WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic surgery residents

  1. Recent trends in resident career choices after plastic surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Fernando A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Tseng, Charles Y; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the initial career choice of plastic surgery residents after completion of training during the last five years and to identify any factors that may influence choice of career path. Demographic data were obtained from graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US plastic surgery residency programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. The type of practice and pursuit of fellowship were recorded for each graduate. Sex, age at graduation, marital status, dependents, advanced degrees, previous research, type of training program, primary residency, and length of plastic surgery training were also documented. Comparison of outcomes between the two plastic surgery training pathways (integrated vs independent) was analyzed. Data were collected for 424 graduates from 37 different training programs. Of these programs, 11% were from the West coast, 32% from Midwest, 33% from East coast, and 24% from the South. Seventy-nine percent of residents were male, mean age at graduation was 35 (2.89) years. Forty-nine percent of residents were married, 30% had one or more dependents, 6% had advanced degrees, and 18% had previous research experience. Fifty-eight percent of graduates were from independent programs. Forty-eight percent of residents pursued private practice immediately after graduation, 8% pursued academic practice, 41% pursued specialty fellowships, and 3% had military commitments. Most of the residents chose to pursue private practice on completion of residency. Independent residents were significantly more likely to pursue private practice immediately compared to integrated/combined residents. No other factors were significant for practice choice.

  2. Applying to plastic surgery residency: factors associated with medical student career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Arin K; May, James W

    2008-03-01

    Applications to plastic surgery residency increased 34 percent from 2002 to 2005, despite decreasing applications to other surgical subspecialties. During this period, medical education, reimbursement, work hours, and media coverage have changed. To determine factors responsible for rising applications to plastic surgery residencies, medical student applicants to plastic surgery residencies for 2005 were surveyed. Applicants recorded exposure to plastic surgery during medical school and graded the influence of personality, lifestyle, income potential, and media coverage on their decision to choose plastic surgery training. To further study the effects of plastic surgery exposure on career choice, the percentage of graduating students applying to plastic surgery residency was compared between medical schools with and without plastic surgery training programs. Medical schools that provided greater exposure to plastic surgery and schools with plastic surgery training programs had a higher percentage of graduates applying to plastic surgery residency (p personality of plastic surgeons as a significant factor in their career choice. Lifestyle and income potential were moderately important, whereas media coverage minimally affected career decision. Applicants typically decided on a plastic surgical career during the third year of medical school. Medical student exposure to plastic surgery is the most influential factor in a student's decision to pursue a career in plastic surgery. To continue the increasing applicant trend toward plastic surgery, plastic surgeon engagement of medical students should be emphasized, ideally before the third year of medical school.

  3. Plastic Surgery Residents' Understanding and Attitudes Toward Biostatistics: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Lifchez, Scott D; Losee, Joseph; Hultman, Charles Scott; Redett, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    An understanding of biostatistics is a critical skill for the practicing plastic surgeon. The purpose of the present study was to assess plastic surgery residents' attitudes and understanding of biostatistics. This was a cross-sectional study of plastic surgery residents. A survey assessing resident attitudes regarding biostatistics, confidence with biostatistical concepts, and objective knowledge of biostatistics was distributed electronically to trainees in plastic surgery programs in the United States. Bivariate and regression analyses were used to identify significant associations and adjust for confounders/effect modifiers. One hundred twenty-three residents responded to the survey (12.3% response rate). Respondents expressed positive attitudes regarding biostatistics in plastic surgery practice, but only moderate levels of confidence with various biostatistical concepts. Both attitudes and confidence were positively associated with the number of plastic surgery journals read monthly and formal coursework in biostatistics (P biostatistics in the practice of plastic surgery but have only a fair understanding of core statistical concepts.

  4. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  5. International plastic surgery missions: a framework for resident education using the CanMEDS competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin P; Lecours, Catherine; Bortoluzzi, Patricia; Caouette-Laberge, Louise; Ying, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Residency education has shifted over the past decade in an attempt to graduate well-rounded physicians. There is a recognition that a physician's abilities must extend beyond medical knowledge. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada introduced the CanMEDS physician competency framework in 2005. The framework provides 7 areas of competencies that are aimed at providing improved patient care. These competencies are medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, scholar, and professional. Teaching and evaluating many of these competencies is often challenging for residency training programs. We believe that international surgical missions provide a prime opportunity to teach and evaluate all CanMEDS' roles.Plastic surgery is a field with many different organizations involved in international surgery. Many plastic surgery training programs offer opportunities for residents to become involved in these international surgical missions. Through these trips, residents gain surgical experience, see a variety and volume of clinical cases, and have the opportunity to travel to a foreign country and experience different cultures. We believe that international plastic surgery surgical missions also provide an exceptional micro environment for the teaching of CanMEDS roles. Using examples from residents' personal experiences on international plastic surgery missions to China, Mali, and Cambodia, we describe the benefits of these missions in transferring the CanMEDS competencies to resident training.

  6. Outcome-based residency education: teaching and evaluating the core competencies in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gregory N; Basu, C Bob; Leong, Mimi; Mateo, Carol; Hollier, Larry H; Stal, Samuel

    2008-06-01

    Through its oversight of residency education in the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated new structural changes in resident education with its newly created core competencies and an emphasis on outcomes-based education. These core competencies represent the central areas in which the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education believes a plastic surgery resident should receive adequate and appropriate education and training. In addition, as part of this outcomes-based education, residents are to be evaluated on their level of mastery in these core competencies. Increasingly, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will assess the ability of residency programs to integrate the teaching and evaluating of the core competencies in their accreditation process of plastic surgery residency programs. This shift in residency evaluation initiated by the Outcomes Project by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will have a significant impact in how plastic surgery residents are taught and, as importantly, evaluated in the coming years. The objectives of this work were as follows: (1) to outline the different methods available to foster a core competency-based plastic surgery training curriculum and (2) to serve as a primer to help both full-time academic and clinical faculty to further develop their curriculum to successfully teach and constructively evaluate their residents in the core competencies in accordance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. At the conclusion of this review, the reader should have a better understanding of what is necessary to formulate and help foster a plastic surgery core competency curriculum, particularly with an emphasis on the contemporary methods used for outcomes evaluations.

  7. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Hultman, MD, MBA, FACS

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care.

  8. Plastic surgery residents' attitudes and understanding of biostatistics: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Redett, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    To assess plastic surgery residents' knowledge, attitudes, and comfort with biostatistics. Cross-sectional study. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A total of 22 plastic surgery residents (91% response rate) completed the study. The study sample consisted of 18 residents in the integrated training path and 4 in the independent training track and was equally divided between junior and senior residents. Most respondents (>54%) had taken at least 1 course in biostatistics or epidemiology. More than 90% of residents reported reading at least 1 plastic surgical journal on a regular basis (mean 2.1 ± 1.5 journals/month). Most residents expressed a desire to learn more about biostatistics (68.2%), reported using statistical information in forming clinical opinions (86.3%), and placed a high value on knowledge of biostatistics in appraising the surgical literature (90.9%). However, only 45% of respondents reported being able to understand all the statistical terms encountered in journal articles. Only 50% of respondents felt comfortable with assessing whether the appropriate statistical tests were used to answer a research question. In case studies, the mean percentage of correct responses was 53.0 ± 24.5% (range: 0-83.3). Higher performance scores were associated with a prior course in biostatistics (p = 0.04) and the number of journals read monthly (p = 0.003). Respondents had difficulty with study design (45.5% correct), analysis of variance (45.5% correct), time to event analysis (9.1% correct), and interpreting a 95% confidence interval (45.5% correct). The number of correct responses strongly correlated with respondent confidence in biostatistics (r = 0.70, p biostatistics but have only a fair understanding of core statistical concepts. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Residency characteristics that matter most to plastic surgery applicants: a multi-institutional analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Mehta, Karan; Squitieri, Lee; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Koeckert, Michael S; Patel, Ashit; Saadeh, Pierre B; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-06-01

    The National Residency Matching Program Match is a very unique process in which applicants and programs are coupled to each other based on a ranking system. Although several studies have assessed features plastic surgery programs look for in applicants, no study in the present plastic surgery literature identifies which residency characteristics are most important to plastic surgery applicants. Therefore, we sought to perform a multi-institutional assessment as to which factors plastic surgery residency applicants consider most important when applying for residency. A validated and anonymous questionnaire containing 37 items regarding various program characteristics was e-mailed to 226 applicants to New York University, Albany, University of Michigan, and University of Southern California plastic surgery residency programs. Applicants were asked to rate each feature on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most important. The 37 variables were ranked by the sum of the responses. The median rating and interquartile range as well as the mean for each factor was then calculated. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare medians in rank order. A total of 137 completed questionnaires were returned, yielding a 61% response rate. The characteristics candidates considered most important were impressions during the interview, experiences during away rotations, importance placed on resident training/support/mentoring by faculty, personal experiences with residents, and the amount of time spent in general surgery. The characteristics candidates considered least important were second-look experiences, compensation/benefits, program reputation from Internet forums, accessibility of program coordinator, opportunity for laboratory research, and fellowship positions available at the program. Applicants value personal contact and time spent in general surgery when selecting residency programs. As the number of integrated programs continues to grow, programs will benefit

  10. Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Gloria R; Narayan, Deepak

    2013-08-01

    Plastic surgery is the most competitive specialty in medicine. We sought to identify factors associated with the successful match of generation Y applicants into integrated plastic surgery residency. We utilized the most recent data from the Charting Outcomes in the Match published by the National Resident Matching Program in 2011. We had data on US senior or independent applicant status, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) status, attendance of top 40 medical schools, advanced degree status, and number of contiguous ranks within plastic surgery. Our main outcome measure was match status. A total of 81 out of 197 applicants (41.1%) successfully matched into integrated plastic surgery in the 2011 main match. US seniors matched at a significantly higher rate compared to independent applicants (44.0% vs 24.1%, P = 0.044). Matched US seniors were more likely to have AOA membership compared to unmatched US seniors (45.9% vs 27.7%, P = 0.014) and attend a top 40 medical school (52.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.022). There were no differences in terms of advanced degrees between matched and unmatched US seniors. Unmatched US seniors were more likely to have 3 or fewer contiguous ranks of plastic surgery residency programs than matched US seniors (86.2% vs 68.9%, P = 0.007). US senior status, AOA membership, and attendance at a top 40 medical school are predictors of matching into integrated plastic surgery. Program directors need to be aware of the background of the millennial applicants to recruit and maintain top residents.

  11. Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria R. Sue, MA

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: US senior status, AOA membership, and attendance at a top 40 medical school are predictors of matching into integrated plastic surgery. Program directors need to be aware of the background of the millennial applicants to recruit and maintain top residents.

  12. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statistics by Year Print 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2015 ...

  13. Ear Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  14. Evaluation of the Current Perspectives on Letters of Recommendation for Residency Applicants among Plastic Surgery Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goals of this project were to evaluate the current perspective on letters of recommendation and to assess the need for, and acceptance of, a more standardized letter of recommendation (LOR. Methods. An eight-question survey was distributed to plastic surgery program directors. A five-point Likert scale was selected as a means of quantifying the participants’ responses to the survey. Results. Twenty-eight of 71 program directors (39.4% completed the survey. The majority of participants felt that current LOR did not offer a realistic way to compare applicants (mean±SD, 2.9±0.8. While most agreed that increasing the objectivity of LOR would be valuable in comparing applicants (mean±SD, 4.1±0.9, the overall average response to whether a more standardized letter format would improve the resident selection process remained only slightly better than neutral (mean±SD, 3.5±1.2. Most of the chairmen supported the notion that familiarity with the author of the LOR strengthened the recommendation (mean±SD, 4.5±0.6. Conclusion. The majority of plastic surgery program directors would like more objectivity in comparing applicants but are ambivalent about a standardized letter of recommendation.

  15. Integrated bariatric surgery residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltorai AE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam EM Eltorai Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major public health concern. Given its lasting efficacy for improving obesity and obesity-related diseases, bariatric surgery is an increasingly common treatment option. As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act progresses, the impending physician shortage will become more severe. Thus there will be an even greater need for doctors specialized in the management and treatment of obese patients. The development of integrated bariatric surgery residency programs could be considered and is discussed herein. Keywords: obesity, bariatric surgery, integrated residency, surgery education

  16. Development of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećanac Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient Times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern Era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  17. 整形外科住院医师医患沟通能力的培养%Experience of resident-patient communication training in plastic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 马显杰; 宋保强; 郭树忠

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discuss the resident-patient communication training methods based on the problems of the residents in clinical work of plastic surgery .Methods According to the characteristics of plastic surgery , we analyzed the problems and reasons of the residents in the resident-patient communication.Based on the experience of the faculty in the department of plastic surgery , we proposed the methods of resident-patient communication training. Results Several dos and don'ts were proposed for the problems of the resident-patient communication.And a series of training methods were suggested from the aspects of residents , attending surgeons and the department programs . Conclusion It is vital of the ability of the resident-patient communication in the complicated modern medical environment in China.The discussion of the training methods in this paper is mainly based on the experience of the faculty in our department.A perfect resident-patient training program should be formulated with the experience of developed country and scientific methods.%目的:结合整形外科临床工作中住院医师在医患沟通中存在的问题,探讨医患沟通能力培养方案。方法根据整形外科的执业特点,分析目前住院医师在医患沟通中存在的问题及原因,结合本科室多年的经验,探讨医患沟通能力的培养方案。结果针对医患沟通的问题及原因,提出了注意事项,并从住院医师、上级医师及科室制度层面等多角度提出一系列培养方案。结论整形外科住院医师医患沟通能力在当代复杂的医疗环境下尤为重要,本文对培养方案的探讨是本科室多年经验的总结,为进一步完善培养方案的制定,需要借鉴发达国家的经验,并通过科学方法逐步建立一整套完善的医患沟通培养方案,以适应临床工作的需要。

  18. The scope of plastic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... areas of surgery (especially general surgery), plastic surgeons are arguably the .... Who do you feel are experts in laparoscopic surgery? e (general surgeons) a. Maxillofacial .... of pressure sore. ORIF = open reduction internal fixation. ... Plastic versus cosmetic surgery: What's the difference? Plast Reconstr.

  19. [Erythropoietin in plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, C I; Rezaeian, F; Harder, Y; Lohmeyer, J A; Egert, S; Bader, A; Schilling, A F; Machens, H-G

    2013-04-01

    EPO is an autologous hormone, which is known to regulate erythropoiesis. For 30 years it has been used for the therapy of diverse forms of anaemia, such as renal anaemia, tumour-related anaemias, etc. Meanwhile, a multitude of scientific publications were able to demonstrate its pro-regenerative effects after trauma. These include short-term effects such as the inhibition of the "primary injury response" or apoptosis, and mid- and long-term effects for example the stimulation of stem cell recruitment, growth factor production, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation. Known adverse reactions are increases of thromboembolic events and blood pressure, as well as a higher mortality in patients with tumour anaemias treated with EPO. Scientific investigations of EPO in the field of plastic surgery included: free and local flaps, nerve regeneration, wound healing enhancement after dermal thermal injuries and in chronic wounds.Acute evidence for the clinical use of EPO in the field of plastic surgery is still not satisfactory, due to the insufficient number of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)-conform clinical trials. Thus, the initiation of more scientifically sound trials is indicated.

  20. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  1. The commercialization of plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric

    2013-09-01

    The last decade has brought a major challenge to the traditional practice of plastic surgery from corporations that treat plastic surgery as a commercial product and market directly to the public. This corporate medicine model may include promotion of a trademarked procedure or device, national advertising that promises stunning results, sales consultants, and claims of innovation, superiority, and improved safety. This article explores the ethics of this business practice and whether corporate medicine is a desirable model for patients and plastic surgeons.

  2. Evidence-Based Education in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shepard P; Chung, Kevin C; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2015-08-01

    Educational reforms in resident training have historically been driven by reports from medical societies and organizations. Although educational initiatives are well intended, they are rarely supported by robust evidence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently introduced competency-based training, a form of outcomes-based education that has been used successfully in nonmedical professional vocations. This initiative has promise to advance the quality of resident education, but questions remain regarding implementation within plastic surgery. In particular, how will competency-based training impact patient outcomes, and will the methodologies used to assess competencies (i.e., milestones) be accurate and validated by literature? This report investigates resident educational reform and the need for more evidence-based educational initiatives in plastic surgery training.

  3. Architecture of European Plastic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, J. -P. A.; Banic, A.; Molea, G.; Mazzola, R.; Poell, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    The architecture of European Plastic Surgery was published in 1996 [Nicolai JPA, Scuderi N. Plastic surgical Europe in an organogram. Eur J Plast Surg 1996; 19: 253-6.] It is the objective of this paper to update information of that article. Continuing medical education (CME), science, training,

  4. Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Periodontal Externships Scholarships & Grants Educators Residents Careers in Periodontics Competencies for Predoc Perio Perio Exam for Dental Licensure Career Options in Periodontics In-Service Examination Dental Hygiene Educators Periodontal Literature ...

  5. Profiling the Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetrenne, Eleonore; Wirth, Garrett A; Kosins, Aaron M; Evans, Gregory R D; Wells, James H

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the common characteristics that may determine potential academicians and chairpersons in academic plastic surgery. The study examined the motivations behind the pursuit of an academic plastic surgery career and the forces that shape this path. A 20-question survey was mailed to all members of the Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery. This organization was targeted because the members are a group of successful academic plastic surgeons who can be profiled to evaluate the personal and professional characteristics that contribute to accomplishment. A total of 144 of 264 surveys were returned over the allotted 6-week period, for a response rate of 55 percent. The three most important motivating factors in pursuing academic plastic surgery were teaching opportunities (82 percent), influence of mentors (70 percent), and scope of clinical cases (65 percent). Eighty-two percent of respondents reported that their mentor (as a role model) had the most marked effect on their career. Despite the use of an open-ended question, most reported that "persistence and determination" and "passion for the vocation" were the most important characteristics for success in academic plastic surgery. Perseverance and passion for plastic surgery are essential for professional advancement. These qualities are manifested early in the academic and clinical accomplishments of plastic surgery residents. The data indicate that mentors/role models have the most marked effect on a trainee's decision to pursue a career in academic plastic surgery. To interest talented plastic surgery residents in academic plastic surgery, role models must inspire them and provide mentorship.

  6. [The history of plastic surgery in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, Itay; Scheflan, Michael; Heller, Lior

    2014-09-01

    The medical institutions in the country have advanced together with the development of the state of Israel. Plastic surgery, which has progressed significantly during the 20th century, has also grown rapidly in the new state. The arrival of Jewish plastic surgeons from all over the world with the knowledge and experience gained in their countries of origin, as well as the need for reconstructive surgical treatment for many combat injured soldiers, also contributed to the development of plastic surgery. This review tells the story of plastic surgery in Israel, since its foundation until nowadays. This article reviews the work of the founders of plastic surgery in Israel, indicating significant milestones in its development, and clinical and scientific contribution to the international plastic surgery profession. Moreover, the article describes the current condition of the field of plastic surgery in Israel and presents the trends and the future challenges facing the next generation of plastic surgery in Israel.

  7. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  8. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Sankar Nath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist′s concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients′ experience and surgical outcome.

  9. "Oriental anthropometry" in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senna-Fernandes Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to Chinese medicine, the acupuncture-points′ (acupoints locations are proportionally and symmetrically distributed in well-defined compartment zones on the human body surface Oriental Anthropometry" (OA. Acupoints, if considered as aesthetic-loci, might be useful as reference guides in plastic surgery (PS. Aim: This study aimed to use aesthetic-loci as anatomical reference in surgical marking of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Method: This was an observational study based on aesthetic surgeries performed in private clinic. This study was based on 106 cases, comprising of 102 women and 4 men, with ages varying from 07 to 73 years, and with heights of between 1.34 m and 1.80 m. Patients were submitted to aesthetic surgical planning by relating aesthetic-loci to conventional surgical marking, including breast surgeries, abdominoplasty, rhytidoplasty, blepharoplasty, and hair implant. The aesthetic-surgical-outcome (ASO of the patients was assessed by a team of plastic surgeons (who were not involved in the surgical procedures over a follow-up period of one year by using a numeric-rating-scale in percentage (% terms. A four-point-verbal-rating-scale was used to record the patients′ opinion of therapeutic-satisfaction (TS. Results: ASO was 75.3 ± 9.4% and TS indicated that most patients (58.5% obtained "good" results. Of the remainder, 38.7% found the results "excellent", and 2.8% found them "fair". Discussion and Conclusion : The data suggested that the use of aesthetic-loci may be a useful tool for PS as an anatomical reference for surgical marking. However, further investigation is required to assess the efficacy of the OA by providing the patients more reliable balance and harmony in facial and body contours surgeries.

  10. Plastic Surgery Response in Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Susan; Zimmerman, Amanda; Gaviria, Andres; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2015-06-01

    Disasters cause untold damage and are often unpredictable; however, with proper preparation, these events can be better managed. The initial response has the greatest impact on the overall success of the relief effort. A well-trained multidisciplinary network of providers is necessary to ensure coordinated care for the victims of these mass casualty disasters. As members of this network of providers, plastic surgeons have the ability to efficiently address injuries sustained in mass casualty disasters and are a valuable member of the relief effort. The skill set of plastic surgeons includes techniques that can address injuries sustained in large-scale emergencies, such as the management of soft-tissue injury, tissue viability, facial fractures, and extremity salvage. An approach to disaster relief, the types of disasters encountered, the management of injuries related to mass casualty disasters, the role of plastic surgeons in the relief effort, and resource management are discussed. In order to improve preparedness in future mass casualty disasters, plastic surgeons should receive training during residency regarding the utilization of plastic surgery knowledge in the disaster setting.

  11. [Galactorrhea after mammary plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguenault, C; Capon-Degardin, N; Martinot-Duquennoy, V; Pellerin, P

    2005-04-01

    Galactorrhoea is a complication rarely observed after mammary plastic surgery. Our experience in the domain extends to three clinical cases - two after prosthetic insertion and one after breast reduction - wich will be presented here. The origin of this complication is uncertain. Nevertheless, it is likely to be multifocal, as surgery alone is not the only cause. Postsurgical galactorrhoea often follows a benign course culminating in spontaneous resolution. However, it may reveal the presence of o prolactin secreting adenoma, as was the case with one of our patients. A detailed history, exploring antecedent factors, is an essential step in guiding subsequent management. When faced with postsurgical galactorrhoea, serum prolactin levels should be measured. If serum prolactin levels exceed 150 ng/ml further investigation by way of an MRI of the sella turcica is advisable to rule out pituitary adenoma. Depending on symptom severity, treatment may be medical with the prescription of dopaminergic agonists, and/or surgical with drainage or removal of prostheses. Increased awareness of galactorrhea as a possible complication of plastic surgery to the breast will improve management.

  12. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the world's largest specialty association for facial plastic surgery. It represents more than 2,700 facial plastic ... the American Board of Otolaryngology , which includes facial plastic surgery. Others are certified in plastic surgery, ophthalmology, and ...

  13. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  14. On innovations in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Hemant

    2009-04-01

    The progress of surgery has been utterly dependent on continuing innovations by surgeon innovators, largely because surgeons work in an environment that is very conducive to innovating. Of all clinicians surgeons excel at improvisations and innovations. The aim of this review is to outline some of my innovations, the circumstances leading to their origin, and to explain some of the fundamental concepts behind those innovations, with a view to inviting and encouraging younger surgeons to consider breaking away - sensibly - from convention at times, and embark on a journey towards innovation. The context and the qualities required of a would-be innovator are explained and the process of innovation itself is analysed. Rigid adherence to prevailing assumptions and practices stifles originality, while adopting a questioning attitude with a smidgen of irreverence facilitates innovation. That an innovation has resulted purely by a chance observation or occurrence - serendipity - may render it less glamorous but never less useful. Innovations in surgical techniques necessitate adoption of a novel pragmatic surgical philosophy. Confined as they are to Oculoplasty, the concepts of innovations cited and illustrated in this review, are equally valid for Plastic surgery and indeed for Surgery in general. Working in a small hospital or an isolated Institution need not be a hindrance to a would-be innovator.

  15. Medical leech therapy in plastic reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houschyar, Khosrow S; Momeni, Arash; Maan, Zeshaan N; Pyles, Malcolm N; Jew, Olivia S; Strathe, Marion; Michalsen, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The use of Hirudo medicinalis in clinical practice has increased in recent years. The primary indication in plastic surgery has traditionally been venous congestion. However, other reported clinical applications were in varicose veins, thrombophlebitis, and osteoarthritis. In this review, we summarize recent data elucidating the role that medicinal leeches play in the field of plastic surgery.

  16. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  17. Knowledge and perception of plastic surgery among tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-16

    Oct 16, 2015 ... in that facility. The most common ... surgeons and known facilities for facial plastic surgery. Even though ... Location of plastic surgery services. Knowledge of ... decisions, actions, and acceptance of the entity. Plastic surgery ...

  18. Fifty Years of Innovation in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Kwasnicki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInnovation has molded the current landscape of plastic surgery. However, documentation of this process only exists scattered throughout the literature as individual articles. The few attempts made to profile innovation in plastic surgery have been narrative, and therefore qualitative and inherently biased. Through the implementation of a novel innovation metric, this work aims to identify and characterise the most prevalent innovations in plastic surgery over the last 50 years.MethodsPatents and publications related to plastic surgery (1960 to 2010 were retrieved from patent and MEDLINE databases, respectively. The most active patent codes were identified and grouped into technology areas, which were subsequently plotted graphically against publication data. Expert-derived technologies outside of the top performing patents areas were additionally explored.ResultsBetween 1960 and 2010, 4,651 patents and 43,118 publications related to plastic surgery were identified. The most active patent codes were grouped under reconstructive prostheses, implants, instruments, non-invasive techniques, and tissue engineering. Of these areas and other expert-derived technologies, those currently undergoing growth include surgical instruments, implants, non-invasive practices, transplantation and breast surgery. Innovations related to microvascular surgery, liposuction, tissue engineering, lasers and prostheses have all plateaued.ConclusionsThe application of a novel metric for evaluating innovation quantitatively outlines the natural history of technologies fundamental to the evolution of plastic surgery. Analysis of current innovation trends provides some insight into which technology domains are the most active.

  19. Plastic surgery after solid organ transplantations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Fa-zhi; ZHANG Yong; YANG Zhen; FENG Zi-hao; GU Jian-ying

    2009-01-01

    Background More patients receive organ transplantation surgeries due to the advancement in immunosuppressive agents and surgical techniques. Some of those patients may need to undergo plastic or reconstructive surgery.Long-term use of immunosuppressive agents raises some serious problems. Therefore, this study aimed to introduce our experience about the safety and effectiveness of plastic surgeries after solid organ allograft transplantation.Methods A retrospective review of 17 transplant recipients who underwent different reconstructive or cosmetic operations was carried out. The subjects included 1 heart transplant, 1 liver transplant and 15 kidney transplant recipients.Results "All patients tolerated the plastic surgery procedures well. Flaps and skin grafts were the main constructive methods. There were no postoperative infections and wound dehiscence. Transferred flaps survived completely. Skin grafts took well. Three of the cosmetic surgery patients were satisfied with the results.Conclusions Immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients can successfully undergo major reconstructive and cosmetic surgery when given special attention.

  20. Medical Student Mentorship in Plastic Surgery: The Mentee's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jenny C; Rendon, Juan; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Mentorship is a universal concept that has a significant impact on nearly every surgical career. Although frequently editorialized, true data investigating the value of mentorship are lacking in the plastic surgery literature. This study evaluates mentorship in plastic surgery from the medical student perspective. An electronic survey was sent to recently matched postgraduate year-1 integrated track residents in 2014, with a response rate of 76 percent. Seventy-seven percent of students reported a mentoring relationship. Details of the mentoring relationship were defined. Over 80 percent of students reported a mentor's influence in their decision to pursue plastic surgery, and nearly 40 percent of students expressed interest in practicing the same subspecialty as their mentor. Benefits of the relationship were also described. Mentees value guidance around career preparation and advice and prioritized "a genuine interest in their career and personal development" above all other mentor qualities (p ≤ 1.6 × 10). Mentees prefer frequent, one-on-one interactions over less frequent interaction or group activities. Students did not prefer "assigned" relationships (91 percent), but did prefer "facilitated exposure." Major barriers to mentorship included mentor time constraints and lack of exposure to plastic surgery. Indeed, significant differences in the presence of a mentoring relationship correlated with involvement of the plastic surgery department in the medical school curriculum. This study defines successes and highlights areas for improvement of mentorship of plastic surgery medical students. Successful mentorship may contribute to the future of plastic surgery, and a commitment toward this endeavor is needed at the local, departmental, and national leadership levels.

  1. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality.

  2. Bibliometric trend analyses of plastic surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, M.P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis was designed to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative aspects of plastic surgery research by means of a bibliometric citation analysis of plastic surgical presentations and publications. Citations to such published work provides an indication of the impact and the relevance of

  3. Bibliometric trend analyses of plastic surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, M.P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis was designed to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative aspects of plastic surgery research by means of a bibliometric citation analysis of plastic surgical presentations and publications. Citations to such published work provides an indication of the impact and the relevance of

  4. Ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Lin, I-Chan; Shen, Yun-Dun; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    We describe in this paper the current status of ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan. Data were collected from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan, the Bulletin of the Taiwan Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Society, and the Statistics Yearbook of Practicing Physicians and Health Care Organizations in Taiwan by the Taiwan Medical Association. We ascertained that 94 ophthalmologists were oculoplastic surgeons and accounted for 5.8% of 1621 ophthalmologists in Taiwan. They had their fellowship training abroad (most ophthalmologists trained in the United States of America) or in Taiwan. All ophthalmologists were well trained and capable of performing major oculoplastic surgeries. The payment rates by our National Health Insurance for oculoplastic and orbital surgeries are relatively low, compared to Medicare payments in the United States. Ophthalmologists should promote the concept that oculoplastic surgeons specialize in periorbital plastic and aesthetic surgeries. However, general ophthalmologists should receive more educational courses on oculoplastic and cosmetic surgery.

  5. Interest in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery among otorhinolaryngologists: a survey in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinxteren, S.A. van; Lohuis, P.J.; Ingels, K.J.A.O.; Nolst Trenite, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the interest of Dutch otorhinolaryngologists in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery (FPRS). METHODS: We conducted a 22-question survey among otorhinolaryngology physicians and residents concerning their experience with and interest in FPRS. The response rate was 71%

  6. Plastic surgery-myths and realities in developing countries: experience from eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Brijesh; Koirala, Robin; Tripathi, Nalini; Shrestha, Kajan Raj; Adhikary, Buddhinath; Shah, Surendra

    2011-01-01

    B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal, is the only tertiary care referral centre in the eastern region of Nepal. This paper discusses the author's experience of starting a plastic surgery unit in eastern Nepal regarding need and present status of plastic surgery care in Nepal. Methods. We analyzed the data of patients treated in Plastic surgery unit from July 2007 to February 2009. We did evaluation regarding type of patients, procedures, and their outcome. We also evaluated the limitations and their possible solutions to overcome the barriers to establish effective plastic surgical centers in developing countries. Results. Plastic surgery services were started as a unit in general surgery by single plastic surgeon and one general surgery resident on rotation. Total 848 patients were treated for different plastic-surgery-related conditions, which included 307 acute burn patients 541 general plastic surgery patients. Trauma constituted the major bulk 22%, followed by tumors 20%, while aesthetic surgery operations were only 10.1%. Conclusions. In developing countries, aesthetic procedures constitute very small part of plastic surgery interventions and plastic surgery units are primarily required for reconstructive needs for optimum management of patients.

  7. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  8. Computer Simulation and Digital Resources for Plastic Surgery Psychomotor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Plana, Natalie M; Stranix, John T; Cutting, Court B; McCarthy, Joseph G; Flores, Roberto L

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary plastic surgery residents are increasingly challenged to learn a greater number of complex surgical techniques within a limited period. Surgical simulation and digital education resources have the potential to address some limitations of the traditional training model, and have been shown to accelerate knowledge and skills acquisition. Although animal, cadaver, and bench models are widely used for skills and procedure-specific training, digital simulation has not been fully embraced within plastic surgery. Digital educational resources may play a future role in a multistage strategy for skills and procedures training. The authors present two virtual surgical simulators addressing procedural cognition for cleft repair and craniofacial surgery. Furthermore, the authors describe how partnerships among surgical educators, industry, and philanthropy can be a successful strategy for the development and maintenance of digital simulators and educational resources relevant to plastic surgery training. It is our responsibility as surgical educators not only to create these resources, but to demonstrate their utility for enhanced trainee knowledge and technical skills development. Currently available digital resources should be evaluated in partnership with plastic surgery educational societies to guide trainees and practitioners toward effective digital content.

  9. The Tsao Fellowship in Global Health: A Model for International Fellowships in a Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Taro, Trisa B; Wipfli, Heather L; Ly, Stephanie; Gillenwater, Justin T; Costa, Melinda A; Gutierrez, Ricardo D; Magee, William

    2016-03-01

    To present a model for integrated global health fellowships in plastic surgical residency training. National surveys have found that North American surgical residents have significant interest in international training. While global health training opportunities exist, less than a third of these are housed within surgical residency programs; even fewer are designed specifically for plastic surgery residents. The Tsao Fellowship was created through a partnership between Operation Smile, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Shriners Hospital for Children, and the University of Southern California. Designed for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited plastic surgery residents between their third and fourth years of residency, the fellowship curriculum is completed over 24 months and divided into 3 areas: clinical research, international reconstructive surgery fieldwork, and the completion of a Master of Science in Clinical and Biomedical Investigations. The Tsao Fellowship has matriculated 4 fellows: 3 have graduated from the program and 1 is in the current cycle. Fellows completed 4 to 7 international missions each cycle and have performed an aggregate total of 684 surgical procedures. Each fellow also conducted 2 to 6 research projects and authored several publications. All fellows continue to assume leadership roles within the field of global reconstructive surgery. Comprehensive global health fellowships provide invaluable opportunities beyond surgical residency. The Tsao Fellowship is a model for integrating international surgical training with global health research in plastic surgical residency that can be applied to other residency programs and different surgical specialties.

  10. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  11. [Gingival recessions and periodontal plastic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quincey, G. de; Padmos, J.A.; Renkema, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is defined as the set of surgical procedures that are performed to prevent or correct developmental disorders and anatomical, traumatic and pathological abnormalities of the gingiva, alveolar mucosa, and alveolar bone. Root coverage procedures fall under this term and hav

  12. Telemedicine in plastic surgery: E-consult the attending surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Stephen A; Lach, Elliot; Upton, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Telemedicine has evolved into a valuable but underused resource for the delivery of health care to patients at a distance, particularly where patient transport is impractical, expensive, complicated, and/or urgent. Today, over 250,000 telemedicine consults are generated annually, involving various specialties in both military and civilian health delivery systems. The ability to evaluate and triage plastic surgery patients through the use of telemedicine has not been widely explored. We have designed, developed, and tested a "store-and-forward" solution at UMass Memorial Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital whereby the plastic surgery residents who responded to a consult request transmitted digital photographs by means of the Internet to the attending physician on call. The customary telephone call between resident and attending physician benefited from the additional photographic data, and patient management resulted in a clear, concise, and unambiguous treatment plan. The initial management suggested by the resident was modified on some occasions, particularly with complex problems. The use of digital images was especially helpful for evaluation of radiographs and complex wounds of the hand and face. The solution proved to be very valuable for both attending physicians and residents in plastic surgery. The photographs provide rich detail and resolution comparable to high-quality prints. The mechanics of obtaining images and the process of sending them electronically was readily mastered. Images reached their destination in only a few minutes over standard telephone lines. No problems were encountered while sending or viewing images on Macintosh or Windows platforms. Determining course of action with a complete clinical history now includes a level of visual detail previously not available. As this application expands into wider use, data integrity and safety will have to be more formally secured and monitored. Our model of telemedicine has broad

  13. Survey of Attitudes on Professionalism in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yong Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of this study is to analyze the current attitudes toward professionalism,the core values, and the type of professionalism among plastic surgeons in Korea to establish acode of ethics regarding the role of professionalism for plastic and reconstructive surgeons.Methods From March 9, to July 1, 2012, face-to-face and mail surveys were conductedtargeting the 325 participants (256 specialists and 69 residents who are registered membersof the Korean Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. The proportion of each responsegiven to an item was obtained through statistical processing through frequency analysis. TheMann–Whitney U test was used to compare the differences in the responses between theresident group and the specialist group.Results The survey results on the perception of professionalism in plastic surgery showed thata high proportion (90.5% of the respondents viewed the future of plastic surgeons as bright.Through evaluation of the importance of the value items,”professional dominance” (4.58 pts,”autonomy” (4.45 pts, ”lifestyle” (4.34 pts, and ”commercialism” (4.31 pts were assessed ascritical values. ”Altruism” (3.84 pts, “interpersonal competence” (3.79 pts, and ”social justice”(3.61 pts were viewed as lesser values. This difference showed the characteristics of anentrepreneurial outlook.Conclusions Plastic surgeons should pursue excellence, humanism, accountability, andaltruism in order to overcome the crisis of professionalism in plastic surgery. In order todevelop the necessary competencies of professionals, vocational education should be arrangedby the Korean Society of Plastic Surgeons, and an appropriate code of ethics should beestablished.

  14. [Gingival recessions and periodontal plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quincey, G de; Padmos, J A D; Renkema, A M

    2015-11-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is defined as the set of surgical procedures that are performed to prevent or correct developmental disorders and anatomical, traumatic and pathological abnormalities of the gingiva, alveolar mucosa, and alveolar bone. Root coverage procedures fall under this term and have been applied for more than fifty years with varying degrees of success. There are several indications for the treatment of gingival recessions. When the treatment of choice - a conservative approach - offers no solace (any more), gingival recessions can be treated by applying periodontal plastic surgery. The goal of this surgery is complete recovery of the anatomical structures in the area of the recession. To this end several surgical techniques have been developed during the last decades. The choice of a particular technique depends on various factors, such as the number of defects, their size and the amount of keratinized gingiva around the defect.

  15. American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of clinical practice in the fields of aesthetic, plastic and reconstructive surgery specializing in the face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal ... of clinical practice in the fields of aesthetic, plastic and reconstructive surgery specializing in the face, orbits, eyelids, and lacrimal ...

  16. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Buyers Guide Links Become a Member About Our Academy The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is the ... Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The Academy About the Academy The AAFPRS Mission History Meet ...

  17. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Souto Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions.

  18. The Plastic Surgery Compass: Navigating the Reconstructive Ladder in the Personalized Health Care Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Lars Johan M

    2016-09-01

    The reconstructive ladder and the reconstructive elevator have withstood the test of time as didactic tools for resident education. Over time, many alternative models have been suggested to incorporate the technological advances in plastic surgery, but none of them have focused on the patient. Changes in practice and the trend toward personalized health care demand a 360-degree evaluation and solution of surgical problems incorporating patient-specific characteristics. We, therefore, suggest the concept of the plastic surgery compass to navigate the ladder.

  19. The Evolution of Surgical Simulation: The Current State and Future Avenues for Plastic Surgery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan, Roy; Cyr, Shantale; Hemmerling, Thomas M; Lin, Samuel J; Gilardino, Mirko S

    2017-02-01

    Alongside the ongoing evolution of surgical training toward a competency-based paradigm has come the need to reevaluate the role of surgical simulation in residency. Simulators offer the ability for trainees to acquire specific skills and for educators to objectively assess the progressive development of these skills. In this article, the authors discuss the historical evolution of surgical simulation, with a particular focus on its past and present role in plastic surgery education. The authors also discuss the future steps required to further advance plastic surgery simulation in an effort to continue to train highly competent plastic surgery graduates.

  20. Public Perceptions of Plastic Surgery Practice in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Araujo, Karin Milleni; Samartine, Hugo; Denadai, Rodrigo; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The perception of medical specialists by the public has a significant effect on health-care decisions, research funding allocation, and implantation of educational measures. The purpose of this survey was to assess the public's perception of the field of plastic surgery practice. General public members (n = 1290) completed a survey where they matched nine specialties with 28 plastic surgery-related scenarios. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeon alone," "plastic surgeon combined with other specialists," or "no plastic surgeon." Sociodemographic data and previous plastic surgery contact were also collected. "Plastic surgeon alone" was identified as an expert by more than 70 % of respondents in four (40 %) aesthetic-related scenarios and in one (5.5 %) general/reconstructive-related scenario. "Plastic surgeon alone" was significantly (all p plastic surgeons in facial fracture surgery, facial paralysis management, chest wall surgery, hand surgery-related scenarios, and tumor surgery-related scenarios. Age, health-care professional, education level, and prior plastic surgery contact were significant (all p plastic surgeon" as a response pattern, according to bivariate analysis and multiple linear regression analysis. The public has a poor understanding of the broad field of plastic surgery practice. Therefore, improved public education about the scope of plastic surgery is needed.

  1. [Informed consent in aesthetic plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger, H

    2006-02-01

    The informed consent plays a very decisive part in aesthetic plastic surgery. As there is often no medical indication in plastic surgery, the patient has to be informed about all the facts of an operation, especially about the possible risks. The legal requests for therapeutic and economic clarification gain in importance. The jurisdiction in Germany demands a merciless clarification for the patient. The patient needs to be clarified about all facts early enough so that he has a sufficient amount of time to weigh-up the pros und cons of the operation and if necessary to take advice from someone else. The sufficient documentation is very important at the sight of the extensive burden of proof at the expense of the physician.

  2. Teaching plastic surgery from different perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Christian; Chong, Tae; Pratt, Daniel D

    2012-06-01

    Just as everyone has a different learning style, teachers too approach the task from different perspectives. There are five basic teaching perspectives or styles: transmission, apprenticeship, developmental, nurturing, and social justice. The acronym BIAS is useful to describe the beliefs, intentions, assessments, and strategies associated with each perspective. The authors present a hypothetical 1-week rotation in plastic and reconstructive surgery in which a student encounters instructors who embody the five basic teaching perspectives. By presenting these perspectives, the authors introduce valuable teaching techniques that can benefit all those charged with the education of learners along the spectrum from premedical to continuing education venues. Educational objectives include the following: (1) explain and illustrate different approaches to effective teaching in plastic surgery; (2) introduce readers to the Teaching Perspectives Inventory as a means of determining their primary teaching style; and (3) argue for a "plurality of the good" in teaching.

  3. Psychiatric issues in cosmetic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericksen, William Leif; Billick, Stephen Bates

    2012-09-01

    The objective of cosmetic surgery is increased patient self-esteem and confidence. Most patients undergoing a procedure report these results post-operatively. The success of any procedure is measured in patient satisfaction. In order to optimize patient satisfaction, literature suggests careful pre-operative patient preparation including a discussion of the risks, benefits, limitations and expected results for each procedure undertaken. As a general rule, the patients that are motivated to surgery by a desire to align their outward appearance to their body-image tend to be the most satisfied. There are some psychiatric conditions that can prevent a patient from being satisfied without regard aesthetic success. The most common examples are minimal defect/Body Dysmorphic Disorder, the patient in crisis, the multiple revision patient, and loss of identity. This paper will familiarize the audience with these conditions, symptoms and related illnesses. Case examples are described and then explored in terms of the conditions presented. A discussion of the patient's motivation for surgery, goals pertaining to specific attributes, as well as an evaluation of the patient's understanding of the risks, benefits, and limitations of the procedure can help the physician determine if a patient is capable of being satisfied with a cosmetic plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgeons can screen patients suffering from these conditions relatively easily, as psychiatry is an integral part of medical school education. If a psychiatric referral is required, then the psychiatrist needs to be aware of the nuances of each of these conditions.

  4. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves. PMID:23864049

  5. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020, previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015, hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001, bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004, and obesity (body mass index ≥30 (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011 to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations.

  6. Academic plastic surgery: a study of current issues and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetrenne, Eleonore; Kosins, Aaron M; Wirth, Garrett A; Bui, Albert; Evans, Gregory R D; Wells, James H

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the role of a full-time academic plastic surgeon, (2) to define the indicators predictive of a successful career in academic plastic surgery, and (3) to understand the current issues that will affect future trends in the practice of academic plastic surgery. A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the role of current full-time academic plastic surgeons and to understand the current issues and future challenges facing academic plastic surgery. Each plastic surgery program director in the United States was sent the survey for distribution among all full-time academic plastic surgeons. Over a 6-week period, responses from 143 full-time academic plastic surgeons (approximately 31%) were returned. Fifty-three percent of respondents had been academic plastic surgeons for longer than 10 years. Seventy-three percent of respondents defined academic plastic surgeons as clinicians who are teachers and researchers. However, 53% of respondents believed that academic plastic surgeons were not required to teach or practice within university hospitals/academic centers. The 3 factors reported most frequently as indicative of a successful career in academic plastic surgery were peer recognition, personal satisfaction, and program reputation. Dedication and motivation were the personal characteristics rated most likely to contribute to academic success. Forty-four percent of respondents were unable to identify future academic plastic surgeons from plastic surgery residency applicants, and 27% were not sure. Most (93%) of the respondents believed that academic surgery as practiced today will change. The overall job description of a full-time academic plastic surgeon remains unchanged (teacher and researcher). Whereas peer recognition, personal satisfaction, and program reputation were most frequently cited as indicative of a successful plastic surgery career, financial success was rated the least indicative. Similarly, whereas the

  7. Botulinum toxin in ophthalmic plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Milind

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin chemodenervation has evolved greatly over the past 30 years since its introduction in the 1970s for the management of strabismus. Among ophthalmic plastic surgeons, botulinum toxins are often used as the first line treatment for facial dystonias. These toxins are also efficacious for the temporary management of various other conditions including keratopathies (through so called chemo-tarsorraphy, upper eyelid retraction, orbicularis overaction-induced lower eyelid entropion, gustatory epiphora, Frey′s syndrome, and dynamic facial rhytids such as lateral canthal wrinkles (crow′s feet, glabellar creases and horizontal forehead lines. This article describes the pharmacology, reconstitution techniques and common current applications of botulinum toxins in ophthalmic plastic surgery.

  8. Borderline personality disorder and aesthetic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Daichi; Ohkubo, Fumio

    2014-12-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common axis II disorder associated with a high risk of impulsivity and self-injury. Several authors have suggested that individuals with BPD are poor candidates for plastic surgery. Recent changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for BPD may be confusing to surgeons. This article reviews the literature on BPD and discusses how important it is to recognize this condition and how difficult it is to treat patients, highlighting features and signs of this condition in plastic surgery settings. Illustrative case examples from our experience are also described. Our careful search of the literature revealed that individuals with BPD may seek treatment from plastic surgeons in two different patterns: as treatment for self-injury or as insatiable requests for aesthetic procedures. Individuals with BPD tend to request corrections of multiple body parts to avoid abandonment by the surgeon or due to their impulsivity, but such preoccupation with appearance is less profound and shifts from one body part to another over time. While flexible and individualized psychological approaches are required to minimize the patient's impulsivity and abandonment fears, surgeons should be inflexible to any unrealistic requests. It is best to avoid surgery on patients with BPD. Surgeons should be aware of the nuances of this condition so as not to miss the proper timing for a psychiatric referral. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  9. A preoperative checklist in esthetic plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Anger,Jaime; Letizio,Nelson; Orel,Maurício; Souza Junior,José Leão de; Santos,Márcio Martines dos

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a checklist to be used at the last stage of a preoperative visit for esthetic plastic surgery composed of 29 yes/no questions, four blank spaces for entering data, and one question for ranking the level of risk of deep vein thrombosis. The criteria are divided into three tables relating to three areas: anesthesia, psychological aspects, and clinical risk factors. The answers are framed in four colors that identify the level of risk and suggest the degree of attention warra...

  10. Challenges of randomized controlled trial design in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Aladdin H; Herrera, Fernando A; Hassanein, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard of evidence-based medicine. In the field of plastic surgery, designing these studies is much more challenging than in pharmaceutical medicine. Randomized trials in plastic surgery encompass several road blocks including problems shared with other surgical trials: equipoise, high cost, placebo issues and learning curves following the establishment of a novel approach. In addition, plastic surgery has more subjective outcomes, thus making study design even more difficult in assessing the end result.

  11. [Lactation after breast plastic surgery: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhassira, J; Haddad, K; Burin des Roziers, B; Achouche, J; Cartier, S

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of lactation is a rare complication of breast plastic surgery. During the course of his practice, the plastic surgeon will probably encounter this complication. The goal of this article is to carry out a literature review of all published galactorrhea and/or galactocele cases following a breast-reduction or a breast-augmentation, representing a total of 34 cases reported in 21 articles. The physiopathology of this complication is linked to an inappropriate secretion of prolactin in a surgical context. The factors favoring this complication would be the number of pregnancies, a history of recent and extensive nursing, and the intake of certain medicines such as an oestro-progestative pill. The main symptom of this complication is the occurrence of a uni- or bilateral galactorrhea, on average 12.6 days after the surgery. The main differential diagnosis is a postoperative infection. The explorations presented a hyperprolactinemia in 69% of cases. No biological inflammatory syndrome was reported. A fluid collection evoking a galactocele was visible on the ultrasound in 65% of cases. One case of prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma was reported. Depending on the case, the treatment varied from a simple surveillance to the association of a dopamine agonist, an antibiotic therapy, and a surgical revision. A diagnostic and therapeutic management strategy is proposed.

