WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic welding machines

  1. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  2. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  3. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    a safe and statically admissible stress distribution is established. The plasticity solutions are compared with tests carried out at the Engineering Academy of Denmark, Lyngby, in the early nineties, and old fillet weld tests. The new failure conditions are in very good agreement with the yield load......This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...... tests, but not so good agreement with the old failure load tests....

  4. Machine for welding solar cell connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorans, D.Y.

    1977-08-09

    A machine for welding a connection wire over a solar cell electrode is described which comprises a base, a welding mount for the solar cell which is supported on the base, means for holding the solar cell on the welding mount, welding electrodes, means to lower the welding electrodes over the solar cell and the connection wire superimposed thereon, means for applying electric current pulses to said welding electrodes. It is characterized by the fact that it further comprises means for imparting to said mount an alternating transverse movement in relation to said base before and during the welding operation.

  5. Welding process automation in power machine building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'bard, S.N.; Shakhnov, A.F.; Shergov, I.V.

    1977-01-01

    The level of welding automation operations in power engineering and ways of its enhancement are highlighted. Used as the examples of comlex automation are an apparatus for the horizontal welding of turbine rotors, remotely controlled automatic machine for welding ring joint of large-sized vessels, equipment for the electron-beam welding of steam turbine assemblies of alloyed steels. The prospects of industrial robots are noted. The importance of the complex automation of technological process, including stocking, assemblying, transportation and auxiliary operations, is emphasized

  6. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  7. Testing and Modeling of Machine Properties in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei

    The objective of this work has been to test and model the machine properties including the mechanical properties and the electrical properties in resistance welding. The results are used to simulate the welding process more accurately. The state of the art in testing and modeling machine properties...... as real projection welding tests, is easy to realize in industry, since tests may be performed in situ. In part II, an approach of characterizing the electrical properties of AC resistance welding machines is presented, involving testing and mathematical modelling of the weld current, the firing angle...... in resistance welding has been described based on a comprehensive literature study. The present thesis has been subdivided into two parts: Part I: Mechanical properties of resistance welding machines. Part II: Electrical properties of resistance welding machines. In part I, the electrode force in the squeeze...

  8. Plastic properties of weld after micro-jet cooling

    OpenAIRE

    J. Piwnik; D. Hadryś; G. Skorulski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: of that paper was analysing main plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling. The main reason of it was investigate possibilities of getting better plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling than welds made by ordinary welding method. It is possible because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in WMD (weld metal deposit) is obtained in MIG method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary welding method.Design/methodology/app...

  9. Identification of Mechanical parameters for Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical dynamic responses of resistance welding machine have a significant influence on weld quality and electrode service life, it must be considered when the real welding production is carried out or the welding process is simulated. The mathematical models for characterizing the mechanical...

  10. Characterisation of Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    characterizing the dynamic mechanical characteristics of resistance welding machines is suggested, and a test set-up is designed determining the basic, independent machine parameters required in the model. The model is verified by performing a series of mechanical tests as well as real projection welds.......The dynamic mechanical properties of a resistance welding machine have significant influence on weld quality, which must be considered when simulating the welding process numerically. However, due to the complexity of the machine structure and the mutual coupling of components of the machine system......, it is very difficult to measure or calculate the basic, independent machine parameters required in a mathematical model of the machine dynamics, and no test method has so far been presented in literature, which can be applied directly in an industrial environment. In this paper, a mathematical model...

  11. Control system of power supply for resistance welding machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Костянтинівна Поднебенна

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the existing methods of heat energy stabilizing, which are realized in thyristor power supplies for resistance welding machines. The advantages and features of thyristor power supplies have been described. A control system of power supply for resistance welding machine with stabilization of heat energy in a welding spot has been developed. Measurements are performed in primary winding of a welding transformer. Weld spot heating energy is calculated as the difference between the energy, consumed from the mains, and the energy losses in the primary and secondary circuits of the welding transformer as well as the energy losses in the transformer core. Algorithms of digital signal processing of the developed control system are described in the article. All measurements and calculations are preformed automatically in real-time. Input signals to the control system are: transformer primary voltage and current, temperature of the welding circuit. The designed control system ensures control of the welding heat energy and is not influenced by the supply voltage and impedance changes caused by insertion of the ferromagnetic mass in the welding circuit, the temperature change during the welding process. The developed control system for resistance welding machine makes it possible to improve the quality of welded joints, increase the efficiency of the resistance welding machine

  12. Testing and Modeling of Mechanical Characteristics of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for both upper and lower electrode systems. This has laid a foundation for modeling the welding process and selecting the welding parameters considering the machine factors. The method is straightforward and easy to be applied in industry since the whole procedure is based on tests with no requirements......The dynamic mechanical response of resistance welding machine is very important to the weld quality in resistance welding especially in projection welding when collapse or deformation of work piece occurs. It is mainly governed by the mechanical parameters of machine. In this paper, a mathematical...... model for characterizing the dynamic mechanical responses of machine and a special test set-up called breaking test set-up are developed. Based on the model and the test results, the mechanical parameters of machine are determined, including the equivalent mass, damping coefficient, and stiffness...

  13. Equipment for welding of details and joints of plastic pipes in work shop conditions and at pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doronin, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A range of welding machines for operation in workshop conditions and at pipelines is presented. Set of welding equipment for mobile shop, producing prototypes, and mobile facility are developed. In 1989 they will provide the whole operation cycle of production and mounting of details and units of plastic tubes and will enable to organize the centralized production of welded and shaped details in the branch, thus excluding the shortage of these details. 8 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Prediction of residual stress distributions due to surface machining and welding and crack growth simulation under residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Katsuyama, JInya; Onizawa, Kunio; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual stress distributions due to welding and machining are evaluated by XRD and FEM. → Residual stress due to machining shows higher tensile stress than welding near the surface. → Crack growth analysis is performed using calculated residual stress. → Crack growth result is affected machining rather than welding. → Machining is an important factor for crack growth. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the weld zone of the core shroud and primary loop recirculation (PLR) pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel Type 316L. The joining process of pipes usually includes surface machining and welding. Both processes induce residual stresses, and residual stresses are thus important factors in the occurrence and propagation of SCC. In this study, the finite element method (FEM) was used to estimate residual stress distributions generated by butt welding and surface machining. The thermoelastic-plastic analysis was performed for the welding simulation, and the thermo-mechanical coupled analysis based on the Johnson-Cook material model was performed for the surface machining simulation. In addition, a crack growth analysis based on the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculation was performed using the calculated residual stress distributions that are generated by welding and surface machining. The surface machining analysis showed that tensile residual stress due to surface machining only exists approximately 0.2 mm from the machined surface, and the surface residual stress increases with cutting speed. The crack growth analysis showed that the crack depth is affected by both surface machining and welding, and the crack length is more affected by surface machining than by welding.

  15. FRICTION - WELDING MACHINE AUTOMATIC CONTROL CIRCUIT DESIGN AND APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan ATEŞ; Ramazan BAYINDIR

    2003-01-01

    In this work, automatic controllability of a laboratory-sized friction-welding machine has been investigated. The laboratory-sized friction-welding machine was composed of motor, brake, rotary and constant samples late pliers, and hydraulic unit. In automatic method, welding parameters such as friction time, friction pressure, forge time and forge pressure can be applied sensitively using time relays and contactors. At the end of the experimental study it's observed that automatic control sys...

  16. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented. PMID:29562635

  17. Machining of Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caggiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are difficult to machine because of the anisotropy and inhomogeneity characterizing their microstructure and the abrasiveness of their reinforcement components. During machining, very rapid cutting tool wear development is experienced, and surface integrity damage is often produced in the machined parts. An accurate selection of the proper tool and machining conditions is therefore required, taking into account that the phenomena responsible for material removal in cutting of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are fundamentally different from those of conventional metals and their alloys. To date, composite materials are increasingly used in several manufacturing sectors, such as the aerospace and automotive industry, and several research efforts have been spent to improve their machining processes. In the present review, the key issues that are concerning the machining of fibre reinforced plastic composite materials are discussed with reference to the main recent research works in the field, while considering both conventional and unconventional machining processes and reporting the more recent research achievements. For the different machining processes, the main results characterizing the recent research works and the trends for process developments are presented.

  18. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components. The...

  19. Development of a Plastic Recycling Machine

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Daniyan,

    2017-01-01

    Plastics are not degradable materials, therefore improper disposal after use constitute environmental problem. The developed plastic recycler was fabricated using 1.5 mm mild metal sheet punched and rolled into cylindrical form. The outer peeling drum was punched inward and fixed to the machine frame while the inner peeling drum was punched outward. The inner drum was constructed using 1.5 mm galvanized metal sheet while the die was constructed using carbon steel. It has an outer diameter of ...

  20. The Effect Of Different Micro-Jet Streams Number On Plastic Properties Of Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of welds made with micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Moreover, it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. During research Erichsen cupping tests and bending tests were carried out for welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling. Argon was cooling medium. Different numbers of micro-jet streams were used to weld cooling. Different plastic properties were obtained for different numbers of micro-jet streams. In this research welds made by new method of welding (welding with micro-jet cooling were compared with welds made by ordinary welding method.

  1. FRICTION - WELDING MACHINE AUTOMATIC CONTROL CIRCUIT DESIGN AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan ATEŞ

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, automatic controllability of a laboratory-sized friction-welding machine has been investigated. The laboratory-sized friction-welding machine was composed of motor, brake, rotary and constant samples late pliers, and hydraulic unit. In automatic method, welding parameters such as friction time, friction pressure, forge time and forge pressure can be applied sensitively using time relays and contactors. At the end of the experimental study it's observed that automatic control system has been worked successfully.

  2. An experimental study on joining of severe plastic deformed aluminium materials with friction welding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Mumin [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)], E-mail: mumins@trakya.edu.tr; Erol Akata, H.; Ozel, Kaan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, 5083 aluminium alloys, which were exposed to severe plastic deformation, were joined with friction welding method and the variation in mechanical properties of the joints was experimentally investigated. Severe plastic deformation methods can be classified as equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) (in other words, equal cross section lateral extrusion - ECSLE) and cyclic extrusion-compression. Aluminium alloy as test material 5083 and square cross-sectional equal channel angular pressing die for severe plastic deformation were used in the study. Firstly 5083 alloys, as purchased, were joined with friction welding method. The optimum parameters for friction time, upset time, friction pressure and upset pressure, which are necessary for welding, were obtained. Afterwards, 5083 aluminium materials as purchased were prepared as square cross-section and then 1-pass severe plastic deformation was applied to specimen by equal channel angular pressing die. The obtained parts as square form were prepared as cylindrical form by machining and then the parts were joined by continuous drive friction welding equipment that was designed and produced in laboratory conditions before. Later, the tensile strengths of the parts, obtained at optimum conditions, were compared with those of the joined parts as purchased form. Then, hardness variations and microstructures of joints were examined. Finally, the obtained results were commented on.

  3. The Effect Of Different Micro-Jet Streams Number On Plastic Properties Of Welds

    OpenAIRE

    Hadryś D.; Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of welds made with micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Moreover, it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. During research Erichsen cupping tests and bending tests were carried out for welds made by MIG method with micro-...

  4. Cyclic Plastic Deformation and Welding Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Horn, C.H.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the concerns of a fitness for purpose analysis is the quantification of the relevant material properties. It is known from experiments that the mechanical properties of a material can change due to a monotonic plastic deformation or a cyclic plastic deformation. For a fitness for purpose

  5. Plastic collapse moment for pipe repaired with weld overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Hasegawa, Kunio; Shibuya, Akira; Deardorff, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    The Weld Overlay has been used in several countries as an effective method to repair the stress corrosion cracks in nuclear power plant piping. However, the method to evaluate the plastic collapse stress for the pipe repaired with Weld Overlay has not been proposed and the limit load criterion for single uniform material has been used to design its structure by now. In this paper, the equations to evaluate the plastic collapse moment for the pipe repaired with Weld Overlay have been derived considering two layer materials. Moreover, several numerical examples are given to show the validity of Weld Overlay. The equations given in this paper are simple to use like the limit load criterion showed in present standards such as JSME Rules on Fitness-for-Service for Nuclear Power Plants or ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, and they can not only be used to evaluate the fracture of the pipe, but also be applied to design the weld structure. (author)

  6. Welding and brazing of the JET machine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walravens, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The report covers the techniques used for joining the various parts of the machine. The difficulties encountered during the welding and brazing of similar and dissimilar metals are underlined and the solutions adopted to solve them are indicated. The vast experience gained by those involved in the processes of joining the various parts of the JET machine components, and the lessons learnt are summarized in this report. (author)

  7. Guarantee of reliability of devices complexes for plastic tube welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskresenskij, L.A.; Zajtsev, A.I.; Nelyubov, V.I.; Fedorov, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Results of calculations and experimental studies on providing reliability of complex for plastic tube welding are presented. Choice of reliability indeces and standards is based. Reliability levels of components are determined. The most waded details are calculated. It is shown that they meet the reqrurements of strength and reliability. Service life tests supported the correct choice of springs. Recommendations on elevating reliability are given. Directions of further developments are shown. 8 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  8. A Method for Identifying the Mechanical Parameters in Resistance Spot Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical dynamic responses of resistance welding machine have a significant influence on weld quality and electrode service life, it must be considered when the real welding production is carried out or the welding process is stimulated. The mathematical models for characterizing the mechanical...

  9. Present and future of laser welding machine; Laser yosetsuki no genjo to tenbo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniu, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes recent trends of laser welding machine. For CO2 laser welding machine, seam weld of large diameter weld pipes using a 25 kW-class machine, and plate weld of steel plate using a 45 kW-class machine are reported. For YAG laser welding machine, high-output 5.5 kW-class machines are commercialized. Machines with slab structure of plate-like YAG chrystal have been developed which show high-oscillation efficiency and can be applied to cutting. Machines have been developed in which YAG laser output with slab structure is transmitted through GI fiber. High-speed welding of aluminum alloys can be realized by improving the converging performance. Efficiency of YAG laser can be enhanced through the time-divided utilization by switching the beam transmission path using fiber change-over switch. In the automobile industry, CO2 laser is mainly used, and a system combining CO laser with articulate robot is realized. TIG and MIG welding is often used for welding of aluminum for railway vehicles. It is required to reduce the welding strain. In the iron and steel industry, the productivity has been improved by the laser welding. YAG laser is put into practice for nuclear reactors. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Single-purpose welding machines used in the manufacture of power equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, J.

    1988-01-01

    A dedicated welding machine based on submerged arc welding with a wire electrode was developed for welding pipe sockets, spacers and other rotary parts to pressure vessel bodies. Two modifications of this apparatus were devised: one is designed for welding low-alloy carbon steels, where preheating is requisite, the other, for welding austenitic materials, requiring vigorous cooling. The single-purpose ADFS-1 device is designed for surfacing rings 200 to 1200 mm in diameter; it consists of a pillar with a drive, a rotary console, a collector, a horizontal support, a console with a vertical motor support, and a welding head with a feed equipment. Submerged arc welding using a 20x0.5 mm strip electrode is applied. Another dedicated welding machine employing submerged arc welding with a strip electrode was developed for the continuous welding of inner surfaces of pressure vessels in the sites of holes for flares. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 3 refs

  11. Welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems using fundamental- and higher-resonance frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hongoh, Misugi; Yoshikuni, Masafumi; Hashii, Hidekazu; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2004-04-01

    The welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems that are driven at only the fundamental-resonance frequency vibration were compared, and also those of the welding systems that were driven at the fundamental and several higher resonance frequencies simultaneously were studied. At high frequency, welding characteristics can be improved due to the larger vibration loss of plastic materials. For welding of rather thin or small specimens, as the fundamental frequency of these welding systems is higher and the numbers of driven higher frequencies are driven simultaneously, larger welded area and weld strength were obtained.

  12. Hybrid friction stir welding for dissimilar materials through electro-plastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun; Lan, Shuhuai; Ni, Jun

    2018-05-29

    A hybrid Friction Stir Welding approach and device for dissimilar materials joining employing Electro-Plastic Effect. The approach and device include an introduction of high density, short period current pulses into traditional friction stir welding process, which therefore can generate a localized softened zone in the workpiece during plastic stirring without significant additional temperature increase. This material softened zone is created by high density current pulses based on Electro-Plastic Effect and will move along with the friction stir welding tool. Smaller downward force, larger processing window and better joint quality for dissimilar materials are expected to be achieved through this hybrid welding technique.

  13. A neutron diffraction study of residual stress and plastic strain in welded beryllium rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.W.; Varma, R.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Holden, T.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ely, T.; Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    We present a study of residual stresses associated with the welding of beryllium rings. Using novel analysis techniques, information about residual stresses and plastic deformation of the base metal were obtained. In the post-welded state, the rings have a strong tensile circumferential residual stress and show evidence of significant plastic deformation. (orig.)

  14. Design of reinforcement welding machine within steel framework for marine engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    In this project, a design scheme that reinforcement welding machine is added within the steel framework is proposed according to the double-side welding technology for box-beam structure in marine engineering. Then the design and development of circuit and transmission mechanism for new welding equipment are completed as well with one sample machine being made. Moreover, the trial running is finished finally. Main technical parameters of the equipment are: the working stroke: ≥1500mm, the welding speed: 8˜15cm/min and the welding sheet thickness: ≥20mm.

  15. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding accelerated by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  16. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to multi-pass welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  17. X-ray evaluation of residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yuu; Okano, Shigetaka; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    The excessive tensile residual stress generated by welding after surface machining may be an important factor to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nuclear power plants. Therefore we need to understand and control the residual stress distribution appropriately. In this study, residual stress distributions within surface machined layer generated by surface machining and sequential welding were evaluated by X-ray diffraction method. Depth directional distributions were also investigated by electrolytic polishing. In addition, to consider the effect of work hardened layer on the residual stress distributions, we also measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) obtained from X-ray diffraction. Testing material was a low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type SUS316L. Test specimens were prepared by surface machining with different cutting conditions. Then, bead-on-plate welding under the same welding condition was carried out on the test specimens with different surface machined layer. As a result, the tensile residual stress generated by surface machining increased with increasing cutting speed and showed nearly uniform distributions on the surface. Furthermore, the tensile residual stress drastically decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Then, the residual stress approached 0 MPa after the compressive value showed. FWHM also decreased drastically with increasing measurement depth and almost constant value from a certain depth, which was almost equal regardless of the machining condition, within surface machined layer in all specimens. After welding, the transverse distribution of the longitudinal residual stress varied in the area apart from the weld center according to machining conditions and had a maximum value in heat affected zone. The magnitude of the maximum residual stress was almost equal regardless of the machining condition and decreased with increasing measurement depth within surface machined layer. Finally, the

  18. Automatic reel controls filler wire in welding machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, A. V.

    1966-01-01

    Automatic reel on automatic welding equipment takes up slack in the reel-fed filler wire when welding operation is terminated. The reel maintains constant, adjustable tension on the wire during the welding operation and rewinds the wire from the wire feed unit when the welding is completed.

  19. The machines maintenance conditions assessment in the plastic industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Borkowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose, methodology, main findings, the originality of the subject area (research, way of using. The main research analysis purpose is a presentation, an assessment and an interpretation of the research findings on the machines maintenance conditions in the plastic industry. The research analysis was carried out with applying Technology ABC method and TPM coefficients calculations connected with Techno pak machine components maintenance. The research was carried out in the chosen manufacturing enterprise of the plastic industry. Research findings interpretation results have been introduced in the analyzed enterprise in the form of the manufacturing processes improvement.

  20. Determination of Machining Parameters of Corn Byproduct Filled Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a collaborative project between the USDA and Northern Illinois University, the use of ethanol corn processing by-products as bio-filler materials in the compression molding of phenolic plastics has been studied. This paper reports on the results of a machinability study in the milling of various ...

  1. Determining Machining Parameters of Corn Byproduct Filled Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a collaborative project between the USDA and Northern Illinois University, the use of corn ethanol processing byproducts (i.e., DDGS) as bio-filler materials in the compression molding of phenolic plastics has been studied. This paper reports on the results of a machinability study in the milling...

  2. On the issue of particularities of design and simulation of welded constructions of machine's basic parts

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaylov, V.; Porhynov, S.

    2010-01-01

    In current conditions of machine industry competitive strength of firms effectively to make the process equipment has an essential value. It predetermines the necessity of wide application of welded constructions of machine tools basic parts. The solution of this task involves development o technique permitting to calculate and optimize the basic parts of machine tools depending on conditions in each case. In the present paper the results of research of deflected mode of machine tool basic pa...

  3. 7 CFR 58.318 - Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.318 Butter, frozen or plastic cream melting machines. Shavers, shredders or melting machines used for rapid melting of butter, frozen or plastic cream shall be of...

  4. Diode Lasers used in Plastic Welding and Selective Laser Soldering - Applications and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinl, S.

    Aside from conventional welding methods, laser welding of plastics has established itself as a proven bonding method. The component-conserving and clean process offers numerous advantages and enables welding of sensitive assemblies in automotive, electronic, medical, human care, food packaging and consumer electronics markets. Diode lasers are established since years within plastic welding applications. Also, soft soldering using laser radiation is becoming more and more significant in the field of direct diode laser applications. Fast power controllability combined with a contactless temperature measurement to minimize thermal damage make the diode laser an ideal tool for this application. These advantages come in to full effect when soldering of increasingly small parts in temperature sensitive environments is necessary.

  5. Effectiveness of Podcasts as Laboratory Instructional Support: Learner Perceptions of Machine Shop and Welding Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Louis Dee

    2014-01-01

    Machine shop students face the daunting task of learning the operation of complex three-dimensional machine tools, and welding students must develop specific motor skills in addition to understanding the complexity of material types and characteristics. The use of consumer technology by the Millennial generation of vocational students, the…

  6. Computerised weld strength testing machine for PHWR fuel elements with a versatile control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, U.C.; Sastry, V.S.; Rasheed, Jawad; Bibawe, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Spacer pads and bearing pads are resistance spot welded on PHWR fuel elements to ensure inter-element gap for coolant flow. These welds are subjected to destructive tests as per SQC specifications while qualifying a machine and during production. The testing machine used earlier over the years was tedious involving manual operations of clamping, tool actuation, increasing and decreasing the pressure, referring to charts and statistical calculations. To carry out the destructive testing of the welds conveniently and reliably, an automatic machine is developed in-house in which are incorporated a quartz force transducer and a computerized data-acquisition and processing system together with a very versatile electronic control system based on a single-chip microcomputer. This paper describes the salient features of the machine and the control system. (author). 4 figs

  7. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  8. Optimizing friction stir weld parameters of aluminum and copper using conventional milling machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisegaran, Lohappriya V.; Ahmad, Nurainaa Ayuni; Nazri, Nurnadhirah; Noor, Amirul Syafiq Mohd; Ramachandran, Vignesh; Ismail, Muhammad Tarmizizulfika; Ahmad, Ku Zarina Ku; Daruis, Dian Darina Indah

    2018-05-01

    The joining of two of any particular materials through friction stir welding (FSW) are done by a rotating tool and the work piece material that generates heat which causes the region near the FSW tool to soften. This in return will mechanically intermix the work pieces. The first objective of this study is to join aluminum plates and copper plates by means of friction stir welding process using self-fabricated tools and conventional milling machine. This study also aims to investigate the optimum process parameters to produce the optimum mechanical properties of the welding joints for Aluminum plates and Copper plates. A suitable tool bit and a fixture is to be fabricated for the welding process. A conventional milling machine will be used to weld the aluminum and copper. The most important parameters to enable the process are speed and pressure of the tool (or tool design and alignment of the tool onto the work piece). The study showed that the best surface finish was produced from speed of 1150 rpm and tool bit tilted to 3°. For a 200mm × 100mm Aluminum 6061 with plate thickness of 2 mm at a speed of 1 mm/s, the time taken to complete the welding is only 200 seconds or equivalent to 3 minutes and 20 seconds. The Copper plates was successfully welded using FSW with tool rotation speed of 500 rpm, 700 rpm, 900 rpm, 1150 rpm and 1440 rpm and with welding traverse rate of 30 mm/min, 60 mm/min and 90 mm/min. As the conclusion, FSW using milling machine can be done on both Aluminum and Copper plates, however the weld parameters are different for the two types of plates.

  9. Remote machining and robotic welding in a proton cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, W; Mark, C

    1984-09-01

    Increasing residual radiation in the TRIUMF meson research facility cyclotron at the University of British Columbia has required development of a remotely operable industrial robot cutting and vacuum tight welding capabili

  10. A reliability-based preventive maintenance methodology for the projection spot welding machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayzimatov Ulugbek

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available An effective operations of a projection spot welding (PSW machine is closely related to the effec-tiveness of the maintenance. Timely maintenance can prevent failures and improve reliability and maintainability of the machine. Therefore, establishing the maintenance frequency for the welding machine is one of the most important tasks for plant engineers. In this regard, reliability analysis of the welding machine can be used to establish preventive maintenance intervals (PMI and to identify the critical parts of the system. In this reliability and maintainability study, analysis of the PSW machine was carried out. The failure and repair data for analysis were obtained from automobile manufacturing company located in Uzbekistan. The machine was divided into three main sub-systems: electrical, pneumatic and hydraulic. Different distributions functions for all sub-systems was tested and their parameters tabulated. Based on estimated parameters of the analyzed distribu-tions, PMI for the PSW machines sub-systems at different reliability levels was calculated. Finally, preventive measures for enhancing the reliability of the PSW machine sub-systems are suggested.

  11. Effect of processing conditions on residual stress distributions by bead-on-plate welding after surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    Residual stress is important factor for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) that has been observed near the welded zone in nuclear power plants. Especially, surface residual stress is significant for SCC initiation. In the joining processes of pipes, butt welding is conducted after surface machining. Residual stress is generated by both processes, and residual stress distribution due to surface machining is varied by the subsequent butt welding. In previous paper, authors reported that residual stress distribution generated by bead on plate welding after surface machining has a local maximum residual stress near the weld metal. The local maximum residual stress shows approximately 900 MPa that exceeds the stress threshold for SCC initiation. Therefore, for the safety improvement of nuclear power plants, a study on the local maximum residual stress is important. In this study, the effect of surface machining and welding conditions on residual stress distribution generated by welding after surface machining was investigated. Surface machining using lathe machine and bead on plate welding with tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc under various conditions were conducted for plate specimens made of SUS316L. Then, residual stress distributions were measured by X-ray diffraction method (XRD). As a result, residual stress distributions have the local maximum residual stress near the weld metal in all specimens. The values of the local maximum residual stresses are almost the same. The location of the local maximum residual stress is varied by welding condition. It could be consider that the local maximum residual stress is generated by same generation mechanism as welding residual stress in surface machined layer that has high yield stress. (author)

  12. Research on TIG weld machine of the upper side ring slot of Gd-rod technology reconstruct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shixiang; Lan Zhibing; Cui Quhu

    2010-01-01

    The research on TIG weld machine of the upper side ring slot of Gd-rod existent matter: seal electrical source got up difficulty; control system had graveness aging; space between was adjusted precision lowness; welding torch lay mode and structure were not in reason. carried through all around technology reconstruct: had chosen the best of TIG weld machine; designed ignite arc device, designed optics imaging device, designed tungsten mighty axis direction auto conditioning, was provided with arc slot, adopted PLC to control the whole system and realization auto control. After TIG weld machine of the upper side ring slot of Gd-rod technology reconstruct research , provided with arc slot the first time in the Gd-rod of nuclear fuel, optimized the weld technics, improved welding line melt width and deep equality, stability, and great breadth advanced nuclear fuel product line technology and throughput. (authors)

  13. Remote machining and robotic welding in a proton cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, W.; Mark, C.

    1984-01-01

    Increasing residual radiation in the TRIUMF meson research facility cyclotron at the University of British Columbia has required development of a remotely operable industrial robot cutting and vacuum tight welding capability for modification and updating of vacuum tank access ports, and for possible repairs of leaks or holes in the vacuum tank periphery

  14. Design of parallel intersector weld/cut robot for machining processes in ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki; Kovanen, Janne; Rouvinen, Asko; Hannukainen, Petri; Saira, Tanja; Jones, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new parallel robot Penta-WH, which has five degrees of freedom driven by hydraulic cylinders. The manipulator has a large, singularity-free workspace and high stiffness and it acts as a transport device for welding, machining and inspection end-effectors inside the ITER vacuum vessel. The presented kinematic structure of a parallel robot is particularly suitable for the ITER environment. Analysis of the machining process for ITER, such as the machining methods and forces are given, and the kinematic analyses, such as workspace and force capacity are discussed

  15. Decreasing the Functioning Consumptions of Plastics Injection Moulding Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilache, V.; Vasilache, M.; Vasilache, A.

    2017-06-01

    A share of about 75% in the cost of a plastic moulded part is held by the energy consumption of the injection machine. It is the heating system of the plasticising unit which is responsible for the energophague character of the process. The transfer rate from the heating elements to the plasticising cylinder depends hardly on the geometry of the system. A new heating system is designed, replacing the classical systems which are applied on the exterior of the cylinder with an “engrooved system”. Proposed heating system leads to decreasing of energy consumption up to 30 % and maintenance costs up to 10 %. A supplementary possibility to decrease the maintenance costs is to modify the geometry of the injection torpedo. The proposed geometry eliminates the possibility of any breaking or gripping related to the injection torpedo.

  16. Precision Machining When Cutting with Leading Plastic Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Yaroslavtseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keeping up the product competitiveness continually requires solving the problems of reducing time for product creation and material costs for its production and ensuring the maximum conformity of the product quality with the individual requirements of a particular consumer. It is especially difficult to implement these tasks in product manufacturing from the hard-to-machine steels and alloys with extremely low production rate in machining (often 10-20 times lower than when cutting the ordinary structural steels.Currently, one of the promising ways to improve the cutting process of hard-to-machine materials and quality of parts made from these materials is development and application of combined processing methods, which use additional energy sources to act on the machined material in the cutting zone. A BMSTU-developed cutting method with leading plastic deformation (LPD, which acts to raise the production rate, gain the cutting tool-life, reduce the surface roughness, improve the accuracy of processing and the performance characteristics of products, ensure the reliable flow chip control, and improve the labor conditions, belongs to such sort of methods.One of the most important indicators of processing quality that has a great impact on the operation and cost characteristics of the product and on the machining rate as well is the accuracy of processing. In cutting, the processing errors largely arise from the elastic deformations of a technological system when the cutting force, and, in particular, the radial component of the cutting force, acts on it.The deforming devices, used in cutting with LPD, being located as a rule, on the diametrically opposite side with respect to the cutting zone, act on the technological system as vibration dampers. In addition, as studies have shown, the choice of a rational direction for applying LPD load helps to compensate partially or completely the cutting force radial component effect on the technological

  17. One-step femtosecond laser welding and internal machining of three glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hua; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, it demonstrated one-step femtosecond laser welding and internal machining of three fused silica substrates in the optical- and non-optical-contact regimes by focusing 1030-nm laser pulses at the middle of the second substrate. Focusing laser pulses within the second glass in optical-contact and non-optical-contact samples induces permanent internal structural modification, leading to the three glass substrates bonding together simultaneously. The bonding mechanism is based on the internal modification of glass, and this mechanism is different from that of ordinary glass welding at the interface. Welding-spot size is affected by not only the gap distance (ablation effect) and heat transmission, but also by gravity through examining the sizes of the welding spots on the four contact welding surfaces. The maximum bonding strength of the lower interface (56.2 MPa) in the optical-contact regime is more than double that (27.6 MPa) in the non-optical-contact regime.

  18. On the Generalized Correlation Equation of Welding Current for the Tig Welding Machine Used in Nuclear Fuel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon

    1995-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fabrication, welding plays a very important role to join the end cap to the tube. In order to determine the welding current in TIG welding process for various materials, weld geometries and welding rates, the correlation between the welding current and the other parameters are needed. This paper presents the correlation of those parameters mentioned above. The proposed correlation was tested and produced satisfactory results. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  19. The Effect of Vibration during Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior, Mechanical Properties, and Machining Characteristics of Stir Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Fouladi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different methods have been applied to refine various characteristics of the zone (or nugget obtained by friction stir welding (FSW. In the current research, joining components are vibrated normal to the weld line during FSW to refine the zone microstructure. This process is described as friction stir vibration welding (FSVW. The effect of FSVW on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and machining characteristics of the zone are investigated. Al5052 alloy specimens are welded using FSW and FSVW processes and their different characteristics are compared and discussed. The results show that the strength and ductility of the welded parts increase when the vibration is applied. The outcomes also show that corrosion resistance of the nugget for FSV-welded specimens is lower than FS welded samples, and machining force of the former specimens is higher than the latter ones. These are related to smaller grain size in the zone of FSV-welded specimens compared to FS welded parts. Smaller grain size leads to a greater volume fraction of grain boundaries and, correspondingly, higher strength and hardness, as well as lower corrosion resistance.

  20. Method for strength calculating of structural elements of mobile machines for flash butt welding of rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Valeriy Moltasov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The subject of this study is the strength of the loaded units of mobile machines for flash butt welding by refining high-strength rails. The theme of the work is related to the development of a technique for strength calculating of the insulation of the central axis of these machines. The aim of the paper is to establish the mathematical dependence of the pressure on the insulation on the magnitude of deflections of the central axis under the action of the upset force. Design/methodology/approach. Using the Mohr’s method, the displacements of the investigated sections of the central axis under the action of the upset force and the equivalent load distributed along the length of the insulation were calculated. The magnitude of the load distributed along the length of the insulation equivalent to the draft force was determined from the condition that the displacements of the same cross sections are equal under the action of this load and under the action of the upset force. Results. An analytical expression for establishing the relationship between the pressure acting on the insulation and the magnitude of the upset force and the geometric dimensions of the structural elements of the machine was obtained. Based on the condition of the strength of the insulation for crushing, an analytical expression for establishing the relationship between the length of insulation and the size of the upset force, the geometric dimensions of the structural elements of the machine, and the physical and mechanical properties of the insulation material was obtained. Originality/cost. The proposed methodology was tested in the calculation and design of the K1045 mobile rail welding machine, 4 of which is currently successfully used in the USA for welding rails in hard-to-reach places.

