the expression of CD10, CD90, CD105, CD140b CD146 and STRO-1. While no significant differences were observed regarding osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, chondrogenic differentiation was superior in medium A as reflected by GAG/DNA content. The choice of expansion medium can have a significant influence on growth, differentiation potential and surface marker expression of mesenchymal stromal cells, which is of fundamental importance for tissue engineering procedures.

  17. Global MicroRNA Profiling in Human Bone Marrow Skeletal—Stromal or Mesenchymal–Stem Cells Identified Candidates for Bone Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Chi Chih; Venø, Morten T.; Chen, Li

    2018-01-01

    Bone remodeling and regeneration are highly regulated multistep processes involving posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we performed a global profiling of differentially expressed miRNAs in bone-marrow-derived skeletal cells (BMSCs; also known as stromal or mesenchymal stem......RNAs for enhancing bone tissue regeneration. Scaffolds functionalized with miRNA nano-carriers enhanced osteoblastogenesis in 3D culture and retained this ability at least 2 weeks after storage. Additionally, anti-miR-222 enhanced in vivo ectopic bone formation through targeting the cell-cycle inhibitor CDKN1B...... cells) during in vitro osteoblast differentiation. We functionally validated the regulatory effects of several miRNAs on osteoblast differentiation and identified 15 miRNAs, most significantly miR-222 and miR-423, as regulators of osteoblastogenesis. In addition, we tested the possible targeting of mi...

  18. Pathogen reduction through additive-free short-wave UV light irradiation retains the optimal efficacy of human platelet lysate for the expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Viau

    Full Text Available We recently developed and characterized a standardized and clinical grade human Platelet Lysate (hPL that constitutes an advantageous substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC expansion required in cell therapy procedures, avoiding xenogenic risks (virological and immunological and ethical issues. Because of the progressive use of pathogen-reduced (PR labile blood components, and the requirement of ensuring the viral safety of raw materials for cell therapy products, we evaluated the impact of the novel procedure known as THERAFLEX UV-Platelets for pathogen reduction on hPL quality (growth factors content and efficacy (as a medium supplement for hMSC expansion. This technology is based on short-wave ultraviolet light (UV-C that induces non-reversible damages in DNA and RNA of pathogens while preserving protein structures and functions, and has the main advantage of not needing the addition of any photosensitizing additives (that might secondarily interfere with hMSCs.We applied the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets procedure on fresh platelet concentrates (PCs suspended in platelet additive solution and prepared hPL from these treated PCs. We compared the quality and efficacy of PR-hPL with the corresponding non-PR ones. We found no impact on the content of five cytokines tested (EGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, VEGF and IGF-1 but a significant decrease in TGF-ß1 (-21%, n = 11, p<0.01. We performed large-scale culture of hMSCs from bone marrow (BM during three passages and showed that hPL or PR-hPL at 8% triggered comparable BM-hMSC proliferation as FBS at 10% plus bFGF. Moreover, after proliferation of hMSCs in an hPL- or PR-hPL-containing medium, their profile of membrane marker expression, their clonogenic potential and immunosuppressive properties were maintained, in comparison with BM-hMSCs cultured under FBS conditions. The potential to differentiate towards the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages of hMSCs cultured in parallel

  19. Pathogen reduction through additive-free short-wave UV light irradiation retains the optimal efficacy of human platelet lysate for the expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viau, Sabrina; Chabrand, Lucie; Eap, Sandy; Lorant, Judith; Rouger, Karl; Goudaliez, Francis; Sumian, Chryslain; Delorme, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed and characterized a standardized and clinical grade human Platelet Lysate (hPL) that constitutes an advantageous substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) expansion required in cell therapy procedures, avoiding xenogenic risks (virological and immunological) and ethical issues. Because of the progressive use of pathogen-reduced (PR) labile blood components, and the requirement of ensuring the viral safety of raw materials for cell therapy products, we evaluated the impact of the novel procedure known as THERAFLEX UV-Platelets for pathogen reduction on hPL quality (growth factors content) and efficacy (as a medium supplement for hMSC expansion). This technology is based on short-wave ultraviolet light (UV-C) that induces non-reversible damages in DNA and RNA of pathogens while preserving protein structures and functions, and has the main advantage of not needing the addition of any photosensitizing additives (that might secondarily interfere with hMSCs). We applied the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets procedure on fresh platelet concentrates (PCs) suspended in platelet additive solution and prepared hPL from these treated PCs. We compared the quality and efficacy of PR-hPL with the corresponding non-PR ones. We found no impact on the content of five cytokines tested (EGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, VEGF and IGF-1) but a significant decrease in TGF-ß1 (-21%, n = 11, p<0.01). We performed large-scale culture of hMSCs from bone marrow (BM) during three passages and showed that hPL or PR-hPL at 8% triggered comparable BM-hMSC proliferation as FBS at 10% plus bFGF. Moreover, after proliferation of hMSCs in an hPL- or PR-hPL-containing medium, their profile of membrane marker expression, their clonogenic potential and immunosuppressive properties were maintained, in comparison with BM-hMSCs cultured under FBS conditions. The potential to differentiate towards the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages of hMSCs cultured in parallel in the

  20. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Osgood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT, also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management.

  1. Bone marrow edema syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V.; Lykissas, Marios G.; Beris, Alexandros E.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES) refers to transient clinical conditions with unknown pathogenic mechanism, such as transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO), and reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). BMES is primarily characterized by bone marrow edema (BME) pattern. The disease mainly affects the hip, the knee, and the ankle of middle-aged males. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of the disease. Unfortunately, the etiology of BMES remains obscure. The hallmark that separates BMES from other conditions presented with BME pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Histological examination of the lesion is unnecessary. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is mainly used for the early diagnosis and monitoring the progression of the disease. Early differentiation from other aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential in order to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities, such as TOH, RMO, and RSD are spontaneously resolving, and surgical treatment is not needed. On the other hand, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment in case of osteonecrosis is of crucial importance. (orig.)

  2. Electron absorbed fractions in skeletal soft tissues based on red bone marrow segmentation at runtime in muCT images of human trabecular bone;Fracoes absorvidas de eletrons em tecidos moles do esqueleto avaliadas com base na segmentacao em tempo de execucao da medula ossea vermelha contida em imagens muCT do osso trabecular humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kramer, R. [Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Khoury, H.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Robson-Brown, K. [University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom). Dept. of Archaeology and Anthropology

    2009-07-01

    Skeletal dosimetry determines equivalent dose or absorbed fractions in the red bone marrow (RBM) and the osteogenic cells on bone surfaces (BSC). Following a method used earlier for the BSC, RBM and yellow bone marrow (YBM) have been segmented in the marrow cavities of muCT images of human spongiosa at runtime, i.e. during the execution of the Monte Carlo calculation, which avoids the necessity to segment RBM and YBM externally in muCT images for many different cellularities and to store the data. Using this internal RBM/YBM segmentation, this study presents electron absorbed fractions for the RBM and the BSC as a function of the voxel resolution and also compares the results with data from other investigations. (author)

  3. Size and dielectric properties of skeletal stem cells change critically after enrichment and expansion from human bone marrow: consequences for microfluidic cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Miguel; de Andrés, María C; Spencer, Daniel; Oreffo, Richard O C; Morgan, Hywel

    2017-08-01

    The capacity of bone and cartilage to regenerate can be attributed to skeletal stem cells (SSCs) that reside within the bone marrow (BM). Given SSCs are rare and lack specific surface markers, antibody-based sorting has failed to deliver the cell purity required for clinical translation. Microfluidics offers new methods of isolating cells based on biophysical features including, but not limited to, size, electrical properties and stiffness. Here we report the characterization of the dielectric properties of unexpanded SSCs using single-cell microfluidic impedance cytometry (MIC). Unexpanded SSCs had a mean size of 9.0 µm; larger than the majority of BM cells. During expansion, often used to purify and increase the number of SSCs, cell size and membrane capacitance increased significantly, highlighting the importance of characterizing unaltered SSCs. In addition, MIC was used to track the osteogenic differentiation of SSCs and showed an increased membrane capacitance with differentiation. The electrical properties of primary SSCs were indistinct from other BM cells precluding its use as an isolation method. However, the current studies indicate that cell size in combination with another biophysical parameter, such as stiffness, could be used to design label-free devices for sorting SSCs with significant clinical impact. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. In vitro migration and proliferation ("wound healing") potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from human CD271(+) bone marrow mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi-Pupovci, Hatixhe; Kuçi, Zyrafete; Wehner, Sibylle; Bönig, Halvard; Lieberz, Ralf; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2015-09-25

    Emerging evidence indicates that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from different tissue sources may be used in vivo as tissue restorative agents. To date, there is no evidence, however, on migration and proliferation ("wound healing") potential of different subsets of MSCs. The main goal of this study was therefore to compare the in vitro "wound healing" capacity of MSCs generated from positively selected CD271(+) bone marrow mononuclear cells (CD271-MSCs) and MSCs generated by plastic adherence (PA-MSCs). The in vitro model of wound healing (CytoSelect™ 24-Well Wound Healing Assay) was used in order to compare the migration and proliferation potential of CD271-MSCs and PA-MSCs of passage 2 and 4 cultured in presence or absence of growth factors or cytokines. CD271-MSCs of both passages when compared to PA-MSCs demonstrated a significantly higher potential to close the wound 12 and 24 h after initiation of the wound healing assay (P MSCs of second passage was significantly improved after stimulation with FGF-2 (P MSCs of P4 12 h after the treatment (P MSCs of both passages with growth factors or cytokines did not affect their migratory potential. Our in vitro data provide the first evidence that CD271-MSCs are significantly more potent in "wound healing" than their counterparts PA-MSCs.

  5. Full GMP-Compliant Validation of Bone Marrow-Derived Human CD133+ Cells as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product for Refractory Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Belotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133+ cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs. In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM, ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 106 of CD133+ cells (range 2.85 × 106–30.84 × 106, with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87% and a median purity of CD133+ cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%–96,20%. Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 106 cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial.

  6. Probable impact of age and hypoxia on proliferation and microRNA expression profile of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlaily Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Decline in the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC is often seen with older donors as compared to young. Although hypoxia is known as an approach to improve the therapeutic potential of MSC in term of cell proliferation and differentiation capacity, its effects on MSC from aged donors have not been well studied. To evaluate the influence of hypoxia on different age groups, MSC from young (60 years donors were expanded under hypoxic (5% O2 and normal (20% O2 culture conditions. MSC from old donors exhibited a reduction in proliferation rate and differentiation potential together with the accumulation of senescence features compared to that of young donors. However, MSC cultured under hypoxic condition showed enhanced self-renewing and proliferation capacity in both age groups as compared to normal condition. Bioinformatic analysis of the gene ontology (GO and KEGG pathway under hypoxic culture condition identified hypoxia-inducible miRNAs that were found to target transcriptional activity leading to enhanced cell proliferation, migration as well as decrease in growth arrest and apoptosis through the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Overall, differentially expressed miRNA provided additional information to describe the biological changes of young and aged MSCs expansion under hypoxic culture condition at the molecular level. Based on our findings, the therapeutic potential hierarchy of MSC according to donor’s age group and culture conditions can be categorized in the following order: young (hypoxia > young (normoxia > old aged (hypoxia > old aged (normoxia.

  7. Full GMP-compliant validation of bone marrow-derived human CD133(+) cells as advanced therapy medicinal product for refractory ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Daniela; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Bassetti, Beatrice; Cabiati, Benedetta; Spaltro, Gabriella; Biagi, Ettore; Parma, Matteo; Biondi, Andrea; Cavallotti, Laura; Gambini, Elisa; Pompilio, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133(+) cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs). In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM), ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 10(6) of CD133(+) cells (range 2.85 × 10(6)-30.84 × 10(6)), with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87%) and a median purity of CD133(+) cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%-96,20%). Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 10(6) cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial).

  8. Full GMP-Compliant Validation of Bone Marrow-Derived Human CD133+ Cells as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product for Refractory Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Daniela; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Bassetti, Beatrice; Cabiati, Benedetta; Spaltro, Gabriella; Biagi, Ettore; Parma, Matteo; Biondi, Andrea; Cavallotti, Laura; Gambini, Elisa; Pompilio, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133+ cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs). In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM), ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 106 of CD133+ cells (range 2.85 × 106–30.84 × 106), with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87%) and a median purity of CD133+ cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%–96,20%). Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 106 cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial). PMID:26495296

  9. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Bonfim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair.

  10. GVHD suppression by incubation of bone marrow grafts with anti-t-cell globulin: effect in the canine model and application to clinical bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodt, H.; Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Rieder, I.; Janka, G.; Belohradsky, B.; Haas, R.J.; Thierfelder, S.

    1979-01-01

    The present studies were performed in order to establish the anti-GVHD effect of an incubation treatment in the dog, which is regarded as a model of particular relevance for clinical bone marrow transplantation. Application of this principle to a case of human marrow transplantation will be reported

  11. Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins promote lipid accumulation and apolipoprotein B-48 receptor transcriptional activity in human circulating and murine bone marrow neutrophils in a fatty acid-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; López, Sergio; Montserrat de la Paz, Sergio; Sánchez, Rosario; Muriana, Francisco J G; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Abia, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) promote atherosclerosis. Recent research points the bone marrow (BM) as a primary site in atherosclerosis. We elucidated how the acute administration of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) MUFAs, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) PUFAs and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) affects human circulating and murine BM neutrophil lipid accumulation and functionality. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia was induced in healthy subjects and Apoe -/- mice by the acute administration of dietary fats enriched in MUFAs, PUFAs, or SFAs. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia increased apolipoprotein-B48 receptor (ApoB48R) transcriptional activity that was linearly correlated with intracellular triglycerides (TGs) TGs accumulation in human circulating and murine BM neutrophils. MUFA and omega-3 PUFAs attenuated ApoB48R gene expression and intracellular TG accumulation compared to SFAs. TRLs induced apoB48R-dependent TG accumulation in human neutrophils ex vivo. Murine BM neutrophils showed a decrease in surface L-selectin and an increase in TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expressions only after SFAs administration. TRLs enriched in SFAs induced BM neutrophil degranulation ex vivo suggesting cell priming/activation. Postprandial TRLs disrupts the normal biology and function of circulating and BM neutrophils. MUFA- and omega-3 PUFA-rich dietary fats such as virgin olive oil or fish oil has the potential to prevent excessive neutrophil lipid accumulation and activation by targeting the fatty acid composition of TRLs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Breast carcinoma cells modulate the chemoattractive activity of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells by interfering with CXCL12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, Manja; List, Catrin; Dittrich, Tobias; Dhawan, Abhishek; Duryagina, Regina; Arabanian, Laleh S; Kast, Karin; Wimberger, Pauline; Stiehler, Maik; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Jakob, Franz; Ehninger, Gerhard; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether breast tumor cells can modulate the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with a special emphasis on their chemoattractive activity towards hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Primary MSCs as well as a MSC line (SCP-1) were cocultured with primary breast cancer cells, MCF-7, MDA-MB231 breast carcinoma or MCF-10A non-malignant breast epithelial cells or their conditioned medium. In addition, the frequency of circulating clonogenic hematopoietic progenitors was determined in 78 patients with breast cancer and compared with healthy controls. Gene expression analysis of SCP-1 cells cultured with MCF-7 medium revealed CXCL12 (SDF-1) as one of the most significantly downregulated genes. Supernatant from both MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 reduced the CXCL12 promoter activity in SCP-1 cells to 77% and 47%, respectively. Moreover, the CXCL12 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced. As functional consequence of lower CXCL12 levels, we detected a decreased trans-well migration of HSPCs towards MSC/tumor cell cocultures or conditioned medium. The specificity of this effect was confirmed by blocking studies with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Downregulation of SP1 and increased miR-23a levels in MSCs after contact with tumor cell medium as well as enhanced TGFβ1 expression were identified as potential molecular regulators of CXCL12 activity in MSCs. Moreover, we observed a significantly higher frequency of circulating colony-forming hematopoietic progenitors in patients with breast cancer compared with healthy controls. Our in vitro results propose a potential new mechanism by which disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow may interfere with hematopoiesis by modulating CXCL12 in protected niches. © 2014 UICC.