  12. From time-based to competency-based standards: core transitional competencies in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Kristina; Yazdani, Arjang; Ross, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. A list of potential core competencies was generated using a modified Delphi method that included the investigators and 6 experienced, academic plastic surgeons from across Canada and the United States. Generated items were divided into 7 domains: basic surgical skills, anesthesia, hand surgery, cutaneous surgery, esthetic surgery, breast surgery, and craniofacial surgery. Members of the Delphi group were asked to rank particular skills on a 4-point scale with anchored descriptors. Item reduction resulted in a survey consisting of 48 skills grouped into the aforementioned domains. This self-administered survey was distributed to all Canadian program directors (n = 11) via e-mail for validation and further item reduction. The response rate was 100% (11/11). Using the average rankings of program directors, 26 "core" skills were identified. There was agreement of core skills across all domains except for breast surgery and esthetic surgery. Of them, 7 skills were determined to be above the level of a trainee at this stage; a further 15 skills were agreed to be important, but not core, competencies. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as "core" for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Applying the concepts of innovation strategies to plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yirong; Kotsis, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C

    2013-08-01

    Plastic surgery has a well-known history of innovative procedures and products. However, with the rise in competition, such as aesthetic procedures being performed by other medical specialties, there is a need for continued innovation in plastic surgery to create novel treatments to advance this specialty. Although many articles introduce innovative technologies and procedures, there is a paucity of publications to highlight the application of principles of innovation in plastic surgery. The authors review the literature regarding business strategies for innovation. The authors evaluate concepts of innovation, process of innovation (i.e., idea generation, idea evaluation, idea conversion, idea diffusion, and adoption), ethical issues, and application to plastic surgery. Adopting a business model of innovation is helpful for promoting a new paradigm of progress to propel plastic surgery to new avenues of creativity.

  14. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Connie C.; Chow, Christopher J.; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's...

  15. Reconstructive pelvic surgery and plastic surgery: safety and efficacy of combined surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jocelyn B; Noblett, Karen L; Conner, Caroline A; Budd, Michael; Lane, Felicia L

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the safety of combining aesthetic and pelvic floor reconstructive procedures. Fifty-four subjects were included in a case-control study; 18 patients undergoing combined pelvic and plastic reconstructive surgery, age and procedure matched to 18 pelvic surgery and 18 plastic surgery only controls. Chi-square, t test, and Kruskal-Wallis analysis were used to compare the estimated blood loss (EBL), body mass index (BMI), hospital days, operative times, and complications between the groups. No differences were seen with regards to age, BMI, or EBL. There was, however, a significant increase in minor complications and hospital stay after combined procedures relative to the pelvic surgery control group but not the aesthetic control group. Operative times were only greater during combined procedures relative to isolated pelvic floor procedures. Combining pelvic and aesthetic procedures may increase complications, operative times, and length of hospital stay when compared to pelvic reconstructive surgery alone.

  16. The Plastic Surgery Compass: Navigating the Reconstructive Ladder in the Personalized Health Care Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The reconstructive ladder and the reconstructive elevator have withstood the test of time as didactic tools for resident education. Over time, many alternative models have been suggested to incorporate the technological advances in plastic surgery, but none of them have focused on the patient. Changes in practice and the trend toward personalized health care demand a 360-degree evaluation and solution of surgical problems incorporating patient-specific characteristics. We, therefore, suggest the concept of the plastic surgery compass to navigate the ladder. PMID:27757348

  17. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Training general surgery residents in pediatric surgery: educational value vs time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven L; Sydorak, Roman M; Applebaum, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the educational value of pediatric surgery rotations, the likelihood of performing pediatric operations upon completing general surgery (GS) residency, and time and cost of training GS residents in pediatric surgery. A survey was administered to GS residents that evaluated the pediatric surgery rotation and anticipated practice intentions. A retrospective analysis (2005-2006) of operative times for unilateral inguinal hernia repair, bilateral inguinal hernia repair, and umbilical hernia repair was also performed. Procedure times were compared for operations performed by a pediatric surgeon with and without GS residents. Cost analysis was based on time differences. General surgery residents (n = 19) considered the pediatric surgery rotation to have high educational value (4.7 +/- 0.6 of 5) with extensive teaching (4.6 +/- 0.7) and operative experience (4.4 +/- 0.8). Residents listed pediatric surgery exposure, operative technique, and observed work ethic as most valuable. Upon graduation, residents expect to perform pediatric operations 2 to 3 times annually. Thirty-seven percent of residents felt competent to perform appendectomy (patients >5 years), 32% appendectomy (3-5 years), 21% gastrostomy (>1 year), and 11% inguinal herniorrhaphy (>1 year). Operative times and costs were significantly higher in operative procedures performed with a GS resident. General surgery residents considered pediatric surgery as a valuable educational experience. Residents anticipate performing pediatric operations a few times annually. Training GS residents in pediatric surgery increased operative time and cost. This information may be useful in determining the appropriate setting for resident education as well as budget planning for pediatric surgical practices.

  19. Development and implementation of a formalized geriatric surgery curriculum for general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Andrew S; Haney, John C; Henry, Brandon V; Heflin, Mitchell T; Lagoo, Sandhya A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growth of the elderly population, most surgical training programs lack formalized geriatric education. The authors' aim was to implement a formalized geriatric surgery curriculum at an academic medical center. Surgery residents were surveyed on attitudes toward the care of elderly patients and the importance of various geriatric topics to daily practice. A curriculum consisting of 16 didactic sessions was created with faculty experts moderating. After curriculum completion, residents were surveyed to assess curriculum impact. Residents expressed increased comfort in accessing community resources. A greater percentage of residents recognized the significance of delirium and acute renal failure in elderly patients. Implementing a geriatric surgery curriculum geared toward surgery residents is feasible and can increase resident comfort with multidisciplinary care and recognition of clinical conditions pertinent to elderly surgical patients. This initiative also provided valuable experience for geriatric surgery curriculum development.

  20. Patients' attitude towards residents' participation during gynaecological surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Marco A. C.; van der Linden, Paul J. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients' attitude towards participation of residents in training in gynaecological surgery and patients understanding of resident position. Study design: An observational survey study was performed between July and February 2007-2008 in an outpatient clinic of a department of

  1. Patients' attitude towards residents' participation during gynaecological surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Marco A. C.; van der Linden, Paul J. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients' attitude towards participation of residents in training in gynaecological surgery and patients understanding of resident position. Study design: An observational survey study was performed between July and February 2007-2008 in an outpatient clinic of a department of

  2. [What do general, abdominal and vascular surgeons need to know on plastic surgery - aspects of plastic surgery in the field of general, abdominal and vascular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damert, H G; Altmann, S; Stübs, P; Infanger, M; Meyer, F

    2015-02-01

    There is overlap between general, abdominal and vascular surgery on one hand and plastic surgery on the other hand, e.g., in hernia surgery, in particular, recurrent hernia, reconstruction of the abdominal wall or defect closure after abdominal or vascular surgery. Bariatric operations involve both special fields too. Plastic surgeons sometimes use skin and muscle compartments of the abdominal wall for reconstruction at other regions of the body. This article aims to i) give an overview about functional, anatomic and clinical aspects as well as the potential of surgical interventions in plastic surgery. General/abdominal/vascular surgeons can benefit from this in their surgical planning and competent execution of their own surgical interventions with limited morbidity/lethality and an optimal, in particular, functional as well as aesthetic outcome, ii) support the interdisciplinary work of general/abdominal/vascular and plastic surgery, and iii) provide a better understanding of plastic surgery and its profile of surgical interventions and options.

  3. Laser therapy in plastic surgery: decolorization in port wine stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peszynski-Drews, Cezary; Wolf, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    For the first time laserotherapy is described as a method of port wine stain decolorization in plastic surgery. The authors present their 20-year experience in the treatment of port wine stains with the argon laser and dye laser.

  4. Plastic surgery in Nigeria-Scope and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOG Chukwuanukwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Plastic surgery as a major subspecialty of surgery has existed in Nigeria for several decades but the populace including medical practitioners are yet to fully appreciate its scope. This leads to very late presentation/referral of cases and management of cases that should have been referred by less qualified practitioners with attendant poor outcomes and complications. Most people still regard plastic surgery as being synonymous with cosmetic/aesthetic surgery but the scope goes far beyond this entity. It is therefore important that the public including medical practitioners who are the main sources of referral to the subspecialty are aware of the range of cases handled by plastic surgery units. The plastic surgeon in Nigeria is also faced with a lot of challenges ranging from the arduous task of one having to manage very many different and complicated cases to being very poorly equipped and appreciated. Objectives To educate the populace especially the medical practitioners on the scope of plastic surgery and the extent of development of the subspecialty in Nigeria and solicit for colleague′s cooperation in order to move plastic surgery forward. To also highlight the difficulties faced by the plastic surgeon in Nigeria and seeking help from appropriate quarters which will help to reduce unnecessary referrals abroad while improving the services rendered to patients locally. Conclusion Plastic surgery in Nigeria has developed significantly both in scope and manpower but it is still faced with a lot of challenges. Knowledge of its scope will help to reduce unnecessary referrals abroad while improving services/skill here in Nigeria.

  5. History of Argentine surgery, abaut general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jankilevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work, as its title indicates, is targeted to young general surgery residents, who have been kind enough to open their journal for this collaboration. A gesture that I appreciate and I’ll try to give back narrating some facts of the first century of our independence. The story starts a few decades before 1810, especially with the institution of the Viceroyalty of Rio de la Plata, and ends at 1880, when indigenous peoples are submited, traditional estate, the gaucho gerrillas and the last caudillos (the pattern and the National Guards pawns are extinguished, agriculture and industry develops, the railroad replaces the wagons, is mass immigration and techniques of exploitation of natural resources strengthens social and economic structure, policy that starts the National Organization bequeathed to us Eighty generation. Two figures are presented as conclusion and synthesis of this period and serve as a bridge that starts from 1880: Francisco Javier Muñiz and Manuel Augusto Montes de Oca. The first such example of a surgeon in the wars of independence, internal frontier garrisons, the vicissitudes of the early university studies and creative work in the solitude of the peoples of campaign not only providing a commendable assistance but researching and discovering the first indigenous smallpox vaccine, rectifying errors jennerianos concept of cows pox disease of horses were infected, combating epidemics and initiating scientific research, natural sciences and producing valued communications throughout the world, as in the case of Darwin himself, who makes the research Muñiz as one of the foundations of his theory of evolution of species. The second: Montes de Oca, is the archetype and the teacher of those surgeons of the eighties generation. He gather in his person a more advanced knowledge and understanding of their subject, son of exile and disagreements before the national organization, contact to Europe, but attached to the reality of

  6. [Science and research in academic plastic surgery in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, R E; Machens, H-G

    2009-12-01

    Plastic surgery has passed through a very positive evolution in the last decades on the solid fundament of constantly developing academic plastic surgery. Aim of this paper is an objective evaluation of the current status of academic plastic surgery regarding research topics, currently available ressources and scientific outcome based on a questionnaire. The return rate of the questionnaire in academic departments was 92%. Main topics in research besides wound healing were topics from regenerative medicine such as tissue engineering, biomaterials, genetherapy and angiogenesis with the main focus on skin and fat tissues. In the past five years a total of 25 million Euros of third party research grants were raised. Research relied mainly on interdisciplinary research facilities. Regarding the scientific outcome more than 200 scientific papers were published in basic science research journals having an impactfactor higher than two. These results clearly demonstrate that plastic surgery is scientifically highly productive in academic surroundings where independent departments are established. Considering that independent units of plastic surgery exist in a relatively small number of all 36 university hospitals in germany, it has to be claimed for further independent departments so to provide adequate research facilities for further evolution of academic plastic surgery.

  7. Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Vogt, Kelly N; Sullivan, Maura E; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bullying is at the forefront of social behavior research, garnering significant media attention. Most of the medical research has addressed bullying of nurses by physicians and demonstrates that patient care and outcomes may suffer. The intent of this study was to determine if general surgery residents are bullied by nurses. A survey instrument previously validated (Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised) to evaluate for workplace bullying was modified to reflect the resident-nurse relationship. After institutional review board approval, the piloted online survey was sent to general surgery program directors to forward to general surgery residents. Demographic data are presented as percentages, and for negative acts, percentages of daily, weekly, and monthly frequencies are combined. Allopathic general surgery residencies in the United States. General surgery residents. The response rate was 22.1% (n = 452). Most respondents were men (55%) and had a mean age of 29 years (standard deviation = 7). Although 27.0% of the respondents were interns, the remaining classes were equally represented (12%-18% of responses/class). The respondents were primarily from medium-sized residency programs (45%), in the Midwest (28%), training in university programs (72%), and rotating primarily in a combined private and county hospital that serves both insured and indigent patients (59%). The residents had experienced each of the 22 negative acts (11.5%-82.5%). Work-related bullying occurs more than person-related bullying and physical intimidation. Ignoring of recommendations or orders by nurses occurs on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for 30.2% of residents (work-related bullying). The most frequent person-related bullying act is ignoring the resident when they approach or reacting in a hostile manner (18.0%), followed by ignoring or excluding the resident (17.1%). Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses is prominent. Future research is needed to determine

  8. Citation Rate Predictors in the Plastic Surgery Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Calotta, Nicholas; Doshi, Ankur; Soni, Ashwin; Milton, Jacqueline; May, James W; Tufaro, Anthony P

    The purpose of this study is to determine and characterize the scientific and nonscientific factors that influence the rate of article citation in the field of plastic surgery. Cross-sectional study. We reviewed all entries in Annals of Plastic Surgery and Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007; and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. All scientific articles were analyzed and several article characteristics were extracted. The number of citations at 5 years was collected as the outcome variable. A multivariable analysis was performed to determine which variables were associated with higher citations rates. A total of 2456 articles were identified of which only 908 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most studies were publications in the fields of reconstructive (26.3%) or pediatric/craniofacial (17.6%) surgery. The median number of citations 5 years from publication was 8. In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with higher citations rates were subspecialty field (p = 0.0003), disclosed conflict of interest (p = 0.04), number of authors (p = 0.04), and journal (p = 0.02). We have found that higher level of evidence (or other study methodology factors) is not associated with higher citation rates. Instead, conflict of interest, subspecialty topic, journal, and number of authors are strong predictors of high citation rates in plastic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Promise and Limitations of Big Data Research in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Victor Zhang; Tuggle, Charles Thompson; Au, Alexander Francis

    2016-04-01

    The use of "Big Data" in plastic surgery outcomes research has increased dramatically in the last 5 years. This article addresses some of the benefits and limitations of such research. This is a narrative review of large database studies in plastic surgery. There are several benefits to database research as compared with traditional forms of research, such as randomized controlled studies and cohort studies. These include the ease in patient recruitment, reduction in selection bias, and increased generalizability. As such, the types of outcomes research that are particularly suited for database studies include determination of geographic variations in practice, volume outcome analysis, evaluation of how sociodemographic factors affect access to health care, and trend analyses over time. The limitations of database research include data which are limited only to what was captured in the database, high power which can cause clinically insignificant differences to achieve statistical significance, and fishing which can lead to increased type I errors. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project is an important general surgery database that may be useful for plastic surgeons because it is validated and has a large number of patients after over a decade of collecting data. The Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons Program is a newer database specific to plastic surgery. Databases are a powerful tool for plastic surgery outcomes research. It is critically important to understand their benefits and limitations when designing research projects or interpreting studies whose data have been drawn from them. For plastic surgeons, National Surgical Quality Improvement Project has a greater number of publications, but Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons Program is the most applicable database for plastic surgery research.

  10. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  11. Thoughts of Quitting General Surgery Residency: Factors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, David Nathan; Dattani, Sheev; Miller, Sarah; Hayes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Attrition rates in general surgery training are higher than other surgical disciplines. We sought to determine the prevalence with which Canadian general surgery residents consider leaving their training and the contributing factors. An anonymous survey was administered to all general surgery residents in Canada. Responses from residents who considered leaving their training were assessed for importance of contributing factors. The study was conducted at the Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, a tertiary academic center. The response rate was approximately 34.0%. A minority (32.0%) reported very seriously or somewhat seriously considering leaving their training, whereas 35.2% casually considered doing so. Poor work-life balance in residency (38.9%) was the single-most important factor, whereas concern about future unemployment (16.7%) and poor future quality of life (15.7%) were next. Enjoyment of work (41.7%) was the most frequent mitigating factor. Harassment and intimidation were reported factors in 16.7%. On analysis, only intention to practice in a nonacademic setting approached significant association with thoughts of leaving (odds ratio = 1.92, CI = 0.99-3.74, p = 0.052). There was no association with sex, program, postgraduate year, relationship status, or subspecialty interest. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more thoughts of leaving with older age. Canadian general surgery residents appear less likely to seriously consider quitting than their American counterparts. Poor work-life balance in residency, fear of future unemployment, and anticipated poor future quality of life are significant contributors to thoughts of quitting. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle, and to assist residents in securing employment, may improve completion rates. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient preferences in print advertisement marketing for plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanan, Akshay; Quinn, Candace; Spiegel, Jeffrey H

    2013-05-01

    Plastic surgeons are competing for their share of a growing but still limited market, thus making advertising an important component in a successful plastic surgery practice. The authors evaluate the variables, characteristics, and presentation features that make print advertisements most effectively pique the interest of individuals selecting a plastic surgeon. An online survey was administered to 404 individuals with active interest in plastic surgery from 10 major metropolitan areas. Participants were presented with 5 different advertisements from plastic surgeons throughout the country and were asked a series of both closed- and open-ended questions to assess verity, quality, and marketability of each advertisement. Reponses to open-ended questions were analyzed using the Wordle program (www.wordle.net). The most frequent themes identified for all 5 ads were "Being beautiful is possible" (41%), "I could be beautiful" (24%), "Some people need surgery to be beautiful" (16%), and "Being beautiful is important" (14%). Advertisement 1-featuring 3 women and no pre- or posttreatment photography, no physician photography, and a listing of the 3 physicians' credentials but not a list of the services provided-received the highest overall preference rating. Factors including emotions felt while reading, unique qualities of the advertisement, list of procedures performed, use of models versus actual patients, and pictures of the plastic surgeons were found to contribute to the respondents' overall perception of advertisements used to market a plastic surgery practice.

  13. Impact factors and publication times for plastic surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanaris, Apostolos P; Vassiliadu, Agapi P; Polykandriotis, Elias; Tjiawi, Jimmy; Arkudas, Andreas; Horch, Raymund E

    2007-12-01

    The purposes of the authors' analysis were to assess the values that plastic surgical journals demonstrate in terms of the standardized measures created by the Institute for Scientific Information's Journal Citation Report, and to assess the relationship between these values and the turnaround time of these journals. The overall indexes of surgical journals were compared with those of journals in other fields of medicine using the following parameters: highest impact factor, average impact factor, cited half-life, immediacy index, and number of journals. Similarly, plastic surgery journals were compared with the highest ranking journals from various fields of surgery. In addition, an evaluation of all original articles published in 2005, assessing the time intervals from submission to publication, submission to acceptance, and acceptance to publication, was conducted for all plastic surgical journals and the highest ranking journals from various surgical fields listed in the Journal Citation Report. Plastic surgical journals demonstrated low overall index values and a greater elongation of their turnaround time in comparison to journals in other fields of surgery and medicine. The fact that the field of plastic surgery targets a rather specific and limited medical audience, and that plastic surgical articles usually get quoted by this audience, partly explains these values. Furthermore, the elongated turnaround time contributes to their endurance. Since plastic surgical journals cannot attract a broader medical audience, journals should speed up their publication times to help these values rise.

  14. Colorectal surgeons teaching general surgery residents: current challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Connie C; Chow, Christopher J; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-09-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's teaching environment is one of the most important legacies that surgical educators can leave for the coming generation. Faculty role modeling and the process of socializing residents is highlighted. We review the American College of Surgeons' Code of Professional Conduct, summarize some of the current strategies for teaching and assessing professionalism, and reflect on principles of motivation that apply to resident training both for the trainee and the trainer.

  15. Employment and satisfaction trends among general surgery residents from a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Taro, Amy E; Kotwall, Cyrus A; Menon, Rema P; Hamann, M Sue; Nakayama, Don K

    2008-01-01

    Physician satisfaction is an important and timely issue in health care. A paucity of literature addresses this question among general surgeons. To review employment patterns and job satisfaction among general surgery residents from a single university-affiliated institution. All general surgery residents graduating from 1986 to 2006, inclusive, were mailed an Institutional Review Board-approved survey, which was then returned anonymously. Information on demographics, fellowship training, practice characteristics, job satisfaction and change, and perceived shortcomings in residency training was collected. A total of 31 of 34 surveys were returned (91%). Most of those surveyed were male (94%) and Caucasian (87%). Sixty-one percent of residents applied for a fellowship, and all but 1 were successful in obtaining their chosen fellowship. The most frequent fellowship chosen was plastic surgery, followed by minimally invasive surgery. Seventy-one percent of residents who applied for fellowship felt that the program improved their competitiveness for a fellowship. Most of the sample is in private practice, and of those, 44% are in groups with more than 4 partners. Ninety percent work less than 80 hours per week. Only 27% practice in small towns (population training in pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and thoracic surgery. Eighty-three percent agreed that they would again choose a general surgery residency, 94% of those who completed a fellowship would again choose that fellowship, and 90% would again choose their current job. Twenty-three percent agreed that they had difficulty finding their first job, and 30% had fewer job offers than expected. Thirty-five percent of the graduates have changed jobs: 29% of the residents have changed jobs once, and 6% have changed jobs at least twice since completing training. Reasons for leaving a job included colleague issues (82%), financial issues (82%), inadequate referrals (64%), excessive trauma (64%), and marriage or family reasons (55

  16. FUNCTIONAL PHYSICAL THERAPY PRACTICE DERMATO POSTOPERATIVELY OF PLASTIC SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Severo Migotto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surgery is a tissue damage that even well directed, can impair tissue function Physiotherapist Dermato Functional fitting to act with all available resources to minimize these changes being a strong contributor both pre and postoperatively. The study included 16 Doctors Plastic Surgeons working in Florianópolis - SC, Brazil, to which was applied a questionnaire to identify theincidence of plastic surgery, knowledge and recognition of dermato functional physical therapy postoperatively. It was found that, as in literature surgeries to enlarge breasts lead the ranking of plastic surgery. Furthermore, it was concluded that physicians not only understand the importance of physiotherapy dermato functional, but also refer their patients to treat postoperative physical therapy valuing employees and recognizing them as important in the rehabilitation process of his patients.

  17. Ongoing deficits in resident training for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Adrian; Witzke, Donald; Donnelly, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Patient preference has driven the adoption of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques and altered surgical practice. MIS training in surgical residency programs must teach new skill sets with steep learning curves to enable residents to master key procedures. Because no nationally recognized MIS curriculum exists, this study asked experts in MIS which laparoscopic procedures should be taught and how many cases are required for competency. Expert recommendations were compared to the number of cases actually performed by residents (Residency Review Committee [RRC] data). A detailed survey was sent nationwide to all surgical residency programs (academic and private) known to offer training in MIS and/or have a leader in the field. The response rate was approximately 52%. RRC data were obtained from the resident statistics summary report for 1998-1999. Experts identified core procedures for MIS training and consistently voiced the opinion that to become competent, residents need to perform these procedures many more times than the RRC data indicate they currently do. At present, American surgical residency programs do not meet the suggested MIS case range or volume required for competency. Residency programs need to be restructured to incorporate sufficient exposure to core MIS procedures. More expert faculty must be recruited to train residents to meet the increasing demand for laparoscopy.

  18. "Does the Organization of Plastic Surgery Units into Independent Departments Affect Academic Productivity?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Scott N; Duquette, Stephen; Valsangkar, Nakul; Avula, Umakanth; Lad, Neha; Socas, Juan; Flores, Roberto L; Sood, Rajiv; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-07-12

    There is an increased push for plastic surgery units in the United States to become independent departments administered autonomously rather than as divisions of a multispecialty surgery department. The purpose of this research was to determine if there are any quantifiable differences in the academic performance of departments versus divisions. Using a list of the plastic surgery units affiliated with The American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons (ACAPS), unit websites were queried for departmental status and to obtain a list of affiliated faculty. Academic productivity was then quantified using the SCOPUS database. National Institute of Health (NIH) funding was determined through the Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools database. Plastic surgery departments were comparable to divisions in academic productivity, evidenced by a similar number of publications per faculty (38.9 versus 38.7; p=0.94), number of citations per faculty (692 versus 761; p=0.64), H-indices (9.9 versus 9.9; p=0.99), and NIH grants (3.25 versus 2.84; p=0.80), including RO1 grants (1.33 versus 0.84; p=0.53). There was a trend for departments to have a more equitable male to female ratio (2.8 versus 4.1; p=0.06), and departments trained a greater number of integrated plastic surgery residents (9.0 versus 5.28; p=0.03). This study demonstrates that the academic performance of independent plastic surgery departments is generally similar to divisions, but with nuanced distinctions.

  19. Oral and maxillofacial surgery residents have poor understanding of biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Al M; Laskin, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate residents' understanding of biostatistics and interpretation of research results. A questionnaire previously used in internal medicine residents was modified to include oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) examples. The survey included sections to identify demographic and educational characteristics of residents, attitudes and confidence, and the primary outcome-knowledge of biostatistics. In 2009 an invitation to the Internet survey was sent to all 106 program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward it to their residents. One hundred twelve residents responded. The percentage of residents who had taken a course in epidemiology was 53%; biostatistics, 49%; and evidence-based dentistry, 65%. Conversely, 10% of OMS residents had taken none of these classes. Across the 6-item test of knowledge of statistical methods, the mean percentage of correct answers was 38% (SD, 22%). Nearly half of the residents (42%) could not correctly identify continuous, ordinal, or nominal variables. Only 21% correctly identified a case-control study, but 79% correctly identified that the purpose of blinding was to reduce bias. Only 46% correctly interpreted a clinically unimportant and statistically nonsignificant result. None of the demographic or experience factors of OMS residents were related to statistical knowledge. Overall, OMS resident knowledge was below that of internal medicine residents (Pbiostatistics and the interpretation of research and are thus unprepared to interpret the results of published clinical research. Residency programs should include effective biostatistical training in their curricula to prepare residents in evidence-based dentistry. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Yong Oock

    2017-05-01

    Recently, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  1. National Survey of Burnout among US General Surgery Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Leisha C; Jeffe, Donna B; Jin, Linda; Awad, Michael M; Turnbull, Isaiah R

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a complex syndrome of emotional distress that can disproportionately affect individuals who work in healthcare professions. Study Design For a national survey of burnout in US general surgery residents, we asked all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery program directors to email their general surgery residents an invitation to complete an anonymous, online survey. Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory; total scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA) subscales were calculated. Burnout was defined as having a score in the highest tertile for EE or DP or lowest tertile for PA. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to test associations between burnout tertiles for each subscale and various resident and training-program characteristics as appropriate. Results From April–December, 2014, 665 residents actively engaged in clinical training had data for analysis; 69% met the criterion for burnout on at least one subscale. Higher burnout on each subscale was reported by residents planning private practice compared with academic careers. A greater proportion of women than men reported burnout on EE and PA. Higher burnout on EE and DP was associated with greater work hours per week. Having a structured mentoring program was associated with lower burnout on each subscale. Conclusions The high rates of burnout among general surgery residents are concerning given the potential impact of burnout on the quality of patient care. Efforts to identify at-risk populations and to design targeted interventions to mitigate burnout in surgical trainees are warranted. PMID:27238875

  2. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  3. General Surgery Resident Vascular Operative Experience in the Era of Endovascular Surgery and Vascular Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Kim, Jerry J; Smith, Brian; Kim, Dennis; Koopmann, Matthew; DeVirgilio, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advances in endovascular surgery have resulted in a decline in major open arterial reconstructions nationwide. Our objective is to investigate the effect of endovascular surgery on general surgery resident experience with open vascular surgery. Between 2004 and 2014, 112 residents graduated from two academic institutions in Southern California. Residents were separated into those who graduated in 2004 to 2008 (period 1) and in 2009 to 2014 (period 2). Case volumes of vascular procedures were compared using two-sample t test. A total of 43 residents were in period 1 and 59 residents were in period 2. In aggregate, there was no significant difference in open cases recorded between the two periods (84 vs 87, P = 0.194). Subgroup analysis showed period 2 recorded significantly fewer cases of open aneurysm repair (5 vs 3, P surgery residents experienced a significant decline in several index open major arterial reconstruction cases. This decline was offset by maintenance of dialysis access procedures. If the trend continues, future general surgeons will not be proficient in open vascular procedures.

  4. [Current problems in training of minimally invasive surgery: vision of residents in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, C; Cano, I; Peláez, D; Fuentes, S; Tardáguila, A R

    2013-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is getting more and more important in our specialty. However, the formation of the residents on MIS is, in many cases, irregular. The purpose of this study is to assess the state of training in MIS among the residents of Pediatric Surgery and their potential weaknesses. An electronic survey was distributed among 71 residents of Pediatric Surgery from 17 national hospitals. The response rate was 70.2%.100% of the residents are interested in a broadening of training activities in MIS. The main areas of interest are gastrointestinal (92%) and thoracic (47%) surgery. Only 57% have access to training facilities and less than half of them attend to courses and conferences. 80% believe that they are not given adequate attention from specialized associations. 52% think they should do rotations at referral centers, 86% that courses and seminars should be enhanced, and 44% that the responsibility of the resident in surgery should be increased. The main defects encountered in their training are scarce volume of patients, lack of financial support and overcoming the learning curve of surgeons in their services. Despite the advance of the MIS, resident's training in this discipline still has shortcomings, as expressed in their views. Knowledge of the current state of training should be the starting point for designing a training strategy that ensures adequate skills.

  5. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  6. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  7. American plastic surgery and global health: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher D; Alkire, Blake; Martin, Christine; Semer, Nadine; Meara, John G

    2012-02-01

    Access to essential surgical care in resource-poor settings is gaining recognition as a major component of international public health efforts. As evidence is mounting about the burden of surgically treatable disease in low- and middle-income countries, so too is the evidence for the significant need for plastic surgery treatment of disease rising in these areas. American plastic surgery has a long history with international surgical efforts in resource-poor regions around the world. Early experiences were not formalized until after World War II, when a foundation partnership provided a venue for interested plastic surgeons to volunteer. These efforts progressed and advanced throughout the 1960s-1970s, but were ultimately devastated by the Vietnam War. Subsequent international plastic surgical experiences by American surgeons over the last 40 years have been largely through several nongovernmental organizations. American plastic surgical involvement in global surgery has changed significantly over the last 70 years. Although quality care is being delivered to resource-poor regions around the world, many of the challenges of regionally appropriate, sustainable care persist today.

  8. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  9. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods.

  10. Patient Selection in Plastic Surgery: Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Sahin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery is a branch of medicine that provides significant improvements to the people with positive changes. But first of all, this branch has a characteristic which requires analysing patients' psychological situation very carefully. Plastic surgeons are often confronted by patients with mental disorders seeking aesthetic surgery. It is imperative for surgeons to recognize possible underlying psychiatric illnesses. Common psychiatric conditions seen in cosmetic surgery patients include body dysmorphic disorder (BDD, narcissistic personality disorder and histrionic personality disorders. BDD is of particular importance to plastic surgeons. Because outrageous dissatisfaction with one's appearance may conceal psychopathologic traits that are not always easily recognizable, and which, if neglected, may result in serious iatrogenic and medicolegal consequences, we hope that this paper will help plastic surgeons in ultimately preventing patient and surgeon dissatisfaction within the population of patients with psychiatric disorders, and should recognize the diagnostic features of body dysmorphic disorder and screen psychologically unstable patients who may never be satisfied with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 109-115

  11. Different models of training and certification in plastic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fodor, L.; Ciuce, C.; Fodor, M.; Shrank, C.; Lapid, O.; Kon, M.; Ramon, Y.; Ullmann, Y.

    2009-01-01

    A varying period of training followed by examinations is the usual way to become a specialist in one of the many fields of Medicine. Plastic Surgery is one of the surgical fields that require good technical and cognitive skills. The best way to train and evaluate a candidate is hard to judge. The mo

  12. Cardiothoracic surgery resident education: update on resident recruitment and job placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jorge D; Ermis, Peter; Laudito, Antonio; Lee, Richard; Wheatley, Grayson H; Paul, Sean; Calhoon, John

    2006-09-01

    Applications to cardiothoracic surgery training programs have steadily declined. The application cycle for 2004 marked the first time the number of applicants was lower than the positions offered. This survey reflects on this trend in applications and the perspectives of current and graduating residents. In June 2004, the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association, in conjunction with CTSNet, surveyed residents completing accredited cardiothoracic training or additional subspecialization. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. Of the 140 graduates, 88 responded. Most were male (92%) and married (72%). Their average age was 35.7 years, and 56% had children. The mean educational debt was less than $50,000. Of the 88 respondents, 69 (78%) had plans to seek jobs whereas 15 (17%) sought additional training. Among job-seeking residents, 12% received no offers. Also, 59% of graduates initially sought a position in academics and 41% in private practice. Nearly one quarter (23%) reported that they would not choose a career in cardiothoracic surgery again, and more than half (52%) would not strongly recommend cardiothoracic surgery to potential trainees. Almost all (90%) of the graduates believed that the number of cardiothoracic training spots should be decreased, and 92% believed that a reduction in training positions should be achieved by closing marginal training programs. Additionally, 91% believed reimbursement for cardiothoracic surgery was inadequate, and 88% thought low reimbursement resulted in restricted patient access and decreased quality of care. Cardiothoracic training programs are having difficulty in both applicant recruitment and in suitable job placement. This frustration in the job search coupled with reimbursement and lifestyle issues most likely contributes to the general dissatisfaction conveyed by the graduates. If these trends continue, the field will be faced with a crisis of unfilled residency programs and unemployed graduates.

  13. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Case Log: General Surgery Resident Thoracic Surgery Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansier, Nicole; Varghese, Thomas K.; Verrier, Edward D.; Drake, F. Thurston; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery resident training has changed dramatically over the past 2 decades, with likely impact on specialty exposure. We sought to assess trends in general surgery resident exposure to thoracic surgery using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating general surgery residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2011–2012 for defined thoracic surgery cases. Data were divided into 5 eras of training for comparison: I, AY89 to 93; II, AY93 to 98; III, AY98 to 03; IV, AY03 to 08; V, AY08 to 12. We analyzed quantity and types of cases per time period. Student t tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at a p values less than 0.05. Results A total of 21,803,843 general surgery cases were reviewed over the 23-year period. Residents averaged 33.6 thoracic cases each in period I and 39.7 in period V. Thoracic cases accounted for nearly 4% of total cases performed annually (period I 3.7% [134,550 of 3,598,574]; period V 4.1% [167,957 of 4,077,939]). For the 3 most frequently performed procedures there was a statistically significant increase in thoracoscopic approach from period II to period V. Conclusions General surgery trainees today have the same volume of thoracic surgery exposure as their counterparts over the last 2 decades. This maintenance in caseload has occurred in spite of work-hour restrictions. However, general surgery graduates have a different thoracic surgery skill set at the end of their training, due to the predominance of minimally invasive techniques. Thoracic surgery educators should take into account these differences when training future cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:24968766

  14. Social media use and impact on plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanian, Andrew J; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Im, Daniel D; Lee, James C; Jarrahy, Reza

    2013-05-01

    Social media platforms have revolutionized the way human beings communicate, yet there is little evidence describing how the plastic surgery community has adopted social media. In this article, the authors evaluate current trends in social media use by practicing plastic surgeons. An anonymous survey on the use of social media was distributed to members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Prevalent patterns of social media implementation were elucidated. One-half of respondents were regular social media users. Reasons for using social media included the beliefs that incorporation of social media into medical practice is inevitable (56.7 percent), that they are an effective marketing tool (52.1 percent), and that they provide a forum for patient education (49 percent). Surgeons with a primarily aesthetic surgery practice were more likely to use social media. Most respondents (64.6 percent) stated that social media had no effect on their practice, whereas 33.8 percent reported a positive impact and 1.5 percent reported a negative impact. This study depicts current patterns of social media use by plastic surgeons, including motivations driving its implementation and impressions on its impact. Many feel that social media are an effective marketing tool that generates increased exposure and referrals. A small number of surgeons have experienced negative repercussions from social media involvement. Our study reveals the presence of a void. There is a definite interest among those surveyed in developing best practice standards and oversight to ensure ethical use of social media platforms throughout the plastic surgery community. Continuing discussion regarding these matters should be ongoing as our experience with social media in plastic surgery evolves.

  15. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    .... If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed...

  16. Surgical Residents are Excluded From Robot-assisted Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Malene; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Implementation of a robotic system may influence surgical training. The aim was to report the charge of the operating surgeon and the bedside assistant at robot-assisted procedures in urology, gynecology, and colorectal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of hospital charts from...... performed. In 10 (1.3%) of these procedures, a resident attended as bedside assistant and never as operating surgeon in the console. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a severe problem with surgical education. Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used; however, robotic surgical training during residency...... surgical procedures during a 1-year period from October 2013 to October 2014. All robot-assisted urologic, gynecologic, and colorectal procedures were identified. Charge of both operating surgeon in the console and bedside assistant were registered. RESULTS: A total of 774 robot-assisted procedures were...

  17. Training general surgery residents to avoid postoperative cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas R; McGoldrick, Jennifer; Fox, Sheryl; Haller, Chris C; Arevalo, Jane

    2007-11-01

    Expertise in cardiac risk assessment takes years to acquire, but unnecessary cardiology consultation delays treatment and consumes scarce resources. A retrospective review was performed of the cardiac work-up and postoperative events during 1 year on a general surgery service. Postgraduate year 1-3 general surgery residents were instructed to obtain a cardiology consult if a patient had any of the following: (1) had undergone coronary artery intervention more than 2 years in the past; (2) was taking an anti-anginal medication (nitroglycerine, Ca channel, or beta-blocker); or (3) was symptomatic or had an abnormal electrocardiogram. Whether a patient was symptomatic was to be tempered by the nature of the planned procedure. Supervised residents screened 720 unique patients for surgery. Cardiology consultation was obtained in 37. All but 1 (97%) patient referred to cardiology met at least 1 of the earlier-described criteria; with 8 (22%) meeting all 3 criteria. On average, patients referred to the cardiologists were taking 1.4 anti-anginal medications; and 1 patient sustained a fatal myocardial infarction after referral. Cardiac imaging (stress test or catheterization) was performed on 24 (65%) referred patients and was positive in 8 (33%). After minimizing cardiac risk by medication or intervention, the surgery service declined to offer the planned procedure to 11 (30%) of the referred patients and an additional 5 (15%) patients declined surgery. The overall surgical mortality was 2%. None of the patients in this series sustained a postoperative myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Postoperative supraventricular tachycardia was not influenced significantly by cardiology consultation (5% referred patients vs 1% nonreferred). Our criteria for obtaining cardiology consultation in general surgery patients appears to appropriately select patients in need of further work-up. Information obtained from a cardiac consultation frequently leads to a re-evaluation of the

  18. [The new residency program in neurological surgery in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, R D; Fernandez Alen, J; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2003-09-01

    A new Residency Program in Neurological Surgery has been recently elaborated by the "Comisión Nacional de Neurocirugía" following the requirement of the National Council of Specialities. This new Program, which will replace the one proposed in 1992, has been designed in a similar way as those applied in countries providing the best neurosurgical training. Changes included deal with the definition of the speciality, and the introduction of new rotations,a resident Log Book, a Tutor with a well defined profil and commitments, a structured planning of academic and clinical objectives, a rotation or training in research, and a planning for continuous evaluation of the progress of the resident. It is likely that an appropriate application of the new Program in Spanish neurosurgical units with accreditation for training will result in formation of highly competent neurosurgeons. However, there are new challenges for improving neurosurgical training and the development of our speciality in Spain, as those related with new legislation regulating resident working hours, or some political decisions changing the mechanisms for controlling the number of resident positions per year.

  19. Nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics in plastic surgery: The next frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Chawla, Reema; G, Natasha; Mahdibeiraghdar, Sara; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    The rapid ascent of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics as applied to medicine and surgery has seen an exponential rise in the scale of research generated in this field. This is evidenced not only by the sheer volume of papers dedicated to nanotechnology but also in a large number of new journals dedicated to nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics specifically to medicine and surgery. Aspects of nanotechnology that have already brought benefits to these areas include advanced drug delivery platforms, molecular imaging and materials engineering for surgical implants. Particular areas of interest include nerve regeneration, burns and wound care, artificial skin with nanoelectronic sensors and head and neck surgery. This study presents a review of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics, with focus on its applications and implications in plastic surgery.

  20. Nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics in plastic surgery: The next frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Chawla, Reema; Natasha, G; Mahdibeiraghdar, Sara; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The rapid ascent of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics as applied to medicine and surgery has seen an exponential rise in the scale of research generated in this field. This is evidenced not only by the sheer volume of papers dedicated to nanotechnology but also in a large number of new journals dedicated to nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics specifically to medicine and surgery. Aspects of nanotechnology that have already brought benefits to these areas include advanced drug delivery platforms, molecular imaging and materials engineering for surgical implants. Particular areas of interest include nerve regeneration, burns and wound care, artificial skin with nanoelectronic sensors and head and neck surgery. This study presents a review of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics, with focus on its applications and implications in plastic surgery. PMID:26422652

  1. ORIGIN OF SURGERY: A HISTORY OF EXPLORATION OF PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sushruta Samhita, Charaka samhita and Astanga sangraha are the tri compendia of Ayurveda encompassing all the aspects of Ayurveda. Plastic surgery (Sandhana karma is a very old branch of surgery described since Vedic era. Almost all the Samhitas described about the methods of Sandhana Karma (Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Now a day the world recognizes the pioneering nature of Sushruta’s plastic and reconstructive surgery and Sushruta is regarded as Father of Plastic surgery. The plastic operations of ear (otoplasty and Rhinoplasty (Plastic Surgery of nose are described in the 16th Chapter of first book (Sutrasthan of the compendium. First methods are described for piercing the earlobes of an infant which still is a widespread practice in India. Sushruta has described 15 methods of joining these cup-up ear lobes. For this plastic operation called karna bedha, a piece of skin was taken from the cheek, turned back, and suitably stitches the lobules. Sushruta has also described Rhinoplasty (Nasa Sandhana. Portion of the nose to be covered should be first measured with a leaf. Then a piece of skin of the required size should be dissected from the living skin of the cheek and turned back to cover the nose, keeping a small pedicle attaches to the cheek. The part of nose to which the skin is to be attached should be made raw by cutting of the nasal stump with a knife. The surgeon then should place the skin on the nose and stitch the two parts swiftly, keeping the skin properly elevated by inserting two tubes of eranda (castor oil plant in each part of nostril so that the new nose gets proper shape. It should then be sprinkled with a powder composed of liquorices, red sandalwood, and barberry plant. Finally it should be covered with cotton and clean sesame oil should be constantly applied to it. Sushruta also mentioned the reconstruction of the broken lip and hare-lip (ostha Sandhana.These descriptions are brief in nature in comparison to

  2. Self-reported problems and wishes for plastic surgery after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenblast, Lene; Laessoe, Line; Printzlau, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    , since some of the patients will experience problems due to excess skin. Foreign studies estimate that ∼30% of all bariatric surgery patients will at some point seek plastic surgical correction of excess skin. The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent the GB patients themselves consider...... plastic surgery for removal of excess skin, and their reasons and motivations for this. The investigation was performed as an anonymous questionnaire handed out to 150 patients at the 1-year standard consultation for GB patients at a private hospital. The questionnaire contained information about......, and the investigation showed that 89.9% of the patients had a wish for plastic surgery for several different reasons. This patient demand showed to have no correlation to age, gender, smoking habits, or earlier comorbidity....

  3. A brief history of plastic surgery in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Hormozi, Abdoljalil

    2013-03-01

     Although the exact time of performing plastic surgery is not addressed in the medical and historical literature, it can be supposed that these surgical procedures have a long and fascinating history.  Recent excavations provided many documents regarding the application of medical instruments, surgical and even reconstructive procedures during the pre-historic and ancient periods. Actually, there is no historical definite time-zone separating general and cosmetic operations in the pre-modern time; however, historically there have been many surgeons who tried to perform reconstructive procedures during their usual medical practice. This article presents a brief look at the history of plastic surgery form the ancient to the contemporary era, with a special focus on Iran.

  4. Career evaluation and the decision process for plastic surgery graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Steven P; Clemens, Mark W

    2011-08-01

    National experience shows that 50 percent of physicians change positions within the first 2 years of practice. Because of market pressures, medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular are shifting away from solo practice. The authors examine the primary reasons for turnover and discuss job search priorities for recent plastic surgery graduates and established surgeons in job transition, with a current analysis of the different job opportunities available, ranging from government to private practice. The advantages and disadvantages of different positions are compared and income data are presented. Academic income is close to that of private practice at a mean of $366,141 annually but requires more work as measured by an overall higher relative value unit of productivity. The concept of creating a personal inventory before seeking the best job match is introduced.

  5. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  6. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Kim, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed. PMID:28573091

  7. Port- a- Cath Catheter placement by general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlottmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years an increasing incidence and prevalence of oncological diseases is observed, with a consequent increase in chemotherapies. In order to avoid repeated venipuncture of patients and toxicity in small veins during different cycles of treatment, devices that provide a permanent central venous access are used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success and safety of port a cath devices inserted by surgery residents. A consecutive case series of patients in whom Port-a-CathTM catheter was placed by residents of surgery in the period from March 2009 to January 2014 were included. A total of 358 Port-a-CathTM catheters were inserted. Average age 58.7 years (16-88. Females 53.1%. Chemotherapy treatment for solid neoplasias (74.8% and for hematological diseases (25.2%. SThe different venous accesses were: Subclavian (67.6%, Cephalic (27.4%, external jugular (3.3%, internal jugular (1.7%. The morbidity rate was 5.3%, twelve patients with catheter-associated infection requiring the removal of it, 3 venous thrombosis with subsequent replacement of the catheter and 4 patients required pleural drainage. Port-a-CathTM catheter placement by residents is a safe and effective procedure for the administration of chemotherapy

  8. Canadian vascular surgery residents' perceptions regarding future job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel A; Dubois, Luc; Power, Adam H; DeRose, Guy; MacKenzie, Kent S; Forbes, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to determine the employment environment for graduates of Canadian vascular surgery training programs. A cross-sectional survey of residents and graduates (2011-2012) was used. Thirty-seven residents were invited with a response rate of 57%, and 14 graduates with a response rate of 71%; 70% of graduates felt the job market played an important role in their decision to pursue vascular surgery as a career compared to 43% of trainees. The top three concerns were the lack of surgeons retiring, the overproduction of trainees, and saturation of the job market. The majority (62%) of trainees see themselves extending their training due to lack of employment. All of the graduates obtained employment, with 50% during their second year (of two years) of training and 30% after training was completed. Graduates spent an average of 12 ± 10.6 months seeking a position and applied to 3.3 ± 1.5 positions, with a mean of 1.9 ± 1.3 interviews and 2 ± 1.2 offers. There was a discrepancy between the favorable employment climate experienced by graduates and the pessimistic outlook of trainees. We must be progressive in balancing the employment opportunities with the number of graduates. Number and timing of job offers is a possible future metric of the optimal number of residents.

  9. Patient perceptions on physician reimbursement in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ryan M; Cassinelli, Ezequiel H; Hultman, C Scott; Erdmann, Detlev

    2014-07-01

    Public perception on physician reimbursement may be that considerable payments are received for procedures: a direct contrast to the actual decline. We aim to investigate patient perceptions toward plastic surgeon reimbursements from insurance companies. A survey of 4 common, single-staged procedures was administered to 140 patients. Patients were asked for their opinion on current insurance company reimbursement fees and what they believed the reimbursement fee should be. Eighty-four patients completed the survey. Patients estimated physician's reimbursements at 472% to 1061% more for breast reduction, 347% to 770% for abdominal hernia reconstruction, 372% to 787% for panniculectomy, and 290% to 628% for mandibular fracture repair. Despite these perceived higher-than-actual-fee payments, 87% of patients thought reimbursements should still be higher. Patients surveyed overestimated plastic surgery procedure fees by 290% to 1061%. Patients should be informed and educated regarding current fee schedules to plastic surgeons to correct current misconceptions.

  10. Financial conflicts of interest in plastic surgery: background, potential for bias, disclosure, and transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Edward A

    2015-04-01

    Relationships between physicians and industry, whether it be pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, or purveyors of medical technology, contain both an element of potential for good and a potential for harm. Certainly, the potential for good is realized when the collaboration results in improved plastic surgery patient care due to product and technology development. If the collaboration contains a financial component, the potential for harm exists in the form of a financial conflict of interest on the part of the physician. Recently, considerable discussion has been directed toward the pervasiveness of financial conflict of interest in all three arenas of the profession of medicine: education, research, and clinical practice, although an overlap exists among all three with respect to the issue of conflict of interest. This article will focus on conflict of interest in plastic surgery education, both continuing medical education for practitioners and graduate medical education for plastic surgery residents, as well as conflict of interest in research, such as conflicts related to publications in our literature.

  11. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures.

  12. On One Application of Fourier Analysis in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimov, Abdumalik; Zainuddin, Hishamuddin

    In present paper, we discuss the spectral methods of measurement of the degree of speech and/or quality of sound by comparing the coefficient of performance indicators depending on energy distributions, ratio of energy of the fundamental tone and energy of overtones. Such a method is very efficient for string oscillation with different initial conditions and it is useful for justification of applications of Fourier analysis in plastic surgery in treatment of some medical diseases.