  1. Optical design and development of a fiber coupled high-power diode laser system for laser transmission welding of plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, Eva; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Azkorbebeitia, Urko; Otaduy, Deitze; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of thermoplastics is a direct bonding technique already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobiles, microfluidics, electronics, and biomedicine. LTW evolves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic to be joined. One of the plastic pieces needs to be optically transparent to the laser radiation whereas the other part has to be absorbent, being that the radiation produced by high power diode lasers is a good alternative for this process. As consequence, a tailored laser system has been designed and developed to obtain high quality weld seams with weld widths between 0.7 and 1.4 mm. The developed laser system consists of two diode laser bars (50 W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a nonimaging solution: equalization of the beam parameter product (BPP) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of step-mirrors. The power scaling was carried out by means of a multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality was performed considering ray tracing simulation (ZEMAX) and experimental validation. The welding experiments were conducted on acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS), a thermoplastic frequently used in automotive, electronics and aircraft applications, doped with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). Quality of the weld seams on ABS was analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. Mechanical properties of weld seams were analyzed by mechanical shear tests. High quality weld seams were produced in ABS, revealing the potential of the laser developed in this work for a wide range of plastic welding applications.

  2. Influence of welding parameter on texture distribution and plastic deformation behavior of as-rolled AZ31 Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, Renlong, E-mail: rlxin@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Transmission, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Liu, Dejia; Shu, Xiaogang; Li, Bo; Yang, Xiaofang; Liu, Qing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has promising application potential for Mg alloys. However, softening was frequently occurred in FSW Mg joints because of the presence of a β-type fiber texture. The present study aims to understand the influence of texture distribution in stir zone (SZ) on deformation behavior and joint strength of FSW Mg welds. AZ31 Mg alloy joints were obtained by FSW with two sets of welding speed and rotation rate. Detailed microstructure and texture evolutions were examined on Mg welds by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that the changes of welding parameters can affect texture distribution and the characteristic of texture in the transition region between SZ and thermal-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ). As a consequence, the activation ability of basal slip and extension twinning was changed, which therefore influenced joint strength, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and fracture behaviors. The present work provided some insights into understanding the texture–property relationship in FSW Mg welds and indicated that it is effective to tailor the joint performance by texture control. - Highlights: • Welding parameters largely affect the inclination angle of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • Fracture morphology is associated with the characteristic of SZ/TMAZ boundary. • The characteristic of plastic deformation is explained from the activation of basal slip.

  3. Effect of prior machining deformation on the development of tensile residual stresses in weld-fabricated nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevey, P.S.; Mason, P.W.; Hornbach, D.J.; Molkenthin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic alloy weldments in nuclear systems may be subject to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) failure if the sum of residual and applied stresses exceeds a critical threshold. Residual stresses developed by prior machining and welding may either accelerate or retard SCC, depending on their magnitude and sign. A combined x-ray diffraction and mechanical procedure was used to determine the axial and hoop residual stress and yield strength distributions into the inside-diameter surface of a simulated Alloy 600 penetration J-welded into a reactor pressure vessel. The degree of cold working and the resulting yield strength increase caused by prior machining and weld shrinkage were calculated from the line-broadening distributions. Tensile residual stresses on the order of +700 MPa were observed in both the axial and the hoop directions at the inside-diameter surface in a narrow region adjacent to the weld heat-affected zone. Stresses exceeding the bulk yield strength were found to develop due to the combined effects of cold working of the surface layers during initial machining and subsequent weld shrinkage. The residual stress and cold work distributions produced by prior machining were found to influence strongly the final residual stress state developed after welding

  4. Surface Coating of Plastic Parts for Business Machines (Industrial Surface Coating): New Source Performance Standards (NSPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about the new source performance standards (NSPS) for surface coating of plastic parts for business machines by reading the rule summary and history and finding the code of federal regulations as well as related rules.

  5. Simulation Study on Multipassed Welding Distortion of Combined Joint Types using Thermo-Elastic-Plastic FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RN Lidam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the angular distortion induced by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW process on the combined butt and T-joint with a thickness of 9 mm. The material used in this study was low manganese carbon steel S355J2G3. A 2-D and 3-D thermo-elastic-plastic finite element (FE analysis has been developed to simulate the induced distortion of multipassed welding. In this research, SYSWELD 2010 with its computation management tool, known as multipassed welding advisor (MPA, was applied to analyze the distortion behavior of combined joint types. To model the heat source of GMAW, Goldak's double ellipsoid representation, which is available within this finite element analysis (FEA code was selected. Prior to the results discussion, this paper also shows the step-bystep procedures to simulate combined jointing which begins with metallurgical and customized heat source modeling, and is followed by creating geometrical mesh using Visual-Mesh 6.5 for analyzing and processing the results. Apart from 2-D and 3-D comparison analysis, the final objective of this research is also aimed to be a baseline study to provide preliminary information in preparing the tools and equipment for experimental investigation.

  6. Construction and final assembly of an automatic arc welding machine; Construccion y puesta a punto de una maquina automatica para soldadura remota por arco bajo atmosfera inerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Alvarez, J; Diaz Diaz, J; Diaz Diaz, J L

    1972-07-01

    It has been constructed a remote are welding machine, wholly transistorized, to be used in a Hot Cell of 1.000 Cu. In this work are presented the different parts of the equipment and its electronic description. Finally, some works of final preparation are shown such as ending of irradiation capsules, thermocouples welding, stainless steel cover welding. For these types of welding are quoted its relative programs. (Author)

  7. Optimization of the Development of a Plastic Recycling Machine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... The performance test analysis carried out defines the characteristics of the machine and shows that at a speed of 268 rpm the machine functions effectively and efficiently in performing its task producing a high finishing recycling efficiency or recyclability of 97%, takes 2 minutes to recycle a ...

  8. Machinability of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with the study of machinability of GFRP composite tubes of different fiber orientation angle vary from 300 to 900. Machining studies were carried out on an all geared lathe using three different cutting tools: namely Carbide (K-20), Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) and Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD). Experiments ...

  9. Improving productivity and quality in plastic and thin metallic plates manufacturing by using ultrasonic welding processes

    OpenAIRE

    Dehelean,D.; Oanca,O.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the research done at the Romanian National R&D Institute for Welding and Material Testing ISIM Timisoara in the field of ultrasonic process development. It starts with a general presentation of the value added by the welding sector in Europe. There are presented figures representing the size of the welding sector in Romania. The need of development of new high efficiency welding processes is mentioned, ultrasonic welding being one of the special welding proce...

  10. Finite element analysis of plastic recycling machine designed for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... design was evaluated using finite element analysis (FEA) tool in Solid Works Computer ... Also, a minimum factor of safety value of 5.3 was obtained for shredder shaft ... Machine; Design; Recycling; Sustainability; Finite Element; Simulation ...

  11. Electron-beam welding of 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) stainless steel: effect of machine parameters on weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-04-01

    The high-manganese, nitrogen-strengthened 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) austenitic stainless steel has a weldability rating similar to that of more common austenitic stainless steels in terms of cracking, porosity, etc. However, weld pool disruption problems may occur with this alloy that can be related to instability within the molten weld pool. Selection of machine parameters is critical to achieving weld pool quiescence as this report confirms from recent tests. Test samples came from heats of air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted, and electroslag remelted material. Low- and high-voltage machine parameters are discussed, and effects of parameter variation on weld pool behavior are given. Data relate weld pool behavior to weld fusion-zone geometry. Various weld parameters are recommended for the 21-6-9 alloy, regardless of its source or chemistry. (auth)

  12. Welding-induced local maximum residual stress in heat affected zone of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with machined surface layer and its influential factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Shigetaka; Ihara, Ryohei; Kanamaru, Daisuke; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of work-hardening and pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel on the welding-induced residual stress were experimentally investigated through the use of weld specimens with three different surface layers; as-cutout, mechanically-polished and electrolytically-polished. The high tensile and compressive stresses exist in the work-hardened surface layer of the as-cutout and mechanically-polished specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, no stress and work-hardened surface layer exist in the electrolytically-polished specimen. TIG bead-on-plate welding under the same welding heat input conditions was performed to introduce the residual stress into these specimens. Using these welded specimens, the distributions of welding-induced residual stress were measured by the X-ray diffraction method. Similarly, the distributions of hardness in welds were estimated by the Vickers hardness test. And then, these distributions were compared with one another. Based on the results, the residual stress in the weld metal (WM) is completely unaffected by the machined surface layer because the work-hardened surface layer disappears through the processes of melting and solidification during welding. The local maximum longitudinal tensile residual stress in the heat affected zone (HAZ) depends on the work-hardening but not on the existing stress, regardless of whether tensile or compressive, in the machined surface layer before welding. At the base metal far from WM and HAZ, the residual stress is formed by the addition of the welding-induced residual stress to the pre-existing stress in the machined surface layer before welding. The features of the welding-induced residual stress in low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with the machined surface layer and their influential factors were thus clarified. (author)

  13. finite element analysis of plastic recycling machine designed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    owing to the fact that different shapes of components are easily manufactured ... then pass them through fixed and rotary blade assembly. The developed .... (c) Low cost of production. 2.3 Material .... of the shredder shaft material, J is the polar moment of .... runs on the machine frame structural integrity, the factor of safety ...

  14. Real-Time Measurement of Machine Efficiency during Inertia Friction Welding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Daniel Joseph [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Mahaffey, David [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Senkov, Oleg [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Semiatin, Sheldon [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Zhang, Wei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Process efficiency is a crucial parameter for inertia friction welding (IFW) that is largely unknown at the present time. A new method has been developed to determine the transient profile of the IFW process efficiency by comparing the workpiece torque used to heat and deform the joint region to the total torque. Particularly, the former is measured by a torque load cell attached to the non-rotating workpiece while the latter is calculated from the deceleration rate of flywheel rotation. The experimentally-measured process efficiency for IFW of AISI 1018 steel rods is validated independently by the upset length estimated from an analytical equation of heat balance and the flash profile calculated from a finite element based thermal stress model. The transient behaviors of torque and efficiency during IFW are discussed based on the energy loss to machine bearings and the bond formation at the joint interface.

  15. Computational modeling and experimental studies of the dynamic performance of ultrasonic horn profiles used in plastic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopa Rani, M; Rudramoorthy, R

    2013-03-01

    Ultrasonic horns are tuned components designed to vibrate in a longitudinal mode at ultrasonic frequencies. Reliable performance of such horns is normally decided by the uniformity of vibration amplitude at the working surface and the stress developed during loading condition. The horn design engineer must pay particular attention to designing a tool that will produce the desired amplitude without fracturing. The present work discusses horn configurations which satisfy these criteria and investigates the design requirements of horns in ultrasonic system. Different horn profiles for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastics have been characterized in terms of displacement amplitude and von-Mises stresses using modal and harmonic analysis. To validate the simulated results, five different horns are fabricated from Aluminum, tested and tuned to the operating frequency. Standard ABS plastic parts are welded using these horns. Temperature developed during the welding of ABS test parts using different horns is recorded using sensors and National Instruments (NIs) data acquisition system. The recorded values are compared with the predicted values. Experimental results show that welding using a Bezier horn has a high interface temperature and the welded joints had higher strength as compared to the other horn profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Heterogeneities in local plastic flow behavior in a dissimilar weld between low-alloy steel and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Fanny [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Martin, Guilhem, E-mail: guilhem.martin@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Lhuissier, Pierre; Bréchet, Yves; Tassin, Catherine [Université Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, SIMAP, 38000 Grenoble (France); Roch, François [Areva NP, Tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Todeschini, Patrick [EDF R& D, Avenue des Renardières, 77250 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Simar, Aude [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (iMMC), Université catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-14

    In dissimilar welds between low-alloy steel and stainless steel, the post-weld heat-treatment results in a high variety of microstructures coexisting around the fusion line, due to carbon diffusion and carbides dissolution/precipitation. The local constitutive laws in the vicinity of the fusion zone were identified by micro tensile specimens for the sub-millimeter sized zones, equivalent bulk materials representing the decarburized layer using both wet H{sub 2} atmosphere and diffusion couple, and nano-indentation for the carburized regions (i.e. the martensitic band and the austenitic region). The decarburized zone presents only 50% of the yield strength of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and a ductility doubled. The carburized zones have a yield strength 3–5 times higher than that of the low-alloy steel heat affected zone and have almost no strain hardening capacity. These properties result in heterogeneous plastic deformation happening over only millimeters when the weld is loaded perpendicularly to the weld line, affecting its overall behavior. The constitutive laws experimentally identified were introduced as inputs into a finite elements model of the transverse tensile test performed on the whole dissimilar weld. A good agreement between experiments and simulations was achieved on the global stress-strain curve. The model also well predicts the local strain field measured by microscale DIC. A large out-of-plane deformation due to the hard carburized regions has also been identified.

  17. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  18. A knowledge-based diagnosis system for welding machine problem solving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnieres, P. de; Boutes, J.L.; Calas, M.A.; Para, S.

    1986-06-01

    This paper presents a knowledge-based diagnosis system which can be a valuable aid in resolving malfunctions and failures encountered using the automatic hot-wire TIG weld cladding process. This knowledge-based system is currently under evaluation by welding operators at the Framatome heavy fabricating facility. Extension to other welding processes is being considered

  19. Study on mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking and analysis of residual stress and work hardening in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with hard surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Toyoda, Masao; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2007-01-01

    In order to make clear the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening, the residual stress and hardness in the butt-joint of pipes as a typical example of the actual structure were estimated and the grain boundary sliding was analyzed from the viewpoint of micro-deformation. On the basis of these results, the mechanism of IGSCC was discussed by the integrated knowledge between metallurgy and mechanics. The relationship between plastic strain and hardness in hard-machined surface near welds was clarified from the experimented relationship and the analysis method by the thermal elastic-plastic analysis. The distributions of hardness and residual stress with the actual surface machining could be simulated. It was made clear that grain boundary sliding occurred in the steel at 561K by a constant strain rate tensile test. From the comparison of grain boundary sliding behavior between solution treated specimen and cold-rolled one, it was found that the grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one occurs in smaller strain conditions than that in as received one, and the amount of grain boundary sliding in cold-rolled one increases remarkably with increases in rolling reduction. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of Type 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  20. Precision machining, sheet-metal work and welding at the heart of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    From the writing of specifications and the production of high-tech components, to technology transfer and call-out work on-site, the MF group in EST Division offers CERN users a wide variety of services. Its full range of activities is presented in a new brochure. In addition to its many physicists and engineers, CERN also has teams of mechanics, welders and sheet-metalworkers whose expertise is a precious asset for the Organization. Within the MF Group (Manufacturing Facilities, EST Division) these teams perform precision machining, sheet-metal work and welding. As an example, the Group has been responsible for producing radiofrequency accelerating cells to a precision of the order of 1/100th mm and with a surface roughness of only 0.1 micron. The Group's workshops also manufactured the stainless steel vacuum chamber for the brand new n-TOF experiment (Bulletin n°47/2000), a 200-m long cylindrical chamber with a diameter of just 800 millimetres! The MF Group is assisted in its task of providing me...

  1. Big Data and Machine Learning in Plastic Surgery: A New Frontier in Surgical Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Jonathan; Corban, Jason; Gaster, Richard; Kanevsky, Ari; Lin, Samuel; Gilardino, Mirko

    2016-05-01

    Medical decision-making is increasingly based on quantifiable data. From the moment patients come into contact with the health care system, their entire medical history is recorded electronically. Whether a patient is in the operating room or on the hospital ward, technological advancement has facilitated the expedient and reliable measurement of clinically relevant health metrics, all in an effort to guide care and ensure the best possible clinical outcomes. However, as the volume and complexity of biomedical data grow, it becomes challenging to effectively process "big data" using conventional techniques. Physicians and scientists must be prepared to look beyond classic methods of data processing to extract clinically relevant information. The purpose of this article is to introduce the modern plastic surgeon to machine learning and computational interpretation of large data sets. What is machine learning? Machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence, can address clinically relevant problems in several domains of plastic surgery, including burn surgery; microsurgery; and craniofacial, peripheral nerve, and aesthetic surgery. This article provides a brief introduction to current research and suggests future projects that will allow plastic surgeons to explore this new frontier of surgical science.

  2. Coefficient of restitution and plastic strain for impact of elements welded with micro-jet cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian HADRYŚ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of investigations is the qualification how post-accident repair of model car body parts influence on the value of coefficient of restitution. Evaluation of impact energy absorption by model car body parts repaired with MIG welding (with and without micro-jet cooling was carried out. The results of investigations present that the value of coefficient of restitution changes with speed of impact. Coefficient of restitution is bigger for elements welded with micro-jet cooling than for element welded with ordinary method. This could have influence on passive safety of vehicle.

  3. A finite element elastic-plastic analysis of residual stresses due to clad welding in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchalet, C.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    Residual stresses due to weld deposited cladding on the inside of a typical Westinghouse pressurized water reactor vessel are investigated using an axisymmetric finite element elastic-plastic analysis. At the beginning of the analysis, one head of the weld cladding is assumed to lie on the reactor vessel wall at melting temperature (2600degF), but in the solid phase, while the vessel remains at 300degF (preheat temperature). All material properties used in the calculations are taken as temperature-dependent. Temperature profiles are obtained in the cladding and base metal at several discrete time intervals. These temperatures profiles are used to obtain the stress distribution for the same time intervals. Residual hoop tensile stresses of approximately 25 ksi were found to exist in the cladding. Peak tensile stresses in the hoop direction occur in the base metal near the cladding interface and reach a value of 60 ksi at the end of the transient. The tensile stress decreases very rapidly through the thickness of the base metal and becomes insignificant at about two inches from the inside surface. In order to lower residual stresses, a post-weld heat treatment is performed by uniformly heating the vessel to 1100degF, holding at that temperature for a specified period of time and then cooling slowly. The analysis shows that after this treatment, the peak stresses in the base metal decrease from 60 ksi to 32 ksi, while the stress in the cladding does not change significantly. (author)

  4. Development and control towards a parallel water hydraulic weld/cut robot for machining processes in ITER vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huapeng; Handroos, Heikki; Pessi, Pekka; Kilkki, Juha; Jones, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a special robot, able to carry out welding and machining processes from inside the ITER vacuum vessel (VV), consisting of a five degree-of-freedom parallel mechanism, mounted on a carriage driven by two electric motors on a rack. The kinematic design of the robot has been optimised for ITER access and a hydraulically actuated pre-prototype built. A hybrid controller is designed for the robot, including position, speed and pressure feedback loops to achieve high accuracy and high dynamic performances. Finally, the experimental tests are given and discussed

  5. Novel Robot Solutions for Carrying out Field Joint Welding and Machining in the Assembly of the Vacuum Vessel of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessi, P.

    2009-01-01

    It is necessary to use highly specialized robots in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) both in the manufacturing and maintenance of the reactor due to a demanding environment. The sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) require more stringent tolerances than normally expected for the size of the structure involved. VV consists of nine sectors that are to be welded together. The vacuum vessel has a toroidal chamber structure. The task of the designed robot is to carry the welding apparatus along a path with a stringent tolerance during the assembly operation. In addition to the initial vacuum vessel assembly, after a limited running period, sectors need to be replaced for repair. Mechanisms with closed-loop kinematic chains are used in the design of robots in this work. One version is a purely parallel manipulator and another is a hybrid manipulator where the parallel and serial structures are combined. Traditional industrial robots that generally have the links actuated in series are inherently not very rigid and have poor dynamic performance in high speed and high dynamic loading conditions. Compared with open chain manipulators, parallel manipulators have high stiffness, high accuracy and a high force/torque capacity in a reduced workspace. Parallel manipulators have a mechanical architecture where all of the links are connected to the base and to the end-effector of the robot. The purpose of this thesis is to develop special parallel robots for the assembly, machining and repairing of the VV of the ITER. The process of the assembly and machining of the vacuum vessel needs a special robot. By studying the structure of the vacuum vessel, two novel parallel robots were designed and built; they have six and ten degrees of freedom driven by hydraulic cylinders and electrical servo motors. Kinematic models for the proposed robots were defined and two prototypes built. Experiments for machine cutting and laser welding with the 6-DOF robot were

  6. Novel Robot Solutions for Carrying out Field Joint Welding and Machining in the Assembly of the Vacuum Vessel of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessi, P.

    2009-07-01

    It is necessary to use highly specialized robots in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) both in the manufacturing and maintenance of the reactor due to a demanding environment. The sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel (VV) require more stringent tolerances than normally expected for the size of the structure involved. VV consists of nine sectors that are to be welded together. The vacuum vessel has a toroidal chamber structure. The task of the designed robot is to carry the welding apparatus along a path with a stringent tolerance during the assembly operation. In addition to the initial vacuum vessel assembly, after a limited running period, sectors need to be replaced for repair. Mechanisms with closed-loop kinematic chains are used in the design of robots in this work. One version is a purely parallel manipulator and another is a hybrid manipulator where the parallel and serial structures are combined. Traditional industrial robots that generally have the links actuated in series are inherently not very rigid and have poor dynamic performance in high speed and high dynamic loading conditions. Compared with open chain manipulators, parallel manipulators have high stiffness, high accuracy and a high force/torque capacity in a reduced workspace. Parallel manipulators have a mechanical architecture where all of the links are connected to the base and to the end-effector of the robot. The purpose of this thesis is to develop special parallel robots for the assembly, machining and repairing of the VV of the ITER. The process of the assembly and machining of the vacuum vessel needs a special robot. By studying the structure of the vacuum vessel, two novel parallel robots were designed and built; they have six and ten degrees of freedom driven by hydraulic cylinders and electrical servo motors. Kinematic models for the proposed robots were defined and two prototypes built. Experiments for machine cutting and laser welding with the 6-DOF robot were

  7. Study of electric arc welding of castings for nuclear power machine-building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymkevich, A.I.; Korsunov, P.M.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties are studied of the welded joints of cast billets from steel 00Kh12N3DL by automatic submerged arc welding. It is shown by testing the joints made with preheating up to 100 deg C and subsequent tempering (620 deg C for 25 h + 640 deg C for 16 h) that in the temperature range of 20-350 deg C they possess fairly good strength, ductility, impact viscosity, and corrosion-resistance properties approximating the corresponding characteristics of the base metal. The welding technology developed can be used to make pump casings for atomic power equipment

  8. Investigation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Machining Using 355 nm Picosecond Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Dezhi

    2018-06-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in the aircraft industry and automobile industry owing to its superior properties. In this paper, a Nd:YVO4 picosecond pulsed system emitting at 355 nm has been used for CFRP machining experiments to determine optimum milling conditions. Milling parameters including laser power, milling speed and hatch distance were optimized by using box-behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM). Material removal rate was influenced by laser beam overlap ratio which affects mechanical denudation. The results in heat affected zones (HAZ) and milling quality were discussed through the machined surface observed with scanning electron microscope. A re-focusing technique based on the experiment with different focal planes was proposed and milling mechanism was also analyzed in details.

  9. Investigation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Machining Using 355 nm Picosecond Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Dezhi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been widely used in the aircraft industry and automobile industry owing to its superior properties. In this paper, a Nd:YVO4 picosecond pulsed system emitting at 355 nm has been used for CFRP machining experiments to determine optimum milling conditions. Milling parameters including laser power, milling speed and hatch distance were optimized by using box-behnken design of response surface methodology (RSM). Material removal rate was influenced by laser beam overlap ratio which affects mechanical denudation. The results in heat affected zones (HAZ) and milling quality were discussed through the machined surface observed with scanning electron microscope. A re-focusing technique based on the experiment with different focal planes was proposed and milling mechanism was also analyzed in details.

  10. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  11. Dislocation structure evolution in 304L stainless steel and weld joint during cyclic plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Jing, Hongyang; Zhao, Lei; Han, Yongdian; Lv, Xiaoqing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu, Lianyong, E-mail: xulianyong@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-04-06

    Dislocation structures and their evolution of 304L stainless steel and weld metal made with ER308L stainless steel welding wire subjected to uniaxial symmetric strain-controlled loading and stress-controlled ratcheting loading were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The correlation between the cyclic response and the dislocation structure has been studied. The experiment results show that the cyclic behaviour of base metal and weld metal are different. The cyclic behaviour of the base metal consists of primary hardening, slight softening and secondary hardening, while the weld metal shows a short hardening within several cycles followed by the cyclic softening behaviour. The microscopic observations indicate that in base metal, the dislocation structures evolve from low density patterns to those with higher dislocation density during both strain cycling and ratcheting deformation. However, the dislocation structures of weld metal change oppositely form initial complicated structures to simple patterns and the dislocation density gradually decrease. The dislocation evolution presented during the strain cycling and ratcheting deformation is summarized, which can qualitatively explain the cyclic behaviour and the uniaxial ratcheting behaviour of two materials. Moreover, the dislocation evolution in the two types of tests is compared, which shows that the mean stress has an effect on the rate of dislocation evolution during the cyclic loading.

  12. Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong Gi Hyeon

    1987-04-01

    This book deals with plastic, which includes introduction for plastic, chemistry of high polymers, polymerization, speciality and structure of a high molecule property of plastic, molding, thermosetting plastic, such as polyethylene, polyether, polyamide and polyvinyl acetyl, thermal plastic like phenolic resins, xylene resins, melamine resin, epoxy resin, alkyd resin and poly urethan resin, new plastic like ionomer and PPS resin, synthetic laminated tape and synthetic wood, mixed materials in plastic, reprocessing of waste plastic, polymer blend, test method for plastic materials and auxiliary materials of plastic.

  13. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  14. Expanding Options. A Model to Attract Secondary Students into Nontraditional Vocational Programs. For Emphasis in: Building Trades, Electronics, Health Services, Machine Shop, Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James D.; DeVore, Mary Ann

    This model has been designed for use by Missouri secondary schools in attracting females and males into nontraditional occupational programs. The research-based strategies are intended for implementation in the following areas: attracting females into building trades, electronics, machine shop, and welding; and males into secondary health…

  15. Effect of shroud material on the spherical aberration in electromagnetic focusing lens used in electron beam welding machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Srijit Kumar; Gupta, Sachin; Kandaswamy, E.

    2015-01-01

    Beam Power density on the target (typically 10"5 -10"6 W/cm"2 ) plays a major role in attaining good weld quality in electron beam welding. Spherical aberration in the electromagnetic focusing lenses places a limitation in attaining the required power density on the target. Conventionally, iron or low carbon steel core are being used as a shroud material in the electromagnetic lenses. The practical difficulty faced in the long term performance of these lenses has initiated a systematic study for various shroud materials and the effect on spherical aberration limited spot size. The particle trajectories were simulated with different magnetic materials, using commercial software. The spherical aberration was found to be the lowest in the air core lens. The possibility of using an aircore electromagnetic focusing lens in electron beam machines is discussed in this paper. The beam power density is limited by various factors such as spherical aberration, space charge aberrations, gun alignment and power source parameters. (author)

  16. Studies on thermo-elastic heating of horns used in ultrasonic plastic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopa Rani, M; Prakasan, K; Rudramoorthy, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic welding horn is half wavelength section or tool used to focus the ultrasonic vibrations to the components being welded. The horn is designed in such a way that it maximizes the amplitude of the sound wave passing through it. The ends of the horn represent the displacement anti-nodes and the center the 'node' of the wave. As the horns perform 20,000 cycles of expansion and contraction per second, they are highly stressed at the nodes and are heated owing to thermo-elastic effects. Considerable temperature rise may be observed in the horn, at the nodal region when working at high amplitudes indicating high stress levels leading to failure of horns due to cyclic loading. The limits for amplitude must therefore be evaluated for the safe working of the horn. Horns made of different materials have different thermo-elastic behaviors and hence different temperatures at the nodes and antinodes. This temperature field can be used as a control mechanism for setting the amplitude/weld parameters. Safe stress levels can be predicted using modal and harmonic analyses followed by a stress analysis to study the effect of cyclic loads. These are achieved using 'Ansys'. The maximum amplitude level obtained from the stress analysis is used as input for 'Comsol' to predict the temperature field. The actual temperature developed in the horn during operation is measured using infrared camera and compared with the simulated temperature. From experiments, it is observed that horn made of titanium had the lowest temperature rise at the critical region and can be expected to operate at amplitudes up to 77 μm without suffering failure due to cyclic loading. The method of predicting thermo-elastic stresses and temperature may be adopted by the industry for operating the horn within the safe stress limits thereby extending the life of the horn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of process parameters on the weld lines of a micro injection molded component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Gava, Alberto; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    The insufficient entanglement of the molecular chains and the stress amplification at the v-notch of a weld line compromise the mechanical strength of a plastic product, also in the micro scale. To investigate the influence of process parameters on the weld lines formation, a special micro cavity...... was designed and manufactured by µEDM (Electro Discharge Machining). Weld lines were quantitatively characterized both in the two-dimensional (direction and position) and three-dimensional range (surface topography characterization). Results showed that shape and position of weld lines are mainly influenced...

  18. Fatigue analysis of a structure with welds considering metallurgical discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, M.T.; Lejeail, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Within the frameworks of a creep-fatigue experimental program, called EVASION, thermo-mechanical tests were conducted on two mock-ups, the first one was fully machined and the second one welded and then machined (in order to eliminate geometrical discontinuities, thus only leaving metallurgical discontinuities). These two mock-ups were submitted to exactly the same loading history. Plastic analyses with a correct description of mechanical properties and fatigue strength of materials are conducted and compared with experimental results in order to highlight the influence of the weld. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  20. Compressive Strength of Steel Frames after Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel weld structures generally exhibit a very linear stress-strain relationship. In the study of strength of materials, the compressive strength is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand loads tending to reduce size of structure. It is mainly measured by plotting applied force against deformation in a testing machine. Compressive strength is a main key value for design of welded structures.The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of frame welds which were made with various parameters of micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better mechanical properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Furthermore it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic and properties of structure steel welds.

  1. Plastic fracture toughness of austenitic welding connection for Ver-1000 nuclear reactor piping of 300-350 mm diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'chenko, G.S.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Kabelevskij, M.G.; Kazantsev, A.G.; Kunavin, S.A.; Merinov, G.N.; Sokov, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    The outside welding technology for circular welds in a pearlitic tube using austenitic welding wire materials is developed and applied in manufacturing pipelines of CPP and ECC. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of austenitic welded joints in pearlitic tubes are determined to substantiate by calculation the practicality of the leakage prior to failure concept. The work is accomplished on experimental tube manufactured by hand arc welding. When manufactured the tube is cut into 5 rings. From the rings the tensile specimens are cut for testing at 20 and 350 deg C as well as Charpy V-notch impact specimens and compact specimens ST-1T. It is shown that the materials of the experimental tube meet the standard requirements. Only axial specimens cut across the weld are not in conformity with the requirements for specific elongation [ru

  2. Friction Stir Welding Process: A Green Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Esther T. Akinlabi; Stephen A. Akinlabi

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented and patented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in the United Kingdom in 1991 for butt and lap welding of metals and plastics. This paper highlights the benefits of friction stir welding process as an energy efficient and a green technology process in the field of welding. Compared to the other conventional welding processes, its benefits, typical applications and its use in joining similar and dissimilar materia...

  3. Mechanical and Acoustic Characteristics of the Weld and the Base Metal Machine Part of Career Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexander N.; Knjaz'kov, Victor L.; Levashova, Elena E.; Ababkov, Nikolay V.; Pimonov, Maksim V.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, many industries use foreign-made machinery. There is no opportunity to purchase quality original spare parts for which machinery. Therefore, enterprises operating this equipment are looking for producers of analogues of various parts and assemblies. Quite often, the metal of such analog components turns out to be substandard, which leads to their breakdown at a much earlier date and the enterprises incur material losses. Due to the fact that the complex of performance characteristics and the resource of products are laid at the stage of their production, it is extremely important to control the quality of the raw materials. The structure, mechanical, acoustic and magnetic characteristics of metal samples of such destroyed details of quarry transport as hydraulic cylinders and detail “axis” of an excavator are investigated. A significant spread of data on the chemical composition of metal, hardness and characteristics of non-destructive testing is established, which gives grounds to recommend to manufacturers and suppliers of parts is more responsible to approach the incoming quality control. The results of the investigation of metal samples by destructive and non-destructive methods of control are compared, which showed that the spectral-acoustic method of nondestructive testing can be used to control the quality of the responsible machine parts under conditions of import substitution.

  4. Toolpath Strategy and Optimum Combination of Machining Parameter during Pocket Mill Process of Plastic Mold Steels Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Y. T.; Baskoro, S. Y.; Manurung, V. A. T.

    2018-02-01

    Plastic based products spread all over the world in many aspects of life. The ability to substitute other materials is getting stronger and wider. The use of plastic materials increases and become unavoidable. Plastic based mass production requires injection process as well Mold. The milling process of plastic mold steel material was done using HSS End Mill cutting tool that is widely used in a small and medium enterprise for the reason of its ability to be re sharpened and relatively inexpensive. Study on the effect of the geometry tool states that it has an important effect on the quality improvement. Cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and radii are input parameters beside to the tool path strategy. This paper aims to investigate input parameter and cutting tools behaviors within some different tool path strategy. For the reason of experiments efficiency Taguchi method and ANOVA were used. Response studied is surface roughness and cutting behaviors. By achieving the expected quality, no more additional process is required. Finally, the optimal combination of machining parameters will deliver the expected roughness and of course totally reduced cutting time. However actually, SMEs do not optimally use this data for cost reduction.