  13. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells secrete endocannabinoids that stimulate in vitro hematopoietic stem cell migration effectively comparable to beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Sevil; Aerts-Kaya, Fatima; Köprü, Çağla Zübeyde; Nemutlu, Emirhan; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Karaosmanoğlu, Beren; Taşkıran, Ekim Zihni; Altun, Belgin; Uçkan Çetinkaya, Duygu; Korkusuz, Petek

    2018-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a well-known hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-mobilizing agent used in both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. However, a proportion of patients or healthy donors fail to mobilize a sufficient number of cells. New mobilization agents are therefore needed. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous lipid mediators generated in the brain and peripheral tissues and activate the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. We suggest that eCBs may act as mobilizers of HSCs from the bone marrow (BM) under stress conditions as beta-adrenergic receptors (Adrβ). This study demonstrates that BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and the peripheral blood (PB) and BM microenvironment contain AEA and 2-AG. 2-AG levels are significantly higher in PB of the G-CSF-treated group compared with BM plasma. BM mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34 + HSCs express CB1, CB2, and Adrβ subtypes. CD34 + HSCs had higher CB1 and CB2 receptor expression in G-CSF-untreated and G-CSF-treated groups compared with MSCs. MNCs but not MSCs expressed CB1 and CB2 receptors based on qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. AEA- and 2-AG-stimulated HSC migration was blocked by eCB receptor antagonists in an in vitro migration assay. In conclusion, components of the eCB system and their interaction with Adrβ subtypes were demonstrated on HSCs and MSCs of G-CSF-treated and G-CSF-untreated healthy donors in vitro, revealing that eCBs might be potential candidates to enhance or facilitate G-CSF-mediated HSC migration under stress conditions in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2018 ISEH – Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive Effects of Suppression of MicroRNA-383 in Human Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Treating Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Wei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs promotes neural cell regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI. Recently, we showed that suppression of microRNA-383 (miR-383 in MSCs increased the protein levels of glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, resulting in improved therapeutic effects on SCI. However, the overall effects of miR-383 suppression in MSCs on SCI therapy were not determined yet. Here, we addressed this question. Methods: We used bioinformatics tools to predict all miR-383-targeting genes, confirmed the functional bindings in a dual luciferase reporter assay. The effects of alteration of candidate genes in MSCs on cell proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay and by Western blotting for PCNA. The effects on angiogenesis were assessed by HUVEC assay. The effects on SCI in vivo were analyzed by transplantation of the modified MSCs into nude rats that underwent SCI. Results: Suppression of miR-383 in MSCs not only upregulated GDNF protein, but also increased vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and cyclin-dependent kinase 19 (CDK19, two other miR-383 targets. MiR-383-suppression-induced increases in CDK19 resulted in a slight but significant increase in MSC proliferation, while miR-383-suppression-induced increases in VEGF-A resulted in a slight but significant increase in MSC-mediated angiogenesis. Conclusions: Upregulation of CDK19 and VEGF-A by miR-383 suppression in MSCs further improve the therapeutic potential of MSCs in treating SCI in rats.

  15. Bone marrow contribution to eosinophilic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denburg Judah A

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-induced bone marrow responses are observable in human allergic asthmatics, involving specific increases in eosinophil-basophil progenitors (Eo/B-CFU, measured either by hemopoietic assays or by flow cytometric analyses of CD34-positive, IL-3Ralpha-positive, and/or IL-5-responsive cell populations. The results are consistent with the upregulation of an IL-5-sensitive population of progenitors in allergen-induced late phase asthmatic responses. Studies in vitro on the phenotype of developing eosinophils and basophils suggest that the early acquisition of IL-5Ralpha, as well as the capacity to produce cytokines such as GM-CSF and IL-5, are features of the differentiation process. These observations are consistent with findings in animal models, indicating that allergen-induced increases in bone marrow progenitor formation depend on hemopoietic factor(s released post-allergen. The possibility that there is constitutive marrow upregulation of eosinophilopoiesis in allergic airways disease is also an area for future investigation.

  16. Variation in primary and culture-expanded cells derived from connective tissue progenitors in human bone marrow space, bone trabecular surface and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadan, Maha A; Piuzzi, Nicolas S; Boehm, Cynthia; Bova, Wesley; Moos, Malcolm; Midura, Ronald J; Hascall, Vincent C; Malcuit, Christopher; Muschler, George F

    2018-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) embody the heterogeneous stem and progenitor cell populations present in native tissue. CTPs are essential to the formation and remodeling of connective tissue and represent key targets for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. To better understand and characterize CTPs, we aimed to compare the (i) concentration and prevalence, (ii) early in vitro biological behavior and (iii) expression of surface-markers and transcription factors among cells derived from marrow space (MS), trabecular surface (TS), and adipose tissues (AT). Cancellous-bone and subcutaneous-adipose tissues were collected from 8 patients. Cells were isolated and cultured. Colony formation was assayed using Colonyze software based on ASTM standards. Cell concentration ([Cell]), CTP concentration ([CTP]) and CTP prevalence (P CTP ) were determined. Attributes of culture-expanded cells were compared based on (i) effective proliferation rate and (ii) expression of surface-markers CD73, CD90, CD105, SSEA-4, SSEA-3, SSEA-1/CD15, Cripto-1, E-Cadherin/CD324, Ep-CAM/CD326, CD146, hyaluronan and transcription factors Oct3/4, Sox-2 and Nanog using flow cytometry. Mean [Cell], [CTP] and P CTP were significantly different between MS and TS samples (P = 0.03, P = 0.008 and P= 0.0003), respectively. AT-derived cells generated the highest mean total cell yield at day 6 of culture-4-fold greater than TS and more than 40-fold greater than MS per million cells plated. TS colonies grew with higher mean density than MS colonies (290 ± 11 versus 150 ± 11 cell per mm 2 ; P = 0.0002). Expression of classical-mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) markers was consistently recorded (>95%) from all tissue sources, whereas all the other markers were highly variable. The prevalence and biological potential of CTPs are different between patients and tissue sources and lack variation in classical MSC markers. Other markers are more likely to discriminate differences

  17. Blood and Bone Marrow Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a stem cell transplant. Risks Bone marrow donation The most serious risk associated with donating bone ... you feel fully recovered. Peripheral blood stem cell donation The risks of this type of stem cell ...

  18. MRI in bone marrow lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, A.; Theissen, P.; Schauerte, G.; Schicha, H.; Diehl, V.

    1989-01-01

    MRI has the potential to demonstrate bone marrow pathology due to its good soft tissue contrast. Inflammation and necrosis can be detected very early before there is evidence of radiological changes. In bone tumors intramedullary infiltration can be visualized in addition to soft tissue changes. Metastases of bone and bone marrow, especially in spinal and pelvic regions, are well depicted, often before bone scintigraphy yields pathological findings. In haematological disorders MRI permits follow-up studies due to its good reproducibility. Infiltration by malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma and its extension in bone marrow can be visualized by MRI, too. However, the most common pathological MRI findings in bone marrow are not very specific, and final diagnosis requires further clinical or histological information. (orig.) [de

  19. Combination Therapy for Radiation-Induced Bone Marrow Aplasia in Nonhuman Primates Using Synthokine SC-55494 and Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacVittle, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Herodin, Francis; Grab, Lisa B; Baum, Charles M; McKearn, John P

    1996-01-01

    .... After irradiation on day (d) 0, cohorts of animals subcutaneously received single-agent protocols of either human serum albumin (HSA; every day [OD], 15 microng/kg/d. n = 10). Synthokine (twice daily [BID...

  20. THE PATHOLOGY OF BONE MARROW FAILURE

    OpenAIRE

    Leguit , Roos; Van Den Tweel , Jan G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract An important indication for bone marrow investigation is the presence of bone marrow failure, which manifests itself as (pan)cytopenia. The causes of cytopenia are varied and differ considerable between childhood and adulthood. In the paediatric age group, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are important causes of bone marrow failure but they play only a minor role in later life. This review gives a comprehensive overview of bone marrow failure disorders in children a...

  1. Autologous bone marrow purging with LAK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, L; Moretti, L; Stramigioli, S; Luchetti, F; Annibali, G M; Baldi, A

    1993-12-01

    In this study we will demonstrate that LAK cells, in vitro, can lyse hematologic neoplastic cells with a minor toxicity of the staminal autologous marrow cells. In fact, after bone marrow and LAK co-culture at a ratio of 1/1 for 8 hours, the inhibition on the GEMM colonies resulted to be 20% less compared to the untreated marrow. These data made LAK an inviting agent for marrow purging in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  2. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-01-01

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation

  3. The effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. 51 Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras. These results raise the possibility that the fulminant GVHD seen in human marrow transplantation is in part due to the major contamination of bone marrow with peripheral blood that results from the techniques currently used for human bone marrow harvest

  4. Bone and marrow dose modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine therapy is being used increasingly in the treatment of cancer (thyroid, leukemia/lymphoma with RIT, primary and secondary bone malignancies, and neuroblastomas). In all cases it is marrow toxicity that limits the amount of treatment that can be administered safely. Marrow dose calculations are more difficult than for many major organs because of the intricate association of bone and soft tissue elements. In RIT, there appears to be no consensus on how to calculate that dose accurately, or of individual patients ability to tolerate planned therapy. Available dose models are designed after an idealized average, healthy individual. Patient-specific methods are applied in evaluation of biokinetic data, and need to be developed for treatment of the physical data (dose conversion factors) as well: age, prior patient therapy, disease status. Contributors to marrow dose: electrons and photons

  5. Gene expression profiles of cryopreserved CD34{sup +} human umbilical cord blood cells are related to their bone marrow reconstitution abilities in mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Kazuhiro [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba (Japan); Yasuda, Jun, E-mail: yasuda-jun@umin.ac.jp [Omics Science Center, RIKEN, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Cell Biology, The JFCR-Cancer Institute (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio, E-mail: yukionak@brc.riken.jp [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-07-09

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are an alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for treatment of leukemia and other diseases. It is very difficult to assess the quality of UCB cells in the clinical situation. Here, we sought to assess the quality of UCB cells by transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Cryopreserved CD34{sup +} UCB cells from twelve different human donors were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD/shi-scid Jic mice. In parallel, the gene expression profiles of the UCB cells were determined from oligonucleotide microarrays. UCB cells from three donors failed to establish an engraftment in the host mice, while the other nine succeeded to various extents. Gene expression profiling indicated that 71 genes, including HOXB4, C/EBP-{beta}, and ETS2, were specifically overexpressed and 23 genes were suppressed more than 2-fold in the successful UCB cells compared to those that failed. Functional annotation revealed that cell growth and cell cycle regulators were more abundant in the successful UCB cells. Our results suggest that hematopoietic ability may vary among cryopreserved UCB cells and that this ability can be distinguished by profiling expression of certain sets of genes.

  6. Widespread marrow necrosis during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knickerbocker, W.J.; Quenville, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, a 22-year-old Caucasian female was referred to our Hospital two days post-partum. She had been feeling unwell during the last few days of her pregnancy and complained of multiple aches and pains, worst in the abdomen and lower back. Her admission platelet count was severely depressed and a bone biopsy showed extensive marrow necrosis with viable bony trabeculae. There was no evidence of vasculitis, vascular thrombosis, or malignancy. Widespread marrow necrosis in pregnancy followed by recovery, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  7. A proteome study of secreted prostatic factors affecting osteoblastic activity: galectin-1 is involved in differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Jensen, Ole N; Moiseeva, Elena P

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone causing a predominantly osteosclerotic response. It has been shown that cells from the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 secrete factors that influence the behavior of osteoblast-like cells. Some of these factors with mitogenic activity have been found...... to be proteins with molecular weights between 20 and 30 kDa, but the identity of the osteoblastic mitogenic factor or factors produced by prostate cancer cells is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the protein profile of conditioned medium (CM) from PC3 cells in the molecular......BMS) cells. Furthermore, we tested whether adhesion of PC3 cells to plastic, laminin, fibronectin, and collagen type I was influenced by lactose, which inhibits galectin-1. Galectin-1 (1000 ng/ml) inhibited the proliferation of hBMS cells up to 70 +/- 12% (treated/control) of control in contrast to PC3 CM...

  8. Bone marrow edema of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Hofmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow edema of the knee joint is a frequent clinical picture in MR diagnostics. It can be accompanied by symptoms and pain in the joint. Diseases that are associated with bone marrow edema can be classified into different groups. Group 1 includes vascular ischemic bone marrow edema with osteonecrosis (synonyms: SONK or Ahlbaeck's disease), osteochondrosis dissecans, and bone marrow edema syndrome. Group 2 comprises traumatic or mechanical bone marrow edema. Group 3 encompasses reactive bone marrow edemas such as those occurring in gonarthrosis, postoperative bone marrow edemas, and reactive edemas in tumors or tumorlike diseases. Evidence for bone marrow edema is effectively provided by MRI, but purely morphological MR information is often unspecific so that anamnestic and clinical details are necessary in most cases for definitive disease classification. (orig.) [de

  9. Bone-marrow transplant - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone-marrow transplants are performed for: deficiencies in red blood cells (aplastic anemia) and white blood cells (leukemia or ... Bone-marrow transplants prolong the life of patients who might otherwise die. As with all major organ transplants, however, ...

  10. A method for generation of bone marrow-derived macrophages from cryopreserved mouse bone marrow cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Marim

    Full Text Available The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L. amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells.

  11. New Insights into Osteogenic and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Potential Clinical Applications for Bone Regeneration in Pediatric Orthopaedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Giuliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are pluripotent adult stem cells capable of being differentiated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. The osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs is regulated either by systemic hormones or by local growth factors able to induce specific intracellular signal pathways that modify the expression and activity of several transcription factors. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2 and Wnt signaling-related molecules are the major factors critically involved in the osteogenic differentiation process by hMSCs, and SRY-related high-mobility-group (HMG box transcription factor 9 (SOX9 is involved in the chondrogenic one. hMSCs have generated a great interest in the field of regenerative medicine, particularly in bone regeneration. In this paper, we focused our attention on the molecular mechanisms involved in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of hMSC, and the potential clinical use of hMSCs in osteoarticular pediatric disease characterized by fracture nonunion and pseudarthrosis.

  12. Bilateral Transplantation of Allogenic Adult Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Subventricular Zone of Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Venkataramana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress of PD and its related disorders cannot be prevented with the medications available. In this study, we recruited 8 PD and 4 PD plus patients between 5 to 15 years after diagnosis. All patients received BM-MSCs bilaterally into the SVZ and were followed up for 12 months. PD patients after therapy reported a mean improvement of 17.92% during “on” and 31.21% during “off” period on the UPDRS scoring system. None of the patients increased their medication during the follow-up period. Subjectively, the patients reported clarity in speech, reduction in tremors, rigidity, and freezing attacks. The results correlated with the duration of the disease. Those patients transplanted in the early stages of the disease (less than 5 years showed more improvement and no further disease progression than the later stages (11–15 years. However, the PD plus patients did not show any change in their clinical status after stem cell transplantation. This study demonstrates the safety of adult allogenic human BM-MSCs transplanted into the SVZ of the brain and its efficacy in early-stage PD patients.

  13. Effect of neutrons with an energy of 0.35 and 0.85 MeV and gamma radiation of 60Co on the organ cultures of the human bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherbin, E.A.; Kolesnikova, A.I.; Konoplyannikov, A.G.; Khoptynskaya, S.K.; Obaturov, G.M.; Kapchigashev, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation injury of human hemopoietic cells under the effect of γ radiation of 60 Co in doses from 100 to 1500 rad, 0.85 MeV neutrons in doses from 50 to 600 rad and 0.35 MeV neutrons in doses from 30 to 600 rad was carried out using the method of organic cultivation of bone marrow. Under the effect of the above radiation types, the fissionable granulocytes (promyelocytes and myelocytes) and lymphocytes are most radiosensitive among the 4-day organic cultures. The dose dependence of the decrease in relative and absolute content of these cell forms in the cultures as well as the dose dependence of the decrease in total cell structure in the cultures were revealed. It has been found that the dose dependence for the above tests consists of two components: radiosensitive and radioresistant ones. The radiation doses causing death in 50% of cells in relation to control (D 50 ) were determined. On the bases of D 50 values, the coefficients of relative biological efficiency (RBE) were calculated for 0.85 and 0.35 MeV neutrons. The RBE coefficients are confined in the 1.4-3.4 and 2.4-6.7 intervals respectively. It has been confirmed that 0.35 MeV neutrons are 1.5-2 times more effective than 0.85 MeV neutrons. The coefficients of RBE neutrons calculated for radioresistant cell components are higher than the corresponding values estimated according to D 50 value; in some cases they reach values ranging from 6 to 10

  14. On the role of subtype selective adenosine receptor agonists during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M Adelina; Barbosa, A; Neto, E; Sá-e-Sousa, A; Freitas, R; Neves, J M; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2011-05-01

    Purines are important modulators of bone cell biology. ATP is metabolized into adenosine by human primary osteoblast cells (HPOC); due to very low activity of adenosine deaminase, the nucleoside is the end product of the ecto-nucleotidase cascade. We, therefore, investigated the expression and function of adenosine receptor subtypes (A(1) , A(2A) , A(2B) , and A(3) ) during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of HPOC. Adenosine A(1) (CPA), A(2A) (CGS21680C), A(2B) (NECA), and A(3) (2-Cl-IB-MECA) receptor agonists concentration-dependently increased HPOC proliferation. Agonist-induced HPOC proliferation was prevented by their selective antagonists, DPCPX, SCH442416, PSB603, and MRS1191. CPA and NECA facilitated osteogenic differentiation measured by increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This contrasts with the effect of CGS21680C which delayed HPOC differentiation; 2-Cl-IB-MECA was devoid of effect. Blockade of the A(2B) receptor with PSB603 prevented osteogenic differentiation by NECA. In the presence of the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX, CPA reduced ALP activity at 21 and 28 days in culture. At the same time points, blockade of A(2A) receptors with SCH442416 transformed the inhibitory effect of CGS21680C into facilitation. Inhibition of adenosine uptake with dipyridamole caused a net increase in osteogenic differentiation. The presence of all subtypes of adenosine receptors on HPOC was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Data show that adenosine is an important regulator of osteogenic cell differentiation through the activation of subtype-specific receptors. The most abundant A(2B) receptor seems to have a consistent role in cell differentiation, which may be balanced through the relative strengths of A(1) or A(2A) receptors determining whether osteoblasts are driven into proliferation or differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Silencing of RB1 and RB2/P130 during adipogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells results in dysregulated differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Cipollaro, Marilena; Melone, Mariarosa A. B.; Peluso, Gianfranco; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is different from fat found elsewhere in the body, and only recently have some of its functions been investigated. BMAT may regulate bone marrow stem cell niche and plays a role in energy storage and thermogenesis. BMAT may be involved also in obesity and osteoporosis onset. Given the paramount functions of BMAT, we decided to better clarify the human bone marrow adipogenesis by analyzing the role of the retinoblastoma gene family, which are key players in ce...