  13. Self-evaluation: how well do surgery residents judge performance on a rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-05-01

    Surgical trainees are evaluated based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 6 core competencies. The ability for a learner to recognize strengths and weaknesses in these areas allows for critical self-improvement. Surgery residents rotating on a pediatric surgery rotation for 1 academic year were asked at an exit interview to provide a self-evaluation within the 6 core competencies on a Likert scale from 1 to 5. Self-evaluation scores were compared with a final group consensus attending evaluation. Further analyses included comparing residents as follows: less than R3 (junior residents) versus R3 (senior residents) residents, general surgery versus non-general surgery residents, university versus community residents, residents in the first half of the academic year versus residents in the second half, and top one third- and lowest one third-performing residents. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests with significance at P surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents compared with junior residents, non-general surgery residents, and lowest one third-performing residents. There were no differences between self-evaluations and attending evaluations when comparing university with community residents and residents in the first half of the academic year with residents in the second half of the academic year. Residents appear to have a more critical self-analysis than attending surgeons, with senior residents, general surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents being the most critical of their own performance. Poorly performing residents appeared to lack insight into their abilities. This method of self-evaluation helps trainees reflect on their performance and highlights trainees who lack self-awareness and need counseling for improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Miguel Angel; Gomes, Walter José; Bras, Ademir Massarico; Araújo, Thiago Cavalcante Vila Nova de; Mota, André Lupp; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Coutinho, Rafael Viana dos S

    2015-01-01

    Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  15. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  16. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  17. Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Bahar; Burce, Karen K; Seal, Stella M; Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J; Frick, Kevin D; Dorafshar, Amir H; Cooney, Carisa M

    2017-05-01

    Rising health care costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American health care are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. The authors conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. The authors anonymously surveyed their department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993 to 2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, the authors implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. Thirty-two of 36 physicians (88.9 percent; 76.6 percent response rate) stated business principles are either "pretty important" or "very important" to being a doctor. Only 36 percent of faculty and 41 percent of trainees had previous business instruction. The authors identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed, with practice management/administration (n = 22) and systems-based practice (n = 6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n = 1), general surgery (n = 2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n = 1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were reported inconsistently. From August of 2013 to June of 2015, the authors held eight business principles sessions. Postsession surveys demonstrated moderately to extremely satisfied responses in 75 percent or more of resident/fellow respondents (n = 13; response rate, 48.1 percent) and faculty (n = 9; response rate, 45.0 percent). Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a

  18. Operating room waste reduction in plastic and hand surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mark G; Rothkopf, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Operating rooms (ORs), combined with labour and delivery suites, account for approximately 70% of hospital waste. Previous studies have reported that recycling can have a considerable financial impact on a hospital-wide basis; however, its importance in the OR has not been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: To propose a method of decreasing cost through judicious selection of instruments and supplies, and initiation of recycling in plastic and hand surgery. METHODS: The authors identified disposable supplies and instruments that are routinely opened and wasted in common plastic and hand surgery procedures, and calculated the savings that can result from eliminating extraneous items. A cost analysis was performed, which compared the expense of OR waste versus single-stream recycling and the benefit of recycling HIPAA documents and blue wrap. RESULTS: Fifteen total items were removed from disposable plastic packs and seven total items from hand packs. A total of US$17,381.05 could be saved per year from these changes alone. Since initiating single-stream recycling, the authors’ institution has saved, on average, US$3,487 per month at the three campuses. After extrapolating at the current savings rate, one would expect to save a minimum of US$41,844 per year. DISCUSSION: OR waste reduction is an effective method of decreasing cost in the surgical setting. By revising the contents of current disposable packs and instrument sets designated for plastic and hand surgery, hospitals can reduce the amount of opened and unused material. CONCLUSIONS: Significant financial savings and environmental benefit can result from this judicious supply and instrument selection, as well as implementation of recycling. PMID:26665137

  19. Plastic surgery marketing in a generation of "tweeting".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wendy W; Gupta, Subhas C

    2011-11-01

    "Social media" describes interactive communication through Web-based technologies. It has become an everyday part of modern life, yet there is a lack of research regarding its impact on plastic surgery practice. The authors evaluate and compare the prevalence of classic marketing methods and social media in plastic surgery. The Web sites of aesthetic surgeons from seven US cities were compared and evaluated for the existence of Facebook, Twitter, or MySpace links and promotions. To find the sites, the authors conducted a Google search for the phrase "plastic surgery" with the name of each city to be studied: Beverly Hills, California; Dallas, Texas; Houston, Texas; Las Vegas, Nevada; Miami, Florida; New York City, New York; and San Francisco, California. The trends of social networking memberships were also studied in each of these cities. In comparison to aesthetic surgeons practicing in other cities, those in Miami, Florida, favored social media the most, with 50% promoting a Facebook page and 46% promoting Twitter. Fifty-six percent of New York City aesthetic surgeons promoted their featured articles in magazines and newspapers, whereas 54% of Beverly Hills aesthetic surgeons promoted their television appearances. An increase in the number of new Facebook memberships among cosmetic providers in the seven cities began in October 2008 and reached a peak in October, November, and December 2009, with subsequent stabilization. The increase in the number of new Twitter memberships began in July 2008 and remained at a steady rate of approximately 15 new memberships every three months. Social media may seem like a new and unique communication tool, but it is important to preserve professionalism and apply traditional Web site-building ethics and principles to these sites. We can expect continued growth in plastic surgeons' utilization of these networks to enhance their practices and possibly to launch direct marketing campaigns.

  20. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  1. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  2. PREPARATION OF CERTIFICATES BY GENERAL SURGERY RESIDENT PHYSICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lazzarino (h

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The physician’s certificate is a statement regarding a present or past event in which the physician has intervened while exercising his/her profession. It is considered written and personal evidence of the attending physician, which verifies the event described. Official certificates are those which must be issued in compliance with legal provisions, while ordinary certificates are private documents prepared at the request of the patient himself/herself. 88 certificates issued by general surgery resident physicians at the patient’s request were assessed, between October and December 2013. All the ordinary certificates assessed were aimed at controlling absenteeism. They all included the patient’s name and surname, date, signature and seal. The preparation of a physicians’ certificate is mandatory, and should only include the facts verified by the physician himself/herself, and upon the patient’s request. General surgery resident physicians are duly licensed medical doctors, which means that they are empowered by law to issue certificates, verifications and/or statements made in the course of their profession, regarding conditions of health or illness, as well as the management, prescription, indication, application or control of the procedures

  3. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  4. The Utility of Outcome Studies in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno, MD, MEng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Outcome studies help provide the evidence-based science rationalizing treatment end results that factor the experience of patients and the impact on society. They improve the recognition of the shortcoming in clinical practice and provide the foundation for the development of gold standard care. With such evidence, health care practitioners can develop evidence-based justification for treatments and offer patients with superior informed consent for their treatment options. Furthermore, health care and insurance agencies can recognize improved cost-benefit options in the purpose of disease prevention and alleviation of its impact on the patient and society. Health care outcomes are ultimately measured by the treatment of disease, the reduction of symptoms, the normalization of laboratory results and physical measures, saving a life, and patient satisfaction. In this review, we outline the tools available to measure outcomes in plastic surgery and subsequently allow the objective measurements of plastic surgical conditions. Six major outcome categories are discussed: (1 functional measures; (2 preference-based measures and utility outcome scores; (3 patient satisfaction; (4 health outcomes and time; (5 other tools: patient-reported outcome measurement information system, BREAST-Q, and Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons; and (6 cost-effectiveness analysis. We use breast hypertrophy requiring breast reduction as an example throughout this review as a representative plastic surgical condition with multiple treatments available.

  5. Medical Ethics in Plastic Surgery: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Azin; Hashem-Zade, Haleh

    2016-09-01

    Currently, cosmetic surgery is spread around the world. Several factors are involved in this rapidly evolving field such as socio-economic development, changes in cultural norms, globalization and the effects of Western culture, advertising, media, and mental disorders. Nowadays the cosmetic surgery is becoming a profitable business, which deals exclusively with human appearance and less from the perspective of beauty based on physical protests and considering factors such as sex, age, and race. The morality of plastic surgery subspecialty has undergone many moral dilemmas in the past few years. The role of the patient regardless of his unrealistic dreams has questionable ethical dimension. The problem is the loss of human values and replacing them with false values, of pride and glory to a charismatic person of higher status, that may underlie some of the posed ethical dilemmas. Cosmetic surgery has huge difference with the general principle of legal liability in professional orientation, because the objective for cosmetic surgeries is different from common therapeutic purposes. To observe excellence in the medical profession, we should always keep in mind that these service providers, often as a therapist (healer) must maintain a commitment and priority for patient safety and prior to any action, a real apply for this service recipient should be present. Also, patient-physician confidentiality is the cornerstone of medical ethics. In this review, we study the issues addressed and the ways that they can be resolved.

  6. The Canadian general surgery resident: defining current challenges for surgical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Corey; Labossière, Joseph; Rommens, Kenton; Birch, Daniel W

    2012-08-01

    Surgery training programs in Canada and the United States have recognized the need to modify current models of training and education. The shifting demographic of surgery trainees, lifestyle issues and an increased trend toward subspecialization are the major influences. To guide these important educational initiatives, a contemporary profile of Canadian general surgery residents and their impressions of training in Canada is required. We developed and distributed a questionnaire to residents in each Canadian general surgery training program, and residents responded during dedicated teaching time. In all, 186 surveys were returned for analysis (62% response rate). The average age of Canadian general surgery residents is 30 years, 38% are women, 41% are married, 18% have dependants younger than 18 years and 41% plan to add to or start a family during residency. Most (87%) residents plan to pursue postgraduate education. On completion of training, 74% of residents plan to stay in Canada and 49% want to practice in an academic setting. Almost half (42%) of residents identify a poor balance between work and personal life during residency. Forty-seven percent of respondents have appropriate access to mentorship, whereas 37% describe suitable access to career guidance and 40% identify the availability of appropriate social supports. Just over half (54%) believe the stress level during residency is manageable. This survey provides a profile of contemporary Canadian general surgery residents. Important challenges within the residency system are identified. Program directors and chairs of surgery are encouraged to recognize these challenges and intervene where appropriate.

  7. Plastic Surgeons' Opinions of Facial Surgery for Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.; Turnbull, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    One hundred plastic surgeons responded to a survey on opinions toward facial plastic surgery for individuals with Down's syndrome. Twenty-four of the surgeons had performed the surgery. Surgeons indicated appropriate circumstances for the surgery, consent requirements, degree of understanding expected of the patient, and degree of discomfort…

  8. Goals and Methodology for a Surgery Residency Program: A Committee Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Charles D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Written goals of a small animal residency program established by Purdue University are identified and an elaborate list of methodology for goals is provided. Tables include: summary of required activities of residents, checklist of residency progress, and comparable effort for surgery residency and masters program. (Author/MLW)

  9. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane and His Contributions to Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakey, Richard William F; Mulliken, John B

    2015-07-01

    Surgical subspecialties were just emerging at the turn of the 20th Century, before this time, general surgeons had to adjust their operative skills to address disorders throughout the body. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane was a British surgeon, whose restless mind led him to wander throughout the field of general surgery and beyond. Although controversial, he advanced in the repair of cleft lip and palate, introduced the "no touch" operative technique, internal fixation of fractures, and is credited as the first surgeon to perform open massage of the heart. During The Great War, he established the British Plastic Surgery unit at Sidcup and delegated the care of facial and jaw injuries to young Major Harold Gillies. Lane later founded The New Health Society, an organization that stimulated the natural food movement. Sadly, in his latter years Lane's thinking drifted further away from with the times and his professional credibility waned. Nevertheless, Lane's variegated life is of sufficient interest to deserve reassessment.

  10. [Monitoring and conditioning in plastic and reconstructive ENT-surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacho, A; Dietz, A

    2006-11-01

    Plastic and reconstructive ENT surgery serves for reconstruction of form and function. Frequent indications in ENT surgery are the covering of large tissue defects after tumor operations, firing and/or explosion injuries, accidents, burns or massive infections. A high revision rate of up to 20 % in selective patient groups show that more knowledge of both monitoring and ischemia-/reperfusion mechanisms is necessary. Besides improved monitor proceedings biochemical cell procedures in pedicled and free flaps are getting more focused. In the last years certain physical and medical factors appear, which have influence on the long-term surviving of a pedicled or free flap, e. g. pre- and/or postconditioning. The increasing knowledge of changes in perfusion and oxygenation, which prevail in the flap, as well as different options of physical and pharmacological therapies permit a promising view into the future, in order to achieve an improved surviving of a pedicled or free flap in combination with improved monitor proceedings.

  11. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of the Consumption of Low Invasive Plastic Surgery Practices: The Case of Spain

    OpenAIRE

    E. De la Poza; Alkasadi, M. S. S.; L. Jódar

    2013-01-01

    Plastic surgery practice grows continuously among the women in Western countries due to their body image dissatisfaction, aging anxiety, and an ideal body image propagated by the media. The consumption growth is so important that plastic surgery is becoming a normal practice among women, like any other cosmetic product, with the risk of suffering psychopathology disorders in the sense that plastic surgery could be employed as an instrument to recover personal self-esteem or even happiness. Pl...

  13. Journal impact factor versus the evidence level of articles published in plastic surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria A; Tedesco, Ana C B; Nahas, Fabio X; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between impact factor and the level of evidence of articles in plastic surgery journals. The four plastic surgery journals with the top impact factors in 2011 were selected. Articles were selected using the PubMed database between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The journal evidence index was calculated by dividing the number of randomized clinical trials by the total number of articles published in the specific journal, multiplied by 100. This index was correlated to the impact factor of the journal and compared with the average of the other journals. Two investigators independently evaluated each journal, followed by a consensus and assessment of the interexaminer concordance. The kappa test was used to evaluate the concordance between the two investigators and Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate which journal presented the highest number of randomized clinical trials. The journal evidence index values were as follows: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1.70; Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 0.40; Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 0.56; and Annals of Plastic Surgery, 0.35. The impact factors of these journals in 2011 were as follows: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 3.382; Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 1.494; Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 1.407; and Annals of Plastic Surgery, 1.318. After consensus, the quantity of adequate studies was low and similar between these journals; only the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery showed a higher journal evidence index. The journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery exhibited the highest journal evidence index and had the highest impact factor. The number of adequate articles was low in all of the assessed journals.

  14. Perioperative corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edina Mariko Koga da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:Early recovery is an important factor for people undergoing facial plastic. However, the normal inflammatory processes that are a consequence of surgery commonly cause oedema (swelling and ecchymosis (bruising, which are undesirable complications. Severe oedema and ecchymosis delay full recovery, and may make patients dissatisfied with procedures. Perioperative corticosteroids have been used in facial plastic surgery with the aim of preventing oedema and ecchymosis.OBJECTIVES:To determine the effects, including safety, of perioperative administration of corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery in adults.METHODS:Search strategy: In January 2014, we searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; Ovid Embase; EBSCO CINAHL; and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS. There were no restrictions on the basis of date or language of publication. Selection criteria: We included RCTs that compared the administration of perioperative systemic corticosteroids with another intervention, no intervention or placebo in facial plastic surgery. ata collection and analysis: Two review authors independently screened the trials for inclusion in the review, appraised trial quality and extracted data.MAIN RESULTS: We included 10 trials, with a total of 422 participants, that addressed two of the outcomes of interest to this review: swelling (oedema and bruising (ecchymosis. Nine studies on rhinoplasty used a variety of different types, and doses, of corticosteroids. Overall, the results of the included studies showed that there is some evidence that perioperative administration of corticosteroids decreases formation of oedema over the first two postoperative days. Meta-analysis was only

  15. Decision aiding in plastic surgery: a multicriteria analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Flávio Autran Monteiro Gomes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present, through a real case, a practical way, based on Multicriteria Decision Aiding, to support decision making in Plastic Surgery. The case studied was a Caucasian woman of 36 years of age with mammarian hypertrophia with ptosis and abdominal lipodystrophy, making it necessary to select the most adequate techniques for the best aesthetic result. For this purpose, the multicriteria methods Even Swaps and PrOACT were used. Three plastic surgeons working in the city of Rio de Janeiro with equivalent professional experience were consulted as decision agents. In order to define the objectives to be achieved, the criteria relevant to the making of the decision and the alternatives which could be used were identified. Throughout this identification and in the later analysis the surgeons participated in the application of the methods, which contributed towards facilitating their acceptance of the multicriteria analysis in their decision making. It was confirmed, in this case study, that the use of Multicriteria Decision Aiding tends to make the medical decision more wide ranging and, above all, transparent. The plastic surgeons themselves validated the analysis, considering it fully consistent with their professional experience.

  16. Does intentional support of degree programs in general surgery residency affect research productivity or pursuit of academic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua Smith, Jesse; Patel, Ravi K; Chen, Xi; Tarpley, Margaret J; Terhune, Kyla P

    2014-01-01

    Many residents supplement general surgery training with years of dedicated research, and an increasing number at our institution pursue additional degrees. We sought to determine whether it was worth the financial cost for residency programs to support degrees. We reviewed graduating chief residents (n = 69) in general surgery at Vanderbilt University from 2001 to 2010 and collected the data including research time and additional degrees obtained. We then compared this information with the following parameters: (1) total papers, (2) first-author papers, (3) Journal Citation Reports impact factors of journals in which papers were published, and (4) first job after residency or fellowship training. The general surgery resident training program at Vanderbilt University is an academic program, approved to finish training 7 chief residents yearly during the time period studied. Chief residents in general surgery at Vanderbilt who finished their training 2001 through 2010. We found that completion of a degree during residency was significantly associated with more total and first-author publications as compared with those by residents with only dedicated research time (p = 0.001 and p = 0.017). Residents completing a degree also produced publications of a higher caliber and level of authorship as determined by an adjusted resident impact factor score as compared with those by residents with laboratory research time only (p = 0.005). Degree completion also was significantly correlated with a first job in academia if compared to those with dedicated research time only (p = 0.046). Our data support the utility of degree completion when economically feasible and use of dedicated research time as an effective way to significantly increase research productivity and retain graduates in academic surgery. Aggregating data from other academic surgery programs would allow us to further determine association of funding of additional degrees as a means to encourage academic

  17. The effect of residency and fellowship type on hand surgery clinical practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan; Pierce, Paul; Chiu, David T W; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires accredited fellowship programs to exhibit proficiency in six broadly defined domains; however, core competencies specifically mandated for hand surgery training have yet to be established. Several studies have demonstrated significant disparities in exposure to essential skills and knowledge between orthopedic surgery- and plastic surgery-based hand surgery fellowship programs. To determine whether significant discrepancies also exist after fellowship between hand surgeons trained in orthopedic surgery and those trained in plastic surgery, clinical practice patterns were evaluated. A 20-question survey was created and distributed electronically to American Society for Surgery of the Hand and American Association for Hand Surgery members. Responses were compared using descriptive statistics. Nine hundred eighty-two hand surgeons (76 percent orthopedic and 24 percent plastic) responded, representing a 39 percent response rate. Most plastic surgery hand practices were academic-based (41 percent), whereas orthopedic practices were private (67 percent). More orthopedic hand surgeons worked in multipractitioner practices than plastic surgeons (54 percent versus 30 percent; p digital replantation cases (53 percent versus 22 percent; p < 0.05) but treated significantly fewer open reduction and internal fixation distal radius fractures. Orthopedic and plastic surgery hand surgeons differ significantly in their clinical practice patterns. Differences in clinical exposure during training are reflected in practice and persist over time. Referral patterns and practice situations are also contributors to ultimate practice patterns.

  18. [Photography in plastic surgery: practices, uses and legislation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Runz, A; Simon, E; Brix, M; Sorin, T; Brengard-Bresler, T; Pineau, V; Guyon, G; Claudot, F

    2015-02-01

    Photography in plastic surgery is omnipresent. Through its various uses, it may present both ethical and forensic risks. The objective of this study is to analyze the use of medical photography by the plastic surgeon, the perception of this use by the patient, and consequence of such use. A questionnaire about the use of medical photography was assessed to 629 plastic surgeons. A questionnaire was given to patients, about their perception of the use of photography by their surgeon. One hundred and seventy-six surgeon's questionnaires and 93 patient's questionnaires were analyzed. For 97.7% of the responding surgeons, the proportion of patients refusing to be photographed was less then 1/20. The objective of the photography was especially medicolegal for 62.5% of the surgeons, especially for following the patient progress (87.5%), partially for the formation (72.1%), partially for scientific publications (57.8%) and not at all for the personal publicity (73.1%). Surgeons often share his photographs with others surgeons (71.1%), sometimes with others medical personnel (48.8%). The security and the access to photographs were determined to be correct for 67.6% of the surgeons and perfect for 23.3%. In total, 17.2% of the surgeons obtained a written consent, 41.4% obtained an oral consent, and 38.5% did not request patient consent. It was found that 48.3% of the surgeons and 40.2% of the patients think that the right to the photographic images belong to the patient. Medical photographs expose the plastic surgeon to medico-legal risks. He must know and follow the law in order to prevent eventual legal proceedings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge and perception of plastic surgery among tertiary education students in Enugu, South-East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiguzo, C M; Nwachukwu, C D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge, perception, and acceptance of plastic surgery among any population are influenced by channel of presentation. A good understanding of the public awareness will define the way plastic surgery services will be provided. To assess the knowledge, awareness of availability, and acceptance of plastic surgery practice in Enugu, South East Nigeria. A questionnaire-based prospective study. The electronic media is the most common medium of awareness. Less than half the sample knew about the existence of plastic surgeons in Enugu even though a large proportion was aware of the existence of plastic surgery as a specialty. The concentration of plastic surgeons in a center is directly related to awareness of plastic surgery services in that facility. The most common esthetic procedure done by a plastic surgeon in Enugu is tattoo removal and scar refashioning. Orthopedic surgeons are thought to be key players in the management of burn patients as much as the plastic surgeons due to the "SIGNPOST EFFECT." The level of awareness is high in the sampled population with associated increase in acceptance of its practice and willing utilization. All public hospitals should be encouraged to employ the services of plastic surgeons. Appropriate branding of specialized hospitals where plastic surgery service is available will advance the practice significantly.

  20. WHO Surgical Checklist and Its Practical Application in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady Abdel-Rehim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The WHO surgical checklist was introduced to most UK surgical units following the WHO “Safe Surgery Saves Lives” initiative. The aim of this audit was to review patient's safety in the delivery of surgical care and to evaluate the practical application of the new WHO surgical checklist. We conducted a retrospective audit of patients who received operative treatment under general anaesthesia at our Plastic Surgery Department, involving a total number of 90 patients. The WHO form was compared to its former equivalents. Complications or incidents occurring during or after surgery were recorded. Using the department's previous surgical checklist, “Time out” was only performed in only 30% of cases. One patient arrived at theatre reception without a completed consent form, and two clinical incidents were reported without patients suffering harm. Following introduction of current WHO surgical checklist, “Time out” was recorded in 80% of cases. In all cases, the new WHO surgical checklist was used and no incidents were reported. The WHO surgical checklist provides a structured frame work that standardizes the delivery of care across hospitals and specialized units; however, it will take some time and practice for teams to learn to use the checklist effectively and reliably.

  1. Bariatric surgery and the changing current scope of general surgery practice: implications for general surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed R; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The scope of general surgery practice has evolved tremendously in the last 20 years. However, clinical experience in general surgery residency training has undergone relatively little change. To evaluate the current scope of academic general surgery and its implications on surgical residency. The University HealthSystem Consortium and Association of American Medical Colleges established the Faculty Practice Solution Center (FPSC) to characterize physician productivity. The FPSC is a benchmarking tool for academic medical centers created from revenue data collected from more than 90,000 physicians who practice at 95 institutions across the United States. The FPSC database was queried to evaluate the annual mean procedure frequency per surgeon (PFS) in each calendar year from 2006 through 2011. The associated work relative value units (wRVUs) were also examined to measure physician effort and skill. During the 6-year period, 146 distinct Current Procedural Terminology codes were among the top 100 procedures, and 16 of these procedures ranked in the top 10 procedures in at least 1 year. The top 10 procedures accounted for more than half (range, 52.5%-57.2%) of the total 100 PFS evaluated for each year. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was consistently among the top 10 procedures in each year (PFS, 18.2-24.6). The other most frequently performed procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (PFS, 30.3-43.5), upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (PFS, 26.5-34.3), mastectomy (PFS, 16.5-35.0), inguinal hernia repair (PFS, 15.5-22.1), and abdominal wall hernia repair (PFS, 21.6-26.1). In all years, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass generated the highest number of wRVUs (wRVUs, 491.0-618.2), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was regularly the next highest (wRVUs, 335.8-498.7). A significant proportion of academic general surgery is composed of bariatric surgery, yet surgical training does not sufficiently emphasize the necessary exposure to technical expertise

  2. 3D Printing: current use in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yen; Dedhia, Raj; Cervenka, Brian; Tollefson, Travis T

    2017-08-01

    To review the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, with a focus on current uses in surgical training, surgical planning, clinical outcomes, and biomedical research. To evaluate the limitations and future implications of 3D printing in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Studies reviewed demonstrated 3D printing applications in surgical planning including accurate anatomic biomodels, surgical cutting guides in reconstruction, and patient-specific implants fabrication. 3D printing technology also offers access to well tolerated, reproducible, and high-fidelity/patient-specific models for surgical training. Emerging research in 3D biomaterial printing have led to the development of biocompatible scaffolds with potential for tissue regeneration in reconstruction cases involving significant tissue absence or loss. Major limitations of utilizing 3D printing technology include time and cost, which may be offset by decreased operating times and collaboration between departments to diffuse in-house printing costs SUMMARY: The current state of the literature shows promising results, but has not yet been validated by large studies or randomized controlled trials. Ultimately, further research and advancements in 3D printing technology should be supported as there is potential to improve resident training, patient care, and surgical outcomes.

  3. Detecting Tweet-Based Sentiment Polarity of Plastic Surgery Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvi Jokhio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sentiment analysis is a growing research these days. Many companies perform this analysis on public opinions to get a general idea about any product or service. This paper presents a novel approach to get views or comments of Twitter users about plastic surgery treatments. The proposed approach uses machine-learning technique embedded with the naïve Bayesian classifier to assign polarities (i.e. positive, negative or neutral to the tweets, collected from ?Twitter micro-blogging website?. The accuracy of the obtained results has been validated using precision, recall and F-score measures. It has been observed from 25000 tweets dataset that people tend to have positive as well as substantial negative opinions regarding particular treatments. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach

  4. The ACGME case log: general surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W; Drake, F Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H

    2013-08-01

    General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989-1990 to 2010-2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989-90 to AY1993-94), Period II (AY1994-95 to AY1998-99), Period III (AY1999-00 to AY2002-03), Period IV (AY2003-04 to AY2006-07), and Period V (AY2007-08 to AY2010-11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  6. Plastic surgery within the Veterans Affairs Medical System: proposed modified indications for operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Detlev; Pradka, Sarah P; Similie, Ernest; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Moyer, Kurtis E; Shelburne, John D; Tyler, Douglas S; Levin, Scott L

    2009-07-01

    Many plastic surgery procedures span the divide between aesthetic ("cosmetic") and reconstructive surgery. However, definitions and guidelines may be inconsistent, which may decrease patients' access to legitimate procedures. The article aims to assist Veterans' Health Administration-affiliated plastic surgeons in continuing to provide optimal care to the Nation's Veterans and family members, and should be regarded as an open discussion.

  7. Plastic Surgery Intervention with Down Syndrome Persons: Summary of a Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The article discusses the role of plastic surgery for persons with Down Syndrome, as considered in a recent conference. The functions of team plastic surgery, importance of intensive speech therapy, and the question of ultimate therapeutic value are among questions considered. (CL)

  8. Cloud-Based Applications for Organizing and Reviewing Plastic Surgery Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Anna; Momeni, Arash; Lee, Gordon K; Galvez, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Cloud-based applications including Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, Evernote, Notability, and Zotero are available for smartphones, tablets, and laptops and have revolutionized the manner in which medical students and surgeons read and utilize plastic surgery literature. Here we provide an overview of the use of Cloud computing in practice and propose an algorithm for organizing the vast amount of plastic surgery literature. Given the incredible amount of data being produced in plastic surgery and other surgical subspecialties, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to lead the process of providing solutions for the efficient organization and effective integration of the ever-increasing data into clinical practice.

  9. Malignant Hyperthermia in Dental and Facial Plastic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Maheri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative evaluation of the patients scheduled for ambulatory surgery is of great importance in regards of both surgery and anesthesia considerations. Malignant Hyperthermia (MH is a pharmacogenetic clinical syndrome which mostly arises from volatile anesthesia with halothane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine. Clinical manifestations of MH are acidosis and rhabdomyolysis which occur following uncontrolled increases in skeletal muscle metabolism and rapidly increasing body temperature (by as much as 1°C/5 min (1. Primary cases of MH were reported to be of a 70% mortality rate; however, thanks to the emergence of diagnostic tools such as end-expired carbon dioxide and the administration of dantrolene, this rate has decreased to less than 5%.      MH might occur even in those with no previous or familial history. Even a safe history of the previous surgery under the administration of MH triggering agents cannot guarantee a next safe surgery. A noteworthy point in the preoperative evaluation is the probable association of MH with certain musculoskeletal disorders including Duchenne, Becker, and myotonic muscular dystrophies, strabismus, osteogenesis imperfecta, ptosis, myelomeningocele, kyphoscoliosis, King-Denborough syndrome, periodic paralysis, hernias, marfanoid syndrome, and central core disease (1. These diseases are frequently encountered by dental and facial plastic surgeons and having the knowledge of the probable association between MH and these conditions could aware the dental and facial plastic surgeons and the anesthesiologists to be more vigilant.      Although MH workup leads to the definite diagnosis, no convincing intraoperative diagnostic tool has been introduced so far. Masseter spasm is a condition which might follow administration of depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents due to the slow tonic fibers of masseter and lateral pterygoid muscles (2-4. The severer forms of masseter spasm would

  10. Mathematical Modeling of the Consumption of Low Invasive Plastic Surgery Practices: The Case of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De la Poza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery practice grows continuously among the women in Western countries due to their body image dissatisfaction, aging anxiety, and an ideal body image propagated by the media. The consumption growth is so important that plastic surgery is becoming a normal practice among women, like any other cosmetic product, with the risk of suffering psychopathology disorders in the sense that plastic surgery could be employed as an instrument to recover personal self-esteem or even happiness. Plastic surgery practice depends on economic, demographic, and social contagion factors. In this paper, a mathematical epidemiological model to forecast female plastic surgery consumption in Spain is fully constructed. Overconsumer subpopulation is predicted and simulated. Robustness of the model versus uncertain parameters is studied throughout a sensitivity analysis.

  11. Measuring general surgery residents' communication skills from the patient's perspective using the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausmire, Julie M; Cashen, Constance P; Myerholtz, Linda; Buderer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) has been used and validated to assess Family and Emergency Medicine resident communication skills from the patient's perspective. However, it has not been previously reported as an outcome measure for general surgery residents. The purpose of this study is to establish initial benchmarking data for the use of the CAT as an evaluation tool in an osteopathic general surgery residency program. Results are analyzed quarterly and used by the program director to provide meaningful feedback and targeted goal setting for residents to demonstrate progressive achievement of interpersonal and communication skills with patients. The 14-item paper version of the CAT (developed by Makoul et al. for residency programs) asks patients to anonymously rate surgery residents on discrete communication skills using a 5-point rating scale immediately after the clinical encounter. Results are reported as the percentage of items rated as "excellent" (5) by the patient. The setting is a hospital-affiliated ambulatory urban surgery office staffed by the residency program. Participants are representative of adult patients of both sexes across all ages with diverse ethnic backgrounds. They include preoperative and postoperative patients, as well as those needing diagnostic testing and follow-up. Data have been collected on 17 general surgery residents from a single residency program representing 5 postgraduate year levels and 448 patient encounters since March 2012. The reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool for surgery residents was 0.98. The overall mean percentage of items rated as excellent was 70% (standard deviations = 42%), with a median of 100%. The CAT is a useful tool for measuring 1 facet of resident communication skills-the patient's perception of the physician-patient encounter. The tool provides a unique and personalized outcome measure for identifying communication strengths and improvement opportunities, allowing residents to receive

  12. The Evolution of Photography and Three-Dimensional Imaging in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Jason M; Stern, Carrie S; Schreiber, Jillian E; Amirlak, Bardia; Tepper, Oren M

    2017-03-01

    Throughout history, the technological advancements of conventional clinical photography in plastic surgery have not only refined the methods available to the plastic surgeon, but have invigorated the profession through technology. The technology of the once traditional two-dimensional photograph has since been revolutionized and refashioned to incorporate novel applications, which have since become the standard in clinical photography. Contrary to traditional standardized two-dimensional photographs, three-dimensional photography provides the surgeon with an invaluable volumetric and morphologic analysis by demonstrating true surface dimensions both preoperatively and postoperatively. Clinical photography has served as one of the fundamental objective means by which plastic surgeons review outcomes; however, the newer three-dimensional technology has been primarily used to enhance the preoperative consultation with surgical simulations. The authors intend to familiarize readers with the notion that three-dimensional photography extends well beyond its marketing application during surgical consultation. For the cosmetic surgeon, as the application of three-dimensional photography continues to mature in facial plastic surgery, it will continue to bypass the dated conventional photographic methods plastic surgeons once relied on. This article reviews a paradigm shift and provides a historical review of the fascinating evolution of photography in plastic surgery by highlighting the clinical utility of three-dimensional photography as an adjunct to plastic and reconstructive surgery practices. As three-dimensional photographic technology continues to evolve, its application in facial plastic surgery will provide an opportunity for a new objective standard in plastic surgery.

  13. The impact of advancing age on postoperative outcomes in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kevin; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Qin, Charles; Kim, John Y

    2015-11-01

    Age has been shown to be an independent predictor of complications in general surgery patients. In contrast, the effect of age on outcomes after plastic surgery has yet to be confirmed or refuted. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate a possible association between age and postoperative outcomes after plastic surgery. The 2005-2012 NSQIP database was retrospectively reviewed for all patients undergoing plastic surgery. Patients ≥60 years with procedures under the category of plastic surgery in NSQIP were selected for analysis. The primary outcome of interest was 30-day overall complication rates. Multivariate regression models were constructed to control for potential perioperative confounders. Of the 2,320,920 patients captured in the NSQIP database, 36,819 patients underwent plastic surgery and met inclusion criteria. The incidence of unadjusted overall complications increased with age with an overall complication rate of 9.0% in patients plastic surgery. Medical complications and mortality were more likely in extremes of age (>80 years). Age alone should not be included as a decisional factor in patients plastic surgery.

  14. A strategic approach to quality improvement and patient safety education and resident integration in a general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Heron, Colette T; Jarman, Benjamin T

    2014-01-01

    To outline a structured approach for general surgery resident integration into institutional quality improvement and patient safety education and development. A strategic plan to address Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Clinical Learning Environment Review assessments for resident integration into Quality Improvement and Patient Safety initiatives is described. Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation is an independent academic medical center graduating three categorical residents per year within an integrated multi-specialty health system serving 19 counties over 3 states. The quality improvement and patient safety education program includes a formal lecture series, online didactic sessions, mandatory quality improvement or patient safety projects, institutional committee membership, an opportunity to serve as a designated American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project and Quality in Training representative, mandatory morbidity and mortality conference attendance and clinical electives in rural surgery and international settings. Structured education regarding and participation in quality improvement and patient safety programs are able to be accomplished during general surgery residency. The long-term outcomes and benefits of these strategies are unknown at this time and will be difficult to measure with objective data. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  15. Canary in a coal mine: does the plastic surgery market predict the american economy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wendy W; Davis, Drew G; Son, Andrew K; Camp, Matthew C; Gupta, Subhas C

    2010-08-01

    Economic tools have been used in the past to predict the trends in plastic surgery procedures. Since 1992, U.S. cosmetic surgery volumes have increased overall, but the exact relationship between economic downturns and procedural volumes remains elusive. If an economic predicting role can be established from plastic surgery indicators, this could prove to be a very powerful tool. A rolling 3-month revenue average of an eight-plastic surgeon practice and various economic indicators were plotted and compared. An investigation of the U.S. procedural volumes was performed from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons statistics between 1996 and 2008. The correlations of different economic variables with plastic surgery volumes were evaluated. Lastly, search term frequencies were examined from 2004 to July of 2009 to study potential patient interest in major plastic surgery procedures. The self-payment revenue of the plastic surgery group consistently proved indicative of the market trends approximately 1 month in advance. The Standard and Poor's 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average, National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations, and Standard and Poor's Retail Index demonstrated a very close relationship with the income of our plastic surgery group. The frequency of Internet search terms showed a constant level of interest in the patient population despite economic downturns. The data demonstrate that examining plastic surgery revenue can be a useful tool to analyze and possibly predict trends, as it is driven by a market and shows a close correlation to many leading economic indicators. The persisting and increasing interest in plastic surgery suggests hope for a recovering and successful market in the near future.

  16. Psychological change after aesthetic plastic surgery: a prospective controlled outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy P; Harris, David L

    2009-10-01

    Aesthetic plastic surgery has been long practiced for primarily psychological rather than physical benefit to patients. However, evaluation of the psychological impact of aesthetic plastic surgery has often been of limited methodological rigor in both study design and appropriate measurement. This study is intended to evaluate the psychological impact of aesthetic surgery on patients seeking such intervention in regard to concerns about breasts, nose or upper limbs using standardised psychometric instruments. Participants were recruited through the Plastic Surgery Unit (Patients) and general surgery, ENT surgery and Maxillo-facial surgery (Comparisons) at a UK General Hospital. Outcome measures included the Crown-Crisp Experiential Inventory anxiety scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Derriford Appearance Scale-24, a valid and reliable measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. Data were collected pre-operatively (T1) and 3 months post-operatively (T2) for both groups. Longitudinal appearance adjustment for the plastic surgery group was also assessed at 12 months (T3). Both groups were less depressed and anxious post-operatively. The improvement in anxiety was significantly greater in the plastic surgery group. Body site specific appearance distress was significantly improved for the plastics group only, and the level of improvement was related to the body site affected.

  17. The benefits of international rotations to resource-limited settings for U.S. surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jaymie A; Groen, Reinou S; Price, Raymond R; Nwomeh, Benedict C; Kingham, T Peter; Hardy, Mark A; Kushner, Adam L

    2013-04-01

    U.S. surgery residents increasingly are interested in international experiences. Recently, the Residency Review Committee approved international surgery rotations for credit toward graduation. Despite this growing interest, few U.S. surgery residency programs offer formal international rotations. We aimed to present the benefits of international surgery rotations and how these rotations contribute to the attainment of the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. An e-mail-based survey was sent in November 2011 to the 188 members of Surgeons OverSeas, a group of surgeons, residents, fellows, and medical students with experience working in resource-limited settings. They were asked to list 5 benefits of international rotations for surgery residents. The frequency of benefits was qualitatively grouped into 4 major categories: educational, personal, benefits to the foreign institution/Global Surgery, and benefits to the home institution. The themes were correlated with the 6 ACGME competencies. The 58 respondents (31% response rate) provided a total of 295 responses. Fifty themes were identified. Top benefits included learning to optimally function with limited resources, exposure to a wide variety of operative pathology, exposure to a foreign culture, and forming relationships with local counterparts. All ACGME competencies were covered by the themes. International surgery rotations to locations in which resources are constrained, operative diseases vary, and patient diversity abound provide unique opportunities for surgery residents to attain the 6 ACGME competencies. General surgery residency programs should be encouraged to establish formal international rotations as part of surgery training to promote resident education and assist with necessary oversight. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  19. 76 FR 42713 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was... of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would be...

  20. Plastic Surgery on Children with Down Syndrome: Parents' Perceptions of Physical, Personal, and Social Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravetz, Shlomo; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study compared perceptions of parents of 19 children with Down's syndrome (DS) who had undergone plastic facial surgery with perceptions of parents of DS children who had not received surgery. The comparison found little evidence of positive impact of the surgery on parents' perceptions of their children's physical, personal, and social…

  1. Legal issues of computer imaging in plastic surgery: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, A E; Dagum, P; Koch, R J; Newman, J P

    1997-11-01

    Although plastic surgeons are increasingly incorporating computer imaging techniques into their practices, many fear the possibility of legally binding themselves to achieve surgical results identical to those reflected in computer images. Computer imaging allows surgeons to manipulate digital photographs of patients to project possible surgical outcomes. Some of the many benefits imaging techniques pose include improving doctor-patient communication, facilitating the education and training of residents, and reducing administrative and storage costs. Despite the many advantages computer imaging systems offer, however, surgeons understandably worry that imaging systems expose them to immense legal liability. The possible exploitation of computer imaging by novice surgeons as a marketing tool, coupled with the lack of consensus regarding the treatment of computer images, adds to the concern of surgeons. A careful analysis of the law, however, reveals that surgeons who use computer imaging carefully and conservatively, and adopt a few simple precautions, substantially reduce their vulnerability to legal claims. In particular, surgeons face possible claims of implied contract, failure to instruct, and malpractice from their use or failure to use computer imaging. Nevertheless, legal and practical obstacles frustrate each of those causes of actions. Moreover, surgeons who incorporate a few simple safeguards into their practice may further reduce their legal susceptibility.

  2. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. Materials and Methods: A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Conclusion: Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students. PMID:27013852

  3. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. Materials and Methods: A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Conclusion: Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students.

  4. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students.

  5. [Surgery training of gynecologic residents: master and student in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathat, G; Hoa, D; Gagnayre, R; Hoffet, M; Mares, P

    2008-02-01

    Describe the surgical training of gynecologic residents in the operating room, by collecting the opinion of French gynecologists. A questionnaire investigating this subject was put on a web site. Every French gynecologist could answer the questionnaire from a duration of six months. The data of the inquiry were studied by comparing five groups: residents (group 1), fellows (group 2), seniors of public hospital (group 3), and seniors of private hospitals (group 4), or, groups 2, 3 and 4 together, as Group A. Six hundred and fifty-seven gynecologists answered the inquiry. For the residents, lack of time and senior's weak educational motivation are the explanations most frequently retained in order to explain that residents do not operate. For group A, it is rather the residents' skills which is the most important fact to have residents operate. Residents more often practice surgery in general public hospital that in faculty hospital. For 31% of all the referees, heads of departments do not incite their teams to have residents operate. Nearly 25% of all the investigated believe that a man operates more than a woman in resident curriculum. Besides, by analyzing the answers of groups 1 and 2, we were able to correlate resident seniority at their first practice of 13 surgical operations. For 26% of the group A, residents operate less than they do during their own studies. Finally, all the investigated confirm the lack of surgical assessment in the resident curriculum. Decision to let the resident operate remains too dependent on senior personal appreciation and does not seem to join a strategy of training. Opinions of surgical training in the operating room is different between residents and seniors. Operating time increases when residents operate but there is no effect on quality of care. These results show again the necessity of a formal teaching and assessment, in a resident program with objectives, collecting every resident's surgery volume. These educational

  6. Effect of residents' previous laparoscopic surgery experience on initial robotic suturing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Walsh, Teresa M; Borahay, Mostafa; Zeybek, Burak; Wen, Michael; Breitkopf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of gynecology residents' previous laparoscopic experience on the learning curve of robotic suturing techniques and the value of initial structured teaching in dry lab prior to surgery. Methods. Thirteen gynecology residents with no previous robotic surgery experience were divided into Group 1, consisting of residents with 2 or fewer laparoscopic experiences, and Group 2, consisting of residents with 3 or more laparoscopic experiences. Group 1 had a dry-laboratory training in suturing prior to their initial experience in the operating room. Results. For all residents, it took on average 382 ± 159 seconds for laparoscopic suturing and 326 ± 196 seconds for robotic suturing (P = 0.12). Residents in Group 1 had a lower mean suture time than residents in Group 2 for laparoscopic suturing (P = 0.009). The residents in Group 2, however, had a lower mean suture time on the robot compared to Group 1 (P = 0.5). Conclusion. Residents with previous laparoscopic suturing experience may gain more from a robotic surgery experience than those with limited laparoscopic surgery experience. In addition, dry lab training is more efficient than hands-on training in the initial phase of teaching for both laparoscopic and robotic suturing skills.

  7. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...

  8. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  9. Surgisis acellular collagen matrix in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery soft tissue applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Robert F

    2009-04-01

    Tissue engineering in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery remains an elusive goal. The advent of Surgisis extracellular collagen matrix and its performance characteristics suggest that the use of a bioengineered tissue substitute can meet some of our reconstructive requirements. Incorporation and replacement by host tissue with minimal allergic or immune response seems to be achievable today. The ability to engineer the device, the ready availability of substrate, and its cost effectiveness support the use of Surgisis in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery applications. Future product innovations and engineering seem promising. The permanent role of Surgisis in aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery will be determined by its documented long-term performance.

  10. The bioethics of separating conjoined twins in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Gosain, Arun K; Becker, Devra

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of craniopagus twins approximates four to six per 10 million births. Although rare, surgical separation of conjoined twins poses significant technical and ethical challenges. The present report uses the case of craniopagus twins AD and TD to examine the bioethical issues faced by a multidisciplinary medical team in planning the separation of craniopagus twins. AD and TD are craniopagus twins conjoined at the head. TD's head is conjoined to the back of AD's head. Neurologically, AD has the dominant cerebral circulation. TD has two normal kidneys, whereas AD has none. AD depends on TD's renal function and, on separation, will require either a kidney transplant or lifelong dialysis. This case report reviews one approach to analyzing and solving complex ethical dilemmas in pediatric plastic surgery. The principles reviewed are (1) autonomy and informed consent, focusing especially on the role of children in the informed consent process; (2) beneficence and nonmaleficence, two intricately intertwined principles because separation could potentially cause irreversible harm to one twin while improving the quality of life for the other (as separation is not a life-saving procedure, is it ethical to perform a procedure with unknown surgical risk to improve children's quality of life?); and (3) justice (is it fair to allocate excessive medical resources for the twins' separation?). The present report explores the ethics behind such decisions with respect to the separation of conjoined twins.

  11. Plastic surgery trends parallel Playboy magazine: the pudenda preoccupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placik, Otto J; Arkins, John P

    2014-09-01

    Aesthetic vulvovaginal procedures are being performed with increased frequency. Many experts have suggested that the growing demand for these procedures relates to the availability and revealing nature of nude images on the Internet and in other media. The authors examined chronologically organized nude photographs from a popular magazine and objectively measured the position of the vulva relative to the center of focus to observe trends for the past 6 decades. Playboy magazine centerfold photographs from 1954 to 2013 were analyzed and categorized. The positions of the vaginal area (V-line) and the breast area (N-line) were measured in relation to the horizontal midline of the photograph. Images also were assessed for degree of grooming and exposure of the breast and pubic areas, as well as visibility of the pudendal cleft, labia majora, and labia minora. Four hundred ninety images met inclusion criteria for the analysis. Full exposure of the V-line increased from 0 instances in the 1950s to 78.6% of images from 2010 through 2013 (P<.001). Moreover, the V-line position became 41.0% closer to the photographic midline (P=.045). The results demonstrate a trend toward increased visibility and prominence of the female genitalia as the focal point of popular nude photographs. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of plastic surgery information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejurikar, Sameer S; Rovak, Jason M; Kuzon, William M; Chung, Kevin C; Kotsis, Sandra V; Cederna, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    The Internet allows vast access to medical information. Unlike most plastic surgery literature, the Internet is a quagmire of unfiltered information, not subject to peer review. To assess the accuracy of medical information on the Internet the authors studied one commonly performed elective procedure, classifying and defining the information retrieved. Using the keyword "breast augmentation," the authors compiled a list of the first 300 web sites, obtained from six distinct search engines, yielding 215 unique sites. They devised an instrument to evaluate each site for its accessibility, relevance, and accuracy. Of the 215 unique web sites evaluated, 20 were inaccessible, 24 were irrelevant, and 41 contained no medical information. Of the remaining 130 sites, almost 34% contained false or misleading information. Errors pertained most often to the technical details of the operation, potential benefits, and risks. In addition, exaggerated claims concerning alternative breast enhancement regimens, adverse sequelae of silicone breast implants, and potential effects on lactation were also seen commonly. A considerable amount of information regarding breast augmentation on the Internet was either misleading or inaccurate. Physicians can assist their patients with specific guidelines to allow them to process information discerningly, thereby diminishing the likelihood that medical decisions are based on misinformation.

  13. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  14. Plastic Surgery and the Breast: A Citation Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac W. Joyce, MB BCh

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This study has identified the most influential articles on breast in the plastic surgery literature over the past 68 years and highlighted many important scientific breakthroughs and landmarks that have occurred during this time.

  15. Fundraising and philanthropy in plastic surgery: an essential tool for academic excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Michael L; Ahmad, Jamil; Rohrich, Rod J

    2011-05-01

    In a time of multiple economic challenges in healthcare and society as a whole, academic plastic surgery units are also struggling to support teaching initiatives, research programs, and poorly remunerative patient care activities. A practical, available, and realistic solution is the establishment of formal fundraising and philanthropic efforts within plastic surgery divisions, sections, and departments. An understanding of donors and their motivations and how the fundraising process operates can lead to a successful long-term fundraising effort, benefitting various areas of the academic plastic surgery unit. Fundraising and philanthropic efforts are essential for the continued success and survival of academic plastic surgery units and will be requisite to ensure that education, research, and clinical programs flourish well into the future.

  16. Rising up to the challenge in Plastic Surgery in Nigeria | Oluwatosin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The environment for the practice of Plastic Surgery in Nigeria has become ... Conclusion: Although myriads of problems which include inadequate ... are challenged to rise up to the challenge of ensuring global best practices.