  5. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  6. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  7. Welding facilities for NPP assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojtenberg, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recommendations concerning the choice of equipment for welding in pre-assembling work shops, in the enlarging assembling shops and at the assembling site, are given. Advanced production automatic welders and semiautomatic machines, applied during the NPP equipment assembling as well as automatic machines specially produced for welding the main reactor components and pipelines are described. Automatic and semiautomatic machine and manual welding post supply sources are considered

  8. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  9. Dictionary: Welding, cutting and allied processes. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiber, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    The dictionary contains approximately 40 000 entries covering all aspects of welding technology. It is based on the evaluation of numerous English, American and German sources. This comprehensive and up to date dictionary will be a reliable and helpful aid in evaluation and translating. The dictionary covers the following areas: Welding: gas welding, arc welding, gas shielded welding, resistance welding, welding of plastics, special welding processes; Cutting: flame cutting, arc cutting and special thermal cutting processes; Soldering: brazing and soldering; Other topics: thermal spraying, metal to metal adhesion, welding filler materials and other consumables, test methods, plant and equipment, accessories, automation, welding trade, general welding terminology. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Severe plastic deformation of copper by machining: Microstructure refinement and nanostructure evolution with strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, S.; Brown, T.L.; Chandrasekar, S.; McNelley, T.R.; Compton, W.D.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructures of copper chips created by plane strain machining at ambient temperature have been analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The strain imposed in the chips was varied by changing the tool rake angle. Characterization of orthogonal faces of the chips showed the microstructure to be essentially uniform through the chip volume, indicative also of uniform deformation

  11. Spot Welding Characterizations With Time Variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Hafid; Pinitoyo, A.; History; Paidjo, Andryansyah; Sagino, Sudarmin; Tamzil, M.

    2001-01-01

    For obtain spot welding used effective data, this research is made, so that time operational of machine increasing. Welding parameters are material classification, electrical current, and weld time. All of the factors are determined welding quality. If the plate more thick, the time must be longer when the current constant. Another factor as determined welding quality are surface condition of electrode, surface condition of weld material, and material classifications. In this research, the weld machine type IP32A2 VI (110 V), Rivoira trademark is characterized

  12. Machinability Study on Milling Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composite Materials using Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, H.; Haron, C. H. C.; Ghani, J. A.; Suhaily, M.; Yuzairi, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of a milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials are depending on the milling parameters (spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut). Therefore, a study was carried out to investigate the relationship between the milling parameters and their effects on a kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The composite panels were fabricated using vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VARTM) method. A full factorial design of experiments was use as an initial step to screen the significance of the parameters on the defects using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). If the curvature of the collected data shows significant, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is then applied for obtaining a quadratic modelling equation that has more reliable in expressing the optimization. Thus, the objective of this research is obtaining an optimum setting of milling parameters and modelling equations to minimize the surface roughness (Ra) and delamination factor (Fd) of milled kenaf reinforced plastic composite materials. The spindle speed and feed rate contributed the most in affecting the surface roughness and the delamination factor of the kenaf composite materials.

  13. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  14. Non-dimensional characterization of the friction stir/spot welding process using a simple Couette flow model part I: Constant property Bingham plastic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Gregory A.; Langerman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simplified model for the material flow created during a friction stir/spot welding process has been developed using a boundary driven cylindrical Couette flow model with a specified heat flux at the inner cylinder for a Bingham plastic material. Non-dimensionalization of the constant property governing equations identified three parameters that influence the velocity and temperature fields. Analytic solutions to these equations are presented and some representative results from a parametric study (parameters chosen and varied over ranges expected for the welding of a wide variety of metals) are discussed. The results also provide an expression for the critical radius (location of vanishing material velocity) as functions of the relevant non-dimensional parameters. A final study was conducted in which values for the non-dimensional heat flux parameter were chosen to produce peak dimensional temperatures on the order of 80% of the melting temperature for a typical 2000 series aluminum. Under these conditions it was discovered that the ratio of the maximum rate of shear work within the material (viscous dissipation) to the rate of energy input at the boundary due to frictional heating, ranged from about 0.0005% for the lowest pin tool rotation rate, to about 1.3% for the highest tool rotation rate studied. Curve fits to previous Gleeble data taken for a number of aluminum alloys provide reasonable justification for the Bingham plastic constitutive model, and although these fits indicate a strong temperature dependence for critical flow stress and viscosity, this work provides a simple tool for more sophisticated model validation. Part II of this study will present numerical solutions for velocity and temperature fields resulting from the non-linear coupling of the momentum and energy equations created by temperature dependent transport properties

  15. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  16. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected

  17. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M. [School of Mechatronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Pauh, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ismail, A. [UniKL MIMET, JalanPantaiRemis, 32200, Lumut, Perak (Malaysia); Ishak, M. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, 02600, Pekan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  18. Body-Machine Interfaces after Spinal Cord Injury: Rehabilitation and Brain Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Seáñez-González

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify rehabilitative effects and changes in white matter microstructure in people with high-level spinal cord injury following bilateral upper-extremity motor skill training. Five subjects with high-level (C5–C6 spinal cord injury (SCI performed five visuo-spatial motor training tasks over 12 sessions (2–3 sessions per week. Subjects controlled a two-dimensional cursor with bilateral simultaneous movements of the shoulders using a non-invasive inertial measurement unit-based body-machine interface. Subjects’ upper-body ability was evaluated before the start, in the middle and a day after the completion of training. MR imaging data were acquired before the start and within two days of the completion of training. Subjects learned to use upper-body movements that survived the injury to control the body-machine interface and improved their performance with practice. Motor training increased Manual Muscle Test scores and the isometric force of subjects’ shoulders and upper arms. Moreover, motor training increased fractional anisotropy (FA values in the cingulum of the left hemisphere by 6.02% on average, indicating localized white matter microstructure changes induced by activity-dependent modulation of axon diameter, myelin thickness or axon number. This body-machine interface may serve as a platform to develop a new generation of assistive-rehabilitative devices that promote the use of, and that re-strengthen, the motor and sensory functions that survived the injury.

  19. Quality status display for a vibration welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Bracey, Jennifer; Wang, Hui; Tavora, Peter W.; Davis, Jeffrey S.; Hutchinson, Daniel C.; Reardon, Ronald L.; Utz, Shawn

    2017-03-28

    A system includes a host machine and a status projector. The host machine is in electrical communication with a collection of sensors and with a welding controller that generates control signals for controlling the welding horn. The host machine is configured to execute a method to thereby process the sensory and control signals, as well as predict a quality status of a weld that is formed using the welding horn, including identifying any suspect welds. The host machine then activates the status projector to illuminate the suspect welds. This may occur directly on the welds using a laser projector, or on a surface of the work piece in proximity to the welds. The system and method may be used in the ultrasonic welding of battery tabs of a multi-cell battery pack in a particular embodiment. The welding horn and welding controller may also be part of the system.

  20. Analysis of cracks in stainless steel TIG [tungsten inert gas] welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagaki, M.; Marschall, C.; Brust, F.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of ductile crack growth in tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments of austenitic stainless steel specimens. The substantially greater yield strength of the weld metal relative to the base metal causes more plastic deformation in the base metal adjacent to the weld than in the weld metal. Accordingly, the analytical studies focused on the stress-strain interaction between the crack tip and the weld/base-metal interface. Experimental work involved tests using compact (tension) specimens of three different sizes and pipe bend experiments. The compact specimens were machined from a TIG weldment in Type 304 stainless steel plate. The pipe specimens were also TIG welded using the same welding procedures. Elastic-plastic finite element methods were used to model the experiments. In addition to the J-integral, different crack-tip integral parameters such as ΔT/sub p/* and J were evaluated. Also, engineering J-estimation methods were employed to predict the load-carrying capacity of the welded pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack under bending

  1. A control system for uniform bead in fillet arc welding on tack welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Lee, Jun Young

    2008-01-01

    Positioning a workpiece accurately and preventing weld distortion, tack welding is often adopted before main welding in the construction of welded structures. However, this tack weld deteriorates the final weld bead profile, so that the grinding process is usually performed for a uniform weld bead profile. In this study, a control system for uniform weld bead is proposed for the fillet arc welding on tack welds. The system consists of GMA welding machine, torch manipulator, laser vision sensor for measuring the tack weld size and the database for optimal welding conditions. Experiments have been performed for constructing the database and for evaluating the control capability of the system. It has been shown that the system has the capability to smooth the bead at the high level of quality

  2. Fundamentals and advances in the development of remote welding fabrication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, J. E.; Masubuchi, K.; Von Alt, C.

    1986-01-01

    Operational and man-machine issues for welding underwater, in outer space, and at other remote sites are investigated, and recent process developments are described. Probable remote welding missions are classified, and the essential characteristics of fundamental remote welding tasks are analyzed. Various possible operational modes for remote welding fabrication are identified, and appropriate roles for humans and machines are suggested. Human operator performance in remote welding fabrication tasks is discussed, and recent advances in the development of remote welding systems are described, including packaged welding systems, stud welding systems, remotely operated welding systems, and vision-aided remote robotic welding and autonomous welding systems.

  3. Feasibility demonstration of using wire electrical-discharge machining, abrasive flow honing, and laser spot welding to manufacture high-precision triangular-pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel-rod-support grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwood, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    Results are reported supporting the feasibility of manufacturing high precision machined triangular pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel rod support grids for application in water cooled nuclear power reactors. The manufacturing processes investigated included wire electrical discharge machining of the fuel rod and guide tube cells in Zircaloy plate stock to provide the grid body, multistep pickling of the machined grid to provide smooth and corrosion resistant surfaces, and laser welding of thin Zircaloy cover plates to both sides of the grid body to capture separate AM-350 stainless steel insert springs in the grid body. Results indicated that dimensional accuracy better than +- 0.001 and +- 0.002 inch could be obtained on cell shape and position respectively after wire EDM and surface pickling. Results on strength, corrosion resistance, and internal quality of laser spot welds are provided

  4. Application of local vacuum slide sealing electron beam welding procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shozo; Takano, Genta; Minami, Masaharu; Enami, Koji; Uchikawa, Takashi; Kuri, Shuhei

    1982-01-01

    Electron beam welding process is efficient and is superior in workmanship and its application to the welding of large plate structures is eagerly awaited. However, since electron beam welding is generally performed with the object of welding entirely put in a vacuum chamber, high welding cost becomes a problem. In response to this demand, two kinds of local vacuum slide sealing type electron beam welding machines have been developed. These welding machines are designed to perform welding with only the neighborhood of the weld line put in vacuum, one of which is for longitudinal joints and the other for circumferential joints. The welding machine for circumferential joints has been put to practical use for the welding of nucear fusion reactor vacuum vessels (outside diameter 3.5 m, inside diameter 1.7 m), showing that it is applicable to the welding of large structures. (author)

  5. Effect of Processing Parameters on Plastic Flow and Defect Formation in Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X. H.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Ni, D. R.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters on material flow and defect formation during friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated on 6.0-mm-thick 2014Al-T6 rolled plates with an artificially thickened oxide layer on the butt surface as the marker material. It was found that the "S" line in the stir zone (SZ) rotated with the pin and stayed on the retreating side (RS) and advancing side (AS) at low and high heat inputs, respectively. When the tool rotation rate was extremely low, the oxide layer under the pin moved to the RS first and then to the AS perpendicular to the welding direction, rather than rotating with the pin. The material flow was driven by the shear stresses produced by the forces at the pin-workpiece interface. With increases of the rotation rate, the depth of the shoulder-affected zone (SAZ) first decreased and then increased due to the decreasing shoulder friction force and increasing heat input. Insufficient material flow appeared in the whole of the SZ at low rotation rates and in the bottom of the SZ at high rotation rates, resulting in the formation of the "S" line. The extremely inadequate material flow is the reason for the lack of penetration and the kissing bonds in the bottom of the SZ at extremely low and low rotation rates, respectively.

  6. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  7. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  8. Prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern for partial denture framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takaichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to report an application of a prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern to construction of removable partial denture framework without the use of a refractory cast. A plastic pattern for the lingual bar was adapted on the master cast of a mandibular Kennedy class I partially edentulous patient. The pattern was polymerized in a light chamber. Cobalt-chromium wires were employed to minimize the potential distortion of the plastic framework. The framework was carefully removed from the master cast and invested with phosphate-bonded investment for the subsequent casting procedures. A retentive clasp was constructed using 19-gauge wrought wire and was welded to the framework by means of laser welding machine. An excellent fit of the framework in the patient′s mouth was observed in the try-in and the insertion of the denture. The result suggests that this method minimizes laboratory cost and time for partial denture construction.

  9. Formed electroslag welded joint from austenitic steel 18/10 CrNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, L.; Kusak, L.; Martinak, A.

    1987-01-01

    The electroslag welded joint from titanium stabilized steel 18/10 CrNi of 150 mm in thickness showed positive results for both nondestructive and destructive testing. Czechoslovak flux VUZ-4F and the optimized welding mode were completely proven. The weldment was subject to deformation by forging with a removal of 20 to 50% and to bending deformation. A 40% to 50% deformation was necessary for breaking the coarse-grain casting structure. The bending deformation resulted in breaking the coarse-grain casting structure in the entire cross-section, it was, however, only acting in a narrow band corresponding to the largest curvature. At the same time, the heat affected zone decayed. Following heat treatment, especially forming, the delta ferrite content in the weld metal decreased, the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the welded joint following welding and heat treatment showed a relatively large scatter. Forming reduced the scatter and improved plastic properties. Machining within 40 and 50% resulted in good echogenicity of the welded joint in ultrasound testing. The welded joint showed equal properties as the base material of the weldment. (author). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  10. Reduction method for residual stress of welded joint using harmonic vibrational load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tadashi; Hiroi, Tetsumaro; Hirai, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Welding is widely used for construction of many structures. Since welding is a process using locally given heat, residual stress is generated near the bead. Tensile residual stress degrades fatigue strength. Some reduction methods of residual stress have been presented and, for example, heat treatment and shot peening are practically used. However, those methods need special tools and are time consuming. In this paper, a new method for reduction of residual stress using harmonic vibrational load during welding is proposed. The proposed method is examined experimentally for some conditions. Two thin plates are supported on the supporting device and butt-welded using an automatic CO 2 gas shielded arc welding machine. Residual stress in the direction of the bead is measured by using a paralleled beam X-ray diffractometer with scintillation counter after removing quenched scale chemically. First, the welding of rolled steel for general structure for some excitation frequencies is examined. Specimens are welded along the groove on both sides. For all frequencies, tensile residual stress near the bead is significantly reduced. Second, welding of the specimen made of high tensile strength steel is examined. In this case, tensile residual stress near the bead is also reduced. Finally, the proposed method is examined by an analytical method. An analytical model which consists of mass and preloaded springs with elasto-plastic characteristic is used. Reduction of residual stress is demonstrated using this model

  11. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  12. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  13. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  14. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  15. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  16. Machined and plastic copings in three-element prostheses with different types of implantabutment joints: a strain gauge comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sussumu Nishioka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Using strain gauge (SG analysis, the aim of this in vitro study was quantify the strain development during the fixation of three-unit screw implant-supported fixed partial dentures, varying the types of implant-abutment joints and the type of prosthetic coping. The hypotheses were that the type of hexagonal connection would generate different microstrains and the type of copings would produce similar microstrains after prosthetic screws had been tightened onto microunit abutments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three dental implants with external (EH and internal (IH hexagonal configurations were inserted into two polyurethane blocks. Microunit abutments were screwed onto their respective implant groups, applying a torque of 20 Ncm. Machined Co-Cr copings (M and plastic prosthetic copings (P were screwed onto the abutments, which received standard wax patterns. The wax patterns were cast in Co-Cr alloy (n=5, forming four groups: G1 EH/M; G2 EH/P; G3 IH/M and G4 IH/P. Four SGs were bonded onto the surface of the block tangentially to the implants, SG 1 mesially to implant 1, SG 2 and SG 3 mesially and distally to implant 2, respectively, and SG 4 distally to implant 3. The superstructure's occlusal screws were tightened onto microunit abutments with 10 Ncm torque using a manual torque driver. The magnitude of microstrain on each SG was recorded in units of microstrain (µε. The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p0.05. The hypotheses were partially accepted. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the type of hexagonal connection and coping presented similar mechanical behavior under tightening conditions.

  17. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  18. Advanced Control Methods for Optimization of Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. S.

    Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is a proces used for joining pieces of metal. Probably, the GMAW process is the most successful and widely used welding method in the industry today. A key issue in welding is the quality of the welds produced. The quality of a weld is influenced by several factors...... in the overall welding process; one of these factors are the ability of the welding machine to control the process. The internal control algorithms in GMAW machines are the topic of this PhD project. Basically, the internal control includes an algorithm which is able to keep the electrode at a given distance...

  19. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  20. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1910.254 Section 1910.254 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.254 Arc welding and cutting. (a... following limits shall not be exceeded: (i) Alternating-current machines (A) Manual arc welding and cutting...

  2. Welding of large-size embelled fittings in NPP construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, N.A.; Savinov, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    Drawbacks of the accepted technology for peoducing embedded fittings are considered. Activities on modernization of the standard ADF-2001 automatic welding machine are described. Results of testing the samples of welded joints performed using the modernized automatic welding machine, and economic effect caused by its introduction at the balakovo NPP second unit construction are presented

  3. Modelling of plastic flow localization and damage development in friction stir welded 6005A aluminium alloy using physics based strain hardening law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Pardoen, Thomas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    of these zones was extracted from micro-tensile specimens cut parallel to the welding direction. The measured material properties and weld topology were introduced into a 3D finite element model, fully coupled with the damage model. A Voce law hardening model involving a constant stage IV is used within...

  4. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  5. Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

    2007-06-06

    It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended

  6. New generation of welded semiautomatic for production of structures out of steels and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, A.N.; Poloskov, S.I.; Efanov, V.A.; Sedov, Yu.S.; Bukhta, O.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the type of semiautomatic welding machines, produced in our country and abroad, is presented. New designs, realized in the 80th, are described. Design of KOMBI-500 and PRM-4M semiautomatic welding machines is described

  7. PLASTIC DEFORMATION ON THE MACHINED SURFACE OF STEEL Cr20Ni10MoTi AT DRILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Jurko

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Information about material machinability is very important for the machining technology. Precise and reliable information on the machinability of a material before it enters the machining process is a necessity, and this brings the verification of technological methods in practice. This article presents the conclusions of machinability tests on austenitic stainless steel according to EN-EU (ISO: steel Cr20Ni10MoTi. This article presents the conclusions of VEGA grant agency at the Ministry of Education SR for supporting research work and co-financing the projects: Grant work #01/3173/2006 with the title „Experimental investigation of cutting zones in drilled and milled stainless steels

  8. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  9. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  10. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  11. MFDC - technological improvement in resistance welding controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somani, A.K.; Naga Bhaskar, V.; Chandramouli, J.; Rameshwara Rao, A. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2008-07-01

    Among the various Resistance Welding operations carried out in the production line of a fuel bundle end plug welding is the most critical operation. Welding controllers play a very vital role in obtaining consistent weld quality by regulating and controlling the weld current. Conventional mains synchronized welding controllers are at best capable of controlling the weld current at a maximum speed of the mains frequency. In view of the very short welding durations involved in the various stages of a fuel bundle fabrication, a need was felt for superior welding controllers. Medium Frequency Welding Controllers offer a solution to these limitations in addition to offering other advantages. Medium Frequency power sources offer precise welding current control as they regulate and correct the welding current faster, typically twenty times faster when operated at 1000Hz. An MFDC was employed on one of the welding machines and its performance was studied. This paper discusses about the various advantages of MFDCs with other controllers employed at NFC to end plug welding operation. (author)

  12. Resistance welding equipment manufacturing capability for exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, V.S.; Raju, Y.S.; Somani, A.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Raw, A.; Hermantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderbad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle is fully welded and is unique in its design. Appendage welding, end closure welding, and end plate welding is carried out using resistance welding technique. Out of many joining processes available, resistance-welding process is reliable, environment friendly and best suitable for mass production applications. Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), an industrial unit is established in Hyderabad, under the aegis of the Dept of Atomic Energy to manufacture fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors. From inception, NFC has given importance for self-reliance and indigenization with respect to manufacturing process and equipment. Sintering furnaces, centreless grinders, appendage-welding machines, end-closure welding equipment and end-plate welding equipments, which were initially imported, are either indigenized or designed and manufactured in house. NFC has designed, manufactured a new appendage-welding machine for manufacturing 37 element fuel bundles. Recently NFC has bagged an order from IAEA through international bidding for design, manufacture, supply, erection and commissioning of end-closure welding equipment. The paper gives in detail the salient features of these welding equipment. (author)

  13. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  14. Comparative estimation of the properties of heat resisting nickel alloy welded joints made by electron-beam and arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morochko, V.P.; Sorokin, L.I.; Yakushin, B.F.; Moryakov, V.F.

    1977-01-01

    As compared to argon arc welding of refractory nickel alloys at 15 m/hour rate, electron beam welding decreases energy consumption per unit length (from 4300 to 2070 cal/cm), the weld area (from 108 to 24 mm 2 ), and the length of the thermal effect zone (from 0.9-1.8 to 0.4-0.8 mm). Electron beam welding also provides for better resistance to hot cracking in the weld metal and in the near-weld zone, as compared to automatic argon arc welding and manual welding with addition of the basic metal. However, this advantage is observed only at welding rates less than 45 m/hour. Electron beam welded joints of refractory nickel alloys with intermetallide reinforcement have higher strength, plasticity and impact strength, and lower scattering of these properties than arc welded joints

  15. Effect of Trailing Intensive Cooling on Residual Stress and Welding Distortion of Friction Stir Welded 2060 Al-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shude; Yang, Zhanpeng; Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Zhang, Liguo

    2018-04-01

    Trailing intensive cooling with liquid nitrogen has successfully applied to friction stir welding of 2 mm thick 2060 Al-Li alloy. Welding temperature, plastic strain, residual stress and distortion of 2060 Al-Li alloy butt-joint are compared and discussed between conventional cooling and trailing intensive cooling using experimental and numerical simulation methods. The results reveal that trailing intensive cooling is beneficial to shrink high temperature area, reduce peak temperature and decrease plastic strain during friction stir welding process. In addition, the reduction degree of plastic strain outside weld is smaller than that inside weld. Welding distortion presents an anti-saddle shape. Compared with conventional cooling, the reductions of welding distortion and longitudinal residual stresses of welding joint under intense cooling reach 47.7 % and 23.8 %, respectively.

  16. Weldability of AISI 304 to copper by friction welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Balalan, Zulkuf [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Friction welding is a solid-state welding method, which can join different materials smoothly and is excessively used in manufacturing industry. Friction welding method is commonly used in welding applications of especially cylindrical components, pipes and materials with different properties, for which other welding methods remain incapable. AISI 304 stainless steel and a copper alloy of 99.6 % purity were used in this study. This couple was welded in the friction welding machine. After the welding process, samples were analyzed macroscopically and microscopically, and their microhardness was measured. Tensile test was used to determine the bond strength of materials that were joined using the friction welding method. At the end of the study, it was observed that AISI 304 stainless steel and copper could be welded smoothly using the friction welding method and the bond strength is close to the tensile strength of copper. (orig.)

  17. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  18. Immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable plastic skull model and laser welding. A technical note on the screw-retained type: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ishida, Osamu; Kanitani, Hideo; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a new procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus. Preoperatively, the framework was fabricated on a photocurable resin skull model produced from a CT scan and individually designed guide template. The implants were immediately placed using the guide template; laser welding connected the components of framework. Despite the custom-made prosthesis, the total treatment from implant placement to superstructure placement can be completed within only 1 day. This procedure for immediate implant-supported oral rehabilitation using a photocurable resin skull model and a laser-welding apparatus may be useful for any implant system and patient.

  19. Multiobjective Design of Turbo Injection Mode for Axial Flux Motor in Plastic Injection Molding Machine by Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Long Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a turbo injection mode (TIM for an axial flux motor to apply onto injection molding machine. Since the injection molding machine requires different speed and force parameters setting when finishing a complete injection process. The interleaved winding structure in the motor provides two different injection levels to provide enough injection forces. Two wye-wye windings are designed to switch two control modes conveniently. Wye-wye configuration is used to switch two force levels for the motor. When only one set of wye-winding is energized, field weakening function is achieved. Both of the torque and speed increase under field weakening operation. To achieve two control objectives for torque and speed of the motor, fuzzy based multiple performance characteristics index (MPCI with particle swarm optimization (PSO is used to find out the multiobjective optimal design solution. Both of the torque and speed are expected to be maximal at the same time. Three control factors are selected as studied factors: winding diameter, winding type, and air-gap. Experimental results show that both of the torque and speed increase under the optimal condition. This will provide enough large torque and speed to perform the turbo injection mode in injection process for the injection molding machine.

  20. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  1. Fillet Weld Stress Using Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnhoff, T. F.; Green, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Average elastic Von Mises equivalent stresses were calculated along the throat of a single lap fillet weld. The average elastic stresses were compared to initial yield and to plastic instability conditions to modify conventional design formulas is presented. The factor is a linear function of the thicknesses of the parent plates attached by the fillet weld.

  2. Simplified welding distortion analysis for fillet welding using composite shell elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the simplified welding distortion analysis method to predict the welding deformation of both plate and stiffener in fillet welds. Currently, the methods based on equivalent thermal strain like Strain as Direct Boundary (SDB has been widely used due to effective prediction of welding deformation. Regarding the fillet welding, however, those methods cannot represent deformation of both members at once since the temperature degree of freedom is shared at the intersection nodes in both members. In this paper, we propose new approach to simulate deformation of both members. The method can simulate fillet weld deformations by employing composite shell element and using different thermal expansion coefficients according to thickness direction with fixed temperature at intersection nodes. For verification purpose, we compare of result from experiments, 3D thermo elastic plastic analysis, SDB method and proposed method. Compared of experiments results, the proposed method can effectively predict welding deformation for fillet welds.

  3. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianbing; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin

    2014-03-01

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  4. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbing Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR, an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  5. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jianbing, E-mail: jianbingmeng@126.com; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  6. Dictionary: Welding, cutting and allied processes. Pt. 2. German/English. Fachwoerterbuch: Schweissen, Schneiden und verwandte Verfahren. Bd. 2. Deutsch/Englisch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiber, A W

    1987-01-01

    The dictionary contains approximately 40 000 entries covering all aspects of welding technology. It is based on the evaluation of numerous English, American and German sources. This comprehensive and up to date dictionary will be a reliable and helpful aid in evaluation and translating. The dictionary covers the following areas: Welding: gas welding, arc welding, gas shielded welding, resistance welding, welding of plastics, special welding processes; Cutting: flame cutting, arc cutting and special thermal cutting processes; Soldering: brazing and soldering; Other topics: thermal spraying, metal to metal adhesion, welding filler materials and other consumables, test methods, plant and equipment, accessories, automation, welding trade, general welding terminology.

  7. Welding processes and ocular hazards and protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabley, A S; Keeney, A H

    1981-07-01

    There are approximately 60 different forms of welding, but only six of these are commonly used. Shielded metal-arc or stick welding, gas metal-arc welding, and oxyacetylene welding are the most frequently used. All produce ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation at damaging levels. Conventional glass welding shields contain ultraviolet, visible, and infrared absorbers. Infrared absorbers, however, cause heating and secondary re-radiation. New polycarbonate lenses offer greater impact resistance, and have less tendency to welding spatter. Early abrasion-resistant and reflective coatings on plastics were ineffective. Thin layers of gold with proprietary coatings provide cool reflection and surface resistance. Thermal monitoring of welding indicated that these new shields reduce temperature rises above the ambient by 150% to 175% compared to green glass filter plates without interfering with the welder's vision.

  8. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  9. Performance Improvement of Friction Stir Welds by Better Surface Finish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sam; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The as-welded friction stir weld has a cross section that may act as a stress concentrator. The geometry associated with the stress concentration may reduce the weld strength and it makes the weld challenging to inspect with ultrasound. In some cases, the geometry leads to false positive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) indications and, in many cases, it requires manual blending to facilitate the inspection. This study will measure the stress concentration effect and develop an improved phased array ultrasound testing (PAUT) technique for friction stir welding. Post-welding, the friction stir weld (FSW) tool would be fitted with an end mill that would machine the weld smooth, trimmed shaved. This would eliminate the need for manual weld preparation for ultrasonic inspections. Manual surface preparation is a hand operation that varies widely depending on the person preparing the welds. Shaving is a process that can be automated and tightly controlled.

  10. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  11. Forming Completely Penetrated Welded T-joints when Pulsed Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Krampit, M. A.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is focused on revealing the influence of welding parameters on weld formation when pulsed arc welding. As an experimental sample a T-joint over 10 mm was selected. Welding was carried out in flat position, which required no edge preparation but provided mono-directional guaranteed root penetration. The following parameters of welding were subjected to investigation: gap in the joint, wire feed rate and incline angles of the torch along and across the weld axis. Technological recommendations have been made with respect to pulsed arc welding; the cost price of product manufacturing can be reduced on their basis due to reduction of labor input required by machining, lowering consumption of welding materials and electric power.

  12. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T.; Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M.; Le Barbier, R.; Määttä, T.; Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  13. ITER lip seal welding and cutting developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesy, B.; Cordier, J.J.; Jokinen, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kujanpää, V.; Karhu, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Le Barbier, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Määttä, T. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland); Martins, J.P.; Utin, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different TIG and Laser welding techniques are tested. • Twin spot laser welding techniques is the best. • Limited heat input gives a stable weld pool in all positions. • Penetrations is achieved. • Lip seal welding and cutting with a robotic arm is successfully performed on a representative mock-up. - Abstract: The welded lip seals form part of the torus primary vacuum boundary in between the port plugs and the vacuum vessel, and are classified as Protection Important Component. In order to refurbish the port plugs or the in-vessel components, port plugs have to be removed from the machine. The lip seal design must enable up to ten opening of the vacuum vessel during the life time operation of the ITER machine. Therefore proven, remote reliable cutting and re-welding are essential, as these operations need to be performed in the port cells in a nuclear environment, where human presence will be restricted. Moreover, the combination of size of the components to be welded (∼10 m long vacuum compatible thin welds) and the congested environment close to the core of the machine constraint the type and size of tools to be used. This paper describes the lip seal cutting and welding development programme performed at the VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland. Potential cutting and welding techniques are analyzed and compared. The development of the cutting, TIG and laser welding techniques on samples are presented. Effects of lip seal misalignments and optimization of the 2 welding processes are discussed. Finally, the manufacturing and test of the two 1.2 m × 1 m representative mock-ups are presented. The set-up and use of a robotic arm for the mock-up cutting and welding operations are also described.

  14. Some electron beam welding equipments for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, H.; Rodier, R.; Sayegh, G.

    1978-01-01

    Results of various electron beam welding equipment developed for the nuclear industry obtained from a 100 kW electron beam machine to weld thick plates made of stainless steel and reactor steel, and from some equipment with local vacuum to weld pipes onto a pipe wall. (orig.) [de

  15. Aspects related to fracture toughness of mismatch welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Suranjit; Khan, I.A.; Bhasin, V.; Vaze, K.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work effect of weld strength mismatch and weld slenderness on plastic η factor was systematically examined. Solutions presented here are based on extensive two-dimensional finite element analysis. Results of FE analysis has shown that for homogeneous specimens plastic η -factor does not vary significantly with material strain hardening index. Plastic η -factors for non-hardening material models were in better agreement with ASTM solutions than for hardening material models. For mismatch welded specimens analyses were performed on Compact tension (CT) and three points bend (TPB) specimens. Studies were performed for both hardening as well as elastic-perfectly plastic (non-hardening) material models. Results of finite element analysis have shown that unlike homogeneous specimens there is an influence of material strain hardening on plastic η -factor. For over match welds plastic η -factor evaluated for non-hardening material model are lower while for under match welds use of non-hardening material model gives higher value as compare to that of hardening material model. However, it was observed that for over match welds use of ASTM based plastic η -factors (valid for homogeneous specimens) gives the higher values than actual plastic η -factors (evaluated for both hardening as well as non-hardening material model) of mismatch welded specimens. This in turn would lead to un-conservative estimate of fracture toughness and vice versa is true for under-matched welds. (author)

  16. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  17. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  18. Effect of shoulder to pin ratio on magnesium alloy Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N. H.; Ishak, M.; Shah, L. H.

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the effect of shoulder to pin diameter ratio on friction stir welding of magnesium alloy AZ31. Two pieces of AZ31 alloy with thickness of 2 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The shoulder to pin diameter ratio used in this experiment are 2.25, 2.5, 2.75, 3, 3.33, 3.66, 4.5, 5 and 5.5. The rotational speed and welding speed used in this study are 1000 rpm and 100 mm/min, respectively. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Equiaxed grains were observed at the TMAZ and stir zone indicating fully plastic deformation. The grain size of stir zone increased with decreasing shoulder to pin ratio from ratio 3.33 to 5.5 due to higher heat input. It is observed that, surface galling and faying surface defect is produced when excessive heat input is applied. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen, tensile test was used in this study. Shoulder to pin ratio 5.5 shows lowest tensile strength while shoulder to pin diameter ratio 3.33 shows highest tensile strength with weld efficiency 91 % from based metal.

  19. Computer modeling of the stress-strain state of welded construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurguzhin, Marat; Danenova, Gulmira; Akhmetzhanov, Talgat

    2017-11-01

    At the present time the maintenance of the welded construction serviceability over normative service life is provided by the maintenance system on the basis of the guiding documents according to the concept of "fail safe". However, technology factors relating to welding such as high residual stresses and significant plastic strains are not considered in the guiding documents. The design procedure of the stressed-strained state of welded constructions is suggested in the paper. The procedure investigates welded constructions during welding and the external load using the program ANSYS. In this paper, the model of influence of the residual stress strain state on the factor of stress intensity is proposed. The calculation method of the residual stressed-strained state (SSS) taking into account the phase transition is developed by the authors. Melting and hardening of a plate material during heating and cooling is considered. The thermomechanical problem of heating a plate by a stationary heat source is solved. The setup of the heating spot center on distance (190 mm) from the crack top in a direction of its propagation leads to the fact that the value of total factor of stress intensity will considerably decrease under action of the specified residual compressing stresses. It can lower the speed of the crack propagation to zero. The suggested method of survivability maintenance can be applied during operation with the purpose of increasing the service life of metal constructions up to running repair of technological machines.