  16. Comparsion between Intravenous Delivered Human Fetal Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Treatment of Rat Cerebral Infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Bin; Ma, Bu-Qing; Guan, Yun-Qian; Zhou, Yi-Dan

    2016-10-10

    Objective To compare the effecacy of human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) with human mononuclear cell (hMNC) in treating rat cerebral infarct.Methods The SD rat models of cerebral infarct were established by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO). Rats were divided into four groups: sham,ischemia vehicle,MSC,and MNC transplantation groups. For the transplantation group,1×10 6 hMSCs or hMNCs were intravascularly transplanted into the tail vein 1 hour after the ischemia onset. The ischemia vehicle group received dMCAO surgery and intravascular saline injection 1,3,5,and 7 days after the ischemia onset,and then behavioral tests were performed. At 48 h after the ischemia onset,the abundance of Iba- 1,the symbol of activated microglia,was evaluated in the peri-ischemia striatum area; meanwhile,the neurotrophic factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in ipsilateral peri-ischemia striatum area were also measured. Results The relative infarct volume in ischemia vehicle group,hMSC group,and hMNC transplantation group were (37.85±4.40)%,(33.41±3.82)%,and (30.23±3.63)%,respectively. The infarct volumes of MSC group (t=2.100,P=0.034) and MNC group (t=2.109,P=0.0009) were significantly smaller than that of ischemia vehicle group,and that of MNC group was significantly smaller than that of MSC group (t=1.743,P=0.043). One day after transplantation,the score of ischemia vehicle group in limb placing test was (4.32±0.71)%,which was significantly lower than that in sham group (9.73±0.36)% (t=2.178,P=8.61×10 -11 ). The scores of MSC and MNC group,which were (5.09±0.62)% (t=2.1009,P=0.024) and (5.90±0.68)% (t=2.1008,P=0.0001),respectively,were significantly higher than that of ischemia vehicle group; also,the score of MNC group was significantly higher than that of MSC group(t=2.1009,P=0.0165). The contralateral forelimb scores of MSC and MNC groups in beam walking test were (5.56±0.86)% (t=2

  17. A novel antagonist of CRTH2 blocks eosinophil release from bone marrow, chemotaxis and respiratory burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Royer, J F; Schratl, P; Lorenz, S

    2007-01-01

    developed small molecule antagonist of CRTH2, Cay10471, on eosinophil function with respect to recruitment, respiratory burst and degranulation. METHODS: Chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils were determined using microBoyden chambers. Eosinophil release...... from bone marrow was investigated in the in situ perfused guinea pig hind limb preparation. Respiratory burst and degranulation were measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Cay10471 bound with high affinity to recombinant human and guinea pig CRTH2, but not DP, receptors. The antagonist prevented the PGD......(2)-induced release of eosinophils from guinea pig bone marrow, and inhibited the chemotaxis of guinea pig bone marrow eosinophils and human peripheral blood eosinophils. Pretreatment with PGD(2) primed eosinophils for chemotaxis towards eotaxin, and this effect was prevented by Cay10471. In contrast...

  18. Evidence for the Existence of a Bone Marrow Blood Barrier for the Passage of Specific Committed Stem Cells in Human and Canine and Their Physical Separation from Lymphocytes and Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-12

    Chest Cold 2. Sastro-intestinal Upset 3. Skin Infections 4. Antibiotic Treatment Within 2 Weeks 5. Pregnancy Within 6 Months 6, Recent Operation...HaematoL 24:367-376, 1973. Thomas, E.D., Buckner, CV., Storb, R.: Aplastic anaemia treated by marrow transplantation. Lancet 1:284-289,1972. Till

  19. The marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-01-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Bone--bone marrow interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    Within medullary cavities, blood formation tends to be concentrated near bone surfaces and this raises interesting questions about hematopoietic consequences of radionuclide fixation in osseous tissue. Thus, it may be important, on the one hand, to consider the medullary radiation dose distribution as well as total marrow dose from bone-bound radioelements and, on the other, to inquire about possible hematopoietic implications of radiation damage to endosteal surfaces per se. The reasons for this are discussed

  1. Bone marrow edema in sports: General concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Snoeckx, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will discuss the value of medical imaging in the detection and follow-up of bone marrow edema (BME), resulting from acute and chronic trauma in sports. MR imaging is the only imaging technique that allows direct evaluation of bone marrow edema in sports medicine. The use of fat suppressed T2-weighted or STIR images is particularly appropriate to detect bone marrow edema. The extent of bone marrow edema reflects the biomechanics of trauma. Compressive forces between two bony structures will result in extensive areas of bone marrow edema, whereas distraction forces provoke more subtle areas of bone marrow edema at the insertion of supporting structures of joints. In most clinical situations, a combination of compression and distraction forces is present, causing a complex pattern of bone marrow edema. A meticulous pattern approach of the distribution of these bone marrow changes around a joint can reveal in most instances the underlying mechanism of trauma. This may be helpful to analyze which joint supporting structures may be at risk. In the acute setting, plain radiography and CT scan may have an additional role in the detection of small avulsion fractures occurring at the site of minor areas of bone marrow edema. The clinical significance and natural history of bone marrow edema is still a matter of debate

  2. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-05-22

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation in the hematopoietic cells during their development. To refine therapies for leukemia, this study sought to improve the homing of healthy donor HSPCs for better transplantation and to find new candidates for differentiating and blocking proliferation in leukemic cells. Characterizing the molecular effectors mediating cell migration forms the basis for improving clinical transplantation of HSPCs. E-selectin/ligand interactions play a critical role in the homing of HSPCs to the BM, however, the identity of E-selectin ligands remains elusive. We aimed to use mass spectrometry (MS) to fully analyze the E-selectin ligands expressed on HSPCs. Immunoprecipitation studies coupled with MS confirmed the expression of three known E-selectin ligands, the hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, and revealed the presence of many interesting candidates on HSPCs-like cell line and on primary human BM CD34+ cells. The MS dataset represents a rich resource for further characterization of E-selectin ligands, which will lead to improvement of HSPCs transplantation. 4 Understanding the critical pathways underlying the initiation and maintenance of leukemia plays a key role in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ligation of the glycoprotein, CD44, using monoclonal antibodies or its natural ligand, hyaluronic acid, drives the differentiation of immature leukemic cells towards mature terminally differentiated cells, inhibits their proliferation and in some case induces their apoptosis. The aim of this study is to characterize the phosphoproteome of AML cells in response to CD44-induced differentiation. This will afford novel insights into the

  3. Sandwich radioimmunolabeling for the study of surface properties of bone marrow lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Uchino, H.; Kuribayashi, K.; Shimizu, S.; Konda, S.

    1980-01-01

    A modification of sandwich radioautographic method was applied to the study of surface immunoglobulin and/or specific antigens on small lymphocytes in mouse and human bone marrow. After incubation of marrow cell suspensions at 37 0 C, cells were reacted at 0 0 C for 30 min with graded dilutions of rabbit anti-mouse or anti-human immunoglobulin followed by further reaction with a sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulin labeled with 125 I. Detectable surface immunoglobulin was demonstrated in approximately one-third of mouse marrow lymphocytes and 20-25% of human marrow lymphocytes. The densities of surface immunoglobulin as assessed by grain counts on individual labeled lymphocytes tended to be lower in the marrow than in spleen or peripheral blood. When the same rabbit antiserum was used to compare the sensitivity of the sandwich method with that of the direct radioautography, the former was found sufficiently sensitive to give a plateau level of labeling without seriously increasing background grains. The advantages of the method are discussed with reference to studies on T and B cell specific antigens on human bone marrow lymphocytes. (Auth.)

  4. Bone marrow ablation with Ho-166 pharmaceuticals as preparation for bone marrow transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, N.J.; Kawakami, T.; Avila, M.; White, R.; Cain, G.; Moore, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow ablation is required preparation for leukemia patients where bone marrow transplantation is to be the therapeutic modality. Presently, the total body irradiation that is used produces appreciable morbidity in terms of radiation sickness, but an evenly distributed dose to marrow. The authors have shown in Beagles that bone-seeking radiolanthanide (Ho-166, t 1/2 = 25 h, 1.8 MeB beta, carrier added) phosphonic acid chelates can be used to completely ablate bone marrow with little morbidity. The research plan, incorporating bone marrow ablation with bone-seeking radionuclides and in vitro purging of aspirated leukemic marrow for use in autologous marrow transplants, is presented. Phosphonic acid complexes of Sm-153 also localize in the skeleton and have found use in the palliation of bone pain. However, the dose distribution is uneven because these radiopharmaceuticals distribute according to available surface; 2-4 times the skeletal average in trabecular vs cortical bone. Thus, the marrow dose can vary. The authors' research group and the Radiation Interactions Division of NIST have announced the discovery that beta radiation-induced excited electrons are trapped in the hydroxyapatite mineral of bone and provide a potential direct dosimetric method for marrow dose when combined with routine bone marrow (and included bone) biopsies. The overall research plan sets the hypothesis that reduced morbidity marrow ablation can be successfully followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with autologous marrow purged in vitro by antibody-targeted alpha emitters

  5. MR imaging of normal bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W.

    1994-01-01

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author)

  6. T-cell acute leukaemia exhibits dynamic interactions with bone marrow microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Edwin D; Duarte, Delfim; Akinduro, Olufolake; Khorshed, Reema A; Passaro, Diana; Nowicka, Malgorzata; Straszkowski, Lenny; Scott, Mark K; Rothery, Steve; Ruivo, Nicola; Foster, Katie; Waibel, Michaela; Johnstone, Ricky W; Harrison, Simon J; Westerman, David A; Quach, Hang; Gribben, John; Robinson, Mark D; Purton, Louise E; Bonnet, Dominique; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2016-10-27

    It is widely accepted that complex interactions between cancer cells and their surrounding microenvironment contribute to disease development, chemo-resistance and disease relapse. In light of this observed interdependency, novel therapeutic interventions that target specific cancer stroma cell lineages and their interactions are being sought. Here we studied a mouse model of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and used intravital microscopy to monitor the progression of disease within the bone marrow at both the tissue-wide and single-cell level over time, from bone marrow seeding to development/selection of chemo-resistance. We observed highly dynamic cellular interactions and promiscuous distribution of leukaemia cells that migrated across the bone marrow, without showing any preferential association with bone marrow sub-compartments. Unexpectedly, this behaviour was maintained throughout disease development, from the earliest bone marrow seeding to response and resistance to chemotherapy. Our results reveal that T-ALL cells do not depend on specific bone marrow microenvironments for propagation of disease, nor for the selection of chemo-resistant clones, suggesting that a stochastic mechanism underlies these processes. Yet, although T-ALL infiltration and progression are independent of the stroma, accumulated disease burden leads to rapid, selective remodelling of the endosteal space, resulting in a complete loss of mature osteoblastic cells while perivascular cells are maintained. This outcome leads to a shift in the balance of endogenous bone marrow stroma, towards a composition associated with less efficient haematopoietic stem cell function. This novel, dynamic analysis of T-ALL interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment in vivo, supported by evidence from human T-ALL samples, highlights that future therapeutic interventions should target the migration and promiscuous interactions of cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment

  7. MR appearances of bone marrow in children following bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothroyd, A.E.; Sebag, G.; Brunelle, F.

    1991-01-01

    Two cases are presented of children who demonstrated complete absence of bone marrow signal on MR imaging of the spine following bone marrow transplantation. The possible causes for these appearances are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells on Biomaterials for Bone Tissue Engineering In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C.; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP, without coating or ...

  9. Patterns of bone-marrow scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touya, J.J.; Lee, G.S.; Narvaez, M.; Marciano, D.

    1977-01-01

    111 In-transferrin, radiocolloid and bone scans were performed within one week on 105 from more than 250 scanned patients with different haematological disorders. All patients had complete haematological workups and confirmed final diagnoses. From the comparison of the 111 In-transferrin marrow scan with the radiocolloid marrow scan and bone scan, eight basic patterns of localized or generalized disorders in the bone marrow cell production were delineated. The first pattern was called a cold area and two sub-patterns were distinguished in it. A cold area in the erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial scans associated with cold or normal areas in the bone scan corresponded to radiation damage of the marrow or multiple myeloma; a cold area in both marrow scans with a hot area in the bone scan to tumour, infarct and bone trauma. The second pattern was called a hot area. A hot area in the two marrow scans with a normal bone scan was observed in islands of active bone-marrow. Hot areas in both 111 In-transferrin and bone scan associated with a cold area in the radiocolloid scan were observed in tumours growing in bones with or without little active bone marrow. Hot areas on the three scans were observed in osteomyelitis of bones of the extremities. The third pattern was bone-marrow expansion, which was observed in hereditary haemolytic anaemias, in myeloproliferative disorders and in patients with bone-marrow damage following irradiation. The fourth pattern was saturation of the serum iron-binding capacity and it was manifested by increased activity in the kidneys in the 111 In-transferrin scan. The fifth pattern was bone-marrow failure which consists of decreased accumulation in the marrow and increased accumulation in the liver of marrow-seeking agents associated with normal bone scan. The sixth pattern, pure red cell aplasia, was characterized by less accumulation of 111 In-transferrin than radiocolloid in the bone marrow. The seventh pattern, bone-marrow siderosis

  10. [Acute unclassified leukemia with bone marrow necrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uoshima, N; Yamazaki, N; Iinuma, S; Kimura, S; Wada, K; Kobayashi, Y; Ozawa, M; Horiuchi, H; Maruo, N; Kondo, M

    1991-01-01

    Massive bone marrow necrosis was seen in a 42-year-old male with acute leukemia. In December, 1988, on admission, laboratory data revealed pancytopenia and a high level of serum LDH and ALKP. Bone marrow aspiration resulted in dry-tap and showed bone marrow necrosis in the bone marrow biopsy specimen. A bone marrow scintigraphy with 111In faintly visualized the bone marrow but visualized area was expanded in the extremities compared with normal subjects. The second bone marrow biopsy showed proliferation of blasts. In the middle of March, blasts began to appear in peripheral blood. The blasts were cytochemically negative for POX, Es, PAS, AcP, TdT and had surface markers CD3-, CD19-, CD33-, CD13-, LCA-, HLA-DR-. Even by investigation on rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy chain region, an origin of the blasts could not be determined. In April, the number of blasts in peripheral blood increased and hepatosplenomegaly developed rapidly. Therefore, he was put on the chemotherapy with vincristine and prednisolone, but he died of cerebral hemorrhage. The autopsy revealed widespread bone marrow necrosis. It has rarely been reported that massive bone marrow necrosis is found prior to the occurrence of acute unclassified leukemia.