  17. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p < 0.03) from the converging learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents. PMID:20591159

  18. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  19. The use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nehme

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Robot-assisted plastic and reconstructive surgery provides clinical outcomes comparable to conventional techniques. Advantages include reported improved cosmesis, functional outcomes and greater surgeon comfort. Disadvantages included longer operating and set-up times, a learning curve, breaking of microneedles, high monetary costs and authors consistently recommended improved end-effectors. All authors were optimistic about the use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  20. MIS training in Canada: a national survey of general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Alia; Vergis, Ashley; Jimenez, Carolina; Green, Jessica; Pryor, Aurora; Schlachta, Christopher M; Okrainec, Allan

    2011-09-01

    General surgery trainees' perceptions regarding their own laparoscopic training remain poorly defined. The objective of this survey was to identify and evaluate learner experiences with laparoscopic procedures in general surgery programs on a national level. Two hundred eighty-four residents were identified and contacted at English-speaking general surgery programs across Canada. Each was asked to complete a web- or paper-based survey regarding their demographics, experiences with basic and advanced minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedures, and perceived barriers to training. Two hundred fifty-two of 284 (89%) surveyed residents responded. Eighty-seven percent of the residents had access to a skills lab that taught MIS techniques; however, standardized MIS curricula were implemented 53% of the time. Eighty percent of residents felt that skills lab training translated to improved performance in the OR. Although 90% of residents felt that they would be comfortable performing basic laparoscopic procedures, only 8% stated they would be comfortable performing advanced procedures at the end of their training. Moreover, 90% of general surgery residents felt that it was the academic surgical department's responsibility to teach both basic and advanced procedures, and 35% of respondents felt their surgical program was meeting this requirement. Half of the residents felt they had limited opportunity to be a primary surgeon because an MIS fellow was present. There exists a wide disparity between the expectations of residents and their actual experience. The majority of residents are concerned that they will not acquire sufficient laparoscopic skills during their training to perform advanced cases in practice. Additionally, the balance between resident and fellow-level cases needs to be more clearly defined as the majority of respondents identified the presence of a MIS fellow as a negative learning influence. Finally, although most centers had a surgical skills lab, 47% of

  1. Are Nursing Students Appropriate Partners for the Interdisciplinary Training of Surgery Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Ingram, Katherine M; Williams, Kristy H; Bencken, Crystal L; Swiderski, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team training in a simulation center recreates clinical team interactions and holds promise in improving teamwork of clinicians by breaking down educational silos. The objective of our study was to assess the appropriateness of interdisciplinary training with general surgery residents and nursing students. Over 2 consecutive academic years (2012-2013 and 2013-2014), general surgery residents participated in interdisciplinary team-training simulation-based sessions with senior nursing students. Scenario objectives included demonstration of appropriate teamwork and communication, and clinical decision making; sessions incorporated interdisciplinary debriefing of the scenarios. Participants were asked to assess their team-training experience and the appropriateness of their team-training partner. Responses were compared. A total of 16 team-training sessions were conducted during the study period. Overall, 12 surgery residents (67%) and 44 nursing students (63%) who had participated in at least 1 session responded to the survey. Although both residents and nursing students indicated that the knowledge and team skills acquired during these sessions were useful to them in clinical practice (73% vs 86%, respectively; p = not significant), residents rated their educational value lower (3.3 vs 4.3 on a 5-point scale, respectively; p nursing students (p nursing students, debriefing (91%), observation of others (68%), and interaction with resident physicians (66%) ranked highest; 48% of student nurses preferred residents as team-training partners whereas 100% residents preferred practicing nurses and 0% with nursing students owing to their limited clinical experience. Interdisciplinary team training and debriefing of surgery residents with nursing students is feasible and highly valued by nursing students. Nevertheless, our experience indicates that residents do not prefer nursing students as team-training partners owing to their limited clinical experience

  2. The Effect of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Plastic Surgery Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Adam; Pace, Elizabeth; Reintgen, Christian; Mast, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    Medical research has a long history of joint venture between commercial entities and nonindustry researchers. Significant concern exists among accrediting bodies for medical education and federal granting agencies that conflicts of interest (COIs) exist that affect the validity of the research. This study evaluates the legitimacy of this concern.All clinical breast and cosmetic articles in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Annals of Plastic Surgery were reviewed for calendar year 2013. If a financial disclosure was present, the article was then reviewed to determine if the subject/findings were in favor of the commercial conflict and, if so, whether the study was valid. To assess plastic surgery versus other specialties, articles from Dermatology and Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery were similarly reviewed from January to April of 2013.Two hundred seventy-two clinical articles were reviewed. Only 15 (5.5%) had a true COI: the article's findings favored the commercial interest of at least 1 author: for each journal, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 7.7%; Annals of Plastic Surgery, 3.3%; Dermatology, 2.2%; Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 7.5%. Conflicts of interest were not statistically significant between pooled articles of plastic surgery versus dermatology/orthopedics. However, COI was statistically greater (P = 0.05) in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery compared with Annals and Dermatology.Despite public and regulatory concerns, this assessment demonstrates that the peer-review process of leading journals polices true COIs. Published articles provide sound research despite presumed COIs. As such, the integrity and validity of published research remain high.

  3. The role of primary plastic surgery in the management of open fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court-Brown, Charles M; Honeyman, Calum S; Clement, Nick D; Hamilton, Stuart A; McQueen, Margaret M

    2015-12-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the requirement for primary plastic surgery in the treatment of open fractures. We reviewed 3297 consecutive open fractures in a 22-year period in a defined population. Analysis showed that 12.6% of patients required primary plastic surgery with 5.6% being treated with split skin grafting and 7.2% with a flap. Only 3.5% of open upper limb fractures required primary plastic surgery compared to 27.9% of open lower limb fractures. The fractures that required most primary plastic surgery were those of the femoral diaphysis and all fractures between the proximal tibia and the midfoot. The incidence of open fractures that require primary plastic surgery was 28/10(6)/year. The incidence in open upper and lower limb fractures was 5.3/10(6)/year and 22.7/10(6)/year respectively. Using these figures it is possible to estimate the numbers of open fractures that will require primary plastic surgery each year in the United Kingdom.

  4. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training in the United States: what can we learn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y F

    2017-04-09

    China is currently in the process of establishing formal residency training programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery and other medical and dental specialties. Regulatory agencies, and educational and academic institutions in China are exploring mechanisms, goals and standards of residency training that meet the needs of the Chinese healthcare system. This article provides an introduction of residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United States, with emphasis on the accreditation standard by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. As there are fundamental differences in the medical and dental education systems between China and United States, the training standards in the United States may not be entirely applicable in China. A competency-based training model that focus on overall competencies in medical knowledge, clinical skills and values at the time of graduation should be taken into consideration in a Chinese residency training program in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  5. Intraoperative flap complications in lasik surgery performed by ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Romero-Diaz-de-Leon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  6. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeer Ahmad Wani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. Results: During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. Conclusions: This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  7. Dr. J. F. S. Esser and his influence on the development of plastic and reconstructive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Haeseker (Barend)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractJan F.S. Esser (1877-1946) was a remarkable and gifled Dutch surgeon whose contributions to plastic and reconstructive surgery, made long befare this specialty was recognised as a branch of surgery, are part of our surgical heritage. His interest in the bloodsupply of skin flaps was the

  8. Current status of residency training in laparoscopic surgery in Brazil: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nácul, Miguel Prestes; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti; de Melo, Marco Cezário

    2015-01-01

    The surgeon's formation process has changed in recent decades. The increase in medical schools, new specialties and modern technologies induce an overhaul of medical education. Medical residency in surgery has established itself as a key step in the formation of the surgeon, and represents the ideal and natural way for teaching laparoscopy. However, the introduction of laparoscopic surgery in the medical residency programs in surgical specialties is insufficient, creating the need for additional training after its termination. To review the surgical teaching ways used in services that published their results. Survey of relevant publications in books, internet and databases in PubMed, Lilacs and Scielo through july 2014 using the headings: laparoscopy; simulation; education, medical; learning; internship and residency. The training method for medical residency in surgery focused on surgical procedures in patients under supervision, has proven successful in the era of open surgery. However, conceptually turns as a process of experimentation in humans. Psychomotor learning must not be developed directly to the patient. Training in laparoscopic surgery requires the acquisition of psychomotor skills through training conducted initially with surgical simulation. Platforms based teaching problem solving as the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery, developed by the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgery and the Laparoscopic Surgical Skills proposed by the European Society of Endoscopic Surgery has been widely used both for education and for the accreditation of surgeons worldwide. The establishment of a more appropriate pedagogical process for teaching laparoscopic surgery in the medical residency programs is mandatory in order to give a solid surgical education and to determine a structured and safe professional activity.

  9. Teaching the Surgical Craft: Surgery Residents Perception of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching methods including supervised exposure to graded operative experience and ... residents evaluated 33 variables that might have an impact on ... using Mann‑Whitney test. Statistical ... Operating theater atmosphere subscale had the highest score of 79.2% while .... In the operating theater I don't like being corrected.

  10. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all......INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  11. Self-citation rate and impact factor in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2017-05-09

    Journal ranking based on the impact factor (IF) can be distorted by self-citation. The aim of this study is to investigate the present status of self-citation in the plastic surgery journals and its effect on the journals' IFs. IF, IF without self-citations (corrected IF), self-cited rate, and self-citing rate for 11 plastic surgery journals were investigated from 2009-2015, by reviewing the Journal Citation Report(®). The correlations of the IF with the self-cited rate and the self-citing rate were statistically assessed. In addition, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was compared with 15 top journals from other surgical specialties in 2015. IF was significantly correlated with the self-cited rate (R: 0.594, p = 0.001) and the self-citing rate (R: 0.824, p journals from other surgical specialties. The IFs of Microsurgery and Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery increased greatly in recent years, but they were inflated by high self-cited and self-citing rates. The self-citation rate positively affects the IF in plastic surgery journals. A high concentration of self-citation of some journals could distort the ranking among plastic surgery journals in general.

  12. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Social media in plastic surgery practices: emerging trends in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Chad K; Said, Hakim; Prucz, Roni; Rodrich, Rod J; Mathes, David W

    2011-05-01

    Social media is a common term for web-based applications that offer a way to disseminate information to a targeted audience in real time. In the current market, many businesses are utilizing it to communicate with clients. Although the field of plastic surgery is constantly changing in response to innovative technologies introduced into the specialty, the utilization of social media in plastic surgery practices is currently unclear. The authors evaluate the current attitudes and practices of aesthetic surgeons to emerging social media technology and compare these to attitudes about more traditional modes of communication. A 19-question web-based survey was disseminated by e-mail to all board-certified or board-eligible American plastic surgeons (n = 4817). Respondents were asked to answer questions on three topics: (1) their use of social media in their personal and professional lives, (2) their various forms of practice marketing, and (3) their demographic information. There were 1000 responses (20.8%). Results showed that 28.2% of respondents used social media in their practice, while 46.7% used it in their personal life. Most plastic surgeons managed their social media themselves or through a staff member. The majority of respondents who used social media in their practice claimed that their efforts were directed toward patient referrals. The typical plastic surgery practice that used social media was a solo practice in a large city with a focus on cosmetic surgery. Local competition of plastic surgeons did not correlate with social media use. Most plastic surgeons (88%) advertised, but the form of marketing varied. The most common forms included websites, print, and search engine optimization, but other modalities, such as television, radio, and billboards, were still utilized. Social media represents a new avenue that many plastic surgeons are utilizing, although with trepidation. As social media becomes commonplace in society, its role in plastic surgery

  14. 75 FR 61507 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was... Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would be held on November 18, 2010. On...

  15. Face recognition via edge-based Gabor feature representation for plastic surgery-altered images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chude-Olisah, Chollette C.; Sulong, Ghazali; Chude-Okonkwo, Uche A. K.; Hashim, Siti Z. M.

    2014-12-01

    Plastic surgery procedures on the face introduce skin texture variations between images of the same person (intra-subject), thereby making the task of face recognition more difficult than in normal scenario. Usually, in contemporary face recognition systems, the original gray-level face image is used as input to the Gabor descriptor, which translates to encoding some texture properties of the face image. The texture-encoding process significantly degrades the performance of such systems in the case of plastic surgery due to the presence of surgically induced intra-subject variations. Based on the proposition that the shape of significant facial components such as eyes, nose, eyebrow, and mouth remains unchanged after plastic surgery, this paper employs an edge-based Gabor feature representation approach for the recognition of surgically altered face images. We use the edge information, which is dependent on the shapes of the significant facial components, to address the plastic surgery-induced texture variation problems. To ensure that the significant facial components represent useful edge information with little or no false edges, a simple illumination normalization technique is proposed for preprocessing. Gabor wavelet is applied to the edge image to accentuate on the uniqueness of the significant facial components for discriminating among different subjects. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on the Georgia Tech (GT) and the Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW) databases with illumination and expression problems, and the plastic surgery database with texture changes. Results show that the proposed edge-based Gabor feature representation approach is robust against plastic surgery-induced face variations amidst expression and illumination problems and outperforms the existing plastic surgery face recognition methods reported in the literature.

  16. Current and future applications of nanotechnology in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K Petersen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although nanotechnology is a relatively young field, there are countless biomedical applications in use or under investigation. Many specialties have benefitted from nanoscale refinements of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Plastic and reconstructive surgery is an incredibly diverse specialty, encompassing craniofacial and hand surgery; trauma, oncologic and congenital reconstruction; burn care, and aesthetic surgery. Advances in nanotechnology have significantly impacted wound management, topical skin care, implant and prosthetic design, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems. Currently, plastic surgeons are researching the utility of nanoscale tools for bone regeneration, bone prosthetics, and drug delivery. Nanotechnology will continue to build upon preceding discoveries, and its biomedical applications in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery will expand significantly.

  17. Attitudes toward professionalism education in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brent G; Stadler, Michael E; Poetker, David M

    2015-02-01

    Resident professionalism development is important for physician training and patient care. Meaningful professionalism curriculum requires collaboration between learners and educators. We aimed to better understand attitudes of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (OHNS) program directors (PDs) and residents toward professionalism education. Prospective survey. We identified contemporary methods of professionalism evaluation and education and formulated questions to assess attitudes toward professionalism education. Surveys were electronically distributed to 104 PDs who were asked to forward a separate survey to residents. The resident survey was completed by 110 OHNS residents, and the PD survey was completed by 33 OHNS PDs. The majority of residents (78%) and faculty (84%) believed professionalism could be taught. Role modeling (93%) and morbidity and mortality conference (90%) were the most common methods of education. Faculty questionnaires (100%) and nursing/ancillary staff questionnaires (93%) were the most common methods of resident evaluation. The majority of residents considered faculty mentoring (66%) and small group discussions (56%) to be useful methods for teaching professionalism, whereas only 14% considered formal lectures useful. Residents valued questionnaires by faculty (98%), medical staff (97%), and patients (94%) for professionalism evaluation. We are the first to study OHNS residents and PDs attitudes toward professionalism evaluation and education. Residents value mentoring programs and small group sessions rather than formal didactics and value evaluation from multiple sources. Programs should consider incorporating these specific educational and evaluative methods into their professionalism curricula. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (Porthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.].

  20. The value of resident teaching to improve student perceptions of surgery clerkships and surgical career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Lorin D; Estes, Norman C; Ash, Jennifer; Meyer, Lynne E

    2006-03-01

    A fundamental function of attending faculty is to teach and mentor medical students, but the benefit of the resident's role is recognized increasingly. Our Standardized Institutional Clinical Clerkship Assessment allows students to rate 27 factors relative to a clinical clerkship. Scores from 1998 to 2005 were used to evaluate our surgical clerkship program and to compare resident and attending teachers. Student surgery career choices also were monitored. Medical students routinely scored residents more highly than attending faculty. Attendings' scores did not improve; however, residents' teaching and overall clerkship scores improved during the study period and paralleled students' increased selection of a surgical career. Students perceived residents as teachers more than attendings. Residents may have significant influence over students' career choice by their teaching and mentoring activities, which benefit attending efforts.

  1. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  2. Optimizing the Selection of General Surgery Residents: A National Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louridas, Marisa; Szasz, Peter; Montbrun, Sandra de; Harris, Kenneth A; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    Surgical programs strive to recruit trainees who will graduate as competent surgeons; however, selection processes vary between institutions. The purpose of the present study was to (1) solicit program directors' (PDs) opinions on the proportion of trainees who have difficulty achieving competence and (2) establish consensus on the desired attributes of general surgery (GS) candidates and the technical skills that would be most indicative of future performance. Delphi consensus methodology was used. An open-ended questionnaire, followed by a closed-ended questionnaire, formulated as a 5-point Likert scale, was administered. A Cronbach α ≥ 0.8 with 80% of responses in agreement (4-agree and 5-strongly agree) determined the threshold for consensus. The first and second rounds were completed by 14 and 11, of a potential 17, GS PDs, respectively. PDs felt that 5% or less of trainees have difficulty reaching competence in clinical knowledge, 5% to 10% in decision-making, and 5% to 15% in technical skill by the time of completion of training. Consensus was excellent (α = 0.92). The top attributes for success in GS included work ethic and passion for surgery. Technical skills that felt to be most appropriate were open tasks (one-handed tie and subcuticular suture) and laparoscopic tasks (coordination, grasping, and cutting). PDs indicate that of the 3 domains, the largest proportion of trainees had difficulty reaching competence in technical skill. Consensus among PDs suggests that top personal attributes include work ethic and passion for surgery. Consensus of technical tasks for inclusion into selection was basic open and laparoscopic skills. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Are general surgery residents adequately prepared for hepatopancreatobiliary fellowships? A questionnaire-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Houssam; Parikh, Janak; Patel, Shirali; Jeyarajah, D Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted to assess the preparedness of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) fellows upon entering fellowship, identify challenges encountered by HPB fellows during the initial part of their HPB training, and identify potential solutions to these challenges that can be applied during residency training. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all HPB fellows in accredited HPB fellowship programmes in two consecutive academic years (n = 42). Reponses were then analysed. Results A total of 19 (45%) fellows responded. Prior to their fellowship, 10 (53%) were in surgical residency and the rest were in other surgical fellowships or surgical practice. Thirteen (68%) were graduates of university-based residency programmes. All fellows felt comfortable in performing basic laparoscopic procedures independently at the completion of residency and less comfortable in performing advanced laparoscopy. Eight (42%) fellows cited a combination of inadequate case volume and lack of autonomy during residency as the reasons for this lack of comfort. Thirteen (68%) identified inadequate preoperative workup and management as their biggest fear upon entering practice after general surgery training. A total of 17 (89%) fellows felt they were adequately prepared to enter HPB fellowship. Extra rotations in transplant, vascular or minimally invasive surgery were believed to be most helpful in preparing general surgery residents pursing HPB fellowships. Conclusions Overall, HPB fellows felt themselves to be adequately prepared for fellowship. Advanced laparoscopic procedures and the perioperative management of complex patients are two of the challenges facing HPB fellows. General surgery residents who plan to pursue an HPB fellowship may benefit from spending extra rotations on certain subspecialties. Focus on perioperative workup and management should be an integral part of residency and fellowship training. PMID:25387852

  4. Urology residents training in laparoscopic surgery. Development of a virtual reality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Baños, J L; Ballestero-Diego, R; Truan-Cacho, D; Aguilera-Tubet, C; Villanueva-Peña, A; Manuel-Palazuelos, J C

    2015-11-01

    The training and learning of residents in laparoscopic surgery has legal, financial and technological limitations. Simulation is an essential tool in the training of residents as a supplement to their training in laparoscopic surgery. The training should be structured in an appropriate environment, with previously established and clear objectives, taught by professionals with clinical and teaching experience in simulation. The training should be conducted with realistic models using animals and ex-vivo tissue from animals. It is essential to incorporate mechanisms to assess the objectives during the residents' training progress. We present the training model for laparoscopic surgery for urology residents at the University Hospital Valdecilla. The training is conducted at the Virtual Hospital Valdecilla, which is associated with the Center for Medical Simulation in Boston and is accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The model is designed in 3 blocks, basic for R1, intermediate for R2-3 and advanced for R4-5, with 9 training modules. The training is conducted in 4-hour sessions for 4 afternoons, for 3 weeks per year of residence. Residents therefore perform 240 hours of simulated laparoscopic training by the end of the course. For each module, we use structured objective assessments to measure each resident's training progress. Since 2003, 9 urology residents have been trained, in addition to the 5 who are currently in training. The model has undergone changes according to the needs expressed in the student feedback. The acquisition of skills in a virtual reality model has enabled the safe transfer of those skills to actual practice. A laparoscopic surgery training program designed in structured blocks and with progressive complexity provides appropriate training for transferring the skills acquired using this model to an actual scenario while maintaining patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Learning styles vary among general surgery residents: analysis of 12 years of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Joshua M V; Fischer, David R; Anderson, Andrea; James, Laura E; Nussbaum, Michael S; Bower, Robert H; Pritts, Timothy A

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the learning styles of individuals may assist in the tailoring of an educational program to optimize learning. General surgery faculty and residents have been characterized previously as having a tendency toward particular learning styles. We seek to understand better the learning styles of general surgery residents and differences that may exist within the population. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory was administered yearly to general surgery residents at the University of Cincinnati from 1994 to 2006. This tool allows characterization of learning styles into 4 groups: converging, accommodating, assimilating, and diverging. The converging learning style involves education by actively solving problems. The accommodating learning style uses emotion and interpersonal relationships. The assimilating learning style learns by abstract logic. The diverging learning style learns best by observation. Chi-square analysis and analysis of variance were performed to determine significance. Surveys from 1994 to 2006 (91 residents, 325 responses) were analyzed. The prevalent learning style was converging (185, 57%), followed by assimilating (58, 18%), accommodating (44, 14%), and diverging (38, 12%). At the PGY 1 and 2 levels, male and female residents differed in learning style, with the accommodating learning style being relatively more frequent in women and assimilating learning style more frequent in men (Table 1, p learning style did not seem to change with advancing PGY level within the program, which suggests that individual learning styles may be constant throughout residency training. If a resident's learning style changed, it tended to be to converging. In addition, no relation exists between learning style and participation in dedicated basic science training or performance on the ABSIT/SBSE. Our data suggests that learning style differs between male and female general surgery residents but not with PGY level or ABSIT/SBSE performance. A greater

  6. [Independence in Plastic Surgery - Benefit or Barrier? Analysis of the Publication Performance in Academic Plastic Surgery Depending on Varying Organisational Structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, C D; Leitsch, S; Haertnagl, F; Haas, E M; Giunta, R E

    2015-08-01

    Despite its recognition as an independent specialty, at German university hospitals the field of plastic surgery is still underrepresented in terms of independent departments with a dedicated research focus. The aim of this study was to analyse the publication performance within the German academic plastic surgery environment and to compare independent departments and dependent, subordinate organisational structures regarding their publication performance. Organisational structures and number of attending doctors in German university hospitals were examined via a website analysis. A pubmed analysis was applied to assess the publication performance (number of publications, cumulative impact factor, impact factor/publication, number of publications/MD, number of publications/unit) between 2009 and 2013. In a journal analysis the distribution of the cumulative impact factor and number of publications in different journals as well as the development of the impact factor in the top journals were analysed. Out of all 35 university hospitals there exist 12 independent departments for plastic surgery and 8 subordinate organisational structures. In 15 university hospitals there were no designated plastic surgery units. The number of attending doctors differed considerably between independent departments (3.6 attending doctors/unit) and subordinate organisational structures (1.1 attending doctors/unit). The majority of publications (89.0%) and of the cumulative impact factor (91.2%) as well as most of the publications/MD (54 publications/year) and publications/unit (61 publications/year) were created within the independent departments. Only in departments top publications with an impact factor > 5 were published. In general a negative trend regarding the number of publications (- 13.4%) and cumulative impact factor (- 28.9%) was observed. 58.4% of all publications were distributed over the top 10 journals. Within the latter the majority of articles were published in

  7. Quality of Life and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Carolina; Tenório, Juliana L.C.; Saltz, Renato; Ely, Pedro B.; Ferrão, Ygor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in plastic surgery. However, authors use different scales to address this subject, making it difficult to compare the outcomes. To address this discrepancy, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a random effect meta-analysis. Methods: The search was made in two electronic databases (LILACS and PUBMED) using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to aesthetic plastic surgery and QoL. We performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of the gathered data. We calculated a random effect meta-analysis with Der Simonian and Laird as variance estimator to compare pre- and postoperative QoL standardized mean difference. To check if there is difference between aesthetic surgeries, we compared reduction mammoplasty to other aesthetic surgeries. Results: Of 1,715 identified, 20 studies were included in the qualitative analysis and 16 went through quantitative analysis. The random effect of all aesthetic surgeries shows that QoL improved after surgery. Reduction mammoplasty has improved QoL more than other procedures in social functioning and physical functioning domains. Conclusions: Aesthetic plastic surgery increases QoL. Reduction mammoplasty seems to have better improvement compared with other aesthetic surgeries.

  8. Identifying and Eliminating Deficiencies in the General Surgery Resident Core Competency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Nicole M; Milewicz, Allen; Whitney, Stephen E; Liang, Michael K; Braxton, Carla C

    2014-06-01

    Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has defined 6 core competencies required of resident education, no consensus exists on best practices for reaching resident proficiency. Surgery programs must develop resourceful methods to incorporate learning. While patient care and medical knowledge are approached with formal didactics and traditional Halstedian educational formats, other core competencies are presumed to be learned on the job or emphasized in conferences. To test the hypothesis that our residents lack a foundation in several of the nonclinical core competencies and to seek to develop a formal curriculum that can be integrated into our current didactic time, with minimal effect on resident work hours and rest hours. Anonymous Likert-type scale needs assessment survey requesting residents within a large single general surgery residency program to rate their understanding, working knowledge, or level of comfort on the following 10 topics: negotiation and conflict resolution; leadership styles; health care legislation; principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement; business of medicine; clinical practice models; role of advocacy in health care policy and government; personal finance management; team building; and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery. Proportions of resident responses scored as positive (agree or strongly agree) or negative (disagree or strongly disagree). In total, 48 surgery residents (70%) responded to the survey. Only 3 topics (leadership styles, team building, and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery) had greater than 70% positive responses, while 2 topics (negotiation and conflict resolution and principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement) had greater than 60% positive responses. The remaining topics had less than 40% positive responses, with the least positive responses on the topics

  9. The polymerase chain reaction and its application to clinical plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rea, S

    2012-02-03

    Molecular biology has become an essential component in many fields of modern medical research, including plastic surgery. Research into the molecular mechanisms underlying many disease processes offer increased understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and provide exciting therapeutic possibilities. Yet for many clinicians, the presentation of much research into molecular biological processes is couched in confusing terminology and based on scientific techniques, the basis of which are frequently difficult for the clinician to understand. The purpose of this review is to present an introduction to some of the molecular biological techniques currently in use, namely the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and explore its applications to different aspects of plastic surgery. This review explores the role PCR now plays in all aspects of modern plastic surgery practise, with particular emphasis on normal and abnormal wound healing, the diagnosis of craniofacial anomalies, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer including melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and burns.

  10. Better to light a candle: Arthur Barsky and global plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher D; Barsky, Emily; Hagander, Lars; Barsky, Arthur J; Meara, John G

    2013-08-01

    Plastic and reconstructive surgery has had a long history with international humanitarian efforts. As the field of global surgery continues to gain momentum in academic centers throughout the world, the role of the surgical subspecialist in the public health infrastructure of low-resource communities has also begun to gain a new sense of wonder and importance. Arthur Barsky, Jr was arguably one of the most influential forefathers of global plastic surgery. Throughout his notable career spanning most of the 20th century, Barsky remained dedicated to delivering plastic and reconstructive surgical care to the disadvantaged worldwide, as well as educating others to do the same. Although he was not the first surgeon with an interest in global health, Barsky's work was unique and influential in its originality, magnitude, and scope. An appreciation and understanding of Barsky's groundbreaking work will help inform the future development of sustainable surgical systems in resource-poor settings.

  11. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, Porthopedic surgery residents.

  12. Where have all the cardiothoracic surgery residents gone? Placement of graduating residents by United States thoracic surgery training programs, 1998 to 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Grayson H; Lee, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We studied the evolving job placement trends of graduating cardiothoracic surgery residents over a 5-year period from the perspective of the program director. Graduate placement questionnaires were sent to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited United States thoracic surgery residency programs (n = 92). Program directors were asked to categorize the type of job that each resident chose upon graduation (1998-2002). Of the program directors surveyed, 71.7% (66/92) responded, representing 76.4% (545/714) of the total graduating resident population during the study period. Three-year training programs constituted 24.2% (16/66) of the respondents and accounted for 20.2% (110/545) of the graduates. Annually, graduates most commonly chose private practice jobs. Between 2001 and 2002, the percentage of graduates entering fellowships increased (11.8% [13/110] versus 19.1% [21/110], P = .008) as the percentage of graduates choosing private practice positions decreased (56.4% [62/110] versus 45.5% [50/110], P = .15). In total, 12.8% (70/545) of the graduates pursued fellowships, with associated specialty choices being: 38.6% (27/70) adult cardiac, 37.1% (26/70) congenital, 15.7% (11/70) transplantation, and 8.6% (6/70) thoracic. There were no significant differences between 2-year and 3-year training program graduates in choice of private practice versus academic jobs. In 2002, a greater percentage of graduates chose to pursue fellowship training at the expense of private practice employment. This difference may in part result from fewer employment opportunities rather than graduate choice. Ongoing studies are needed to follow this trend. Annual analysis of the placement of all graduating residents would help to identify changes in employment.

  13. [Bariatric and plastic surgery in obese adolescents: an alternative treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubern, Béatrice; Tounian, Patrice

    2014-06-01

    The increased frequency of extreme forms of obesity in adolescents and the disappointing results of conventional treatments are now leading pediatricians to consider bariatric or cosmetic surgery as the only real long-term effective therapeutic alternative. The two main techniques currently used for bariatric surgery in adolescents are gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding. Whatever the technique, weight loss is significant with improvement of comorbidities and quality of life. In addition, the complications are identical to those in adults and equally frequent. However, because of the particularities of this age, caution is still required. Adolescence is indeed characterized by specific nutritional needs, but also changes in body image in which surgery could have a negative effect. Currently, all obese teenagers making a request for bariatric surgery should have a comprehensive assessment with global care for at least 6 months. The indication is then discussed on a case-by-case basis by multidisciplinary teams and experts. To date, the type of surgery (gastric banding, gastric sleeve, or bypass) is still widely discussed. Based on experience with adults, we believe that gastric sleeve and bypass should be preferred. In addition, obesity in adolescents almost always involves psychosocial consequences, while somatic complications are rare. Thus, the care of adipo- or gynecomastia, abdominal fat excess, and concealed penis is essential and therefore justifies cosmetic surgery.

  14. [Information and assent: presentation of 32 information cards concerning plastic and aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flageul, G; Horay, P; Rouanet, F

    2009-06-01

    Obligation to deliver full information and obtaining enlightened assent are now, for the whole French practitioner, a necessary preliminary to each operation. Henceforth, in case of suit, the practitioner must prove the reality and the quality of preoperative information. The authors propose 32 information cards corresponding to the most currently operations of plastic and aesthetic surgery. They will being clear and simple, with a large agreement, strictly informative and yearly up to date. They have the label and therefore the scientific guaranty of the French Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery.

  15. [Jean-Louis-Paul Denucé (1824-1889): A forgotten pioneer of plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, K W; Martin, D

    2016-02-01

    The authors propose to define as main characterization of plastic reconstructive surgery the conceptual thinking that leads to a rational choice of an operative treatment. Conceptual thinking in plastic surgery started halfway the nineteenth century with the first schematic representations of the operative procedures available at that time, in which Von Ammon and Baumgarten, Szymanowski and Denucé played a prominent role. These four authors and their works are presented with special attention for the less known of them, Jean-Paul Denucé, surgeon in Bordeaux.

  16. The Ethics of Stem Cell-Based Aesthetic Surgery: Attitudes and Perceptions of the Plastic Surgery Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Harry S; Caplan, Arthur L; Eaves, Felmont F; Rubin, J Peter

    2014-08-01

    The emerging field of stem cell-based aesthetics has raised ethical concerns related to advertising campaigns and standards for safety and efficacy. The authors sought to characterize the attitudes of plastic surgeons regarding the ethics of stem cell-based aesthetics. A cross-sectional electronic survey was distributed to 4592 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery and the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statements addressed ethical concerns about informed consent, conflicts of interest, advertising, regulation, and stem cell tourism. An agreement score (AS) from 0 to 100 was calculated for each statement. Majority agreement was designated as ≥60 and majority disagreement as ≤40. A total of 770 questionnaires were received (16.7%). The majority of respondents indicated that knowledge regarding the risks and benefits of stem cell procedures is insufficient to obtain valid informed consent (AS, 29) and that direct-to-consumer advertising for these technologies is inappropriate and unethical (AS, 23). Most respondents reported that patients should be actively warned against traveling abroad to receive aesthetic cell therapies (AS, 86) and that registries and evaluations of these clinics should be made publicly available (AS, 71). Even more respondents noted that financial conflicts of interest should be disclosed to patients (AS, 96) and that professional societies should participate in establishing regulatory standards (AS, 93). The plastic surgeons surveyed in this study support a well-regulated, evidence-based approach to aesthetic procedures involving stem cells. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  17. A study of an assisting robot for mandible plastic surgery based on augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunyong; Lin, Li; Zhou, Chaozheng; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Le; Chai, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Mandible plastic surgery plays an important role in conventional plastic surgery. However, its success depends on the experience of the surgeons. In order to improve the effectiveness of the surgery and release the burden of surgeons, a mandible plastic surgery assisting robot, based on an augmented reality technique, was developed. Augmented reality assists surgeons to realize positioning. Fuzzy control theory was used for the control of the motor. During the process of bone drilling, both the drill bit position and the force were measured by a force sensor which was used to estimate the position of the drilling procedure. An animal experiment was performed to verify the effectiveness of the robotic system. The position error was 1.07 ± 0.27 mm and the angle error was 5.59 ± 3.15°. The results show that the system provides a sufficient accuracy with which a precise drilling procedure can be performed. In addition, under the supervision's feedback of the sensor, an adequate safety level can be achieved for the robotic system. The system realizes accurate positioning and automatic drilling to solve the problems encountered in the drilling procedure, providing a method for future plastic surgery.

  18. Clinical Use of GalaFLEX in Facial and Breast Cosmetic Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William P; Toriumi, Dean M; Van Natta, Bruce W

    2016-11-01

    Resolution of ptosis is a key step to the success of many plastic surgery procedures. Ptosis is a manifestation of tissue stretch. Tissue stretch can occur as a result of the natural aging process or health of the patient, or tissue may stretch under added weight or volume, such as when implants are placed. Surgical rejuvenation of ptotic tissues is very effective and results in marked changes in the patient profile yet the tissue that resulted in the need for the procedure first place has not improved and ptosis can recur. Recent developments in long-term resorbable porous materials have provided surgeons with the opportunity to experiment with tissue reinforcement in plastic surgery procedures. These new materials have a low profile, rapid tissue integration, and a long-term strength retention profile. Long-term resorbable scaffolds such as poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB) natural scaffold (GalaFLEX scaffold, Galatea Surgical, Inc., Lexington, MA) have shown promise for a host of plastic surgery indications. This article presents clinical experience with GalaFLEX for soft tissue reinforcement in three different clinical applications; including the reinforcement of the superficial muscular aponeurotic system (SMAS) in minimally invasive facelift, reinforcement of the skin envelope in mastopexy, and reinforcement of the breast capsule (pocket) in revisional breast surgery. Soft tissue reinforcement has been shown to provide increased mechanical strength as well as improved maintenance of postoperative results. 5 Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Confidence Crisis Among General Surgery Residents: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfenbein, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    In the surgical community, there is concern that general surgery residents are choosing subspecialty training in large numbers because of a crisis in confidence at the end of training. Confidence is an essential quality of surgeons, and recent studies have attempted to quantify and measure it in graduating general surgery residents. To systematically review the quality of evidence provided and to critically analyze the language used to describe the findings using quantitative methods. A systematic review of the PubMed indexed literature on general surgery resident confidence was performed in March 2015. A summative table of each study's hypothesis, definition of confidence, quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument, influence using Web of Science citations, results, and conclusions was created, and qualitative coding was applied to identify emerging themes. No date restrictions were used in the search. Fifteen survey studies have been performed that measure confidence or readiness to practice. Although 5 studies had neutral or positive conclusions, most studies reported low confidence in general surgery graduates. There are conflicting data about definitions of confidence. The relationships between confidence, autonomy, and competence are varied and complex. Comparisons with the past are frequent. Confidence is difficult to define and measure. Despite limitations, survey studies are used to shape discourse and influence policies. Social and cultural factors influence self-efficacy, and focusing on operative volume and autonomy alone may not address all of the reasons that some residents express concerns about readiness to practice.

  1. [Two French pioneers of plastic surgery: François Dubois and Raymond Passot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derquenne, François

    2015-01-01

    After World War, especially during the interwar years, new plastic surgical techniques were highly developed by I two French surgeons: Dr Raymond Passot, a pupil of Pr Hippolyte Morestin, Head of surgery department in Val-de-Grâce military hospital, Father of the Gueules cassées and Dr François Dubois, a pupil of Pr Sébileau, head of ear nose throat disorders department at Lariboisière Hospital in Paris. By the way of papers, publications and interviews to media, they described new French cosmetic techniques (rhitidectomy, sutures, liposuccion) and extensively developed this outpatient surgery. They used to renove famous actresse's and actors' face and nose and those of hundreds of patients. They participate to French societies of plastic surgery meetings and publications. Their enthusiastic dare largely participated to the current success of cosmetic surgery in France.

  2. [Plastic surgery in patients with surgical wound infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostishchev, V K; Lipatov, K V; Komarova, E A; Marakutsa, E V

    2009-01-01

    Results of various skin plastic operations performed in 312 patients with soft-tissue infection were analyzed. The choice of the method depended on size and site of the wound, predisposing pathological process, age and general patient's condition. Differential approach to the choice of reconstruction method allowed satisfactory short-term results in 91,4% of patients. 80% of patients demonstrated good long-term results.

  3. Presentation of Mycobacterium abscessus infection following rhytidectomy to a UK plastic surgery unit

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, Philippe; Miller, Mary-Clare; Cartwright, Samuel; Jones, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We report the presentation of a patient to a UK plastic surgery unit with Mycobacterium abscessus infection following a facelift surgery in Southern India. Treatment was protracted requiring surgical debridement and 6 months of antibiotics including a 3-week hospital admission for intravenous antibiotic therapy. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this unusual microorganism with reference to more familiar pyogenic infections.

  4. Presentation of Mycobacterium abscessus infection following rhytidectomy to a UK plastic surgery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Philippe; Miller, Mary-Clare; Cartwright, Samuel; Jones, Martin

    2014-05-28

    We report the presentation of a patient to a UK plastic surgery unit with Mycobacterium abscessus infection following a facelift surgery in Southern India. Treatment was protracted requiring surgical debridement and 6 months of antibiotics including a 3-week hospital admission for intravenous antibiotic therapy. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this unusual microorganism with reference to more familiar pyogenic infections.

  5. Weekly e-mailed teaching tips and reading material influence teaching among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ammara A; Gondek, Stephen P; Lagisetty, Kiran H; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Cahalane, Michael J; Kent, Tara S

    2017-01-01

    A nonintrusive e-mail reminder incorporating teaching tips and manuscripts was developed to supplement resident-as-teacher curricula. Ten high-yield manuscripts and 10 teaching tips exemplifying the themes of mentorship or role modeling, teaching methods, adult learning theory, feedback, and the resident role of teaching were distributed to general surgery house staff through a weekly e-mail series. House staff completed surveys before and after the 20-week e-mail series. Thirty (43%) and 28 (40%) respondents completed the pre-e-mail and post-e-mail survey, respectively. Residents found teaching tips to be more helpful than manuscripts. Weekly e-mail reminders were "just right" in frequency according to 74% of respondents. Forty percent of residents felt the weekly e-mails helped them teach more often and 50% of residents changed their teaching style. Weekly reminders are an easy way to encourage resident teaching without a significant resident time commitment. Residents typically find teaching tips to be more useful than manuscripts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing oral and maxillofacial surgery resident risk exposure: lessons from graduate medical education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Suzanne Morse; Buhrow, Jack A

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that, in the United States, more than 40,000 patients are injured each day because of preventable medical errors. Although numerous studies examine the causes of medical trainee errors and efforts to mitigate patient injuries in this population, little research exists on adverse events experienced by oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) residents or strategies to improve patient safety awareness in OMFS residency programs. The authors conducted a retrospective literature review of contemporary studies on medical trainees' reported risk exposure and the impact of integrating evidence-based patient safety training into residency curricula. A review of the literature suggests that OMFS residents face similar risks as medical trainees in medical, surgical, and anesthesia residency programs and may benefit from integrating competency-based safety training in the OMFS residency curriculum. OMFS trainees face particular challenges when transitioning from dental student to surgical resident, particularly related to their limited clinical exposure to high-reliability organizations, which may place them at higher risk than other medical trainees. OMFS educators should establish resident competence in patient safety principles and system improvement strategies throughout the training period.

  7. Does operative experience during residency correlate with reported competency of recent general surgery graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Arash; Lai, Sarah; Butterworth, Sonia; Hameed, Morad; Schiller, Dan; Skarsgard, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of attributes of residency training that predict competency would improve surgical education. We hypothesized that case experience during residency would correlate with self-reported competency of recent graduates. Methods Aggregate case log data of residents enrolled in 2 general surgery programs were collected over a 12-month period and stratified into Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) categories. We surveyed recent (surgery (4, 0.04%), and the least common EU procedure was abdomen–spleen (1, 0.1%). The questionnaire response rate was 45%. For EC procedures, self-reported competency was highest in skin and soft tissue, thoracic and head and neck (each 100%) and lowest in vascular–venous (54%), whereas for EU procedures it was highest in abdomen–general (100%) and lowest in vascular–arterial (62%). The correlation between case volume and self-reported competency was poor (R = 0.2 for EC procedures). Conclusion Self-reported competency correlates poorly with operative case experience during residency. Other curriculum factors, including specific rotations and timing, balance between inpatient and outpatient surgical experience and competition for cases, may contribute to procedural competency acquisition during residency. PMID:22854144

  8. Relationships between study habits, burnout, and general surgery resident performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Thrush, Carol R; McDaniel, Faith K; Gill, Roop; Kimbrough, Mary K; Shames, Brian D; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Galante, Joseph M; Wittgen, Catherine M; Ansari, Parswa; Allen, Steven R; Nussbaum, Michael S; Hess, Donald T; Knight, David C; Bentley, Frederick R

    2017-09-01

    The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is used by programs to evaluate the knowledge and readiness of trainees to sit for the general surgery qualifying examination. It is often used as a tool for resident promotion and may be used by fellowship programs to evaluate candidates. Burnout has been associated with job performance and satisfaction; however, its presence and effects on surgical trainees' performance are not well studied. We sought to understand factors including burnout and study habits that may contribute to performance on the ABSITE examination. Anonymous electronic surveys were distributed to all residents at 10 surgical residency programs (n = 326). Questions included demographics as well as study habits, career interests, residency characteristics, and burnout scores using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, which assesses burnout because of both exhaustion and disengagement. These surveys were then linked to the individual's 2016 ABSITE and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and 2 scores provided by the programs to determine factors associated with successful ABSITE performance. In total, 48% (n = 157) of the residents completed the survey. Of those completing the survey, 48 (31%) scored in the highest ABSITE quartile (≥75th percentile) and 109 (69%) scored less than the 75th percentile. In univariate analyses, those in the highest ABSITE quartile had significantly higher USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores (P burnout scores (disengagement, P Burnout Inventory exhaustion (P = 0.02), and USMLE step 1 and 2 scores (P = 0.007 and 0.0001, respectively). Residents who perform higher on the ABSITE have a regular study schedule throughout the year, report less burnout because of exhaustion, study away from home, and have shown success in prior standardized tests. Further study is needed to determine the effects of burnout on clinical duties, career advancement, and satisfaction. Copyright © 2017

  9. The Value of Postconditioning in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Weidong; Zhang, Feng; Lineaweaver, William C; Gao, Weiyang; Yan, Hede

    2016-05-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by abrupt restoration of circulation after prolonged ischemia has still been an unsolved problem in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The concept of postconditioning (post-con), which has been well described in cardiovascular surgery, has been recently introduced in plastic and reconstructive surgery. As an "after-injury strategy," post-con may be a promising approach to reduce I/R injury and improve flap survival after ischemia. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching electronic databases of PubMed and web of science to identify all the studies regarding the application of the post-con technique in plastic and reconstructive surgery between 1950 and 2015. Inclusion criteria were English articles with clear reporting the post-con techniques and detailed outcomes. Results In total, 476 articles were identified and 18 studies reporting post-con in plastic and reconstructive surgery met the inclusion criteria in this review, including 11 studies of mechanical post-con, 3 studies of pharmacological post-con, 1 study of both mechanical and pharmacological post-con, and 3 studies of remote post-con. All these studies reported protective effects of any kind of post-con techniques in I/R injuries and could improve flap survivals. Conclusion In general, the strategy of post-con may effectively reduce I/R injury and improve the survival of flaps after ischemia in animal studies, yet no consensus regarding the exact technical details (intervention timing, cycles, intermittent duration, etc.) has been reached. Further studies aiming to explore its mechanisms as well as specific methodology are required before clinical application in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  10. Beauty, health and risk in Brazilian plastic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I take up the theme of the volume by analyzing the dynamic and sometimes conflicting relationship between ‘health’ and ‘beauty’ in the practice of cosmetic surgery. Approaching Brazil as a case study, I show how cosmetic and medical rationales are merged within a broader field of ‘aes

  11. Reduction Mammoplasty: A Comparison Between Operations Performed by Plastic Surgery and General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kordahi, Anthony M.; Hoppe, Ian C.; Lee, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reduction mammoplasty is an often-performed procedure by plastic surgeons and increasingly by general surgeons. The question has been posed in both general surgical literature and plastic surgical literature as to whether this procedure should remain the domain of surgical specialists. Some general surgeons are trained in breast reductions, whereas all plastic surgeons receive training in this procedure. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project provides a unique opportuni...

  12. 75 FR 47606 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the...

  13. 76 FR 65200 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for December...

  14. 75 FR 1395 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting...

  15. Combined Soft and Hard Tissue Peri-Implant Plastic Surgery Techniques to Enhance Implant Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltacıoğlu, Esra; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bağış, Nilsun; Aydın, Güven; Yuva, Pınar; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Bağış, Bora

    2014-01-01

    This case report presents an implant-aided prosthetic treatment in which peri-implant plastic surgery techniques were applied in combination to satisfactorily attain functional aesthetic expectations. Peri-implant plastic surgery enables the successful reconstruction and restoration of the balance between soft and hard tissues and allows the option of implant-aided fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:25489351

  16. Should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? An ethical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Hartin, Charles W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the ethical implications of teaching general surgery residents laparoscopic pyloromyotomy. Using the authors' previously presented ethical framework, and examining survey data of pediatric surgeons in the United States and Canada, a rigorous ethical argument is constructed to examine the question: should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? A survey was constructed that contained 24 multiple-choice questions. The survey included questions pertaining to surgeon demographics, if pyloromyotomy was taught to general surgery and pediatric surgery residents, and management of complications encountered during pyloromyotomy. A total of 889 members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association and Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons were asked to participate. The response rate was 45% (401/889). The data were analyzed within the ethical model to address the question of whether general surgery residents should be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies. From an ethical perspective, appealing to the ethical model of a physician as a fiduciary, the answer is no. We previously proposed an ethical model based on 2 fundamental ethical principles: the ethical concept of the physician as a fiduciary and the contractarian model of ethics. The fiduciary physician practices medicine competently with the patient’s best interests in mind. The role of a fiduciary professional imposes ethical standards on all physicians, at the core of which is the virtue of integrity, which requires the physician to practice medicine to standards of intellectual and moral excellence. The American College of Surgeons recognizes the need for current and future surgeons to understand professionalism, which is one of the 6 core competencies specified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Contracts are models of negotiation and ethically permissible compromise. Negotiated assent or consent is the core concept of contractarian

  17. Parents Speak Out: Facial Plastic Surgery for Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeke, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    This qualitative study examined comments of 250 parents of children with Down syndrome concerning facial plastic surgery as a means of improving the physical functioning, appearance, and social acceptance of these children. Most respondents viewed improvement of negative societal attitudes toward individuals with Down syndrome and futhering their…

  18. Quality of Life and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Rodrigo; Blaya, Carolina; Tenório, Juliana L C; Saltz, Renato; Ely, Pedro B; Ferrão, Ygor A

    2016-09-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in plastic surgery. However, authors use different scales to address this subject, making it difficult to compare the outcomes. To address this discrepancy, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a random effect meta-analysis.

  19. Parents Speak Out: Facial Plastic Surgery for Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeke, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    This qualitative study examined comments of 250 parents of children with Down syndrome concerning facial plastic surgery as a means of improving the physical functioning, appearance, and social acceptance of these children. Most respondents viewed improvement of negative societal attitudes toward individuals with Down syndrome and futhering their…

  20. Face recognition across makeup and plastic surgery from real-world images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini, Ali; Faez, Karim; Moeini, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    A study for feature extraction is proposed to handle the problem of facial appearance changes including facial makeup and plastic surgery in face recognition. To extend a face recognition method robust to facial appearance changes, features are individually extracted from facial depth on which facial makeup and plastic surgery have no effect. Then facial depth features are added to facial texture features to perform feature extraction. Accordingly, a three-dimensional (3-D) face is reconstructed from only a single two-dimensional (2-D) frontal image in real-world scenarios. Then the facial depth is extracted from the reconstructed model. Afterward, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) is applied to both texture and reconstructed depth images to extract the feature vectors. Finally, the final feature vectors are generated by combining 2-D and 3-D feature vectors, and are then classified by adopting the support vector machine. Promising results have been achieved for makeup-invariant face recognition on two available image databases including YouTube makeup and virtual makeup, and plastic surgery-invariant face recognition on a plastic surgery face database is compared to several state-of-the-art feature extraction methods. Several real-world scenarios are also planned to evaluate the performance of the proposed method on a combination of these three databases with 1102 subjects.

  1. [Plastic surgery defect coverage in the area of the pelvis and trunk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, G; Erdmann, D; Sauerbier, M; Bickert, B

    1997-05-01

    Complex defects of the trunk and pelvic region are rare, but are mostly the sequelae of serious conditions. Stable soft tissue coverage after radical debridement of all avital tissue may be of vital importance for the patient. The article will demonstrate the options of plastic surgery procedures that should be known by the general surgeon to be eventually integrated into a interdisciplinary therapeutic concept.

  2. 76 FR 20840 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Low Level Laser...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 878 Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery...? In accordance with section 513(f)(1) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) (21 U... Medical devices. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and under authority...

  3. A novel suturing approach for tissue displacement within minimally invasive periodontal plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Vincent; Dard, Michel

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a novel suturing approach that achieves harmonious and atraumatic soft tissue displacement in periodontal plastic surgery and soft tissue management around implants. The technique relies on a combination of horizontal and vertical mattress that are anchored at the splinted incisal contact points.

  4. A novel suturing approach for tissue displacement within minimally invasive periodontal plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ronco, Vincent; Dard, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This paper describes a novel suturing approach that achieves harmonious and atraumatic soft tissue displacement in periodontal plastic surgery and soft tissue management around implants. The technique relies on a combination of horizontal and vertical mattress that are anchored at the splinted incisal contact points.

  5. RECONSTRUCTIVE PLASTIC SURGERIES IN PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANCIES OF TONGUE AND FLOOR OF THE MOUTH. TYPES OF PLASTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Radjabova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Issues of tissue defects replacement after radical surgery for tumors of the head and neck do not lose their relevance. The article presents the results of plastics and replacement of the perforating combined defects of the floor of the mouth, portion of the upper and lower lips, the angle of the mouth, cheeks, neck lateral parts with simultaneous reduction of the configuration and function of the operated organs. Depending on the depth and nature of the existing tissue defect various methods of plastics were applied using arterialized flaps on the vascular pedicle in a free and non-free version. Satisfactory cosmetic and functional results were achieved in patients allowing to improve life quality and to adapt socially.