  20. Quality demands and methods of control in the case of welded plastic-casing pipe joints. Part 1. Kontrolmetoder og kvalitetskrav til svejste kapperoerssamlinger af plast. 1. delrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, P.; Svanum, M.

    1983-03-15

    The aim of the literary study was to attain knowledge relevant to the production and utilization of pre-insulated district heating pipes coated with polyethylene. Methods of testing for longevity and quality in addition to an evaluation of welding processes were also studied. It was concluded that welders should be specially trained and follow clearly specified working procedures and that their equipment should be standardized. (AB).

  1. Plastic condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Only simple equipment, simple technology and low initial capital investment are needed in their manufacture. The condoms can be made by people who were previously unskilled or only semi-skilled workers. Plastic condoms differ from those made of latex rubber in that the nature of the plastic film allows unlimited shelf-life. Also, the plastic has a higher degree of lubricity than latex rubber; if there is a demand for extra lubrication in a particular market, this can be provided. Because the plastic is inert, these condoms need not be packaged in hermetically sealed containers. All these attributes make it possible to put these condoms on the distributors' shelves in developing countries competitively with rubber condoms. The shape of the plastic condom is based on that of the lamb caecum, which has long been used as luxury-type condom. The plastic condom is made from plastic film (ethylene ethyl acrilate) of 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) thickness. In addition, a rubber ring is provided and sealed into the base of the condom for retention during coitus. The advantage of the plastic condom design and the equipment on which it is made is that production can be carried out either in labour-intensive economy or with varying degrees of mechanization and automation. The uniform, finished condom if made using previously untrained workers. Training of workers can be done in a matter of hours on the two machines which are needed to produce and test the condoms. The plastic film is provided on a double wound roll, and condom blanks are prepared by means of a heat-sealing die on the stamping machine. The rubber rings are united to the condom blanks on an assembly machine, which consists of a mandrel and heat-sealing equipment to seal the rubber ring to the base of the condom. Built into the assembly machine is a simple air-testing apparatus that can detect the smallest pinhole flaw in a condom. The manufacturing process is completed by unravelling the condom from the assembly

  2. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  3. Modeling aluminum-lithium alloy welding characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a finite element model of the heat-affected zone in the vicinity of a weld line on a plate in order to determine an accurate plastic strain history. The resulting plastic strain increments calculated by the finite element program were then to be used to calculate the measure of damage D. It was hoped to determine the effects of varying welding parameters, such as beam power, efficiency, and weld speed, and the effect of different material properties on the occurrence of microfissuring. The results were to be compared first to the previous analysis of Inconel 718, and then extended to aluminum 2195.

  4. Device for electron beam machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Ardenne, T. von; Liebergeld, H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention concerns a device for electron beam machining, in particular welding. It is aimed at continuous operation of the electron irradiation device. This is achieved by combining the electron gun with a beam guiding chamber, to which vacuum chambers are connected. The working parts to be welded can be arranged in the latter

  5. Intelligent sensing and control of gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Intelligent sensing and control is a multidisciplinary approach that attempts to build adequate sensing capability, knowledge of process physics, control capability, and welding engineering into the welding system such that the welding machine is aware of the state of the weld and knows how to make a good weld. The sensing and control technology should reduce the burden on the welder and welding engineer while providing the great adaptability needed to accommodate the variability found in the production world. This approach, accomplished with application of AI techniques, breaks the tradition of separate development of procedure and control technology

  6. Use of narrow gap welding in nuclear power engineering and development of welding equipment at Vitkovice Iron Works (VZSKG), Ostrava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehar, F.; Sevcik, P.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discussed are problems related to automatic submerged arc welding into narrow gaps. The said method was tested for the first time at the Vitkovice Iron Works VZSKG for peripheral welds on pressurizers for WWER-440 reactors. The demands are summed up which are put on the welding workplace which must be met for the use of the said technology. The requirements mainly include the provision of the positioning of the welding nozzle towards the weld gap in order to maximally exclude the effect of the welder. An automatic device was designed and manufactured at the VZSKG plant for mounting the welding nozzle on the automatic welding machine manufactured by ESAB which operates on the principle of the flexible compression of the nozzle to the wall of the weld gap. In the bottom part the welding nozzle is provided with a pulley which rolls during welding thereby providing a constant distance to be maintained between the welding wire and the wall of the weld gap. The diameter of the pulley is ruled by the diameter of the welding wire. Provided the clamping part is appropriately adjusted the developed equipment may be used for any type of automatic welding machine with motor driven supports. (Z.M.). 8 figs., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  7. Defect Detectability Improvement for Conventional Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of defect detectability via phased array ultrasound technology in conventional friction stir welds by comparing conventionally prepped post weld surfaces to a machined surface finish. A machined surface is hypothesized to improve defect detectability and increase material strength.

  8. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  9. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  10. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  11. ADIMEW: Fracture assessment and testing of an aged dissimilar metal weld pipe assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, J.B.; Hayes, B.; Goldthorpe, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    ADIMEW (Assessment of Aged Piping Dissimilar Metal Weld Integrity) was a three-year collaborative research programme carried out under the EC 5th Framework Programme. The objective of the study was to advance the understanding of the behaviour and safety assessment of defects in dissimilar metal welds between pipes representative of those found in nuclear power plant. ADIMEW studied and compared different methods for predicting the behaviour of defects located near the fusion boundaries of dissimilar metal welds typically used to join sections of austenitic and ferritic piping operating at high temperature. Assessment of such defects is complicated by issues that include: severe mis-match of yield strength of the constituent parent and weld metals, strong gradients of material properties, the presence of welding residual stresses and mixed mode loading of the defect. The study includes the measurement of material properties and residual stresses, predictive engineering analysis and validation by means of a large-scale test. The particular component studied was a 453mm diameter pipe that joins a section of type A508 Class 3 ferritic pipe to a section of type 316L austenitic pipe by means of a type 308 austenitic weld with type 308/309L buttering laid on the ferritic pipe. A circumferential, surface-breaking defect was cut using electro discharge machining into the 308L/309L weld buttering layer parallel to the fusion line. The test pipe was subjected to four-point bending to promote ductile tearing of the defect. This paper presents the results of TWI contributions to ADIMEW including: fracture toughness testing, residual stress measurements and assessments of the ADIMEW test using elastic-plastic, cracked body, finite element analysis. (orig.)

  12. The Effect of Welding Energy on the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic-Welded Copper Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwei; Cao, Biao; Lu, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    The effects of welding energy on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of ultrasonic-welded pure copper plates were investigated. Complex dynamic recrystallization and grain growth occurred inside the weld zone during ultrasonic welding. At a low welding energy, a thin band of straight weld interfaces was observed and had an ultra-fine grain structure. With an increase in welding energy, the weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal, and eventually turned into a convoluted wavy pattern, bearing similarities to shear instabilities, as observed in fluid dynamics. The lap shear load of the joints initially increased and then remained stable as the welding energy increased. The tensile characteristics of the joints significantly depended on the development of plastic deformation at the interface. The influence of the microstructure on the hardness was also discussed. PMID:28772553

  13. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  14. DEFORMATION INFLUENCE ON A LIFETIME OF WELDING ELECTRODE TIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Viňáš

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the influence of welding electrode tips deformation on their lifetime. The influence of material properties, production technology and the intensity of welding electrodes load on their lifetime are presented. The electrode tips of the most used type of CuCr1Zr alloy of three basic standard shapes before and after the process of welding are evaluated. The process of welding is realized with low, middle and maximum welding parameters on programmable pneumatic spot welding machine VTS BPK 20. The influence of welding parameters on chosen material characteristics of welding tips is observed. Through the use of upsetting test, dependency of forming strength and deformation of material on used technology of welding tip production is observed.

  15. Improving productivity and quality in plastic and thin metallic plates manufacturing by using ultrasonic welding processes Melhorando a produtividade e qualidade na fabricação em plástica e chapas finas de metal por soldagem por ultra-som

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dehelean

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of the research done at the Romanian National R&D Institute for Welding and Material Testing ISIM Timisoara in the field of ultrasonic process development. It starts with a general presentation of the value added by the welding sector in Europe. There are presented figures representing the size of the welding sector in Romania. The need of development of new high efficiency welding processes is mentioned, ultrasonic welding being one of the special welding processes with exceptional application perspectives. Practical examples of industrial application of the ultrasonic welding process for joining plastic and metallic materials are presented. A special case study refers to the welding of new shape memory alloys. The use of the ultrasonic welding instead of an conventional welding process has lead in each presented case study to an increase of the efficiency of the welding process through higher productivity and saving of manpower, consumable, energy.Este trabalho apresenta um panorama dos trabalhos de pesquisa conduzidos no Instituto nacional Romeno de P&D em Soldagem e Avaliação de Materiais (ISIM - Timisoara no desenvolvimento de processos ultrassônicos. Ele se inicia com uma apresentação geral pelo valor adicionado pelo setor de soldagem à Europa. São apresentados valores representativos do tamanho do setor de soldagem na Romênia. A necessidade do desenvolvimento de novos processos de soldagem de alta eficiência é mencionada, sendo a soldagem ultrassônica um dos processos especiais de soldagem com perspectivas excepcionais de aplicação. Exemplos práticos da aplicação industrial deste processo de soldagem para a união de plásticos e de metais são apresentados e um caso especial se refere à soldagem de novas ligas com efeito de memória de forma. O uso de soldagem por ultrassom no lugar de um processo convencional de soldagem resultou, em cada um dos estudos de caso apresentados, em um aumento

  16. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  17. A Review on Solidification and Change in Mechanical Properties Under Vibratory Welding Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Jyoti Prakash; Dr. S.P. Tewari; Bipin Kumar Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Welding has been applied to various industries in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. Thermal cycle produced near weld line generates residual stress and inhomogeneous plastic deformation in weldments. However there are many methods for welding the workpieces and one of the method among these is vibratory welding. It has the advantages of less investment, more convenient operation, less pollution and shorter manufacturing period. In vibratory welding, workpiece vibrates in...

  18. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  19. Effect of rotation speed and welding speed on Friction Stir Welding of AA1100 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P.; Bojanampati, S.; Karthikeyan, R.; Ganithi, R.

    2018-04-01

    Aluminum AA1100 is the most widely used grade of Aluminium due to its excellent corrosion resistance, high ductility and reflective finish, the selected material was welded with Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process on a CNC machine, using a combination of different tool rotation speed (1500 rpm, 2500 rpm, 3500 rpm) and welding speed (10 mm/min, 30 mm/min, 50 mm/min) as welding parameters. The effect of FSW using this welding parameter was studied by measuring the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints. A high-speed steel tool was prepared for welding the Aluminium AA1100 alloy having an 8mm shoulder diameter and pin dimension of 4mm diameter and 2.8 mm length. The welded joints were tested using the universal testing machine. It was found that Ultimate Tensile Strength of FSW specimen was highest with a value of 98.08 MPa when the weld was performed at rotation speed of 1500 RPM and welding speed of 50 mm/min.

  20. Macrostructural and microstructural features of 1 000 MPa grade TRIP steel joint by CO2 laser welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wenquan; Sun Daqian; Kang Chungyun

    2008-01-01

    Bead-on-plate CO2 laser welding of 1 000 MPa grade transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel was conducted under different welding powers, welding speeds and shield gases. The macrostructural and microstructural features of the welded joint were investigated. The increase of welding speed reduced the width of the weld bead and the porosities in the weld bead resulting from the different flow mode of melted metal in weld pool. The decrease of welding power or use of shield gas of helium also contributed to the reduction of porosity in the weld bead due to the alleviation of induced plasma formation, thus stabilizing the keyhole. The porosity formation intimately correlated with the evaporation of alloy element Mn in the base metal. The laser welded metal had same martensite microstructure as that of water-quenched base metal. The welding parameters which increased cooling rate all led to fine microstructures of the weld bead.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Welded Deformed Reinforcing Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghafur H. Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement strength, ductility and bendability properties are important components in design of reinforced concrete members, as the strength of any member comes mainly from reinforcement. Strain compatibility and plastic behaviors are mainly depending on reinforcement ductility. In construction practice, often welding of the bars is required. Welding of reinforcement is an instant solution in many cases, whereas welding is not a routine connection process. Welding will cause deficiencies in reinforcement bars, metallurgical changes and re-crystallization of microstructure of particles. Weld metal toughness is extremely sensitive to the welding heat input that decreases both of its strength and ductility. For determining the effects of welding in reinforcement properties, 48 specimens were tested with 5 different bar diameters, divided into six groups. Investigated parameters were: properties of un-welded bars; strength, ductility and density of weld metal; strength and ductility reduction due to heat input for bundled bars and transverse bars; welding effect on bars’ bending properties; behavior of different joint types; properties of three weld groove shapes also the locations and types of failures sections. Results show that, strength and elongation of the welded bars decreased by (10-40% and (30-60% respectively. Cold bending of welded bars and groove welds shall be prevented.

  2. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  3. Feasibility study of inside automatic welding system of cooling pipe of divertors for FER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, S.; Adachi, J.; Morishita, H.; Kakudate, S.; Taguchi, H.; Tada, E.

    1995-01-01

    In order to replace divertors for FER, cooling pipes of divertors should be cut and welded since they are too long to be replaced with divertors via horizontal maintenance ports. An inside cutting and welding system is also required because of an accessibility to pipes. A combination of an inside disc-cutting machine and an inside TIG-welding machine has been proposed as a candidate of the systems. We have made tests to confirm possibility to weld pipes which were cut with the disc-cutting machine. Possibility of welding has been proven. The tests result is described in the paper. (orig.)

  4. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toropchin, A; Frolov, V; Pipa, A V; Kozakov, R; Uhrlandt, D

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results

  5. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropchin, A.; Frolov, V.; Pipa, A. V.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results.

  6. Laser welding to expand the allowable gap in bore welding for ITER blanket hydraulic connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Hisashi, E-mail: tanigawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Maruyama, Takahito; Noguchi, Yuto; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    For application to bore welding of hydraulic connection in the ITER blanket module, laser welding presents the following benefits: low weld heat input is preferred for re-welding of the irradiated material. Its contactless process can intrinsically avoid a failure mode of the tool sticking on the weld. The exact requirements for pipe alignment were assessed in comparison with the assembly tolerance. The groove geometry was modified to expand the allowable initial gap. The groove was machined to be partially thick to obviate the filler wire. First, plates with partially thick grooves were welded to elucidate the preferred groove geometry and welding conditions. With the modified groove, the plates were welded for the initial gap of 1.0 mm. Then the groove geometry and welding conditions were adjusted based on results of pipe welding tests. By application of the additional 0.5-mm-thick and 2.5-mm-wide metal in the groove, pipes with an initial gap of 0.7 mm were welded successfully.

  7. Resistance to wear and microstructure of martensitic welds deposits for recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; Vedia, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    This work studied the welding metal for a martensitic steel (alloyed to Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W), deposited with a tubular metal-cored wire with gaseous protection of 82%Ar-18%Co 2 on a low carbon steel using the semi-automatic welding process. Transverse pieces were cut from the welded coupon for microstructural characterization, measurement of hardness profiles, determination of the chemical composition and wear trials. The microstructural characterization was done using optic and scanning electronic microscopes, X-rays diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Vicker microhardness (1 kg.) was measured. The wear trials (metal-metal) were performed in an Amsler machine under pure flow conditions. Different loads were used and the reference material was a SAE 1020 steel. The temperatures for each case were measured and the weight loss curves were defined as a function of the distance run and of the load. After testing the wear surfaces and the debris were measured. The microstructure of the welded deposit mostly consists of martensite and some retained austenite, with a pattern of dendritic segregation, and a hardness on the surface of 612 HVI. A lineal variation between the weight loss and the load applied was obtained as a response to the wear. The following phenomena were observed: abrasion, plastic deformation, oxidation and adhesion to the wear surfaces, as well as a tempering effect in the condition of the biggest load. The wear mechanisms acting on both surfaces were identified (CW)

  8. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  9. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  10. The effect of post-welding conditions in friction stir welds: From weld simulation to Ductile Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Tutum, Cem Celal

    2012-01-01

    software ANSYS, a thermo-mechanical model is employed to predict the thermally induced stresses and strains during welding, while an in-house finite element code is used to study the plastic flow localization and failure in a subsequent structural analysis. The coupling between the two models is made......The post-welding stress state, strain history and material conditions of friction stir welded joints are often strongly idealized when used in subsequent modeling analyses, typically by neglecting one or more of the features above. But, it is obvious that the conditions after welding do influence......, showed the largest influence of the post-welding conditions, even though significant relaxation of the residual stress state was predicted....

  11. Plastic Properties of Fine-Grained WMD After Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet welding is an innovative method of weld forced cooling immediately after welding. It allows to obtain weld with superior properties in comparison to conventional welding. The reason for this is to obtain a more favorable structure of the weld metal deposit (WMD with much higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF. Different structures and mechanical properties of weld metal deposit were obtained by using various gases for cooling. The paper shows the relationship between the type of gas for micro-jet cooling and plastic properties of the weld joint. Coefficient of restitution and plastic strain were selected to describe changes of weld plastic properties for different micro-jet cooling gases. The tests were performed in dynamic conditions (impact.

  12. Design of cylindrical pipe automatic welding control system based on STM32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuaishuai; Shen, Weicong

    2018-04-01

    The development of modern economy makes the demand for pipeline construction and construction rapidly increasing, and the pipeline welding has become an important link in pipeline construction. At present, there are still a large number of using of manual welding methods at home and abroad, and field pipe welding especially lacks miniature and portable automatic welding equipment. An automated welding system consists of a control system, which consisting of a lower computer control panel and a host computer operating interface, as well as automatic welding machine mechanisms and welding power systems in coordination with the control system. In this paper, a new control system of automatic pipe welding based on the control panel of the lower computer and the interface of the host computer is proposed, which has many advantages over the traditional automatic welding machine.

  13. Sensor controlled robotic welding for nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to apply real time monitoring, artificial intelligence and on-line correction to dynamically control the depth of weld penetration and weld integrity during the welding process. Welding is a major technique used in the fabrication, construction and maintenance of power generating and energy conversion systems. In the welding process, fluctuations in process variables lead to weld defects such as lack of penetration, cracks, porosity and undesirable metallurgical structures. This research will apply advanced infrared sensing techniques which have been successfully used in seam tracking to the equally complex problem of weld defect and weld puddle penetration control. Thermal temperature distributions of plates being welded will be dynamically measured during welding using infrared techniques. These temperature distributions will be used to interpret changes in the size and shape of the molten metal pool and the presence of conditions that may lead to defects in the solidified weld. The ultimate result of this research will be the development of machines which are capable of sensing and altering process variables to eliminate defective welds and increase the productivity of the welding process. Successful completion of this proposed research will lead to potential major improvements in the fabrication, construction and maintenance of advanced nuclear reactors and promote increased safety and reliability while decreasing construction costs. 47 refs., 50 figs

  14. Fully Automatic Spot Welding System for Application in Automotive Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Puschner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A Virtual Machine has led to a fully automatic spot welding system. All necessary parameters are created by measuring systems and algorithms running in the Virtual Machine. A hybrid operating circuit allows the Virtual Machine to read the exact process voltage between the tips of the electrodes every 50 µs. Actual welding voltage and current allow for the first time reading process impedance, electric power and total energy being transferred to the spot weld. Necessary energy input is calculated by a calorimetric model after measuring the total thickness of the materials to be welded as soon as the welding gun is positioned at the workpiece. A precision potentiometer implemented in the gun delivers the total material thickness within the 0.1 mm range during the pre-pressure phases. The internal databank of the Virtual Machine controls all essential parameters to guide the total welding process. Special generator characteristics of the welding power unit are created by the Virtual Machine just during the upslope and the welding phases. So the process will be initialized in differentiating the kind of material, mild steel or high strengthen steel. This will affect the kind of energy input and current decrease during the upslope and downslope phases.

  15. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...

  16. Variation behavior of residual stress distribution by manufacturing processes in welded pipes of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near heat affected zone (HAZ) of primary loop recirculation pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the nuclear power plants. For the non-sensitization material, residual stress is the important factor of SCC, and it is generated by machining and welding. In the actual plants, welding is conducted after machining as manufacturing processes of welded pipes. It could be considered that residual stress generated by machining is varied by welding as a posterior process. This paper presents residual stress variation due to manufacturing processes of pipes using X-ray diffraction method. Residual stress distribution due to welding after machining had a local maximum stress in HAZ. Moreover, this value was higher than residual stress generated by welding or machining. Vickers hardness also had a local maximum hardness in HAZ. In order to clarify hardness variation, crystal orientation analysis with EBSD method was performed. Recovery and recrystallization were occurred by welding heat near the weld metal. These lead hardness decrease. The local maximum region showed no microstructure evolution. In this region, machined layer was remained. Therefore, the local maximum hardness was generated at machined layer. The local maximum stress was caused by the superposition effect of residual stress distributions due to machining and welding. Moreover, these local maximum residual stress and hardness are exceeded critical value of SCC initiation. In order to clarify the effect of residual stress on SCC initiation, evaluation including manufacturing processes is important. (author)

  17. The Hooey Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarnati, James T.; Tice, Craig J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how students can make and use Hooey Machines to learn how mechanical energy can be transferred from one object to another within a system. The Hooey Machine is made using a pencil, eight thumbtacks, one pushpin, tape, scissors, graph paper, and a plastic lid. (PR)

  18. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    , a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example......This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  19. Simulation of Temperature Field in HDPE Pipe Thermal Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Li-jun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For high density polyethylene pipe connection,welding technology is the key of the high density engineering plastic pressure pipe safety. And the temperature distribution in the welding process has a very important influence on the welding quality. Polyethylene pipe weld joints of one dimensional unsteady overall heat transfer model is established by MARC software and simulates temperature field and stress field distribution of the welding process,and the thermocouple temperature automatic acquisition system of welding temperature field changes were detected,and compared by simulation and experiment .The results show that,at the end of the heating,the temperature of the pipe does not reach the maximum,but reached the maximum at 300 s,which indicates that the latent heat of phase change in the process of pressure welding. In the process of pressure welding, the axial stress of the pipe is gradually changed from tensile stress to compressive stress.

  20. Today's status of application of high power electron beam welding to heavy electric machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Hisanao; Okuni, Tetsuo; Sejima, Itsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    The progress in high energy welding is remarkable in recent years, and electron beam welding is now widely used in heavy industries. However, there are number of problems to be solved in the application of high power electron beam welding to ultra thick steel plates (over 100 mm). The following matters are described: the economy of high power electron beam welding; the development of the welding machines; the problems in the actual application; the instances of the welding in a high-pressure spherical gas tank, non-magnetic steel structures and high-precision welded structures; weldor training; etc. For the future rise in the capacities of heavy electric machinery, the high efficiency by high power electron beam welding will be useful. The current status is its applications to the high-precision welding of large structures with 6 m diameter and the high-quality welding of heavy structures with 160 mm thickness. (J.P.N.)

  1. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  2. The Newest Machine Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yeong Seop; Choe, Byeong Do; Bang, Meong Sung

    2005-08-01

    This book gives descriptions of machine material with classification of machine material and selection of machine material, structure and connection of material, coagulation of metal and crystal structure, equilibrium diagram, properties of metal material, elasticity and plasticity, biopsy of metal, material test and nondestructive test. It also explains steel material such as heat treatment of steel, cast iron and cast steel, nonferrous metal materials, non metallic materials, and new materials.

  3. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  4. Quality status display for a vibration welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Abell, Jeffrey A.; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Bracey, Jennifer; Wang, Hui; Tavora, Peter W.; Davis, Jeffrey S.; Hutchinson, Daniel C.; Reardon, Ronald L.; Utz, Shawn

    2017-11-28

    A method includes receiving, during a vibration welding process, a set of sensory signals from a collection of sensors positioned with respect to a work piece during formation of a weld on or within the work piece. The method also includes receiving control signals from a welding controller during the process, with the control signals causing the welding horn to vibrate at a calibrated frequency, and processing the received sensory and control signals using a host machine. Additionally, the method includes displaying a predicted weld quality status on a surface of the work piece using a status projector. The method may include identifying and display a quality status of a suspect weld. The laser projector may project a laser beam directly onto or immediately adjacent to the suspect welds, e.g., as a red, green, blue laser or a gas laser having a switched color filter.

  5. Micro-tensile strength of a welded turbine disc superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oluwasegun, K.M.; Cooper, C.; Chiu, Y.L.; Jones, I.P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Li, H.Y., E-mail: h.y.li.1@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Baxter, G. [Rolls-Royce plc., P.O. Box 31, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-24

    A micro-tensile testing system coupled with focussed ion beam (FIB) machining was used to characterise the micro-mechanical properties of the weld from a turbine disc alloy. The strength variations between the weld and the base alloy are rationalised via the microstructure obtained.

  6. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW), which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The ...

  7. Applicability evaluation of eddy current testing for underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Noriyasu; Kasuya, Takashi; Ueno, Souichi; Ochiai, Makoto; Yuguchi, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We clarified a defect detecting capability of eddy current testing (ECT) as a surface inspection technique for underwater laser beam welding. An underwater laser beam welding procedure includes groove caving as a preparation, laser beam welding in groove and welding surface grinding as a post treatment. Therefore groove and grinded welding surface inspections are required underwater. We curried out defect detection tests using three kinds of specimens simulated a groove, reactor vessel nozzle dissimilar metal welding materials and a laser beam welding material with a cross coil ECT probe. From experimental results, we confirmed that it is possible to detect 0.3 mm or more depth electro-discharge machining slits on machining surfaces in all specimens and an ECT has possibility as a surface inspection technique for underwater laser beam welding. (author)

  8. Sub-arc narrow gap welding of Atucha 2 RPV closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantsch, H.; Million, K.; Zimmermann, H.

    1982-01-01

    Narrow gap technology was used for reasons of design and fabrication when welding the closure-head dome to its flange. Preliminary tests had yielded the necessary improvements of the well-proven sub-arc practice. New facilities had to be developed for welding proper and for the accompanying machining work (finishing in the narrow gap). Special measures were adopted for monitoring the welding process and for recording the welding parameters. The new method was tried out on several large test coupons before welding of the final product was started. No difficulties were encountered during the welding job. Fabrication of the closure head is shown in a short film sequence. (orig.)

  9. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  10. The National Shipbuilding Research Program: Evaluation of the Cincinnati Milacron T-3 Robot for Shipbuilding Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    acknowledgement is extended to the members of Welding Panel SP-7 of the SNAME Ship Production Committee, who served as technical advisors in the preparation...Binzel Robo 450. . . . . . 4.4.4.1.3 Hobart WCG 600 . . . . . . 4.4.4.2 Maintenance and Service . . . . . . . 4.4.4.3 Recommendation...Machine Specialties D & F - Welding . . . Torch Binzel Robo 450 - Welding Torch. Hobart WCG - 600 - Welding Torch. Binzel Nozzle Cleaner

  11. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  12. Production and testing of flexible welding flux rods, used for protecting briquetting press molds from wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, B.; Czerwinski, M.; Dittrich, V.

    1985-11-01

    Production, properties and trial application are discussed for the Feroplast ZIS 218 welding powder rod, developed for automated surface armouring of brown coal briquetting press moulds by arc welding. The welding rod has a diameter of 8 mm and can be bent to a radius of less than 150 mm for reeling. The welding rod is produced by mixing 9% plasticizer (Miravithen and polyisobutylene according to GDR patent 203 269) to the steel welding powder. Weldability of the rod proved to be favourable; there was no emission of toxic fumes during welding. Microscopic studies of the welded surface coating showed that welding with 650A achieved the best coat pore structure. At the Schwarze Pumpe Gasworks the trial service life of various briquet press moulds, reinforced with Ferroplast ZIS 218, proved to be not shorter than that of moulds reinforced with the conventional ZIS powder welding method. 1 reference.

  13. Mechanisms of joint and microstructure formation in high power ultrasonic spot welding 6111 aluminium automotive sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakavos, D.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is difficult to apply to aluminium automotive alloys. High power ultrasonic spot welding (HP-USW) is a new alternative method which is extremely efficient, using ∼2% of the energy of RSW. However, to date there have been few studies of the mechanisms of bond formation and the material interactions that take place with this process. Here, we report on a detailed investigation where we have used X-ray tomography, high resolution SEM, and EBSD, and dissimilar alloy welds, to track the interface position and characterise the stages of weld formation, and microstructure evolution, as a function of welding energy. Under optimum conditions high quality welds are produced, showing few defects. Welding proceeds by the development and spread of microwelds, until extensive plastic deformation occurs within the weld zone, where the temperature reaches ∼380 deg. C. The origin of the weld interface 'flow features' characteristic of HP-USW are discussed.

  14. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints.

  15. Unstable Temperature Distribution in Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq Aziz Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the friction stir welding process, a nonuniform and high generated temperature is undesirable. Unstable temperature and distribution affect thermal and residual stresses along the welding line, thus necessitating mitigation. This paper presents a simple method to prevent significant temperature difference along the welding line and also to help nullifying some defect types associated with this welding, such as end-hole, initial unwelded line, and deformed areas. In the experimental investigation, a heat and force thermocouple and dynamometer were utilized while couple-field thermomechanical models were used to evaluate temperature and its distribution, plastic strain, and material displacement. The suggested method generated uniform temperature distributions. Measurement results are discussed, showing a good correlation with predictions.

  16. Metal Flow in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The plastic deformation field in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is compared to that in metal cutting. A shear surface around the FSW tool analogous to the metal cutting shear plane is identified and comprises the basis of the "rotating plug" flow field model and the "wiping" model of tool interaction with weld metal. Within the context of these models: The FSW shear rate is estimated to be comparable to metal cutting shear rates. The effect of tool geometry on the FSW shear surface is discussed and related to published torque measurements. Various FS W structural features are explained, including a difference in structure of bimetallic welds when alloys on the advancing and retreating sides of the weld seam are exchanged. The joining mechanism and critical parameters of the FSW process are made clear.

  17. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  18. Electron Beam Welding of Gear Wheels by Splitted Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dřímal Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the issue of electron beam welding of high-accurate gear wheels composed of a spur gearing and fluted shaft joined with a face weld for automotive industry. Both parts made of the high-strength low-alloy steel are welded in the condition after final machining and heat treatment, performed by case hardening, whereas it is required that the run-out in the critical point of weldment after welding, i. e. after the final operation, would be 0.04 mm max..

  19. Evaluation of residual stress on pipe welded joints using laser interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ho Seob; Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Koung Suk [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Residual stresses that occur during the welding process, are the main cause of failure and defects in welded structures. This paper, presents the use of an electronic processing laser speckle interferometer to measure the residual stress of a welded pipe for a nuclear power plant. A tensile testing machine was used to evaluate a welded pipe that failed in compression. The inform plane deformation and modulus of elasticity of the base metal and welds were measured using an interferometer. Varying the load on the welded pipe had a larger effect on the deformation of the base metal the other properties of the base metal and welds. The elastic moduli of the base metal and weld of the welded pipe were 202.46 and 212.14 GPa, respectively, the residual stress was measured to be 6.29 MPa.

  20. Automatic monitoring of the alignment and wear of vibration welding equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Cai, Wayne W.; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Mink, Keith

    2017-05-23

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host machine, a check station, and a welding robot. At least one displacement sensor is positioned with respect to one of the welding equipment and the check station. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station, when a threshold condition is met, i.e., a predetermined amount of time has elapsed or a predetermined number of welds have been completed. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the at least one displacement sensor, at the check station, and determines a status condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. The status condition may be one of the alignment of the vibration welding equipment and the wear or degradation of the vibration welding equipment.

  1. Automatization of welding for nuclear power equipments and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Yasumasa; Matsumoto, Teruo; Koyama, Takaichi

    1980-01-01

    For the requirement of high reliability in the construction of nuclear power plants and the reduction of radiation exposure in the modefying works of existing plants, the automation and remote operation of welding have increased their necessity. In this paper, the present state of the automation of welding for making machines, equipments and pipings for nuclear power plants in Hitachi Ltd. is described, and the aim of developing the automation, the features of the equipments and the state of application to actual plants are introduced, centering around the automation of welding for large structures such as reactor containment vessels and the remote type automatic welding system for pipings. By these automations, the large outcomes were obtained in the improvement of welding quality required for the machines and equipments for atomic energy. Moreover, the conspicuous results were also obtained in case of the peculiar works to nuclear power plants, in which the reduction of the radiation exposure related to human bodies and the welding of high quality are demanded. The present state of the automation of welding for nuclear installations in Hitachi Ltd., the development of automatic welding equipments and the present state of application to actual plants, and the development and application of the automatic pipe working machine for reducing radiation exposure are explained. (Kako, I.)

  2. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  3. Discontinuity Detection in the Shield Metal Arc Welding Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocota, José Alberto Naves; Garcia, Gabriel Carvalho; da Costa, Adilson Rodrigues; de Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes; Rocha, Filipe Augusto Santos; Freitas, Gustavo Medeiros

    2017-05-10

    This work proposes a new methodology for the detection of discontinuities in the weld bead applied in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processes. The detection system is based on two sensors-a microphone and piezoelectric-that acquire acoustic emissions generated during the welding. The feature vectors extracted from the sensor dataset are used to construct classifier models. The approaches based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers are able to identify with a high accuracy the three proposed weld bead classes: desirable weld bead, shrinkage cavity and burn through discontinuities. Experimental results illustrate the system's high accuracy, greater than 90% for each class. A novel Hierarchical Support Vector Machine (HSVM) structure is proposed to make feasible the use of this system in industrial environments. This approach presented 96.6% overall accuracy. Given the simplicity of the equipment involved, this system can be applied in the metal transformation industries.