  11. Homing of bone marrow lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Osmond, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    DNA labeling, bone marrow fractionation, and radioautography were used to follow the fate of transfused, newly formed marrow lymphocytes in irradiated hosts. After infusing donor Hartley guinea pigs with 3 H-thymidine for 3 to 5 days, high concentrations of labeled small lymphocytes and large lymphoid cells were separated from marrow by sedimentation in sucrose-serum gradients and injected into lethally x-irradiated syngeneic recipients. Most labeled small lymphocytes and large lymphoid cells rapidly left the circulation. They appeared to be mainly in the marrow and spleen, increasing in incidence from 1 to 3 days, but declining in mean grain count. Labeled cells were scattered throughout the recipient marrow; in the spleen they localized initially in the red pulp, and subsequently in peripheral areas of white pulp, often in clusters. Labeled small lymphocytes showed a delayed migration into the mesenteric lymph node, mainly in the superficial cortex and medulla; they also appeared in small numbers in Peyer's patches, but rarely in the thymus or thoracic duct lymph. It is concluded that a rapid selective homing of newly formed marrow lymphoid cells occurs in both the marrow and certain areas of the spleen of irradiated hosts, followed by a continuing proliferation of large lymphoid cells and production of small lymphocytes. The results are discussed with respect to the life history of marrow lymphocytes and the use of adoptive immune assays of marrow cells to characterize B lymphocyte maturation

  12. Intraoperative bone and bone marrow sampling: a simple method for accurate measurement of uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in bone and bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyen, W.J.G.; Buijs, W.C.A.M.; Kampen, A. van; Koenders, E.B.; Claessens, R.A.M.J.; Corstens, F.H.M.

    1993-01-01

    Accurate estimation of bone marrow uptake of radiopharmaceuticals is of crucial importance for accurate whole body dosimetry. In this study, a method for obtaining normal bone marrow and bone during routine surgery without inconvenience to volunteers is suggested and compared to an indirect method. In five volunteers (group 1), 4 MBq 111 In-labelled human polyclonal IgG ( 111 In-IgG) was administered 48h before placement of a total hip prosthesis. After resection of the femoral head and neck, bone marrow was aspirated from the medullary space with a biopsy needle. In five patients, suspected of having infectious disease (group 2), bone marrow uptake was calculated according to a well-accepted method using regions of interest over the lumbar spine, 48h after injection of 75 MBq 111 In-IgG. Bone marrow uptake in group 1 (4.5 ±1.3%D kg -1 ) was significantly lower than that in group 2 (8.5 ± 2.1%D kg -1 ) (P<0.01). Blood and plasma activity did not differ significantly for both groups. This method provides a system for directly and accurately measuring uptake and retention in normal bone marrow and bone of all radiopharmaceuticals at various time points. It is a safe and simple procedure without any discomfort to the patient. Since small amounts of activity are sufficient, the radiation dose to the patient is low. (author)

  13. Bone Marrow Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Bone Marrow Transplantation ... transplant - slideshow Graft-versus-host disease Related Health Topics Bone Marrow Diseases Stem Cells National Institutes of ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a severe disorder that usually begins ...

  15. Hard tissue formation in a porous HA/TCP ceramic scaffold loaded with stromal cells derived from dental pulp and bone marrow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of hard tissue regeneration of four types of stem cells or precursors under both in vitro and in vivo situations. Primary cultures of rat bone marrow, rat dental pulp, human bone marrow, and human dental pulp cells were seeded onto a porous ceramic

  16. Studies on the distribution of hematopoietic bone marrow by bone marrow scintigraphy, 2. The bone marrow distribution in leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, K [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1976-04-01

    Distribution of the leukemic marrow was investigated in 42 cases by bone marrow scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in association with clinical findings and ferrokinetics studies in order to clarify hematopoietic function in leukemia. 17 of chronic myelogenous leukemia, 3 of lymphatic leukemia, 2 of monocytic leukemia, 7 of atypical leukemia and one of erythroleukemia. 12 acute myelogenous leukemia were classified into 3 types A, B and C. Type A showed the distribution similar to those obtained with normal controls. Ferrokinetics studies, however, indicated complete absence of erythropoiesis. Type B showed complete lack of sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites, although ferrokinetics data showed normal erythropoeitic function. Type C showed abnormal concentration of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in the tibiae. 17 chronic myelogenous leukemia showed reduced sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites and remarkable expanded marrow extending into distal femurs, proximal and distal tibiae and bones of feet. 2 acute lymphotic leukemia patients showed complete absence of sup(99m)Tc activity. The one chronic type showed almost normal distribution. Monocytic leukemia showed decreased marrow distribution in the sternum and vertebrae. Of 6 atypical leukemias one showed almost normal distribution. The others, including a case with hypoplastic luekemia, demonstrated marrow extension similar to that observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia or monocytic leukemia. Erythroleukemia showed increased concentrations of sup(99m)Tc activity in the usual marrow sites and marked marrow expansion throughout all long bones. These results suggest that there is a discrepancy between bone marrow distribution and hematopoietic function in the cases of acute myelogenous leukemia.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  18. Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes (IBMFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI IBMFS Cohort Study consists of affected individuals and their immediate families in North America who have an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (IBMFS)-either one that has been specifically identified and defined, or bone marrow failure that appears to be inherited but has not yet been clearly identified as having a genetic basis.

  19. How to exhaust your bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Louise; Salomo, Morten; Andersen, Steven A W

    2013-01-01

    at work and in his spare time, and kept a very thorough training and weight diary. Owing to a high intake of energy and protein drinks he tried to optimise his physical performance and kept a normal body mass index  at 23.7. A bone marrow biopsy showed gelatinous bone marrow transformation, normally seen...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  1. Clinical aspects of bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmitts, N.; Gassmann, V.; Leffler, G.

    1986-01-01

    Experience of bone marrow transplantation into patients with myeloproliferative syndromes, myelodysplasias and highly malignant lymphomas is presented. Side early and late effects of transplantation are described. The frequency and severity of complications of bone marrow transplantation depend sufficiently on the disease as well as on patient's age and general condition

  2. [Endogenous pyrogen formation by bone marrow cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, O M; Sorokin, A V; El'kina, O A

    1978-01-01

    The cells of the rabbit bone marrow produced endogenous pyrogen in response to stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Incubation of the cells in medium No 199 containing a 15% homologous serum is optimal for the release of pyrogen. It is supposed that the cells of the bone marrow take part in the formation of endgenous pyrogen and in the mechanism of pyrexia in the organism.

  3. Marrow uptake index (MUI): A quantitative scintigraphic study of bone marrow in aplastic anaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.; Garg, A.; Kochupillai, V.; Gopinath, P.G.; Basu, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Aplastic anaemia affects the entire bone marrow. This prospective study was undertaken to develop and standardise a new nuclear medicine technique called 'dynamic bone marrow imaging'. Eleven patients and ten controls were studied. Serial images of the pelvis were obtained in frame mode following intravenous injection of 185-370 mBq of 99m Tc S. Colloid, and an index, called the bone marrow uptake index was calculated by taking into consideration the time activity curve obtained over the iliac crest. This was followed by static imaging of the entire bone marrow in all cases. It was possible to obtain excellent information regarding topographic distribution of bone marrow as well as detect early changes in bone marrow function following treatment. An attempt was also made to correlate bone marrow cellularity as obtained by bone marrow biopsy with results of dynamic bone marrow scintigraphy. On the basis of the encouraging results obtained in the present study, the authors feel that dynamic bone marrow imaging is an excellent technique for the objective evaluation of bone marrow in aplastic anaemia. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costachel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N. [Oncological Institute, Bucharest (Romania)

    1969-07-15

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: Bullet Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. Bullet While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. Bullet No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4 Degree-Sign C. Bullet DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. Bullet In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: Bullet The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. Bullet No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. Bullet Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. Bullet In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of

  5. Bone-Marrow Storage and Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costăchel, O.; Corneci, I.; Andrian, T.; Kitzulescu, I.; Popescu, N.; Pascu, D.; Buzi, E.; Voiculetz, N.

    1969-01-01

    The authors present some results from their experiments on bone-marrow storage and transplantation. The main problems with preservation of stored bone marrow are the duration, temperature, adjuvant substances and the significance of viability tests during the conservation processes. The results showed that: • Storage of bone marrow at +4eC produces a progressive decrease in its restoring capacity versus storage time. • While bone marrow stored for 24 h is able to restore 100% of dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad, after 10 days of storage only 20% of the animals can be restored. • No correlation exists between the actual survival of dogs and that calculated by dye exclusion tests, which indicate a rather high (70%) viability, even after 10 days bone-marrow storage at +4°C. • DNA degradation (depolymerization) measurements of the bone marrow may be used as a supplementary test for checking the viability or restoration potency of bone-marrow cells after storage. • In the freezing process, the optimum contact time between glycerol and the bone-marrow cells is 15 min. Results of experiments regarding certain bone-marrow transplantation problems showed that: • The best time to administer bone marrow is between 24 and 48 h after irradiation. • No survivors were obtained with dogs lethally irradiated with 600 rad by administering autogenic or allogenic DNA extracted from bone marrow, spleen or liver. • Histocompatibility related to sex may play an important role in the bone-marrow graft. The lowest survival of C57BL mice was obtained when the donors were males and the recipients females. • In radioprotection with foetal haemocytopoietic tissues, the donor's age represents one of the main factors. The best results were obtained in experiments on rats, with 19- to 20-day foetal liver (period of complete and maximum haemocytopoietic activity). The tissues mentioned below may be connected with the appearance of certain typical signs of secondary syndrome

  6. MR imaging of bone marrow disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Mano, I.; Yashiro, N.; Asai, S.; Lio, M.

    1986-01-01

    The author performed MR imaging in 89 patients with bone marrow disorders (29 with aplastic anemia, 20 with leukemia, 9 with postirradiation changes, 8 with hemosiderosis, 6 with primary bone tumors and metastases, and 17 with bone marrow disorders of other etiologies). They selected the thoracic and lumbar vertebral marrow as a target and used both T1-weighted spin-echo images and calculated T1 images. T1 was prolonged in bone marrow hyperplasia but shortened in hypoplasia. Bone marrow T1 values proved to depend on the number of fat cells (pathologic correlation). In aplastic anemia scattered islands of low signal intensity were seen within a background of high signal intensity in some typical cases. MR imaging patterns were used for staging aplastic anemia. T1 was prolonged in leukemia cells

  7. CHORD simulation for insult assessment to the red bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.

    1976-09-01

    Critical Human Organ Radiation Dosimetry (CHORD) probability density functions for A-P, P-A, bilateral, rotational, and isotropic incidence, plus simple depth-dose data, permit the rapid estimation of the radiation insult to the active red bone marrow system of the ICRP Reference Man. The CHORD concept follows the variations in the microscopic processes of absorption, attenuation, and scattering on a macroscopic level so that it is not necessary to attempt detailed calculations for each and every case of interest. Similar techniques have been applied to reactor criticality calculations and the general logic of the CHORD process can be applied to any cause-response type situation which can be described in terms of variation with distance in the medium of interest. Doses to active bone marrow from exposures to photons and neutrons are presented and excellent agreement is shown with the few available experimental results

  8. Red-yellow marrow conversion: Its effect on the location of some solitary bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kricun, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The location of red marrow related bone lesions is dependent upon the distribution of red marrow. It is altered by the normal conversion of red marrow to yellow (fat) marrow and by the reconversion of yellow marrow to red marrow caused by marrow infiltrating disorders or marrow stress disorders. (orig.)

  9. Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Blaha, M.; Merka, V.

    1990-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation is successful in only a part of the affected patients. The Chernobyl accident added to our knowledge: BMT can save life after whole-body irradiation with a dose exceeding 7-8 Gy. A timely decision on transplantation after a nuclear accident is difficult to make (rapid determination of homogeneity and type of radiation and the total dose. HL-A typing in lymphopenia, precise identification of radiation damage to other target organs, etc.). Further attention is to be paid to the treatment. Transplantations in case of malignities (especially hematologic ones) and other diseases will add to our knowledge and will lead to more simple procedures. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  10. Alterations in bone marrow and blood mononuclear cell polyamine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) levels: phase I evaluation of alpha-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) treatment of human hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, A M; Freireich, E J; Keating, M J; Haddox, M K

    1988-03-01

    Nine patients with hematological malignancies were treated with difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone). The number of circulating blast cells decreased in all of the patients treated with DFMO and MGBG for longer than 1 wk. Morphological evidence of myeloid maturation was evident in four patients with leukemia and the circulating M Protein decreased in one patient with multiple myeloma. The polyamine content of the mononuclear cells in both the peripheral blood and bone marrow was transiently increased after the initial MGBG dose. During administration of DFMO decreases were achieved in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell putrescine levels in 7 patients, spermidine levels in 5 patients, and spermine levels in 4 patients. Alterations in bone marrow mononuclear cell polyamine levels were similar to those which occurred in the peripheral cells. An average of 9 days of DFMO treatment was required to lower mononuclear cell polyamine levels. Three of the 4 evaluable patients receiving multiple MGBG doses had an increased mononuclear cell content of MGBG after DFMO pretreatment. Enhancement of cellular MGBG levels was not directly correlated to the degree of cellular polyamine depletion.

  11. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  12. Can bone marrow differentiate into renal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Enyu; Ito, Takahito

    2002-10-01

    A considerable plasticity of adult stem cells has been confirmed in a wide variety of tissues. In particular, the pluripotency of bone marrow-derived stem cells may influence the regeneration of injured tissues and may provide novel avenues in regenerative medicine. Bone marrow contains at least hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, and both can differentiate into a wide range of differentiated cells. Side population (SP) cells, which are originally defined in bone marrow cells by high efflux of DNA-binding dye, seem to be a new class of multipotent stem cells. Irrespective of the approach used to obtain stem cells, the fates of marrow-derived cells following bone marrow transplantation can be traced by labeling donor cells with green fluorescence protein or by identifying donor Y chromosome in female recipients. So far, bone marrow-derived cells have been reported to differentiate into renal cells, including mesangial cells, endothelial cells, podocytes, and tubular cells in the kidney, although controversy exists. Further studies are required to address this issue. Cell therapy will be promising when we learn to control stem cells such as bone marrow-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and resident stem cells in the kidney. Identification of factors that support stem cells or promote their differentiation should provide a relevant step towards cell therapy.

  13. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  14. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colnot, C.; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-01-01

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis

  15. Irradiation of the red bone marrow and the health implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physiology and function of the bone is looked at as to the role in housing bone marrow. The bone marrow and particularly the red bone marrow is discussed. Sources of radiation are discussed and the health implications highlighted for caution and for study or evaluation. Key Words: Bone marrow, Irradiation, Radiation, ...

  16. Myelosuppressive conditioning using busulfan enables bone marrow cell accumulation in the spinal cord of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coral-Ann B Lewis

    Full Text Available Myeloablative preconditioning using irradiation is the most commonly used technique to generate rodents having chimeric bone marrow, employed for the study of bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in the healthy and diseased central nervous system. However, irradiation has been shown to alter the blood-brain barrier, potentially creating confounding artefacts. To better study the potential of bone marrow-derived cells to function as treatment vehicles for neurodegenerative diseases alternative preconditioning regimens must be developed. We treated transgenic mice that over-express human mutant superoxide dismutase 1, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with busulfan to determine whether this commonly used chemotherapeutic leads to stable chimerism and promotes the entry of bone marrow-derived cells into spinal cord. Intraperitoneal treatment with busulfan at 60 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg followed by intravenous injection of green fluorescent protein-expressing bone marrow resulted in sustained levels of chimerism (~80%. Bone marrow-derived cells accumulated in the lumbar spinal cord of diseased mice at advanced stages of pathology at both doses, with limited numbers of bone marrow derived cells observed in the spinal cords of similarly treated, age-matched controls; the majority of bone marrow-derived cells in spinal cord immunolabelled for macrophage antigens. Comparatively, significantly greater numbers of bone marrow-derived cells were observed in lumbar spinal cord following irradiative myeloablation. These results demonstrate bone marrow-derived cell accumulation in diseased spinal cord is possible without irradiative preconditioning.

  17. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Copyright © 1996-2018 National Marrow Donor Program. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, Filippo Del; Farahani, Sahar J; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted

  19. Thalassemia paravertebral tumors and bone marrow scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huglo, D.; Rose, C.; Deveaux, M.; Bauters, F.; Marchandise, X.

    1995-01-01

    Two first cousins with thalassemia and with a paravertebral mass had had an indium 111 chloride bone marrow scan. Result of scan influenced therapy: medical treatment in one case where an extramedullary erythropoiesis was confirmed, surgical treatment in the other case. The use of dual-isotope SPECT (indium 111 chloride, HDP -99 Tc) constitutes a contribution to the establishment of diagnosis of extramedullary erythropoiesis, giving to bone marrow scintigraphy a merited importance, avoiding the biopsy. (authors). 15 refs., 5 figs

  20. Bone marrow lesions: A systematic diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Del Grande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow lesions on magnetic resonance (MR imaging are common and may be seen with various pathologies. The authors outline a systematic diagnostic approach with proposed categorization of various etiologies of bone marrow lesions. Utilization of typical imaging features on conventional MR imaging techniques and other problem-solving techniques, such as chemical shift imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, to achieve accurate final diagnosis has been highlighted.

  1. BONE MARROW ABONRMALITIES IN HIV INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sharad Antiram Dhurve

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection. Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection. Present work was carried out to study the bone marrow abnormalities in patients with HIV/AIDS. Methods 160 patients of HIV +ve were included in the study. A complete blood count, relevant biochemical investigations, CD4 counts were done, besides a thorough history and clinical examination. HIV positive patients were classified as those having AID...