  6. Quality Improvement-Focused Departmental Grand Rounds Reports: A Strategy to Engage General Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Jonathan S; Mitchell, Katrina B; Afaneh, Cheguevera; Rich, Barrie S; Frey, Theresa J; Gellman, Carol; Pomp, Alfons; Michelassi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Background Many institutions are seeking ways to enhance their surgical trainees' quality improvement (QI) skills. Objective To educate trainees about the importance of lifelong performance improvement, chief residents at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medicine are members of a multidisciplinary QI team tasked with improving surgical outcomes. We describe the process and the results of this effort. Methods Our analysis used 2 data sources to assess complication rates: the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) and ECOMP, our own internal complication database. Chief residents met with a multidisciplinary QI team to review complication rates from both data sources. Chief residents performed a case-by-case analysis of complications and a literature search in areas requiring improvement. Based on this information, chief residents met with the multidisciplinary team to select interventions for implementation, and delivered QI-focused grand rounds summarizing the QI process and new interventions. Results Since 2009, chief residents have presented 16 QI-focused grand rounds. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and surgical site infections (SSIs) were the most frequently discussed. Interventions to improve UTIs and SSIs were introduced to the department of surgery through these reports in 2011 and 2012. During this time we saw improvement in outcomes as measured by NSQIP odds ratio. Conclusions Departmental grand rounds are a suitable forum to review NSQIP data and our internal, resident-collected data as a means to engage chief residents in QI improvement, and can serve as a model for other institutions to engage surgery residents in QI projects.

  7. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  8. Assessing residents' operative skills for external ventricular drain placement and shunt surgery in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors previously demonstrated the use of a validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) tool for evaluating residents' operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery. However, no benchmarks have been established for specific pediatric procedures despite an increased need for meaningful assessments that can either allow for early intervention for underperforming trainees or allow for proficient residents to progress to conducting operations independently with more passive supervision. This validated methodology and tool for assessment of operative skills for common pediatric neurosurgical procedures-external ventricular drain (EVD) placement and shunt surgery- was applied to establish its procedure-based feasibility and reliability, and to document the effect of repetition on achieving surgical skill proficiency in pediatric EVD placement and shunt surgery. METHODS A procedure-based technical skills assessment for EVD placements and shunt surgeries in pediatric neurosurgery was established through the use of task analysis. The authors enrolled all residents from 3 training programs (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, and University of Texas-Medical Branch) who rotated through pediatric neurosurgery at Texas Children's Hospital over a 26-month period. For each EVD placement or shunt procedure performed with a resident, the faculty and resident (for self-assessment) completed an evaluation form (OSATS) based on a 5-point Likert scale with 7 categories. Data forms were then grouped according to faculty versus resident (self) assessment, length of pediatric neurosurgery rotation, postgraduate year level, and date of evaluation ("beginning of rotation," within 1 month of start date; "end of rotation," within 1 month of completion date; or "middle of rotation"). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed with the commercially available SPSS statistical software package. A p value skills. The learning curves

  9. Assessment of moral reasoning skills in the orthopaedic surgery resident applicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Kyle C; Van Heest, Tyler; Gioe, Terence J; Agel, Julie; Johnson, Todd C; Van Heest, Ann

    2014-09-03

    Assessing orthopaedic surgery residency applicants is a complex process. One important applicant characteristic not commonly measured during the interview process is moral behavior, a key component of the guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for professionalism competency. We sought to determine whether a relationship exists between the results of residency selection interviews, as measured by match rank order, and moral reasoning skills, as measured by the revised version of the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2). The DIT-2, a psychological tool that has been validated in assessing moral reasoning in >30,000 subjects, was administered to orthopaedic surgery residency candidates on a voluntary basis during their interview day. Data were collected annually from four applicant classes (2009 to 2012) at one institution. Each candidate was interviewed by an orthopaedic faculty team and was ranked comparatively with the other interviewing applicants. The five-part aggregate interview method for ranking applicants for the match list included a focused interview station presenting ethical dilemmas as one part of determining rank order. One hundred and twenty-four fourth-year medical students interviewing for orthopaedic surgery residency were assessed with the DIT-2. The results from the DIT-2 produced a postconventional score, which correlates with various levels of moral development. Each applicant's postconventional score was then compared with the patient's overall rank order. Applicants had highly variable moral reasoning skills, with no relationship to the final rank list. Despite a wide range of DIT-2 scores, the interview process did not differentiate applicants based on moral reasoning skills. It remains unclear whether the DIT-2 could (or should) be used as an additional data point to help stratify orthopaedic residency applicants and to predict their performance. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

  10. Laparoscopic skill laboratory in urological surgery: tools and methods for resident training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Laparoscopy has certainly brought considerable benefits to patients, but laparoscopic surgery requires a set of skills different from open surgery, and learning in the operating room may increase surgical time, and even may be harmful to patients. Several training programs have been developed to decrease these potential prejudices. PURPOSES: to describe the laparoscopic training program for urological residents of the "Hospital das Clinicas" of the Sao Paulo Medical School, to report urological procedures that are feasible in dry and wet labs, and to perform a critical analysis of the cost-benefit relation of advanced laparoscopic skills laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The laparoscopic skill lab has two virtual simulators, three manual simulators, and four laparoscopic sets for study with a porcine model. The urology residents during their first year attend classes in the virtual and manual simulator and helps the senior urological resident in activities carried out with the laparoscopic sets. During the second year, the urological resident has six periods per week, each period lasting four hours, to perform laparoscopic procedures with a porcine model. Results: In a training program of ten weeks, one urological resident performs an average of 120 urological procedures. The most common procedures are total nephrectomy (30%, bladder suture (30%, partial nephrectomy (10%, pyeloplasty (10%, ureteral replacement or transuretero anastomosis (10%, and others like adrenalectomy, prostatectomy, and retroperitoneoscopy. These procedures are much quicker and caused less morbidity. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic skills laboratory is a good method for achieving technical ability.

  11. Three-dimensional surface imaging in plastic surgery: foundation, practical applications, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jessica B; Small, Kevin H; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface imaging has gained clinical acceptance in plastic and reconstructive surgery. In contrast to computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging, three-dimensional surface imaging relies on triangulation in stereophotography to measure surface x, y, and z coordinates. This study reviews the past, present, and future directions of three-dimensional topographic imaging in plastic surgery. Historically, three-dimensional imaging technology was first used in a clinical setting in 1944 to diagnose orthodontologic conditions. Karlan established its use in the field of plastic surgery in 1979, analyzing contours and documenting facial asymmetries. Present use of three-dimensional surface imaging has focused on standardizing patient topographic measurements to enhance preoperative planning and to improve postoperative outcomes. Various measurements (e.g., volume, surface area, vector distance, curvature) have been applied to breast, body, and facial topography to augment patient analysis. Despite the rapid progression of the clinical applications of three-dimensional imaging, current use of this technology is focused on the surgeon's perspective and secondarily the patient's perspective. Advancements in patient simulation may improve patient-physician communication, education, and satisfaction. However, a communal database of three-dimensional surface images integrated with emerging three-dimensional printing and portable information technology will validate measurements and strengthen preoperative planning and postoperative outcomes. Three-dimensional surface imaging is a useful adjunct to plastic and reconstructive surgery practices and standardizes measurements to create objectivity in a subjective field. Key improvements in three-dimensional imaging technology may significantly enhance the quality of plastic and reconstructive surgery in the near future.

  12. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Milothridis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Methods: Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Results: Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social networks, their psychological characteristics, such as body image, self-esteem and other personality traits and for specific psychopathology and found that these may either positively or negatively predict their motivation to seek and undergo a cosmetic procedure. Conclusions: The review examined the psychosocial characteristics associated with an interest in cosmetic surgery. Understanding cosmetic patients' characteristics, motivation and expectation for surgery is an important aspect of their clinical care to identify those patients more likely to benefit most from the procedure.

  13. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Plastic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sergio; Valdes, Jorge; Salama, Moises

    2016-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major health concern because it increases morbidity and mortality after a surgical procedure. A number of well-defined, evidence-based guidelines are available delineating suitable use of prophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Despite the available literature, there are clear gaps between recommendations and clinical practice, affecting the incidence of VTE. Plastic surgeons underuse the substantiated literature and risk stratification tools that are available to decrease the incidence of VTE in the office-based surgical setting because of fear of bleeding or hematoma complications postoperatively. Venous thromboembolism creates an economic burden on both the patient and the healthcare system. The intent of this literature review is to determine existing VTE risk using assessment models available to aid in the implementation of protocols for VTE prevention, specifically for high-risk cosmetic surgical patients in office-based settings.

  14. Preparation of Plaster Moulage (Cast in Plastic Surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique of making casts using alginate compound for negative and dental stone plaster for positive impressions. With certain modifications a cast could be made of any part of the body and one can make a museum of interesting cases. Casts serve as useful teaching material especially in cleft lip and palate patients to study the effect of surgery on growth and development of the cleft lip-palate-nose complex in relation to the remaining face. It also helps in planning reconstruction in cases of facial defects, recording serial changes in multistage surgery, pre-operative and post-operative comparison as in rhinoplasty, ear reconstruction, hand etc; for comparing results before and after treatment in keloid and hypertrophic scars, fabrication of implants and preparation of prosthesis. In spite of newer modalities like 3-D imaging and stereolithography, the usefulness of this old technique in certain interesting cases can not be denied.

  15. Medical Specialty Society Sponsored Data Registries – Opportunities in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Keith M.; Crotty, Catherine A.; Simmons, Christopher J.; Neumeister, Michael W.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data registries are commonly used worldwide and are implemented for a variety of purposes ranging from physician or facility clinic logs for tracking patients, collecting outcomes data, to measuring quality improvement or safety of medical devices. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has used data collected through registries to facilitate the drug and device regulatory process, ongoing surveillance during the product life-cycle, and for disease appraisals. Furthermore, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, in certain instances, base registry participation and submitting data to registries as factors for reimbursement decisions. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of clinical data registries, the role that medical specialty societies, in particular the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and The Plastic Surgery Foundation, can have in the development and management of registries, and the opportunities for registry use in Plastic Surgery. As outcomes data are becoming essential measures of quality healthcare delivery, participating in registry development and centralized data collection has become a critical effort for Plastic Surgery to engage in to proactively participate in the national quality and performance measurement agenda. PMID:23806935

  16. Is current surgery resident and GI fellow training adequate to pass FES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J; Willis, Ross E; Van Sickle, Kent; Truitt, Michael S; Uecker, John; Brown, Kimberly M; Marks, Jeffrey M; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of current surgical residency and gastroenterology (GI) fellowship flexible endoscopy training as measured by performance on the FES examination. Fifth-year general surgery residents and GI fellows across six institutions were invited to participate. All general surgery residents had met ACGME/ABS case volume requirements as well as additional institution-specific requirements for endoscopy. All participants completed FES testing at the end of their respective academic year. Procedure volumes were obtained from ACGME case logs. Curricular components for each specialty and institution were recorded. Forty-eight (28 surgery and 20 GI) trainees completed the examination. Average case numbers for residents were 76 ± 26 colonoscopies and 45 ± 12 EGDs. Among GI fellows, PGY4 s (N = 10) reported 99 ± 64 colonoscopies and 147 ± 79 EGDs. PGY5 s (N = 3) reported 462 ± 307 colonoscopies and 411 ± 260 EGDs. PGY6 GI fellows (N = 7) reported 515 ± 111 colonoscopies and 418 ± 146 EGDs. The overall pass rate for all participants was 75 %, with 68 % of residents and 85 % of fellows passing both the cognitive and skills components. For surgery residents, pass rates were 75 % for manual skills and 85.7 % for cognitive. On the skills examination, Task 2 (loop reduction) was associated with the lowest performance. Skills scores correlated with both colonoscopy (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and EGD experience (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristics curves were examined among the resident cohort. The minimum number of total cases associated with passing the FES skills component was 103. Significant variability existed in curricular components across institutions. These data suggest that current flexible endoscopy training may not be sufficient for all trainees to pass the examination. Implementing additional components of the FEC may prove beneficial in achieving more uniform pass

  17. Emerging trends in social media and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel J; Leland, Hyuma A; Ho, Adelyn L; Patel, Ketan M

    2016-12-01

    Social media has increasingly changed the landscape of medicine and surgery and is rapidly expanding its influence in most peoples' lives. The average person spends nearly 2 hours per day using social media, consuming information about everything from family updates to entertainment news to presidential elections. The concentration of consumers on social media platforms has resulted in direct medicine and medical products marketing to consumers. Similarly, social media is increasingly becoming a platform for interaction between physicians and potential patients. Some physicians have taken this opportunity to better educate patients, while allowing patients to learn more about their surgeons online. These tools can increase internet traffic online to bonafide internet sites, as well as bolster marketing for many hospitals, hospital systems, and individual doctors. It can also serve to increase knowledge about procedures and conditions through direct outreach to patients. Social media is a powerful tool which needs to be utilized wisely to avoid pitfalls.

  18. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Koolen, Pieter G. L.; Ashraf, Azra A.; Kim, Kuylhee; Mureau, Marc A. M.; Lee, Bernard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in plastic surgery have become increasingly popular particularly for breast reconstruction. Despite their advantages, questions exist regarding their association with a possible increased incidence of complications. We describe a collective experience of plastic surgeons’ use of ADMs in reconstructive breast surgery using an internet-based survey. Methods: Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons were recruited through voluntary, anonymous participation in an online survey. The web-based survey garnered information about participant demographics and their experience with ADM use in breast reconstruction procedures. After responses were collected, all data were anonymously processed. Results: Data were ascertained through 365 physician responses of which 99% (n = 361) completed the survey. The majority of participants were men (84.5%) between 51 and 60 years (37.4%); 84.2% used ADM in breast reconstruction, including radiated patients (79.7%). ADM use was not favored for nipple reconstruction (81.5%); 94.6% of participants used drains, and 87.8% administered antibiotics postoperatively. The most common complications were seroma (70.9%) and infection (16%), although 57.4% claimed anecdotally that overall complication rate was unchanged after incorporating ADM into their practice. High cost was a deterrent for ADM use (37.5%). Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours. PMID:25973359

  19. The 2010 Thoracic Surgery Residents Association workforce survey report: a view from the trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Carr, Shamus R; MacIver, Robroy H; Whitson, Bryan A; Joyce, David L; Stulak, John; Mery, Carlos M; Guitron, Julian; Singh, R Ramesh; Mettler, Bret; Turek, Joseph W

    2011-12-01

    Workforce estimates suggest 11% of general surgery residents are considering careers in cardiothoracic (CT) surgery. In an effort to identify areas for programmatic improvement, we examined trends in thoracic surgery residents' perspectives on training and employment. Results from the 2010 Thoracic Surgery Residents Association workforce survey were analyzed. The survey was administered to all trainees in North America during the annual in-service exam. Longitudinal trends from 2006 to 2010 are reported. Of 299 respondents, 76% (228 of 299) were US citizens. The most common determinants in choosing CT surgery were types of cases (123 of 299, 41%) and mentorship (95 of 299, 32%). Sixty-five percent (193 of 299) would recommend CT surgery to potential trainees. While 81% (242 of 299) felt they would be adequately trained in their program, 39% (118 of 299) planned additional fellowship training. Only 23% (70 of 299) felt the 80-hour work week had a positive impact on training. Of residents seeking jobs, 68% (62 of 92) received 2 or more job interviews and 70% (69 of 99) more than 1 job offer. Seventeen percent (16 of 92) had no offers. While 45% (51 of 114) reported still searching for employment, 20% (23 of 114) had accepted private practice positions, 25% (29 of 114) academic positions, and 6% (7 of 114) fellowship positions. Education-related debt was greater than $100,000 in 46% (140 of 299) and greater than $200,000 in 17% (52 of 299). From 2007 to 2010, CT residents reporting debt greater than $200,000 rose from 8% to 17%. Accepted fellowship training positions dropped to 6% in 2010 compared with 13% and 15% in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Diminished CT job opportunities remain a concern. There are concerning trends in debt accrual and perceptions of work-hour restrictions on quality of training. These data justify further investigation into areas of improvement in CT training. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Do plastic surgery division heads and program directors have the necessary tools to provide effective leadership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Js; McInnes, Cw; Carr, Nj; Lennox, P; Hill, M; Petersen, R; Woodward, K; Skarlicki, D

    2014-01-01

    Effective leadership is imperative in a changing health care landscape driven by increasing expectations in a setting of rising fiscal pressures. Because evidence suggests that leadership abilities are not simply innate but, rather, effective leadership can be learned, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to evaluate the training and challenges of their leaders because there may be opportunities for further growth and support. To investigate the practice profiles, education/training, responsibilities and challenges of leaders within academic plastic surgery. Following research ethics board approval, an anonymous online survey was sent to division heads and program directors from all university-affiliated plastic surgery divisions in Canada. Survey themes included demographics, education/training, job responsibilities and challenges. A response rate of 74% was achieved. The majority of respondents were male (94%), promoted to their current position at a mean age of 48 years, did not have a leadership-focused degree (88%), directly manage 30 people (14 staff, 16 faculty) and were not provided with a job description (65%). Respondents worked an average of 65 h per week, of which 18% was devoted to their leadership role, 59% clinically and the remainder on teaching and research. A discrepancy existed between time spent on their leadership role (18%) and related compensation (10%). Time management (47%) and managing conflict (24%) were described as the greatest leadership challenges by respondents. Several gaps were identified among leaders in plastic surgery including predominance of male sex, limitations in formal leadership training and requisite skill set, as well as compensation and human resources management (emotional intelligence). Leadership and managerial skills are key core competencies, not only for trainees, but certainly for those in a position of leadership. The present study provides evidence that academic departments, universities and medical centres may

  1. Welcome to cultural competency: surgery's efforts to acknowledge diversity in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L; Chun, Maria B J

    2013-01-01

    Although cultural competency is not a new concept in healthcare, it has only recently been formally embraced as important in the field of surgery. All physicians, including and especially surgeons, must acknowledge the potential influence of culture in order to provide effective and equitable care for patients of all backgrounds. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recognizes cultural competency as a component of "patient care," "professionalism," and "interpersonal and communication skills." A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All publications focusing on surgical residents and the assessment of patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, or specifically cultural competency and/or were considered. This initial search resulted in 12 articles. To further refine the review, publications discussing curricula in residencies other than surgery, the assessment of technical, or clinical skills and/or without any explicit focus on cultural competency were excluded. Based on the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles were selected. These studies utilized various methods to improve surgical residents' cultural competency, including lectures, Objective Structural Clinical Examinations (OSCE), and written exercises and evaluations. A number of surgical residency programs have made promising strides in training culturally competent surgeons. Ultimately, in order to maximize our collective efforts to improve the quality of health care, the development of cultural competency curricula must be made a priority and such training should be a requirement for all trainees in surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient safety in plastic surgery: identifying areas for quality improvement efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn M; Rhoads, Kim F; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-05-01

    Improving quality of health care is a global priority. Before quality benchmarks are established, we first must understand rates of adverse events (AEs). This project assessed risk-adjusted rates of inpatient AEs for soft tissue reconstructive procedures.Patients receiving soft tissue reconstructive procedures from 2005 to 2010 were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Inpatient AEs were identified using patient safety indicators (PSIs), established measures developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.We identified 409,991 patients with soft tissue reconstruction and 16,635 (4.06%) had a PSI during their hospital stay. Patient safety indicators were associated with increased risk-adjusted mortality, longer length of stay, and decreased routine disposition (P plastic surgery patients had significantly lower risk-adjusted rate compared to other surgical inpatients for all events evaluated except for failure to rescue and postoperative hemorrhage or hematoma, which were not statistically different. Risk-adjusted rates of hematoma hemorrhage were significantly higher in patients receiving size-reduction surgery, and these rates were further accentuated when broken down by sex and payer. In general, plastic surgery patients had lower rates of in-hospital AEs than other surgical disciplines, but PSIs were not uncommon. With the establishment of national basal PSI rates in plastic surgery patients, benchmarks can be devised and target areas for quality improvement efforts identified. Further prospective studies should be designed to elucidate the drivers of AEs identified in this population.

  3. Senior Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Resident Confidence in Performing Invasive Temporomandibular Joint Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Mohmedvasim; Miloro, Michael; Mercuri, Louis G; Munaretto, Alexander; Markiewicz, Michael R

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of confidence that senior-level oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents have in the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, determine their exposure to various invasive TMJ procedures during training, and assess their confidence in performing those procedures on completion of residency. A questionnaire was designed, and a link to a University of Illinois at Chicago Qualtrics Survey platform (Qualtrics, Provo, UT) was e-mailed to all program directors at Commission on Dental Accreditation-accredited OMS training programs in the United States. The program directors were asked to forward the 20-multiple-choice question anonymous survey to their senior-level residents for completion. The survey included the program's demographic characteristics, resident's confidence in assessing and managing patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), resident's experience performing various invasive TMJ procedures, and whether the resident believed he or she had received sufficient education and clinical experience in the management of TMJ disorders. The data were collected and summarized by use of a standard spreadsheet analysis, as well as appropriate descriptive and analytical statistical tests. The response rate was 28.0%. Of the 56 respondents, 52 (92.9%) reported having received instruction in nonsurgical management of TMDs. All respondents confirmed that invasive TMJ procedures were performed in their program. The most commonly performed procedure was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.11), followed by open TMJ surgery (mean rating, 2.82). The least-performed invasive surgical procedure was autogenous total TMJ replacement surgery (mean rating, 1.39). Eighty percent of residents reported being comfortable managing the TMD patient. The only procedure with which the respondents were highly confident was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.89). This study suggests that confidence levels in the

  4. A comparison of pop and chop to divide and conquer in resident cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Fredric J; Garcia-Zalisnak, Debra E; Bovee, Courtney E; Strawn, Joy D

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized prospective study, the cumulative dissipated energy and case time of pop and chop and of traditional four-quadrant divide and conquer in the first 60 cases (in total 120 eyes) of cataract surgery performed by two residents at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Hampton, Virginia, were compared. Overall and individually, the residents had significantly shorter case times and used significantly less cumulative dissipated energy for performing pop and chop than that for divide and conquer technique. There was no difference in complication rates or visual outcomes between these two techniques. The results of this study suggest that pop and chop is a more time- and energy-efficient method of nucleofractis than divide and conquer for novice resident surgeons.

  5. Risk Factors for Return to the Operating Room after Resident-Performed Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menda, Shivali A; Driver, Todd H; Neiman, Alexandra E; Blumberg, Seth; Naseri, Ayman; Stewart, Jay M

    2016-09-29

    Investigate risk factors for unplanned return to the operating room after resident-performed cataract surgery. Retrospective case-control study. Institutional. Study population: All patients with reoperation within 90 days of resident-performed phacoemulsification were matched to four control eyes which had surgery within 30 days of the reoperation at the same institution. Billing codes were used to identify all patients who underwent resident-performed intended phacoemulsification with intraocular lens placement from January 2005 to December 2010. Investigated risk factors for reoperation included cataract characteristics and preexisting ocular co-morbidities, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment history, glaucoma, corneal pathology, and uveitis. Additional preoperative risk factors studied included resident training year, history of tamsulosin use, phacodonesis, pupillary dilation, presence of pseudoexfoliation, myopia, history of trauma, visual acuity, and monocular status. Intraoperative variables were the use of iris expansion devices, use of capsular stain, attending type, incision type, use of sutures, vitreous loss, anesthesia type, and phacoemulsification technique. There were 67 returns to the operating room (i.e., cases) over five years that were assigned to 268 control eyes. In preoperative multivariate analysis, phacoemulsification done by a first- or second-year resident (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.7-6.0, p risk of reoperation. In postoperative multivariate analysis, only the use of the divide-and-conquer technique (OR 4.0, 95% CI:1.7-9.2, p = 0.001) was associated with an increased risk of reoperation. Phacoemulsification done by a junior resident or using the divide-and-conquer technique had the highest risk of reoperation.

  6. Impact of Integrated Vascular Residencies on Academic Productivity within Vascular Surgery Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Liang, Tiffany W; Murphy, Michael P; Zimmers, Teresa A; Bell, Teresa M; Davies, Mark G; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-02-01

    Changing training paradigms in vascular surgery have been introduced to reduce overall training time. Herein, we sought to examine how shortened training for vascular surgeons may have influenced overall divisional academic productivity. Faculty from the top 55 surgery departments were identified according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Academic metrics of 315 vascular surgery, 1,132 general surgery, and 2,403 other surgical specialties faculty were examined using institutional Web sites, Scopus, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools from September 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015. Individual-level and aggregate numbers of publications, citations, and NIH funding were determined. The mean size of the vascular divisions was 5 faculty. There was no correlation between department size and academic productivity of individual faculty members (R(2) = 0.68, P = 0.2). Overall percentage of vascular surgery faculty with current or former NIH funding was 20%, of which 10.8% had major NIH grants (R01/U01/P01). Vascular surgery faculty associated with integrated vascular training programs demonstrated significantly greater academic productivity. Publications and citations were higher for vascular surgery faculty from institutions with both integrated and traditional training programs (48 of 1,051) compared to those from programs with integrated training alone (37 of 485) or traditional fellowships alone (26 of 439; P productivity was improved within vascular surgery divisions with integrated training programs or both program types. These data suggest that the earlier specialization of integrated residencies in addition to increasing dedicated vascular training time may actually help promote research within the field of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Surgeon Diagnostic Accuracy in Facial Plastic and Oculoplastic Surgery Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Andrew W; Ishii, Lisa; Joseph, Shannon S; Smith, Jane I; Su, Peiyi; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick; Boahene, Kofi; Papel, Ira; Kontis, Theda; Douglas, Raymond; Nelson, Christine C; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relative contraindication for facial plastic surgery, but formal screening is not common in practice. The prevalence of BDD in patients seeking facial plastic surgery is not well documented. To establish the prevalence of BDD across facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practice settings, and estimate the ability of surgeons to screen for BDD. This multicenter prospective study recruited a cohort of 597 patients who presented to academic and private facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practices from March 2015 to February 2016. All patients were screened for BDD using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ). After each clinical encounter, surgeons independently evaluated the likelihood that a participating patient had BDD. Validated instruments were used to assess satisfaction with facial appearance including the FACE-Q, Blepharoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (BOE), Facelift Outcomes Evaluation (FOE), Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE), and Skin Rejuvenation Outcomes Evaluation (SROE). Across participating practices (9 surgeons, 3 sites), a total of 597 patients were screened for BDD: 342 patients from site 1 (mean [SD] age, 44.2 [16.5] years); 158 patients, site 2 (mean [SD] age, 46.0 [16.2] years), site 3, 97 patients (mean [SD] age, 56.3 [15.5] years). Overall, 58 patients [9.7%] screened positive for BDD by the BDDQ instrument, while only 16 of 402 patients [4.0%] were clinically suspected of BDD by surgeons. A higher percentage of patients presenting for cosmetic surgery (37 of 283 patients [13.1%]) compared with those presenting for reconstructive surgery (21 of 314 patients [6.7%]) screened positive on the BDDQ (odds ratio, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.20-3.68; P = .01). Surgeons were only able to correctly identify 2 of 43 patients (4.7%) who screened positive for BDD on the BDDQ, and the positive likelihood ratio was only 1.19 (95% CI, 0.28-5.07). Patients screening positive for BDD by the BDDQ had lower

  8. Age, gender, lateral dominance, and prediction of operative skill among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueneman, A L; Pickleman, J; Freeark, R J

    1985-09-01

    Ability patterns and surgical proficiency were examined in matched groups of general surgery residents selected on the basis of age, gender, or hand preference from a population of 141 residents who had completed neuropsychologic tests of visuospatial, psychomotor, and stress tolerance abilities and had been rated on 12 aspects of technical skill exhibited during 1480 operative procedures. Older residents (ages 28 to 42 years) exhibited less motor speed (p less than 0.05) and coordination (p less than 0.005) and more caution in avoiding psychomotor errors (p less than 0.05) than did their younger counterparts. No differences were found for visuospatial abilities, stress tolerance, or rated surgical skill. These findings indicate that although age does appear to adversely affect pure motor skills, these are not important components of operative proficiency. Female residents exhibited superior (p less than 0.05) academic achievement (MCAT, Verbal and National Boards Part II) as compared with their male counterparts. They also excelled on a signal detection task requiring identification of visual patterns. However, the women scored less well (p less than 0.05) than men on a visuomotor task demonstrated to be a significant predictor of operative skill. Greater cautiousness in avoiding errors may be a contributing factor to their reduced efficiency on this task. In comparison to male controls, female residents received consistently lower surgical skills ratings, particularly on items measuring confidence and task organization. Left-handed residents were more reactive to stress (p less than 0.03), more cautious (p less than 0.04), and more proficient on a neuropsychologic test of tactile-spatial abilities (p less than 0.03) than right-handed counterparts. Although these traits correlated positively (p less than 0.05) with rated operative skill within the left-handed group, the group received consistently lower ratings than did right-handed residents. The inconvenience of

  9. Improving Communication Skills: A Course for Academic Medical Center Surgery Residents and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Steven E; Gupta, Meera; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Morris, Jon B

    2015-01-01

    To improve physician/patient communication and familiarize surgeons with contemporary skills for and metrics assessing communication, courses were developed to provide academic general surgery residents and faculty with a toolkit of information, behaviors, and specific techniques. If academic faculty are expected to mentor residents in communication and residents are expected to learn good communication skills, then both should have the necessary education to accomplish such a goal. Didactic lectures introduced current concepts of physician-patient communication including information on better patient care, fewer malpractice suits, and the move toward transparency of communication metrics. Next, course participants viewed and critiqued "Surgi-Drama" videos, with actors simulating "before" and "after" physician-patient communication scenarios. Finally, participants were provided with a "toolkit" of techniques for improving physician-patient communication including "2-3-4"-a semiscripted short communication tool residents and other physicians can use in patient encounters-and a number of other acronymic approaches. Each participant was asked to complete an anonymous evaluation to assess course content satisfaction. Overall, 86% of residents participated (68/79), with a 52% response rate (35/68) for the evaluation tool. Overall, 88% of faculty participated (84/96), with an 84% response rate (71/84). Residents voiced satisfaction with all domains. For faculty, satisfaction was quantitatively confirmed (Likert score 4 or 5) in 4 of 7 domains, with the highest satisfaction in "communication of goals" and "understanding of the HCAHPS metric." The percentage of "top box" Doctor Communication Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores and national percentile ranking showed a sustained increase more than 1 and 2 years from the dates of the courses. The assessment of communication skills is increasing in importance in the practice of

  10. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...

  11. Biopolymers for Hard and Soft Engineered Tissues: Application in Odontoiatric and Plastic Surgery Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zavan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of modern dentistry and plastic surgery is to restore the patient to normal function, health and aesthetics, regardless of the disease or injury to the stomatognathic and cutaneous system respectively. In recent years tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have yielded many novel tissue replacements and implementation strategies. Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cell isolation, growth and differentiation factors and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory. Repairing of bone and skin is likely to become of clinical interest when three dimensional tissue reconstructive procedures and the appropriate supporting biomimetic materials are correctly assembled. In the present review, we provide an overview of the most promising biopolymers that may find clinical application in dento-maxillo-facial and plastic surgery.

  12. Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, S; Florescu, IP; Jecan, C

    2010-01-01

    Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery Pressure sores can be defined as lesions caused by unrelieved pressure resulting in damage of the underlying tissue. They represent a common problem in the pathology of plegic patients and, plastic surgery has a significant role in their treatment. Pressure sores occur over bony prominences and so, they are most commonly seen at the sacrum and trochanters in paralyzed patients and at ischium for the patients who sit in a wheelchair for a long time. For these patients, surgical treatment is very important because on one hand, it stops the loss of nutrients and proteins at the site of the pressure sore, and on the other hand, it permits the initiation of neuromuscular recuperation treatment much faster. PMID:20968200

  13. [French resident's performance on laparoscopic surgery box trainer: 7-year results of pelvitrainer contests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madec, F-X; Dariane, C; Pradere, B; Amadane, N; Bergerat, S; Gryn, A; Lebacle, C; Matillon, X; Olivier, J; Nouhaud, F-X; Panayotopoulos, P; Peyronnet, B; Rizk, J; Sanson, S; Seisen, T; Salomon, L; Fiard, G

    2016-12-01

    The study objectives were to analyze the resident's laparoscopic surgery performance in order to build a self-assessment data set, to identify discriminatory exercises and to investigate the suturing time changes. From 2007 to 2014, the French Association of Urologist in Training (AFUF) organized 7 pelvitrainer contests. Participant scores on 11 laparoscopic surgery exercises were evaluated. Sixty-six residents participated to these contests and performed 11 exercises each. Twenty-two (33.3 %) participants were beginners, 26 (39.4 %) intermediates et 18 (27.3 %) experienced. The participant scores were gathered into a data set including the average time per exercise. We found a time scoring improvement related to the resident experience for all exercises. A significant decline in time was noted for exercise 8 and 9 between beginners and intermediates (139s [±71]), (173.9s [±118.3]) and between beginners and experienced (80.6s [±26.7]), (94,1s [±42.7]) with a P<0.05. The correlation coefficient for the exercise 11 duration (vesico-uretral anastomosis) was 0.04 over a 7-year period (P=0.44). The study provided a data set on 11 laparoscopic surgery tasks which can be consulted by all residents as a reference in a self-assessment process. Two exercises (8 and 9) discriminated beginners from intermediates and experienced groups and could be used as a benchmark ahead of an operating room procedure. The vesico-uretral anastomosis duration (exercise 11) did not improve significantly between 2006 and 2014. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  15. [The Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery - A Systematic Review of Screening Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houschyar, K S; Philipps, H M; Duscher, D; Rein, S; Weissenberg, K; Nietzschmann, I; Maan, Z N; Pyles, M N; Siemers, F

    2017-08-01

    Background The body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is considered to be a sub-form of somatoform disorders. BDD can express itself in a delirious experience, an excessive evaluation and employment of the external appearance, in particular the face. Preliminary results suggest that individuals with BDD do not benefit from plastic surgery, so that aesthetic surgery often results in aggravation of their symptoms. Thus, the identification of signs for a BDD is crucial, whether a patient should be operated plastically-aesthetically. This overview explains the often difficult diagnostics of the BDD by summarizing the current literature on its screening. Study design Systematic overview Methods An electronic search was conducted in the German and English-language literature in order to identify all screening instruments for the BDD. The specific development and validation processes are assessed whether the screening instruments have a positive predictive value for the BDD. Results Six different screening instruments were identified for the BDD. Only two of these were evaluated in a cosmetic setting: the "Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire Dermatology Version" (BDDQ-DV) and the "Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire" (DCQ). The influence on the subjective results after a plastic-aesthetic procedure was measured only for the DCQ. Conclusion The limited availability of validated screening instruments for BDD in plastic surgery is markedly in contrast to the supposedly high prevalence of the disease of 2.4 %. Among the currently used screening tools, the BDDQ-DV and the DCQ appear to be most suitable. Further research efforts are needed to establish better screening methods for the BDD in the plastic surgical patient population and to examine the effects of BDD on treatment results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Resident Duty Hour Restrictions in Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Katharine S.; Keshet, Itay; Spicer, Jonathan; Imrie, Kevin; Feldman, Liane; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Kayssi, Ahmed; Lipsman, Nir; Elmi, Maryam; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Parshuram, Chris; Mainprize, Todd; Warren, Richard J.; Fata, Paola; Gorman, M. Sean; Feinberg, Stan; Rutka, James

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated 80-hour resident duty limits. In 2011 the ACGME mandated 16-hour duty maximums for PGY1 (post graduate year) residents. The stated goals were to improve patient safety, resident well-being, and education. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the impact of resident duty hours (RDH) on clinical and educational outcomes in surgery. Methods: A systematic review (1980–2013) was executed on CINAHL, Cochrane Database, Embase, Medline, and Scopus. Quality of articles was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Sixteen-hour shifts and night float systems were analyzed separately. Articles that examined mortality data were combined in a random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of RDH on patient mortality. Results: A total of 135 articles met the inclusion criteria. Among these, 42% (N = 57) were considered moderate-high quality. There was no overall improvement in patient outcomes as a result of RDH; however, some studies suggest increased complication rates in high-acuity patients. There was no improvement in education related to RDH restrictions, and performance on certification examinations has declined in some specialties. Survey studies revealed a perception of worsened education and patient safety. There were improvements in resident wellness after the 80-hour workweek, but there was little improvement or negative effects on wellness after 16-hour duty maximums were implemented. Conclusions: Recent RDH changes are not consistently associated with improvements in resident well-being, and have negative impacts on patient outcomes and performance on certification examinations. Greater flexibility to accommodate resident training needs is required. Further erosion of training time should be considered with great caution. PMID:24662409

  17. National trends in minimally invasive and open operative experience of graduating general surgery residents: implications for surgical skills curricula development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey S; Smith, Lynette; Are, Madhuri; Edney, James; Azarow, Kenneth; Mercer, David W; Thompson, Jon S; Are, Chandrakanth

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national trends in minimally invasive and open cases of all graduating residents in general surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education logs (1999-2008) of graduating residents from all US general surgery residency programs. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests and the Bonferroni adjustment to detect trends in the number of minimally invasive and open cases. Minimally invasive procedures accounted for an increasing proportion of cases performed (3.7% to 11.1%, P pediatric surgery (P surgery residents in the United States are performing a greater number of minimally invasive and fewer open procedures for common surgical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Conversion of Plastic Surgery meeting abstract presentations to full manuscripts: a brazilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Pinho, André Silveira; Samartine, Hugo; Denadai, Rodrigo; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    to assess the conversion rate of Plastic Surgery meeting abstract presentations to full manuscript publications and examine factors associated with this conversion. we assessed the abstracts presented at the 47th and 48th Brazilian Congresses of Plastic Surgery by cross-referencing with multiple databases. We analyzed the Abstracts' characteristics associated with full manuscript publications. of the 200 abstracts presented, 50 abstracts were subsequently published in full, giving the conference a conversion rate of 25%. The mean time to publish was 15.00±13.75 months. In total, there were 4.93±1.63 authors per abstract and 67.8±163 subjects per abstract; 43.5% of the abstracts were of retrospective studies; 69% comprised the plastic surgery topics head and neck, and chest and trunk, and 88.5% had no statistical analysis. Overall, 80% of the manuscripts were published in plastic surgery journals, 76% had no impact factor and 52% had no citations. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed the presence of statistical analysis to be the most significant (previstas de Cirurgia Plástica, 76% não exibiam fator de impacto e 52% não possuíam citações. As análises bivariada e multivariada revelaram que a presença de análise estatística foi o fator preditivo significativo (p<0,05) para a conversão de resumos em manuscritos completos. a taxa de conversão deste estudo bibliométrico foi inferior à tendência de conversão descrita em congressos internacionais de Cirurgia Plástica, e a presença de análise estatística foi um determinante para o sucesso de conversão.

  19. Challenges of periodontal plastic surgery in a depressed economy: a report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon O Nwhator

    2010-01-01

    Solomon O NwhatorDepartment of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, NigeriaAbstract: Advancements in restorative dentistry have resulted in people keeping their teeth for longer, and an increase in gingival recession as the gums recede due to age, periodontal disease, thin gingiva, or other factors. The demand for periodontal plastic surgery appears to be increasing. Several methods have been used in the treatment of denuded roots. Of these, the free gingiv...

  20. [Some similarities between the work of M.C. Escher and plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, K W

    2002-12-21

    At first sight there would appear to be no similarities between the work of the Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher and plastic surgery. M.C. Escher was a gifted graphic artist who produced a large collection of work. Most of his fame is due to the works that play with symmetry, space and infinity and leave the viewer astounded. However, how Escher came to produce these works is less well known. A theory which he developed himself formed the basis of the regular plane division. It later became apparent that this theory almost completely agreed with the mathematics of plane division. Two movements (isometries) defined in mathematics, translation and rotation, are equivalent to two techniques for transferring local skin in plastic surgery, namely, advancement and transposition. Escher's performance on the plane of a sheet of paper and a plastic surgeon's performance on the plane of the skin, therefore have a similar mathematical background. Escher has visualised these mathematical rules in an unusual and artistic manner, whereas plastic surgeons apply these rules in the grace of an elastic and healing nature.

  1. 3D animation of facial plastic surgery based on computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    More and more people, especial women, are getting desired to be more beautiful than ever. To some extent, it becomes true because the plastic surgery of face was capable in the early 20th and even earlier as doctors just dealing with war injures of face. However, the effect of post-operation is not always satisfying since no animation could be seen by the patients beforehand. In this paper, by combining plastic surgery of face and computer graphics, a novel method of simulated appearance of post-operation will be given to demonstrate the modified face from different viewpoints. The 3D human face data are obtained by using 3D fringe pattern imaging systems and CT imaging systems and then converted into STL (STereo Lithography) file format. STL file is made up of small 3D triangular primitives. The triangular mesh can be reconstructed by using hash function. Top triangular meshes in depth out of numbers of triangles must be picked up by ray-casting technique. Mesh deformation is based on the front triangular mesh in the process of simulation, which deforms interest area instead of control points. Experiments on face model show that the proposed 3D animation facial plastic surgery can effectively demonstrate the simulated appearance of post-operation.

  2. Validity, Reliability, and the Questionable Role of Psychometrics in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This report examines the meaning of validity and reliability and the role of psychometrics in plastic surgery. Study titles increasingly include the word “valid” to support the authors’ claims. Studies by other investigators may be labeled “not validated.” Validity simply refers to the ability of a device to measure what it intends to measure. Validity is not an intrinsic test property. It is a relative term most credibly assigned by the independent user. Similarly, the word “reliable” is subject to interpretation. In psychometrics, its meaning is synonymous with “reproducible.” The definitions of valid and reliable are analogous to accuracy and precision. Reliability (both the reliability of the data and the consistency of measurements is a prerequisite for validity. Outcome measures in plastic surgery are intended to be surveys, not tests. The role of psychometric modeling in plastic surgery is unclear, and this discipline introduces difficult jargon that can discourage investigators. Standard statistical tests suffice. The unambiguous term “reproducible” is preferred when discussing data consistency. Study design and methodology are essential considerations when assessing a study’s validity.

  3. Big Data and Machine Learning in Plastic Surgery: A New Frontier in Surgical Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Jonathan; Corban, Jason; Gaster, Richard; Kanevsky, Ari; Lin, Samuel; Gilardino, Mirko

    2016-05-01

    Medical decision-making is increasingly based on quantifiable data. From the moment patients come into contact with the health care system, their entire medical history is recorded electronically. Whether a patient is in the operating room or on the hospital ward, technological advancement has facilitated the expedient and reliable measurement of clinically relevant health metrics, all in an effort to guide care and ensure the best possible clinical outcomes. However, as the volume and complexity of biomedical data grow, it becomes challenging to effectively process "big data" using conventional techniques. Physicians and scientists must be prepared to look beyond classic methods of data processing to extract clinically relevant information. The purpose of this article is to introduce the modern plastic surgeon to machine learning and computational interpretation of large data sets. What is machine learning? Machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence, can address clinically relevant problems in several domains of plastic surgery, including burn surgery; microsurgery; and craniofacial, peripheral nerve, and aesthetic surgery. This article provides a brief introduction to current research and suggests future projects that will allow plastic surgeons to explore this new frontier of surgical science.

  4. Plastic surgery in the treatment of primary melanoma of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panajotović Ljubomir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is still the most effective treatment modality of skin melanoma. The margins of excision are determined by the thickness of primary tumor. From January 1999 to December 2001, 99 patients (57 male and 42 female, of the average age 55, were surgically treated at the Clinic for Plastic Surgery and Burns of the Military Medical Academy. The most usual localization of the primary tumor was the back (23.23%, followed by the forearm, and the lower leg. Regarding the clinical type of the melanoma, nodular melanoma dominated (62.62%. Microscopic staging of the melanoma (classification according to Clark and Breslow, showed that the majority of patients already suffered from the advanced primary disease, which called for radical excision and the choice of reconstructive methods in the closure of post-excision defects. The reconstructive plastic surgical methods enabled the closure of post-excision tissue defects, regardless of their size, structure, and localization. During the closure of post-excision defects, direct wound closure or split skin draft was performed in 76.76% of patients. Flaps were applied in 19.19% of patients with the primary melanoma of the head, face foot, and hand. The sufficiency of the available reconstructive procedures makes plastic surgery irreplaceable in the surgical treatment of the primary melanoma of the skin.

  5. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  6. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wani, Shabeer Ahmad; Rabah, Sari M; Alfadil, Sara; Dewanjee, Nancy; Najmi, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility...

  7. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  8. The burn disease: a disease of great value in the cultural heritage of plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, F

    2014-06-30

    In 1961 I began my career as a plastic surgeon at the Department of Plastic Surgery of the Civic Hospital of Padua. In those years, the department was headed by its founder, Prof. G. Dogo, who had just gained his independence to work within the discipline of surgery. Its key feature consisted, at its core, in an entirely new section for those times: the Burn Centre, later known as the "Intensive Care Unit for Acute Burn Victims." At that time, Prof. Masellis, the founder of the Mediterranean Burn Club, was also working among us. The department was still dealing with the disastrous traumatic pathologies that the Italian population had from the Second World War. The beds were still largely occupied by patients suffering from war injuries caused by bomb explosions and fires. These were the reason for the creation of the Burn Centre and subsequently for the promotion of the establishment of a department of plastic surgery. I therefore had the opportunity to see a multitude of different clinical cases and to experiment with the various operation techniques known to plastic surgeons at the time. But it was not only the surgical aspect that fascinated me; I was fascinated by the burn as a disease - the extraordinary problems of their pathophysiology and the logic of treating them, generally and locally - no longer as had been suggested by vague suppositions, but by suggestive hypotheses based on clinical and experimental observations. Over the years, the skills involved in plastic surgery have expanded: its numerous therapeutic procedures have been applied to the treatment of many other diseases. But the burn-as-disease was always at the top of my cultural interests. It always had something to teach me, whether clinically, scientifically or ethically. Yes, even ethically, because the burn patient, like few others who are ill, truly challenges his physician's ethical core and moral strength. The contents of this piece of writing stem from "opinions" that the author has had

  9. The burn disease: a disease of great value in the cultural heritage of plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, F.

    2014-01-01

    Personal introduction In 1961 I began my career as a plastic surgeon at the Department of Plastic Surgery of the Civic Hospital of Padua. In those years, the department was headed by its founder, Prof. G. Dogo, who had just gained his independence to work within the discipline of surgery. Its key feature consisted, at its core, in an entirely new section for those times: the Burn Centre, later known as the “Intensive Care Unit for Acute Burn Victims.” At that time, Prof. Masellis, the founder of the Mediterranean Burn Club, was also working among us. The department was still dealing with the disastrous traumatic pathologies that the Italian population had from the Second World War. The beds were still largely occupied by patients suffering from war injuries caused by bomb explosions and fires. These were the reason for the creation of the Burn Centre and subsequently for the promotion of the establishment of a department of plastic surgery. I therefore had the opportunity to see a multitude of different clinical cases and to experiment with the various operation techniques known to plastic surgeons at the time. But it was not only the surgical aspect that fascinated me; I was fascinated by the burn as a disease – the extraordinary problems of their pathophysiology and the logic of treating them, generally and locally – no longer as had been suggested by vague suppositions, but by suggestive hypotheses based on clinical and experimental observations. Over the years, the skills involved in plastic surgery have expanded: its numerous therapeutic procedures have been applied to the treatment of many other diseases. But the burn-as-disease was always at the top of my cultural interests. It always had something to teach me, whether clinically, scientifically or ethically. Yes, even ethically, because the burn patient, like few others who are ill, truly challenges his physician’s ethical core and moral strength. The contents of this piece of writing stem from

  10. 76 FR 39882 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  11. 78 FR 30928 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  12. 76 FR 62419 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  13. 76 FR 14415 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  14. 78 FR 16684 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  15. 77 FR 20642 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  16. 75 FR 49940 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic...

  17. Esthetic plastic surgery: Experiencies concerning corporal (reconstructions and implications for nursin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Fernanda Voese

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify reasons which lead healthy subjects to search, for the first time, surgical methods for corporal modifications. Methods: it is a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews which were recorded. The interviews were made with eight women and resulted into four analytic categories. Results: the reasons which took healthy subjects to face surgical risks are regarding the improvement of the satisfaction with their own corporal image aiming at reaching a higher social insertion. It was observed that dissatisfaction concerning physical appearance was generated by inherited characteristics or by marks left after pregnancy. Financial cost, fear and family support, can make the decision to undergo the surgery difficult. Conclusion: the plastic surgery can promote the regain of self-esteem in the subject who makes the surgery.

  18. Evaluation of resident's training for endoscopic sinus surgery using a sheep's head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Vargas, Beatriz; Romero-Salazar, Azucena Lloris; Reyes Burneo, Pablo M; Vásquez Hincapie, Catalina; de Los Santos Granado, Gonzalo; Del Castillo López, Raúl; Frágola Arnau, Claudio; Cobeta Marco, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Training in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is an essential part of each ENT resident and it takes place on a very fragile area. This study focus on showing the learning curve of FESS, using an anatomical model such as the sheep's head. Four residents in our centre performed dissections. Each of these residents operated eight sheep's head. They performed an endoscopic septoplasty followed by maxillary antrostomy, total ethmoidectomy and frontal sinusotomy on every head. A staff member guided all procedures and checked for the appropriate dissection and complications occurred. Analysis was made upon the residents' performance of their first four septoplasties and eight nasal sides against their subsequent performance of the same. Final procedures presented better outcomes than the initial ones on every step of them. Results were measured by means of decrease of time (P < 0.0001) and complications, showing no major complications on the latest ones. Sheep's head is a suitable substitute for the cadaveric human head, to obtain the surgical skills needed for FESS procedures. Sheep's nasal cavity allows gaining dexterity and it is an easy model to obtain.