  4. Reliability of copper based alloys for electric resistance spot welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovicj, M.; Mihajlovicj, A.; Sherbedzhija, B.

    1977-01-01

    Durability of copper based alloys (B-5 and B-6) for electric resistance spot-welding was examined. The total amount of Be, Ni and Zr was up to 2 and 1 wt.% respectively. Good durability and satisfactory quality of welded spots were obtained in previous laboratory experiments carried out on the fixed spot-welding machine of an industrial type (only B-5 alloy was examined). Electrodes made of both B-5 and B-6 alloy were tested on spot-welding grips and fixed spot-welding machines in Tvornica automobila Sarajevo (TAS). The obtained results suggest that the durability of electrodes made of B-5 and B-6 alloys is more than twice better than of that used in TAS

  5. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  6. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  7. Friction stir welding (FSW process of copper alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miličić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the structure of the weld joint of technically pure copper, which is realized using friction stir welding (FSW. The mechanism of thermo-mechanical processes of the FSW method has been identified and a correlation between the weld zone and its microstructure established. Parameters of the FSW welding technology influencing the zone of the seam material and the mechanical properties of the resulting joint were analyzed. The physical joining consists of intense mixing the base material along the joint line in the “doughy” phase. Substantial plastic deformations immediately beneath the frontal surface of tool provide fine-grained structure and a good quality joint. The optimum shape of the tool and the optimum welding regime (pressure force, rotation speed and the traverse speed of the tool in the heat affected zone enable the achievement of the same mechanical properties as those of the basic material, which justifies its use in welding reliable structures.

  8. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yılmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept were important considerations for penetration. Welding process was performed using various welding current values. The study showed that both welding parameters and composition of the stainless steels has influence on the penetration and It is increased with increasing of welding current. Besides, P/W rate of the weldments were influenced by the current and hardness values of the weld metal decrease with increasing welding current. The microstructure of the weld metal was also changed by variation of welding current.

  9. FFTF report: FFTF piping installation and welding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, J.

    1975-01-01

    The main sodium piping with a diameter of 16'' or 28 '' is being installed at the FFTF construction site starting in December 1974. The supplier and authority demarcations are: Combustion Engineering supplies the reactor vessel, guard vessel and adjoining pipes and uses the machine welding equipment ''Dimetrics''; for the piping system of the primary and secondary loops the pipes manufactured by Rollmet at HUICO, Pasco, were delivered and prefabricated there, as far as compatible with the installation. ''Astroarc'' welding machines are used by Bechtel for the piping prefabrication in the weld laboratory as well as on site at the construction site. Technical welding problems occurring during the course of the installation at the construction site and several during this time are described. At present 6 weld seams in the reactor and 14 weld seams in the secondary loop are accepted. The requirement exists to carry out as many welds as possible automatically, in order to produce sodium pipe welds of high technical quality and which are reproducible. The welding equipment is described

  10. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgardt, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pierce, Stanley W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  11. Corrosion resistance of «tube – tubesheet» weld joint obtained by friction welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIZVANOV Rif Garifovich

    2017-08-01

    speak of a qualitative improvement in the structure of compounds as a result of exposure to a metal at the nanolevel. The conducted study of electrode potential values in specific points of parent metal and of welded joints obtained via different methods showed, that from the electrochemical corrosion point of view the «tube – tubesheet» joints obtained by friction welding without thermal treatment are highly competitive in terms of corrosion resistance with similar details obtained via arc welding methods. This fact allows to consider the friction welding method of «tube – tubesheet» fixed joints manufacturing as an alternative for arc welding methods, which in its turn not only allows producers to obtain «tube – tubesheet» fixed joints with high level of strength and plastic properties without thermal treatment but also significantly reduce energy and labor costs on manufacturing of tube bundles of shell-and-tube heat exchangers, including those made of steel 15H5M.

  12. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cali; Demokritou, Philip; Shafer, Martin; Christiani, David

    2013-01-01

    Welding fume particles have been well studied in the past; however, most studies have examined welding fumes generated from machine models rather than actual exposures. Furthermore, the link between physicochemical and toxicological properties of welding fume particles has not been well understood. This study aims to investigate the physicochemical properties of particles derived during real time welding processes generated during actual welding processes and to assess the particle size specific toxicological properties. A compact cascade impactor (Harvard CCI) was stationed within the welding booth to sample particles by size. Size fractionated particles were extracted and used for both off-line physicochemical analysis and in vitro cellular toxicological characterization. Each size fraction was analyzed for ions, elemental compositions, and mass concentration. Furthermore, real time optical particle monitors (DustTrak™, TSI Inc., Shoreview, Minn.) were used in the same welding booth to collect real time PM2.5 particle number concentration data. The sampled particles were extracted from the polyurethane foam (PUF) impaction substrates using a previously developed and validated protocol, and used in a cellular assay to assess oxidative stress. By mass, welding aerosols were found to be in coarse (PM 2.5–10), and fine (PM 0.1–2.5) size ranges. Most of the water soluble (WS) metals presented higher concentrations in the coarse size range with some exceptions such as sodium, which presented elevated concentration in the PM 0.1 size range. In vitro data showed size specific dependency, with the fine and ultrafine size ranges having the highest reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity. Additionally, this study suggests a possible correlation between welders' experience, the welding procedure and equipment used and particles generated from welding fumes. Mass concentrations and total metal and water soluble metal concentrations of welding fume particles may be

  13. Micro Structure and Hardness Analysis of Brass Metal Welded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukman Faris, N.; Muljadi; Djuhana

    2018-01-01

    Brass metals are widely used for plumbing fittings. High tensile brasses are more highly alloyed and find uses in marine engineering. The welding of brass metal has been done by using electrical weld machine (SMAW). The microstructure of brass metal welded was observed by optical microscope. The result can see that the microstructure has been changed due to heat from welding. The microstructure of original brass metal is seen a fine laminar stucture, but the microstructure at HAZ appears bigger grains and some area at HAZ is seen coarser microstructure. The microstructure at weld zone can be seen that it was found some of agglomeration of materials from reaction between brass metal and electrode coating wire. According the hardness measurement, it is found highest hardness value about 301.92 HV at weld zone, and hardness value at base metal is 177.84 HV

  14. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  15. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  16. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  17. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  18. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still

  19. A comparative study of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding and TIG welding of thin Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study aiming at comparing properties of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy joints between pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding and traditional fusion welding. To achieve the research purpose, Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plates with a thickness of 0.8 mm were welded using pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG), respectively. Residual distortions, weld geometry, microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints produced with LBW and TIG welding were compared. During the tensile test, with the aid of a high speed infrared camera, evolution of the plastic strain within tensile specimens corresponding to LBW and TIG welding were recorded and analyzed. Compared with the TIG, the welded joint by LBW has the characters of small overall residual distortion, fine microstructure, narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ), high Vickers hardness. LBW welding method can produce joints with higher strength and ductility. It can be concluded that Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding is much more suitable for welding the thin Ti6Al4V titanium alloy plate than TIG welding.

  20. Tensile strength of laser welded cobalt-chromium alloy with and without an argon atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Anna; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2010-06-01

    The tensile strength and depth of weld of two cobalt chromium alloys before and after laser welding with and without an argon gas atmosphere were investigated. Using two cobalt chromium alloys, rod shaped specimens (5 cm x 1.5 mm) were cast. Specimens were sand blasted, sectioned and welded with a pulsed Nd: YAG laser welding machine and tested in tension using an Instron universal testing machine. A statistically significant difference in tensile strength was observed between the two alloys. The tensile strength of specimens following laser welding was significantly less than the unwelded controls. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the micro-structure of the cast alloy was altered in the region of the weld. No statistically significant difference was found between specimens welded with or without an argon atmosphere.

  1. Damage Tolerance Assessment of Friction Pull Plug Welds in an Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks. Self-reacting friction stir welding is one variation of the friction stir weld process being developed for manufacturing tanks. Friction pull plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential self-reacting friction stir weld. A friction plug weld placed in a self-reacting friction stir weld results in a non-homogenous weld joint where the initial weld, plug weld, their respective heat affected zones and the base metal all interact. The welded joint is a composite plastically deformed material system with a complex residual stress field. In order to address damage tolerance concerns associated with friction plug welds in safety critical structures, such as propellant tanks, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data relating residual strength capability to flaw size in an aluminum alloy friction plug weld will be presented.

  2. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  3. Weld repair of helium degraded reactor vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Lohmeier, D.A.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Rankin, D.T.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Madeyski, A.; Shogan, R.P.; Lessmann, G.G.

    1990-01-01

    Welding methods for modification or repair of irradiated nuclear reactor vessels are being evaluated at the Savannah River Site. A low-penetration weld overlay technique has been developed to minimize the adverse effects of irradiation induced helium on the weldability of metals and alloys. This technique was successfully applied to Type 304 stainless steel test plates that contained 3 to 220 appm helium from tritium decay. Conventional welding practices caused significant cracking and degradation in the test plates. Optical microscopy of weld surfaces and cross sections showed that large surface toe cracks formed around conventional welds in the test plates but did not form around overlay welds. Scattered incipient underbead cracks (grain boundary separations) were associated with both conventional and overlay test welds. Tensile and bend tests were used to assess the effect of base metal helium content on the mechanical integrity of the low-penetration overlay welds. The axis of tensile specimens was perpendicular to the weld-base metal interface. Tensile specimens were machined after studs were resistance welded to overlay surfaces

  4. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    testing machine in order to determine fatigue crack propagation life. The fatigue crack propagation life of weld-repaired specimens was compared to un-welded and as-welded specimens. At the end of fatigue test, samples were cut from the fracture surfaces of typical welded and weld-repaired specimens and are examined under Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characteristics features from these micrographs are explained.

  5. Welding engineering handbook. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundarrajan, S.; Bhaskar, S.V.; Amarnath Kumar, G.C.

    1992-11-01

    In this Welding Engineering Handbook, we have brought key application areas of welding which are of technocommercial importance. These details are not normally available. Each author, highly specialized in these areas has spent considerable amount of time and covered the topic exhaustively giving valuable details. Each application area has different quality requirements which are brought out clearly. This handbook is designed to cater the information source for various professionals in core sector industries like fabrication, shipbuilding, automobiles, nuclear plants, machine building, fertilisers and chemical industry, pressure vessel manufactures etc. We are sure that this handbook will serve as a reference reckoner to all plant/works managers, maintenance, projects, engineers, R and D and students. (original)

  6. Continuous internal channels formed in aluminum fusion welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, J.; Sabo, W.

    1967-01-01

    Process produces continuous internal channel systems on a repeatable basis in 2014-T6 aluminum. Standard machining forms the initial channel, which is filled with tungsten carbide powder. TIG machine fusion welding completes formation of the channel. Chem-mill techniques enlarge it to the desired size.

  7. The effect of microstructure and geometry on the fatigue behaviour of bundle assembly welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, B.A.; Gabbani, M.

    1997-01-01

    Cracking of end plates, in the Darlington NGS, was attributed to high-cycle fatigue resulting from flow-induced vibrations. Because the cracks were predominantly associated with the bundle assembly welds and with certain element positions, a program was initiated to study whether the microstructure and geometry of the weld zone affected the fatigue behaviour of the assembly welds. Assembly weld samples were subjected to different heat treatments, resulting in different microstructures of the weld zone. Results of fatigue testing suggest that heat treatment of the welds (i.e., microstructure) had little effect on the fatigue life. Assembly welds were also produced with different weld notch geometries, and compared with samples having notches produced by machining (instead of welding). The results of these tests showed that geometry of the weld had a significant effect on fatigue life. However, the geometry of the weld notch required to significantly improve fatigue life is not achievable using the current assembly welding process. A small improvement in fatigue life of welded samples appears possible by increasing the weld diameter. (author)

  8. Analysis of Welding Joint on Handling High Level Waste-Glass Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlan Martono; Aisyah; Wati

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of welding joint of stainless steel austenitic AISI 304 for canister material has been studied. At the handling of waste-glass canister from melter below to interim storage, there is a step of welding of canister lid. Welding quality must be kept in a good condition, in order there is no gas out pass welding pores and canister be able to lift by crane. Two part of stainless steel plate in dimension (200 x 125 x 3) mm was jointed by welding. Welding was conducted by TIG machine with protection gas is argon. Electric current were conducted for welding were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, and 140 A. Welded plates were cut with dimension according to JIS 3121 standard for tensile strength test. Hardness test in welding zone, HAZ, and plate were conducted by Vickers. Analysis of microstructure by optic microscope. The increasing of electric current at the welding, increasing of tensile strength of welding yields. The best quality welding yields using electric current was 110 A. At the welding with electric current more than 110 A, the electric current influence towards plate quality, so that decreasing of stainless steel plate quality and breaking at the plate. Tensile strength of stainless steel plate welding yields in requirement conditions according to application in canister transportation is 0.24 kg/mm 2 . (author)

  9. Improving the properties of stainless steel electron-beam welds by laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xueyi; Zhou Changchi

    1991-10-01

    For improving the properties of corrosion resistance of stainless steel, which is widely used in nuclear engineering, the technological test on rapid fusing and setting formed by using laser treatment in electron-beam welds on stainless steel was investigated and the analytical results of welding structure and properties were reported. The experimental results show that after laser treatment more finegrained structure in the surface of the welding centreline and welding heat-affected zone was observed. Segregation of chemical composition was reduced. Plasticity and corrosion resistance in the welding zone was increased. Intergranular corrosion of heat-affected zone was improved

  10. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  11. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  12. Equipment to weld fuel rods of mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, G.; Orlando, O.S.; Olano, V.R.; Toubes, B.; Munoz, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two welding outfits system T1G were designed and constructed to weld fuel rods with mixed oxides pellets (uranium and plutonium). One of them is connected to a glove box where the loading of sheaths takes place. The sheaths are driven to the welder through a removable plug pusher in the welding chamber. This equipment was designed to perform welding tests changing the parameters (gas composition and pressure, welding current, electrode position, etc.). The components of the welder, such as plug holder, chamber closure and peripheral accessories, were designed and constructed taking into account the working pressures in the machine, which is placed in a controlled area and connected to a glove box, where special safety conditions are necessary. The equipment to weld fuel bars is complemented by another machine, located in cold area, of the type presently used in the fuel elements factory. This equipment has been designed to perform some welding operations in sheaths and mixed oxide rods of the type Atucha I and II. Both machines have a programmed power supply of wide range and a vacuum, and pressurizing system that allows the change of parameters. Both systems have special features of handling and operation. (Author)

  13. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  14. The investigation of typical welding defects for 5456 aluminum alloy friction stir welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabin; Yan Keng; Lin Tao; Chen Shanben; Jiang Chengyu; Zhao Yong

    2006-01-01

    The external factors on the friction stir welding defects are so abundant that the experiments of friction stir welding were conducted for 5456 aluminum alloy. With the changes of the tool tilt angle and material condition, defects can be generated. These defects can be conventional ones (lack of penetration or voids), or lazy S, which are unique to friction stir welding. However, the origin of the defects remains an area of uncertainty. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the formation of these defects. The typical welding defects of friction stir welding joint for 5456 aluminum alloy were analyzed and discussed, respectively, by using optical microscopy (OM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microscopic examination of the nugget zone and fracture location of the weld confirms that the tilt angle can change the plastic material flow patterns in the stir zone and accordingly control the weld properties. In addition, the oxide layer from the initial butt surface during FSW is dispersed at the grain boundary. These A1 2 O 3 particles are actually the major cause of failure of the joint

  15. Effects Of Welding On The Fatigue Behaviour Of Commercial Aluminum AA-1100 Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthayakumar, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Rani, Ahmad Majdi Abdul; Hadzima, Branislav

    2018-04-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is an budding solid state welding process, which is frequently used for joining aluminum alloys where materials can be joined without melt and recast. Therefore, when welding alloys through FSW the phase transformations occurs will be in the solid state form. The present work is aimed in evaluating the fatigue life of friction stir welded commercial grade aluminum alloy joints. The commercial grade AA1100 aluminum alloy of 12mm thickness plate is welded and the specimens are tested using a rotary beam fatigue testing machine at different stress levels. The stress versus number of cycles (S-N) curves was plotted using the data points. The Fatigue life of tungsten inert gas (TIG) and metal inert gas (MIG) welded joints was compared. The fatigue life of the weld joints was interrelated with the tensile properties, microstructure and micro hardness properties. The effects of the notches and welding processes are evaluated and reported.

  16. Automatic Welding System of Aluminum Pipe by Monitoring Backside Image of Molten Pool Using Vision Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    An automatic welding system using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with vision sensor for welding of aluminum pipe was constructed. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position and moving welding torch with the AC welding machine. The monitoring system consists of a vision sensor using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Neural network model for welding speed control were constructed to perform the process automatically. From the experimental results it shows the effectiveness of the control system confirmed by good detection of molten pool and sound weld of experimental result.

  17. Influence of weld-induced residual stresses on the hysteretic behavior of a girth-welded circular stainless steel tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin-Hyung; Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Chang, Kyong-Ho; Jeon, Jun-Tai; Um, Tae-Hwan

    2018-04-01

    The present study attempts to characterize the relevance of welding residual stresses to the hysteretic behaviour of a girth-welded circular stainless steel tube under cyclic mechanical loadings. Finite element (FE) thermal simulation of the girth butt welding process is first performed to identify the weld-induced residual stresses by using the one-way coupled three-dimensional (3-D) thermo-mechanical FE analysis method. 3-D elastic-plastic FE analysis equipped with the cyclic plasticity constitutive model capable of describing the cyclic response is next carried out to scrutinize the effects that the residual stresses have on the hysteretic performance of the girth-welded steel tube exposed to cyclic axial loading, which takes the residual stresses and plastic strains calculated from the preceding thermo-mechanical analysis as the initial condition. The analytical results demonstrate that the residual stresses bring about premature yielding and deterioration of the load carrying capacity in the elastic and the transition load ranges, whilst the residual stress effect is wiped out quickly in the plastic load domain since the residual stresses are nearly wholly relaxed after application of the cyclic plastic loading.

  18. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  19. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  20. IMPROVEMENT OF WELDED CONNECTIONS WITH SIDE LAP WELDS BY REDISTRIBUTION OF ALL-WELD METAL ALONG LENGTHS AND CROSS-SECTIONS THEREOF USING MECHANIZED AND ROBOTIC WELDING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Evgeniy Igorevich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of bearing capacity of samples of two series performed by semiautomatic welding in CO2 on the axis, and by robotic welding machine in mixture (CO2 + Ar, is presented. Welds of constant cross section, welds with extended leg on end sections, and welds in the form of two dowels on end sections were performed. Efficiency of pilot samples of the first series (with extended leg on end sections by way of a smooth transition defined by the ratio of weld metal volume to a crushing load reaches 28 % relative to samples with a leg constant as per length. Samples of the first series with an extended leg on end sections also showed efficiency increased to 17 %. According to the second series samples test results, the exceeding of bearing capacity of the samples performed with an extended leg on end sections by 24 % in comparison with the samples with a leg of constant cross section was determined. Samples of the second series performed in the form of two dowels on end sections demonstrated the exceeding of the relative bearing capacity by 42 % in comparison with the samples with a continuous leg of constant cross-section.

  1. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  2. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  3. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  4. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  5. Computational simulation of weld microstructure and distortion by considering process mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M.; Mikami, Y.; Okano, S.; Itoh, S.

    2009-05-01

    Highly precise fabrication of welded materials is in great demand, and so microstructure and distortion controls are essential. Furthermore, consideration of process mechanics is important for intelligent fabrication. In this study, the microstructure and hardness distribution in multi-pass weld metal are evaluated by computational simulations under the conditions of multiple heat cycles and phase transformation. Because conventional CCT diagrams of weld metal are not available even for single-pass weld metal, new diagrams for multi-pass weld metals are created. The weld microstructure and hardness distribution are precisely predicted when using the created CCT diagram for multi-pass weld metal and calculating the weld thermal cycle. Weld distortion is also investigated by using numerical simulation with a thermal elastic-plastic analysis. In conventional evaluations of weld distortion, the average heat input has been used as the dominant parameter; however, it is difficult to consider the effect of molten pool configurations on weld distortion based only on the heat input. Thus, the effect of welding process conditions on weld distortion is studied by considering molten pool configurations, determined by temperature distribution and history.

  6. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  7. Heat input effect of friction stir welding on aluminum alloy AA 6061-T6 welded joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmak, A.; Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Tadić, S.; Djurdjević, A. A.; Čeković, I. R.; Dončeva, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2016), s. 637-641 ISSN 0354-9836 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : friction stir welding * defect * heat input * maximum temperature Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2016 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-9836/2016/0354-98361500147D.pdf

  8. Effects of Welding Parameters on Strength and Corrosion Behavior of Dissimilar Galvanized Q&P and TRIP Spot Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Russo Spena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the main welding parameters on mechanical strength and corrosion behavior of galvanized quenching and partitioning and transformation induced plasticity spot welds, which are proposed to assemble advanced structural car elements for the automotive industry. Steel sheets have been welded with different current, clamping force, and welding time settings. The quality of the spot welds has been assessed through lap-shear and salt spray corrosion tests, also evaluating the effects of metal expulsion on strength and corrosion resistance of the joints. An energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping has been used to assess the damage of the galvanized zinc coating and the nature of the corrosive products. Welding current and time have the strongest influence on the shear strength of the spot welds, whereas clamping force is of minor importance. However, clamping force has the primary effect on avoiding expulsion of molten metal from the nugget during the joining process. Furthermore, clamping force has a beneficial influence on the corrosion resistance because it mainly hinders the permeation of the corrosive environment towards the spot welds. Although the welded samples can exhibit high shear strength also when a metal expulsion occurs, this phenomenon should be avoided because it enhances the damage and vaporization of the protective zinc coating.

  9. Development of a one side automatic TIG arc welding system in horizontal position for annular vessels in nuclear fuel cycle factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Takao; Ohsawa, Morihiko; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Habuta, Susumu; Hori, Tomiji; Fujiwara, Katsusi; Kitaguchi, Yoshihisa.

    1995-01-01

    Various annular vessels are planned to be equipped as a part of the plutonium refining facility in the nuclear fuel cycle factory. For manufacturing the high quality vessels, a one side automatic TIG arc welding system which is applied to the circumferencial joints in horizontal welding position have been completed. The automatic welding system is confirmed to be effective for improving the joint qualities and saving the manufacturing cost by our Mockup test. The main points of our welding system are as follows. (1) Low pulsed TIG arc welding process with a mixed shielding gas of Ar+5%H 2 is being employed. (2) Mechanical seam trucking system for the carriage and welding torch is equipped in the welding machine. (3) Arc voltage controlling system is employed for stabilizing the welding condition. (4) Magnetic wheels are equipped at the carriage for travelling without rails. The weight of this welding machine is designed to be less than 15 kg. (author)

  10. Problems in laser repair welding of polished surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Skumavc

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents problems in laser repair welding of the tools for injection moulding of plastics and light metals. Tools for injection moulding of the car headlamps are highly polished in order to get a desirable quality of the injected part. Different light metals, glasses, elastomers, thermoplastics and thermosetting polymers are injected into the die cavity under high pressures resulting in the surface damages of the tool. Laser welding is the only suitable repair welding technique due to the very limited sputtering during deposition of the filler metal. Overlapping of the welds results in inhomogeneous hardness of the remanufactured surface. Results have shown strong correlation between hardness and surface waviness after final polishing of the repair welded surface.

  11. EBSD characterization of the effect of welding parameters on HAZ of AISI409

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjbarnodeha E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth in the heat affected zone (HAZ. In the present study, microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated. The effect of the welding parameters on grain size٫ local misorientation and low angle grain boundaries was studied. It was found that the base metal was partly in recrystallization state. Complete recrystallization followed by severe grain growth occurs after joining process due to welding heating cycle. A decrease in the number of low angle grain boundaries in HAZ was observed. Nevertheless, the welding plastic strain increases the density of local misorientation and low angle grain boundaries. This investigation shows that the final state of strain is the result of the competition between welding plastic strains and stress relieving from recrystallization but the decisive factor in determining the grain size in HAZ is heat input.

  12. Design of automatic tracking system for electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chengdan; Chinese Academy of Space Technology, Lanzhou; Li Heqi; Li Chunxu; Ying Lei; Luo Yan

    2004-01-01

    The design and experimental process of an automatic tracking system applied to local vacuum electron beam welding are dealt with in this paper. When the annular parts of an exactitude apparatus were welded, the centre of rotation of the electron gun and the centre of the annular weld are usually not superposed because of the machining error, workpiece's setting error and so on. In this teaching process, a little bundle of electron beam is used to scan the weld groove, the amount of the secondary electrons reflected from the workpiece is different when the electron beam scans the both sides and the centre of the weld groove. The difference can indicate the position of the weld and then a computer will record the deviation between the electron beam spot and the centre of the weld groove. The computer will analyze the data and put the data into the storage software. During the welding process, the computer will modify the position of the electron gun based on the deviation to make the electron beam spot centered on the annular weld groove. (authors)

  13. Electron beam welding of copper lids. Status report up to 2001-12-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claesson, Soeren; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2003-10-01

    The report describes a summary of achieved results from 21 lid welds and numerous test block welds, performed at SKB Canister Laboratory in Oskarshamn for the period 1999-02-12 to 2001-12-31. Good weld quality has been achieved and some welds fulfilled the preliminary interpretation criteria, but the weld process need to be further developed before process qualification. Many different parameter settings have been tested and the influence on the weld profile has been mapped and documented. Deformations of the canister after welding have been measured and found to be very small. The preliminary inspection methods of the weld quality works satisfactory for the need of the development of the weld process. The welding machine is a new design developed for welding of thick copper in reduced pressure and performs well, but suffers from teething problems, which has delayed the work with development of the weld process. The welding system needs to be further developed and improved to work more reliably in a production plant

  14. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  15. Plug-welding of ODS cladding tube for BOR-60 irradiation. Welding condition setting. Device remodeling and welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masayuki; Ishibashi, Fujio; Kono, Syusaku; Hirako, Kazuhito; Tsukada, Tatsuya

    2003-04-01

    Irradiation test in BOR-60 at RIAR to judge practical use prospect of ODS cladding tube at early stage is planned as Japan-Russia a joint research. RIAR does fuel design of fuel pin used for this joint research. JNC manufactures ODS cladding tube and bar materials (two steel kind of martensite and ferrite), upper endplug production. They are welded by pressurized resistance welding, and are inspected in JNC Tokai, transported to RIAR. And RIAR manufactures vibration packing fuel pin. On the upper endplug welding by pressurized resistance welding method, we worded on the problems such as decision of welding condition by changing the size and crystallization of cladding tube and the design of endplug, and the chucking device remodeling to correspond to the long scale cladding tube welding system (included handling) and of quality assurance method. Especially, use of long scale cladding tube caused problem that bending transformation occurred in cladding tube by welding pressure. However, we solved this problem by shortening the distance of cladding tube colette chuck and pressure receiving, and by putting the sleeve in an internal space of welding machine, losing the bending of cladding tube. Moreover, welding defects were occurred by the difference of an inside state, an inside defect and recrystallization of cladding tube. We solved the problem by inside grinding for the edge of tube, angle beam method by ultrasonic wave, and ultrasonic wave form confirmation. Manufacturing process with long scale cladding tube including heat-treatment to remove combustion return and remaining stress was established besides, Afterwards, welding of ODS cladding tube and upper endplug. As the quality assurance system, we constructed [Documented procedure (referred to JOYO)] based on [Document of the QA plan] by OEC. Welding and inspection were executed by the document procedure. It is thought that the quality assurance method become references for the irradiation test in JOYO in the

  16. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Ravi, E-mail: prakash@ipr.res.in; Gangradey, Ranjana, E-mail: ranjana@ipr.res.in

    2013-10-15

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach.

  17. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Gangradey, Ranjana

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach

  18. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  19. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    OpenAIRE

    T. Muhič; J. Tušek; M. Pleterski; D. Bombač

    2009-01-01

    The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repa...

  20. Welding techniques development of CLAM steel for Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Chunjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)], E-mail: lcj@ipp.ac.cn; Huang Qunying; Wu Qingsheng; Liu Shaojun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Lei Yucheng [Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 212013 (China); Muroga, Takeo; Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Jifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Zhang Jianxun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710049 (China); Li Jinglong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shanxi, 710072 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Fabrication techniques for Test Blanket Module (TBM) with CLAM are being under development. Effect of surface preparation on the HIP diffusion bonding joints was studied and good joints with Charpy impact absorbed energy close to that of base metal have been obtained. The mechanical properties test showed that effect of HIP process on the mechanical properties of base metal was little. Uniaxial diffusion bonding experiments were carried out to study the effect of temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties. And preliminary experiments on Electron Beam Welding (EBW), Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding and Laser Beam Welding (LBW) were performed to find proper welding techniques to assemble the TBM. In addition, the thermal processes assessed with a Gleeble thermal-mechanical machine were carried out as well to assist the fusion welding research.

  1. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  2. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  3. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  4. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  5. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    and deformations are a few examples of the unwanted consequences which somehow would lead to brittle fracture, fatigue fracture, shape instability...was made under the copper tips of the spot welding machine. The fatigue results showed higher fatigue strength of the joints with transition layer...kHz ultrasonic butt welding system with a vibration source applying eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction

  6. Plasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lubliner, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The aim of Plasticity Theory is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary state of knowledge in basic plasticity theory and to its applications. It treats several areas not commonly found between the covers of a single book: the physics of plasticity, constitutive theory, dynamic plasticity, large-deformation plasticity, and numerical methods, in addition to a representative survey of problems treated by classical methods, such as elastic-plastic problems, plane plastic flow, and limit analysis; the problem discussed come from areas of interest to mechanical, structural, and

  7. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  8. Machinability of Stellite 6 hardfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzinski D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports some experimental findings concerning the machinability at high cutting speed of nickel-base weld-deposited hardfacings for the manufacture of hot tooling. The forging work involves extreme impacts, forces, stresses and temperatures. Thus, mould dies must be extremely resistant. The aim of the project is to create a rapid prototyping process answering to forging conditions integrating a Stellite 6 hardfacing deposed PTA process. This study talks about the dry machining of the hardfacing, using a two tips machining tool and a high speed milling machine equipped by a power consumption recorder Wattpilote. The aim is to show the machinability of the hardfacing, measuring the power and the tip wear by optical microscope and white light interferometer, using different strategies and cutting conditions.

  9. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  10. Influence of tool geometry and processing parameters on welding defects and mechanical properties for friction stir welding of 6061 Aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneji, A.; Ali, M.; Pervaiz, S.

    2018-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a form of solid state welding process for joining metals, alloys, and selective composites. Over the years, FSW development has provided an improved way of producing welding joints, and consequently got accepted in numerous industries such as aerospace, automotive, rail and marine etc. In FSW, the base metal properties control the material’s plastic flow under the influence of a rotating tool whereas, the process and tool parameters play a vital role in the quality of weld. In the current investigation, an array of square butt joints of 6061 Aluminum alloy was to be welded under varying FSW process and tool geometry related parameters, after which the resulting weld was evaluated for the corresponding mechanical properties and welding defects. The study incorporates FSW process and tool parameters such as welding speed, pin height and pin thread pitch as input parameters. However, the weld quality related defects and mechanical properties were treated as output parameters. The experimentation paves way to investigate the correlation between the inputs and the outputs. The correlation between inputs and outputs were used as tool to predict the optimized FSW process and tool parameters for a desired weld output of the base metals under investigation. The study also provides reflection on the effect of said parameters on a welding defect such as wormhole.

  11. The behavior of welded joint in steel pipe members under monotonic and cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kyong-Ho; Jang, Gab-Chul; Shin, Young-Eui; Han, Jung-Guen; Kim, Jong-Min

    2006-01-01

    Most steel pipe members are joined by welding. The residual stress and weld metal in a welded joint have the influence on the behavior of steel pipes. Therefore, to accurately predict the behavior of steel pipes with a welded joint, the influence of welding residual stress and weld metal on the behavior of steel pipe must be investigated. In this paper, the residual stress of steel pipes with a welded joint was investigated by using a three-dimensional non-steady heat conduction analysis and a three-dimensional thermal elastic-plastic analysis. Based on the results of monotonic and cyclic loading tests, a hysteresis model for weld metal was formulated. The hysteresis model was proposed by the authors and applied to a three-dimensional finite elements analysis. To investigate the influence of a welded joint in steel pipes under monotonic and cyclic loading, three-dimensional finite elements analysis considering the proposed model and residual stress was carried out. The influence of a welded joint on the behavior of steel pipe members was investigated by comparing the analytical result both steel pipe with a welded joint and that without a welded joint

  12. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  13. Proton-irradiation technology for high-frequency high-current silicon welding diode manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagov, P B; Drenin, A S; Zinoviev, M A

    2017-01-01

    Different proton irradiation regimes were tested to provide more than 20 kHz-frequency, soft reverse recovery “snap-less” behavior, low forward voltage drop and leakage current for 50 mm diameter 7 kA/400 V welding diode Al/Si/Mo structure. Silicon diode with such parameters is very suitable for high frequency resistance welding machines of new generation for robotic welding. (paper)

  14. Proton-irradiation technology for high-frequency high-current silicon welding diode manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagov, P. B.; Drenin, A. S.; Zinoviev, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Different proton irradiation regimes were tested to provide more than 20 kHz-frequency, soft reverse recovery “snap-less” behavior, low forward voltage drop and leakage current for 50 mm diameter 7 kA/400 V welding diode Al/Si/Mo structure. Silicon diode with such parameters is very suitable for high frequency resistance welding machines of new generation for robotic welding.

  15. Effect of process parameters on the residual stresses in AA5083-H321 friction stir welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, H. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Hattingh, D.G. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Steuwer, A. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); FaME38 at the ILL-ESRF, 6 rue J Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steuwer@ill.fr; James, M.N. [NMMU, Gardham Avenue, PO Box 77000, 6031 Port Elizabeth (South Africa); University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effect of varying welding parameters on the residual stress profiles in friction stir welds of aluminium alloy AA5083-H321, which were created on a fully instrumented friction welding machine. The residual stresses were determined non-destructively using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The width and maximum of the residual stress profile show clear correlation with the heat input, and in particular feed rate, which was found to be the dominant parameter.

  16. Performance of indigenous resistance welding equipment for PHWR fuel fabrication in NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Prakash, M.S.; Gupta, U.C.; Ganguly, C.

    1999-01-01

    Indigenisation of critical equipment for manufacturing of PHWR fuel and automation in the production line have been the main thrust in NFC in recent years. As part of this endeavour, resistance welding equipment for end plug welding of Zircaloy-4 clad Uranium Oxide fuel pin and end plates of 19-element fuel bundles have been developed. The paper discusses the equipment design features, critical operating parameters and performance of these indigenous welding machines. (author)

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated

  18. Thermo-Mechanical Calculations of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding at Equal Diameter Copper Bars and Effects of Essential Parameters on Dependent Special Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, M. H.; Davari, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2007-05-01

    Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding is a modified type of common rotary friction welding processes. In this welding method parameters such as pressure, angular velocity and time of welding control temperature, stress, strain and their variations. These dependent factors play an important rule in defining optimum process parameters combinations in order to improve the design and manufacturing of welding machines and quality of welded parts. Thermo-mechanical simulation of friction welding has been carried out and it has been shown that, simulation is an important tool for prediction of generated heat and strain at the weld interface and can be used for prediction of microstructure and evaluation of quality of welds. For simulation of Hybrid Rotary Friction Welding, a commercial finite element program has been used and the effects of pressure and rotary velocity of rotary part on temperature and strain variations have been investigated.

  19. A New Approach for Heating the Plastics Injection Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgilius Vasilache

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The plastics injection molding machines are one of the most eager consumers of energy. The plasticizing unit itself is the most important energetic consumer among the subassemblies of these machines; that is why this subassembly is the target of most actions of consumption decreasing on such machines. Our concerns on this direction got the shape of developing a new heating system for the plasticizing unit, which system was already patented [1].

  20. Parametric Investigation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrasonic spot welded Aluminium to Copper sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Satpathy, Mantra; Das Mohapatra, Kasinath; Sahoo, Ananda Kumar; Sahoo, Susanta Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Ultrasonic welding is one of the promising solid state welding methods which have been widely used to join highly conductive materials like aluminum and copper. Despite these applications in the automotive field, other industries also have a strong interest to adopt this process for joining of various advanced alloys. In some of its applications, poor weld strength and sticking of the workpiece to the tool are issues. Thus, an attempt has been taken in the present study to overcome these issues by performing experiments with a suitable range of weld parameters. The major objectives of this study are to obtain a good joint strength with a reduced sticking phenomenon and microstructure of Al-Cu weld coupons. The results uncovered the mechanical strength of the joint increased up to 0.34 sec of weld time and afterward, it gradually decreased. Meantime, the plastic deformation in the weld zone enhanced the formation of an intermetallic layer of 1.5 μm thick, and it is composed of mainly Al2Cu compound. The temperature evolved during the welding process is also measured by thermocouples to show its relationship with the plastic deformation. The present work exemplifies a finer understanding of the failure behavior of joints and provides an insight of ultrasonic welding towards the improvement in the quality of weld.

  1. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  2. Research on Microstructure and Properties of Welded Joint of High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengxiao; Li, Yi; Chen, Bo; Ma, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongya; Tang, Cai

    2018-01-01

    BS960 steel plates were welded by Laser-MAG and MAG. The microstructure and properties of the welded joints were investigated by optical microscope, micro-hardness tester, universal tensile testing machine, impact tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fatigue tester. By a series of experiments, the following results were obtained: The grain size of the coarse grain zone with Laser-MAG welded joint is 20μm, and that with MAG welded joint is about 32μm, both of the fine grain region are composed of fine lath martensite and granular bainite; the width of the heat affected region with Laser-MAG is lower than that with MAG. The strength and impact energy of welded joints with Laser-MAG is higher than that with MAG. The conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with Laser-MAG is 280MPa; however, the conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with MAG is 250MPa.

  3. Laser welding of thin polymer films to container substrates for aseptic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N.; Kerr, D.; Jackson, M. R.; Parkin, R. M.

    2000-03-01

    Keyhole laser welding of polymers is a subject well covered and researched, but relatively little information exists regarding the welding of thin polymer films, particularly to a heavier substrate. This paper presents the design of a suitable test apparatus for laser welding thin film to a heavier substrate, and shows the results of an investigation into the feasibility of laser welding multi-layer polymer film lids to tubs for the manufacture of aseptic food containers. A consistent weld, free from defects, is the key to process success. Typical welding defects have been synthesised in order to investigate, and consequently remove, their cause. The result is a reliable welding method based on even film clamping. With careful attention to machine design, a seal of high mechanical strength and chemical integrity is possible.

  4. Monitoring of the submerged arc welding process using current and voltage transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G.; Velez, M.; Espinosa, M.A.; Santos, O.; Barrera, E.; Gomez, G.

    1996-01-01

    Welding by fusion is one of the most used techniques to join materials in the manufacture industry. given the increase in applications of this welding process and the demand of more quality in the welding deposits, these welding processes are good candidates for the improvement of their instrumentation and control. Any improvement in the control technique will have a positive effect in the quality and productivity of the welding process. Some of the most significant variables in the submerged arc welding process are: current, voltage and torch speed. For the instrumentation of this research work, two transducers were designed, one for CD current monitoring and one for CD voltage monitoring of the welding machine. The design of both transducers includes an isolation amplifier. Graphical programming and the concept of virtual instrumentation were the main tools used for the design of the data acquisition system and the signal processing task. (Author) 9 refs

  5. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  6. Effect of Machining Velocity in Nanoscale Machining Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Sumaiya; Khondoker, Noman; Ibrahim, Raafat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the generated forces and deformations of single crystal Cu with (100), (110) and (111) crystallographic orientations at nanoscale machining operation. A nanoindenter equipped with nanoscratching attachment was used for machining operations and in-situ observation of a nano scale groove. As a machining parameter, the machining velocity was varied to measure the normal and cutting forces. At a fixed machining velocity, different levels of normal and cutting forces were generated due to different crystallographic orientations of the specimens. Moreover, after machining operation percentage of elastic recovery was measured and it was found that both the elastic and plastic deformations were responsible for producing a nano scale groove within the range of machining velocities from 250-1000 nm/s. (paper)

  7. An Experimental Study of the Electrical Contact Resistance in Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Electrical contact resistance is of critical importance in resistance welding. In this article, the contact resistance is experimentally investigated for welding mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum to themselves. A parametric study was carried out on a Gleeble® machine, investigating...

  8. Eddy current testing system for bottom mounted instrumentation welds - 15206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Ueno, S.; Suganuma, N.; Oodake, T.; Maehara, T.; Kasuya, T.; Ichikawa, H.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated the scanning of eddy current testing (ECT) probe on the welds area including the nozzle, the J-welds and the buildup welds of the Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI) mock-up using the developed ECT system and procedure. It is difficult to scan the probe on the BMI welds area because the area has a complex curved surface shape and narrow spaces. We made the space coordinates and the normal vectors on the scanning points as the scanning trajectory of probe on the welds area based on the measured results of welds surface shape on the mock-up. The multi-axis robot was used to scan the probe on the welds surface. Each motion axis position of the robot corresponding to each scanning point was calculated by the inverse kinematic algorithm. The BMI mock-up test was performed using the cross coil probe in the differential mode. The artificial stress corrosion cracking and the electrical discharge machining slits given on the mock-up surface were detected. The results show that the ECT can detect a defect of approximately 2.3 mm in length, 0.5 mm in depth and 0.2 mm in width for the BMI welds. From the output voltage of single coil, we estimated that the average and the maximum probe tilt angles on the mock-up surface under scanning were 2.6 degrees and 8.5 degrees, respectively

  9. Bench for mechanical cleaning of circular welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklifasovskij, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    A special bench for weld reinforcement removal and mechanical cleaning of the heat affected zones was designed to provide for a possibility of an ultrasonic testing of welded joints in the course of steam generator section fabrication. The bench comprises a mechanized roller support for fixing and rotating the workpiece; a lap-cutting device for external machining; milling/grinding tractor for internal machining and a delivery table for tractor approach and departure. The bench performance and overall view are presented. The operation succession is described

  10. Residual stress measurement of electron beam welded copper plates using prism hole drilling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakkonen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Eleven electron beam (EB) welded copper plates were measured in this investigation with Prism hole drilling equipment made by Stresstech Oy. All samples contained a linear weld in their center. Two different sets of plates were measured in this investigation. The first set included five samples (X436, X437, X438, X439 and X440) which were welded using four different welding speeds. Samples X439 and X440 were welded with the same speed but X440 is the only sample of the set that received a cosmetic pass. The second set received heat treatments at four different temperatures. Samples X456 and X458 were annealed at the same temperature but sample X456 received a cosmetic pass while X458 did not. Samples X455 and X457 were both annealed at a different temperature, with (X455) or without (X457) the cosmetic pass. Two areas were machined from the samples. About five millimeters was machined from the surfaces on the both of areas. Machined surfaces located on the top surfaces. The measurement points on the top surface are located on the weld and 20 mm and 120 mm from the weld on machined areas. Lower surface measurements are located -20 mm, 20 mm and 120 mm from the weld. All measurements were about 122 mm from the edges perpendicular to the weld. The top surfaces of all samples were machined in two areas across the weld. About 5 mm were removed. Stress measurements on the top surfaces were performed in these two areas, on the weld and 20 mm and 120 mm away from the weld. Stresses were also measured on the back sides, at -20 mm, 20 mm and 120 mm distance from the weld. All measurement locations were about 122mm from the sample edges. Most of the measurements give tensile strengths from 0 MPa to 30 MPa. Stresses parallel to the weld were slightly higher than weld stresses in transverse direction. The machined surfaces have residual stress values above 30 MPa near the surface. (orig.)

  11. Residual stress measurement of electron beam welded copper plates using prism hole drilling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakkonen, M. [Stresstech Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2013-12-15

    Eleven electron beam (EB) welded copper plates were measured in this investigation with Prism hole drilling equipment made by Stresstech Oy. All samples contained a linear weld in their center. Two different sets of plates were measured in this investigation. The first set included five samples (X436, X437, X438, X439 and X440) which were welded using four different welding speeds. Samples X439 and X440 were welded with the same speed but X440 is the only sample of the set that received a cosmetic pass. The second set received heat treatments at four different temperatures. Samples X456 and X458 were annealed at the same temperature but sample X456 received a cosmetic pass while X458 did not. Samples X455 and X457 were both annealed at a different temperature, with (X455) or without (X457) the cosmetic pass. Two areas were machined from the samples. About five millimeters was machined from the surfaces on the both of areas. Machined surfaces located on the top surfaces. The measurement points on the top surface are located on the weld and 20 mm and 120 mm from the weld on machined areas. Lower surface measurements are located -20 mm, 20 mm and 120 mm from the weld. All measurements were about 122 mm from the edges perpendicular to the weld. The top surfaces of all samples were machined in two areas across the weld. About 5 mm were removed. Stress measurements on the top surfaces were performed in these two areas, on the weld and 20 mm and 120 mm away from the weld. Stresses were also measured on the back sides, at -20 mm, 20 mm and 120 mm distance from the weld. All measurement locations were about 122mm from the sample edges. Most of the measurements give tensile strengths from 0 MPa to 30 MPa. Stresses parallel to the weld were slightly higher than weld stresses in transverse direction. The machined surfaces have residual stress values above 30 MPa near the surface. (orig.)

  12. Process Model for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new process being applied for joining of metal alloys. The process was initially developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) in Cambridge, UK. The FSW process is being investigated at NASA/MSEC as a repair/initial weld procedure for fabrication of the super-light-weight aluminum-lithium shuttle external tank. The FSW investigations at MSFC were conducted on a horizontal mill to produce butt welds of flat plate material. The weldment plates are butted together and fixed to a backing plate on the mill bed. A pin tool is placed into the tool holder of the mill spindle and rotated at approximately 400 rpm. The pin tool is then plunged into the plates such that the center of the probe lies at, one end of the line of contact, between the plates and the shoulder of the pin tool penetrates the top surface of the weldment. The weld is produced by traversing the tool along the line of contact between the plates. A lead angle allows the leading edge of the shoulder to remain above the top surface of the plate. The work presented here is the first attempt at modeling a complex phenomenon. The mechanical aspects of conducting the weld process are easily defined and the process itself is controlled by relatively few input parameters. However, in the region of the weld, plasticizing and forging of the parent material occurs. These are difficult processes to model. The model presented here addresses only variations in the radial dimension outward from the pin tool axis. Examinations of the grain structure of the weld reveal that a considerable amount of material deformation also occurs in the direction parallel to the pin tool axis of rotation, through the material thickness. In addition, measurements of the axial load on the pin tool demonstrate that the forging affect of the pin tool shoulder is an important process phenomenon. Therefore, the model needs to be expanded to account for the deformations through the material thickness and the

  13. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming

  14. Mechanical behaviour of cracked welded structures including mismatch effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornet, P.

    2002-01-01

    The most important parameters for predicting more precisely the fracture behaviour of welded structures have been identified. In particular, the plasticity development at the crack tip in the ligament appeared as a major parameter to evaluate the yield load of such a complex structure. In this way defect assessments procedures have been developed or modified to take into account the mismatch effect that is to say the mechanical properties of the different material constituting the weld joint. This paper is a synthesis of the work done in the past at Electricite de France on this topic in regards with other work done in France or around the World. The most important parameters which control the plasticity development at the crack tip and so mainly influence the fracture behaviour of welded structures are underlined: the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the mismatch ratio (weld to base metal yield strength ratio), the ligament size and the weld width. Moreover, commonly used fracture toughness testing procedures developed in case of homogeneous specimens cannot be used in a straight forward manner and so has to be modified to take into account the mismatch effect. Number or defect assessment procedures taking into account the mismatch effect by considering the yield load of the welded structure are shortly described. Then, the 'Equivalent Material Method' developed at EDF which allows a good prediction of the applied J-Integral at the crack tip is more detailed. This procedure includes not only both weld and base metal yield strength, the structure geometry, the crack size and the weld dimension using the yield load of the real structures but also includes the effect of both weld and base metal strain hardening exponents. Some validations of this method are proposed. Finally, the ability of finite element modelling to predict the behaviour of such welded structures is demonstrated by modelling real experiments: crack located in the middle of

  15. Correlation of Weld Appearance with Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy Welded by Fiber Laser with Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Fei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Two typical cross-section of welds, including nail shape and near X shape, are obtained in the process of fiber laser welding 2024-T4 Al alloy with filler wire. The correlations of the two weld appearances and other elements (such as microstructure, microhardness, and joint's tensile properties were analyzed. The results show that the weld with near X shape cross-section during the welding process is more stable than that with nail shape cross-section, and the welding spatter of the former is smaller than that of the latter. The microstructure of the weld zone is columnar grains and equiaxed grains, the columnar grains are formed near the fusion line and growing along the vertical direction of the fusion line, the equiaxed grains are distributed in the center of the weld zone. The secondary dendrite of the grains in the center of the weld with nail shape cross-section grows better, and gradually forms to equiaxed dendrite, while the grains size of the weld with near X shape cross-section is relatively finer, exhibiting equiaxed cellular grain. Compared with the joint with nail shape cross-section of the weld, the joint with near X shape cross-section of the weld have some different characteristics, the precipitation strengthening phase θ(Al2Cu content in weld zone of the latter is more than that of the former, the average microhardness value of the weld zone of the latter is higher than that of the former, the softening phenomenon of heat affect zone (HAZ of the latter is weaker than that of the former, and the joint's tensile strength and plasticity of the latter are lower than that of the former slightly.

  16. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  17. Machine Shop Grinding Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James

    This curriculum manual is one in a series of machine shop curriculum manuals intended for use in full-time secondary and postsecondary classes, as well as part-time adult classes. The curriculum can also be adapted to open-entry, open-exit programs. Its purpose is to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the…

  18. 49 CFR 192.285 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.285 Plastic pipe: Qualifying persons to make joints. (a) No person may make a plastic pipe joint unless that person has been qualified under the applicable joining procedure...

  19. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  20. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  1. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  2. Simulation of Weld Mechanical Behavior to Include Welding Induced Residual Stress and Distortion: Coupling of SYSWELD and Abaqus Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    able to investigate how the welding process modifies the resultant fracture and fatigue behavior for structural components on its vessels. NSWCCD-61...Investigation of the Strain Rate and Temperature Effects on the Plastic Flow Stress and Ductile Failure Strain of Aluminum Alloys 5083- H116, 6082-T6, and a...883-895. 4. Xiaosheng Gao, Tingting Zhang, Matthew Hayden, and Charles Roe, Effects of the Stress State on Plasticity and Ductile Failure of an

  3. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified by...

  4. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  5. Fundamentals of the theory of plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Kachanov, L M

    2004-01-01

    Intended for use by advanced engineering students and professionals, this volume focuses on plastic deformation of metals at normal temperatures, as applied to strength of machines and structures. 1971 edition.

  6. Analysis of the Charpy V-notch test for welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, A.

    2000-01-01

    The ductile-brittle transition for a weld is investigated by numerical analyses of Charpy impact specimens. The material response is characterized by an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a porous plastic solid, with adiabatic heating due to plastic dissipation and the resulting thermal...... softening accounted for. The onset of cleavage is taken to occur when a critical value of the maximum principal stress is attained. The effect of weld strength undermatch or overmatch is investigated for a comparison material, and analyses are also carried out based on experimentally determined flow...... strength variations in a weldment in a HY100 steel. The predicted work to fracture shows a strong sensitivity to the location of the notch relative to the weld, with the most brittle behavior for a notch close to the narrow heat affected zone. The analyses illustrate the strong dependence of the transition...

  7. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  8. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  9. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  10. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  11. Residual and operating stresses in welded Alloy 600 penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, E.S.; Gross, D.J.; Pathania, R.

    1995-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite element model has been developed for calculating residual and operating stresses in Alloy 600 penetrations which are installed in pressure vessel shells by J-groove welds. The welding process is simulated by multiple passes of heat input with heat transfer into the adjacent parts during welding and cooling. Analysis results are presented for CRDM nozzles, pressurizer instrument nozzles and pressurizer heater sleeves. The effect of several key variables such as nozzle material yield strength, angle of the nozzle relative to the vessel shell, weld size, presence of counterbores, etc. are explored. Results of the modelling are correlated with field and laboratory data. Application of the stress analysis results to PWSCC predictive modeling is discussed. (author). 6 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Beijing international welding fair report. Kokusaika ni ugokidashita chugoku yosetsukai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports the affairs at the Beijing International Scientific Conference for Welding and the International Welding Fair held in May 1991, including visitors{prime} comments on their impression. The Scientific Conference was held for three days in eleven sessions, where 135 theses were presented, most of which were related to high-tech areas including robotization, automation, laser welding and cutting, and ceramic bonding. The total attendance numbered 231 members, including 30 from Germany, 20 from Japan, 17 from Soviet, 7 from Korea, and one each from Finland and Switzerland, plus 150 from China. It was the third meeting for the Scientific Conference, which had the number of attendance jumped from the previous one showing the increased interest by the international welding industry toward China. Exhibits from overseas countries were few, a possible effect from the Tiananmen incident, only three from Japan. Welding machines exhibited by China were those made in or licensed by Japan. Strong impression was felt on the spread in use of CO{sub 2} semi-automatic welding machines. 3 figs.

  13. Friction welding of A 6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, T. [Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kawata, S. [Post Graduate Student, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Many researches for friction welding of aluminum with either carbon steel or stainless steel have been carried out. From those results, it is concluded that the greatest problem is the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at weld interface. However, it is not clearly demonstrated the effect of friction welding parameters on the formation of intermetallic compounds. This research purposes are to evaluate the formation of intermetallic compounds and to investigate the effect of friction welding parameters on the strength of welded joint. For these purposes, A6061 aluminum alloy and S45C carbon steel were used with a continuous drive vertical friction welding machine. Tensile test results revealed that the maximum tensile strength was achieved at extremely short friction time and high upset. The joint strength reached 92% of the tensile strength of A6061 base metal. Tensile strength of friction welding was increasing with increasing upset pressure when friction time 1sec. However, tensile properties were deteriorated with increasing friction time. It was observed that the amount of formed intermetallic compound was increasing with increasing friction time at weld interface. Partly formed intermetallic compound on weld interface were identified when friction time 1 sec. However, intermetallic compound layer were severely developed with longer friction time at weld interface. It was concluded that intermetallic compound layer deteriorated the tensile properties of weld joints. (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigations of tungsten inert gas assisted friction stir welding of pure copper plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, M. A.; Boșneag, A.; Nitu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Welding copper and its alloys is usually difficult to join by conventional fusion welding processes because of high thermal diffusivity of the copper, alloying elements, necessity of using a shielding gas and a clean surface. To overcome this inconvenience, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation, is used as a feasible welding process. In order to achieve an increased welding speed and a reduction in tool wear, this process is assisted by another one (WIG) which generates and adds heat to the process. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the additional heat on the process parameters and on the welding joint properties (distribution of the temperature, hardness and roughness). The research includes two experiments for the FSW process and one experiment for tungsten inert gas assisted FSW process. The outcomes of the investigation are compared and analysed for both welding variants. Adding a supplementary heat source, the plates are preheated and are obtain some advantages such as reduced forces used in process and FSW tool wear, faster and better plasticization of the material, increased welding speed and a proper weld quality.

  15. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  16. Strength of gusset plates in welded steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Aage

    2004-01-01

    . A different approach is taken in the paper where upper and lower bounds are derived for the yield load assuming a perfect plastic material and Tresca's yield condition. Ther theoretical results are supported by a few numbers of tests. The paper deals mainly with the case of a single member welded into a cut...

  17. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The developed model derives its main advantage from its applicability in parametric studies of a wide range of laser transmission metal to plastic welding problems of different geometrical, material and joint type, requiring only the basic thermo-physical material properties, the geometric details and the laser process ...

  18. In-service weld repairs of valve bodies and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    The idea of performing welding and machining to valve bodies in line, has only come of age within the last five to seven years. This concept has been scrutinized by various technical power plant personnel, some with mixed views. Although many plants currently use this technology, many limit its use to light machine cuts, lapping or polishing of seats and/or gasket faces. Technological advances in machine welding processes and specialized machine tooling over the past few years have greatly improved the quality of repairs and the time it takes to complete them. As in any new technology there are typically some concerns, and in-line repairs require considerable planning, communication, teamwork, capable personnel, and state-of-the-art equipment

  19. Retention Strength of Conical Welding Caps for Fixed Implant-Supported Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Diego; Degidi, Marco; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Tebbel, Florian; Marchetti, Claudio

    This study evaluated the retention strength of welding caps for Ankylos standard abutments using a pull-out test. Each sample consisted of an implant abutment and its welding cap. The tests were performed with a Zwick Roell testing machine with a 1-kN load cell. The retention strength of the welding caps increased with higher abutment diameters and higher head heights and was comparable or superior to the values reported in the literature for the temporary cements used in implant dentistry. Welding caps provide a reliable connection between an abutment and a fixed prosthesis without the use of cement.

  20. Improving resistance welding of aluminum sheets by addition of metal powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Naimi, Ihsan K.; Al-Saadi, Moneer H.; Daws, Kasim M.

    2015-01-01

    . The improvement obtained is shown to be due to the development of a secondary bond in the joint beside the weld nugget increasing the total weld area. The application of powder additive is especially feasible, when using welding machines with insufficient current capacity for producing the required nugget size......In order to ensure good quality joints between aluminum sheets by resistance spot welding, a new approach involving the addition of metal powder to the faying surfaces before resistance heating is proposed. Three different metal powders (pure aluminum and two powders corresponding to the alloys AA....... In such cases the best results are obtained with pure aluminum powder....

  1. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assire, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental results

  2. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  3. Laser Indirect Shock Welding of Fine Wire to Metal Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Huang, Tao; Luo, Yapeng; Liu, Huixia

    2017-09-12

    The purpose of this paper is to present an advanced method for welding fine wire to metal sheet, namely laser indirect shock welding (LISW). This process uses silica gel as driver sheet to accelerate the metal sheet toward the wire to obtain metallurgical bonding. A series of experiments were implemented to validate the welding ability of Al sheet/Cu wire and Al sheet/Ag wire. It was found that the use of a driver sheet can maintain high surface quality of the metal sheet. With the increase of laser pulse energy, the bonding area of the sheet/wire increased and the welding interfaces were nearly flat. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that the intermetallic phases were absent and a short element diffusion layer which would limit the formation of the intermetallic phases emerging at the welding interface. A tensile shear test was used to measure the mechanical strength of the welding joints. The influence of laser pulse energy on the tensile failure modes was investigated, and two failure modes, including interfacial failure and failure through the wire, were observed. The nanoindentation test results indicate that as the distance to the welding interface decreased, the microhardness increased due to the plastic deformation becoming more violent.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Characterization of Friction-Stir-Welded Dual-Phase Brass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Akinlabi, E. T.; Murugan, N.

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an ideal process to join brass to avoid the evaporation of zinc. In the present investigation, 6-mm-thick dual-phase brass plates were joined efficiently using FSW at various tool rotational speeds. The microstructures were studied using optical microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The optical micrographs revealed the evolution of various zones across the joint line. The microstructure of the heat-affected zone was similar to that of base metal. The weld zone exhibited finer grains due to dynamic recrystallization. The recrystallization was inhomogeneous and the inhomogeneity reduced with increased tool rotational speed. The dual phase was preserved in the weld zone due to the retention of zinc. The severe plastic deformation created a lot of dislocations in the weld zone. The weld zone was strengthened after welding. The role of tool rotational speed on the joint strength is further reported.

  5. Characteristics of Laser Beam and Friction Stir Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the comparative evaluation of microstructural features and mechanical properties of friction stir welded (solid-state) and laser beam welded (high energy density fusion welding) AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints. Optical microscopy, microhardness testing, transverse tensile, and impact tests were performed. The coarse ferrite grains in the base material were changed to fine grains consisting duplex structure of ferrite and martensite due to the rapid cooling rate and high strain induced by severe plastic deformation caused by frictional stirring. On the other hand, columnar dendritic grain structure was observed in fusion zone of laser beam welded joints. Tensile testing indicates overmatching of the weld metal relative to the base metal irrespective of the welding processes used. The LBW joint exhibited superior impact toughness compared to the FSW joint.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance spot welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Zhang, Wenqi; Perret, William

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws from the fundamentals of electro-thermo-mechanical coupling to the main aspects of finite element implementation and three-dimensional modelling of resistance welding. A new simulation environment is proposed in order to perform three-dimensional simulations and optimization...... of resistance welding together with the simulations of conventional and special-purpose quasi-static mechanical tests. Three-dimensional simulations of resistance welding consider the electrical, thermal, mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of the material as well as the operating conditions...... of the welding machines. Simulations of the mechanical tests take into account material softening due to the accumulation of ductile damage and cover conventional tests, such as tensile–shear tests, cross-tension test and peel tests, as well as the possibility of special-purpose tests designed by the users...

  7. Micro friction stir welding of copper electrical contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of micro friction stir welding (μFSW of electrolytic tough pitch copper (CuETP in a lap and butt joint. Experimental plan was done in order to investigate the influence of tool design and welding parameters on the formation of defect free joints. The experiments were done using universal milling machine where the tool rotation speed varied between 600 and 1 900 rpm, welding speed between 14 and 93 mm/min and tilt angle between 3° and 5°. From the welds samples for analysis of microstructure and samples for tensile tests were prepared. The grain size in the nugget zone was greatly reduced compared to the base metal and the joint tensile strength exceeded the strength of the base metal.

  8. Laser welding by dental Nd:YAG device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Bertrand, Caroline; Merigo, Elisabetta; Bonanini, Mauro; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Nammour, Samir

    2009-06-01

    Welding laser was introduced in jewellery during years 70 and, just after, was successfully used also by dental technicians. Welding laser gives a great number of advantages, versus traditional welding and, for this reason, this procedure had a great diffusion in the technician laboratories and stimulated the companies to put in the market more and more evolutes appliances. Some aspects, such great dimensions, high costs and delivery system today still characterize these machines by fixed lenses, which have strictly limited its use only to technician laboratories. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the possibility, by using a fibber-delivered laser normally utilized in the dental office, to make, by dentist himself in his office, welding on different metals and to evaluate advantages and possibilities of this new technique.

  9. Development and prevention of porosity in the fusion welding of thick titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, F.R.; Redchits, V.V.; Khokhlov, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    This article describes the results of experimental investigations of the mechanics of formation of porosity in electron-beam welding, single-pass and multipass welding in argon with a consumable and non-consumable electrode, and also in the electroslag welding of alloys VT14 and VT22 from 10 to 60mm thick. It was established that nuclei of gas phase form at the moment of fusion of the edges of the parts being welded, the end surfaces of which have machining defects. The weld metal porosity can be prevented by: careful machining of the faying surfaces of the parts to be welded immediately before welding; the use of welding conditions ensuring long pool existence time, sufficient for hydrogen bubbles to float up and escape; intensification of the weld pool degassing process by using fluxes based on metal fluorides and chlorides, applied to the ends of the root part of the faying edges, and on the filler wire; reduction of the gas pressure in the beam channel by making gas-escape paths

  10. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  11. TIG welding method and TIG welding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Eishi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of TIG welding for members having different heat capacities including a cladding tube and an end plug of a fuel rod to be used, for example, in a reactor, and a device therefor. Namely, in the TIG welding method, the flow rate of a sealed gas to the side of a member having smaller heat capacity is made greater than that on the side of the member having greater heat capacity bordered on the top end of a welding electrode. Since the sealed gas is jetted being localized relative to the welding electrode, arc is restricted in a region of the member having smaller heat capacity and is increased at a region having a larger heat capacity. As a result, the arc is localized, so that the heat input amount to the region having a large heat capacity is increased, and then a plurality of members at the abutting portion are melted uniformly thereby capable of obtaining a uniform molten pool. A bead is formed at the abutting portion thereby capable of obtaining a welded portion with less unevenness and having large strength. (I.S.)

  12. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  13. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  14. Electron Gun for Computer-controlled Welding of Small Components

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dupák, Jan; Vlček, Ivan; Zobač, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 62, 2-3 (2001), s. 159-164 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2065015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Electron beam-welding machine * Electron gun * Computer- control led beam Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.541, year: 2001

  15. Modular Power Supply for Micro Resistance Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko Oleksandr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the important issue of enhancing the circuitry and characteristics of power supplies for micro resistance welding machines. The aim of the research is to provide high quality input current and to increase the energy efficiency of the output pulse generator by means of improving the circuit topologies of the power supply main blocks. In study, the principle of constructing the power supply for micro resistance welding, which provides high values of output welding current and high accuracy of welding pulse formation, makes it possible to reduce energy losses, and provides high quality of consumed input current, is represented. The multiphase topology of the charger with power factor correction based on SEPIC converters is suggested as the most efficient for charging the supercapacitor storage module. The multicell topology of the supercapacitor energy storage with voltage equalizing is presented. The parameters of the converter cells are evaluated. The calculations of energy efficiency of the power supply’s input and output converters based on suggested topologies are carried out and verified in MATLAB Simulink. The power factor value greater than 99 % is derived.

  16. Investigation of TIG welding characteristics with a dual cooled rod for the fuel irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2008-01-01

    To establish the fabrication process, and for satisfying the requirements of the irradiation test, an TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding machine for the dual cooled rods specimens was developed, and the preliminary welding experiments were performed to optimize the welding process conditions. Cladding tubes of 15.9 and 9 mm for the outer and inner diameters, respectively with a 0.57 mm thickness and end caps were used for the specimens. This paper describes the experimental results of the TIG welds and the micrograph examinations of the TIG welded specimens corresponding to various welding conditions for the dual cooled fuel irradiation test. The investigations revealed that the present TIG process satisfied the requirements for the fuel irradiation test in the HANARO research reactor

  17. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  18. Correlation of fatigue properties and microstructure in investment cast Ti-6Al-4V welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jinkeun; Kim, Nack J.; Lee, Sunghak; Lee, Eui W.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microstructural characteristics on high-cycle fatigue properties and fatigue crack propagation behavior of welded regions of an investment cast Ti-6Al-4V were investigated. High-cycle fatigue and fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on the welded regions, which were processed by two different welding methods: tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) welding. Test data were analyzed in relation to microstructure, tensile properties, and fatigue fracture mode. The base metal was composed of an alpha plate colony structure transformed to a basket-weave structure with thin α platelets after welding and annealing. High-cycle fatigue results indicated that fatigue strength of the EB weld was lower than that of the base metal or the TIG weld because of the existence of large micropores formed during welding, although it had the highest yield strength. In the case of the fatigue crack propagation, the EB weld composed of thinner α platelets had a faster crack propagation rate than the base metal or the TIG weld. The effective microstructural feature determining the fatigue crack propagation rate was found to be the width of α platelets because it was well matched with the reversed cyclic plastic zone size calculated in the threshold ΔK regime

  19. Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints and Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints: A Review of the Literature to July 1, 1936

    Science.gov (United States)

    1936-12-02

    determined on a machined rectangular bar. According to Bierett b1 other tests have shown that the double-sided run is no more unfavorable than the...38, Feb. 1931. 189. Hodge, J. C., Amer. Weld. Soc. Jnl. 9, 93-116, Oct. 1930. 190. Hawkins, H. W., Proc. Rugby Engg. Soc., 27, 41-65 (1), (1932-1933

  20. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  1. Multipurpose ANSYS FE procedure for welding processes simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capriccioli, Andrea [ENEA CR Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Frosi, Paolo [ENEA CR Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)], E-mail: frosi@frascati.enea.it

    2009-06-15

    ANSYS FE procedures and 3D models for thermal and mechanical simulation of both Laser and TIG welding processes are presented. The special features are the applicability to a non uniform gap and the use of a fast iterative procedure that assures the constancy of the fixed maximum temperature along the single pass and between each pass and the following, apart from their shapes and sizes. All the thermal and mechanical material properties of both INCONEL 625 and AISI 316 are described till to liquid phase; convection and radiation effects are considered. The 3D ANSYS models use both brick and non linear contact elements and elastic and elastic-plastic materials. Two full simulation are presented: a laser welding test (taken from ENEA) and a TIG welding one (source W7-X) with the root seam plus 14 passes; thermal and mechanical results are reported in the two cases and for the latter an extensive sensitivity analysis, changing mesh size of the filling material, welding speed and material properties, is explained with results and comparisons. This large sensitivity analysis has been executed for TIG welding because in this case (multi-pass welding) the reduction of CPU time is a strong requirement; but some conclusions are helpful for laser welding too. The mechanical calculation results very sensitive to the mesh shape: this fact implies very fine and regular meshes. The specimens are first restrained and then welded with the foreseen welding procedure; after that it is released and the final linear and angular shrinkages are calculated. The ANSYS birth and death procedure is used and the CPU time was strongly reduced.

  2. Multipurpose ANSYS FE procedure for welding processes simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capriccioli, Andrea; Frosi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    ANSYS FE procedures and 3D models for thermal and mechanical simulation of both Laser and TIG welding processes are presented. The special features are the applicability to a non uniform gap and the use of a fast iterative procedure that assures the constancy of the fixed maximum temperature along the single pass and between each pass and the following, apart from their shapes and sizes. All the thermal and mechanical material properties of both INCONEL 625 and AISI 316 are described till to liquid phase; convection and radiation effects are considered. The 3D ANSYS models use both brick and non linear contact elements and elastic and elastic-plastic materials. Two full simulation are presented: a laser welding test (taken from ENEA) and a TIG welding one (source W7-X) with the root seam plus 14 passes; thermal and mechanical results are reported in the two cases and for the latter an extensive sensitivity analysis, changing mesh size of the filling material, welding speed and material properties, is explained with results and comparisons. This large sensitivity analysis has been executed for TIG welding because in this case (multi-pass welding) the reduction of CPU time is a strong requirement; but some conclusions are helpful for laser welding too. The mechanical calculation results very sensitive to the mesh shape: this fact implies very fine and regular meshes. The specimens are first restrained and then welded with the foreseen welding procedure; after that it is released and the final linear and angular shrinkages are calculated. The ANSYS birth and death procedure is used and the CPU time was strongly reduced.

  3. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  4. Fracture toughness testing of pipeline girth welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, G.; Gianetto, J.A.; Bouchard, R.; Bowker, J.T.; Tyson, W.R.

    2005-06-01

    This paper reviewed the fracture toughness test standards for pipeline girth welds outlined in CSA Z662-03, Annex K as well as the referenced testing standards BS 7448 and ASTM Standard E 1290. The requirements outlined in API 1104, appendix A were also reviewed given its application throughout the world. Crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) tests were conducted on a manual shielded-metal-arc weld (SMAW) that was prepared in a high strength X80 pipeline steel. Another girth weld test consisted of a mechanized gas metal arc weld (GMAW), but only the results for the SMAW were presented in this paper. Two tensile specimens were machined parallel to the pipe axis from the base metal of the X80 pipe used in preparing the pipeline girth welds. The tensile specimens from the pipe base metal and weld metal were tested at 20 degrees C. The yield strength at the CTOD test temperature was estimated by using the yield strength-temperature relationship given in BS 7448. The experimental results obtained by applying the two testing standards were compared. The intent was to identify the differences between these two standards and their influence on test results. The authors discussed critical issues for the fracture toughness tests, such as weld position and notch orientation, circumferential sampling location, residual stress and its modification, crack length measurement and the equations used to evaluate CTOD. The variation of strength and toughness with clock position around the circumference of the girth welds was also discussed. It was concluded that for a high-strength material, local compression may be needed to create a uniform fatigue crack front. For deep-cracked specimens, the maximum allowable difference of the measured fatigue crack length varies significantly between ASTM E 1290-02 and BS 7448 by a factor of about 1 to 3 for ASTM E 1290 and 3 to 15 for BS 7448. The CTOD calculated according to ASTM E 1290-02 and according to BS 7448 can also differ substantially

  5. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  6. A welding system for spent fuel canister lid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suikki, M.; Wendelin, T.

    2008-06-01

    The report presents a proposed welding system for spent fuel canister lids. The system is used for welding the copper lid to the copper overpack. The apparatus will be installed in the encapsulation plant. The report presents basic requirements for and implementation of the welding system, operation, service and maintenance of the equipment, as well as a cost estimate. Some aspects of the apparatus design are quite specified, but the actual detailed planning and final selection of components is not included. The report also describes actions for possible malfunction and fault conditions. Closing of the copper cylinder's lid is carried out by electron beam welding, which must be performed in vacuum. The welding system for spent fuel canister lid consists of two welding chambers, a canister docking system, an EB-welding machine with its accessories, a vacuum apparatus, as well as necessary auxiliary equipment. The system's equipment is housed in a welding room, an auxiliary system room, an operation control room, as well as mounted on the ceiling of a transfer corridor. One of the welding chambers is intended for carrying out test welding procedures and for calibration of welding parameters. The actual spent fuel canister lid welding chamber has a weldingready canister docked thereto in an airtight manner. The chamber is pumped for a vacuum, followed by closing the canister's copper lid and carrying out the lid welding process. The lid is brought into the chamber prior to docking the canister by means of a canister transfer trolley lifting gear. Lifting of the canister and rotating it during a welding process are also handled by means of the transfer trolley. The lid welding chamber houses equipment for the alignment and installation of the lid, as well as heating means for the top side of a copper overpack for ensuring a sufficient installation clearance between the lid and the overpack. The equipment not needed in the immediate vicinity of welding chambers, is

  7. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  8. Study of weld quality real-time monitoring system for auto-body assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Li, Yong-Bing; Chen, Guan-Long

    2005-12-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is widely used for the auto-body assembly in automotive industry. But RSW suffers from a major problem of inconsistent quality from weld to weld. The major problem is the complexity of the basic process that may involve material coatings, electrode force, electrode wear, fit up, etc. Therefore weld quality assurance is still a big challenge and goal. Electrode displacement has proved to be a particularly useful signal which correlates well with weld quality. This paper introduces a novel auto-body spot weld quality monitoring system which uses electrode displacement as the quality parameter. This system chooses the latest laser displacement sensor with high resolution to measure the real-time electrode displacement. It solves the interference problem of sensor mounting by designing special fixture, and can be successfully applied on the portable welding machine. It is capable of evaluating weld quality and making diagnosis of process variations such as surface asperities, shunting, worn electrode and weld expansion with real-time electrode displacement. As proved by application in the workshop, the monitoring system has good stability and reliability, and is qualified for monitoring weld quality in process.

  9. Effects of microplasma arc AISI 316L welds on the corrosion behaviour of pipelines in LiBr cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tovar, R.; Montañés, M.T.; García-Antón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •SECM tests reveal differences in electrochemical activity of base and welded alloys. •The highest electrochemical activity is obtained for the welded alloy. •Microplasma arc welding process hinders passivation in lithium bromide. •Microplasma arc welding increases corrosion rate and susceptibility to pitting. •The galvanic pair between base and welded alloys in LiBr is weak. -- Abstract: The effect of microplasma arc welding (MPAW) on the electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel tubes has been studied. Scanning electrochemical measurements were performed in sodium chloride to evaluate the difference in the electrochemical activity of base (non-welded) and welded samples. Oxygen reduction rates increase in AISI 316L due to the heat treatment effect induced by welding, indicating a higher electrochemical activity in the welded samples. Additionally, the use of MPA weldments in lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption machines was also analysed at typical operating temperatures and Reynolds numbers. The welding process increases corrosion rates, hinders passivation and increases the susceptibility to pitting attack in LiBr. However, zero-resistance ammeter and localization index measurements show that the galvanic pair generated between the base and welded alloys is weak, both electrodes being in their passive state. Temperature greatly affects the corrosion process

  10. Study of welding characteristics of inconel 600 alloy using a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Seong Wook; Yoo, Young Tae; Shin, Ho Jun

    2004-01-01

    Laser beam welding is increasingly being used in welding of structural steels. The laser welding process is one of the most advanced manufacturing technologies owing to its high speed and deep penetration. The thermal cycles associated with laser welding are generally much faster than those involved in conventional arc welding processes, leading to a rather small weld zone. Experiments are performed for Inconel 600 plates changing several process parameter such as laser power, welding speed, shielding gas flow rate, presence of surface pollution, with fixed or variable gap and misalignment between plate and plate, etc. The follow conclusions can be drawn that laser power and welding speed have a pronounced effect on size and shape of the fusion zone. Increase in welding speed resulted in an increase in weld depth/ aspect ratio and hence a decrease in the fusion zone size. The penetration depth increased with the increase in laser power. Welding characteristics of austienite Inconel 600 using a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser are experimentally investigated. This paper describes the weld ability of inconel 600 for machine structural use by Nd:YAG laser

  11. Sustainable machining

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview on current sustainable machining. Its chapters cover the concept in economic, social and environmental dimensions. It provides the reader with proper ways to handle several pollutants produced during the machining process. The book is useful on both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and it is of interest to all those working with manufacturing and machining technology.

  12. Weld analysis and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  13. Effects of Ar and He on Microstructures and Properties of Laser Welded 800MPa TRIP Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen-Quan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser welding of cold rolled TRIP steel (transformation Induced Plasticity steel sheet with tensile strength of 820MPa and thickness of 1.4mm was carried out using shielding gases Ar and He, respectively. For the same laser power and welding speed, the effects of different shielding gases on penetration and bead section morphologies were investigated. The microstructures and properties of the TRIP steel joints were also studied. The investigation showed that higher penetration and lower porosity could be obtained under shielding gas He using the same laser power and welding speed. The microstructures of the TRIP joint mainly included martensite and retained austenite. But the joint microhardness and tensile strength were higher under the shielding gas He. The tensile strength of the welded joint perpendicular to the weld line was equal to that of the base metal. But the tensile strength of the joint parallel with the weld line was higher than that of the base metal. The plasticity and formability of the welded joint were impaired due to the formation of martensite in the weld metal.

  14. Welding distortion analysis of multipass joint combination with different sequences using 3D FEM and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manurung, Yupiter H.P.; Lidam, Robert Ngendang; Rahim, M. Ridzwan; Zakaria, M. Yusof; Redza, M. Ridhwan; Sulaiman, M. Shahar; Tham, Ghalib; Abas, Sunhaji K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the welding sequence effect on induced angular distortion using FEM and experiments. The specimen of a combined joint geometry was modeled and simulated using Multipass Welding Advisor (MWA) in SYSWELD 2010 based on the thermal-elastic-plastic approach with low manganese carbon steel S3355J2G3 as specimen material and Goldak's double ellipsoid as heat source model. To validate the simulation results, a series of experiments was conducted with two different welding sequences using automated welding process, low carbon steel as parent metal, digital GMAW power source with premixed shielding gas and both-sided clamping technique. Based on the results, it was established that the thermo-elastic-plastic 3D FEM analysis shows good agreement with experimental results and the welding sequence “from outside to inside” induced less angular distortion compared to “from inside to outside”. -- Highlights: • 3D FEM was used to analyze the welding distortion on two different sequences. • Simulation results were validated with experiments using automated welding system. • Simulation results and experiments showed acceptable accuracy. • Welding sequence “outside–inside” showed less distortion than “inside–outside”

  15. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  16. Wear characteristics and defects analysis of friction stir welded joint of aluminium alloy 6061-t6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Hloch, Sergej; Krolczyk, G.; Legutko, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), s. 128-135 ISSN 1507-2711 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : Friction stir welding (FSW) * grinding machine * Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2016 http://www.ein.org.pl/2016-01-17

  17. Electrical discharge machining for vessel sample removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litka, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to aging-related problems or essential metallurgy information (plant-life extension or decommissioning) of nuclear plants, sample removal from vessels may be required as part of an examination. Vessel or cladding samples with cracks may be removed to determine the cause of cracking. Vessel weld samples may be removed to determine the weld metallurgy. In all cases, an engineering analysis must be done prior to sample removal to determine the vessel's integrity upon sample removal. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is being used for in-vessel nuclear power plant vessel sampling. Machining operations in reactor coolant system (RCS) components must be accomplished while collecting machining chips that could cause damage if they become part of the flow stream. The debris from EDM is a fine talclike particulate (no chips), which can be collected by flushing and filtration

  18. Wear Resistance Analysis of A359/SiC/20p Advanced Composite Joints Welded by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cuevas Mata

    Full Text Available Abstract Advancement in automotive part development demands new cost-effective materials with higher mechanical properties and improved wear resistance as compared to existing materials. For instance, Aluminum Matrix Composites (AMC shows improved mechanical properties as wear and abrasion resistance, high strength, chemical and dimensional stability. Automotive industry has focused in AMC for a variety of applications in automotive parts in order to improve the fuel economy, minimize vehicle emissions, improve design options, and increase the performance. Wear resistance is one of the most important factors in useful life of the automotive components, overall in those components submitted to mechanical systems like automotive brakes and suspensions. Friction Stir Welding (FSW rises as the most capable process to joining AMC, principally for the capacity to weld without compromising their ceramic reinforcement. The aim of this study is focused on the analysis of wear characteristics of the friction-stir welded joint of aluminum matrix reinforced with 20 percent in weight silicon carbide composite (A359/SiC/20p. The experimental procedure consisted in cut samples into small plates and perform three welds on these with a FSW machine using a tool with 20 mm shoulder diameter and 8 mm pin diameter. The wear features of the three welded joints and parent metal were analyzed at constant load applying 5 N and a rotational speed of 100 rpm employing a Pin-on - Disk wear testing apparatus, using a sapphire steel ball with 6 mm diameter. The experimental results indicate that the three welded joints had low friction coefficient compared with the parent metal. The results determine that the FSW process parameters affect the wear resistance of the welded joints owing to different microstructural modifications during welding that causes a low wear resistance on the welded zone.

  19. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  20. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  1. Plastic dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Shiro; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines major features and applications of plastic dosimeters. Some plastic dosimeters, including the CTA and PVC types, detect the response of the plastic material itself to radiations while others, such as pigment-added plastic dosimeters, contain additives as radiation detecting material. Most of these dosimeters make use of color centers produced in the dosimeter by radiations. The PMMA dosimeter is widely used in the field of radiation sterilization of food, feed and medical apparatus. The blue cellophane dosimeter is easy to handle if calibrated appropriately. The rad-color dosimeter serves to determine whether products have been irradiated appropriately. The CTA dosimeter has better damp proofing properties than the blue cellophane type. The pigment-added plastic dosimeter consists of a resin such as nylon, CTA or PVC that contains a dye. Some other plastic dosimeters are also described briefly. Though having many advantages, these plastic dosimeter have disadvantages as well. Some of their major disadvantages, including fading as well as large dependence on dose, temperature, humidity and anviroment, are discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  2. Recent developments in Micro Friction Stir Welding: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithole, Keydon; Rao, Veeredhi Vasudeva

    2016-01-01

    The advent of friction stir welding (FSW) in 1991 has been evolutionary in the joining of metals and related materials. Friction stir welding has enabled the joining of metals that could not be joined by other welding processes. Research has shown that dissimilar materials with very different properties, plastics, composites and even wood can be joined by FSW. Recent activities in the application of FSW has seen the development of micro friction stir welding (μFSW), which is the FSW of very thin sections of thickness 1000 μm (1 mm) or less. Micro friction stir welding further extends the applications of FSW to areas such as copper electrical contacts, tailor-welded blanks, wood. Though μFSW is relatively new development significant work has been done to date with interesting research findings being reported. This paper aims to review developments in μFSW to date. The focus of the paper will be on problems peculiar to μFSW due to downscaling to the micro scale and other practical considerations. (paper)

  3. Mismatch effect on CT specimen mechanical effect and consequences on the weld toughness characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-01-01

    The welded joints are particularly sensitive areas in the structures in terms of harmfulness of defects. Given the complexity of the problem (geometry poorly controlled, multi-material aspect, the potential influence of residual stresses), the tests are conducted based on pessimistic assumptions that can wrap all the uncertainties of the problem. In the case of a defect assessment, the considered toughness is deduced from conventional characterization tests with a crack in the welding, considering the current standards, ISO 12135 or ASTM E-1820 which are valid only for an homogeneous specimen. In 2010, a new standard ISO 16563 was published to address the specificity of welded joints. If it covers some of the difficulties, it remains incomplete. In nuclear piping, welds have a mismatch M, i.e. the ratio between the yield strength of the weld metal and the base metal, usually greater than 1: this avoids any problem of strain localization at the junction and ensure that the stresses in the base metal are also easily supported by the welded joint. In this configuration, it turns out that for a given mechanical loading, a crack in the weld located generally has a solicitation, quantified by the parameter J, less (depending on the size of the junction) to those that would see the same crack located in the base metal. Unfortunately, this phenomenon exists also potentially for a characterization test, which would overestimate the true toughness of the welded joint. Plasticity that develops from the crack tip can quickly reach this interface and be affected. To evaluate this phenomenon, we considered two types of representative welded joint (PWR secondary loop ferritic weld and a 316 stainless steel weld) and performed a F.E. analysis of the multi-material CT specimen mechanical answer and on the η coefficient conventionally used to derive the plastic component of J from the area under the curve force-opening displacement. (authors)

  4. Machine safety: proper safeguarding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K J

    1992-06-01

    1. OSHA mandates certain safeguarding of machinery to prevent accidents and protect machine operators. OSHA specifies moving parts that must be guarded and sets criteria for the guards. 2. A 1989 OSHA standard for lockout/tagout requires locking the energy source during maintenance, periodically inspecting for power transmission, and training maintenance workers. 3. In an amputation emergency, first aid for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shock, and bleeding are the first considerations. The amputated part should be wrapped in moist gauze, placed in a sealed plastic bag, and placed in a container of 50% water and 50% ice for transport. 4. The role of the occupational health nurse in machine safety is to conduct worksite analyses to identify proper safeguarding and to communicate deficiencies to appropriate personnel; to train workers in safe work practices and observe compliance in the use of machine guards; to provide care to workers injured by machines; and to reinforce safe work practices among machine operators.

  5. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  6. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  7. Tunnel boring machine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, K.K.; McDonald, R.; Saunders, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM

  8. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  9. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  10. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  11. The numerical high cycle fatigue damage model of fillet weld joint under weld-induced residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a development of nonlinear continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for multiaxial high cycle fatigue is proposed in which the cyclic plasticity constitutive model has been incorporated in the finite element (FE) framework. T-joint FE simulation of fillet welding is implemented to characterize sequentially coupled three-dimensional (3-D) of thermo-mechanical FE formulation and simulate the welding residual stresses. The high cycle fatigue damage model is then taken account into the fillet weld joints under the various cyclic fatigue load types to calculate the fatigue life considering the residual stresses. The fatigue crack initiation and the propagation in the present model estimated for the total fatigue is compared with the experimental results. The FE results illustrated that the proposed high cycle fatigue damage model in this study could become a powerful tool to effectively predict the fatigue life of the welds. Parametric studies in this work are also demonstrated that the welding residual stresses cannot be ignored in the computation of the fatigue life of welded structures.

  12. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, ... We report on a pilot study on the use of a circumareolar excision and the use of .... and 1 gynecomastia patient) requested reduction in NAC size.

  13. Underwater Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Esam F. Alajmi; Ahmad A. Alqenaei

    2017-01-01

    Welding demand in offshore and marine applications is increased with the increasing in oil and gas activities as well as increasing in the marine transportation and industrial applications. Applications of underwater welding well be increased in Kuwait in the coming years due to the strategic directive of the country toward starting the offshore oil and gas exploration and production, and the increase in marine transportation projects. Therefore, there is a need to understand the concept of u...

  14. Plastic Fishes

    CERN Multimedia

    Trettnak, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness. The slideshow below gives you a taste of the artworks by Wolfgang Trettnak and Margarita Cimadevila.

  15. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results.

  16. Potential Applications of Friction Stir Welding to the Hydrogen Economy. Hydrogen Regional Infrastructure Program In Pennsylvania, Materials Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendlinger, Jennifer [Concurrent Technologies Corporation, Johnstown, PA (United States)

    2009-07-17

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding technique developed by The Welding Institute (TWI) of Cambridge, UK in the early 1990’s. The process uses a non-consumable rotating tool to develop frictional heat and plastically deform workpieces to be joined, resulting in a solid-state weld on the trailing side of the advancing tool. Since the materials to be joined are not melted, FSW results in a finer grain structure and therefore enhanced properties, relative to fusion welds. And unlike fusion welding, a relatively small number of key process parameters exist for FSW: tool rotational speed, linear weld velocity and force perpendicular to the joining surface. FSW is more energy efficient than fusion welding and can be accomplished in one or two passes, versus many more passes required of fusion welding thicker workpieces. Reduced post-weld workpiece distortion is another factor that helps to reduce the cost of FSW relative to fusion welding. Two primary areas have been identified for potential impact on the hydrogen economy: FSW of metallic pipes for hydrogen transmission and FSW of aluminum pressure vessels for hydrogen storage. Both areas have been under active development and are explored in this paper.

  17. SORPAS – The Professional Software for Simulation of Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi

    2002-01-01

    and easily operate and utilize the software. With the user-friendly facilities for flexible geometric design of work pieces and electrodes as well as process parameter settings similar to real machine parameter settings, the software has been readily applied in industry for supporting product development...... applied in industries including automotive, electronics and other metal processing industries as well as welding equipment manufacturers....... directly usable by engineers and technicians in industry, all of the important parameters in resistance welding are considered and automatically implemented into the software. With the specially designed graphic user interface for Windows, engineers (even without prior knowledge of FEM) can quickly learn...

  18. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Lu, J.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    is influenced by inductive noise caused by the high welding current. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage at primary side and current at secondary side. This increases the accuracy of measurement because of higher signal-noise ratio, and allows to apply to in-process......The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision...

  19. Metallurgical and mechanical characterization of a submerged arc welded joint in a 316 type stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatti, G.; Vedani, M.

    1990-01-01

    The tensile (deformation and fracture) behaviour of a multipass submerged arc welded joint Type 316 stainless steel is investigated by tests at room temperature and at 400 0 C on all-weld metal and transverse to weld (composite) specimens as well as by microstructural and compositional analyses (optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy). The as-deposited metal is characterised by a systematic variation in the tensile properties across the thickness with the higher strength and the lower ductility in the weld centre. These variations are related to material variability (mainly in dislocation density) because of local dissimilarities in thermal and mechanical histories occurring during the welding process. However, the material variability in the fusion zone, although important is not so large in the present weld and it does not influence the tensile properties of the weld as a whole. Moreover, the tensile behaviour concerning the transverse to weld specimens is characterized by a supporting effect from the higher yield strength material zone (fusion zone) to the lower yield strength material zone (parent metal) justified by the different contribution of the parent metal and of the weld-deposit metal to the integral plastic strain of the specimens. (author)

  20. Creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 5930C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1976-03-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 593 0 C was investigated over the time range from 3.6 x 10 4 s to 2.5 x 10 7 s. Equations relating stress to the time to rupture, the time to the onset of tertiary creep, and the time to produce a given creep strain were obtained. The experimental results indicate that the control of welding parameters (e.g. current, voltage and travel speed) within reasonable ranges can yield weld deposits with consistent time-dependent properties. Limited data suggest that high temperature (1065 0 C) post-weld annealing significantly alters only the flow curve for plastic deformation, while long-term thermal exposure at an intermediate temperature (565 0 C) produces only minor changes in either the plastic deformation or creep behavior of the weld materials

  1. Mechanical tunnel excavation in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperry, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Review Board for the US high-level radioactive waste facility at Yucca Mountain has recommended maximum use of open-quotes the most modern mechanical excavation techniques...in order to reduce disturbance to the rock walls and to achieve greater economy of time and cost.close quotes Tunnels for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain can be economically constructed with mechanical excavation equipment. This paper presents the results of mechanical excavation of a tunnel in welded tuff, similar to the tuffs of Yucca Mountain. These results are projected to excavation of emplacement drifts in Yucca Mountain using a current state-of-the-art tunnel boring machine (TBM)

  2. Friction riveting as an alternative mechanical fastening to join engineering plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Francesco; Conte, Romina; Bentrovato, Renato; Simeoli, Giorgio; Russo, Pietro; Ambrogio, Giuseppina

    2018-05-01

    Friction Rivecting is a quite new joining process to connect multi-material structures. In brief, a metallic rivet is dipped rotating inside matrixes, usually made of plastics, increasing its original diameter. The use of high-performance plastics is more suitable being their higher mechanical and thermal properties important to avoid material degradation and to allow strong part connections. High-speed friction welding system has been usually used to perform the process. In the work here proposed, the joints have been achieved by means of a traditional milling machine and the attention has been focused on a widely used engineering plastic, i.e. polyamide 6 (PA6) with and without glass fiber reinforcement. A specific speed multiplier has been attached into the mandrel of the used machine to increase the reachable rotational speed. Moreover, rivets made of Titanium Grade 2 and of an Aluminum Alloy, the AA-6060, are utilized. The influence that the heating and the forging length can have on the quality of the obtained junctions, considering a fixed joining depth, has been tested and investigated. The performed connections have been judged by tensile tests, which were set to quantify the maximum strength of the joints for a transverse speed of 1,0 mm/min. Barreling effect can be observed close to the tip, which loses the initial shape of a cylinder characterized by straight vertical walls. Finally, the possible degradation of the polymer, due to temperature increment, has been also evaluated close to the working zone. According to that, it has to be highlighted that the process needs a heating balance, which is necessary to get sound joints. The compromise has, on one side, to allow the rivet penetration and deformation, and on the other side, to avoid the degradation of the polymer, which would affect its properties and a proper rivet deformation.

  3. Application of Hard Metal Weld Deposit in the Area of Mixing Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any machine part is subject to degradation processes. Intensive wear occurs either when two bearing surfaces come into contact or when loose particles rub the function surface of a machine part. Soil processing machines are a good example. A similar process of abrasive wear occurs also in mixing machines or lines for material transport, such as worm-conveyors. The experiment part of this paper analyses hard metal weld deposit dedicated for renovation of abrasive stressed surfaces. In order to prolong the service life of a blade disc in a mixing machine Kreis-Biogas-Dissolver, the technology of hard surfacing by an electric arc was used. Tested hard metal electrodes were applied on a steel tape class 11 373. To eliminate mixing with the base material, weld beads were applied in two layers. Firstly, the weld bead was visually analyzed on a binocular microscope. Further, weld bead as well as the base material was analyzed from the metallographic point of view, whose aim was to identify the structure of weld metal and the origin of microcracks in weld bead. Moreover, there was also measured microhardness of weld metal. Abrasive resistance was tested according to the norm ČSN 01 5084, which is an abrasive cloth test. As in the mixing process also erosion wear occurs, there was also processed a test on a Bond device simulating stress of test samples by loose abrasive particles. The abrading agents were formed by broken stones of 8–16 mm in size. Based on the results of the individual tests, the recommendation of usage hard metal electrodes for prolonging service life of machine parts will be made.

  4. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-01-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl 2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting

  5. QUANTITATIVE PHASE ANALYSIS OF ARMOUR STEEL WELDED JOINT BY X-RAY DIFFRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetinov, Miroslav; Čabrilo, Aleksandar; Gerić, Katarina; Stojanović, Maja; Klisurić, Olivera

    2017-01-01

    Ultra-high tensile strength ischaracteristic of armour steel and in order to preserve this strength itswelding process is of paramount importance. Austenitic filler material istraditionally used for welding of armour steel, yet it has lower mechanicalproperties than the base material, i.e. the filler material is the weakestpoint of the welded joint. Moreover, due to the plastic deformation at thecrack tip austenitic filler material gets transformed into martensite duringfatigue crack propagat...

  6. Welding of 3D-printed carbon nanotube?polymer composites by locally induced microwave heating

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Charles B.; Lackey, Blake A.; Pospisil, Martin J.; Achee, Thomas C.; Hicks, Victoria K.; Moran, Aaron G.; Teipel, Blake R.; Saed, Mohammad A.; Green, Micah J.

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing through material extrusion, often termed three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a burgeoning method for manufacturing thermoplastic components. However, a key obstacle facing 3D-printed plastic parts in engineering applications is the weak weld between successive filament traces, which often leads to delamination and mechanical failure. This is the chief obstacle to the use of thermoplastic additive manufacturing. We report a novel concept for welding 3D-printed thermoplas...

  7. Analysis of mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed RPV weld overlay cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, J [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    Mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed outer layer of reactor pressure vessel weld overlay cladding, composed of Cr19Ni10Nb alloy, have been experimentally determined by conventional tensile testing and indentation testing. The constitutive properties of weld overlay cladding are then modelled with two homogenization models of the constitutive properties of elastic-plastic matrix-inclusion composites; numerical and experimental results are then compared. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Analysis of mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed RPV weld overlay cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical tensile properties of irradiated and annealed outer layer of reactor pressure vessel weld overlay cladding, composed of Cr19Ni10Nb alloy, have been experimentally determined by conventional tensile testing and indentation testing. The constitutive properties of weld overlay cladding are then modelled with two homogenization models of the constitutive properties of elastic-plastic matrix-inclusion composites; numerical and experimental results are then compared. 10 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Elucidation of Metallic Plume and Spatter Characteristics Based on SVM During High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiangdong; Liu Guiqian

    2015-01-01

    During deep penetration laser welding, there exist plume (weak plasma) and spatters, which are the results of weld material ejection due to strong laser heating. The characteristics of plume and spatters are related to welding stability and quality. Characteristics of metallic plume and spatters were investigated during high-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates at a continuous wave laser power of 10 kW. An ultraviolet and visible sensitive high-speed camera was used to capture the metallic plume and spatter images. Plume area, laser beam path through the plume, swing angle, distance between laser beam focus and plume image centroid, abscissa of plume centroid and spatter numbers are defined as eigenvalues, and the weld bead width was used as a characteristic parameter that reflected welding stability. Welding status was distinguished by SVM (support vector machine) after data normalization and characteristic analysis. Also, PCA (principal components analysis) feature extraction was used to reduce the dimensions of feature space, and PSO (particle swarm optimization) was used to optimize the parameters of SVM. Finally a classification model based on SVM was established to estimate the weld bead width and welding stability. Experimental results show that the established algorithm based on SVM could effectively distinguish the variation of weld bead width, thus providing an experimental example of monitoring high-power disk laser welding quality. (plasma technology)

  10. Circumferential welding applied for inox steel super duplex UNS S32750 using the process MIG using CMT® control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invernizzi, Bruno Pizol

    2017-01-01

    This study carried out circumferential welding experiments in UNS S32750 Super Duplex Stainless Steel tubes using diameters of 19,05 mm and 48,20 mm. Welds were performed using various welding parameters on a MIG machine with Cold Metal Transfer® CMT control. The weld joints were evaluated by visual and dimensional inspection in addition to the Vickers microhardness and traction tests, as well as the microstructural analysis in conjunction with phase precipitation analysis, which was performed according to practice A of ASTM A923, and corrosion test in accordance with practice A of ASTM G48 in conjunction with ASTM A923. The results indicated that welds performed in pipes with a diameter of 19.05 mm showed a weld joint with unacceptable dimensions according to the standard, this condition being attributed the use of a high wire diameter for the welding conditions used. Welding performed for pipes with a diameter of 48.20 mm showed a lack of penetration under the conditions employed when welded by the conventional CMT® process. In the case of the use of CMT® combined with pulsed arc, under conditions that generated greater heat input during welding, this resulted in total penetration of the joint and adequate surface finish. The results indicated that welding using the CMT® process combined with pulsed arc, under the conditions (parameters) employed generated good surface finish, combined mechanical properties, meeting standards requirements, as well as a balanced microstructure and high resistance to corrosion. (author)

  11. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  12. GREEN PLASTIC: A NEW PLASTIC FOR PACKAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Pankaj Kumar*, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief idea about a new type of plastic called as bio-plastic or green plastic. Plastic is used as a packaging material for various products, but this plastic is made up of non renewable raw materials. There are various disadvantages of using conventional plastic like littering, CO2 production, non-degradable in nature etc. To overcome these problems a new type of plastic is discovered called bio-plastic or green plastic. Bio-plastic is made from renewable resources and also...

  13. Electron Beam Welding of a Depleted Uranium Alloy to Niobium Using a Calibrated Electron Beam Power Density Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; Terrill, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Electron beam test welds were made joining flat plates of commercially pure niobium to a uranium-6wt%Nb (binary) alloy. The welding parameters and joint design were specifically developed to minimize mixing of the niobium with the U-6%Nb alloy. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the precise power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines and/or to other facilities

  14. Simple machines

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Just how simple are simple machines? With our ready-to-use resource, they are simple to teach and easy to learn! Chocked full of information and activities, we begin with a look at force, motion and work, and examples of simple machines in daily life are given. With this background, we move on to different kinds of simple machines including: Levers, Inclined Planes, Wedges, Screws, Pulleys, and Wheels and Axles. An exploration of some compound machines follows, such as the can opener. Our resource is a real time-saver as all the reading passages, student activities are provided. Presented in s

  15. Strength of joints made of BT16 alloy produced by diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, N.F.; Mashkova, N.A.; Varyanitsa, V.Yu.; Ermakova, N.V.; Fedorova, O.V.

    1984-01-01

    Strength characteristics of samples prepared by diffusion welding have been estimated for determination of optimum conditions for producing welded joints. It is shown that the joint strength ultimate plasticity and character of the joint fracture should be necessarily taken into accoUnt for choice of the optimum welding regime of homogeneous materials. The following regime is optimum for the titanium VT16 alloy: 1170 K welding temperature, 2 h duration of hold-up at the maximum temperature; 8 MPa pressure. A necessity of recrystallization annealing after welding is demonstrated. The annealing regime is as follows: 1070 K temperature; 60 min hold-up time. This treatment permits to reduce the grain size from the first point to the eighth one

  16. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  17. Flaw evaluation of Nd:YAG laser welding based plume shape by infrared thermal camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Yoo, Young Tae; Yang, Dong Jo; Song, Kyung Seol; Ro, Kyoung Bo

    2003-01-01

    In Nd:YAG laser welding evaluation methods of welding flaw are various. But, the method due to plume shape is difficult to classification od welding flaw. The Nd:YAG laser process is known to have high speed and deep penetration capability to become one of the most advanced welding technologies. At the present time, some methods are studied for measurement of plume shape by using high-speed camera and photo diode. This paper describes the machining characteristics of SM45C carbon steel welding by use of an Nd:YAG laser. In spite of its good mechanical characteristics, SM45C carbon steel has a high carbon contents and suffers a limitation in the industrial application due to the poor welding properties. In this study, plume shape was measured by infrared thermal camera that is non-contact/non-destructive thermal measurement equipment through change of laser generating power, speed, focus. Weld was performed on bead-on method. Measurement results are compared as two equipment. Here, two results are composed of measurement results of plume quantities due to plume shape by infrared thermal camera and inspection results of weld bead include weld flaws by ultrasonic inspector.

  18. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacob, S; Ariffin, N; Ali, R; Arshad, A; Wahab, M I A; Ismail, S A; Roji, NS M; Din, W B W; Zakaria, M H; Abdullah, A; Yusof, M I; Kamarulzaman, K Z; Mahyuddin, A; Hamzah, M N; Roslan, R; MAli, M A; Ahsan, Q

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld. (paper)

  19. Welding zinc coated steel with a CO/sub 2/ laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, R.; Steen, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Welding of zinc coated steel has been studied using a high power CO/sub 2/ laser. This process is of great interest to the manufactures of car, washing machines and other components made from sheet steel and subject to corrosion. The problem associated with the welding of zinc coated steel is the low boiling point of zinc (906C) relative to the high melting point of steel (1500C). The problem is particularly important in lap welding where the zinc layer is between the lapped sheets. Under these conditions the laser 'keyhole' will generate very high vapour pressure in the zinc layer with a consequent severe risk of vapour eruption destroying the continuity of the weld bead. Several techniques are presented for the removal of zinc vapours from the interface between the two sheets. It is shown that this problem solved by suitable gap between the sheets during lap welding. Hence full penetration welds without deterioration of the weld bead can be obtained. A theory has been presented which predicted an exact gap size needed to exhaust the zinc vapour. The gap depends upon the welding speed, zinc coating thickness and thickness of the sheet. The theory predicts the weld quality satisfactorily. (author)

  20. Impact Load of Welds After Micro-Jet Cooling / Dynamiczne Obciążenie Spoin Chłodzonych Mikrojetowo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling is an innovative method of forced cooling. It could be used to cooling after welding immediately. It allows to obtain welds with better properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Favourable structure of weld metal deposit (WMD with higher content of acicular ferrite (AF could be obtained. These properties can be controlled by several variables (e. g. type of cooling gas, number of jets. Plastic properties are particularly important in case of impact load. This type of strength is very dangerous for the structure and for safety of users (ex. car body during car crash. This article presents the influence of the cooling gas and the number of jets on plastic properties of the weld joint for impact load. It is described by restitution coefficient and plastic strain.

  1. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  2. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  3. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  4. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  5. An investigation on mechanical properties of steel fibre reinforced for underwater welded joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, K.; Zakaria, M. S.; Zairi, S.

    2017-09-01

    Underwater pipelines are always exposed to water and have a high tendency to have corrosion especially on the welded joint. This research is about using fiber glass as steel fiber to coat the welded joint to determine the effectiveness in corrosion prevention of the welded joint. Number of coating is varied to determine the better number coating to coat the pipeline. Few samples were left without immersion in salt water and few samples are immersed into salt water with same salinity as sea water. The material sample is prepared in dog bone shape to enable to be used in Universal Tensile Machine (UTM). The material prepared is left immersed for recommended time and tested in Universal Tensile Machine. Upon analyzing the result, the result is used to determine the breakage point whether broken on the welded joint or different place and also the suitable number of coating to be used.

  6. TBM performance prediction in Yucca Mountain welded tuff from linear cutter tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsch, R.; Ozdemir, L.; Gertsch, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses performance prediction which were developed for tunnel boring machines operating in welded tuff for the construction of the experimental study facility and the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The predictions were based on test data obtained from an extensive series of linear cutting tests performed on samples of Topopah String welded tuff from the Yucca Mountain Project site. Using the cutter force, spacing, and penetration data from the experimental program, the thrust, torque, power, and rate of penetration were estimated for a 25 ft diameter tunnel boring machine (TBM) operating in welded tuff. The result show that the Topopah Spring welded tuff (TSw2) can be excavated at relatively high rates of advance with state-of-the-art TBMs. The result also show, however, that the TBM torque and power requirements will be higher than estimated based on rock physical properties and past tunneling experience in rock formations of similar strength

  7. Influence of deformation on structural-phase state of weld material in St3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.ru; Ababkov, Nicolay, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Ozhiganov, Yevgeniy, E-mail: zhigan84@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); LLC “Kuzbass Center of Welding and Control”, 33/2, Lenin Str., 650055, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Kozlov, Eduard, E-mail: kozlov@tsuab.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Popova, Natalya, E-mail: natalya-popova-44@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4, Akademicheskii Ave., 634021, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nikonenko, Elena, E-mail: vilatomsk@mail.ru [Kuzbass State Technical University, 25-54, Krasnaya Str., 650000, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Str., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Zboykova, Nadezhda, E-mail: tezaurusn@gmail.com; Koneva, Nina, E-mail: koneva@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structural-phase condition of the weld material subjected to the plastic deformation was investigated using the translucent diffraction electron microscopy method. The investigations were carried out near the joint of the weld and the base metal. The seam was done by the method of manual arc welding without artificial defects. The St3 steel was taken as the welded material. Influence of the plastic deformation on morphology, phase composition, defect structure and its parameters of weld metal was revealed. All investigations were done at the distance of 0.5 mm from the joint of the weld and the base metal at the deformation degrees from 0 to 5% and after destruction of a sample. It was established that deformation of the sample did not lead to qualitative changes in the structure (the structure is still presented by ferrite-pearlite mixture) but changed the quantitative parameters of the structure, namely, with the increase of plastic deformation a part of the pearlite component becomes more and more imperfect. In the beginning it turns into the destroyed pearlite then into ferrite, the volume fraction of pearlite is decreased. The polarization of dislocation structure takes place but it doesn’t lead to the internal stresses that can destroy the sample.

  8. Development of friction welding method by electric servo motors; Dendo servo shiki masatsu assetsuho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, H; Onuma, M; Hasegawa, T; Sakamoto, T [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The standard friction welding has two methods; the brake method and the inertia method. We have developed a new friction welding method with the electric servo motor system. The forming of plastic fluidity layers of interface is evaluated quantitatively with the feedback control characteristics. The new method has enabled to reduce the heat effect and the burr of friction welding. In the method, we could reduce the getting heat energy, from one-third to half less than the previous methods. 6 refs., 16 figs.

  9. Specific energy of cold crack initiation in welding low alloy high-strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brednev, V.I.; Kasatkin, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for determination of energy spent on cold crack initiation, when testing welded joint samples by the Implant method, are described. Data on the effect of the steel alloying system, cooling rate of welded joints, content of diffusion hydrogen on the critical specific energy spent on the development of local plastic deformation upto cold crack initiation are presented. The value of specific energy spent on cold crack initiation is shown to be by two-three orders lower than the value of impact strength minimum accessible. The possibility to estimate welded joint resistance to cold crack initiation according to the critical specific energy is established

  10. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  11. Electron beam welding of heavy section 3Cr-1.5Mo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; David, S.A.; Nasreldin, A.

    1986-01-01

    Welding of thick section steels is a common practice in the fabrication of pressure vessels for energy systems. The fabrication cost is strongly influenced by the speed at which these large components can be welded. Conventional welding processes such as shielded metal arc (SMA) and submerged arc (SA) are time-consuming and expensive. Hence there is a great need to reduce welding time and the tonnage of weld metal deposited. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a process that potentially could be used to achieve dramatic reduction in the welding time and costs. The penetrating ability of the beam produces welds with high depth-to-width ratios at relatively high travel speeds, making it possible to weld thick sections with one or two passes without filler metals and other consumables. The paper describes a study that was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using a high power electron beam welding machine to weld heavy section steel. The main emphasis of this work was concentrated on determining the mechanical properties of the resulting weldment, characterizing the microstructure of the various weldment regions, and comparing these results with those from other processes. One of the steels selected for the heavy section electron beam welding study was a new 3 Cr-1.5 Mo-0.1 V alloy. The steel was developed at the AMAX Materials Research Center by Wada and co-workers for high temperature, high pressure hydrogen service as a possible improved replacement for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels. The excellent strength and toughness of this steel make it a promising candidate for future pressure vessels such as those for coal gasifiers. The work was conducted on 102 mm (4 in.) thick plates of this material in the normalized-and-tempered condition

  12. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-01-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit

  13. Load-Displacement Curves of Spot Welded, Bonded, and Weld-Bonded Joints for Dissimilar Materials and Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Al-Bahkali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional finite element models of spot welded, bonded and weld-bonded joints are developed using ABAQUS software. Each model consists of two strips with dissimilar materials and thickness and is subjected to an axial loading. The bonded and weld-bonded joints have specific adhesive thickness. A detailed experimental plan to define many properties and quantities such as, the elastic - plastic properties, modulus of elasticity, fracture limit, and properties of the nugget and heat affected zones are carried out. Experiments include standard testing of the base metal, the adhesive, the nugget and heat affected zone. They also include employing the indentation techniques, and ductile fracture limits criteria, using the special notch tests. Complete load-displacement curves are obtained for all joining models and a comparison is made to determine the best combination.

  14. Special grain boundaries in the nugget zone of friction stir welded AA6061-T6 under various welding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yong, Zou, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Xuemei, Liu [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Matsuda, Kenji [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    The age hardenable AA6061-T6 plate was butt welded by friction stir welding. The total heat input, generated by friction between the tool and work piece and plastic deformation, results in a consumption of meta-stable phases in the nugget zone. Precipitation phenomena were closely related to the diffusion of the solute atoms. The existence of special grain boundaries like Σ1a and Σ3 will increase the difficulty in diffusion, which will improve the hardness in the nugget zone. Furthermore, the formation of Σ3 grain boundaries can result from an impingement of re-crystallized grains coming from texture components in twin relationship already. An appropriate strain level may benefit the development of the twin components with a similar intensity. The welding parameters have an effect on heat source mode and the strain level. Then, the type of dynamic re-crystallization and distribution of the special grain boundaries was altered by changing the parameters.

  15. Face machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-06-01

    The article surveys latest equipment available from the world`s manufacturers of a range of machines for tunnelling. These are grouped under headings: excavators; impact hammers; road headers; and shields and tunnel boring machines. Products of thirty manufacturers are referred to. Addresses and fax numbers of companies are supplied. 5 tabs., 13 photos.

  16. Electric machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi [Niskayuna, NY; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath [Madison, WI

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  17. Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Diane E.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists seek to develop machines that can "learn," that is, solve problems by imitating the human brain, a gold mine of information on the processes of human learning is being discovered, expert systems are being improved, and human-machine interactions are being enhanced. (SK)

  18. Nonplanar machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritson, D.

    1989-05-01

    This talk examines methods available to minimize, but never entirely eliminate, degradation of machine performance caused by terrain following. Breaking of planar machine symmetry for engineering convenience and/or monetary savings must be balanced against small performance degradation, and can only be decided on a case-by-case basis. 5 refs

  19. Optimising residual stresses at a repair in a steam header to tubeplate weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soanes, T.P.T.; Bell, W.; Vibert, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Following the discovery of incorrect weld metal in the steam side shell to tubeplate weld in a type 316H stainless steel superheater steam header, a repair strategy had to be determined. The strategy adopted was to remove the incorrect weld material, which extended around the full circumference, by machining from the inside of the header, followed by rewelding from the inside using an automatic welding process and localised post-weld heat treatment. Due to concern over potential reheat cracking of the repair after return to service, a considerable amount of residual stress modelling was carried out to support the development and optimisation of a successful repair and heat treatment strategy and thus underwrite the safety case for return to service

  20. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  1. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  2. Pulsed TIG welding of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing, U.

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigates into the effects of impulse welding parameters on weld geometry in the joint welding of thin-walled sheets and pipes (d=2.5 mm), and it uses random samples of thick-walled sheets and pipes (d=10 mm), in fixed positions. (orig./MM) [de

  3. THE NEED FOR A NEW JOINING TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CLOSURE WELDING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL GR; HILL BE; GRANT GJ

    2008-01-01

    One of the activities associated with cleanup throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is packaging radioactive materials into storage containers. Much of this work will be performed in high-radiation environments requiring fully remote operations, for which existing, proven systems do not currently exist. These conditions demand a process that is capable of producing acceptable (defect-free) welds on a consistent basis; the need to perform weld repair, under fully-remote operations, can be extremely costly and time consuming. Current closure welding technology (fusion welding) is not well suited for this application and will present risk to cleanup cost and schedule. To address this risk, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are proposing that a new and emerging joining technology, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), be considered for this work. FSW technology has been demonstrated in other industries (aerospace and marine) to produce near flaw-free welds on a consistent basis. FSW is judged capable of providing the needed performance for fully-remote closure welding of containers for radioactive materials for the following reasons: FSW is a solid-state process; material is not melted. As such, FSW does not produce the type of defects associated with fusion welding, e.g., solidification-induced porosity, cracking, distortion due to weld shrinkage, and residual stress. In addition, because FSW is a low-heat input process, material properties (mechanical, corrosion and environmental) are preserved and not degraded as can occur with 'high-heat' fusion welding processes. When compared to fusion processes, FSW produces extremely high weld quality. FSW is performed using machine-tool technology. The equipment is simple and robust and well-suited for high radiation, fully-remote operations compared to the relatively complex equipment associated with the fusion-welding processes. Additionally, for standard wall thicknesses of radioactive materials

  4. Inspection from outside of weld bead on tubes by gamma absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, L.; Lefevre, C.; Bergey, C.

    1983-07-01

    In this method used when it is impossible to place the gamma source inside the tube, the gamma rays pass through the tube twice. The thickness of the weld bead is determined by only one coordinate of space: the polar angle in the plane of the weld. The method was tested with an uranium ring with machined defects. The position of the defects was determined with an accuracy of 1 degree and resolution is of the order of the tube thickness [fr

  5. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  6. Residual stress investigation of copper plate and canister EB-Welds Complementary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripenberg, H.

    2009-03-01

    The residual stresses in copper as induced by EB-welding were studied by specimens where the weld had two configurations: either a linear or a circumferential weld. This report contains the residual stress measurements of two plates, containing linear welds, and the full-scale copper lid specimen to which a hollow cylinder section had been joined by a circumferential EB-weld. The residual stress state of the EB-welded copper specimens was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), hole drilling (HD) ring core (RC) and contour method (CM). Three specimens, canister XK010 and plates X251 and X252, were subjected to a thorough study aiming at quantitative determination of the residual stress state in and around the EB-welds using XRD for surface and HD and RC for spatial stress analysis. The CM maps one stress component over a whole cross section. The surface residual stresses measured by XRD represent the machined condition of the copper material. The XRD study showed that the stress changes towards compression close to the weld in the hollow cylinder, which indicates shrinkage in the hoop direction. According to the same analogy, the shrinkage in the axial direction is much smaller. The HD measurements showed that the stress state in the base material is bi-axial and, in terms of von Mises stress, 50 MPa for the plates and 20 MPa for the cylinder part of the canister. The stress state in the EB-welds of all specimens differs clearly from the stress state in the base material being more tensile, with higher magnitudes of von Mises stress in the plate than in the canister welds. The HD and RC results were obtained using linear elastic theory. The RC measurements showed that the maximum principal stress in the BM is close to zero near the surface and it becomes slightly tensile, 10 MPa, deeper under the surface. Welding pushed the general stress state towards tension with the maximum principal stress reaching 50 MPa, deeper than 5 mm below the surface in the weld. The

  7. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    Through years, the dynamic resistance across the electrodes has been used for weld quality estimation and contact resistance measurement. However, the previous methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly based on measuring the voltage and current on the secondary side of the transfo......Through years, the dynamic resistance across the electrodes has been used for weld quality estimation and contact resistance measurement. However, the previous methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly based on measuring the voltage and current on the secondary side...... of the transformer in resistance welding machines, implying defects from induction noise and interference with the leads connected to the electrodes for measuring the voltage. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage on the primary side and the current on the secondary side...

  8. Welding wire velocity modelling and control using an optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for controlling the velocity of a welding wire at the tip of the handle is described. The method is an alternative to the traditional welding apparatus control system where the wire velocity is controlled internal in the welding machine implying a poor disturbance reduction....... To obtain the tip velocity a dynamic model of the wire/liner system is developed and verified.  In the wire/liner system it turned out that backlash and reflections are influential factors. An idea for handling the backlash has been suggested. In addition an optical sensor for measuring the wire velocity...... at the tip has been constructed. The optical sensor may be used but some problems due to focusing cause noise in the control loop demanding a more precise mechanical wire feed system or an optical sensor with better focusing characteristics....

  9. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  10. Magical Engineering Plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-15

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  11. Magical Engineering Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  12. Plasma Processes of Cutting and Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    TIG process. 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding In plasma arc welding , the term...Cutting 3 3 4 4 4 2.2 Plasma Arc Welding 5 2.2.1 Needle Arc Welding 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding 5 6 3. Applications 8 93.1 Economics 4. Environmental Aspects of...Arc Lengths III. Needle Arc Welding Conditions IV. Keyhole Welding Conditions v. Chemical Analyses of Plates Used - vii - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

  13. Mechanical properties of friction stir welded butt joint of steel/aluminium alloys: effect of tool geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafiq, W. M.; Afendi, M.; Daud, R.; Mazlee, M. N.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Lee, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper described the mechanical properties from hardness testing and tensile testing of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) materials. In this project, two materials of aluminium and steel are welded using conventional milling machine and tool designed with different profile and shoulder size. During welding the temperature along the weld line is collected using thermocouples. Threaded pins was found to produce stronger joints than cylindrical pins. 20 mm diameter shoulder tool welded a slightly stronger joint than 18 mm diameter one, as well as softer nugget zone due to higher heat input. Threaded pins also contributed to higher weld temperature than cylindrical pins due to increase in pin contact surface. Generally, higher temperatures were recorded in aluminium side due to pin offset away from steel.

  14. Residual-stresses in austenitic stainless-steel primary coolant pipes and welds of pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, F.; Leggatt, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Surface and through thickness residual stress measurements were performed on an aged cast austenitic-ferritic stainless steel pipe and on an orbital TIG weld representative of those of primary coolant pipes in pressurized water reactors. An abrasive-jet hole drilling method and a block removal and layering method were used. Surface stresses and through thickness stress profiles are strongly dependent upon heat treatments, machining and welding operations. In the aged cast stainless steel pipe, stresses ranged between -250 and +175 MPa. On and near the orbital TIG weld, the outside surface of the weld was in tension both in the axial and hoop directions, with maximum values reaching 420 MPa in the weld. On the inside surface, the hoop stresses were compressive, reaching -300 MPa. However, the stresses in the axial direction at the root of the weld were tensile within 4 mm depth from the inside surface, locally reaching 280 MPa. (author)

  15. Process of welding gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speigel, Lyle B.; White, Raymond Alan; Murphy, John Thomas; Nowak, Daniel Anthony

    2003-11-25

    A process for welding superalloys, and particularly articles formed of gamma prime-strengthened nickel-base superalloys whose chemistries and/or microstructures differ. The process entails forming the faying surface of at least one of the articles to have a cladding layer of a filler material. The filler material may have a composition that is different from both of the articles, or the same as one of the articles. The cladding layer is machined to promote mating of the faying surfaces, after which the faying surfaces are mated and the articles welded together. After cooling, the welded assembly is free of thermally-induced cracks.

  16. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  17. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  18. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  19. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  20. Defect detectability of eddy current testing for underwater laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Souichi; Kobayashi, Noriyasu; Ochiai, Makoto; Kasuya, Takashi; Yuguchi, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We clarified defect detectability of eddy current testing (ECT) as a surface inspection technique for underwater laser beam welding works of dissimilar metal welding (DMW) of reactor vessel nozzle. The underwater laser beam welding procedure includes groove caving as a preparation, laser beam welding in the grooves and welded surface grinding as a post treatment. Therefore groove and welded surface inspections are required in the underwater condition. The ECT is a major candidate as this inspection technique because a penetrant testing is difficult to perform in the underwater condition. Several kinds of experiments were curried out using a cross coil an ECT probe and ECT data acquisition system in order to demonstrate the ECT defect detectability. We used specimens, simulating groove and DMW materials at an RV nozzle, with electro-discharge machining (EDM) slits over it. Additionally, we performed a detection test for artificial stress corrosion cracking (SCC) defects. From these experimental results, we confirmed that an ECT was possible to detect EDM slits 0.3 mm or more in depth and artificial SCC defects 0.02 mm to 0.48 mm in depth on machined surface. Furthermore, the underwater ECT defect detectability is equivalent to that in air. We clarified an ECT is sufficiently usable as a surface inspection technique for underwater laser beam welding works. (author)

  1. Fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel dissimilar joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paventhan, R.; Lakshminarayanan, P.R.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fusion welding of dissimilar metals is a problem due to difference in properties. → Solid state welding process such as friction welding is a solution for the above problem. → Fatigue life of friction welded carbon steel and stainless steel joints are evaluated. → Effect of notch on the fatigue life of friction welded dissimilar joints is reported. → Formation of intermetallic is responsible for reduction in fatigue life of dissimilar joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel-austenitic stainless steel (MCS-ASS) dissimilar joints. Commercial grade medium carbon steel rods of 12 mm diameter and AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel rods of 12 mm diameter were used to fabricate the joints. A constant speed, continuous drive friction welding machine was used to fabricate the joints. Fatigue life of the joints was evaluated conducting the experiments using rotary bending fatigue testing machine (R = -1). Applied stress vs. number of cycles to failure (S-N) curve was plotted for unnotched and notched specimens. Basquin constants, fatigue strength, fatigue notch factor and notch sensitivity factor were evaluated for the dissimilar joints. Fatigue strength of the joints is correlated with microstructure, microhardness and tensile properties of the joints.

  2. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  3. Pervasive plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Human manipulation of hydrocarbons — as fuel and raw materials for modern society — has changed our world and the indelible imprint we will leave in the rock record. Plastics alone have permeated our lives and every corner of our planet.

  4. Plastic fish

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness.   Artwork by Wolfgang Trettnak. Packaging materials, consumer goods (shoes, kids’ toys, etc.), leftovers from fishing and aquaculture activities… our oceans and beaches are full of plastic litter. Most of the debris from beaches is plastic bottles. “PET bottles have high durability and stability,” explains Wolfgang Trettnak, a chemist by education and artist from Austria, who gave a lecture on this topic organised by the Staff Association at CERN on 26 May. “PET degrades very slowly and the estimated lifetime of a bottle is 450 years.” In addition to the beach litter accumulated from human use, rivers bring several ki...

  5. Plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.

    1937-01-01

    § 1. Plastic deformation of solid matter under high confining pressures has been insufficiently studied. Jeffreys 1) devotes a few paragraphs to deformation of solid matter as a preface to his chapter on the isostasy problem. He distinguishes two properties of solid matter with regard to its

  6. Microstructure of Friction Stir Welded AlSi9Mg Cast with 5083 and 2017A Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.; Kopyściański, M.; Dymek, S.; Węglowska, A.; Pietras, A.

    2018-03-01

    Wrought aluminum alloys 5083 and 2017A were each joined with cast aluminum alloy AlSi9Mg through friction stir welding in butt weld configurations. For each material system, the wrought and cast alloy positions, i.e., the advancing side or the retreating side, were exchanged between welding trials. The produced weldments were free from cracks and discontinuities. For each alloy configuration, a well-defined nugget comprised of alternating bands of the welded alloys characterized the microstructure. The degree of mixing, however, strongly depended on which wrought alloy was present and on its position during processing. In all cases, the cast AlSi9Mg alloy dominated the weld center regardless of its position during welding. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis showed that the grain size in both alloys (bands) constituting the nugget was similar and that the majority of grain boundaries exhibited a high angle character (20°-60°). Regardless of the alloy, however, all grains were elongated along the direction of the material plastic flow during welding. A numerical simulation of the joining process visualized the material flow patterns and temperature distribution and helped to rationalize the microstructural observations. The hardness profiles across the weld reflected the microstructure formed during welding and correlated well with the temperature changes predicted by the numerical model. Tensile specimens consistently fractured in the cast alloy near the weld nugget.

  7. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Yokono, Tomomi.

    1991-01-01

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  8. Techniques for intergranular crack formation and assessment in alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Hong Deok; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A technique developed to produce artificial intergranular stress corrosion cracks in structural components was applied to thick, forged alloy 600 base and alloy 182 weld metals for use in the qualification of nondestructive examination techniques for welded components in nuclear power plants. An externally controlled procedure was demonstrated to produce intergranular stress corrosion cracks that are comparable to service-induced cracks in both the base and weld metals. During the process of crack generation, an online direct current potential drop method using array probes was used to measure and monitor the sizes and shapes of the cracks. A microstructural characterization of the produced cracks revealed realistic conformation of the crack faces unlike those in machined notches produced by an electrodischarge machine or simple fatigue loading using a universal testing machine. A comparison with a destructive metallographic examination showed that the characteristics, orientations, and sizes of the intergranular cracks produced in this study are highly reproducible.

  9. The Machine within the Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Although Virtual Machines are widespread across CERN, you probably won't have heard of them unless you work for an experiment. Virtual machines - known as VMs - allow you to create a separate machine within your own, allowing you to run Linux on your Mac, or Windows on your Linux - whatever combination you need.   Using a CERN Virtual Machine, a Linux analysis software runs on a Macbook. When it comes to LHC data, one of the primary issues collaborations face is the diversity of computing environments among collaborators spread across the world. What if an institute cannot run the analysis software because they use different operating systems? "That's where the CernVM project comes in," says Gerardo Ganis, PH-SFT staff member and leader of the CernVM project. "We were able to respond to experimentalists' concerns by providing a virtual machine package that could be used to run experiment software. This way, no matter what hardware they have ...

  10. Synergy of corrosion activity and defects in weld bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work evaluates synergism of atmosphere corrosive action and material defects. These defects appear not only during particular technological process of connecting of structural material but also during cooling and up to hundreds hours afterwards. The multiplication of degradation impact of defects in joint welds and heat-affected zone caused by activity of atmosphere acidic medium is simulated in condensation chambers. The verification is realized by use of mechanical uniaxial tension loading and following fractographic and metalgraphic analysis.The metal plasticity is sufficient factor to eliminate thermal stress in tough metal (11 373. This is reflected in more homogenous weld root area (with no cracks. The corrosion influence of environment is in case of such specimens limited to very slight decrease of weld maximum load. The ultimate strength value decreases approximately for 20MPa only in contrast to dramatic strength decrease in case of 11 503 material. Before metalographic examination was observed surprisingly great value of load capacity of spot welds. These welds were not ruptured nor in a single case even during maximum length of corrosion exploitation. The consequent material analysis discovered high qualitative material and strength properties of this kind of joint.

  11. Mechanized hyperbaric welding by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Santos, J.F. dos; Bohm, K.H.; Hensel, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    At the GKSS-Forschungszentrum investigations are carried out on mechanized welded test plates produced under working pressure between 10 to 110 bar in breathable TRIMIX-5-atmosphere. The welds are performed by a modified industrial robot, which was adapted in its components to withstand these severe conditions. Variations on the welding parameters were made to maintain a stable arc as well as to provide on indication of the effect of the variables on the mechanical properties of the welded joint. During all tests the robot showed a very good function. Good reliable welds were achieved meeting the requirements according API II04 or BS 4515-1984. (orig.) [de

  12. Initial Testing for the Recommendation of Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Procedures for HY-80 Steel Plate Butt Joints at Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    17  Figure 11.  IRMS versus VRMS Comparison with Different Ar/CO2 Gas Mixtures Using GMAW-P...21  Figure 13.  IRMS versus VRMS Comparison with Miller and Lincoln Welding Machines in the Horizontal and Vertical Positions Using GMAW-P...Gas Metal Arc Welding Pulsed Spray Transfer GMAW-S Gas Metal Arc Welding Spray Transfer HAZ Heat Affected Zone HC#1 Hull Cut #1 IRMS Current Root

  13. Mechanical behavior of multipass welded joint during stress relief annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yukio; Fukuda, Keiji; Nakacho, Keiji; Takahashi, Eiji; Sakamoto, Koichi.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation into mechanical behavior of a multipass welded joint of a pressure vessel during stress relief annealing was conducted. The study was performed theoretically and experimentally on idealized research models. In the theoretical analysis, the thermal elastic-plastic creep theory developed by the authors was applied. The behavior of multipass welded joints during the entire thermal cycle, from welding to stress relief annealing, was consistently analyzed by this theory. The results of the analysis show a good, fundamentally coincidence with the experimental findings. The outline of the results and conclusions is as follows. (1) In the case of the material (2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel) furnished in this study, the creep strain rate during stress relief annealing below 575 0 C obeys the strain-hardening creep law using the transient creep and the one above 575 0 C obeys the power creep law using the stational creep. (2) In the transverse residual stress (σsub(x)) distribution after annealing, the location of the largest tensile stress on the top surface is about 15 mm away from the toe of weld, and the largest at the cross section is just below the finishing bead. These features are similar to those of welding residual stresses. But the stress distribution after annealing is smoother than one from welding. (3) The effectiveness of stress relief annealing depends greatly on the annealing temperature. For example, most of residual stresses are relieved at the heating stage with a heating rate of 30 0 C/hr. to 100 0 C/hr. if the annealing temperature is 650 0 C, but if the annealing temperature is 550 0 C, the annealing is not effective even with a longer holding time. (4) In the case of multipass welding residual stresses studied in this paper, the behaviors of high stresses during annealing are approximated by ones during anisothermal relaxation. (auth.)

  14. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  15. Machine translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, M

    1982-04-01

    Each language has its own structure. In translating one language into another one, language attributes and grammatical interpretation must be defined in an unambiguous form. In order to parse a sentence, it is necessary to recognize its structure. A so-called context-free grammar can help in this respect for machine translation and machine-aided translation. Problems to be solved in studying machine translation are taken up in the paper, which discusses subjects for semantics and for syntactic analysis and translation software. 14 references.

  16. Material Flow and Oxide Particle Distributions in Friction-Stir Welded F/M-ODS Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Jin, Hyun Ju; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion in ODS(Oxide dispersion strengthened) steel. However, these advantages will disappear while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. There is only limited literature available on the joining of ODS steels. Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered to be the best welding technique for welding ODS steels as the technique helps in retaining the homogeneous nano-oxide particles distributions in matrix. FSW is a solid.state, hot.shear joining process in which a rotating tool with a shoulder and terminating in a threaded pin, moves along the butting surfaces of two rigidly clamped plates placed on a backing plate. Heat generated by friction at the shoulder and to a lesser extent at the pin surface, softens the material being welded. Severe plastic deformation and flow of this plasticised metal occurs as the tool is translated along the welding direction. Material is transported from the front of the tool to the trailing edge where it is forged into a joint. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels. This study found that, during FSW, the forward movement of the tool pin results in loose contact between the tool pin and the receding material on the advancing side.

  17. Residual stresses analysis of friction stir welding using one-way FSI simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Wook; Jang, Beom Seon; Song, Ha Cheol

    2015-01-01

    When certain mechanisms, such as plastic deformations and temperature gradients, occur and are released in a structure, stresses remain because of the shape of the structure and external constraints. These stresses are referred to as residual stresses. The base material locally expands during heating in the welding process. When the welding is completed and cooled to room temperature, the residual stresses are left at nearly the yield strength level. In the case of friction stir welding, the maximum temperature is 80% to 90% of the melting point of the materials. Thus, the residual stresses in the welding process are smaller than those in other fusion welding processes; these stresses have not been considered previously. However, friction stir welding residual stresses are sometimes measured at approximately 70% or above. These residual stresses significantly affect fatigue behavior and lifetime. The present study investigates the residual stress distributions in various welding conditions and shapes of friction stir welding. In addition, the asymmetric feature is considered in temperature and residual stress distribution. Heat transfer analysis is conducted using the commercial computational fluid dynamics program Fluent, and results are used in the finite element structural analysis with the ANSYS Multiphysics software. The calculated residual stresses are compared with experimental values using the X-ray diffraction method.

  18. Welding method by remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashinokuchi, Minoru.

    1994-01-01

    Water is charged into a pit (or a water reservoir) and an article to be welded is placed on a support in the pit by remote handling. A steel plate is disposed so as to cover the article to be welded by remote handling. The welding device is positioned to the portion to be welded and fixed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded from radiation by water and the steel plate. Water in the pit is drained till the portion to be welded is exposed to the atmosphere. Then, welding is conducted. After completion of the welding, water is charged again to the pit and the welding device and fixing jigs are decomposed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded again from radiation by water and the steel plate. Subsequently, the steel plate is removed by remote handling. Then, the article to be welded is returned from the pit to a temporary placing pool by remote handling. This can reduce operator's exposure. Further, since the amount of the shielding materials can be minimized, the amount of radioactive wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  19. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  20. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.