  2. Reintegration after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, F; Zabora, J; Polland, A; Wingard, J

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the problems of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) survivors in returning to "normal" life in the community after BMT. Before being released from The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, 84 recipients of BMT were interviewed regarding their quality of life and psychosocial adaptation. Survivors were reinterviewed at 6 months, and at 1 year post-BMT, producing considerable qualitative data regarding their problems in living. Eighty-four patients who had received BMT completed qualitative interviews and standardized measures before treatment, before the return home, and at 6 and 12 months post-BMT. The interviews were subjected to a content analysis methodology to establish units and categories to examine the body of material. Content analysis of these interviews from the first year after BMT identified three areas of psychosocial morbidity; 1) physical problems, which included fatigue, appearance, troubles in eating, and physical restrictions; 2) psychological problems, which included fears about the future, sense of loss of control, anxiety, and depression; and 3) community reintegration problems, which included difficulty in returning to former social roles, separation from home, family, and friends, difficulty in resuming social relations, dealing with stigmatization, problems with family and children, and financial and employment difficulties. Identification of these problems for BMT survivors can be used to guide the development of specific materials and services to prepare recipients of BMTs and their families for life after the transplant. These qualitative results can also be used to direct the development of assessment tools to identify potential patient and family problems.

  3. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and dysfunctional bone marrow stroma in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerweel, Peter E; Teraa, Martin; Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E; White, Ian A; Hooper, Andrea T; Doevendans, Pieter A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2013-01-01

    Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired -at least partly- due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1(+)Flk-1(+) EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell-endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients.

  4. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and dysfunctional bone marrow stroma in diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Westerweel

    Full Text Available Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired -at least partly- due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment.Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1(+Flk-1(+ EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34(+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell-endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed.In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro.EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients.

  5. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells: role in epithelial tumor cell determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Fernando A; Sierralta, Walter D; Epuñan, Maria J; Minguell, José J

    2004-01-01

    Marrow stroma represents an advantageous environment for development of micrometastatic cells. Within the cellular structure of marrow stroma, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been postulated as an interacting target for disseminated cancer cells. The studies reported here were performed to gain more information on the interaction of the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 with human bone marrow-derived MSC cells and to investigate whether this interaction affects tumor cell properties. The results showed that after co-culture with MSC, changes were detected in the morphology, proliferative capacity and aggregation pattern of MCF-7 cells, but these parameters were not affected after the co-culture of MSC cells with a non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10. Since the indirect culture of MCF-7 with MSC or its products also resulted in functional changes in the tumor cells, we evaluated whether these effects could be attributed to growth factors produced by MSC cells. It was found that VEGF and IL-6 mimic the effects produced by MSC or its products on the proliferation and aggregation properties of MCF-7, cells, respectively. Thus, it seems that after entry of disseminated tumor cells into the marrow space, their proliferative and morphogenetic organization patterns are modified after interaction with distinct stromal cells and/or with specific signals from the marrow microenvironment.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Klatte, E.C.; Baehner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Seven children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow: results showed that it is technically feasible to obtain good MR images of marrow in children. MR has detected abnormality in the bone marrow of a child who had metastatic neuroblastoma. The extent of abnormality in the femur correlated well with findings of a bone marrow isotope scan. In one child who had idiopathic aplastic anemia, diseased marrow could not be distinguished from normal marrow on MR images. MRI identified abnormality of the marrow in osteogenic sarcoma, and demonstrated change in response to chemotherapy. It displayed marrow spread of tumors as well as CT. MRI showed marrow abnormality in four children who had leukemia

  7. Studies on the distribution of hematopoietic bone marrow by bone marrow scintigraphy, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Katsuhiko

    1976-01-01

    Distribution of the leukemic marrow was investigated in 42 cases by bone marrow scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in association with clinical findings and ferrokinetics studies in order to clarify hematopoietic function in leukemia. 17 of chronic myelogenous leukemia, 3 of lymphatic leukemia, 2 of monocytic leukemia, 7 of atypical leukemia and one of erythroleukemia. 12 acute myelogenous leukemia were classified into 3 types A, B and C. Type A showed the distribution similar to those obtained with normal controls. Ferrokinetics studies, however, indicated complete absence of erythropoiesis. Type B showed complete lack of sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites, although ferrokinetics data showed normal erythropoeitic function. Type C showed abnormal concentration of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in the tibiae. 17 chronic myelogenous leukemia showed reduced sup(99m)Tc activity in usual marrow sites and remarkable expanded marrow extending into distal femurs, proximal and distal tibiae and bones of feet. 2 acute lymphotic leukemia patients showed complete absence of sup(99m)Tc activity. The one chronic type showed almost normal distribution. Monocytic leukemia showed decreased marrow distribution in the sternum and vertebrae. Of 6 atypical leukemias one showed almost normal distribution. The others, including a case with hypoplastic luekemia, demonstrated marrow extension similar to that observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia or monocytic leukemia. Erythroleukemia showed increased concentrations of sup(99m)Tc activity in the usual marrow sites and marked marrow expansion throughout all long bones. These results suggest that there is a discrepancy between bone marrow distribution and hematopoietic function in the cases of acute myelogenous leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  8. Histological methods for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in human nerve trunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, T L; Gschmeissner, S E

    1994-03-01

    Although there are many histological techniques for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in paraffin embedded or frozen sections of the peripheral nervous system, modern approaches usually use plastic embedded material. Although plastic embedding is superior for small cutaneous branches, this method has limited value for histological assessment of nerve trunks. We report three methods which together yield a comprehensive approach for thorough and detailed investigation of human nerve trunks. The rapid osmication method permitted assessment of myelinated nerve fibers from frozen sections at operation, thus providing the surgeon with guidance on the extent of nerve resection. The modification presented here resulted in permanent slides, allowing comparison of results with those of the other two procedures. The new osmium-hematoxylin technique could be performed on paraffin embedded nerves. Paraffin, unlike plastic, permitted the study of the whole cross sectional area of the nerve in single sections. Moreover, the sharp image of the myelin permitted computerized morphometry. The significantly modified axonal silver impregnation technique was performed on frozen sections mounted on glass slides, as opposed to the time-consuming impregnation of free-floating sections. The latter technique had a high success rate and permitted semiquantitative assessment of axons in nerve trunks. These methods can be performed in any routine histology laboratory and resulted in greater accuracy compared to conventional methods.

  9. Bone marrow scintigraphy in hemopoietic depletion states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortynova, J.; Bakos, K.; Pradacova, J.

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 29 patients with hemopoietic depletion states of various etiology. Two tracers were used for visualization, viz., sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid and 111 InCl 3 ;some patients were examined using both indicators. 111 InCl 3 is bound to transferrin and is adsorbed on the surface of reticulocytes and erythroblasts. A scintillation camera PHO GAMMA SEARLE IV fitted with a moving table and computer CLINCOM were used to obtain whole-body images. The comparison of all scans and marrow puncture smears was done. In patients with aplastic anemia with both hyperplastic or hypoplastic marrow good correlation of bone marrow scans and sternal puncture smears was found. In several cases the scintigraphic examination helped to establish the diagnosis of marrow depletion. A peculiar disadvantage of the imaging method with either sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid or 111 InCl 3 is that it shows the disorders in erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial cells whereas the defects in myelopoietic cell series and platelet precursors are not provable. According to literature data, great attention is paid to the prognostic value of scintigraphic examination in aplastic anemia. (author)

  10. Bone marrow scintigraphy in hemopoietic depletion states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortynova, J. (Ustav Hematologie a Krevni Transfuze, Prague (Czechoslovakia)); Bakos, K.; Pradacova, J. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Biofyzikalni Ustav)

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy was performed in 29 patients with hemopoietic depletion states of various etiology. Two tracers were used for visualization, viz., sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid and /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/; some patients were examined using both indicators. /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/ is bound to transferrin and is adsorbed on the surface of reticulocytes and erythroblasts. A scintillation camera PHO GAMMA SEARLE IV fitted with a moving table and computer CLINCOM were used to obtain whole-body images. The comparison of all scans and marrow puncture smears was done. In patients with aplastic anemia with both hyperplastic or hypoplastic marrow good correlation of bone marrow scans and sternal puncture smears was found. In several cases the scintigraphic examination helped to establish the diagnosis of marrow depletion. A peculiar disadvantage of the imaging method with either sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid or /sup 111/InCl/sub 3/ is that it shows the disorders in erythropoietic and reticuloendothelial cells whereas the defects in myelopoietic cell series and platelet precursors are not provable. According to literature data, great attention is paid to the prognostic value of scintigraphic examination in aplastic anemia.

  11. Shifting bone marrow edema of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosikasuwan, Josh B.; Schultz, Elizabeth; Miller, Theodore T.; Math, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe shifting bone marrow edema in the knee as the MR imaging feature of intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee. Five men, aged 45-73 years, were referred by orthopedic surgeons for MR imaging evaluation of knee pain, which had been present for 2 weeks to 6 months. One patient had a prior history of blunt trauma. None had risk factors for osteonecrosis. Four patients had two MR examinations and the patient with prior blunt trauma had four. Plain radiographs were obtained in all patients. In all cases, a large area of marrow edema initially involved a femoral condyle, with migration of the bone marrow edema to the other femoral condyle, tibia, and/or patella occurring over a 2- to 4-month period. Adjacent soft tissue edema was present in all five patients, while none had a joint effusion. Radiographs of two patients showed generalized osteopenia. In the absence of acute trauma or clinical suspicion of infection, a large area of bone marrow edema without a zone of demarcation may represent intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis. Demonstration of shifting bone marrow edema on follow-up examinations suggests this diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. Abscopal suppression of bone marrow erythropoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werts, E.D.; Johnson, M.J.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Abscopal responses of hemopoietic tissue, which we noted in preliminary studies of mice receiving partial-body irradiation, led us to clarify these effects. In studies reported here, one hind leg of CF-1 female mice received 1000, 5000, or 10,000 rad of x radiation. We found a persistent shift from medullary to splenic erythropoiesis preventing anemia in mice receiving 5000 or 10,000 rad. Splenectomy prior to 5000-rad irradiation resulted in anemia, which was not ameliorated by exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Despite evidence for increased levels of erythropoietin in the animals, namely, a reticulocytosis and increased erythrocyte radioiron incorporation, both 59 Fe uptake and erythroblast counts in shielded marrow remained below normal. We found 50 to 90% suppression of the growth of marrow stromal colonies (MSC) from bone marrow aspirates of the shielded and irradiated femoral marrow at 1 month and at least 20% depression of MSC at 1 year, with each dose. We conclude that: (i) high doses of x radiation to one leg of mice caused prolonged suppression of medullary erythropoiesis with splenic compensation to prevent anemia; (ii) splenectomy, anemia, and hypoxia prevented the severe abscopal depression of medullary erythropoiesis; and (iii) suppressed medullary erythropoiesis with decreased growth of MSC suggested a change in the hemopoietic microenvironment of the bone marrow

  13. Marrow donor registry and cord blood bank in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung Dao

    2002-08-01

    Unrelated Bone marrow transplant was initiated thirty years ago. Though there are over millions of donors registered with the bone marrow registries worldwide, Asian patients rarely find a match with all these donors. Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry was established to meet this need. It has become the largest Asian marrow donor registry in the world. With the introduction of high technology to test the HLA of the donors and recipients, the success rate of bone marrow transplant is greatly improved among Asian countries. 50% of blood disease Asian patients who cannot find a bone marrow matched donor will be complemented by the establishment of cord blood banks in Taiwan.

  14. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N

    1998-01-01

    The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats....

  15. Adipocyte tissue volume in bone marrow is increased with aging and in patients with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Ebbesen, E N

    2001-01-01

    Aging of the human skeleton is characterized by decreased bone formation and bone mass and these changes are more pronounced in patients with osteoporosis. As osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during...

  16. The twitcher mouse. Central nervous system pathology after bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suzuki, K.; Hoogerbrugge, P. M.; Poorthuis, B. J.; Bekkum, D. W.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the pathology of the central nervous system were evaluated, at light and electron microscope levels, in the homozygous twitcher mouse (twi/twi), an authentic murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD, Krabbe disease) in humans. In the twitcher

  17. Multilineage differentiation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells associated with specific gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Chen, Li

    2007-01-01

    There are increasing reports regarding differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) from human and various species of animals including pigs. The phenotype and function of BMSC along a mesenchymal lineage differentiation are well characterized by specific transcription factors and marker g...

  18. Modeling Dynamics and Function of Bone Marrow Cells in Mouse Liver Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedone, Elisa; Olteanu, Vlad-Aris; Marucci, Lucia; Muñoz-Martin, Maria Isabel; Youssef, Sameh A; de Bruin, Alain; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2017-01-01

    In rodents and humans, the liver can efficiently restore its mass after hepatectomy. This is largely attributed to the proliferation and cell cycle re-entry of hepatocytes. On the other hand, bone marrow cells (BMCs) migrate into the liver after resection. Here, we find that a block of BMC

  19. Selective interactions between epithelial tumour cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombauer, H; Minguell, J J

    2000-01-01

    This work is a comparative study on the features displayed by an epithelial metastatic breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) when set in co-culture with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or a feeder layer of 3T3 fibroblasts. MSC, a subset of non-haematopoietic cells in the marrow stroma, display a potential for self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation into precursors for bone, cartilage, connective and muscular tissue. Adhesion of MCF-7 cells to monolayers of MSC or 3T3 was high...

  20. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  1. Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate-Enhanced Marrow Stimulation of Chondral Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Hermann; Orth, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow play a critical role in osteochondral repair. A bone marrow clot forms within the cartilage defect either as a result of marrow stimulation or during the course of the spontaneous repair of osteochondral defects. Mobilized pluripotent MSCs from the subchondral bone migrate into the defect filled with the clot, differentiate into chondrocytes and osteoblasts, and form a repair tissue over time. The additional application of a bone marrow aspirate (BMA) to the procedure of marrow stimulation is thought to enhance cartilage repair as it may provide both an additional cell population capable of chondrogenesis and a source of growth factors stimulating cartilage repair. Moreover, the BMA clot provides a three-dimensional environment, possibly further supporting chondrogenesis and protecting the subchondral bone from structural alterations. The purpose of this review is to bridge the gap in our understanding between the basic science knowledge on MSCs and BMA and the clinical and technical aspects of marrow stimulation-based cartilage repair by examining available data on the role and mechanisms of MSCs and BMA in osteochondral repair. Implications of findings from both translational and clinical studies using BMA concentrate-enhanced marrow stimulation are discussed. PMID:28607559

  2. Effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong; Zhang Weiguang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To provide scientific information for the prevention and treatment of the radiation damage by analyzing the effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition. Methods: 7 group mice were exposed to smoke and/or tea and/or radiation respectively. There were also b blank control group and a cyclophosphamide positive control group. The frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE), the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) to mature erythrocytes (RBC) in marrow, and the count of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte were observed. Results: The frequencies of MPCE in the groups irradiated with γ-rays were significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P<0.05 or 0.01). The smoke + radiation group's frequency was significantly higher than single radiation group (P<0.05). The ratios of PCE to RBC in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.01). The counts of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than the blank control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Radiation were able to cause marrow cell mutation and induce marrow inhibition. Smoke increases the effect of radiation-induced marrow cell mutation. Tea and smoke could not affect radiation-induced bone marrow inhibition

  3. BONE MARROW ABONRMALITIES IN HIV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Antiram Dhurve

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction; Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of HIV infection.  Bone marrow abnormalities occur in all stages of HIV infection.  Present work was carried out to study the bone marrow abnormalities in patients with HIV/AIDS.  Methods: 160 patients of HIV +ve were included in the study. A complete blood count, relevant biochemical investigations, CD4   counts were done, besides a thorough history and clinical examination. HIV positive patients were classified as those having AIDS and those without AIDS according to NACO criteria.   Bone marrow examination was performed for indication of anemia, leucopenia, pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Results: As per CDC criteria 59.81% patients had AIDS in 107 patients. The most common hematological abnormality was anemia, seen in 93.12% patients.  Bone marrow was normocellular in 79.06% of non-AIDS and 79.68% of AIDS, hypocellular in 13.95%.Thrombocytopenia was seen in 4 cases of ART (4.93% and 3 cases (4.68% of AIDS group. Abnormal cells like plasma cell, histocyte and toxic granule found in bone marrow. Conclusions: Myelodysplasia was more common in AIDS than in non AIDS patients. Granulocytic series is most commonly associated with evidence of dysplasia. Anemia in HIV patients can be a good clinical indicator to predict and access the underlying immune status. Thus bone marrow study is imperative to methodically observe and follow clinical and laboratory aberration in such patients in order to improve our diagnostic and therapeutic skills pertinent to HIV/AIDS.