  19. Career decisions and the structure of training: an American Board Of Colon and Rectal Surgery survey of colorectal residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Constance C; Rothenberger, David A; Trudel, Judith L; Wolff, Bruce G

    2009-07-01

    To investigate potential impacts of restructuring general surgery training on colorectal (CR) surgery recruitment and expertise. In response to the American Surgical Association Blue Ribbon Committee report on surgical education (2004), the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery, working with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and American Board of Surgery, established a committee (2006) to review residency training curricula and study new pathways to certification as a CR surgeon. To address concerns related to shortened general surgery residency, the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery committee surveyed recent, current, and entering CR residents on the timing and factors associated with their career choice and opinions regarding restructuring. A 10-item, online survey of 189 CR surgeons enrolled in the class years of 2005, 2006, and 2007 was administered and analyzed May to July 2007. One hundred forty-five CR residents responded (77%); results were consistent across class years and types of general surgery training program. Seventy percent of respondents had rotated onto a CR service by the end of their PGY-2 year. Most identified CR as a career interest in their PGY-3 or PGY-4 year. Overall interest in CR surgery, the influence of CR mentors and teachers, and positive exposure to CR as PGY-3, PGY-4, or PGY-5 residents were the top cited factors influencing choice decisions. Respondents were opposed to restructuring by a 2:1 ratio, primarily because of concerns about inadequate training and lack of time to develop technical expertise. Shortening general surgery residency would not necessarily limit exposure to CR rotations and mentors unless such rotations are cut. The details of proposed restructuring are critical.

  20. Does resident participation influence otolaryngology-head and neck surgery morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Nicholas B; Reh, Douglas D; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Gourin, Christine G

    2016-10-01

    Patients may perceive resident procedural participation as detrimental to their outcome. Our objective is to investigate whether otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) housestaff participation is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. Case-control study. OHNS patients were analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2006 to 2013 databases. We compared the incidence of 30-day postoperative morbidity, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations in patients operated on by resident surgeons with attending supervision (AR) with patients operated on by an attending surgeon alone (AO) using cross-tabulations and multivariable regression. There were 27,018 cases with primary surgeon data available, with 9,511 AR cases and 17,507 AO cases. Overall, 3.62% of patients experienced at least one postoperative complication. The AR cohort had a higher complication rate of 5.73% than the AO cohort at 2.48% (P < .001). After controlling for all other variables, there was no significant difference in morbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 [0.89 to 1.24]), mortality (OR = 0.91 [0.49 to 1.70]), readmission (OR = 1.29 [0.92 to 1.81]), or reoperation (OR = 1.28 [0.91 to 1.80]) for AR compared to AO cases. There was no difference between postgraduate year levels for adjusted 30-day morbidity or mortality. There is an increased incidence of morbidity, mortality, readmission, and reoperation in OHNS surgical cases with resident participation, which appears related to increased comorbidity with AR patients. After controlling for other variables, resident participation was not associated with an increase in 30-day morbidity, mortality, readmission, or reoperation odds. These data suggest that OHNS resident participation in surgical cases is not associated with poorer short-term outcomes. 3b Laryngoscope, 126:2263-2269, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. The surgical experience of general surgery residents: an analysis of the applicability of the specialty program in General and Digestive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targarona Soler, Eduardo Ma; Jover Navalon, Jose Ma; Gutierrez Saiz, Javier; Turrado Rodríguez, Víctor; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-03-01

    Residents in our country have achieved a homogenous surgical training by following a structured residency program. This is due to the existence of specific training programs for each specialty. The current program, approved in 2007, has a detailed list of procedures that a surgeon should have performed in order to complete training. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the program with regard to the number of procedures performed during the residency period. A data collection form was designed that included the list of procedures from the program of the specialty; it was sent in April 2014 to all hospitals with accredited residency programs. In September 2014 the forms were analysed, and a general descriptive study was performed; a subanalysis according to the resident's sex and Autonomous region was also performed. The number of procedures performed according to the number of residents in the different centers was also analyzed. The survey was sent to 117 hospitals with accredited programs, which included 190 resident places. A total of 91 hospitals responded (53%). The training offered adapts in general to the specialty program. The total number of procedures performed in the different sub-areas, in laparoscopic and emergency surgery is correct or above the number recommended by the program, with the exception of esophageal-gastric and hepatobiliary surgery. The sub-analysis according to Autonomous region did not show any significant differences in the total number of procedures, however, there were significant differences in endocrine surgery (P=.001) and breast surgery (P=.042). A total of 55% of residents are female, with no significant differences in distribution in Autonomous regions. However, female surgeons operate more than their male counterparts during the residency period (512±226 vs. 625±244; P<.01). The number of residents in the hospital correlates with the number of procedures performed; the residents with more procedures

  2. Plastic Surgery Inclusion in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Perception, Challenges, and Career Choice-A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, M; Vaughan, R; Thomas, S

    2017-01-01

    The undergraduate medical curriculum has been overcrowded with core learning outcomes with no formal exposure to plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to compare medical students from two educational settings for the basic understanding, preferred learning method, and factors influencing a career choice in plastic surgery. A prospective cohort study based on a web-based anonymous questionnaire sent to final year medical students at Birmingham University (United Kingdom), McGill University (Canada), and a control group (non-medical staff). The questions were about plastic surgery: (1) source of information and basic understanding; (2) undergraduate curriculum inclusion and preferred learning methods; (3) factors influencing a career choice. A similar questionnaire was sent to non-medical staff (control group). The data was analysed based on categorical outcomes (Chi-square χ2) and level of significance p ≤ 0.05. Questionnaire was analysed for 243 students (Birmingham, n = 171/332, 52%) (McGill n = 72/132, 54%). Birmingham students (14%) considered the word "plastic" synonymous with "cosmetic" more than McGill students (4%, p inclusion. The preferred learning method was lectures for McGill students (61%, p inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. There was a difference for plastic surgery source of information, operations, and preferred method of learning for students. The study highlighted the urgent need to reform plastic surgery undergraduate teaching in collaboration with national educational bodies worldwide.

  3. Trends in Pediatric Surgery Operative Volume among Residents and Fellows: Improving the Experience for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talutis, Stephanie; McAneny, David; Chen, Catherine; Doherty, Gerard; Sachs, Teviah

    2016-06-01

    The ACGME requires general surgery residents (GSR) to perform 20 pediatric surgery cases as part of the total 750 cases before graduation. We queried the ACGME General Surgery (1999 to 2014) and Pediatric Surgery (2003 to 2014) Case Logs for all pediatric operations performed during training. Means (±SD) and medians (10(th):90(th) percentiles) were compared, and R(2) was calculated for all trends. The number of pediatric surgery fellows (PSF) increased 63% (23 to 39; R(2) = 0.82), while GSR numbers increased 12% (989 to 1,105; R(2) = 0.77). Total and average pediatric surgery case volume for GSR decreased from 39,309 to 32,156 (R(2) = 0.90) and 39.7 ± 13 to 29.1 ± 10 (R(2) = 0.91), respectively. Meanwhile, average PSF case volume increased from 980 ± 208 to 1,137 ± 202 (R(2) = 0.83). These trends persisted for inguinal/umbilical hernia (GSR 22.1 ± 13 to 15.6 ± 10; R(2) = 0.93; PSF 90.5 ± 17.6 to 104.4 ± 20.7; R(2) = 0.34), pyloric stenosis (GSR 3.9 ± 3 to 2.8 ± 3; R(2) = 0.60; PSF 29.6 ± 15 to 39.7 ± 16.8; R(2) = 0.69), and intestinal atresia (GSR 1.3 ± 2 to 1.1 ± 2; R(2) = 0.34; PSF 4.3 ± 4 to 11.8 ± 8; R(2) = 0.21). The mean number of GSR pediatric operations diminished for both junior (37.1 ± 20 to 27.3 ± 16; R(2) = 0.88) and chief (2.6 ± 5 to 1.7 ± 5; R(2) = 0.75) years. Teaching cases in pediatric surgery decreased at all levels. Although the percentage of GSR teaching cases performed during chief years fell modestly (6.6% to 4.7%; R(2) = 0.53), median teaching cases dropped from 2 (0:11 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]) to zero (0:0 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]). Mean PSF teaching cases declined (100.7 ± 396 to 44.5 ± 42; R(2) = 0.72), while the percentage of operations that were teaching cases decreased more sharply (10.3% to 3.5%; R(2) = 0.82). Total pediatric surgery cases and PSF operative volume have increased, while GSR operative volume has decreased. Opportunities may exist to increase resident participation while

  4. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  5. Compliance of Systematic Reviews in Plastic Surgery With the PRISMA Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon-Young; Sagoo, Harkiran; Whitehurst, Katharine; Wellstead, Georgina; Fowler, Alexander J; Agha, Riaz A; Orgill, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews attempt to answer research questions by synthesizing the data in primary articles. They are an increasingly important tool within evidence-based medicine, guiding clinical practice, future research, and health care policy. To determine the reporting quality of recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses in plastic surgery with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, in 5 major plastic surgery journals. Screening, identification, and data extraction were performed independently by 2 teams. Articles were reviewed for compliance with reporting of 27 items in the PRISMA checklist. Data analysis was conducted from January 1 to July 30, 2015. The sum of PRISMA checklist items (1-27) per systematic review. From an initial set of 163 articles, 79 met the inclusion criteria. The median PRISMA score was 16 of 27 items (59%) (range, 6%-26%; 95% CI, 14%-17%). Compliance varied between individual PRISMA items. It was poorest for items related to the use of review protocol (item 5; 4 articles [5%]) and presentation of data on the risk of bias of each study (item 19; 14 articles [18%]). Compliance was the highest for description of rationale (item 3; 78 articles [99%]), sources of funding and other support (item 27; 75 articles [95%]), and inclusion of a structured summary in the abstract (item 2; 75 articles [95%]). The reporting quality of systematic reviews in plastic surgery requires improvement. Enforcement of compliance through journal submission systems, as well as improved education, awareness, and a cohesive strategy among all stakeholders, is called for. NA.

  6. A family operation: plastic surgeons who perform aesthetic surgery on spouses or other family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Sara A; Slavin, Sumner A; Goldwyn, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether plastic surgeons would perform elective cosmetic surgery on spouses or other family members and how many have done so, the type of procedures, the circumstances under which the surgery took place, and the results. Participants were 465 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, representing 30.7 percent of the overall sample pool of 1513 members recruited through anonymous, voluntary participation in an online survey. Approximately half (51.8 percent) were 51 to 65 years old, most were men (91.2 percent), and most were from large urban areas; respondents had been in practice for 1 to 40 years. The plastic surgeons who returned the survey were comfortable performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members, the majority having already done so. Eighty-eight percent reported they would operate on a spouse or other family member, and 83.9 percent reported they already had. The main motivation (67 percent) was their belief that they were the best surgeon for the procedure. The most commonly listed operations were rhinoplasty, abdominoplasty, eyelidplasty, face lift, breast augmentation, and liposuction. Patients included spouses, children, parents, cousins, and in-laws, ranging from teenaged males to women in their 70s. The overwhelming majority (94.2 percent) reported no complications, and 99.5 percent believed the patients were satisfied with their outcome. Survey participants are comfortable with the idea of performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members. Regardless of the invasiveness of the procedure or their relationship with the patient, respondents reported no complications and a high level of patient satisfaction anomalous for any patient-surgeon sample, suggesting that surgeons who operate on family members hold confident opinions of their surgical skills and results.

  7. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Surgery Resident Operative Logs: The Last Quarter Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Garland, Brandon T; Huntington, Ciara R; McAteer, Jarod P; Richards, Morgan K; Zern, Nicole Kansier; Gow, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    To describe secular trends in operative experience for surgical trainees across an extended period using the most comprehensive data available, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs. Some experts have expressed concern that current trainees are inadequately prepared for independent practice. One frequently mentioned factor is whether duty hours' restrictions (DHR) implemented in 2003 and 2004 contributed by reducing time spent in the operating room. A dataset was generated from annual ACGME reports. Operative volume for total major cases (TMC), defined categories, and four index laparoscopic procedures was evaluated. TMC dropped after implementation of DHR but rebounded after a transition period (949 vs 946 cases, P = nonsignificance). Abdominal cases increased from 22% of overall cases to 31%. Alimentary cases increased from 21% to 26%. Trauma and vascular surgery substantially decreased. For trauma, this drop took place well before DHR. The decrease in vascular surgery also began before DHR but continued afterward as well: 148 cases/resident in the late 1990s to 107 currently. Although total operative volume rebounded after implementation of DHR, diversity of operative experienced narrowed. The combined increase in alimentary and abdominal cases is nearly 13%, over a half-year's worth of operating in 5-year training programs. Bedrock general surgery cases-trauma, vascular, pediatrics, and breast-decreased. Laparoscopic operations have steadily increased. If the competence of current graduates has, in fact, diminished. Our analysis suggests that operative volume is not the problem. Rather, changing disease processes, subspecialization, reductions in resident autonomy, and technical innovation challenge how today's general surgeons are trained.

  8. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  9. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip fracture, 65 years or older and allowed weight-bearing after surgery. Patients or their relatives were interviewed about their residential status and functional level at pre-fracture, three months and one year after surgery, using the Functional Independence Measure. Losses of function for the main activities affected were, at the first month, third month and one year relative to the pre-fracture status, 50%, 25% and 12%, respectively, for locomotion, 40%, 25% and 20%, respectively, for mobility and 27%, 17% and 15%, respectively, for self care (p loss of independence in the first year after a hip fracture is substantial for specific activities. Recovery mainly takes place during the first three months after surgery. Change of residence mostly involved those patients who lived alone in their own home at pre-fracture. Implications for Rehabilitation One year after fracture, patients did not recover their previous function, and the activities most affected at the one-year follow-up were: dressing lower body, bathing/showering, transfer bathtub/shower and walking up/down stairs. After a hip fracture, most recovery of the function happens within the first three months, though some functional activities continue recovering over the first year. Rehabilitation programs cannot be based only on mobility activities, the recovery of other daily living activities should also be included.

  10. Ultrasound Screening for Deep Venous Thrombosis Detection: A Prospective Evaluation of 200 Plastic Surgery Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The natural history of thromboembolism in plastic surgery outpatients differs from orthopedic patients. The risk of a deep venous thrombosis in a patient treated with Spontaneous breathing, Avoid gas, Face up, Extremities mobile anesthesia is approximately 0.5%. Thromboses are unlikely to develop intraoperatively. In the single affected patient, the thrombosis was located distally, in a location that is less prone to embolism and highly susceptible to anticoagulation. Ultrasound screening is an effective and highly feasible method to identify affected patients for treatment.

  11. A Simple Method for International Standardization of Photographic Documentation for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Seung Chul

    2017-02-03

    Due to the lack of internationally standardized, objective, and scientific photographic standardization methods, differences in photographic documents have gravely affected the truth of surgical outcomes by visual misperception or illusion, thus hindering the development of plastic surgery clinically and scholastically. Here I suggest a simple method for standardization of facial photographs. The method consists of an imaginary transverse line (tentatively the "PSA line") rather than the Frankfort horizontal plane and uses a white background with black grids and standard RGB with CMYK circles. This simplified method of photographic standardization would help our professional society to make international standards on facial photographic documentation to maintain scholastic ethics, conscience, and morals.

  12. Global contributions to Annals of Plastic Surgery: authorship in an English language journal by international colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Lee; Lineaweaver, William

    2012-06-01

    We reviewed the contributor demographics of recent volumes of Annals of Plastic Surgery to quantify the contributions of authors from countries where the primary language is not English. For 2 volumes of Annals (63 and 65), such authors contributed 57% of the total articles published. Within the new section format of volume 66, authors from non-English language countries accounted for 60% of all original articles with substantial and often dominant representation in all sections. This survey shows that Annals publishes articles from an international population of contributors with effective inclusion of authors from countries with primary languages other than English.

  13. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to m...

  14. Bone-added periodontal plastic surgery: a new approach in esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Gholam Ali; Gholami, Hadi; Amid, Reza; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Mehdizadeh, Amir Reza; Youssefi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a combined technique including bone grafting, connective tissue graft, and coronally advanced flap to create some space for simultaneous bone regrowth and root coverage. A 23 year-old female was referred to our private clinic with a severe class II Miller recession and lack of attached gingiva. The suggested treatment plan comprised of root coverage combined with xenograft bone particles. The grafted area healed well and full coverage was achieved at 12-month follow-up visit. Bone-added periodontal plastic surgery can be considered as a practical procedure for management of deep gingival recession without buccal bone plate.

  15. Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  16. A review of prophylactic antibiotics use in plastic surgery in China and a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge-hong; Hou, Dian-ju; Fu, Hua-dong; Guo, Jing-ying; Guo, Xiao-bo; Gong, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for plastic surgical procedures at our hospital, and to perform a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgery. The records of patients who received plastic surgical procedures with Class I surgical incisions between 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A systematic literature review was conducted for studies examining the use of prophylactic antibiotics for Class I surgical wounds. A total of 13,997 cases with Class I surgical incisions were included. Prophylactic antibiotics were given in 13,865 cases (99.1%). The antibiotics used were primarily cefuroxime, clindamycin, metronidazole, cefoxitin sodium, and gentamicin. The average duration of administration was 4.84 ± 3.07 (range, 1-51) days. Antibiotics were administered postoperatively in >99% of cases while preoperative antibiotic administration was only given in 32 cases (0.23%). Wound infections occurred in 21 cases for an overall infection rate of 0.15%. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. There was marked variation in the timing of antibiotic administration with antibiotics given pre-, peri-, and postoperatively. Of studies that compared the use of prophylactic antibiotics with placebo, a reduction in wound infections was noted in 4 trials and no difference was noted in 6 trials. No significant difference in infection rates was shown between the prophylactic and postoperative arms. In conclusion, prophylactic antibiotics are overused in plastic surgical procedures. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgical procedures are needed.

  17. Evaluation of Body Image and Sexual Satisfaction in Women Undergoing Female Genital Plastic/Cosmetic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael P; Placik, Otto J; Matlock, David L; Simopoulos, Alex F; Dalton, Teresa A; Veale, David; Hardwick-Smith, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Little prospective data exists regarding the procedures constituting female genital plastic/cosmetic surgery (FGPS). To evaluate whether the procedures of labiaplasty and vaginoperineoplasty improve genital self image, and evaluate effects on sexual satisfaction. Prospective cohort case-controlled study of 120 subjects evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative, paired with a demographically similar control group. Interventions include labiaplasty, clitoral hood reduction, and/or aesthetic vaginal tightening, defined as perineoplasty + "vaginoplasty" (aka "vaginal rejuvenation."). Outcome measures include body image, genital self-image, sexual satisfaction, and body esteem. As a group, study patients tested at baseline showing body dissatisfaction, negative genital self-image, and poorer indices of sexual satisfaction. Preoperative body image of study patients were in a range considered to be mild to moderately dysmorphic, but matched controls at one and two years; genital self-image scores at entry were considerably lower than controls, but by 2-year follow-up had surpassed control value at entry. Similarly, sexual satisfaction values, significantly lower at entry, equaled at one, and surpassed control values, at 2 years. Postoperatively, at all points in time, these differences in body image and genital self-image disappeared, and sexual satisfaction markedly improved. Overall body esteem did not differ between study and control groups, with the exception of the genital esteem quotient, which improved after surgery. Women requesting and completing FGPS, when tested by validated instruments, at entry report sexual dissatisfaction and negative genital self-image. When tested at several points in time after surgery up to two years, these findings were no longer present. When performed by an experienced surgeon, FGPS appears to provide sexual and genital self-image improvement. 2 Therapeutic. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

  18. Plastic Surgery Inclusion in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Perception, Challenges, and Career Choice—A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R.; Thomas, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The undergraduate medical curriculum has been overcrowded with core learning outcomes with no formal exposure to plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to compare medical students from two educational settings for the basic understanding, preferred learning method, and factors influencing a career choice in plastic surgery. Design and Setting A prospective cohort study based on a web-based anonymous questionnaire sent to final year medical students at Birmingham University (United Kingdom), McGill University (Canada), and a control group (non-medical staff). The questions were about plastic surgery: (1) source of information and basic understanding; (2) undergraduate curriculum inclusion and preferred learning methods; (3) factors influencing a career choice. A similar questionnaire was sent to non-medical staff (control group). The data was analysed based on categorical outcomes (Chi-square χ2) and level of significance p ≤ 0.05. Results Questionnaire was analysed for 243 students (Birmingham, n = 171/332, 52%) (McGill n = 72/132, 54%). Birmingham students (14%) considered the word “plastic” synonymous with “cosmetic” more than McGill students (4%, p inclusion. The preferred learning method was lectures for McGill students (61%, p inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. There was a difference for plastic surgery source of information, operations, and preferred method of learning for students. The study highlighted the urgent need to reform plastic surgery undergraduate teaching in collaboration with national educational bodies worldwide. PMID:28630768

  19. Plastics and microplastics on recreational beaches in Punta del Este (Uruguay): Unseen critical residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya, J P; Teixeira de Mello, F; Carrizo, D; Weinstein, F; Olivera, Y; Cedrés, F; Pereira, M; Fossati, M

    2016-11-01

    Beaches are social-ecological systems that provide several services improving human well-being. However, as one of the major coastal interfaces they are subject to plastic pollution, one of the most significant global environmental threats at present. For the first time for Uruguayan beaches, this study assessed and quantified the accumulation of plastic and microplastic debris on sandy beaches of the major touristic destination Punta del Este during the austral spring of 2013. Aiming to provide valuable information for decision-making, we performed a detailed analysis of plastic debris, their eventual transport pathways to the coast (from land and sea), and the associated persistent pollutants. The results indicated that the smallest size fractions (plastic debris, and their levels did not differ from baseline values reported for similar locations. The abundance of plastic debris was significantly and positively correlated with both the presence of possible land-based sources (e.g. storm-water drains, beach bars, beach access, car parking, and roads), and dissipative beach conditions. The analysis of coastal currents suggested some potential deposition areas along Punta del Este, and particularly for resin pellets, although modeling was not conclusive. From a local management point of view, the development and use of indices that allow predicting trends in the accumulation of plastic debris would be critically useful. The time dimension (e.g. seasonal) should also be considered for this threat, being crucial for locations such as Uruguay, where the use of beaches increases significantly during the summer. This first diagnosis aims to generate scientific baseline, necessary for improved management of plastic litter on beaches and their watersheds.

  20. Endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should preferentially be done by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Gary R; Sharp, John

    2005-03-01

    This article is the result of a debate. The motion proposed was that "endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should be done preferentially by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.'' Arguments in favor of the motion were that with the development of endovascular surgery, there are now less open vascular procedures to perform and hence, vascular trainees needed to hone their skills on these limited cases rather than waste that experience on a general surgery resident. This focused training experience would allow vascular fellows to be become more highly skilled vascular surgeons. Additionally, endovascular procedures are an important component of modern vascular surgery, and it is important for the vascular fellow to develop significant experience with and acquire the appropriate numbers of endovascular cases to get the necessary credentials when going into a vascular practice. Arguments against the motion were that exposure to vascular cases will make a better general surgeon, one who will also be well equipped to deal with trauma cases and situations where the control of bleeding might be life saving. Additionally, the issue of exposure of general surgery residents to vascular cases might be a positive recruitment strategy for future vascular fellows. The motion was carried by a small majority vote.

  1. Microsurgery: The Top 50 Classic Papers in Plastic Surgery: A Citation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac Weekes Joyce

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The number of citations that a published article has received reflects the importance of the paper in the particular area of practice. In microsurgery, thus far, which journal articles are cited most frequently is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the characteristics of the top 50 papers in the field of microsurgery in the plastic surgery literature. Methods The 50 most cited papers published in high impact plastic surgery and microsurgery journals were identified. The articles were ranked in the order of the number of citations received. These 50 classic papers were analyzed for article type, journal distribution, and geographic and institutional origin. Results Six international journals contributed to the top 50 papers in microsurgery. The most cited paper reported on the early use of the vascularized bone graft and was cited 116 times. The top 50 papers originated from just 10 countries with the United States producing the most. The Preston and Northcote Community Hospital, Melbourne published 5 papers and this was the most productive institution in the top 50. Conclusions These papers represent many important milestones in the relatively short history of microsurgery. Furthermore, our citation analysis provides useful information to budding authors as to what makes a paper attain a "classic" status.

  2. Challenges of periodontal plastic surgery in a depressed economy: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon O Nwhator

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Solomon O NwhatorDepartment of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, NigeriaAbstract: Advancements in restorative dentistry have resulted in people keeping their teeth for longer, and an increase in gingival recession as the gums recede due to age, periodontal disease, thin gingiva, or other factors. The demand for periodontal plastic surgery appears to be increasing. Several methods have been used in the treatment of denuded roots. Of these, the free gingival autograft, the coronally displaced flap, guided tissue regeneration, and, lately, the connective tissue graft appear to be the main methods employed. There are as yet no reports of periodontal plastic surgery performed in Nigeria. We report two cases of Miller’s Class 2 gingival recession treated by free gingival autografts in the specialist periodontal clinic of a South-Western teaching hospital in Nigeria. The challenges of awareness, a dearth of expertise, cost of materials, consequent cost of treatment, and how these affect the accessing of treatment are highlighted. The methods used in getting over these hurdles to provide treatment are also discussed.Keywords: gingival recession, free gingival autograft, Nigeria

  3. Development of Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterson, Stephanie A; Singh, Mansher; Orgill, Dennis; Ghazinouri, Roya; Han, Elizabeth; Ciociolo, George; Laskowski, Karl; Greenberg, Jeffery O

    2015-09-01

    With rising cost of healthcare, there is an urgent need for developing effective and economical streamlined care. In clinical situations with limited data or conflicting evidence-based data, there is significant institutional and individual practice variation. Quality improvement with the use of Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs) might be beneficial in such scenarios. The SCAMPs method has never before been reported to be utilized in plastic surgery. The topic of immediate breast reconstruction was identified as a possible SCAMPs project. The initial stages of SCAMPs development, including planning and implementation, were entered. The SCAMP Champion, along with the SCAMPs support team, developed targeted data statements. The SCAMP was then written and a decision-tree algorithm was built. Buy-in was obtained from the Division of Plastic Surgery and a SCAMPs data form was generated to collect data. Decisions pertaining to "immediate implant-based breast reconstruction" were approved as an acceptable topic for SCAMPs development. Nine targeted data statements were made based on the clinical decision points within the SCAMP. The SCAMP algorithm, and the SDF, required multiple revisions. Ultimately, the SCAMP was effectively implemented with multiple iterations in data collection. Full execution of the SCAMP may allow better-defined selection criteria for this complex patient population. Deviations from the SCAMP may allow for improvement of the SCAMP and facilitate consensus within the Division. Iterative and adaptive quality improvement utilizing SCAMPs creates an opportunity to reduce cost by improving knowledge about best practice.

  4. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop: A Cadaver-Based Workshop to Prepare Residents for Surgery in Austere Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Meguid, Robert A; Kuwayama, David P

    2017-08-29

    Interest in humanitarian surgery is high among surgical and obstetric residents. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop is an annual 2-day course exposing senior residents to surgical techniques essential in low- and middle-income countries but not traditionally taught in US residencies. We evaluated the course's ability to foster resident comfort, knowledge, and competence in these skills. The cohort of course participants was studied prospectively. Participants attended didactic sessions followed by skills sessions using cadavers. Sample areas of focus included general surgery (mesh-free hernia repair), orthopedics (powerless external fixation), and neurosurgery (powerless craniotomy). Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire assessing confidence with taught skills; took a knowledge-based test composed of multiple choice and open-ended questions; and participated in a manual skills test of tibial external fixation. The Center for Surgical Innovation, University of Colorado School of Medicine. A total of 12 residents (11 general surgical and 1 obstetric) from ten US institutions. After the course, participants perceived increased confidence in performing all 27 taught procedures and ability to practice in low- and middle-income countries. In knowledge-based testing, 10 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on multiple choice questioning and 9 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on open-ended questioning with structured scoring. In manual skills testing, all external fixator constructs demonstrated objective improvement on structured scoring and subjective improvement on stability assessment. For senior residents interested in humanitarian surgery, a combination of skills-focused teaching and manual practice led to self-perceived and objective improvement in relevant surgical knowledge and skills. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop represents an effective model for transmitting essential surgical

  5. Variables Influencing the Depth of Conscious Sedation in Plastic Surgery: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonwoo; Park, Hyochun; Kim, Hoonnam

    2017-01-01

    Background Conscious sedation has been widely utilized in plastic surgery. However, inadequate research has been published evaluating adequate drug dosage and depth of sedation. In clinical practice, sedation is often inadequate or accompanied by complications when sedatives are administered according to body weight alone. The purpose of this study was to identify variables influencing the depth of sedation during conscious sedation for plastic surgery. Methods This prospective study evaluated 97 patients who underwent plastic surgical procedures under conscious sedation. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, and glucose levels were measured. Midazolam and ketamine were administered intravenously according to a preset protocol. Bispectral index (BIS) recordings were obtained to evaluate the depth of sedation 4, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after midazolam administration. Associations between variables and the BIS were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results Alcohol intake and female sex were positively associated with the mean BIS (P<0.01). Age was negatively associated with the mean BIS (P<0.01). Body mass index (P=0.263), creatinine clearance (P=0.832), smoking history (P=0.398), glucose (P=0.718), AST (P=0.729), and ALT (P=0.423) were not associated with the BIS. Conclusions Older patients tended to have a greater depth of sedation, whereas females and patients with greater alcohol intake had a shallower depth of sedation. Thus, precise dose adjustments of sedatives, accounting for not only weight but also age, sex, and alcohol consumption, are required to achieve safe, effective, and predictable conscious sedation. PMID:28194341

  6. Effect of the 80-hour work week on cases performed by general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElearney, Shannon Tierney; Saalwachter, Alison R; Hedrick, Traci L; Pruett, Timothy L; Sanfey, Hilary A; Sawyer, Robert G

    2005-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented mandatory work week hours restrictions in 2003. Due to the traditionally long hours in general surgery, the effect of restrictions on surgical training and case numbers was a matter of concern. Data was compiled retrospectively from ACGME logs and operating room (OR) records at a university hospital for 2002 and 2003. Work week restrictions began in January 2003. This data was reviewed to determine resident case numbers, both in whole and by postgraduate year (PGY). Mean case numbers per resident-month in 2002 were 8.8 +/- 8.2 for PGY1s, 16.2 +/- 15.7 for PGY2s, 31.4 +/- 12.9 for PGY3s, 31.5 +/- 17.6 for PGY4s, and 31.5 +/- 17.6 for PGY5s. In 2003, they were 8.8 +/- 5.2 for PGY1s, 16.6 +/- 13.9 for PGY2s, 27.8 +/- 12.5 for PGY3s, 38.2 +/- 18.8 for PGY4s, and 26.1 +/- 9.6 for PGY5s. PGY1s, PGY2s, PGY3s, PGY4s, or all classes were not statistically different. PGY5s did have statistically fewer cases in 2003 (P = 0.03). PGY5s did have statistically fewer cases after the work-hours restriction, which likely represented shifting of postcall afternoon cases to other residents. Comparing other classes and all PGYs, case numbers were not statistically different. Operative training experience does not appear to be hindered by the 80-hour work week.

  7. Striving for work-life balance: effect of marriage and children on the experience of 4402 US general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael C; Yeo, Heather; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    To determine how marital status and having children impact US general surgical residents' attitudes toward training and personal life. There is a paucity of research describing how family and children affect the experience of general surgery residents. Cross-sectional survey involving all US categorical general surgery residents. Responses were evaluated by resident/program characteristics. Statistical analysis included the χ test and hierarchical logistic regression modeling. A total of 4402 residents were included (82.4% response rate) and categorized as married, single, or other (separated/divorced/widowed). Men were more likely to be married (57.8% vs 37.9%, P work (P work (P work hours caused strain on family life (P work (P = 0.001), were happy at work (P = 0.001), and reported a good program fit (P = 0.034), but had strain on family life (P work [odds ratio (OR): 1.22, P = 0.035], yet feeling that work caused family strain (OR: 1.66, P work (OR: 0.81, P = 0.007). Residents who were married or parents reported greater satisfaction and work-life conflict. The complex effects of family on surgical residents should inform programs to target support mechanisms for their trainees.

  8. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pcareer, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  9. [Plastic surgery in day hospital conditions: comparison between two hospital models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faga, A; Carminati, M; Falconi, D; Gatti, S; Rottino, A

    2003-12-01

    Personal experience of plastic surgery carried out in Day Hospital conditions is reported. The experience took place within the hospital structure through two different organisational models called here transversal and divisional organisation models: characteristic of the former is that it uses a dedicated interdivisional structure within the hospital involving the centralization of all day-surgery activities, whereas the latter organizes Day Surgery activities within the operating unit whose structures it shares. On the basis of a comparison between the two models we were able to note advantages and disadvantages. We can review our experience in brief by stating that our own preference went to the transversal model which presents the indubitable advantage of being a logistic structure which is hinged on daytime activity and is ready therefore to satisfy on the one hand the needs of this type of patient and, on the other, the needs of the structure itself in efficiency terms. We propose to correct the disadvantages of the transversal model which can be outlined in its lack of homogeneity in the pathology treated and in the subtraction of the criterion of clinical priority in waiting lists through the attainment of a critical dimensional threshold such as to permit programmable sessions with patients with homogeneous pathology (i.e. belonging to the same hospital unit) and through the maintenance of a certain number of Day Hospital beds (around 25%) reserved for new emergency clinical cases.

  10. The power of words: sources of anxiety in patients undergoing local anaesthetic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddick, J; Jawad, S; Southern, S; Majumder, S

    2012-03-01

    With local or regional anaesthesia being employed for more as well as more complex surgical procedures, an increasing number of patients remain fully conscious during their operation. This is generally perceived as being advantageous to the patient as less time is spent in hospital and the side effects of general anaesthesia are avoided. However, there is no direct measure of the patient experience during 'awake surgery', in particular of which aspects of the process may be distressing. Seventy patients undergoing day case plastic surgery under local anaesthesia were asked to complete a short questionnaire immediately following their operation. This was designed to identify specific factors likely to either increase or reduce anxiety during surgery. The questionnaire was initially validated on a pilot group of ten patients. Unsurprisingly, painful stimuli such as injections were identified as potential stressors. More interestingly, the data highlighted that some commonly used surgical terms such as 'knife' and 'scalpel' provoke considerable anxiety in the conscious patient. This varied according to age and sex with younger and female patients being most vulnerable. Other events identified as potential stressors, such as casual conversations and movements among theatre staff, were actually shown to be non-stressful and, in some cases, stress relieving. Technical jargon used by surgical staff can elevate anxiety levels among patients who are awake for their operation. Careful consideration of the words we use may reduce this, particularly in female patients.

  11. Teaching Surgery Residents the Skills to Communicate Difficult News to Patient and Family Members: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Tyrie, Leslie S; Bryczkowski, Sarah; Nagurka, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    Trainees and practicing physicians alike find breaking bad, sad, or difficult news to a patient or family member as one of the most challenging communication tasks they perform. Interpersonal and communication skills are a core competency for resident training. However, in disciplines where technical skills have a major emphasis, such as surgery, the teaching of communication skills may not be a priority. The objective of our study is to review literature in order to identify best practices and learning modalities used to teach surgery trainees the communication skills regarding delivery of difficult news to patients and family members. The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were that the study (1) addresses surgeons' training (nontechnical skills) in breaking difficult news to patient and/or families, (2) describes a teaching modality or intervention targeted to teach surgery residents how to deliver difficult news to patient/family, and (3) is published in English. Articles (n = 225) were screened for final eligibility. After discarding duplicates and noneligible studies, and after abstract/full-text review, 18 articles were included in the final analysis. Most studies are single site; address general surgery residents at varying training levels; and include case-specific, outpatient, and intensive care unit (ICU) settings. There is a paucity of studies in the trauma and unexpected death setting. There is a recent trend to use Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) both to teach and assess communication skills. Variable tools are used to assess this competency as described. Simulation and OSCE format have emerged as modalities of choice both to teach surgery residents how to deliver difficult news and to assess achievement of this competency. There is a gap in the literature regarding teaching and assessing surgery resident communication skills in delivering difficult news after unexpected events in the trauma and operating room

  12. Dedicated Research Time During Surgery Residency Leads to a Significant Decline In Self-Assessed Clinical Aptitude and Surgical Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, Monica M; Yang, Anthony D; Humphries, Misty D; Galante, Joseph M; Salcedo, Edgardo S

    2017-05-19

    The surgical community commonly perceives a decline in surgical and patient care skills among residents who take dedicated time away from clinical activity to engage in research. We hypothesize that residents perceive a decline in their skills because of dedicated research time. UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, an institutional tertiary care center. General surgery residents and graduates from UC Davis general surgery residency training program, who had completed at least 1 year of research during their training. A total of 35 people were asked to complete the survey, and 19 people submitted a completed survey. Participants were invited to complete an online survey. Factors associated with the decline in skills following their research years were examined. All statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS Statistics software. A total of 19 current or former general surgery residents responded to the survey (54% response rate). Overall, 42% described their research as "basic science." Thirteen residents (68%) dedicated 1 year to research, while the remainder spent 2 or more years. Basic science researchers were significantly more likely to report a decrease in clinical judgment (75% vs. 22%, p = 0.013) as well as a decrease in patient care skills (63% vs. 0%, p = 0.002). Residents who dedicated at least 2 years to research were more likely to perceive a decline in overall aptitude and surgical skills (100% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), and a decline in patient care skills (67% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Most residents who dedicate time for research perceive a decline in their overall clinical aptitude and surgical skills. This can have a dramatic effect on the confidence of these residents in caring for patients and leading a care team once they re-enter clinical training. Residents who engaged in 2 or more years of research were significantly more likely to perceive these problems. Further research should determine how to keep residents who are interested in academics

  13. The performance and publication of cost-utility analyses in plastic surgery: Making our specialty relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Achilleas; Ignacy, Teegan A; Ziolkowski, Natalia; Voineskos, Sophocles

    2012-01-01

    Increased spending and reduced funding for health care is forcing decision makers to prioritize procedures and redistribute funds. Decision making is based on reliable data regarding the costs and benefits of medical and surgical procedures; such a study design is known as an economic evaluation. The onus is on the plastic surgery community to produce high-quality economic evaluations that support the cost effectiveness of the procedures that are performed. The present review focuses on the cost-utility analysis and its role in deciding whether a novel technique/procedure/technology should be accepted over one that is prevalent. Additionally, the five steps in undertaking a cost-utility (effectiveness) analysis are outlined.

  14. Reporting the level of evidence in the Canadian Journal of Plastic Surgery: Why is it important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Achilleas; Ignacy, Teegan A; Li, Yu Kit; Coroneos, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    The levels of evidence (LOE) table has been increasingly used by many surgical journals and societies to emphasize the importance of proper study design. Since their origin, LOE have evolved to consider multiple study designs and also the rigour of not only the study type but multiple aspects of its design. The use of LOE aids readers in appraising the literature while encouraging clinical researchers to produce high-quality evidence. The current article discusses the benefits and limitations of the LOE, as well as the LOE of articles published in the Canadian Journal of Plastic Surgery (CJPS). Along with an assessment of the LOE in the CJPS, the authors have provided recommendations to improve the quality and readability of articles published in the CJPS.

  15. Parotitis after epidural anesthesia in plastic surgery: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosique, Marina Junqueira Ferreira; Rosique, Rodrigo Gouvea; Costa, Ilson Rosique; Lara, Brunno Rosique; Figueiredo, Jozé Luiz Ferrari; Ribeiro, Davidson Gomes Barbosa

    2013-08-01

    Acute swelling of the parotid glands after general anesthesia has become known as anesthesia mumps. Its cause is unknown. Only one case of postsurgical parotitis without general anesthesia is reported. This report describes three cases in this setting after plastic surgery. A 37-year-old women underwent breast surgery and abdominoplasty with a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block (bupivacaine 0.5 %). The operative time totaled almost 6 h. Subsequently, 4 h after surgery, the patient experienced painless bilateral parotid swelling without palpable crepitus. The edema resolved completely within 12 h under clinical observation and parenteral hydration. A 45-year-old patient received subglandular breast implants and body contouring with liposuction, all with the patient under a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with 0.5 % marcaine. The total surgical time was 5 h. Subsequently, 3 h after surgery, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. The problem resolved completely in 36 h with clinical observation and parenteral hydration. CASE 3: A 30-year-old patient received a subglandular breast implant and underwent liposuction of the outer thighs using a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with lidocaine 1 %. The duration of surgery was 1 h. Subsequently, 5 h postoperatively, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. Dexamethasone and parenteral hydration were administered. The problem resolved completely in 48 h without sequelae. The occurrence of parotitis in patients undergoing surgery under epidural anesthesia is a novel situation, which increases the range of possible etiologies for this little known condition. Dehydration leading to transient parotid secretion obstruction may play a significant role. Further reports of parotitis occurring in the regional anesthesia setting are expected to help elucidate its pathophysiology. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of

  16. Looking at plastic surgery through Google Glass: part 1. Systematic review of Google Glass evidence and the first plastic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Rosenfield, Lorne K

    2015-03-01

    Google Glass has the potential to become a ubiquitous and translational technological tool within clinical plastic surgery. Google Glass allows clinicians to remotely view patient notes, laboratory results, and imaging; training can be augmented via streamed expert master classes; and patient safety can be improved by remote advice from a senior colleague. This systematic review identified and appraised every Google Glass publication relevant to plastic surgery and describes the first plastic surgical procedures recorded using Google Glass. A systematic review was performed using PubMed National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ovid MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, following modified Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Key search terms "Google" and "Glass" identified mutually inclusive publications that were screened for inclusion. Eighty-two publications were identified, with 21 included for review. Google Glass publications were formal articles (n = 3), editorial/commentary articles (n = 7), conference proceedings (n = 1), news reports (n = 3), and online articles (n = 7). Data support Google Glass' positive impact on health care delivery, clinical training, medical documentation, and patient safety. Concerns exist regarding patient confidentiality, technical issues, and limited software. The first plastic surgical procedure performed using Google Glass was a blepharoplasty on October 29, 2013. Google Glass is an exciting translational technology with the potential to positively impact health care delivery, medical documentation, surgical training, and patient safety. Further high-quality scientific research is required to formally appraise Google Glass in the clinical setting.

  17. Factors influencing residency choice of general surgery applicants--how important is the availability of a skills curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Miles, William S; Greene, Frederick L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the factors that impact residency choice by general surgery applicants and the importance of the availability of skill curricula. Fourth-year medical students (n = 104) interviewing for a general surgery position in an academic medical center voluntarily completed an anonymous survey detailing questions about the factors that influenced their choice of a residency program. Applicants were asked to rank in order of importance 14 factors potentially influencing their decision making and to address specifically the value of skills training. Data are reported as medians (range). The applicants' median age was 26 (range, 24-35) years; 44% were women, and the prior simulator exposure was 1 (range, 0-90) hour. The factors influencing the choice of residency in order of importance were the quality of life of current residents, the volume and variety of cases, and the quality of the curriculum (medians, 3-4), followed by the reputation of the institution and the program director, the location, and mentor advice (medians, 6-8); and the presence of expertise in areas of interest, the availability of a skills curriculum, the academic versus private designation, the efficiency of the hospital, and the size of residency (medians, 9-10). Women were more likely than men to rank lifestyle higher. Applicants' decision making was influenced positively in 92% by the presence of an organized skills curriculum. The main determinants of the applicants' choice of a general surgery program are the quality of life of the residents and the anticipated clinical experience and curriculum quality. The availability of organized skills curricula is low in the applicant priorities, but it does influence their decision-making process. These findings may help program directors to optimize their residency curriculum and interviewing process.

  18. Student Teachers' Evaluations of Slides of Children with Down Syndrome: Impact of Facial Plastic Surgery, Labelling and Factual Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkabetz, R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the impact of facial plastic surgery, labeling (mentally retarded, normal, Down's syndrome), and level of knowledge of Down's syndrome on 127 student teachers' evaluations of slides of persons with such characteristics. Although there was no overall significant main effect for the pre-post operation condition, there was a…

  19. Undiagnosed Long-Lasting Ulcerative Colitis Engaging Transplant after Vaginal Plastic Surgery with Colon: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Vazharov, PhD¹

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the report of a 59-year-old woman suffering from recurrent vaginal pain and bleeding and episodes of anal bleeding. At the age of 16 she underwent vaginal plastic surgery. The case demonstrates the ulcerative engagement of the vaginal transplant.

  20. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Telemedicina y Cirugía Plástica Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cabrera Sánchez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La Telemedicina es aplicable a todos los campos médicos, incluyendo la Cirugía. Poca atención se ha prestado a sus aplicaciones diagnósticas, de las que sin embargo, nuestra especialidad, en la que es perfectamente aplicable el antiguo proverbio chino "una imagen vale mil palabras", podría salir muy beneficiada. Esto permitiría una mayor reducción de costes con contundentes mejoras en eficiencia y calidad. Presentamos un modelo de Telemedicina tipo envío y almacenaje (store and forward desarrollado y aplicado en un hospital británico del sureste de Inglaterra desde hace 7 años. Comentamos las ventajas e inconvenientes del sistema y sus posibles aplicaciones en nuestro medio. Es un hecho claro que estas tecnologías van a producir un gran cambio en la sociedad y en el quehacer diario del médico durante la próxima década. Lo que hoy conocemos como Telemedicina, en breve perderá el prefijo "tele" porque la población entenderá este tipo de Medicina y de aplicaciones telemáticas como algo habitual. Sin duda, nuestra especialidad será una de las grandes beneficiadas de la aplicación de estas tecnologías.Telemedicine is available in any medical fields, including Surgery. Poor attention has been showed to diagnosis application. Nevertheless, Plastic Surgery, is a practice in which the application of the old chinese proverb: "A picture is better than thousand words", would be very benefited, reducing costs and improving efficiency and quality. We present a Telemedicine store and forward model developed and worked in a Plastic Surgery Unit of southern England for 7 years. We show system advantages and disvantages and its potential applications in our country. It's clear that this technology will be able to produce a great change in our society and in our daily medical activity in the next years. What today we knows as Telemedicine, in a few time will lose "tele" prefix, because people will understand as usual this kind of Medicine and

  3. Plastic Surgery and Acellular Dermal Matrix: Highlighting Trends from 1999 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, David A; Gandy, Jessica R; Clark, Emily G; Mowlds, Donald S; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A

    2016-05-01

    The last decade has ushered in a rapidly expanding global discussion regarding acellular dermal matrix (ADM) applications, economic analyses, technical considerations, benefits, and risks, with recent emphasis on ADM use in breast surgery. This study aims to evaluate global trends in ADM research using bibliometric analysis. The top nine Plastic Surgery journals were determined by impact factor (IF). Each issue of the nine journals between 1999 and 2013 was accessed to compile a database of articles discussing ADM. Publications were further classified by IF, authors' geographic location, study design, and level of evidence (LOE, I-V). Productivity index and productivity share were calculated for each region. In total, 256 ADM articles were accessed. The annual global publication volume increased significantly by 4.2 (0.87) articles per year (p<0.001), with a mean productivity index of 36.3 (59.0). The mean impact factor of the nine journals increased significantly from 0.61 (0.11) to 2.47 (0.99) from 1993 to 2013 (p<0.001). Despite this increase in the global ADM literature, the majority of research was of weaker LOE (level I: 2.29% and level II: 9.17%). USA contributed the most research (87%), followed by Asia (4.76%) and Western Europe (4.71%). USA contributed the greatest volume of research. Regarding clinical application of ADM, the majority of publications focused on ADM use in breast surgery, specifically breast reconstruction (154 articles, 60.2%). The majority of research was of lower LOE; thus, efforts should be made to strengthen the body of literature, particularly with regard to cost analysis.

  4. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  5. Tissue-Engineered Solutions in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: Principles and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Jessop, Zita M; Al-Sabah, Ayesha; Combellack, Emman; Ibrahim, Amel; Doak, Shareen H; Hart, Andrew M; Archer, Charles W; Thornton, Catherine A; Whitaker, Iain S

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in microsurgery, imaging, and transplantation have led to significant refinements in autologous reconstructive options; however, the morbidity of donor sites remains. This would be eliminated by successful clinical translation of tissue-engineered solutions into surgical practice. Plastic surgeons are uniquely placed to be intrinsically involved in the research and development of laboratory engineered tissues and their subsequent use. In this article, we present an overview of the field of tissue engineering, with the practicing plastic surgeon in mind. The Medical Research Council states that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering "holds the promise of revolutionizing patient care in the twenty-first century." The UK government highlighted regenerative medicine as one of the key eight great technologies in their industrial strategy worthy of significant investment. The long-term aim of successful biomanufacture to repair composite defects depends on interdisciplinary collaboration between cell biologists, material scientists, engineers, and associated medical specialties; however currently, there is a current lack of coordination in the field as a whole. Barriers to translation are deep rooted at the basic science level, manifested by a lack of consensus on the ideal cell source, scaffold, molecular cues, and environment and manufacturing strategy. There is also insufficient understanding of the long-term safety and durability of tissue-engineered constructs. This review aims to highlight that individualized approaches to the field are not adequate, and research collaboratives will be essential to bring together differing areas of expertise to expedite future clinical translation. The use of tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery would result in a paradigm shift but it is important to maintain realistic expectations. It is generally accepted that it takes 20-30 years from the start of basic science research to clinical utility

  6. MCTP is an ER-resident calcium sensor that stabilizes synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Özgür; Dickman, Dion K; Ma, Wenpei; Tong, Amy; Fetter, Richard D; Davis, Graeme W

    2017-01-01

    Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity (PHP) controls synaptic transmission in organisms from Drosophila to human and is hypothesized to be relevant to the cause of human disease. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PHP are just emerging and direct disease associations remain obscure. In a forward genetic screen for mutations that block PHP we identified mctp (Multiple C2 Domain Proteins with Two Transmembrane Regions). Here we show that MCTP localizes to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that elaborate throughout the soma, dendrites, axon and presynaptic terminal. Then, we demonstrate that MCTP functions downstream of presynaptic calcium influx with separable activities to stabilize baseline transmission, short-term release dynamics and PHP. Notably, PHP specifically requires the calcium coordinating residues in each of the three C2 domains of MCTP. Thus, we propose MCTP as a novel, ER-localized calcium sensor and a source of calcium-dependent feedback for the homeostatic stabilization of neurotransmission. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22904.001 PMID:28485711

  7. Surgery and Medicine Residents' Perspectives of Morbidity and Mortality Conference: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve ACGME Core Competency Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Mandell, Samuel P; Eaton, Erik Van; Schleyer, Anneliese M; McIntyre, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are often used to fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) competency, but there is variation among institutions and disciplines in their approach to MMCs. The objective of this study is to examine the trainees' perspective and experience with MMCs and adverse patient event (APE) reporting across disciplines to help guide the future implementation of an institution-wide, workflow-embedded, quality improvement (QI) program for PBLI. Between April 1, 2013, and May 8, 2013, surgical and medical residents were given a confidential survey about APE reporting practices and experience with and attitudes toward MMCs and other QI/patient safety initiatives. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses using the chi-square test for independence were calculated for all variables. Logistic regression and ordered logistic regression were used for nominal and ordinal categorical dependent variables, respectively, to calculate odds of reporting APEs. Qualitative content analysis was used to code free-text responses. A large, multihospital, tertiary academic training program in the Pacific Northwest. Residents in all years of training from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs in surgery and internal medicine. Survey response rate was 46.2% (126/273). Although most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that knowledge of and involvement in QI/patient safety activities was important to their training (88.1%) and future career (91.3%), only 10.3% regularly or frequently reported APEs to the institution's established electronic incident reporting system. Senior-level residents in both surgery and medicine were more likely to report APEs than more junior-level residents were (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI: 3.1-7.5). Surgery residents had a 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3-10.5) times higher odds than medicine residents had to have reported an APE to

  8. Can teenage novel users perform as well as General Surgery residents upon initial exposure to a robotic surgical system simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A; Patel, S; Robison, W; Senkowski, T; Allen, J; Shaw, E; Senkowski, C

    2017-06-05

    New techniques in minimally invasive and robotic surgical platforms require staged curricula to insure proficiency. Scant literature exists as to how much simulation should play a role in training those who have skills in advanced surgical technology. The abilities of novel users may help discriminate if surgically experienced users should start at a higher simulation level or if the tasks are too rudimentary. The study's purpose is to explore the ability of General Surgery residents to gain proficiency on the dVSS as compared to novel users. The hypothesis is that Surgery residents will have increased proficiency in skills acquisition as compared to naive users. Six General Surgery residents at a single institution were compared with six teenagers using metrics measured by the dVSS. Participants were given two 1-h sessions to achieve an MScoreTM in the 90th percentile on each of the five simulations. MScoreTM software compiles a variety of metrics including total time, number of attempts, and high score. Statistical analysis was run using Student's t test. Significance was set at p value technology.

  9. Catheter-Based Educational Experiences: A Canadian Survey of Current Residents and Recent Graduates in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanda, Nadzir; Chan, Vincent; Chan, Ryan; Rubens, Fraser D

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant developments in the use of catheter-based therapies in cardiovascular medicine. We sought to assess the educational opportunities for cardiac surgery trainees to determine their readiness for participation in these strategies. A web-based survey was distributed to current residents, recent graduates, and program directors in Canadian cardiac surgery residency programs from 2008-2013. The survey was distributed to 110 residents and graduates. Forty-five percent completed the survey. Thirty-five percent expressed that they experienced resistance organizing their rotations because they had to compete with non-cardiac surgery colleagues, and 6 were denied local cardiac catheterization rotations. By the end of the rotation, 56% were comfortable performing a diagnostic cardiac catheterization independently. Exposure to being the operator performing diagnostic catheterization was significantly associated with the positive perception of being able to perform a diagnostic catheterization independently (odds ratio [OR], 5.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-19.81; P = 0.017). Eighty-eight percent of respondents expressed the need for more exposure in catheter-based rotations. Seven of 11 program directors completed the survey. All believed such rotations should be mandatory and foresaw a bigger role for hybrid catheter-based/cardiac surgery procedures in the future. Trainees and program directors perceive that increased exposure to catheter-based therapies is important to career development as a cardiac surgeon. This survey will contribute to the development of a cardiac surgery training curriculum as we foresee more hybrid and team procedures.

  10. Functional exercise after high temporomandibular joint plastic surgery%高位颞下颌关节成形术后的功能康复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪霞; 羊玉荣; 赵丽

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of functional exercise following high temporomandibular joint plastic surgery on functional recovery.Methods High temporomandibular joint plastic surgery was performed on 31 patients suffered from temporomandibular ankylosis.Titanium fragment and pedicle fascia were inserted.Functional exercise as well as locally hot compress and healthy education were carried out after operation.Results 29 subjects showed favorable functional recovery.Results showed 2 subjects developed ankylosis again due to poor mouth opening training (2/31).Conclusion Functional exercise after high temporomandibular joint plastic surgery is effective for recovery of temporomandibular joint functional.

  11. Appropriate Roles for the Subscriber, Publisher, Editor, Author, and Reviewer in the Archives of Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hwang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Authors, editors and reviewers, publishers, and subscribers all play their role in scientific journals. These 5 stakeholders are essential to journals. In this paper, firstly, I briefly summarize the role of each journal stakeholder and their respective goals. Secondly, the status of each participant in the Archives of Plastic Surgery is described. Finally, I propose an appropriate role and plan for each of them. Specific roles and responsibilities include the following: subscribers should welcome and submit the critiques of published papers in letters to the editor. Publishers should trust editors and provide them with adequate financial support for ongoing quality improvement of the journal. The editor-in-chief should be given a sufficient period of time-several years-to build up journal quality and train the incoming editor. The editors, including section editors, are also responsible for increasing the author pool. One editor might be designated a 'devil's referee', that is, a kind of devil's advocate with the responsibility of examining the originality of the manuscript, taking a skeptical view of the manuscript, and looking for holes in the methods and results of reported experiments. Authors' responsibilities include submitting manuscripts with scientific integrity and being ready to take responsibility for their articles even long after publication. Finally, reviewers' responsibilities include identifying similar articles not cited. Reviewers are also welcome to write a discussion on the article they review.

  12. Two stage study of wound microorganisms affecting burns and plastic surgery inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Ali, Syed N; Jeffery, Steven L A; Thomas, Sunil S

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to identify wound microorganisms and the reasons for differing prevalence between the wards, burns unit and intensive care unit (ICU) in a regional centre for burns and plastic surgery. Antibiotic sensitivities of the 10 most prevalent microorganisms cultured from inpatient wound swabs were also investigated. Inpatient wound swab data were collected retrospectively using notes and departmental database information between January and June 2007. Data were analyzed using chi-squared tests and P-values. Eight hundred five positive wound swabs from 204 swab positive inpatients were analyzed. Stage 1 of this study demonstrated 917 positive swab episodes and 30 varieties of organism. The five most prevalent organisms cultured were Staphylococcus (23.9%), Acinetobacter (21.2%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (20.8%), Pseudomonas (9.7%) and Enterococcus (5.2%). Stage 2 revealed that Acinetobacter baumanni (ABAU) was significantly more prevalent in military over civilian inpatients (P PAER) was significantly more prevalent in military inpatients over civilian inpatients (P PAER were significantly more prevalent in the ICU setting. Furthermore, military inpatient wounds grew more ABAU, MRSA, and PAER than civilians, probably due to the longer inpatient stay, dirty nature of wounds, site and complex mechanism of injury. Finally, this study suggests that ABAU was brought into the unit by military patients.

  13. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  14. Tissue-Engineered Solutions in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Jessop, Zita M.; Al-Sabah, Ayesha; Combellack, Emman; Ibrahim, Amel; Doak, Shareen H.; Hart, Andrew M.; Archer, Charles W.; Thornton, Catherine A.; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in microsurgery, imaging, and transplantation have led to significant refinements in autologous reconstructive options; however, the morbidity of donor sites remains. This would be eliminated by successful clinical translation of tissue-engineered solutions into surgical practice. Plastic surgeons are uniquely placed to be intrinsically involved in the research and development of laboratory engineered tissues and their subsequent use. In this article, we present an overview of the field of tissue engineering, with the practicing plastic surgeon in mind. The Medical Research Council states that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering “holds the promise of revolutionizing patient care in the twenty-first century.” The UK government highlighted regenerative medicine as one of the key eight great technologies in their industrial strategy worthy of significant investment. The long-term aim of successful biomanufacture to repair composite defects depends on interdisciplinary collaboration between cell biologists, material scientists, engineers, and associated medical specialties; however currently, there is a current lack of coordination in the field as a whole. Barriers to translation are deep rooted at the basic science level, manifested by a lack of consensus on the ideal cell source, scaffold, molecular cues, and environment and manufacturing strategy. There is also insufficient understanding of the long-term safety and durability of tissue-engineered constructs. This review aims to highlight that individualized approaches to the field are not adequate, and research collaboratives will be essential to bring together differing areas of expertise to expedite future clinical translation. The use of tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery would result in a paradigm shift but it is important to maintain realistic expectations. It is generally accepted that it takes 20–30 years from the start of basic science research to clinical utility

  15. Orthopedic surgery fellowships: the effects of interviewing and how residents establish a rank list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Matthew C; Wong, Jeffrey; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia; SooHoo, Nelson Fong; Luck, James V; Eckardt, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match was established in 2008 to streamline and improve the process of matching residents and fellowships. The purpose of this study was to quantify the factors that affect the application process and to determine how residents establish a rank list. The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match has improved the ability of residents and programs to consider their options more carefully and to focus on finding the best match. However, this process introduces new factors for all parties involved to consider. The costs of the interview process and time away from service for residents may be larger than anticipated. Ultimately, residents value operative experience and staff members at a fellowship more than all other factors when selecting a fellowship.

  16. 无痛化眼部美容术%Painless plastic surgery on ocular region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昕; 陈小平; 林金德; 朴相根; 唐安; 徐利刚; 郑翔宇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of painless plastic surgery on ocular region. Meth ods About 136 patients with painful scare who could make a good communication with aesthetic surgeons were performed the aesthetic surgery on ocular region under local anesthesia combining the intravenous Midazolam and Ketamine, and the effects of sedation and pain, postoperative amnesia, treatment dependence and behavior therapy efficacy were observed and evaluated. The vital signs such as SpO2 , HR, SBP and ECG were detected. Results Patients who treated with intravenous infusion of Midazolam and Ketamine in advance were performed the aesthetic surgery on ocular region under local anesthesia. There was no injective pain during local anesthesia and no pain reaction during the operation because the patients were in deep sleep. It was significant good for intraoperative sedation, analgesia and anterograde amnesia without significant respiratory and cardiovascular depression during operation. However, 6 cases were with temporary hypoxemia (SpO2 < 80% ) and 15 cases with oculocardiac reflex, which did not affect to finish the whole operation. No severe complications were detected. The treat dependence and behavior therapy efficacy were satisfied. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the intravenous Midazolam and Ketamine combining with local anesthesia provided satisfactory intraoperarive sedation, analgesia and amnesia in oculoplastic surgery patients with dread pain.%目的 探讨实施无痛化眼部美容手术的可行性.方法 对136例因恐惧手术疼痛但能与医师良好沟通的眼部美容受术者,采用静脉注射咪达唑仑复合氯胺酮辅助局部麻醉实施无痛化眼部美容术,并对镇痛、镇静效果、治疗依从性和治疗行为效果及术后遗忘进行了临床观察和评定,并在术中全程监测SpO2、HR、SBP和心电图变化.结果 静脉注射咪达唑仑和氯胺酮后,恐惧疼痛的受术者均顺利接受局麻注射和

  17. Prophylactic plastic surgery closure of neurosurgical scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications in previously-operated patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®) and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Alyssa Reiffel; Boyko, Tatiana; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip E; Boockvar, John A; Spector, Jason A

    2014-09-01

    Neurosurgical craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal interventions are performed for a variety of indications, including the resection of benign or malignant tumors, hematoma evacuation, and for the management of intractable seizure disorders. Despite an overall low complication rate of intervention, wound healing complications such as dehiscence, surgical site infection, and cerebrospinal fluid leak are not uncommon. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent scalp incision closure at a single institution by a single plastic surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Sixty patients (83 procedures) were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (95.0 %) underwent previous craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal procedure. Of the total 60 patients, 35 patients received preoperative radiation. Sixteen patients received bevacizumab prior to their index case, while 12 received bevacizumab postoperatively. Ten patients (16.7 %) required additional plastic surgical intervention for wound complications after their index plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically in 34 patients (38 procedures). When plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically, 4 patients (11.8 %) required further wound revision. None of the 14 patients who underwent prophylactic plastic surgery closure for previous scalp incision, preoperative bevacizumab, and XRT administration required re-intervention. Plastic surgery closure of complex scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications among patients who underwent previous neurosurgical intervention, XRT administration, and preoperative bevacizumab administration. This is particularly true when plastic surgery closure is performed "prophylactically." Further collaboration between the neurosurgical and plastic surgery teams is therefore warranted, particularly in the setting of these high-risk cases.

  18. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in the Treatment of Oncological Perineal and Genital Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekka eBrodbeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Defects of the perineum may result from ablative procedures of different malignancies. The evolution of more radical excisional surgery techniques resulted in an increase in large defects of the perineum. The perineogenital region per se has many different functions for urination, bowel evacuation, sexuality and reproduction. Up-to-date individual and interdisciplinary surgical treatment concepts are necessary to provide optimum oncological as well as quality of life outcome.Not only the reconstructive method but also the timing of the reconstruction is crucial. In cases of postresectional exposition of e. g. pelvic or femoral vessels or intrapelvic and intra-abdominal organs, simultaneous flap procedure is mandatory. In particular, the reconstructive armamentarium of the plastic surgeon should not only include pedicled, but also free microsurgical flaps so that no compromise in terms of the extent of the oncological resection has to be accepted. For intra-abdominally and/or pelvic tumors of the rectum, the anus or the female reproductive system, which were resected through an abdominally and a sacrally surgical access, simultaneous VRAM flap reconstruction is recommendable. In terms of soft tissue sarcoma of the pelvic / caudal abdomen / proximal thigh region, two-stage reconstructions are possible.This review focuses on the treatment of perineum, genitals and pelvic floor defects after resection of malignant tumors, giving a distinct overview of the different type of defects faced in this region and describing a number of reconstructive techniques, especially VRAM flap and pedicled flaps like ALT flap or free flaps. Finally, this review outlines some considerations concerning timing of the different operative steps.

  19. Bra Sizing and the Plastic Surgery Herd Effect: Are Breast Augmentation Patients Getting Accurate Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Christopher R; Small, Kevin H; Adams, William P

    2017-01-17

    Bra sizing is a common method to preoperatively select implants for breast augmentation; however, no series has analyzed the accuracy of this modality postoperatively. Alternatively, previous investigations have validated the accuracy and utility of three-dimensional (3D) imaging for preoperative simulation in breast augmentation. This investigation utilizes 3D analysis to determine if preoperative bra sizing provides equivocal information compared to surgical 3D simulation for patient education and planning prior to a breast augmentation. During primary breast augmentation consultation, patients received preoperative 3D images and associated simulations. Sizers, equivocal to the implants chosen in the simulation, were placed in a surgical bra, and 3D images were repeated. Volumetric and contour analyses were compared between the surgical simulation and the bra/sizer image. All patients used a surgical bra and smooth, round silicone sizers (average volume, 302 cc; range, 265-339 cc). Seven patients (14 breasts) underwent analysis and comparison. The mean bra/sizer volume image was 22.3% greater than the preoperative simulated breast image. The mean absolute difference of all surface points between the two breast images was 9.25 mm (range, 5.98-11.96 mm; standard deviation, 8.59). The maximum anterior displacement of the bra image from the simulated image was 19.52 mm, centered at the upper pole; the maximum posterior displacement was 25.49 mm, centered at the lower pole. In comparison to 3D simulation, preoperative bra sizing overestimates postoperative volume, and upper pole fullness and underestimates lower pole projection. This investigation outlines some deficiencies of bra sizing and offers solutions for clinical management in primary breast augmentation. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Periodontal plastic surgery to improve aesthetics in patients with altered passive eruption/gummy smile: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Francesco; Graziani, Filippo; Franchi, Lorenzo; Defraia, Efisio; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Altered passive eruption/gummy smile is a common challenge in patients requiring aesthetic treatment. A specific surgical protocol was designed and tested in patients with altered passive eruption. Standardized preoperative X-rays were used to assess crown length at baseline and to place submarginal incisions. Osseous respective therapy was performed to achieve biological width. Clinical outcomes were recorded 6 months after surgery. Eleven patients with a total of 58 teeth were treated with flap surgery and osseous resective therapy at upper anterior natural teeth. At the last followup, a significant and stable improvement of crown length was obtained when compared to the baseline (P periodontal plastic surgery including osseous resection leads to predictable outcomes in the treatment of altered passive eruption/gummy smile: A careful preoperative planning avoids unpleasant complications and enhances postsurgical stability of the gingival margin.

  1. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  2. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery : Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, E. A. te; Bax, N. M. A.; Tytgat, S. H. A. J.; de Jong, J. R.; Travassos, D. Vieira; Kramer, W. L. M.; van der Zee, D. C.

    Background: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A retrospective

  3. Voluntary autonomous simulator based training in minimally invasive surgery, residents' compliance and reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Empel, P.J.; Verdam, M.G.E.; Strypet, M.; van Rijssen, L.B.; Huirne, J. A.; Scheele, F.; Bonjer, H.J.; Meijerink, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Knot tying and suturing skills in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) differ markedly from those in open surgery. Appropriate MIS training is mandatory before implementation into practice. The Advanced Suturing Course (ASC) is a structured simulator based training course that includes a 6-w

  4. 整形外科新进展与发展设想%Recent advancements and prospects of plastic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢新

    2011-01-01

    目的 综述国内外整形外科研究现状和发展动态,提出未来我军整形外科的发展方向、目标和重点.方法 在PubMed、Medline和中文生物医学期刊文献数据库(CMCC)中检索近5年发表的相关文献并进行综述,同时对军队整形外科近5年来取得的成就进行统计调查.结果 近5年来,整形外科在基础研究和临床治疗方面都取得了可喜进展,在战创伤早期救治中的作用和地位也得到重视和认可;我军整形外科在慢性创面修复、皮肤软组织爆炸伤及海水浸泡伤的损伤机制和防治方法 、战创伤面部畸形救治新技术、同种异体面部复合组织移植等方面取得了令人瞩目的成就.结论未来我军整形外科的发展应以战创伤组织缺损和畸形的修复与重建作为主要研究方向,重点开展组织工程、同种异体复合组织移植、干细胞治疗、异常瘢痕形成机制等科研工作,以解决严重面部毁损伤、广泛性胸腹壁全层缺损、慢性溃疡以及异常瘢痕等临床治疗难题,同时应注重发挥专业特长,积极参与战创伤的早期救治.%Objective To summarize the recent advancements and developmentalprospects of plastic surgery worldwide, and to describe the future directions, aims, and highlights of Chinese military plastic surgery. Methods Relevant articles published in the last five years were retrieved through a search in PubMed, Medline, and CMCC. A statistical survey was conducted to summarize the achievements obtained by the Chinese military plastic surgery unit in the last five years. Results Considerable progress has been achieved in both clinical treatment and basic research of plastic surgery in the past five years. Its important role in the early treatment of combat injury and trauma has been recognized and emphasized Chinese military plastic surgery has achieved considerable accomplishments in the last five years, especially in chronic wound repair; mechanism

  5. A brief history of the development of plastic surgery in The Netherlands East-Indies from World War I until the independence of Indonesia (1914-1950).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeseker, B

    1990-05-01

    This study of surgical operations published in the Medical Journal of the Netherlands East-Indies over the period 1914-1950, supplemented with a series of interviews with retired Dutch East-Indian surgeons and their relatives, shows a vivid interest in plastic surgery from World War I until the independence of Indonesia. One can conclude that plastic surgery was performed more frequently and on a larger scale than in Holland, due to a larger number of patients, specific tropical pathology and often a longer patient delay, requiring extensive reconstructive procedures. The East-Indian publications on plastic surgical topics outnumber the Dutch ones enormously.

  6. Staged ridge-split evaluated using cone beam computed tomography and peri-implant plastic surgery in the mandibular arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasant Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of sufficient bone to place an implant at a functionally and an esthetically appropriate position is a common problem, especially in the mandibular posterior region. Narrow edentulous alveolar ridges <5 mm wide require bone augmentation before implant placement to establish a bony wall of at least 1 mm around the endosseous implant. Various surgical widening techniques are available, including lateral augmentation with or without guided bone regeneration, ridge-split technique and horizontal distraction osteogenesis. The ridge-split technique aims at creating a new implant bed by longitudinal osteotomy of the alveolar bone. The buccal cortex is repositioned laterally by greenstick fracture, and the space between the buccal and lingual cortices is filled with a graft material. Peri-implant plastic surgery focuses on harmonizing peri-implant structures by means of hard- and soft-tissue engineering and includes bone structure enhancement, soft-tissue enhancement, precision in implant placement and improves quality of the prosthetic restoration. The rationale for the peri-implant plastic surgery approach goes well beyond pure esthetics as it creates peri-implant keratinized mucosa and interimplant soft-tissue height in order to avoid food impaction, interimplant airflow, and speech problems. This case report demonstrates a staged ridge-split technique evaluated with cone beam computed tomography using a piezosurgical unit and a surgical technique to restore a papilla-like tissue at the time of the second-stage implant surgery.

  7. [Practice of reconstructive plastic surgery of the clitoris after genital mutilation in Burkina Faso. Report of 94 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, C M R; Madzou, S; Touré, B; Ouédraogo, A; Ouédraogo, S; Lankoandé, J

    2013-06-01

    To describe and evaluate the results of reconstructive plastic surgery of the clitoris in order to promote reproductive health. We conducted a retrospective study from 2007 to 2010. Ninety-four women were included in our study. The mean age was 32.3 years. The evaluation of the experience of sexuality before reconstruction showed that 41.5 % of patients had never had a sexual desire before surgery, more than half did not have a clitoral orgasm and dyspareunia was experienced by about a third of them. The main reason for consultation in our series was related to sexual dysfunction in more than half of our study population. All patients were operated using the technique of Dr Pierre Foldès. Evaluation with a decline of at least 6 months after surgery showed us a massive restoration of the clitoris at 89.7 %. There was a significant difference between sexual desire before and after surgery. A significant improvement in sexuality was observed in 83.6 % of patients. However, there was no significant difference between orgasm before and after surgery. This showed us that getting an orgasm is multifactorial and it is not enough to have a clitoris to have an orgasm, you have to use it. Regardless of the anatomical and functional results, all women were satisfied with respect to body found. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Reoperations after first lumbar disc herniation surgery; a special interest on residives during a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautiainen Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall rate of operations after recurrent lumbar disc herniation has been shown to be 3–11%. However, little is known about the rate of residives. Thus the aim of this study was to explore the cumulative rates of re-operations and especially residive disc herniations at the same side and level as the primary disc herniation after first lumbar disc herniation surgery and the factors that influence the risk of re-operations over a five year follow-up study. Methods 166 virgin lumbar disc herniation patients (mean age 42 years, 57% males were studied. Data on patients' initial disc operations and type and timing of re-operations during the follow-up were collected from patient files. Back and leg pain on visual analog scale and employment status were collected by questionnaires. Results The cumulative rate of re-operations for lumbar disc herniation was 10.2% (95% Cl 6.0 to 15.1. The rate of residives at initial site was 7.4% (95% Cl 3.7 to 11.3 and rate of lumbar disc herniations at other sites was 3.1% (95% Cl 0.6 to 6.2. The occurrence of residive lumbar disc herniations was evenly distributed across the 5 years. Neither age, gender, preoperative symptoms, physical activity nor employment had effect on the probability of re-operation. Conclusion Seven percent of the lumbar disc patients had a residive lumbar disc operation within five years of their first operation. No specific factors influencing the risk for re-operation were found.

  9. Teaching the surgical craft: Surgery residents perception of the operating theater educational environment in a tertiary institution in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transformation of a surgical trainee into a surgeon is strongly influenced by the quality of teaching in the operating theater. This study investigates the perceptions of residents about the educational environment of the operating theater and identifies variables that may improve the operating theater education of our trainees. Materials and Methods: Residents in the department of surgery anonymously evaluated teaching in the operating room using the operating theater education environment measure. The residents evaluated 33 variables that might have an impact on their surgical skills within the operating theater. The variables were grouped into four subscales; teaching and training, learning opportunities, operating theater atmosphere and workload/supervision/support. Differences between male and female residents and junior and senior registrars were assessed using Mann-Whitney test. Statistical analysis was completed with the statistics package for the social sciences version 17. Results: A total of 33 residents were participated in this study. Twenty nine (88% males and 4 (12% females. 30 (90% were junior registrars. The mean total score was 67.5%. Operating theater atmosphere subscale had the highest score of 79.2% while workload/supervision/support subscale had the least score of 48.3%. There were significant differences between male and female resident′s perception of workload/supervision/support P 0.05. Conclusion: This study has shown a satisfactory teaching environment based on the existing local realities of means, resources and tools and highlighted the need for improvement in workload/supervision/support in our institution. An acceptable learning environment in the operating theatre will produce surgeons that are technically competent to bridge the gap in the enormous unmet need for surgical care in Nigeria.

  10. Resection And Reconstructive-plastic Surgery In Treatment Of Extended And Multifocal Cicatrical Tracheal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otabek Eshonkhodjaev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Main issues of treatment of patients with cicatricial stenosis of trachea (CST are to increase its efficacy and safety, as well as to determine indications and contraindications for circular resection and reconstructive interventions on the trachea in patients with extended lesions of trachea, with stenoses involving subvocal cords part of larynx and well as multifocal narrowing of the trachea which could improve treatment results and quality of life of patients, to gain recovery and reduce disability and mortality.Material and methods. One hundred two patients aged from 11 to 62 years with CST were surgically treated. Stenotic site length in patients varied from 0,3 to 7 cm. Most frequently (64,2%, CST length of more than 2 cm was observed. In critical and decompensated stenosis with diameter of CST up to 5 mm with the threat of asphyxiation by the first stage we used endoscopic laser-and electric destruction of constriction followed by restricted zone bouging. If long-term rehabilitation was necessary and in case of absence of the conditions to the implementation of circular tracheal resection, we used tracheal stents. Circular resection of the trachea was performed in 24 patients. In case of contraindications, 28 patients underwent reconstructive plastic surgery with dissection the stenosis, excision of scar tissue and formation of trachea lumen in T-tube. After removing T-tube plasty of anterior tracheal wall and of soft tissues of the neck defects was performed using local tissues and grafts with microsurgical techniques.Results. Long-term results of treatment evaluated and studied in a period of 6 months to 5 years in 89 (87.3% patients. 13 patients continues to one of the stages of complex treatment. Еhe patients are under dynamic endoscopic control. Good results were achieved in the treatment of 71 patients (79.8%, satisfactory - in 12 (13.4%, unsatisfactory results in 6 (6.7% patients.Conclusions. 1. Patients with CST

  11. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  12. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  13. Cirurgia de catarata realizada por residentes: avaliação dos riscos Cataract surgery performed by residents: risk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Barreto Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a frequência de complicações nas cirurgias de catarata realizada por residentes de um hospital universitário (segundo e terceiro anos, comparado com as realizadas por cirurgiões experientes (assistentes. MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva dos prontuários de todos pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de catarata realizadas nas primeiras quinzenas de março (época do início do aprendizado da técnica cirúrgica e de novembro (meados do aprendizado da técnica. Foram analisados a época da realização da cirurgia; graduação do cirurgião (residente ou médico assistente; técnica cirúrgica empregada (extração extracapsular ou facoemulsificação e a ocorrência de complicações per-operatórias e pós-operatórias. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 481 cirurgias, destas, 194 (40% foram realizadas pelos residentes do terceiro ano, 165 (34% pelos residentes do segundo ano e 116 (26% pelos assistentes. A complicação mais frequentemente encontrada em todas as cirurgias foi a rotura de cápsula posterior (4,8%. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa de complicações entre as cirurgias realizadas em março e novembro (p=0,97, bem como entre os residentes sob supervisão e os assistentes (p=0,08. CONCLUSÃO: A rotura de cápsula posterior continua sendo a complicação mais frequentemente encontrada nas cirurgias de residentes em treinamento. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as taxas de complicação destes residentes e os assistentes, o que demonstra o importante papel de uma supervisão adequada.PURPOSE: To evaluate the complication's rate of cataract surgery performed by ophthalmology residents (second and third-year and experienced surgeons at a public teaching hospital. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients who had cataract surgery between March (begin of the technique practice and November (end of the technique practice was conducted. RESULTS: In 481 cataracts surgeries

  14. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. METHOD: This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip...

  15. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  16. Pilot Study Evaluating the Impact of Otology Surgery Videos on Otolaryngology Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Charles; Stevens, Shawn M; Golub, Justin S; Pensak, Myles L; Samy, Ravi N

    2017-03-01

    Use of videos as educational tools is not a novel concept; however, there is a paucity of high-quality video resources available to otolaryngology trainees. We hypothesized that residents would deem surgical-videos using a multimedia-style format more valuable as preparatory tools. Aims of this study: 1) develop portfolio of otology/neurotology videos overviewing key steps, anatomy, and pearls by a senior surgeon; 2) have residents rate the effectiveness of the videos as a preoperative tool. Prospective study. A video-library of procedures at (https://www.youtube.com/user/cisurgeon) was formatted via time-stamping to coincide expert level narration with closed captioning, critical procedural steps, relevant instrumentation, radiographic pictures, orientation cues, and anatomical highlights. Otolaryngology trainees of postgraduate years 2 through 5 (n = 13) watched a minimum of three videos and completed an assessment addressing: current resource identification/usefulness comparison, self-efficacy, impact on preparation time, and prioritization of resources. The videos rated as highly useful compared with current resources (p = 0.002) and capable of promoting self-efficacy. Residents reported moderate-high prioritization of our multi-media formatted resource (scores >6) among their current preoperative regimen. The varied videos were rated highly in terms of usefulness, promoting self-efficacy and as a high-priority for a resident's surgical preparation. Multimedia-formatted training videos should be further explored for this generation of electronic-learners. Future studies with a larger cohort, objective approaches, and multidisciplinary involvement are needed to determine the full impact of this education medium on surgical-training.

  17. The influence of social media and easily accessible online information on the aesthetic plastic surgery practice: literature review and our own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Paolo; Porcnik, Ales; Hedén, Per; Otte, Maximilian

    2015-04-01

    Patients interested in aesthetic plastic surgery procedures increasingly seek advice on social media and rely on easily accessible online information. The investigatory goal was to determine the impact of this phenomenon on the everyday aesthetic plastic surgery practice. Five hundred consecutive patients completed a questionnaire prior to their consultation with a plastic surgeon at our clinic. A questionnaire was also completed by 128 plastic surgeons practising in 19 different countries. A literature review was performed. Almost all patients (95%) used the internet to collect information prior to consultation, for 68% of them it being their first search method. Social media were used by 46% of patients and 40% of these were strongly influenced when choosing a specific doctor. The majority of plastic surgeons (85%) thought the information found on social media could lead to unrealistic expectations. However, 45% of plastic surgeons believed that their consultations became easier after the advent of social media, 29% found them more difficult. A literature review showed a high percentage of poor quality internet websites regarding plastic surgery and an increase in use of social media among plastic surgeons. The internet and social media play an important and growing role in plastic surgery. This results in more informed patients but may create unrealistic expectations. Even if the internet provides ample information, it cannot replace the face-to-face consultation, which always should remain a detailed process, covering both risks and limitations of alternative procedures. Available literature on how social media influences the medical practice is still scarce and further research is needed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  18. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level of implement...

  19. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  20. Pulmonary Hemorrhagic Infarction due to Fat Embolism and Thromboembolism after Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery: a Rare Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Dong-hua; SHAO Yu; ZHANG Jian-hua; QIN Zhi-qiang; LIU Ning-guo; HUANG Ping; CHEN Yi-jiu

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary fat embolism (PFE) and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) are common post-operative complications of orthopedic surgical procedures,but are reported less often following maxillofacial plastic surgical procedures,especially with respect to PFE.Thrombi,or together with fat emboli in pulmonary vessels can induce hemorrhagic infarction and cause death.Herein this report introduced a death due to pulmonary hemorrhagic infarction following maxillofacial plastic surgery.The female patient underwent several osteotomies of the mandible,zygomas and autologous bone grafting within a single operation.The operative time was longer than normal and no preventive strategies for pulmonary embolism were implemented.The patient died 20 days after hospital discharge.The autopsy confirmed pulmonary hemorrhagic infarction.The fat emboli and thrombi were also noted in the pulmonary vessels,which were thought to have resulted from the maxillofacial osteotomy.Suggestions were offered to forensic pathologists that risk factors of PFE and PTE,such as the type and length of surgery,the surgical sites,and the preventive strategies,should be considered when handling deaths after maxillofacial operations.

  1. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  2. Factors Impacting Successfully Competing for Research Funding: An Analysis of Applications Submitted to The Plastic Surgery Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Keith M.; Giladi, Aviram M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Federal research funding is decreasing, forcing specialty organizations to have an increasingly important position in developing and fostering research.1,2 As the research and innovation arm of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, The Plastic Surgery Foundation (PSF) has a key role in supporting promising plastic surgery research. Understanding the grant review process, as well as factors that contribute to funding well-written grant funding applications, is paramount for aspiring academic surgeons. METHODS All research grant applications submitted to The PSF in 2012 and 2013 were evaluated. Each reviewer comment was independently assessed by two study team members and classified into key weakness categories. Chi-square test compared results between funded and unfunded grants. Linear regression identified which critique elements corresponded to changes in scores, and logistic regression identified elements that predicted funding. RESULTS We analyzed 1,764 comments from 240 applications. Of these, 55 received funding. Funded grants had significantly fewer reviewer comments in 4 of 5 weakness categories. As expected, funded grants received better (lower) scores. Concerns in the categories of “plan for execution” and “other elements/granstmanship” significantly affected score as well as odds of funding. CONCLUSION Ensuring that a grant addresses all required elements is important for receiving a low reviewer score. Our study demonstrates that “plan for execution” and “grantsmanship” influence reviewer scoring more than others. Investigators must clearly address items associated with conducting their experiments and performing the analysis. Investigators must also give equal attention to elements of overall quality and completeness to optimize chances of funding. PMID:25626827

  3. [Analysis of the application and funding projects of National Natural Science Foundation of China in the field of burns and plastic surgery from 2010 to 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Dou, D; Wang, X Y; Xie, D H; Yan, Z C

    2017-02-20

    We analyzed the data of application and funding projects of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2016 in the field of burns and plastic surgery and summarized the NSFC funding pattern, the research hotspots, and weaknesses in this field. The NSFC has funded 460 projects in the field of burns and plastic surgery, with total funding of RMB 227.96 million. The scientific issues involved in the funding projects include orthotherapy against malformations, wound repair, basic research of burns, skin grafting, scars prevention, and regeneration of hair follicle and sweat glands. The research techniques involved in the funding projects are diversified. NSFC plays an important role in the scientific research and talents training in the field of burns and plastic surgery.

  4. Navigation-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery (reconstructive and plastic, orthognathic, oncology)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen GF; Zhang SL; Wang CT

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: Advance in the field of compeer assisted surgery enables the surgical procedures to be less invasive and more accurate for the support of diagnosis imaging, pre-operative simulation and intraoperative navigation.

  5. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  6. Certificate-of-Need regulation in outpatient surgery and specialty care: implications for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Salvatore J; Comstock, Matthew; Kuzon, William M

    2005-09-15

    For plastic surgeons, independent development of outpatient surgical centers and specialty facilities is becoming increasingly common. These facilities serve as important avenues not only for increasing access and efficiency but in maintaining a sustainable, competitive specialty advantage. Certificate of Need regulation represents a major hurdle to plastic surgeons who attempt to create autonomy in this fashion. At the state level, Certificate of Need programs were initially established in an effort to reduce health care costs by preventing unnecessary capital outlays for facility expansion (i.e., managing supply of health care resources) in addition to assisting with patient safety and access to care. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Certificate of Need regulations on health care costs, patient safety, and access to care and to discuss specific implications of these regulations for plastic surgeons. Within Certificate of Need states, these regulations have done little, if anything, to control health care costs or affect patient safety. Presently, Certificate of Need effects coupled with recent provisions in the Medicare Modernization Act banning development of specialty hospitals may restrict patient access to ambulatory surgical and specialty care. For the plastic surgeon, these effects not only act as an economic barrier to entry but can threaten the efficiencies gained from providing surgical care in an ambulatory setting. An appreciation of these effects is critical to maintaining specialty autonomy and access to fiscal policy.

  7. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    specialty. CONCLUSION: OPS has become integrated in all breast centres, but has not yet been fully implemented. For optimal results in all patients, this study underlines the importance of the inclusion of a dedicated plastic surgeon within the multidisciplinary team for optimal initial evaluation of all...

  8. Examining the validity of the ACS-NSQIP Risk Calculator in plastic surgery: lack of input specificity, outcome variability and imprecise risk calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cassandra; Campwala, Insiyah; Gupta, Subhas

    2017-03-01

    American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) created the Surgical Risk Calculator, to allow physicians to offer patients a risk-adjusted 30-day surgical outcome prediction. This tool has not yet been validated in plastic surgery. A retrospective analysis of all plastic surgery-specific complications from a quality assurance database from September 2013 through July 2015 was performed. Patient preoperative risk factors were entered into the ACS Surgical Risk Calculator, and predicted outcomes were compared with actual morbidities. The difference in average predicted complication rate versus the actual rate of complication within this population was examined. Within the study population of patients with complications (n=104), the calculator accurately predicted an above average risk for 20.90% of serious complications. For surgical site infections, the average predicted risk for the study population was 3.30%; this prediction was proven only 24.39% accurate. The actual incidence of any complication within the 4924 patients treated in our plastic surgery practice from September 2013 through June 2015 was 1.89%. The most common plastic surgery complications include seroma, hematoma, dehiscence and flap-related complications. The ACS Risk Calculator does not present rates for these risks. While most frequent outcomes fall into general risk calculator categories, the difference in predicted versus actual complication rates indicates that this tool does not accurately predict outcomes in plastic surgery. The ACS Surgical Risk Calculator is not a valid tool for the field of plastic surgery without further research to develop accurate risk stratification tools.

  9. Wall Street's assessment of plastic surgery--related technology: a clinical and financial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-02-01

    Many plastic surgeons develop technologies that are manufactured by Wall Street-financed companies. Others participate in the stock market as investors. This study examines the bioengineered skin industry to determine whether it integrates clinical and financial information as Wall Street tenets would predict, and to see whether the financial performance of these companies provides any lessons for practicing plastic surgeons. In efficient markets, the assumptions on which independent financial analysts base their company sales and earnings projections are clinically reasonable, the volatility of a company's stock price does not irrationally differ from that of its industry sector, and the buy/sell recommendations of analysts are roughly congruent. For the companies in this study, these key financial parameters were compared with a benchmark index of 69 biotech companies of similar age and annual revenues (Student's t test). Five bioengineered skin companies were included in the study. Analysts estimated that each company would sell its product to between 24 and 45 percent of its target clinical population. The average stock price volatility was significantly higher for study companies than for those in the benchmark index (p cycle of poor clinical correlation when assigning sales projections, which in turn leads to price volatility and discordance of buy/sell recommendations. This study's findings have implications for plastic surgeons who develop new technology or who participate in the equities markets as investors. Plastic surgeons who develop new medical devices or technology cannot universally depend on the market to drive clinically reasonable financial performance. Although inflated sales estimates have benefits in the short term, failure to meet projections exacts severe financial penalties. Plastic surgeons who invest in the stock market, because of their unique clinical experience, may sometimes be in the position to evaluate new technologies and

  10. Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: Perspectives of Applicants and Program Directors on Medical Student Away Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Seth W; Drolet, Brian C; Brower, Jonathan P; LaPorte, Dawn; Eberson, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Senior medical students frequently rotate at orthopaedic residency programs away from their home medical schools. However, to our knowledge, the perspective of program directors (PDs) and applicants on the value, objectives, and costs of these rotations has not been studied. Surveys evaluating the frequency, costs, benefits, and objectives of away rotations were distributed to all orthopaedic residency PDs in the United States and applicants in the 2014-2015 Match cycle. Data analysis was conducted to perform inferential and descriptive statistics; comparisons were made between and among PD and applicant groups using two-tailed means Student t-test and analysis of variance. A total of 74 PD (46.0%) and 524 applicant (49.3%) responses were obtained from a national distribution. Applicants completed an average of 2.4 away rotations, with an average cost of $2,799. When stratified on self-reported likelihood of Matching, there were no substantial differences in the total number of rotations performed. The only marked differences between these groups were the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score and the number of applications to residency programs. PDs reported that significantly fewer rotations should be allowed, whereas applicants suggested higher limits (2.42 rotations versus 6.24, P < 0.001). PDs and applicants had similar perspectives on the value of away rotations; both groups reported more value in finding a "good fit" and making a good impression at the program and placed less value on the educational impact. The value of orthopaedic away rotations appears more utilitarian than educational for both PDs and applicants. Rotations are performed regardless of perceived likelihood of Matching and are used by students and programs to identify a "good fit." Therefore, given the portion of an academic year that is spent on orthopaedic rotations, findings showing perceived low educational value and marked discrepancies between the expected number of

  11. Periodontal Plastic Surgery to Improve Aesthetics in Patients with Altered Passive Eruption/Gummy Smile: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cairo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered passive eruption/gummy smile is a common challenge in patients requiring aesthetic treatment. A specific surgical protocol was designed and tested in patients with altered passive eruption. Standardized preoperative X-rays were used to assess crown length at baseline and to place submarginal incisions. Osseous respective therapy was performed to achieve biological width. Clinical outcomes were recorded 6 months after surgery. Eleven patients with a total of 58 teeth were treated with flap surgery and osseous resective therapy at upper anterior natural teeth. At the last followup, a significant and stable improvement of crown length was obtained when compared to the baseline (P<0.0001. All patients rated as satisfactory in the final outcomes (final VAS value = 86.6. In conclusion, this study showed that periodontal plastic surgery including osseous resection leads to predictable outcomes in the treatment of altered passive eruption/gummy smile: A careful preoperative planning avoids unpleasant complications and enhances postsurgical stability of the gingival margin.

  12. Patient access in plastic surgery: an operational and financial analysis of service-based interventions to improve ambulatory throughput in an academic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Gilland, Wendell G; Weir, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    Inefficient patient throughput in a surgery practice can result in extended new patient backlogs, excessively long cycle times in the outpatient clinics, poor patient satisfaction, decreased physician productivity, and loss of potential revenue. This project assesses the efficacy of multiple throughput interventions in an academic, plastic surgery practice at a public university. We implemented a Patient Access and Efficiency (PAcE) initiative, funded and sponsored by our health care system, to improve patient throughput in the outpatient surgery clinic. Interventions included: (1) creation of a multidisciplinary team, led by a project redesign manager, that met weekly; (2) definition of goals, metrics, and target outcomes; 3) revision of clinic templates to reflect actual demand; 4) working down patient backlog through group visits; 5) booking new patients across entire practice; 6) assigning a physician's assistant to the preoperative clinic; and 7) designating a central scheduler to coordinate flow of information. Main outcome measures included: patient satisfaction using Press-Ganey surveys; complaints reported to patient relations; time to third available appointment; size of patient backlog; monthly clinic volumes with utilization rates and supply/demand curves; "chaos" rate (cancellations plus reschedules, divided by supply, within 48 hours of booked clinic date); patient cycle times with bottleneck analysis; physician productivity measured by work Relative Value Units (wRVUs); and downstream financial effects on billing, collection, accounts receivable (A/R), and payer mix. We collected, managed, and analyzed the data prospectively, comparing the pre-PAcE period (6 months) with the PAcE period (6 months). The PAcE initiative resulted in multiple improvements across the entire plastic surgery practice. Patient satisfaction increased only slightly from 88.5% to 90.0%, but the quarterly number of complaints notably declined from 17 to 9. Time to third

  13. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M; Lee, Walter T

    2013-10-29

    Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership 'Basic Training' is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this 'Basic Training'. Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (pvirtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  14. Plastic bronchitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Vinoth, Bharathi; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Sivakumar, Kothandam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics...

  15. [Application of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and its derivatives in dental implantologie and plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Maczy; Arteaga-Vizcaíno, Melvis; Benito, Marisol; Benito, Mariluz

    2012-12-01

    The platelet rich plasma (PRP), as its name implies, has a high concentration of thrombocytes; is a non-toxic and non-allergenic autologous preparation, obtained by blood centrifugation at low speed. Its function is directly linked to the release of growth factors (FC) by platelets. These factors have properties of induction of tissue regeneration. For the preparation of the present work, a literature search was performed in different documentary sources using the following descriptors: platelet rich plasma, PRP, growth factors, GF, dentistry and cosmetic surgery. This article is a description of some relevant aspects of the PRP and its application in the areas of dentistry and cosmetic surgery.

  16. A 3D Finite Element model of the face for simulation in plastic and maxillo-facial surgery

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanas, M; Chabanas, Matthieu; Payan, Yohan

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a new Finite Element biomechanical model of the human face, which has been developed to be integrated into a simulator for plastic and maxillo-facial surgery. The idea is to be able to predict, from an aesthetic and functional point of view, the deformations of a patient face, resulting from repositioning of the maxillary and mandibular bone structures. This work will complete the simulator for bone-repositioning diagnosis that has been developed by the laboratory. After a description of our research project context, each step of the modeling is precisely described: the continuous and elastic structure of the skin tissues, the orthotropic muscular fibers and their insertions points, and the functional model of force generation. First results of face deformations due to muscles activations are presented. They are qualitatively compared to the functional studies provided by the literature on face muscles roles and actions.

  17. New internalized distraction device for craniofacial plastic surgery using Ni-free, Ti-based shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Kudo, Tada-aki; Zhang, Ye; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Sano, Yuya; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Hideki; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2010-11-01

    This study was undertaken to examine effects and biocompatibility of a new internalized distraction device made from newly developed Ti-Nb-Al shape memory alloy (SMA). Crania of Wistar rats were expanded using a U-shaped wire of this SMA set on each cranium in an experimental group. At 2 or 4 weeks after operation, the rats were killed; width measurements and three-dimensional observations of crania were conducted using soft x-ray and microfocus x-ray computed tomography photography. After photography, histologic sections were made and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. No pathologic change in the experimental duration was observed macroscopically or histologically. Significantly increased size was found for the rat crania in the experimental group compared with the control group. Results demonstrated the feasibility and biocompatibility of internalized distraction osteogenesis using Ni-free, Ti-based SMA in craniofacial plastic surgery for craniofacial deformities.

  18. Parents' and Doctors' Attitudes toward Plastic Facial Surgery for Persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Shlomo; Kravetz, Shlomo; Marks, Yoval

    1997-01-01

    A study of 42 Israeli parents of children with Down syndrome and 48 family doctors found no differences between the parents and doctors regarding support for facial surgery. However, parents who showed less acceptance of their child expressed more support for the operation than parents who showed more acceptance. (Author/CR)

  19. Remote Digital Preoperative Assessments for Cleft Lip and Palate May Improve Clinical and Economic Impact in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher; Campbell, Jacob; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; McCormack, Susan; Silverman, Richard; Lalikos, Janice; Babigian, Alan; Castiglione, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructive surgical care can play a vital role in the resource-poor settings of low- and middle-income countries. Telemedicine platforms can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of surgical care. The purpose of this study is to determine whether remote digital video evaluations are reliable in the context of a short-term plastic surgical intervention. The setting for this study was a district hospital located in Latacunga, Ecuador. Participants were 27 consecutive patients who presented for operative repair of cleft lip and palate. We calculated kappa coefficients for reliability between in-person and remote digital video assessments for the classification of cleft lip and palate between two separate craniofacial surgeons. We hypothesized that the technology would be a reliable method of preoperative assessment for cleft disease. Of the 27 (81.4%) participants, 22 received operative treatment for their cleft disorder. Mean age was 11.1 ± 8.3 years. Patients presented with a spectrum of disorders, including cleft lip (24 of 27, 88.9%), cleft palate (19 of 27, 70.4%), and alveolar cleft (19 of 27, 70.4%). We found a 95.7% agreement between observers for cleft lip with substantial reliability (κ = .78, P cleft palate, with a moderate interrater reliability (κ = .55, P = .01). We found only a 47.8% agreement between observers for alveolar cleft with a nonsignificant, weak kappa agreement (κ = .06, P = .74). Remote digital assessments are a reliable way to preoperatively diagnose cleft lip and palate in the context of short-term plastic surgical interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Future work will evaluate the potential for real-time, telemedicine assessments to reduce cost and improve clinical effectiveness in global plastic surgery.

  20. Simulating plastic surgery: from human skin tensile tests, through hyperelastic finite element models to real-time haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeer, R J; Gasson, P D; Karri, V

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we provide a summary of a number of experiments we conducted to arrive at a prototype real-time simulator for plastic surgical interventions such as skin flap repair and inguinal herniotomy. We started our research with a series of in-vitro tensile stress tests on human skin, harvested from female patients undergoing plastic reconstructive surgery. We then used the acquired stress-strain data to fit hyperelastic models. Three models were considered: General Polynomial, Reduced Polynomial and Ogden. Only Reduced Polynomial models were found to be stable, hence they progressed to the next stage to be used in an explicit finite element model aimed at real-time performance in conjunction with a haptic feedback device. A total Lagrangian formulation with the half-step central difference method was employed to integrate the dynamic equation of motion of the mesh. The mesh was integrated into two versions of a real-time skin simulator: a single-threaded version running on a computer's main central processing unit and a multi-threaded version running on the computer's graphics card. The latter was achieved by exploiting recent advances in programmable graphics technology.

  1. Google Glass in the Operating Room: The Plastic Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkin, Jeremy C; Rahman, Omar F; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-07-01

    New technologies and innovations are common in the delivery of modern health care. Google Glass is one such device gaining increased attention in medical specialties. The authors surveyed residents and attending physicians in the Department of Plastic Surgery, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, on their experience using Google Glass in the operating room. Ease of use, quality of images, gaze disruption, and distraction during surgery were measured. Overall, subjects found the device to be comfortable and satisfying to wear and use during surgery to capture images of good quality. Despite some identified weaknesses, Google Glass is a unique technology with a promising plastic surgical application in the operating room.