  4. Immunoglobulin levels in dogs after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Halliwell, R.E.; Johnson, P.M.; Fey, T.A.; McDonough, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of total-body irradiation (TBI) and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation on serum immunoglobulin subclasses was determined in a dog model. Only IgG1 levels decreased after low-dose (+/- 4.5 Gy) TBI, but levels of all immunoglobulin classes fell after high-dose TBI (8.5 GyX1 or 2X6.0 Gy). After autologous bone marrow transplantation IgM levels were the first and IgE levels were the last to return to normal. After successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation prolonged low IgM and IgE levels were found but IgA levels increased rapidly to over 150% of pretreatment values. A comparison of dogs with or without clinical signs or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), revealed no differences in IgM levels. Dogs with GVHD had higher IgA but lower IgE levels. Dogs that rejected their allogeneic bone marrow cells showed significant early rises in IgE and IgA levels in comparison with dogs with GVHD. These results differ from the observations made on Ig levels in human bone marrow transplant patients. No significant differences in phytohemagglutinin stimulation tests were found between dogs with or without GVHD or dogs receiving an autologous transplant for the first four months after TBI and transplantation. An early primary or secondary involvement of humoral immunity in GVHD and graft rejection in dogs is postulated

  5. Mortality of monkeys after exposure to fission neutrons and the effects of autologous bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Bekkum, D.W. van; Hollander, C.F.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1978-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation in man, and to evaluate the results of therapeutic measures, the mortality of rhesus monkeys irradiated with X-rays and fission neutrons and the effect of autologous bone marrow transplantation have been investigated. The LDsub(50/30d) values for X- and neutron-irradiated monkeys amount to 525 and 260 rad respectively, resulting in an r.b.e. of approximately 2 for the occurrence of the bone marrow syndrome. Protection of the animals by autologous bone marrow transplantation was observed up to doses of 860 rad of X-rays and 440 rad of fission neutrons. After both fission-neutron irradiation and X-irradiation in the lowest range of lethal doses, the bone marrow syndrome was found to occur without the concurrent incidence of the intestinal syndrome. The studies indicate that, for humans accidentally exposed to what would otherwise be lethal doses of fast neutrons, bone marrow transplantation may be beneficial. (author)

  6. High frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Anders; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is now a routine analysis and serves as a diagnostic marker as well as a complement or alternative to B19 serology. The clinical significance of a positive B19 DNA finding is however dependent on the type of tissue or body fluid...... analysed and of the immune status of the patient. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone marrow samples from rheumatic patients. STUDY DESIGN: Parvovirus B19 DNA was analysed in paired bone marrow and serum samples by nested PCR technique. Serum was also analysed...... negative group. A high frequency of parvovirus B19 DNA was thus detected in bone marrow samples in rheumatic patients. The clinical data does not support a direct association between B19 PCR positivity and rheumatic disease manifestation. Therefore, the clinical significance of B19 DNA positivity in bone...

  7. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage...

  8. Bone-marrow MR imaging before and after autologous marrow transplantation in lymphoma patients without known bone-marrow involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Blystad, A.K.; Holte, H.; Kvaloey, S.; Langholm, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To study lumbar bone marrow by means of MR imaging before and after bone-marrow transplantation in lymphoma patients. Particular emphasis was paid to heterogeneity and to focal manifestations, i.e. appearances that could simulate tumor. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients who were disease-free for a minimum of 30 months after transplantation were studied in 107 MR examinations. Two radiologists visually evaluated coronal T1-weighted and short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) images. Results: T1-weighted images demonstrated a more heterogeneous marrow after transplantation than before it. Sharply defined focal low signal intensity areas appeared on this sequence in 5 (23%) of the 22 patients at between 21 and 60 weeks after transplantation. The mean age of these 5 patients was 48.4 years (range 42-54 years). The difference in age between these 5 patients and the remaining 17 patients, who had a mean age of 33.4 years (range 14-51 years), was statistically significant (p<0.01, Student's t-test, 2-sided test). Conclusion: Sharply defined focal low signal intensity areas may be seen on T1-weighted images of bone marrow in patients who are in complete remission after transplantation, particularly in those aged over 40-45 years. (orig.)

  9. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Nobuyuki

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  10. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  11. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Arai, Nobuyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  12. Use of G-CSF-stimulated marrow in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several researchers have unraveled the previously unrecognized effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on hematopoiesis and the immune cell functions of bone marrow in healthy donors. In human leukocyte antigen-matched or haploidentical transplant settings, available data have established the safety of using G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts, as well as the ability of this source to produce rapid and sustained engraftment. Interestingly, G-CSF-primed bone marrow transplants could capture the advantages of blood stem cell transplants, without the increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease that is associated with blood stem cell transplants. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence that supports the use of G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts as an alternative stem cell source in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Biochemical markers predictive for bone marrow involvement in systemic mastocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, Marjolein L.; van Doormaal, Jasper J.; van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Kluin, Philip M.; van der Veer, Eveline; de Monchy, Jan G. R.; Kema, Ido P.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by bone marrow involvement, which requires a bone marrow biopsy for diagnostic work-up. We questioned whether bone marrow involvement could be predicted using biochemical markers. We selected patients with various symptoms suggestive of indolent systemic

  14. The Role od Bone Marrow Aspirate and Trephine Samples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other disorders diagnosed after bone marrow examination include myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), aplastic anaemia, megaloblastic anaemia and myelofibrosis. Only 8.75% of these patients had a normal bone marrow. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the complexity of using bone marrow examination in ...

  15. Cytogenetic and morphological assessment of bone marrow in therapeutic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, U.; Das, B.P.; Singhal, R.M.; Radhakrishnaiah, Y.; Rath, G.K.; Padmaraju, I.; Bhargava, V.L.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological and cytogenetic study from the irradiated bone marrow, in 59 cases of radically irradiated carcinoma cervix was done. Regeneration of a marrow adjudged on cellular morphology was after 12 months whereas cytogenetic studies revealed it at the end of three months. It is concluded that cytogenetic study is a more sensitive parameter in assessing the recovery of bone marrow. (author)

  16. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  17. PET in Benign Bone Marrow Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bruggen, Wouter; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    This review aims to describe the current status of benign bone marrow (BM) imaging using PET. BM imaging is important as the BM is not only involved in poiesis of different vital cell lines and. can be affected by primary BM disorders, but it is also frequently affected by several extramedullary

  18. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf; Sourbron, Steven; Duerr, Hans-Roland; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  19. Diabetes Mellitus Induces Bone Marrow Microangiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Siragusa, Mauro; Quaini, Federico; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Katare, Rajesh G.; Caporali, Andrea; van Buul, Jaap D.; van Alphen, Floris P. J.; Graiani, Gallia; Spinetti, Gaia; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Prezioso, Lucia; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective-The impact of diabetes on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment was not adequately explored. We investigated whether diabetes induces microvascular remodeling with negative consequence for BM homeostasis. Methods and Results-We found profound structural alterations in BM from mice with

  20. Allogeneic and Autologous Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg, H. Joachim

    1988-01-01

    The author of this paper presents an overview of the current status of bone marrow transplantation, including indications, pre-transplant considerations, the transplant procedure, acute and delayed transplant-related problems, results currently attainable, and a short discussion of possible future developments.

  1. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    2005-01-01

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  2. Periapical multilocular osteoporotic bone marrow defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    A case of osteoporotic bone marrow defect, which appeared as a well-defined multilocular radiolucency overlapping the roots of mandibular right second molar, was reported. On periapical radiograph, a daughter cyst-like radiolucency was seen at the anterior margin of the lesion making it difficult to rule out odontogenic keratocyst.

  3. Agar Technique for the Cultivation In Vitro of Bone-Marrow Colonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, D. [Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1969-07-15

    In solid-state agar cultures certain haemopoietic cells proliferate and form discrete colonies of 200 - 4000 cells. Colony formation is dependent on stimulation by the colony-stimulating factor, and this is achieved by (1) the use of a cell feeder layer, (2) the addition of conditioned medium, or (3) the addition of human or mouse serum or urine containing the factor. All colonies initially contain granulocytic cells which differentiate from myeloblasts to polymorphs as colony growth proceeds. Later colonies develop a second population of phagocytic mononuclear cells (macrophages). The colony-forming-system is simple, readily quantitated and highly reproducible. Linear dose responses occur between the dose of colony-stimulating factor and the number and size of colonies developing from a standard number of bone-marrow cells. In-vitro colony formation has been achieved with haemopoietic cells of the following species: mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit and human. In the adult mouse, colony-forming cells are located in the bone marrow, spleen and blood and in the embryo, in the yolk sac, liver and spleen. The colony-forming cell appears to be an early member of the granulocytic series. The colony-forming system has been used as a quantitative assay system: (1) to assay levels of colony-stimulating factor in serum and urine and in the chemical- characterization and purification of the factor; and (2) to enumerate the number of colony-forming cells in haemopoietic tissues in response to a variety of experimental procedures and disease states. Since the system is applicable to human bone-marrow cells, it should prove of value in the quantitative assay of (1) survival of human bone marrow on storage, and (2) bone-marrow content of granulocytic precursor cells in various disease states and following various types of therapy. The system is not suitable for the mass production in vitro of haemopoietic cells for therapeutic use. (author)

  4. Bone marrow examination: Indications and diagnostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashawri, Layla A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective was to identify the main indications for bone marrow examination in a University hospital setup and the most common diagnoses encountered. To also identify the extent of correlation, if any, between the preliminary diagnosis and the result of the final bone marrow diagnosis. The requests and reports of all bone marrow biopsies and aspirations carried out during a 12-year period from January 1988 through to December 1999, in King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed. The information extracted included the main indications for performing this procedure, age groups involved, and the most common diagnoses encountered. A specially designed form was used for this purpose and the data was analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences. Randomly selected slides of the most common diagnoses were reviewed to concur with the diagnosis. There was a total of 1813 bone marrow biopsies or aspirations, or both, performed. The main indications for bone marrow examination in a descending order of frequency were the following: The diagnosis and management of acute leukemia 403 (22.2%), staging for lymphoma 276 (15.2%), evaluation of pancytopenia 215 (11.9%), thrombocytopenia 173 (9.5%), investigation of anemia 151 (8.3%), fever (pyrexia of unknown origin) 130 (7.2%), lymphadenopathy 120 (6.6%), and hepatosplenomegaly 80 (4.4%). The most common diagnoses encountered were: acute lymphoblastic leukemia 242 (13.3%), immune thrombocytopenia 123 (6.8%), acute myeloblastic leukemia 80 (4.4%), hypersplenism 79 (4.4%), chronic granulocytic leukemia 73 (4.0%), megaloblastic anemia 66 (3.6%), bone marrow positive for lymphomatous infiltration 63 (3.5%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia 40 (2.2%), and multiple myeloma 32 (1.8%). This study confirms that bone marrow examination is a very important investigation for establishing the diagnosis in many conditions, especially hematological neoplasms. The most common

  5. Effects and Complications of Bone-Marrow Transplantation in Man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathe, G.; Schwarzenberg, L.; Miel, J.L. A; Schneider, M.; Cattan, A.; Schlumberger, J. R. [Institut de cancerologie et immunogenetique, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif (France)

    1969-07-15

    Full text: Allogenic bone-marrow grafting in 24 human leukaemic subjects is described. The graft failed in 7 cases and took in 17 cases. In the latter group, all 17 cases were complicated by the secondary syndrome which was-fatal in 13 cases and controlled in 4 cases. The immunogenetic and immunological factors determining the establishment and evolution of haematological radiochimeras in man are discussed. The choice of donor is fundamental. Three tests are effective in donor selection, the indirect histocompatibility test, the leucocyte antigen test and the reaction of donor and recipient leucocytes in the dermis of an irradiated hamster. When marrow from several donors is transfused, the recipient spontaneously selects the genetically nearest. It seems likely there is more chance of finding a suitable donor among genetically related subjects than among those who are unrelated. The frequency of graft take seems slightly lower in recipients who have previously received blood transfusions. Total bone-marrow graft is associated with specific tolerance towards donor tissues. This is paralleled by the production in the chimera of immunoglobulins produced by the graft. The secondary syndrome seems, as in animals, to be related essentially to the graft-versus-host reaction. It is convenient to distinguish among its various manifestations, on the one hand, those lesions which are readily controlled such as hepatitis or erythrodermia associated with infiltration and proliferation of immunologically competent cells from the graft and, on the other hand, immune insufficiency with regard to micro-organisms, especially viruses and Candida albicans. This latter group, the mechanism of which is complex, still eludes attempts at preventive and curative control. The use of multiple donors and the administration of cortisone during marrow transfusion and A-methopterin and/or cyclophosphamide in the days following transfusions; seem to have reduced the severity of the secondary

  6. Development of a 3D bone marrow adipose tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Farrell, Mariah; Vary, Calvin; Boucher, Joshua M; Driscoll, Heather; Liaw, Lucy; Rosen, Clifford J; Reagan, Michaela R

    2018-01-26

    Over the past twenty years, evidence has accumulated that biochemically and spatially defined networks of extracellular matrix, cellular components, and interactions dictate cellular differentiation, proliferation, and function in a variety of tissue and diseases. Modeling in vivo systems in vitro has been undeniably necessary, but when simplified 2D conditions rather than 3D in vitro models are used, the reliability and usefulness of the data derived from these models decreases. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop and validate reliable in vitro models to reproduce specific tissue-like structures and mimic functions and responses of cells in a more realistic manner for both drug screening/disease modeling and tissue regeneration applications. In adipose biology and cancer research, these models serve as physiologically relevant 3D platforms to bridge the divide between 2D cultures and in vivo models, bringing about more reliable and translationally useful data to accelerate benchtop to bedside research. Currently, no model has been developed for bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), a novel adipose depot that has previously been overlooked as "filler tissue" but has more recently been recognized as endocrine-signaling and systemically relevant. Herein we describe the development of the first 3D, BMAT model derived from either human or mouse bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We found that BMAT models can be stably cultured for at least 3 months in vitro, and that myeloma cells (5TGM1, OPM2 and MM1S cells) can be cultured on these for at least 2 weeks. Upon tumor cell co-culture, delipidation occurred in BMAT adipocytes, suggesting a bidirectional relationship between these two important cell types in the malignant BM niche. Overall, our studies suggest that 3D BMAT represents a "healthier," more realistic tissue model that may be useful for elucidating the effects of MAT on tumor cells, and tumor cells on MAT, to identify novel therapeutic

  7. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  8. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauffaille, M L L F; Pinheiro, R F; Stefano, J T; Kerbauy, J

    2003-07-01

    The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases) to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis). Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively) were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05). GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  9. Bone Marrow Gene Therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Herrera-Carrillo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow gene therapy remains an attractive option for treating chronic immunological diseases, including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. This technology combines the differentiation and expansion capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs with long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes using integrating vectors. In this review we summarize the potential of bone marrow gene therapy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. A broad range of antiviral strategies are discussed, with a particular focus on RNA-based therapies. The idea is to develop a durable gene therapy that lasts the life span of the infected individual, thus contrasting with daily drug regimens to suppress the virus. Different approaches have been proposed to target either the virus or cellular genes encoding co-factors that support virus replication. Some of these therapies have been tested in clinical trials, providing proof of principle that gene therapy is a safe option for treating HIV/AIDS. In this review several topics are discussed, ranging from the selection of the antiviral molecule and the viral target to the optimal vector system for gene delivery and the setup of appropriate preclinical test systems. The molecular mechanisms used to formulate a cure for HIV infection are described, including the latest antiviral strategies and their therapeutic applications. Finally, a potent combination of anti-HIV genes based on our own research program is described.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow in hematological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.; Michaux, L.; Ferrant, A.

    1998-01-01

    Despite its lack of specificity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow has the potential to play a role in the management of patients with primary neoplastic disorders of the hematopoietic system, including lymphomas, leukemias and multiple myeloma. In addition to its use in the assessment of suspected spinal cord compression, bone marrow MRI could be used as a prognostic method or as a technique to assess the response to treatment. The current review addresses the common patterns of bone marrow involvement observed in primary neoplasms of the bone marrow, basic technical principles of bone marrow MRI, and several applications of MRI in selected clinical situations. (orig.) (orig.)