  2. Predictors and causes of unplanned re-operations in outpatient plastic surgery: a multi-institutional analysis of 6749 patients using the 2011 NSQIP database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seokchun; Jordan, Sumanas W; Jain, Umang; Kim, John Y S

    2014-08-01

    Studies that evaluate the predictors and causes of unplanned re-operation in outpatient plastic surgery. This study retrospectively reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) and identified all plastic surgery outpatient cases performed in 2011. Multiple logistic regression analysis was utilised to identify independent risk factors and causes of unplanned reoperations. Of the 6749 outpatient plastic surgery cases identified, there were 125 (1.9%) unplanned re-operations (UR). Regression analysis demonstrated that body mass index (BMI, OR = 1.041, 95% CI = 1.019-1.065), preoperative open wound/wound infection (OR = 3.498, 95% CI = 1.593-7.678), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class 3 (OR = 2.235, 95% CI = 1.048-4.765), and total work relative value units (RVU, OR = 1.014, 95% CI = 1.005-1.024) were significantly predictive of UR. Additionally, the presence of any complication was significantly associated with UR (OR = 15.065, 95% CI = 5.705-39.781). In an era of outcomes-driven medicine, unplanned re-operation is a critical quality indicator for ambulatory plastic surgery facilities. The identified risk factors will aid in surgical planning and risk adjustment.

  3. 小儿手烧伤瘢痕畸形的整形外科治疗%Plastic surgery treatment on cicatricial deformation in child burn of hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛乃航; 朱云

    2002-01-01

    Background: Cicatricial deformation in child burn of hand often leads to severe squaelae. According to different causes of disease , different plastic surgery were adopted .The key of operation lies in skin repairing , articulation dealing, and thumb correcting, which aim is to resume normal longitudinal and transverse arcs ,holding and clenching ability.

  4. Comparison of preoperative quality of life in breast reconstruction, breast aesthetic and non-breast plastic surgery patients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraes, Eliana F R; Durand, Paul; Duraes, Leonardo C; Orra, Susan; Moreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Sousa, Joao Batista de; Djohan, Risal S; Zins, James; Bernard, Steven; Schwarz, Graham S

    2016-11-01

    A breast cancer diagnosis imposes significant emotional and psychological duress. The purpose of this study is to assess the baseline quality of life (QOL) of immediate, delayed, and secondary breast reconstruction patients, comparing these results with QOL in women seeking plastic surgery for cosmetic breast, and non-breast procedures. From 2012 through 2013, immediate (group 1), delayed (group 2), and secondary (Group 3) reconstruction patients, aesthetic breast (group 4) and non-breast plastic surgery patients (group 5) answered Breast-Q questionnaires. Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 answered 141, 12, 23, 72 and 160 preoperative questionnaires respectively. There was no difference (p = NS) in breast satisfaction, psychosocial well-being, physical well-being-chest, and sexual well-being between groups 1 and 5. Group 1 had higher satisfaction with breast (p breasts (p breasts, psychosocial, and sexual well-being, compared to groups 2 and 3. Group 4 had lower scores in all domains, compared to groups 1 and 5 (p reconstruction patients had similar satisfaction with breasts, psychosocial well-being, and chest physical well-being, compared to non-breast plastic surgery patients. Aesthetic breast surgery patients demonstrate similar low scores in satisfaction with breasts, psychosocial well-being, and sexual well-being to those of patients prior to delayed breast reconstruction, or secondary salvage procedures. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing the Quality and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy by Emergency Medicine and Surgery Residents; a Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Parvin; Harati, Sepideh; Shirafkan, Ali; Amirbeigi, Alireza; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tube thoracostomy complications depend on the operator’s skill, patients’ general condition and the place in which the procedure is done. The present study aimed to compare the quality and complications of tube thoracostomy carried out by emergency medicine residents (EMRs) and surgery residents (SRs). Methods: This cohort study was conducted on 18-60 years old trauma patients in need of tube thoracostomy presenting to two academic emergency departments. Quality of tube placement and its subsequent complications until tube removal were compared between SRs and EMRs using SPSS 20. Results: 72 patients with the mean age of 37.1 ± 14.1 years were studied (86.1% male). 23 (63.8%) cases were complicated in SRs and 22 (61.1%) cases in EMRs group (total= 62.5%). Chest drain dislodgement (22.2% in SRs vs. 22.2% EMRs; p>0.99), drainage failure (19.4% in SRs vs. 16.7% EMRs; p=0.50), and surgical site infection (11.1% in SRs vs. 19.4% EMRs; p=0.25) were among the most common observed complications. The overall odds ratio of complication development was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.35-2.25, p = 0.814) for SRs and 1.12 (95% CI: 0.28-4.53, p = 0.867) for EMRs. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed no significant difference between SRs and EMRs regarding quality of tube thoracostomy placement and its subsequent complications for trauma patients. The rate of complications were interestingly high (>60%) for both groups. PMID:28286840

  6. Plastic paradise: transforming bodies and selves in Costa Rica's cosmetic surgery tourism industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sara L

    2010-10-01

    Long popular as a nature tourism destination, Costa Rica has recently emerged as a haven for middle class North Americans seeking inexpensive, state-of-the-art cosmetic surgery. This paper examines "cosmetic surgery tourism" in Costa Rica as a form of medicalized leisure, situated in elite private spaces and yet inextricably linked to a beleaguered national medical program. Through historical context and ethnographic analysis of activities at medical hotels and clinics, I describe how the recovery industry operates on the embodied subjectivities of visiting patients and their local caretakers. Recovery sociality and healing landscapes facilitate patients' transition through a period of post-surgical liminality and provide nostalgic transport to an imagined medical arcadia, while clinicians are attracted by a neoliberal promise of prosperity and autonomy. Ultimately, Costa Rica's transformation into a paradise of medical consumption and self-optimization is contingent on a mythology that obscures growing uncertainties and inequities in the nation's broader medical landscape.

  7. Plasticity of cognitive functions before and after awake brain tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaina Satoer

    2015-04-01

    Results: P1 and P2 showed opposite preoperative cognitive profiles. P1 obtained normal cognitive results and P2 had clinically significant impairments in all cognitive domains, (language, memory, attentional and executive deficits (z-score ≥-1.50. P3 and P4 also demonstrate opposite preoperative profiles. P4 obtained intact cognitive results, whereas P3 was impaired in memory and executive functions (z-score ≥-1.50. Intraoperatively, in both P3 and P4 positive language sites were found (left inferior frontal gyrus and left parietal lobe. At 3 months postoperatively, P3 presented language deficits followed by recovery at 12 months, whereas P4 appeared to have recovered at 3 months postoperatively from the observed premorbid impairments in memory and executive functioning (z-score <-1.50. Pathological examination revealed a slow growing brain tumor (low-grade in P1 and P3 and a fast growing brain tumor (high-grade in P2 and P4. Conclusion: In patients with similar brain tumor localizations, we found distinct cognitive profiles, possibly affected by different neural plasticity processes. Preoperatively, a favorable plasticity effect on cognition was found in P1 (temporoparietal area, potentially affected by tumor grade. Preserved cognitive functions was possibly facilitated by the slow growth rate of a low-grade tumor allowing functional reorganization (Mandonnet et al., 2003. However, P2 with a brain tumor in the same area showed preoperative deficits in several domains (language, memory and attention/executive functions. A faster growth rate of a high-grade tumor could have more aggressively affected cognition. In P3 and P4 with the same localization (insula, we found a different effect on the cognitive recovery process; at short term (3 months, improvement of the preoperatively observed cognitive impairments in a low-grade tumor P3, whereas a more gradual functional reorganization was found in language (3-12 months in P4, a high-grade tumor, contrasting Habets

  8. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Periodontal plastic surgery for management of cleft alveolar ridge: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit A; Yeltiwar, Ramreddy K

    2012-02-01

    Cleft lips, alveoli, and palates are the most common congenital malformations of the head and neck region, all of which often can be managed successfully when presented at a young age. It is a common belief that clefts in the alveolar ridge should be treated with the help of bone grafting materials. This could be the best option when the cleft is to be treated in early age, when the patient is still developing and has high regenerative potential. However, in adults, the literature supports the fact that bone grafting in alveolar clefts has a higher chance for failure. The present case report exemplifies a periodontal plastic surgical procedure involving a combination of connective tissue and free gingival grafting to restore the form and function of a cleft alveolar ridge in an adult patient.

  10. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods: As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results: Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9 and military personnel (n=2,433 as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001 in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions: A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  11. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M.; Lee, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency. PMID:24172053

  12. Level of billing as a function of resident documentation and orthopedic subspecialty at an academic multispecialty orthopedic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Smith, Jordan L

    2012-11-01

    Documentation, coding, and billing for physician-patient encounters have evolved over time and have significant variability. Appropriate and complete documentation of these encounters can contribute to the financial viability of private and academic medical centers. The objectives of this study were to assess the financial effect of documentation on billing and to compare the authors' institution's distribution of billing level compared with Medicare normative data. Four orthopedic surgery subspecialty clinics were evaluated at a university outpatient clinic over a 1-year period. A single full-day clinic per week was used for each subspecialty. Residents dictated the majority of the reports. All reports were transcribed by medical transcriptionists and coded by certified professional coders. The sports medicine subspecialty generated the highest volume of patient clinic visits, followed by foot and ankle, trauma, and spine (Porthopedic practice (P<.01). The estimated loss of revenue from the fewer level 4 reports was $81,281.11 for 1 year. These findings highlight the need for greater educational interventions to improve provider documentation, coding, and billing. The effect of new electronic medical record systems that prompt providers to include key evaluation and management components will likely affect practices and warrant further analysis.

  13. Association of Otolaryngology Resident Duty Hour Restrictions With Procedure-Specific Outcomes in Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Braden, Lauren; Wan, Jim; Sebelik, Merry

    2017-06-01

    Graduate medical education has undergone a transformation from traditional long work hours to a restricted plan to allow adequate rest for residents. The initial goal of this restriction is to improve patient outcomes. To determine whether duty hour restrictions had any impact on surgery-specific outcomes by analyzing complications following thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed before and after duty hour reform. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS).The NIS was queried for procedure codes associated with thyroid and parathyroid procedures for the years 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008. Hospitals were divided based on teaching status into 3 groups: nonteaching hospitals (NTHs), teaching hospitals without otolaryngology programs (THs), and teaching hospitals with otolaryngology programs (THs-OTO). Procedure-specific complication rates, length of stay, and mortality rates were collected. SAS statistical software (version 9.4) was used for analysis with adjustment using Charlson comorbidity index. Total numbers of head and neck endocrine procedures were 34 685 and 39 770 (a 14.7% increase), for 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008, respectively. THs-OTO contributed a greater share of procedures in 2006 to 2008 (from 18% to 25%). With the earlier period serving as the reference, length of stay remained constant (2.1 days); however, total hospital charges increased (from $12 978 to $23 708; P otolaryngology programs.

  14. Development of a new valid, reliable, and internationally applicable assessment tool of residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M

    2013-09-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed.

  15. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients.The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated.Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries ("Plan B"), approaches 100%.The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries.Furthermore, the academic visiting professor ("Plan A": hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model ("Plan C": to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance.The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful.

  16. Three-dimensional medical images and its application for surgical simulation of plastic and reconstructive surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Hideo; Fujino, Toyomi (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    The author's three surgical simulation systems are presented. First the computer graphics surgical simulation system has been developed which make the three dimensional skull image from CT scans and the arbitrary osteotomy, mobilization of bone segments and prediction of post-operative appearance is made possible. The second system is solid modeling of the skull using laser curable resin and it is concluded that life-sized skull model is useful not only for surgical simulation of major craniofacial surgery but also educational purposes. The third one is solid modeling of the ear using non-contact 3-D shape measurement with slit laser scanner. The mirror image life-sized wax model is made from the normal side of th ear and the autologous cartilage framework is assembled to simulate the wax model, thus the precise three dimensional reconstruction of the auricle is made possible. (author).

  17. The best marketing strategy in aesthetic plastic surgery: evaluating patients' preferences by conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsidi, Nick; van den Bergh, Maurice W H M; Luijendijk, Roland W

    2014-01-01

    To provide the best marketing strategy for a private clinic, knowledge of patients' preferences is essential. In marketing, conjoint analysis has been frequently used to calculate which attributes of a product are most valuable to consumers. This study investigates the relative importance of attributes that influence the selection and decision-making process when choosing an aesthetic private clinic, using conjoint analysis. The following attributes were chosen by the senior author (R.W.L.) and a marketing and communications director after a preselection of 25 randomly selected people: relative cost of the procedure, travel time, experience of the plastic surgeon, size of the clinic, method of referral, and online presentation. The attributes were then divided into levels. Using a random factor conducted by SPSS, 18 different scenarios were created and rated online by 150 potential patients before their potential visit or consultation. The patients could rate these scenarios on a scale from 1 to 7 with respect to the likeliness of visiting the clinic. The most important attribute was experience of the surgeon (35.6 percent), followed by method of referral (21.5 percent), travel time (14.2 percent), cost of procedure (12.9 percent), online presentation (9.7 percent), and size of the clinic (6.1 percent). Six of 16 levels gave a negative influence on the decision making. The authors' study shows that the two most important attributes are the experience of the surgeon and the method of referral and that conjoint analysis is effective in determining patients' preferences. It also shows which levels positively or negatively contribute per attribute.

  18. 妇科整形术后护理的临床体会%Clinical Experience of the Nursing After Gynecological Plastic Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁虹梅

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析总结妇科美容中常用的术后护理方法,探讨妇科美容整形护理的发展趋势。方法:对我院2010年9月~2012年3月收治的56例接受妇科整形的患者进行护理,总结和分析术后护理的效果和患者术后恢复情况,为妇科整形护理的发展提供参考。结果:所有患者手术均顺利完成,术后对患者实施护理后均恢复良好,患者很快恢复自信,重新融入日常生活。结论:随着生活水平的提高,女性对美容整形的要求越来越高,妇科美容整形受到更多青睐,对于妇科整形患者的护理不仅能使其术后恢复良好,还能消除心理负担,使之更快的恢复到正常生活中去,值得临床推广。%Objective To analyze and summarize the commonly used nursing method after gynecological plastic surgery,and to explore gynecological cosmetic surgery nursing trend. Methods 56 cases received nursing after gynecological plastic surgery in the hospital from September,2010 to March,2012. The effect of postoperative nursing and postoperative recovery were summarized and analyzed to provide reference for the development of gynecological surgery nursing. Results All patients successfully received the operation,and patients recovered well after postoperative nursing. The patients’ self-confidence recovered quickly,and got back into their daily life. Conclusion With the improvement of living standards,women have more and more requirement on plastic surgery,and gynecological plastic surgery gets the patients more and more attention. The nursing of patients who undergo gynecological plastic surgery can not only make its recovery good,but also can eliminate the psychological burden,to make them faster return to normal life. It is worthy of clinical promotion.

  19. Acquisition and elaboration of superficial three-dimensional images in plastic and reconstructive surgery: Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfano C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1970, as computed axial tomography machines became easily available and became more sophisticated, image acquisition techniques and analysis improved, developed rapidly and became very useful in medical diagnosis. Today it is possible to examine either the anatomic and functional aspects of deep body organs and tissues including all the minute details as well as their morphological relations with superficial structures. Through precise graphic elaboration programs we can obtain information about spatial relations which was not possible using simply classical clinical examination. It is possible, for example, to "point out" an area of interest from its anatomic context, to carry out virtual cleavage of planes and to measure volumes and distances. New developments in image acquisition systems permit transfer of three-dimensional data directly from existing objects. The three -dimensional computerized axial tomography for deep structures, and the laser scanners for superficial structure, quickly furnish (1-3 seconds for the laser scanners useful information to plan the surgical operation. When analysing 3D-imaging techniques it is important to appreciate their utility for the planning and the follow up of surgery, particularly for the head and thorax, where the three dimensional evaluation is better than the classic double dimensional system that is incomplete and difficult to interpret. In the future, these systems will be important for the best aesthetic and functional results and above all for reducing the surgical time.

  20. [Contribution of the physical and rehabilitation medicine in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, L; Devinck, F; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Physical, non-painful processes guide the scar reshaping in children in order to prevent growth anomalies due to cutaneous shrinkage. The objective of the surgical treatment, coordinated with the reeducation care, is to improve the physical abilities of the skin, to restore the function and avoid the deformations. Reeducation uses various techniques (i.e. sensitive-motility, massage and mobilizations) with or without physical agent (water, aspiration and touch-drive technique). Posture and positioning rely on the small or major aids, from orthosis to prosthesis. Compression is obtained by the adjustment of aids on molding and compression garment. Indications of the reeducation treatment depend on the timing of cutaneous covering and the advance of the healing process. It also depends on the underlying condition including skin traumas (frictions, wounds, burns), skin surgeries (purpura fulminans consequences, skin graft reconstruction after giant nevus resection, malignant lesion or vascular malformations). The final goal is the rehabilitation and development of the child and the adolescent in its entire somatopsychic dimension.

  1. Self-audit in plastic surgery: toward total quality management of personal professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhoqail, Rola Abdullah

    2011-03-01

    Researchers did not describe before the process of self-audit as proposed in this research. A new concept of total quality management of personal professional practice (TQM-PPP) is introduced. A prospective audit of a personal professional practice, clinical and academic, for the first 7 years as a consultant plastic surgeon is described. The number of patients reported was 248; 145 (59.4%) were male patients and 99 (40.6%) were female patients, of whom 159 (65.2%) and 85 (34.8%) were Saudis and non-Saudis, respectively. Sources of admission were mainly emergency (118, 47.8%) and outpatient departments (115, 46.6%). Operations were performed in 177 (72%) of patients; the author was the actual surgeon in 155 (62.5%) of patients, which were classified as intermediate (48.3%), major (38.4%), minor (12.6%), and major complex (0.7%). Operations were elective in 109 patients (61.6%), and the rest were emergencies. Clinicopathologic typing was mostly traumatic in 108 patients (59%), followed by aesthetic in 42 patients (23.0%). The region most operated on was the upper limb and then the head and neck; 89 (70.6%) of operations were done in 2 hours. Six complications were detected. Significant relations observed between clinicopathologic typing and age groups, nationality, and sex. However, no significant difference was detected between adults and pediatric age groups or between elective and emergency cases with respect to total hospital stay. There was no significant difference in the mean length of stay in relation to age groups. Various academic achievements in the same period and the pyramid of TQM-PPP are included. In conclusion, it was a satisfying experience, and I encourage other colleagues to do the same. Identifying the zone of practice of the individual consultant/health professional, designing audit tools for each, and accurate record keeping; using specific staff for data collection, entry, and analysis; and developing outcome evaluation techniques from

  2. L-PRP/L-PRF in esthetic plastic surgery, regenerative medicine of the skin and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslik-Bielecka, Agata; Choukroun, Joseph; Odin, Guillaume; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2012-06-01

    The use of platelet concentrates for topical use is of particular interest for the promotion of skin wound healing. Fibrin-based surgical adjuvants are indeed widely used in plastic surgery since many years in order to improve scar healing and wound closure. However, the addition of platelets and their associated growth factors opened a new range of possibilities, particularly for the treatment of chronic skin ulcers and other applications of regenerative medicine on the covering tissues. In the 4 families of platelet concentrates available, 2 families were particularly used and tested in this clinical field: L-PRP (Leukocyte- and Platelet-rich Plasma) and L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin). These 2 families have in common the presence of significant concentrations of leukocytes, and these cells are important in the local cleaning and immune regulation of the wound healing process. The main difference between them is the fibrin architecture, and this parameter considerably influences the healing potential and the therapeutical protocol associated to each platelet concentrate technology. In this article, we describe the historical evolutions of these techniques from the fibrin glues to the current L-PRP and L-PRF, and discuss the important functions of the platelet growth factors, the leukocyte content and the fibrin architecture in order to optimize the numerous potential applications of these products in regenerative medicine of the skin. Many outstanding perspectives are appearing in this field and require further research.

  3. Postmastectomy radiation therapy and immediate autologous breast reconstruction: integrating perspectives from surgical oncology, radiation oncology, and plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlin, Danielle H; Jeong, Ah-Reum; Goldberg, Leah; Harris, Timothy; Mohan, Kriti; Seal, Stella; Canner, Joe; Sacks, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    The effect of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) on immediately reconstructed abdominal wall-based tissue remains imprecisely defined. We evaluated evidence from all fields involved in care of the breast cancer patient in order to advance a unified recommendation regarding this therapeutic sequence. We performed a MEDLINE and manual reference search to identify studies of PMRT with immediate autologous breast reconstruction. Inclusion criteria required studies to describe patients, flaps, and complication rates. Analyses were based on a random effects model. Surgical and radiation oncology literature was reviewed. Eleven retrospective studies of 337 patients with an average follow-up of 18-60 months (out of 268 patients) were selected for inclusion. Overall rates of fat necrosis, revisional surgery, volume loss, and fibrosis/contracture ranged from 16.9% to 35.4%. One out of 260 patients experienced total flap loss. There was an increased probability of fat necrosis in the irradiated breast (OR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.42-6.89, P = 0.005) among three studies with non-irradiated controls. Five studies evaluated aesthetics with variable outcomes. There is mixed evidence for the utility of PMRT with immediate autologous abdominal wall breast reconstruction. Further investigation requires prospective studies with collaboration among surgical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and plastic surgeons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Photogrammetric Techniques for Analysis and Visualization of Changes in 2d and 3d Data: Plastic Surgery Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz, V. A.; Zheltov, S. Y.; Chibunichev, A.

    2017-05-01

    Accurate measurements of 3D scenes and change detection of spatial distributed data are of great importance in different areas of research and application. For more accurate data analysis it is useful to take into account the all available data from various sensors and sources. The common case is that the different kinds of data available in their own coordinate systems and it is needed to transform all data in common coordinate system. This can be provided by finding correspondence between features in data of different types and different sources. Photogrammetry provides structurally connected 2D and 3D data which gives valuable information about correspondence of 2D and 3D features. The approaches to 2D and 3D data fusion and analysis are proposed which are based on complex processing of 2D and 3D data for changes detection and visualization. The techniques for data fusion are developed. The results of applying the developed techniques are presented for plastic surgery application.

  5. Topography of the greater palatine artery and the palatal vault for various types of periodontal plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Hye; Won, Sung-Yoon; Bae, Jung-Hee; Jung, Ui-Won; Park, Dong-Soo; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hu, Kyung-Seok

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to provide useful data that could be applied to various types of periodontal plastic surgery by detailing the topography of the greater palatine artery (GPA), looking in particular at its depth from the palatal masticatory mucosa (PMM) and conducting a morphometric analysis of the palatal vault. Forty-three hemisectioned hard palates from embalmed Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. The morphometry of the palatal vault was analyzed, and then the specimens were decalcified and sectioned. Six parameters were measured using an image-analysis system after performing a standard calibration. In one specimen, the PMM was separated from the hard palate and subjected to a partial Sihler's staining technique, allowing the branching pattern of the GPA to be observed in a new method. The distances between the GPA and the gingival margin, and between the GPA and the cementoenamel junction were greatest at the maxillary second premolar. The shortest vertical distance between the GPA and the PMM decreased gradually as it proceeded anteriorly. The GPA was located deeper in the high-vault group than in the low-vault group. The premolar region should be recommended as the optimal donor site for tissue grafting, and in particular the second premolar region. The maximum size and thickness of tissue that can be harvested from the region were 9.3 mm and 4.0 mm, respectively.

  6. A novel approach to assessing technical competence of colorectal surgery residents: the development and evaluation of the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montbrun, Sandra L; Roberts, Patricia L; Lowry, Ann C; Ault, Glenn T; Burnstein, Marcus J; Cataldo, Peter A; Dozois, Eric J; Dunn, Gary D; Fleshman, James; Isenberg, Gerald A; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Reznick, Richard K; Satterthwaite, Lisa; Schoetz, David; Trudel, Judith L; Weiss, Eric G; Wexner, Steven D; MacRae, Helen

    2013-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an objective method of technical skills assessment for graduating subspecialists in colorectal (CR) surgery-the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS). It may be reasonable for the public to assume that surgeons certified as competent have had their technical skills assessed. However, technical skill, despite being the hallmark of a surgeon, is not directly assessed at the time of certification by surgical boards. A procedure-based, multistation technical skills examination was developed to reflect a sample of the range of skills necessary for CR surgical practice. These consisted of bench, virtual reality, and cadaveric models. Reliability and construct validity were evaluated by comparing 10 graduating CR residents with 10 graduating general surgery (GS) residents from across North America. Expert CR surgeons, blinded to level of training, evaluated performance using a task-specific checklist and a global rating scale. The mean global rating score was used as the overall examination score and a passing score was set at "borderline competent for CR practice." The global rating scale demonstrated acceptable interstation reliability (0.69) for a homogeneous group of examinees. Both the overall checklist and global rating scores effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents (P Technical Skill effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents. With further validation, the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill could be incorporated into the colorectal board examination where it would be the first attempt of a surgical specialty to formally assess technical skill at the time of certification.

  7. [Body modifications and sexual health : Impact of tattoos, body piercing and esthetic genital plastic surgery on the sexual health of women and men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, Aglaja Valentina; Zannoni, Ronja

    2017-07-25

    The present paper addresses the psychological impact of body modifications (e.g. tattoos, body piercing and esthetic genital plastic surgery) on the sexual health of individuals and refers to past and present research insights. Body modifications are understood as invasive interventions on the human body, especially interventions on the human skin which result in (semi-)permanent changes. Tattoos and body piercing (in particular genital piercing) positively affect the sexual satisfaction and the sexual appeal of men and women but there is a controversial association with high risk sexual behavior. Moreover, this article focuses on esthetic genital plastic surgery based on the increasing interest and insights of the impact on female genital self-perception and sexual behavior.

  8. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  9. Measuring service-specific performance and educational value within a general surgery residency: the power of a prospective, anonymous, Web-based rotation evaluation system in the optimization of resident satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, O C; Antonetti, M; Morejon, O; Dobkin, E; Angelica, M D; Reilly, P J; Serebriakov, I; Horowitz, S; Civetta, J M

    2001-08-01

    We used a Web-based evaluation system to institute specific changes to various clinical teaching services in our integrated residency in an effort to optimize the overall quality of the educational experience and measured the resident satisfaction in these rotations. Residents rated 8 categories of experience on a scale of 1 to 5 (maximum summation score, 40 points). Data were analyzed by t-test for equality of means. A probability value of less than.05 was considered significant. Compliance with completion of the evaluations was 100%. The Chronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of the tool was 0.826. Tukey's estimate of power to achieve additivity was 1.5. Six under-performing services were re-engineered with prominent effects on 7 postgraduate year (PGY) rotations. On 2 general surgery services at 1 hospital, the workload was redistributed, and a dedicated team teaching time was instituted (PGY-3 [a]: before, 22 points/after, 31 points; P =.003; PGY-3 [b]: before, 25 points/after, 31 points; P =.004; PGY-1: before, 24 points/after, 29 points; P =.07). A general surgery service at another hospital redistributed coverage of the attending surgeons to create a nonteaching service (PGY-1: before, 22 points/-after, 27 points; P =.01). The transplantation service (PGY-3) was examined, and the role of the point was redefined (before, 24 points/after, 31 points; P =.01). One vascular service (PGY-2) redistributed cases and workload (before, 27 points/after, 22 points; P =.07). The vascular PGY-2 position was eliminated and replaced by a mid-level practitioner. The cardiothoracic service (PGY-1) rotation was converted into a preceptorship (before, 23 points/after, 30 points; P =.015). A web-based clinical rotation evaluation provides a means for the assessment of the impact of programmatic changes while preserving resident anonymity and maintaining accountability.

  10. Superior subconjunctival anesthesia versus retrobulbar anesthesia for manual small-incision cataract surgery in a residency training program: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongsap P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pipat KongsapDepartment of Ophthalmology, Prapokklao Hospital, Chanthaburi, Thailand; Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandPurpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of subconjunctival anesthesia as compared to retrobulbar anesthesia for pain control during manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS performed by third-year residents.Design: A randomized, controlled trial.Patients and methods: A total of 150 patients undergoing routine cataract surgery were randomly assigned to receive either subconjunctival anesthesia (group 1, n = 75 or retrobulbar anesthesia (group 2, n = 75. Third-year residents performed MSICS using the modified Blumenthal technique. Subconjunctival anesthesia was administered by injecting 2% xylocaine with adrenalin into the superior conjunctiva, and retrobulbar anesthesia by injecting 2 mL of 2% xylocaine with adrenalin into the retrobulbar space. We studied the following variables: intraoperative pain score rated on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS, operative time, and injection and operative complications.Results: A mean age of 69 vs 70 years, an operative time of 47.1 (SD, 9.9 min vs 47.7 (10.9 min, and a median (interquartile range pain score of 40 (range, 20–70 vs 40 (range, 20–50 were observed in the subconjunctival and the retrobulbar groups, respectively. The injection complication of subconjunctival hemorrhage was significantly higher in the subconjunctival group (25.3% compared to the retrobulbar group (1.3%. The operative complication rate between groups was not different (P > 0.05.Conclusion: Both, superior subconjunctival anesthesia and retrobulbar anesthesia were effective during MSICS when used in a residency training program.Keywords: subconjunctival anesthesia, retrobulbar anesthesia, cataract surgery, small-incision cataract surgery, visual analog scale, pain score

  11. “Inscrutable Intelligence”: The Case against Plastic Surgery in the Works of Jean Stafford and Sylvia Plath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Cuenca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean Stafford’s short story “The Interior Castle” (1946 and Sylvia Plath’s “Face Lift” and “The Plaster”, written in the early 1960s but published posthumously in Crossing the Water (1971, dwell on a theme which is rarely tackled in Postwar American literature: plastic surgery. Using a markedly mnemonic tone, both authors trace in detail the passive submission of female bodies to male (reconstruction. While the history of women in early Cold War America is usually associated with the patriarchal mystifying of housewifery, the myth of ideal, domestic femininity was also intimately related to bodily beauty. The demand for physical “perfection” which resulted from constructing women as, primarily, objects of male desire was mirrored in popular magazines, such as Ladies’ Home Journal, which endorsed women’s seeking medical aid to model themselves into “ideal” sexual mates (Meyerowitz in Meyerowitz ed., 244. Women’s submission to the notion that they should use any means necessary to become aesthetic objects to be appraised by men was thus represented as desirable. In this paper, I shall trace how both Stafford and Plath adopted a confessional style of writing in the abovementioned pieces in order to denounce the cultural construction of women as passive bodies to be moulded at will, instead of as active, thinking subjects. I shall argue that by reproducing the recollections and thoughts of the women being stitched, sewn and bandaged in their pieces, both authors articulated an alternative protofeminist aesthetics based on the beauty of what Stafford described as “inscrutable intelligence”.

  12. Surgical treatment of burns sequelae. our experience in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pristina, Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, Z; Arifi, H; Hoxha, E; Duqi, S

    2015-09-30

    Burn injuries are very frequent in Kosovo, leading to long-lasting physical, functional, aesthetic, psychological and social consequences directly proportional to the time of healing; the longer it takes for the burn wound to heal, the more serious are the sequelae. The objectives of the present study are to review the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of burn patients presenting with post-burn sequelae and treated at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Pristina, Kosovo, from January 2005 until December 2011. This study included 188 patients with burns sequelae. The following variables were considered: age, sex, anatomical location, pathological types, and surgical procedure. There were 82 men (43.6%) and 106 women (56.4%), ranging in age from 0 to 67 years (mean age 33.5 years), most of the patients were children (139 = 73.9%). Burn contractures were observed in 135 (71.8%) patients, hypertrophic scars in 32 (17%), keloids in 10 (5.3%), alopecia in 6 (3.2%), syndactyly in 12 (6.4%), ectropion in 4 (2.1%) and ear deformity in 1 (0.53%) cases. To correct the deformities the most common choice was the Z-plasty technique, used in 31.4% of cases, followed by Z-plasty+full thickness skin grafts in 21.8%, full thickness skin grafts in 18.1%, tissue expansion in 8%, Z-plasty+local flaps in 4.8%, flaps (local, fascio-cutaneous, radial forearm) in 6.9% and direct closure in 6.4%. Timely wound closure and the development of an individual programme for surgical treatment of burns sequelae are crucial for optimal outcomes in patients with burns.

  13. Deliberate Self-Harm and the Elderly: A Volatile Combination—An Overview from the Plastic Surgery Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Packer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the factors associated with the DSH in the elderly group of 60 years and above and to recommend changes to be implemented in order to improve the management in this specific group. Materials and Methods. Five-year retrospective study was undertaken from July 2005 to July 2010 in the Plastic Surgery Department of the Royal Preston Hospital, NHS Trust. A Performa was designed to collect data about the inpatient admission and included certain areas of key information. The case notes for all patients were extensively analysed in order to gather adequate information for the devised Performa. Results. DSH is getting more common in the elderly group, and males are more affected than females. 60% of the patients had a previous history of DSH. A large number (80% of patients had a previous history of mental illness. 60% of those DSH patients were living with family. Almost all patients (90% were reviewed by the Psychiatry Liaison Team. The timing of patients being assessed was highly variable. Conclusions. Marriage is not a protective factor in the prevention of the DSH in the elderly group. A mental health team referral in the early phases of the management would be of huge benefit and a likely step to prevent possible future admissions. The Department would benefit from the creation of a protocol for the management of these patients. There should be a joint effort of the professionals in the management of DSH in the elderly, and GPs play a very important role in the prevention of DSH in the later life.

  14. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improvement in treating injuries and chronic wounds.Materials and methodsIn this study, we present the recent experience of the Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery of the University Hospital Center of Avicenne in Rabat. This therapy was used for the first time this year (in 2014, in three young patients who presented with chronic wounds associated with local and general factors that are unfavorable for the healing process.ResultsIn all three of our cases we obtained highly satisfactory clinical results.TNP allows wounds to bud in a shorter time, as well as a fast healing by second intention due to controlled wound healing or split-skin graft without using flaps. This enables to decrease the margin of error, the time and the number of dressing replacements, and to reduce the length of hospital stay.ConclusionThis is an expensive and specific equipment. However, the cost-benefit ratio analysis shows that it is an essential method that should be part of our therapeutic strategies.Keywords: loss of substance, negative pressure, budding, healing.  

  15. Evaluation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Operative Skills: Feasibility and Engagement Study Using SIMPL Software for a Mobile Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B; Cappetta, Alyssa; George, Brian C; Lahey, Edward T; Bohnen, Jordan D; Troulis, Maria J

    2017-06-08

    There are no universally accepted tools to evaluate operative skills of surgical residents in a timely fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a smartphone application, SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning), developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative, to achieve a high rate of timely operative evaluations and resident communication and to collect performance data. The authors hypothesized that these goals would be achieved because the process is convenient and efficient. This was a prospective feasibility and engagement study using SIMPL to evaluate residents' operative skills. SIMPL requires the attending surgeon to answer 3 multiple-choice questions: 1) What level of help (Zwisch Scale) was required by the trainee? 2) What was the level of performance? 3) How complex was the case? The evaluator also can dictate a narrative. The sample was composed of 3 faculty members and 3 volunteer senior residents. Predictor variables were the surgeons, trainees, and procedures performed. Outcome variables included number and percentage of procedures performed by faculty-and-resident pairs assessed, time required to complete assessments, time lapsed to submission, percentage of assessments with narratives, and residents' response rates. From March through June 2016, 151 procedures were performed in the operating room by the faculty-and-resident teams. There were 107 assessments submitted (71%). Resident response (self-assessment) to faculty evaluations was 81%. Recorded time to complete assessments (n = 75 of 107) was shorter than 2 minutes. The time lapsed to submission was shorter than 72 hours (100%). Dictations were submitted for 35 evaluations (33%). Data for the type of help, performance, and complexity of cases were collected for each resident. SIMPL facilitates timely intraoperative evaluations of surgical skills, engagement by faculty and residents, and collection of detailed procedural

  16. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breastfeeding: A systematic review. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery. 2010;63:1688. Kerrigan CL, et al. Evidence-based medicine: Reduction mammoplasty. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2013;132: ...

  17. 四步法眼袋整形术在老年眼部整形中的应用分析%Four-step blepharoplasty plastic surgery in elderly Eye Surgery Application Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大艳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application of eye surgery for elderly four-step analysis of the efficacy. Methods In our hospital ophthalmology patients in need of eye surgery were randomly selected elderly patients 80 cases as the study, patients were divided into a control group of 40 patients with the study group of 40 patients in the control group were treated with traditional surgical methods that lower eyelid skin into the road method to remove bags under the eyes;study group were treated with four-step blepharoplasty plastic surgery to remove bags under the eyes, and all patients in the postoperative one week stitches, observed under different plastic surgery patients in each group and eye bags removal recovery. Results All patients in the postoperative ocular conditions have improved, patients in the control group occurred ectropion two cases, one case of wound infection, hematoma in one case a small study group of patients with no complications. Conclusion The application of four-step pouch bags have plastic surgery to remove the safety, efficacy, is more suitable for elderly patients with an ocular plastic surgery.%目的:探讨老年眼部整形中应用四步法的疗效。方法将我院眼部整形老年患者80例分为两组各40例,对照组应用下睑皮肤入路法去除眼袋;研究组应用四步法(疝出眶隔脂肪切除、眶隔加固、外眦韧带悬吊和多余皮肤切除)眼袋整形术去除眼袋,术后1周拆线,观察两组眼袋去除效果及眼部恢复情况。结果所有患者术后眼部状况都得到改善,对照组患者中有2例发生眼睑外翻、1例切口感染、1例小血肿,研究组无并发症发生。结论四步法眼袋整形术去除眼袋安全有效,是目前比较适合老年患者的一种眼部整形术。

  18. PLASTIC SURGERY AND BURNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Objective Endotoxin as the inciting agentof cytokines and other mediators, whose highlevel expression correlates with the septicshock and MOF, has been the one of leadingcauses of death in ICU. Methods For treatingsepsis and MOF caused by endotoxin, the anti-lipid A of LPS antibody was used. 19 burned

  19. PLASTIC SURGERY AND BURNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    The amount and constitution of protein, itsultraviolet photo-absorption ability, andesterase in homogenates of human cadavericand guinea pig skin (each consisted of newborn,fresh adult and stored adult skin) were assayedby using ultraviolet spectrophotometer,polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sodiumdodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electro-

  20. Periodontal plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Mounssif, Ilham

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present article is to summarize current knowledge in terms of the etiology, diagnosis, prognosis and surgical treatment of gingival recession. Whilst the main etiological factors (i.e. toothbrushing trauma and bacterial plaque) are well established, challenges still remain to be solved in the diagnostic, prognostic and classification processes of gingival recession, especially when the main reference parameter - the cemento-enamel junction - is no longer detectable on the affected tooth or when there is a slight loss of periodontal interdental attachment. Root coverage in single type gingival recession defects is a very predictable outcome following the use of various surgical techniques. The coronally advanced flap, with or without connective tissue grafting, is the technique of choice. The adjunctive use of connective tissue grafts improves the probability of achieving complete root coverage. Surgical coverage of multiple gingival recessions is also predictable with the coronally advanced flap and the coronally advanced flap plus the connective tissue graft, but no data are available indicating which, and how many, gingival recessions should be treated adjunctively with connective tissue grafting in order to limit patient morbidity and improve the esthetic outcome. None of the allograft materials currently available can be considered as a full substitute for the connective tissue graft, even if some recent results are encouraging. The need for future studies with patient-based outcomes (i.e. esthetics and morbidity) as primary objectives is emphasized in this review.

  1. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PRS PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us Cosmetic Surgery New procedures and advanced technologies offer plastic surgery ... David Berman MD 14 Pidgeon Hill Drive Berman Cosmetic Surgery & S... Sterling, VA 20165 Website Franklin Richards MD Suite ...

  2. Silicone rubber materials in facial plastic surgery%硅橡胶材料在面部整形中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪海涵; 龙腾河; 何勇; 王佳

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silicone rubber can be used as an ideal material for facial plastic.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the application of silicone rubber in facial plastic surgery.METHODS: A computer-based search was performed using the keywords of “Silicone rubber,Composite, Mechanical properties,Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing, Head and facial plastic surgery” in Chinese and English for articles about silicone rubber in facial reconstruction published from 2001-01 to 2010-12. Repetitive articles and Meta analysis were excluded, and finally 22 articles were eligible.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A computer model can be used for surgical design of facial plastic. All kinds of complications occur in 6% patients receiving facial plastic surgery, and the reasons are as follows: ①operative misconduct; ②do not perform the surgery according to the cosmetic principles; ③weak of sterile concept. Based on preoperative computer simulation design and effectiveness preview, the patients can participate in the individual design of their cosmetic surgery, which greatly increases the success rate of surgery. As long as a good grasp of cosmetic elements using solid silicone materials and surgical principle, the majority of complications can be avoided.%背景:硅橡胶材料可作为一种较理想的面部整形植入材料.目的:评价硅橡胶材料在面部整形的应用.方法:以 "硅橡胶,复合材料,生物力学性能,计算机辅助设计与制造,头面部整形"为中文关键词;以"Silicone rubber,Composite,Mechanical properties,Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing,Head and facial plastic surgery" 为英文关键词,采用计算机检索2001-01/2010-12相关文章.纳入与硅橡胶材料在面部整形的应用相关的文章;排除重复研究或Meta分析类文章.以22篇文献为主重点进行了讨论硅橡胶材料的研究及其在面部整形的应用.结果与结论:计算机的模型可用于面部整形的手术方案设计.整形术可解决了

  3. Preventive application of antibiotic in plastic surgery%抗生素在整形外科中的预防性应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万睿; 舒瑛; 庞星原; 任军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the reasonable proposal of prophylactic antibiotics use in plastic surgery with type Ⅰ incision.Methods The data of 748 patients with plastic surgery in our hospital were collected and the operation number was 770.Using a retrospective case-control study,we analysed the clinical effect of different administration methods.Results Clinical effects were compared among the multiple days medication group,normative administration group and no medication groups,and there was no significant difference in the prevention of postoperative infection results.Conclusions Plastic surgery with type Ⅰ incision does not need the prophylactic application of antibiotics.In special circumstances we should take medicine in strict accordance with the "Guiding Principles for Clinical Application of Antibiotics".%目的 探讨整形外科Ⅰ类切口手术预防性应用抗生素的合理方案.方法 采用回顾性对照研究,对比观察748例整形外科Ⅰ类切口住院患者围手术期不给药及不同给药方式的临床感染率.结果 多天数给药组(A组)、规范给药组(B组)、不给药组(C组)3个组别互相比较,其预防术后感染的效果差异无统计学意义.结论 整形外科大多数Ⅰ类切口不需预防性应用抗生素,特殊情况者严格按照《抗菌药物临床应用指导原则》进行给药即可达到良好的临床疗效.

  4. Advanced care nurse practitioners can safely provide sole resident cover for level three patients: impact on outcomes, cost and work patterns in a cardiac surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Henry; Skoyles, Julian; Redfearn, Sue; Jutley, Raj; Mitchell, Ian; Richens, David

    2013-01-01

    There are significant pressures on resident medical rotas on intensive care. We have evaluated the safety and feasibility of nurse practitioners (NPs) delivering first-line care on an intensive care unit with all doctors becoming non-resident. Previously, resident doctors on a 1:8 full-shift rota supported by NPs delivered first-line care to patients after cardiac surgery. Subsequently, junior doctors changed to a 1:5 non-resident rota and NPs onto a 1:7 full-shift rota provided first-line care. A single centre before-and-after service evaluation on cardiac intensive care. mortality rates, surgical trainee attendance in theatre and cost before and after the change. After-hour calls by NPs to doctors and subsequent actions were also audited after the change. The overall mortality rates in the 12 months before the change were 2.8 and 2.2% in the 12 months after (P = 0.43). The median [range] logistic EuroSCORE was 5.3 [0.9-84] before and 5.0 [0.9-85] after the change (P = 0.16). After accounting for the risk profile, the odds ratio for death after the change relative to before was 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.41-1.69. Before the change, a surgical trainee attended theatre 467 of 702 (68%) cases. This increased to 539 of 677 (80%) cases after the change (P cardiac intensive care. Training opportunities for junior surgeons increased and costs were reduced.

  5. 整形清创美容缝合术处理面部外伤的研究%Study on the treatment of facial trauma by plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周明; 安杏星; 孙同祖; 胡尧; 李章; 李凯

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of the treatment of plastic surgery for the treatment of facial trauma patients. Methods 122 patients with facial trauma were treated in our hospital from January 2014 to January in.The patients were divided into conventional group and beauty group according to the random method,61 cases in each group.The conventional group was treated with routine debridement and suture,and the patients were treated with plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery. Results The treatment effect of the patients in the beauty group was significantly higher than that of the conventional group,and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant( P<0.05). Conclusion The treatment of facial trauma patients with plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery can obtain better results,improve the quality of treatment and meet the aesthetic needs of patients.%目的:探究对面部外伤患者应用整形清创美容缝合术治疗的效果.方法:选取本院2014年1月-2015年1月收治的面部外伤患者122例,依照随机方式将其分为常规组与美容组,每组均为61例.对常规组患者实施常规清创缝合处理,对美容组患者采用整形清创美容缝合术治疗.结果:美容组患者的治疗效果明显比常规组患者好,且两组差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:对面部外伤患者采用整形清创美容缝合术治疗可获取较好效果,提升治疗质量,满足患者的美观需求.

  6. The collection of Adipose Derived Stem Cells using Water Jet Assisted Lipoplasty for their use in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Purpura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The graft of autologous fat for the augmentation of soft tissue is a common practice frequently used in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. In addition, the presence of adipose derived stem cells (ASCs in adipose tissue stimulates the regeneration of tissue in which it is applied after the autologous fat grafting improving the final clinical results. Due to these characteristics, there is an increasing interest in the use of ASCs for the treatment of several clinical conditions. As a consequence, the use of clean room environment is required for the production of cell-based therapies. The present study is aimed to describe the biological properties of adipose tissue and cells derived from it cultured in vitro in clean room environment according to current regulation. The collection of adipose tissue was performed using the water – jet assisted liposuction in order to preserve an high cell viability increasing their chances of future use for different clinical application in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  7. [Prevention of operational thromboembolic risk in plastic and aesthetic surgery. Analysis of cases, inquiries of practice and recommendations of professional practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulo, C; Samama, C M; Benhamou, D; Jeandel, T

    2012-08-01

    Thromboembolic accidents are a frightening complication of plastic and aesthetic surgery. The absence of recommendations for professional practices for the prevention of such accidents justified this work. The therapeutic practices of the surgeons were analysed and the results were then compared with those of the international literature. The analysis by a group of experts made it possible to establish recommendations for professional practices. This work consisted in collecting, retrospectively, the therapeutic practices and the complications of 440 surgeons, concerning four types of interventions (abdominoplasty, mammoplasty, abdominal lift and liposuction), from 2006 to 2008, i.e., approximately 110.000 interventions. The intervention with the greatest risk is abdominoplasty with 0.9% of thromboembolic accidents; the intervention with the least risk is mammoplasty with 0.1% of accidents. The risk with the abdominal lift and liposuction of more than three zones is similar and intermediate with 06% of accidents. A protocol of prevention of thromboembolic accidents in plastic surgery is proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. 整形美容手术中知情同意的伦理探讨%The investigation of informed consent in the plastic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈慧青; 陆尔奕; 吴正一

    2014-01-01

    目的 明确知情同意在整形美容行业中的必要性和重要性,探讨其中隐藏的伦理学意蕴,用知情同意这一重要的伦理原则规范医务人员的行为.方法 使用文献检索法、专家咨询法、抽样调查等方法对整形美容手术中的知情同意情况进行调查,分析实施过程中的规范化情况和遇到的难点和伦理困境.结果 整形美容医师牢牢把握了知情同意这一原则,作为术前常规工作执行,但在实际操作过程中还有些难点.结论 整形美容医生应规范履行知情告知义务,尊重患者的知情权;院方须制定一系列的制度来规范知情同意这一原则.%Object To emphasize the necessity and significance of informed consent in the plastic surgery.Further investigating the ethical implication involved in informed consent principles.To standardize the medical treatment action according to the informed consent principles.Methods Through the literature search method,counseling for experts,sampling surveys and other approaches to elucidate the importancy of informed consent in plastic surgery,to survey and analyze the difficulties and ethical dilemma encountered in the process of standardization.Results Plastic surgeons firmly are aware of the principles of informed consent,as a routine preoperative procedure,however there are still some difficulties in practice.Conclusions To respect the patient's right to know,plastic surgery doctors should be standardized to perform the principle of informed consent; meanwhile hospital should develop a series of systems to regulate the principle of informed consent.

  9. Application of Plastic Surgery in Diabetic Foot%整形外科技术在糖尿病足中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林炜; 朱立群; 卫裴; 李发强

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨整形外科治疗措施在糖尿病足中的应用,以保留肢体降低伤残率。方法23例患者在控制血糖、抗感染的基础上,根据创面的不同情况,采取个体化的治疗方案。7例简单创面换药,11例游离植皮,3例局部皮瓣修复,2例保守截趾手术。结果23例患者中,7例通过单纯换药愈合,14例通过整形外科技术愈合,保肢成功率91.3%;仅2例因创面较深,保肢失败,通过截肢手术封闭创面痊愈。结论在系统治疗的基础上,结合整形外科的治疗手段,治疗糖尿病足慢性溃疡创面,能够获得满意的效果,大大降低病人伤残率。%Objective To investigate the application of plastic surgery in the treatment of diabetic foot, in order to reduce the rate of disability. Methods Based on the control of blood glucose and anti infection, 23 patients were treated according to the different conditions of the wound. 7 cases of simple wound dressing, 11 cases of skin graft, 3 cases of local skin flaps, 2 cases of conservative amputation surgery. Results Among the 23 cases, 7 cases were healed by dressing change, 14 cases were healed by plastic surgery, and the limb salvage rate was 91.3%. Only 2 cases were fai