  11. Preservation of Bone-Marrow Cells, Leucocytes and Platelets at Low Temperatures. A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood-Smith, M. J. [Medical Research Council, Radiobiological Research Unit, Harwell, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1969-07-15

    The basic principles of cryobiology are discussed and applications of these principles by numerous workers in attempts to preserve marrow cells, leucocytes and platelets at low temperatures are reviewed. It is concluded that: (1) Lymphocytes from animals and man can be stored for long periods of time at low temperatures when cooled slowly in 10-15% DMSO or glycerol and thawed rapidly. Recovery figures are high and function is intact and unaltered. DMSO is probably a better preservative than glycerol, and storage life at -196 Degree-Sign C is probably indefinite for all practical purposes. Other leucocytes can be stored with similar techniques but recoveries after freezing and thawing are probably lower than with lymphocytes. (2) Bone-marrow cells of several animals including mouse, rabbit and dog can be preserved at -196 Degree-Sign C, probably indefinitely, and similar procedures to those used for lymphocytes give the best results. The comprehensive studies of Lewis and Trobaugh indicate that under carefully controlled conditions 95% of the stem cells in mouse marrow are viable after freezing and thawing. Opinions are divided over the efficacy of the two preservatives, DMSO and glycerol, but in view of the well documented accounts of the lack of toxicity of glycerol it would seem advisable for the moment to use this agent with all human marrow samples. The usefulness of PVP as a preservative for marrow is still to be resolved. Human marrow after freezing and thawing probably behaves in a similar manner to mouse marrow both in vitro and in vivo. However, it would be wise to consider that there might be differences which could cause wrong assessments of freezing procedures. (3) Platelet preservation, clinically perhaps the most useful procedure discussed in this review, is still to a large extent in the experimental stage. Much work has been done but even the best methods available permit relatively low recoveries of viable platelets. Preservation of human platelets

  12. The skeletal cell-derived molecule sclerostin drives bone marrow adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Harris, Elizabeth; Demambro, Victoria; McDonald, Michelle; Pettitt, Jessica A; Mohanty, Sindhu T; Croucher, Peter; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Rosen, Clifford J; Reagan, Michaela R

    2018-02-01

    The bone marrow niche is a dynamic and complex microenvironment that can both regulate, and be regulated by the bone matrix. Within the bone marrow (BM), mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) precursors reside in a multi-potent state and retain the capacity to differentiate down osteoblastic, adipogenic, or chondrogenic lineages in response to numerous biochemical cues. These signals can be altered in various pathological states including, but not limited to, osteoporotic-induced fracture, systemic adiposity, and the presence of bone-homing cancers. Herein we provide evidence that signals from the bone matrix (osteocytes) determine marrow adiposity by regulating adipogenesis in the bone marrow. Specifically, we found that physiologically relevant levels of Sclerostin (SOST), which is a Wnt-inhibitory molecule secreted from bone matrix-embedded osteocytes, can induce adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, mouse ear- and BM-derived MSCs, and human BM-derived MSCs. We demonstrate that the mechanism of SOST induction of adipogenesis is through inhibition of Wnt signaling in pre-adipocytes. We also demonstrate that a decrease of sclerostin in vivo, via both genetic and pharmaceutical methods, significantly decreases bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) formation. Overall, this work demonstrates a direct role for SOST in regulating fate determination of BM-adipocyte progenitors. This provides a novel mechanism for which BMAT is governed by the local bone microenvironment, which may prove relevant in the pathogenesis of certain diseases involving marrow adipose. Importantly, with anti-sclerostin therapy at the forefront of osteoporosis treatment and a greater recognition of the role of BMAT in disease, these data are likely to have important clinical implications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Use of lymphokine-activated killer cells to prevent bone marrow graft rejection and lethal graft-vs-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaplan, J.

    1989-01-01

    Prompted by our recent finding that lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells mediate both veto and natural suppression, we tested the ability of adoptively transferred LAK cells to block two in vivo alloreactions which complicate bone marrow transplantation: resistance to transplanted allogeneic bone marrow cells, and lethal graft-vs-host disease. Adoptive transfer of either donor type B6D2 or recipient-type B6 lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells, cells found to have strong LAK activity, abrogated or inhibited the resistance of irradiated B6 mice to both B6D2 marrow and third party-unrelated C3H marrow as measured by CFU in spleen on day 7. The ability of lymphokine-activated bone marrow cells to abrogate allogeneic resistance was eliminated by C lysis depletion of cells expressing asialo-GM1, NK1.1, and, to a variable degree, Thy-1, but not by depletion of cells expressing Lyt-2, indicating that the responsible cells had a LAK cell phenotype. Similar findings were obtained by using splenic LAK cells generated by 3 to 7 days of culture with rIL-2. Demonstration that allogeneic resistance could be blocked by a cloned LAK cell line provided direct evidence that LAK cells inhibit allogeneic resistance. In addition to inhibiting allogeneic resistance, adoptively transferred recipient-type LAK cells prevented lethal graft-vs-host disease, and permitted long term engraftment of allogeneic marrow. Irradiation prevented LAK cell inhibition of both allogeneic resistance and lethal graft-vs-host disease. These findings suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with LAK cells may prove useful in preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in human bone marrow transplant recipients

  15. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-01-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation

  16. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-11-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  17. Prostacyclin Suppresses Twist Expression in the Presence of Indomethacin in Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, Oliver; Herten, Monika; Fischer, Johannes; Haversath, Marcel; Beck, Sascha; Classen, Tim; Warwas, Sebastian; Tassemeier, Tjark; Landgraeber, Stefan; Lensing-Höhn, Sabine; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Jäger, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Background Iloprost, a stable prostacyclin I2 analogue, seems to have an osteoblast-protective potential, whereas indomethacin suppresses new bone formation. The aim of this study was to investigate human bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) proliferation and differentiation towards the osteoblastic lineage by administration of indomethacin and/or iloprost. Material/Methods Human bone marrow cells were obtained from 3 different donors (A=26 yrs/m; B=25 yrs/f, C=35 yrs/m) via vacuum aspiration of t...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal marrow: Basic understanding of the normal marrow pattern and its variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab; Eid, Ahmed Fathi

    2015-01-01

    For now, magnetic resonance (MR) is the best noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate vertebral bone marrow thanks to its inherent soft-tissue contrast and non-ionizing nature. A daily challenging scenario for every radiologist interpreting MR of the vertebral column is discerning the diseased from normal marrow. This requires the radiologist to be acquainted with the used MR techniques to judge the spinal marrow as well as its normal MR variants. Conventional sequences used basically to image marrow include T1W, fat-suppressed T2W and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging provides gross morphological data. Interestingly, using non-routine MR sequences; such as opposed phase, diffusion weighted, MR spectroscopy and contrasted-enhanced imaging; may elucidate the nature of bone marrow heterogeneities; by inferring cellular and chemical composition; and adding new functional prospects. Recalling the normal composition of bone marrow elements and the physiologic processes of spinal marrow conversion and reconversion eases basic understanding of spinal marrow imaging. Additionally, orientation with some common variants seen during spinal marrow MR imaging as hemangiomas and bone islands is a must. Moreover, awareness of the age-associated bone marrow changes as well as changes accompanying different variations of the subject’s health state is essential for radiologists to avoid overrating normal MR marrow patterns as pathologic states and metigate unnecessary further work-up. PMID:26753060

  19. Postirradiation bone marrow damage in chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skardova, I.; Ojeda, F.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of bone marrow damage induced by the continuous gamma irradiation was studied. Effect of dose rate and level of cumulated doses of radiation was evaluated in clinical and hematological examinations and bone marrow damage was determined by chromosome aberrations in anaphase. The regulative ability of hematopoiesis of many cytokines are discussed. Positive regulators are inducers of cell proliferation, and negative regulators are inducers of apoptosis /programmed cell death/. Birds corresponding with similarities in thymus-T and bursal-B cells appear to be an interesting model for studying the possible participation of apoptosis in radiation disease. Our recent experimental studies continue to progress in this direction. (author) 17 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Bone marrow transplantation for childhood malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Yasunori

    1992-01-01

    As of June 30, 1991, 1013 pediatric patients had registrated to The Bone Marrow Transplantation Committee of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Hematology. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from HLA-matched siblings is now reasonably safe and an established method of treatment in acute leukemia. Total body irradiation, which is major part of preparative regimen for BMT, affect endocrine function, subsequent growth, gonadal function, development of secondary malignancies. We propose the indication of TBI for children and young adults as follows; those who are at high risk for leukemic relapse after BMT such as Phl-positive-All, leukemia-lymphoma syndrome, AML with monocytic component, BMT in elapse, BMT from other than HLA-matched siblings. (author)

  1. Central and peripheral distribution of bone marrow on bone marrow scintigraphy with antigranulocytic antibody in hematologic malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young [Dong-A University College of Medicne, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Tae; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Kyu Bo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the status of bone marrow in various hematologic disorders. We have analyzed the peripheral distribution pattern and central uptake ratio of bone marrow using anti-NCA-95 monoclonal antibody and the their correlation in patients with various hematologic malignancy. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m anti-granulocyte monoclonal mouse antibody BW 250/183. Fifty patients were classified into four groups; 11 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 12 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 15 with lymphoma and 12 with myelodysplastic syndrome. Th extension of peripheral bone marrow was categorized into four grades: I, II, III and IV. The activity of central bone marrow was expressed as sacroiliac uptake ratio. The patient's number was 4 in grade I, 27 in grade II, 15 in grade III and 4 in grade IV according to extension of peripheral bone marrow. The extension of peripheral bone marrow was marked (58% in grade III and IV) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia and mild (93% in grade I and II) in lymphoma. Sacroiliac uptake ratio was highest (8.5{+-}4.0) in myelodysplastic syndrome and lowest (5.9{+-}3.6) in acute myelogenous leukemia, but not significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). Sacroiliac uptake ratio of whole patients was significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). The pattern of peripheral bone marrow extension and activity of central hemopoietic marrow were not specific to the disease entities. Response of hemopoietic bone marrow may be evaluated on both peripheral and central bone marrow in patients with hematologic malignancy.

  2. Central and peripheral distribution of bone marrow on bone marrow scintigraphy with antigranulocytic antibody in hematologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Do Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow scintigraphy has been used to evaluate the status of bone marrow in various hematologic disorders. We have analyzed the peripheral distribution pattern and central uptake ratio of bone marrow using anti-NCA-95 monoclonal antibody and the their correlation in patients with various hematologic malignancy. Bone marrow immunoscintigraphy was performed using Tc-99m anti-granulocyte monoclonal mouse antibody BW 250/183. Fifty patients were classified into four groups; 11 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 12 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 15 with lymphoma and 12 with myelodysplastic syndrome. Th extension of peripheral bone marrow was categorized into four grades: I, II, III and IV. The activity of central bone marrow was expressed as sacroiliac uptake ratio. The patient's number was 4 in grade I, 27 in grade II, 15 in grade III and 4 in grade IV according to extension of peripheral bone marrow. The extension of peripheral bone marrow was marked (58% in grade III and IV) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute lymphocytic leukemia and mild (93% in grade I and II) in lymphoma. Sacroiliac uptake ratio was highest (8.5±4.0) in myelodysplastic syndrome and lowest (5.9±3.6) in acute myelogenous leukemia, but not significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). Sacroiliac uptake ratio of whole patients was significantly different among four grades (p=0.003), but there was not correlated between grade of peripheral bone marrow and sacroiliac uptake ratio (r=0.05). The pattern of peripheral bone marrow extension and activity of central hemopoietic marrow were not specific to the disease entities. Response of hemopoietic bone marrow may be evaluated on both peripheral and central bone marrow in patients with hematologic malignancy

  3. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ASBMT American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation ASEATTA Australasian and South East Asian Tissue Typing Association ASH American...for investigators to obtain statistical and data management support for prospective trials focusing on addressing various transplant issues. These...these relationships so that when an event occurs no one will need to exchange business cards, but rather will already know who to call. Two levels

  4. Protecting the interests of the child bone marrow donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Louise M; Campbell, Anne

    2004-01-01

    At a time when designer babies have been created to act as cord blood donors to sick siblings, ethical debate has focused predominantly on the extent to which it is acceptable to create one human being to assist another. However, children are frequently used this way, by their families and doctors who extract their bone marrow, to try to save the life of another, usually a sibling. With any life-threatening illness, there is the possibility that the urgency of the sick sibling's need means that the short-term welfare of the donor child receives less attention than it should by parents and doctors. This article suggests ways to protect the interests of such children and empower them within the decision-making process and concludes that the drive to save life must be tempered by recognition of the intrinsic worth of donor children and their rights not to be exploited.

  5. Molecular Interaction of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue with Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchacki, Karla J; Cawthorn, William P

    2018-01-01

    The last decade has seen a resurgence in the study of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) across diverse fields such as metabolism, haematopoiesis, skeletal biology and cancer. Herein, we review the most recent developments of BMAT research in both humans and rodents, including the distinct nature of BMAT; the autocrine, paracrine and endocrine interactions between BMAT and various tissues, both in physiological and pathological scenarios; how these interactions might impact energy metabolism; and the most recent technological advances to quantify BMAT. Though still dwarfed by research into white and brown adipose tissues, BMAT is now recognised as endocrine organ and is attracting increasing attention from biomedical researchers around the globe. We are beginning to learn the importance of BMAT both within and beyond the bone, allowing us to better appreciate the role of BMAT in normal physiology and disease.

  6. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT

  7. Allogeneic bone marrow grafts in genotyped swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.

    1974-01-01

    The proof of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) called SL-A enabled to promote bone marrow allografts. A study of the response to that kind of graft in irradiated pig states a number of interesting points. Bone marrow allografting complies with the rule of tissular compatibility with the major histocompatibility complex. The taking of SL-A incompatible bone marrow allografts could not be achieved under the experimental conditions. In spite of the high doses of radiation, 950 to 1050 rads, higher than 1.5 LD 100%, recipients were capable of rejecting their grafts, regularly. SL-A identify ensured 100%, initial achievement. However, animals developed regular fatal disease within a fairly short time. This development could by no means, be ascribed to the sole sequealae of radiation sickness since autografted animals at equal or even higher doses, showed none of the symptome. Assumption of a chronic graft-vs-host reactions, induced by the minor histocompatible systems, was put foreward, but should be confirmed histopathologically [fr

  8. Tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendra, J.R.; Halil, O.; Barrett, A.J.; Selwyn, S.

    1982-01-01

    A brief report is presented of a case of tetanus after allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation complicated by radiation-induced pneumonitis. A 30-year-old army sergeant received a bone-marrow transplant from his brother for the treatment of a granulocytic sarcoma after local radiotherapy to the tumour. Six years earlier he had sustained an open, compound fracture of the left tibia and fibula while on army exercise. At the time a pin and plate had been inserted and booster anti-tetanus administered. Bone-marrow transplantation was performed after total body irradiation. Cyclosporin A was given against graft-versus-host disease. Fifty four days after transplantation tetanus was diagnosed and death followed 14 days later. Necropsy disclosed radiation-induced pneumonitis, but no organisms were cultured from the lungs or the old fracture site. It is suggested that spores were incorporated into the wound site before surgery and that oxygenation around the plate became compromised after transplantation, permitting germination of dormant spores, immunosuppression allowing development of the disease. (U.K.)

  9. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.G.; Irfan, M.; Shamsi, T.S.; Hussain, M.

    2007-01-01

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  10. Mastocytosis: magnetic resonance imaging patterns of marrow disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, N.A.; Ling, A.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Worobec, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To report the bone marrow MRI findings of patients with mastocytosis and correlate them with clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features. Design and patients. Eighteen patients with mastocytosis had T1-weighted spin echo and short tau inversion recovery MRI of the pelvis at 0.5 T. In each patient the MR pattern of marrow disease was classified according to intensity and uniformity and was correlated with the clinical category of mastocytosis, bone marrow biopsy results, and radiographic findings. Results. Two patients had normal MRI scans and normal bone marrow biopsies. One patient had a normal MRI scan and a marrow biopsy consistent with mastocytosis. Fifteen patients had abnormal MRI scans and abnormal marrow biopsies. There were several different MR patterns of marrow involvement; none was specifically associated with any given clinical category of mastocytosis. Fifteen of the 18 patients had radiographs of the pelvis; of those, 13 with abnormal MRI scans and abnormal marrow biopsies had the following radiographic findings: normal (nine); sclerosis (three); diffuse osteopenia (one). Conclusion. While radiographs are very insensitive for the detection of marrow abnormalities in mastocytosis, MRI is very sensitive and may display several different patterns of marrow involvement. (orig.)

  11. Molecular Mechanisms That Contribute to Bone Marrow Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Ivanusic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated a bony pathology puts a significant burden on individuals, society, and the health-care systems worldwide. Pathology that involves the bone marrow activates sensory nerve terminal endings of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors, and is the likely trigger for pain. This review presents our current understanding of how bone marrow nociceptors are influenced by noxious stimuli presented in pathology associated with bone marrow. A number of ion channels and receptors are emerging as important modulators of the activity of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors. Nerve growth factor (NGF sequestration has been trialed for the management of inflammatory bone pain (osteoarthritis, and there is significant evidence for interaction of NGF with bone marrow nociceptors. Activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 sensitizes bone marrow nociceptors and could contribute to increased sensitivity of patients to noxious stimuli in various bony pathologies. Acid-sensing ion channels sense changes to tissue pH in the bone marrow microenvironment and could be targeted to treat pathology that involves acidosis of the bone marrow. Piezo2 is a mechanically gated ion channel that has recently been reported to be expressed by most myelinated bone marrow nociceptors and might be a target for treatments directed against mechanically induced bone pain. These ion channels and receptors could be useful targets for the development of peripherally acting drugs to treat pain of bony origin.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse malignant bone marrow diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, R.; Rehn, S.; Glimelius, B.; Hagberg, H.; Hemmingsson, A.; Jung, B.; Simonsson, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    Twenty-four patients with malignant bone marrow involvement or polycythemia vera, 8 patients with reactive bone marrow and 7 healthy individuals were examined with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 T and 0.5 T. Signs of an increased longitudinal relaxation time, T1, were found when normal bone marrow was replaced by malignant cells, polycythemia vera or reactive marrow. A shortened T1 was indicated in 4 patients in bone marrow regions treated by radiation therapy; the marrow was most likely hypocellular in these cases. The estimated T1 relaxation times were highly correlated to the cellularity of the bone marrow as assessed by histology. Among patients with close to 100% cellularity neither T1 nor T2 discriminated between the various malignancies or between malignant and reactive, non-malignant bone marrow. Characterization of tissues in terms of normalized image intensities was also attempted, the motive being to avoid approximations and uncertainties in the assessment of T1 and T2. The normalization was carried out with respect to the image of highest intensity, i.e. the proton density weighted image. The results were in agreement with those for T1 and T2. It was concluded that MRI is valuable for assessing bone marrow cellularity, but not for differentiating between various bone marrow disorders having a similar degree of cellularity.

  13. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  14. Safety assessment of bone marrow derived MSC grown in platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Fukuda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The injection of endothelial progenitor cells and mononuclear cells derived from bone marrow at the ischemic region of peripheral artery disease patients is reported to be effective for therapeutic angiogenesis; however, these cell therapies require large amounts of bone marrow to obtain sufficient numbers of cells. To solve this problem, we attempted to culture bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC, which are supposed to secrete several cytokines that promote angiogenesis. We also focused on using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a supplement for cell culture instead of fetal bovine serum. Human BM-MSC obtained from healthy volunteers expanded rapidly when cultured with 10% PRP prepared from their own blood. FACS analysis revealed that these cultured human MSC were homogeneous populations, and chromosomal analysis showed a normal karyotype. Moreover, the angiogenetic effect was apparent two weeks after human BM-MSC were injected into the ischemic muscle in SCID mice. Tumor formation was not detected three months after injection into SCID mice either subcutaneously or intramuscularly. To simulate clinical settings, canine BM-MSC were grown with canine PRP and injected into their ischemic muscles. We confirmed that donor cells existed in situ two and six weeks after operation without any side effects. These results suggest that cultured human BM-MSC can be a promising cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  15. Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Differential Diagnosis to Remember after Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Dantas Brito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infection in immunocompromised hosts is reported in the literature, mostly concerning human immunodeficiency virus infected patients. It is not well characterized in the context of stem cell transplantation. We report a rare case clinical case of visceral leishmaniasis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. A 50-year-old Caucasian male was referred to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with a high-risk acute lymphoblastic B leukemia in first complete remission. Allogeneic SCT was performed with peripheral blood stem cells from an unrelated Portuguese matched donor. In the following months, patient developed mild fluctuating cytopenias, mostly thrombocytopenia (between 60 and 80∗109/L. The only significant complaint was intermittent tiredness. The common causes for thrombocytopenia in this setting were excluded—no evidence of graft versus host disease, no signs of viral or bacterial infection, and no signs of relapsed disease/dysplastic changes. The bone marrow smear performed 12 months after transplantation revealed an unsuspected diagnosis: a massive bone marrow infiltration with amastigotes.

  16. Discrepancy of biologic behavior influenced by bone marrow derived cells in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Xiao-Min; Liao, Mei-Lin; Liu, Yun; Sha, Hui-Fang; Zhao, Yi; Yu, Yong-Feng; Tan, Qiang; Xiang, Jia-Qing; Fang, Jing; Lv, Dan-Dan; Li, Xue-Bing; Lu, Shun; Chen, Hai-Quan

    2010-11-01

    Disseminated cancer cells may initially require local nutrients and growth factors to thrive and survive in bone marrow. However, data on the influence of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC, also called bone stromal cells in some publications) on lung cancer cells is largely unexplored. This study explored the mechanism of how bone stromal factors contribute to the bone tropism in lung cancer. The difference among lung cancer cell lines in their abilities to metastasize to bone was found using the SCID animal model. Supernatant of bone marrow aspiration (BM) and condition medium from human bone stromal cells (BSC) were used to study the activity of bone stromal factors. We found bone stromal factors significantly increased the proliferation, invasion, adhesion and expression of angiogenosis-related factors, and inhibited the apoptosis for high bone metastasis H460 lung cancer cells. These biologic effects were not seen in SPC-A1 or A549 cells, which are low bone metastasis lung cancer cells. Adhesion of H460 cells to surface coated with bone stromal cells can activate some signal transduction pathways, and alter the expression of adhesion associated factors, including integrin β 3 and ADAMTS-1, two potential targets related with bone metastasis. We concluded that bone marrow derived cells had a profound effect on biological behavior of lung cancers, therefore favoring the growth of lung cancer cells in bone.

  17. Studies on the distribution of hematopoietic bone marrow by bone marrow scintigraphy, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Katsuhiko

    1976-01-01

    In 42 patients with hypoplastic anemia, 10 mCi of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid was injected intravenously, and scanning was performed one hour later with a Pho/Gamma III scintillation camera. Active bone marrow was usually found in the sternum, vertebrae, pelvis, and the poximal ends of humeri and femurs. These 42 cases were classified into 5 types according to distribution pattern. Type 1 (4 cases) showed complete lack of sup(99m)Tc activity in the usual marrow sites. Ferrokinetic studies indicated remarkable erythropoietic hypofunction. Type 2 (18 cases) showed island-like distribution of marrow in the pelvis or in the heads of humeri and femurs. Type 3 (6 cases) showed approximately normal uptake of sup(99m)Tc sulfur colloid in the sternum and the vertebrae, but no activity in the pelvis; or showed the apposite distribution. Marrow specimens obtained from the sternum and the pelvis showed differences in cellularity in such cases. Type 4 (8 cases) were divided into two groups, A and B. Four patients of group A showed decreased uptake of the colloid in the usual marrow sites, but expanded marrow extending into distal femous, proximal and distal tibiae and bones of the feet. These patients subsequently developed leukemia. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy or when leukemic features appeared during the clinical course. The remaining cases, group B, showed island-like sup(99m)Tc activity in the tibia. Until then, there had been no signs of leukemia. Type 5 (6 cases) showed normal distribution with below-normal uptake. It is concluded that the reduction of hematopoietic tissue mass is the main cause of decreased hematopoiesis in hypoplastic anemia. (J.P.N.)

  18. Effects of marrow storage at 4 degrees C on the subsequent generation of long-term marrow cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Singer, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of marrow preservation at 4 degrees C on subsequent long-term culture, which evaluates both hematopoietic precursor cells and hematopoietic microenvironmental cells. Storage of unfractionated marrow was superior to storage of buffy-coat cells in tissue culture medium with 20% fetal calf serum. CFU-C recovery in unfractionated marrow was 48.4% at four days and 21.4% at seven days. Long-term marrow cultures from cells stored at 4 degrees C for up to seven days produced CFU-C for up to seven weeks and established confluent marrow stromal cell layers. Suspension cultures of marrow cells preserved at 4 degrees C for seven days cultured with irradiated allogeneic marrow stromal cell layers from normal long-term marrow cultures showed significantly increased CFU-C production from week 2 to week 5 when compared with the control cultures without adherent cell layers. These data suggest that marrow storage at 4 degrees C for up to seven days preserves early hematopoietic precursor cells and microenvironmental cells and may be used for autologous rescue from marrow ablative therapy

  19. Bone marrow dosimetry in rats using direct tissue counting after injection of radio-iodinated intact monoclonal antibodies or F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Chalandon, Y.; Pelegrin, A.; Hardman, N.; Mach, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Normal rats were injected intravenously with 131I- and 125I-labeled intact murine and chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies directed against carcinoembryonic antigen or with the corresponding F(ab')2 fragments. At different times after injection, individual animals were killed and radioactivity of blood and major organs, including bones and bone marrow, was determined. Ratios comparing radioactivity concentration in different tissues with that of bone marrow were calculated and found to remain stable during several effective half-lives of the antibodies. Mean bone marrow radioactivity was 35% (range, 29%-40%) of that of blood and 126% (range, 108%-147%) of that of liver after injection of intact Mabs or F(ab')2 fragments. In nude rats bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts producing carcinoembryonic antigen, relative bone marrow radioactivity was slightly lower than that in normal rats

  20. Meeting report of the 2016 bone marrow adiposity meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eerden, Bram; van Wijnen, André

    2017-10-02

    There is considerable interest in the physiology and pathology, as well as the cellular and molecular biology, of bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). Because bone marrow adiposity is linked not only to systemic energy metabolism, but also to both bone marrow and musculoskeletal disorders, this biologic compartment has become of major interest to investigators from diverse disciplines. Bone marrow adiposity represents a virtual multi-tissue endocrine organ, which encompasses cells from multiple developmental lineages (e.g., mesenchymal, myeloid, lymphoid) and occupies all the non-osseous and non-cartilaginous space within long bones. A number of research groups are now focusing on bone marrow adiposity to understand a range of clinical afflictions associated with bone marrow disorders and to consider mechanisms-based strategies for future therapies.

  1. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological changes were studied of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen of lethally irradiated mice (0.2 C/kg) after transplantation of living bone marrow cells. It was observed that functional trombopoietic megakaryocytes occur from day 15 after transplantation and that functional active megakaryocytes predominate in bone marrow and spleen from day 20. In addition, other types of cells, primarily granulocytes, were detected in some megakaryocytes. (author)

  2. MR imaging of marrow heterotopia in the hemoglobinopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakadas, S.; Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.D.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    The MR imaging findings of marrow heterotopia in the costovertebral angles in patients with various hemoglobinopathies are presented. There was good correlation between the MR imaging findings and the appearance of the masses on conventional radiography or CT. The masses were of low signal intensity, similar to the signal intensity of the adjacent marrow of the thoracic spine, and surrounded by a high-intensity rim attributed to a layer of fat surrounding the masses. The latter finding is thought to be characteristic of marrow heterotopia masses. MR imaging may also reveal potential intrusion of marrow heterotopia into the spinal canal, thus eliminating the need for myelography

  3. Bone marrow scintigraphy with 111In-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Masayasu; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    1977-01-01

    111 In-chloride as a useful bone marrow-scanning agent has been used for various hematological diseases. We also have studied the distribution of indium-111 by scintigraphy in 28 patients with systemic hematopoietic disorders and other: 4 with aplastic anemia, 8 with leucemia, 3 with iron-deficiency anemia, one with pernicious anemia, 2 with myelofibrosis, 3 with multiple myeloma, one with malignant lymphoma, 3 with liver cirrhosis or Banti-syndrome and 3 with seminoma received post operative irradiation. The results of scintigraphy (the image of bone marrow, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine) were compared with bone marrow biopsies, ferrokinetic data and Se.I./TIBC. The bone marrow image was interpreted on a three-point scale: normal distribution of activity (+), abnormal distribution (+-), body back ground level (-). In the cases of iron-deficiency anemia and pernicious anemia with hyperplastic erythroid marrow, regardless of its severe anemia, the scintigrams showed clearly delineated bone marrow images and normal organ distribution of indium. On the other hand, the scan images revealed severe suppressions of bone marrow activity and markedly increased renal activity in some cases of aplastic anemia, acute leucemia and malignant lymphoma with hypoplastic and/or tumour-cell infiltrative marrows. Thus, it may be said that the bone marrow uptake of indium-111 correlates well with the degree of erythroid elements, no correlation with nucleated cell counts, and there is a strong tendency to increased renal activity in the cases of markedly decreased erythropoietic cell counts. (auth.)

  4. Reversal of acute (''malignant'') myelosclerosis by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.L.; Spruce, W.E.; Bearman, R.M.; Forman, S.J.; Scott, E.P.; Fahey, J. L.; Farbstein, M.J.; Rappaport, H.; Blume, K.G.

    1982-01-01

    A 28-yr-old woman with acute malignant myelosclerosis received, as primary treatment, ablative chemotherapy and total body radiation therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation from her histocompatible brother. The patient is now well more than 15 mo after bone marrow transplantation, with normal peripheral blood counts, a normal bone marrow, no evidence of graft-versus-host disease, and is on no therapy. In light of the poor results obtained with conventional chemotherapy in this disease, bone marrow transplantation may represent the treatment of choice for patients who have an appropriate donor

  5. Evaluation of Functional Marrow Irradiation Based on Skeletal Marrow Composition Obtained Using Dual-Energy Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magome, Taiki [Department of Radiological Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Komazawa University, Tokyo (Japan); Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Froelich, Jerry [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Takahashi, Yutaka [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Arentsen, Luke [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Holtan, Shernan; Verneris, Michael R. [Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Brown, Keenan [Mindways Software Inc, Austin, Texas (United States); Haga, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer L. [College of Medicine, Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Giebel, Sebastian [Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Comprehensive Cancer Center M. Curie-Sklodowska Memorial Institute, Gliwice (Poland); Wong, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, California (United States); Dusenbery, Kathryn [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hui, Susanta K., E-mail: shui@coh.org [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, California (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging method to characterize and map marrow composition in the entire skeletal system, and to simulate differential targeted marrow irradiation based on marrow composition. Methods and Materials: Whole-body dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images of cadavers and leukemia patients were acquired, segmented to separate bone marrow components, namely, bone, red marrow (RM), and yellow marrow (YM). DECT-derived marrow fat fraction was validated using histology of lumbar vertebrae obtained from cadavers. The fractions of RM (RMF = RM/total marrow) and YMF were calculated in each skeletal region to assess the correlation of marrow composition with sites and ages. Treatment planning was simulated to target irradiation differentially at a higher dose (18 Gy) to either RM or YM and a lower dose (12 Gy) to the rest of the skeleton. Results: A significant correlation between fat fractions obtained from DECT and cadaver histology samples was observed (r=0.861, P<.0001, Pearson). The RMF decreased in the head, neck, and chest was significantly inversely correlated with age but did not show any significant age-related changes in the abdomen and pelvis regions. Conformity of radiation to targets (RM, YM) was significantly dependent on skeletal sites. The radiation exposure was significantly reduced (P<.05, t test) to organs at risk (OARs) in RM and YM irradiation compared with standard total marrow irradiation (TMI). Conclusions: Whole-body DECT offers a new imaging technique to visualize and measure skeletal-wide marrow composition. The DECT-based treatment planning offers volumetric and site-specific precise radiation dosimetry of RM and YM, which varies with aging. Our proposed method could be used as a functional compartment of TMI for further targeted radiation to specific bone marrow environment, dose escalation, reduction of doses to OARs, or a combination of these factors.

  6. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell

  7. CXCR7 maintains osteosarcoma invasion after CXCR4 suppression in bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Wu, Chunlei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Na

    2017-05-01

    The major cause of death in osteosarcoma is the invasion and metastasis. Better understanding of the molecular mechanism of osteosarcoma invasion is essential in developing effective tumor-suppressive therapies. Interaction between chemokine receptors plays a crucial role in regulating osteosarcoma invasion. Here, we investigated the relationship between CXCR7 and CXCR4 in osteosarcoma invasion induced by bone marrow microenvironment. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with osteosarcoma cells to mimic actual bone marrow microenvironment. Osteosarcoma cell invasion and CXCL12/CXCR4 activation were observed within this co-culture model. Interestingly, in this co-culture model, osteosarcoma cell invasion was not inhibited by suppressing CXCR4 expression with neutralizing antibody or specific inhibitor AMD3100. Downstream signaling extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were not significantly affected by CXCR4 inhibition. However, suppressing CXCR4 led to CXCR7 upregulation. Constitutive expression of CXCR7 could maintain osteosarcoma cell invasion when CXCR4 was suppressed. Simultaneously, inhibiting CXCR4 and CXCR7 compromised osteosarcoma invasion in co-culture system and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signals. Moreover, bone marrow microenvironment, not CXCL12 alone, is required for CXCR7 activation after CXCR4 suppression. Taken together, suppressing CXCR4 is not enough to impede osteosarcoma invasion in bone marrow microenvironment since CXCR7 is activated to sustain invasion. Therefore, inhibiting both CXCR4 and CXCR7 could be a promising strategy in controlling osteosarcoma invasion.

  8. Bone Marrow Regeneration Promoted by Biophysically Sorted Osteoprogenitors From Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited s