WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic surgery procedures

  1. Disparities in Aesthetic Procedures Performed by Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model. The number of residents not achieving case minimums was also calculated. Case logs of 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed. There was marked variability in craniofacial (range, 6.0-15.0), breast (range, 2.4-5.9), trunk/extremity (range, 3.0-16.0), and miscellaneous (range, 2.7-22.0) procedure categories. In 2015, the bottom 10th percentile of integrated and independent/combined residents did not achieve case minimums for botulinum toxin and dermal fillers. Case minimums were achieved for the other aesthetic procedure categories for all graduating years. Significant variability persists for many aesthetic procedure categories during plastic surgery residency training. Greater efforts may be needed to improve the aesthetic surgery experience of plastic surgery residents. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Essential hand surgery procedures for mastery by graduating plastic surgery residents: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Fischer, Lauren H; Lee, Gordon K; Friedrich, Jeffrey B; Hentz, Vincent R

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to establish the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. This framework can then be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach technical skills in hand surgery. Ten expert hand surgeons were surveyed regarding the essential hand surgery procedures that should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The top 10 procedures from this survey were then used to survey all 89 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery program directors. There was a 69 percent response rate to the program director survey (n = 61). The top nine hand surgery procedures included open carpal tunnel release, open A1 pulley release, digital nerve repair with microscope, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of metacarpal fracture, excision of dorsal or volar ganglion, zone II flexor tendon repair with multistrand technique, incision and drainage of the flexor tendon sheath for flexor tenosynovitis, flexor tendon sheath steroid injection, and open cubital tunnel release. Surgical educators need to develop objective methods to teach and document technical skill. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill is a valid method for accomplishing this task. There has been no consensus regarding which hand surgery procedures should be mastered by graduating plastic surgery residents. The authors have identified nine procedures that are overwhelmingly supported by plastic surgery program directors. These nine procedures can be used as a guideline for developing Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill to teach and document technical skills in hand surgery.

  3. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  4. Surgery without papilla incision: tunneling flap procedures in plastic periodontal and implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhr, Otto; Rebele, Stephan F; Cheung, Stefani L; Hürzeler, Markus B

    2018-06-01

    Diverse clinical advancements, together with some relevant technical innovations, have led to an increase in popularity of tunneling flap procedures in plastic periodontal and implant surgery in the recent past. This trend is further promoted by the fact that these techniques have lately been introduced to a considerably expanded range of indications. While originally described for the treatment of gingival recession-type defects, tunneling flap procedures may now be applied successfully in a variety of clinical situations in which augmentation of the soft tissues is indicated in the esthetic zone. Potential clinical scenarios include surgical thickening of thin buccal gingiva or peri-implant mucosa, alveolar ridge/socket preservation and implant second-stage surgery, as well as soft-tissue ridge augmentation or pontic site development. In this way, tunneling flap procedures developed from a technique, originally merely intended for surgical root coverage, into a capacious surgical conception in plastic periodontal and implant surgery. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview on tunneling flap procedures, to introduce the successive development of the approach along with underlying ideas on surgical wound healing and to present contemporary clinical scenarios in step-by-step photograph-illustrated sequences, which aim to provide clinicians with guidance to help them integrate tunneling flap procedures into their daily clinical routine. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, ... We report on a pilot study on the use of a circumareolar excision and the use of .... and 1 gynecomastia patient) requested reduction in NAC size.

  6. The economics of plastic surgery practices: trends in income, procedure mix, and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M; Lee, Gordon K

    2004-07-01

    Anecdotally, plastic surgeons have complained of working harder for the same or less income in recent years. They also complain of falling fees for reconstructive surgery and increasing competition for cosmetic surgery. This study examined these notions using the best available data. To gain a better understanding of the current plastic surgery market, plastic surgeon incomes, fees, volume, and relative mix of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery were analyzed between the years 1992 and 2002. To gain a broader perspective, plastic surgeon income trends were then compared with those of other medical specialties and of nonmedical professions. The data show that in real dollars, plastic surgeon incomes have remained essentially steady in recent years, despite plastic surgeons increasing their surgery load by an average of 41 percent over the past 10 years. The overall income trend is similar to that of members of other medical specialties and other nonmedical professionals. The average practice percentage of cosmetic surgery was calculated and found to have increased from 27 percent in 1992 to 58 percent in 2002. This most likely can be explained by the findings that real dollar fees collected for cosmetic surgery have decreased very slightly, whereas those for reconstructive procedures have experienced sharp declines. This study demonstrates that plastic surgeons have adjusted their practice profiles in recent years. They have increased their case loads and shifted their practices toward cosmetic surgery, most likely with the goal of maintaining their incomes. The strategy appears to have been successful in the short term. However, with increasing competition and falling prices for cosmetic surgery, it may represent a temporary bulwark for plastic surgeon incomes unless other steps are taken.

  7. Video Capture of Plastic Surgery Procedures Using the GoPro HERO 3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Nicholas Graves, MA

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: The GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera enables high-quality, cost-effective video recording of plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. When set to a narrow field of view and automatic white balance, the camera is able to sufficiently compensate for the contrasting light environment of the operating room and capture high-resolution, detailed video.

  8. Plastic surgery: quo vadis? Current trends and future projections of aesthetic plastic surgical procedures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, P Niclas; Levine, Steven M; Juran, Sabrina

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate past and current trends regarding aesthetic operations in the United States and to project future changes regarding such procedures. Cosmetic surgery statistics from the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery from 1997 to 2012 were analyzed by sex, age, and ethnic group. Then, using population projections from the U.S. Census Bureau based on the 2010 census, two projection scenarios of the expected number of aesthetic plastic surgery procedures were generated. The scenarios included the presumed occurrence and nonoccurrence of a recession like that which occurred in 2007. Aesthetic procedures are expected to grow from 1,688,694 in 2012 to 3,847,929 by 2030, representing an average annual growth rate of 7.1 percent. Should another recession of similar degree to the one in 2007 occur, procedures would increase to only 2,086,994, displaying an average annual growth percentage rate of 1.3 percent. Because the age distribution of the patient population will change, preferences for specific procedures according to age influence-and thus are reflected in-future demand for those procedures. Furthermore, the ethnic profile of patients will change significantly, with 32 percent of all procedures being performed on patients other than Caucasians by 2030. Demand for aesthetic plastic surgical procedures is expected to continue to grow, while depending on the economic performance at the macro level and changing demographic dynamics of the U.S. population. Considering all investigated factors and trends among all patients, the most commonly requested procedures by 2030 are likely to be (1) breast augmentations, (2) lipoplasties, and (3) blepharoplasties.

  9. Anthropometric and clinical profiles of post-bariatric patients submitted to procedures in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Simone Corrêa; Macedo, Jefferson Lessa Soares DE; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Canedo, Lucas Ribeiro; Marques, João Vitor Almeida

    2018-01-01

    to evaluate the profile of patients submitted to post-bariatric plastic surgery at the North Wing Regional Hospital, Brasília, DF. we conducted a prospective, descriptive and analytical study of patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastroplasty, and subsequently to plastic surgery, from January 2011 to December 2016. We assessed body mass index before gastroplasty and after surgery plastic surgery, postoperative complications and comorbidities. we studied 139 patients (130 women and nine men), with a mean age of 41 years, who underwent 233 operations. The mean BMI at the time of plastic surgery was 27.44kg/m2. The mean weight loss was 47.02kg and the mean maximum BMI was 45.17kg/m2. The mean time between bariatric surgery and plastic surgery was 42 months. The most important co-morbidities before plastic surgery were arterial hypertension (11.5%), arthropathy (5.4%), diabetes mellitus (5%) and metabolic syndrome (4.3%) (pprofile of post-bariatric patients who underwent plastic surgery was similar to that reported in the literature, except for the low rate of associated surgeries and postoperative complications. Plastic surgery in post-bariatric patients has led to an improvement in the quality of life in most of these patients.

  10. Video Capture of Plastic Surgery Procedures Using the GoPro HERO 3+

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Nicholas Graves, MA; Deana Saleh Shenaq, MD; Alexander J. Langerman, MD; David H. Song, MD, MBA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Significant improvements can be made in recoding surgical procedures, particularly in capturing high-quality video recordings from the surgeons? point of view. This study examined the utility of the GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera for high-definition, point-of-view recordings of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Methods: The GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera was head-mounted on the surgeon and oriented to the surgeon?s perspective using the GoPro App. The camera was used to ...

  11. Video Capture of Plastic Surgery Procedures Using the GoPro HERO 3+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Steven Nicholas; Shenaq, Deana Saleh; Langerman, Alexander J; Song, David H

    2015-02-01

    Significant improvements can be made in recoding surgical procedures, particularly in capturing high-quality video recordings from the surgeons' point of view. This study examined the utility of the GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera for high-definition, point-of-view recordings of plastic and reconstructive surgery. The GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera was head-mounted on the surgeon and oriented to the surgeon's perspective using the GoPro App. The camera was used to record 4 cases: 2 fat graft procedures and 2 breast reconstructions. During cases 1-3, an assistant remotely controlled the GoPro via the GoPro App. For case 4 the GoPro was linked to a WiFi remote, and controlled by the surgeon. Camera settings for case 1 were as follows: 1080p video resolution; 48 fps; Protune mode on; wide field of view; 16:9 aspect ratio. The lighting contrast due to the overhead lights resulted in limited washout of the video image. Camera settings were adjusted for cases 2-4 to a narrow field of view, which enabled the camera's automatic white balance to better compensate for bright lights focused on the surgical field. Cases 2-4 captured video sufficient for teaching or presentation purposes. The GoPro HERO 3+ Black Edition camera enables high-quality, cost-effective video recording of plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. When set to a narrow field of view and automatic white balance, the camera is able to sufficiently compensate for the contrasting light environment of the operating room and capture high-resolution, detailed video.

  12. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fixation of fractures, wound debridement and reconstruction of soft tissue ... Soft tissue coverage of lower limb wounds may include one or the ... The recovery is lengthy, and the outcome dependent on the initial injury, the surgical procedures.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  14. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 2: Collaboration Between Surgeons and Hospital Administrators to Develop a Funds Flow Model for Procedures Performed at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Although plastic surgeons make important contributions to the clinical, educational, and research missions of academic medical centers (AMCs), determining the financial value of a plastic surgery service can be difficult, due to complex cost accounting systems. We analyzed the financial impact of plastic surgery on an AMC, by examining the contribution margins and operating income of surgical procedures. We collaborated with hospital administrators to implement 3 types of strategic changes: (1) growth of areas with high contribution margin, (2) curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin, (3) improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption. Outcome measures included: facility charges, hospital collections, contribution margin, operating margin, and operating room times. We also studied the top 50 Current Procedural Terminology codes (total case number × charge/case), ranking procedures for profitability, as determined by operating margin. During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty; did not pursue any formal marketing; did not change our surgical fees, billing system, or payer mix; and maintained our commitment to indigent care. After rebalancing our case mix, through procedural portfolio planning, average hospital operating income/procedure increased from $-79 to $+816. Volume and diversity of cases increased, with no change in payer mix. Although charges/case decreased, both contribution margin and operating margin increased, due to improved throughput and decreased operating room times. The 5 most profitable procedures for the hospital were hernia repair, mandibular osteotomy, hand skin graft, free fibula flap, and head and neck flap, whereas the 5 least profitable were latissimus breast reconstruction, craniosynostosis repair, free-flap breast reconstruction, trunk skin graft, and cutaneous free flap. Total operating income for the hospital, from plastic surgery procedures, increased

  15. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  16. Looking at plastic surgery through Google Glass: part 1. Systematic review of Google Glass evidence and the first plastic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Rosenfield, Lorne K

    2015-03-01

    Google Glass has the potential to become a ubiquitous and translational technological tool within clinical plastic surgery. Google Glass allows clinicians to remotely view patient notes, laboratory results, and imaging; training can be augmented via streamed expert master classes; and patient safety can be improved by remote advice from a senior colleague. This systematic review identified and appraised every Google Glass publication relevant to plastic surgery and describes the first plastic surgical procedures recorded using Google Glass. A systematic review was performed using PubMed National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ovid MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, following modified Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Key search terms "Google" and "Glass" identified mutually inclusive publications that were screened for inclusion. Eighty-two publications were identified, with 21 included for review. Google Glass publications were formal articles (n = 3), editorial/commentary articles (n = 7), conference proceedings (n = 1), news reports (n = 3), and online articles (n = 7). Data support Google Glass' positive impact on health care delivery, clinical training, medical documentation, and patient safety. Concerns exist regarding patient confidentiality, technical issues, and limited software. The first plastic surgical procedure performed using Google Glass was a blepharoplasty on October 29, 2013. Google Glass is an exciting translational technology with the potential to positively impact health care delivery, medical documentation, surgical training, and patient safety. Further high-quality scientific research is required to formally appraise Google Glass in the clinical setting.

  17. Plastic Surgery: Tackling Misconceptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    will succeed. First impressions tend to last, and if young people's first impression of plastic surgeons is that they spend much of their time doing cosmetic surgery then this is a first impression that might be long ... Res 2014;4 Suppl S3:169‑70. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: www.amhsr.org. DOI:.

  18. Views of college students on plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Mohmand, Humayun; Ahmad, Nabila

    2013-06-01

    Various studies have been conducted in many countries to determine the perception/awareness about plastic surgery. The present study assessed the views of college students about plastic surgery. A questionnaire consisted of nine questions regarding the basic knowledge about plastic surgery was randomly distributed among college students. The students were given 20 minutes to fill out the forms. A total of 250 male and 250 female college students were randomly included in the study. The mean age of the male students was 21.1 years as compared to 20.7 years of female students. The top five conditions named were related to hair (89.8%) followed by face scars (88%). The most common procedure named by the students was liposuction (88.2%) followed by hair transplantation. 80.2% of the students opted not to be a plastic surgeon if given an opportunity to select the profession. 33.8% of the students had seen some kinds of plastic surgery operation. Only 5.6% of the students (3.4% male and 2.2% female) had seen some kinds of plastic surgery procedure. 68% of male students and 48% of female students wished to have a plastic surgery procedure sometime in their lives. Majority of the students (88%) got the information from the internet. The second most common source was magazines (85.2%). Majority of the students (53.4%) had an idea of an invisible scar as a result of having a plastic surgery procedure. Only 22% thought to have no scar. Late Michael Jackson was at the top of the list of celebrities having a plastic surgery procedure (97.8%) followed by Nawaz Shariff (92.4%). Despite the rapid growth of plastic surgery in the last two decades, a large portion of population remains unaware of the spatiality. It is essential to institute programs to educate healthcare consumers and providers about the plastic surgery.

  19. Undergraduate Plastic Surgery Education: Problems, Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on principles rather than limited procedures, with surgical interventions ranging from complex microsurgery-based reconstructions to aesthetic procedures. However, medical students' perceptions of the field of plastic surgery are limited and underestimate the versatility of services offered by plastic surgeons.[1,2] In ...

  20. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery has its objectives in publishing original articles about developments in all areas related to plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as to trauma surgery. It also serves as a means of providing a forum for correspondence, information and discussion. It also accepts review articles that ...

  1. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of stem cells in aesthetic dermatology and plastic surgery procedures. A compact review of experimental and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Maciej; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Pietkun, Katarzyna; Zegarski, Maciej; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Habib, Samy L; Drewa, Tomasz; Zegarska, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to collect currently available data related to the use of stem cells in aesthetic dermatology and plastic surgery based on a systemic review of experimental and clinical applications. We found that the use of stem cells is very promising but the current state of art is still not effective. This situation is connected with not fully known mechanisms of cell interactions, possible risks and side effects. We think that there is a big need to create and conduct different studies which could resolve problems of stem cells use for implementation into aesthetic dermatology and plastic surgery.

  3. "Oriental anthropometry" in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senna-Fernandes Vasco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to Chinese medicine, the acupuncture-points′ (acupoints locations are proportionally and symmetrically distributed in well-defined compartment zones on the human body surface Oriental Anthropometry" (OA. Acupoints, if considered as aesthetic-loci, might be useful as reference guides in plastic surgery (PS. Aim: This study aimed to use aesthetic-loci as anatomical reference in surgical marking of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Method: This was an observational study based on aesthetic surgeries performed in private clinic. This study was based on 106 cases, comprising of 102 women and 4 men, with ages varying from 07 to 73 years, and with heights of between 1.34 m and 1.80 m. Patients were submitted to aesthetic surgical planning by relating aesthetic-loci to conventional surgical marking, including breast surgeries, abdominoplasty, rhytidoplasty, blepharoplasty, and hair implant. The aesthetic-surgical-outcome (ASO of the patients was assessed by a team of plastic surgeons (who were not involved in the surgical procedures over a follow-up period of one year by using a numeric-rating-scale in percentage (% terms. A four-point-verbal-rating-scale was used to record the patients′ opinion of therapeutic-satisfaction (TS. Results: ASO was 75.3 ± 9.4% and TS indicated that most patients (58.5% obtained "good" results. Of the remainder, 38.7% found the results "excellent", and 2.8% found them "fair". Discussion and Conclusion : The data suggested that the use of aesthetic-loci may be a useful tool for PS as an anatomical reference for surgical marking. However, further investigation is required to assess the efficacy of the OA by providing the patients more reliable balance and harmony in facial and body contours surgeries.

  4. Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tomography (CBCT) American Academy of Periodontology Installs New President, Officers in Boston American Academy of Periodontology Announces ... May Increase Lung Cancer Risk CDC Estimate: New Mexico, Hawaii Have Highest U.S. Incidence of Advanced Gum ...

  5. Architecture of European Plastic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, J. -P. A.; Banic, A.; Molea, G.; Mazzola, R.; Poell, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    The architecture of European Plastic Surgery was published in 1996 [Nicolai JPA, Scuderi N. Plastic surgical Europe in an organogram. Eur J Plast Surg 1996; 19: 253-6.] It is the objective of this paper to update information of that article. Continuing medical education (CME), science, training,

  6. Body dysmorphia and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a mental disorder characterized by a preoccupation with some aspect of one's appearance. In cosmetic surgery, this preoccupation can be overlooked by practitioners resulting in a discrepancy between expected and realistic outcome. Identifying the characteristics of this disorder may be crucial to the practitioner-patient relationship in the plastic surgery setting.

  7. Overview of Facial Plastic Surgery and Current Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jessica; Barnes, Christian; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Facial plastic surgery is a multidisciplinary specialty largely driven by otolaryngology but includes oral maxillary surgery, dermatology, ophthalmology, and plastic surgery. It encompasses both reconstructive and cosmetic components. The scope of practice for facial plastic surgeons in the United States may include rhinoplasty, browlifts, blepharoplasty, facelifts, microvascular reconstruction of the head and neck, craniomaxillofacial trauma reconstruction, and correction of defects in the face after skin cancer resection. Facial plastic surgery also encompasses the use of injectable fillers, neural modulators (e.g., BOTOX Cosmetic, Allergan Pharmaceuticals, Westport, Ireland), lasers, and other devices aimed at rejuvenating skin. Facial plastic surgery is a constantly evolving field with continuing innovative advances in surgical techniques and cosmetic adjunctive technologies. This article aims to give an overview of the various procedures that encompass the field of facial plastic surgery and to highlight the recent advances and trends in procedures and surgical techniques. PMID:28824978

  8. The Plastic Surgery Hand Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Levin, L Scott; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Designing an effective hand rotation for plastic surgery residents is difficult. The authors address this limitation by elucidating the critical components of the hand curriculum during plastic surgery residency. Hand questions on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam for six consecutive years (2008 to 2013) were characterized by presence of imaging, vignette setting, question taxonomy, answer domain, anatomy, and topic. Answer references were quantified by source and year of publication. Two hundred sixty-six questions were related to hand surgery (22.7 percent of all questions; 44.3 per year) and 61 were accompanied by an image (22.9 percent). Vignettes tended to be clinic- (50.0 percent) and emergency room-based (35.3 percent) (p < 0.001). Questions required decision-making (60.5 percent) over interpretation (25.9 percent) and recall skills (13.5 percent) (p < 0.001). Answers focused on interventions (57.5 percent) over anatomy/pathology (25.2 percent) and diagnoses (17.3 percent) (p < 0.001). Nearly half of the questions focused on the digits. The highest yield topics were trauma (35.3 percent), reconstruction (24.4 percent), and aesthetic and functional problems (14.2 percent). The Journal of Hand Surgery (American volume) (20.5 percent) and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (18.0 percent) were the most-cited journals, and the median publication lag was 7 years. Green's Operative Hand Surgery was the most-referenced textbook (41.8 percent). These results will enable trainees to study hand surgery topics with greater efficiency. Faculty can use these results to ensure that tested topics are covered during residency training. Thus, a benchmark is established to improve didactic, clinical, and operative experiences in hand surgery.

  9. Top five craniofacial techniques for training in plastic surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kenneth; Kawamoto, Henry K; McCarthy, Joseph G; Bartlett, Scott P; Matthews, David C; Wolfe, S Anthony; Tanna, Neil; Vu, Minh-Thien; Bradley, James P

    2012-03-01

    Despite increasing specialization of craniofacial surgery, certain craniofacial techniques are widely applicable. The authors identified five such craniofacial techniques and queried American Society of Plastic Surgeons members and plastic surgery program directors regarding their comfort level with the procedures and their opinion on resident training for these selected procedures. First, a select group of senior craniofacial surgeons discussed and agreed on the top five procedures. Second, active American Society of Plastic Surgeons were surveyed regarding their opinion on training and their comfort level with each procedure. Third, plastic surgery residency program directors were studied to see which of the top five procedures are taught as part of the plastic surgery residency curriculum. The top five widely applicable craniofacial procedures are technically described and include the following: (1) cranial or iliac bone graft for nasal reconstruction, (2) perialar rim bone graft, (3) lateral canthopexy, (4) osseous genioplasty, and (5) bone graft harvest for orbital floor defects. For practicing plastic surgeons, comfort level in all procedures increased with advancing years in practice (except those with 75 percent), especially those with craniofacial fellowship training, felt competent in all procedures except osseous genioplasty (53 percent). Plastic surgery program directors agreed that all top five procedures should be mastered by graduation. Although program directors felt that all five selected craniofacial procedures should be taught and mastered during residency training, plastic surgeons without craniofacial fellowship training were less comfortable with the techniques. Residency training goals should include competence in core craniofacial techniques.

  10. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 1: Strategic Changes in Clinical Practice to Increase Physician Revenue, Improve Operative Throughput, and Maintain Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Portfolio planning in health care represents the strategic prioritization of services that permits an organization to better achieve its goals of margin and mission. Because of recent volatility in the economy, declining reimbursement, and rising costs of providing care, such strategic planning has become increasingly important if physicians want to remain leaders in health care. This project assesses the financial impact of procedural portfolio planning on an academic plastic surgery practice from the physician's perspective. We tracked the top 50 procedures, defined as total charges per CPT code, that were performed in our baseline year, for 6 providers in a stable plastic surgery practice. At the end of the first year, we implemented 3 types of strategic changes: growth of areas with high contribution margin (laser resurfacing of burn scars), curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin (panniculectomy in smokers), and improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption (free-flap breast reconstruction). During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty, did not pursue any formal marketing, did not change our surgical fees or billing system, provided care independent of payer mix, and maintained our commitment to indigent care. Outcome measures included procedural charges and revenue, collection rates, work relative value units, operating room times, idle times (room time less case time), receipts/minute in operating room, uncompensated charity care, and patient satisfaction (Press-Gainey scores). Before the study period, annual incremental growth in our practice was 1% to 2%, in terms of charges and receipts. After implementation of the portfolio planning project, the financial position of our division improved significantly, with patient satisfaction rates increasing from 85.5% to 94.1% and charity care remaining constant at US $400,000 per year. Encounters, work relative value units, charges

  11. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Souto Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions.

  12. Psychology of plastic and reconstructive surgery: a systematic clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Manson, Paul N; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2010-12-01

    The authors sought to review the various types of patients with psychological abnormalities who may present to the plastic surgeon and the psychological impact of various plastic surgery procedures on these patients. After systematically searching the Embase and PubMed databases and following further refinement (based on the authors' inclusion and exclusion criteria), the authors identified 65 studies. In addition, the authors felt that important information was contained in four textbooks, two press releases, and one Internet database. The inclusion criteria were studies that investigated the psychological outcomes, background, and personality types of patients seeking specific plastic surgery procedures. In addition, studies that addressed the impact of plastic surgery on patients' psychological status and quality of life were also included. The authors excluded studies with fewer than 30 patients, studies that did not pertain to the particular plastic surgery procedures, and studies that addressed psychological sequelae of revision operations. Narcissistic and histrionic personality disorders and body dysmorphic disorder are the three most common psychiatric conditions encountered in patients seeking cosmetic surgery. Overall, plastic surgery not only restores the appearance and function of the disfigured body unit but also alleviates psychological distress. Identifying the psychologically challenging patient before surgical intervention will allow the patient to obtain the appropriate psychological assistance and may result in a healthier individual with or without associated plastic surgery procedures.

  13. Litigation After Nasal Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Razmpa, Ebrahim; Saedi, Babak; Safavi, Amin; Shahsavari, Ebrahim; Arvin Sazgar, Amir; Massihi, Farzaneh; Tofighi, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Esthetic surgeries are among the commonest medical procedures in the world nowadays; and as statistics declare, there has been a rapid increase in the rate of rhinoplasty during the recent years. Hence, as the number of cosmetic surgeries rises, the increment in the number of physicians being sued is quite inevitable; either due to complication in rhinoplasties or even inability to fulfill the patients’ expectations. This article aims to clarify the aspects of causes leading ...

  14. History of plastic surgery: Art, philosophy, and rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macionis, Valdas

    2018-03-23

    The 200th anniversary of K. F. Graefe's "Rhinoplasty," E. Zeis' naming of the specialty of plastic surgery in 1838, and the continuing discussion on what is plastic surgery have prompted this historical-conceptual review with a semantic insight into the meaning of the word "plastic." A literature search has revealed that this term contains dual aspects: artistic and philosophical. The progressive development of these two connotations can be traced from their origin in the ceramics and the myths of ancient Greeks to their metamorphoses in fine arts, science, and philosophy of plasticity of the modern day. Although the names of plastic procedures and the title of the specialty carry both the artistic and philosophical features, the philosophical notion is less evident. This article underlines the importance of etymology in the interpretation of the concept of plastic surgery. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Prevalence of Cosmetic Facial Plastic Procedures among Facial Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayer, Roxana; Sand, Jordan P; Han, Albert; Nabili, Vishad; Keller, Gregory S

    2018-04-01

    This is the first study to report on the prevalence of cosmetic facial plastic surgery use among facial plastic surgeons. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency with which facial plastic surgeons have cosmetic procedures themselves. A secondary aim is to determine whether trends in usage of cosmetic facial procedures among facial plastic surgeons are similar to that of nonsurgeons. The study design was an anonymous, five-question, Internet survey distributed via email set in a single academic institution. Board-certified members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) were included in this study. Self-reported history of cosmetic facial plastic surgery or minimally invasive procedures were recorded. The survey also queried participants for demographic data. A total of 216 members of the AAFPRS responded to the questionnaire. Ninety percent of respondents were male ( n  = 192) and 10.3% were female ( n  = 22). Thirty-three percent of respondents were aged 31 to 40 years ( n  = 70), 25% were aged 41 to 50 years ( n  = 53), 21.4% were aged 51 to 60 years ( n  = 46), and 20.5% were older than 60 years ( n  = 44). Thirty-six percent of respondents had a surgical cosmetic facial procedure and 75% has at least one minimally invasive cosmetic facial procedure. Facial plastic surgeons are frequent users of cosmetic facial plastic surgery. This finding may be due to access, knowledge base, values, or attitudes. By better understanding surgeon attitudes toward facial plastic surgery, we can improve communication with patients and delivery of care. This study is a first step in understanding use of facial plastic procedures among facial plastic surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. [Tobacco and plastic surgery: An absolute contraindication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiak, C; De Runz, A; Maschino, H; Brix, M; Simon, E; Claudot, F

    2017-08-01

    Smoking increases perioperative risk regarding wound healing, infection rate and failure of microsurgical procedures. There is no present consensus about plastic and aesthetic surgical indications concerning smoking patients. The aim of our study is to analyze French plastic surgeons practices concerning smokers. A questionnaire was send by e-mail to French plastic surgeons in order to evaluate their own operative indications: patient information about smoking dangers, pre- and postoperative delay of smoking cessation, type of intervention carried out, smoking cessation supports, use of screening test and smoking limit associated to surgery refusing were studied. Statistical tests were used to compare results according to practitioner activity (liberal or public), own smoking habits and time of installation. In 148 questionnaires, only one surgeon did not explain smoking risk. Of the surgeons, 49.3% proposed smoking-cessation supports, more frequently with public practice (P=0.019). In total, 85.4% of surgeons did not use screening tests. Years of installation affected operative indication with smoking patients (P=0.02). Pre- and postoperative smoking cessation delay were on average respectively 4 and 3 weeks in accordance with literature. Potential improvements could be proposed to smoking patients' care: smoking cessation assistance, screening tests, absolute contraindication of some procedures or level of consumption to determine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Fifty Years of Innovation in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Kwasnicki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInnovation has molded the current landscape of plastic surgery. However, documentation of this process only exists scattered throughout the literature as individual articles. The few attempts made to profile innovation in plastic surgery have been narrative, and therefore qualitative and inherently biased. Through the implementation of a novel innovation metric, this work aims to identify and characterise the most prevalent innovations in plastic surgery over the last 50 years.MethodsPatents and publications related to plastic surgery (1960 to 2010 were retrieved from patent and MEDLINE databases, respectively. The most active patent codes were identified and grouped into technology areas, which were subsequently plotted graphically against publication data. Expert-derived technologies outside of the top performing patents areas were additionally explored.ResultsBetween 1960 and 2010, 4,651 patents and 43,118 publications related to plastic surgery were identified. The most active patent codes were grouped under reconstructive prostheses, implants, instruments, non-invasive techniques, and tissue engineering. Of these areas and other expert-derived technologies, those currently undergoing growth include surgical instruments, implants, non-invasive practices, transplantation and breast surgery. Innovations related to microvascular surgery, liposuction, tissue engineering, lasers and prostheses have all plateaued.ConclusionsThe application of a novel metric for evaluating innovation quantitatively outlines the natural history of technologies fundamental to the evolution of plastic surgery. Analysis of current innovation trends provides some insight into which technology domains are the most active.

  18. Pregnancy and the Plastic Surgery Resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Rebecca M; Weston, Jane S; Furnas, Heather J

    2017-01-01

    Combining pregnancy with plastic surgery residency has historically been difficult. Two decades ago, 36 percent of plastic surgery program directors surveyed actively discouraged pregnancy among residents, and 33 percent of women plastic surgeons suffered from infertility. Most alarmingly, 26 percent of plastic surgery trainees had had an elective abortion during residency. With increasing numbers of women training in plastic surgery, this historical lack of support for pregnancy deserves further attention. To explore the current accommodations made for the pregnant plastic surgery resident, an electronic survey was sent to 88 plastic surgery program directors in the United States. Fifty-four responded, for a response rate of 61.36 percent. On average, a director trained a total of 7.91 women among 17.28 residents trained over 8.19 years. Of the women residents, 1.43 were pregnant during a director's tenure, with 1.35 of those residents taking maternity leave. An average 1.75 male residents took paternity leave. Approximately one-third of programs had a formal maternity/paternity leave policy (36.54 percent) which, in most cases, was limited to defining allowed weeks of leave, time required to fulfill program requirements, and remuneration during leave. This survey of plastic surgery directors is a first step in defining the challenges training programs face in supporting the pregnant resident. Directors provided comments describing their challenges accommodating an absent resident in a small program and complying with the American Board of Plastic Surgery's required weeks of training per year. A discussion of these challenges is followed by suggested solutions.

  19. Litigation After Nasal Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Razmpa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Esthetic surgeries are among the commonest medical procedures in the world nowadays; and as statistics declare, there has been a rapid increase in the rate of rhinoplasty during the recent years. Hence, as the number of cosmetic surgeries rises, the increment in the number of physicians being sued is quite inevitable; either due to complication in rhinoplasties or even inability to fulfill the patients’ expectations. This article aims to clarify the aspects of causes leading to these legal claims. Materials and Methods: We designed a retrospective study according to the available files in the Iranian Organization for Forensic Medicine in which physicians were sued for the outcomes of rhinoplasty through the years 2004 to 2010. In addition, information on the patients’ demographic data, surgeons’ specialty and experience, and method of anesthesia were also collected. Results: One hundred twenty six patients entered the study among which 77 (61% were female and 49 (39% male. Mean age was obtained as 26.9 ± 7.7yrs. Up to 79.4% of patients had complaints concerning the cosmetic outcomes, 39.7% with respiratory and 4.8% with olfactory problems. The reason to sue the physician had a significant relationship with the patients’ age and sex, and also with the surgeons’ experience. Conclusion: There are multiple reasons impelling the patients to sue surgeons after rhinoplasty, some are related to physicians’ malpractice and some to the patients’ social and personal circumstances.

  20. Litigation After Nasal Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmpa, Ebrahim; Saedi, Babak; Safavi, Amin; Shahsavari, Ebrahim; Arvin Sazgar, Amir; Massihi, Farzaneh; Tofighi, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Esthetic surgeries are among the commonest medical procedures in the world nowadays; and as statistics declare, there has been a rapid increase in the rate of rhinoplasty during the recent years. Hence, as the number of cosmetic surgeries rises, the increment in the number of physicians being sued is quite inevitable; either due to complication in rhinoplasties or even inability to fulfill the patients’ expectations. This article aims to clarify the aspects of causes leading to these legal claims. Materials and Methods: We designed a retrospective study according to the available files in the Iranian Organization for Forensic Medicine in which physicians were sued for the outcomes of rhinoplasty through the years 2004 to 2010. In addition, information on the patients’ demographic data, surgeons’ specialty and experience, and method of anesthesia were also collected. Results: One hundred twenty six patients entered the study among which 77 (61%) were female and 49 (39%) male. Mean age was obtained as 26.9 ± 7.7yrs. Up to 79.4% of patients had complaints concerning the cosmetic outcomes, 39.7% with respiratory and 4.8% with olfactory problems. The reason to sue the physician had a significant relationship with the patients’ age and sex, and also with the surgeons’ experience. Conclusion: There are multiple reasons impelling the patients to sue surgeons after rhinoplasty, some are related to physicians’ malpractice and some to the patients’ social and personal circumstances. PMID:24303371

  1. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in plastic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lea Juul; Matzen, Steen H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism is a well-documented complication of surgery, including plastic surgery. However, few consensus guidelines on thromboembolism prophylaxis exist in plastic surgery and, thus, the different approaches in the public as well as the private clinics in Denmark were...... investigated using a web-based survey. METHODS: Forty-two clinics were contacted and 45% responded. RESULTS: The collected data reveals a lack of consensus in plastic surgery in Denmark, not only regarding the use of mechanical and chemical prophylaxis, but also which type of prophylaxis to apply, the duration...... of prophylaxis, and how to risk stratify the patients. CONCLUSION: The development of a guideline, based on plastic surgical data, using a validated risk assessment model, which combines the surgical risk with the patient related risk and recommends guidelines for mechanical as well as chemoprophylaxis...

  2. Bibliometric trend analyses of plastic surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, M.P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis was designed to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative aspects of plastic surgery research by means of a bibliometric citation analysis of plastic surgical presentations and publications. Citations to such published work provides an indication of the impact and the relevance of

  3. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: The Plastic Surgery Paradigm Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Erica L; Zavlin, Dmitry; Friedman, Jeffrey D; Abdollahi, Aariane; Rappaport, Norman H

    2017-12-14

    With a focus on providing high quality care and reducing facility based expenses there has been an evolution in perioperative care by way of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS). ERAS allows for a multidisciplinary and multimodal approach to perioperative care which not only expedites recovery but maximizes patient outcomes. This paradigm shift has been generally accepted by most surgical specialties, including plastic surgery. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of ERAS on outcomes in cosmetic plastic surgery. A prospective study consisting of phone call questionnaires was designed where patients from two senior plastic surgeons (N.H.R. and J.D.F.) were followed. The treatment group (n = 10) followed an ERAS protocol while the control group (n = 12) followed the traditional recovery after surgery which included narcotic usage. Patients were contacted on postoperative days (POD) 0 through 7+ and surveyed about a number of outcomes measures. The ERAS group demonstrated a significant reduction in postoperative pain on POD 0, 1, 2, and 3 (all P plastic surgery. The utility lies in the ability to expedite patient's recovery while still providing quality care. This study showed a reduction in postoperative complaints by avoiding narcotics without an increase in complications. Our findings signify the importance of ERAS protocols within cosmetic plastic surgery. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended to...

  5. Patient preferences in print advertisement marketing for plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanan, Akshay; Quinn, Candace; Spiegel, Jeffrey H

    2013-05-01

    Plastic surgeons are competing for their share of a growing but still limited market, thus making advertising an important component in a successful plastic surgery practice. The authors evaluate the variables, characteristics, and presentation features that make print advertisements most effectively pique the interest of individuals selecting a plastic surgeon. An online survey was administered to 404 individuals with active interest in plastic surgery from 10 major metropolitan areas. Participants were presented with 5 different advertisements from plastic surgeons throughout the country and were asked a series of both closed- and open-ended questions to assess verity, quality, and marketability of each advertisement. Reponses to open-ended questions were analyzed using the Wordle program (www.wordle.net). The most frequent themes identified for all 5 ads were "Being beautiful is possible" (41%), "I could be beautiful" (24%), "Some people need surgery to be beautiful" (16%), and "Being beautiful is important" (14%). Advertisement 1-featuring 3 women and no pre- or posttreatment photography, no physician photography, and a listing of the 3 physicians' credentials but not a list of the services provided-received the highest overall preference rating. Factors including emotions felt while reading, unique qualities of the advertisement, list of procedures performed, use of models versus actual patients, and pictures of the plastic surgeons were found to contribute to the respondents' overall perception of advertisements used to market a plastic surgery practice.

  6. Education on the Business of Plastic Surgery During Training: A Survey of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Gishen, Kriya; Desai, Urmen; Garcia, Alejandro M; Thaller, Seth R

    2018-06-01

    Entrepreneurial skills are important for physicians, especially plastic surgeons. Nevertheless, these skills are not typically emphasized during residency training. Evaluate the extent of business training at plastic surgery residency programs as well as means of enhancing business training. A 6-question online survey was sent to plastic surgery program directors for distribution to plastic surgery residents. Responses from residents at the PGY2 level and above were included for analysis. Tables were prepared to present survey results. Hundred and sixty-six residents including 147 PGY2 and above residents responded to our survey. Only 43.5% reported inclusion of business training in their plastic surgery residency. A majority of residents reported they do not expect on graduation to be prepared for the business aspects of plastic surgery. Additionally, a majority of residents feel establishment of a formal lecture series on the business of plastic surgery would be beneficial. Results from our survey indicate limited training at plastic surgery programs in necessary business skills. Plastic surgery residency programs should consider incorporating or enhancing elements of business training in their curriculum. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Changing trends in plastic surgery training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The currently available training models are being put to scrutiny in India today, both by the residents and the teachers. Plastic surgery specialty was created primarily for reconstructive purposes but the society always perceived it from a cosmetic angle, particularly in the post second world war era. As a result, there is a need to redefine the goals of plastic surgery training in the present times so that the plastic surgeon is "future ready" to meet the needs of society and the market forces. Materials and Methods: The author has reviewed the currently available literature on plastic surgery training from India and the western countries. An attempt has been made to study opinions from the teachers and the trainees. The modules currently available in India and abroad have been analyzed and a suggestion has been made for drafting training programs that would meet the demands of the society as well as prepare the resident both for the aesthetic and reconstructive practice. Conclusions: The plastic surgery training needs to be more vibrant and in tune with the changing times. While maintaining its core nature, the current predominantly reconstructive modules need to incorporate the aesthetic content. The evaluation should be both knowledge and competence based. The teachers need to be educated in the various teaching methods that are more applicable to grown up residents. There is a need to find ways to attract talented people in the academic plastic surgery.

  8. Changing trends in plastic surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The currently available training models are being put to scrutiny in India today, both by the residents and the teachers. Plastic surgery specialty was created primarily for reconstructive purposes but the society always perceived it from a cosmetic angle, particularly in the post second world war era. As a result, there is a need to redefine the goals of plastic surgery training in the present times so that the plastic surgeon is "future ready" to meet the needs of society and the market forces. The author has reviewed the currently available literature on plastic surgery training from India and the western countries. An attempt has been made to study opinions from the teachers and the trainees. The modules currently available in India and abroad have been analyzed and a suggestion has been made for drafting training programs that would meet the demands of the society as well as prepare the resident both for the aesthetic and reconstructive practice. The plastic surgery training needs to be more vibrant and in tune with the changing times. While maintaining its core nature, the current predominantly reconstructive modules need to incorporate the aesthetic content. The evaluation should be both knowledge and competence based. The teachers need to be educated in the various teaching methods that are more applicable to grown up residents. There is a need to find ways to attract talented people in the academic plastic surgery.

  9. Computer Simulation and Digital Resources for Plastic Surgery Psychomotor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Plana, Natalie M; Stranix, John T; Cutting, Court B; McCarthy, Joseph G; Flores, Roberto L

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary plastic surgery residents are increasingly challenged to learn a greater number of complex surgical techniques within a limited period. Surgical simulation and digital education resources have the potential to address some limitations of the traditional training model, and have been shown to accelerate knowledge and skills acquisition. Although animal, cadaver, and bench models are widely used for skills and procedure-specific training, digital simulation has not been fully embraced within plastic surgery. Digital educational resources may play a future role in a multistage strategy for skills and procedures training. The authors present two virtual surgical simulators addressing procedural cognition for cleft repair and craniofacial surgery. Furthermore, the authors describe how partnerships among surgical educators, industry, and philanthropy can be a successful strategy for the development and maintenance of digital simulators and educational resources relevant to plastic surgery training. It is our responsibility as surgical educators not only to create these resources, but to demonstrate their utility for enhanced trainee knowledge and technical skills development. Currently available digital resources should be evaluated in partnership with plastic surgery educational societies to guide trainees and practitioners toward effective digital content.

  10. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Eirini, Liodaki; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Emmanouil, Liodakis; Papadopoulos, Othonas; Othonas, Papadopoulos; Machens, Hans-Günther; Hans-Günther, Machens; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Nikolaos, Papadopulos A

    2012-02-01

    In this report we highlight the use of PET scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge.

  11. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meetings of Interest Online Education Job Board CME Policies CBN Fellowship Certificate Research Grant Program Resources All Resources Approved Procedures Patient Safety Vignettes Dr. Mason Historical Library Governing Documents Guidelines Access and Insurance Position and ...

  12. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton H. L. McNichols, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions:. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  13. Recent advancements and prospects of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin XING

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the recent advancements and developmental prospects of plastic surgery worldwide,and to describe the future directions,aims,and highlights of Chinese military plastic surgery.Methods Relevant articles published in the last five years were retrieved through a search in PubMed,Medline,and CMCC.A statistical survey was conducted to summarize the achievements obtained by the Chinese military plastic surgery unit in the last five years.Results Considerable progress has been achieved in both clinical treatment and basic research of plastic surgery in the past five years.Its important role in the early treatment of combat injury and trauma has been recognized and emphasized.Chinese military plastic surgery has achieved considerable accomplishments in the last five years,especially in chronic wound repair;mechanism,prevention,and treatment of explosive soft tissue injuries and seawater immersion wounds;and new remedies of maxillofacial traumatic deformity,composite facial tissue allograft,and so on.Conclusions The repair and reconstruction of tissue defect and deformity caused by war injury and trauma will be the future major research direction of military plastic surgery.Research work should focus on tissue engineering,composite tissue allograft,stem cell therapy,mechanism of abnormal scar formation,among others,to solve the clinical problems of destructive facial injuries,extensive thora-abdominal wall defects,chronic ulcer,abnormal scars,and so on.Furthermore,plastic surgeons should fully utilize their special skills and take active part in the early treatment of war injury and trauma.

  14. [The role of balneology in plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, N; Binet, A; Caliot, J; Poli Merol, M-L; Bodin, F; François-Fiquet, C

    2016-02-01

    Balneology can be part of the plastic surgery care sector. The objectives of this study were firstly to the state of knowledge about the hydrotherapy and specify the place reserved for hydrotherapy by surgeons as an adjunct in plastic and reconstructive surgery (adult and child). Multicentric national study by poll (Google Drive®) focused at plastic and/or pediatric surgeons. The following information was analyzed: frequency, timing of prescription, indications, the surgeon's feelings towards hydrotherapy and the differences between adult's and children's prescriptions. Fifty-four teams were contacted: 22 responses were received (15 "adult" plastic surgeons, 9 "pediatric" plastic surgeons, 6 pediatric surgeons, with 12 out of 22 working with burnt patients). Eighteen out of 22 prescribed hydrotherapy. Twenty out of 22 thought that hydrotherapy had a role as adjuvant therapy in plastic surgery. The indications were: burns (11/20), skin-graft hypertrophy (10/20), inflammatory and pruritic scar and cutaneous trophic disorders (9/20), psychological (3/20), retractions (2/20), weight loss and smoking (1/20). The timing of the prescription was: 6 months and 1 year (8/20) after surgery/trauma. Twenty out of 22 found a beneficial effect: physical (19/20): reduction of inflammatory signs, pruritus and pain, scar maturation, skin thinning improvement; psychological (14/20): positive for patient/family. Five out of 17 made the difference between child/adult, 10/17 made no difference but only treated adults or children. The respondents in the study are probably more sensitive to the effects of hydrotherapy that non-respondents. It is difficult to assess the real impact of hydrotherapy in plastic surgery because distinguishing spontaneous favorable evolution of a scar from one only due to the hydrotherapy or multidisciplinary management is difficult. However, hydrotherapy seems to have its role among multidisciplinary management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  15. Vibration for Pain Reduction in a Plastic Surgery Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Mitchell George; Karadsheh, Murad Jehad; Krebiehl, Johanna Ruth; Ford, Dawn Marie; Ford, Ronald D

    2016-01-01

    Patients can experience significant pain during routine procedures in the plastic surgery clinic. Methods for clinical pain reduction are often impractical, time-consuming, or ineffective. Vibration is a safe, inexpensive, and highly applicable modality for pain reduction that can be readily utilized for a wide variety of procedures. This study evaluated the use of vibration as a viable pain-reduction strategy in the clinical plastic surgery setting. Patients requiring at least 2 consecutive procedures that are considered painful were enrolled in the study. These included injections, staple removal, and suture removal. In the same patient, one half of the procedures were performed without vibration and the other half with vibration. After completing the procedures, the patients rated their pain with vibration and without vibration. The patient and the researcher also described the experience with a short questionnaire. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. Patients reported significantly less pain on the Numeric Rating Scale pain scale when vibration was used compared with the control group (p reduction. It significantly reduces the pain experienced by patients during minor office procedures. Given its practicality and ease of use, it is a welcome tool in the plastic surgery clinic.

  16. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A brief history of plastic surgery in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Hormozi, Abdoljalil

    2013-03-01

     Although the exact time of performing plastic surgery is not addressed in the medical and historical literature, it can be supposed that these surgical procedures have a long and fascinating history.  Recent excavations provided many documents regarding the application of medical instruments, surgical and even reconstructive procedures during the pre-historic and ancient periods. Actually, there is no historical definite time-zone separating general and cosmetic operations in the pre-modern time; however, historically there have been many surgeons who tried to perform reconstructive procedures during their usual medical practice. This article presents a brief look at the history of plastic surgery form the ancient to the contemporary era, with a special focus on Iran.

  18. Social Media and the Plastic Surgery Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, Sarah C; Li, Alexander Y; Gilstrap, Jarom; Canales, Francisco L; Furnas, Heather J

    2017-11-01

    Many plastic surgeons use social media as a marketing tool to attract and retain patients, but information about how patients use social media and their preferred types of plastic surgery posts have been lacking. To investigate patients' preferred social media networks and the type of posts they wished to see, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a single aesthetic practice of two plastic surgeons by surveying 100 consecutive patients. The age of the patients averaged 44.4 years (range, 17 to 78 years). Facebook had the greatest patient use and engagement, with YouTube second in use, and Instagram second in number of engaged users. Over half used Pinterest, but with little daily engagement. Only one-fourth used Snapchat, but the percentage of users who were highly engaged was second only to Facebook. The least popular network was Twitter, with the fewest patient users and least engagement. Social media played a minor role compared with the practice's Web site in both influencing patients to choose the practice and providing information on the day of the appointment. Patients most wanted to see posts on a plastic surgeon's social media platform related to practice information, before-and-after photographs, and contests. Articles about plastic surgery held the least interest. Among five types of Web site content, patients expressed most interest in before-and-after photographs. This study is the first to articulate the plastic surgery patient perspective regarding social media. The findings aim to help plastic surgeons maximize their influence on their target audience.

  19. Ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Lin, I-Chan; Shen, Yun-Dun; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    We describe in this paper the current status of ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan. Data were collected from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan, the Bulletin of the Taiwan Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Society, and the Statistics Yearbook of Practicing Physicians and Health Care Organizations in Taiwan by the Taiwan Medical Association. We ascertained that 94 ophthalmologists were oculoplastic surgeons and accounted for 5.8% of 1621 ophthalmologists in Taiwan. They had their fellowship training abroad (most ophthalmologists trained in the United States of America) or in Taiwan. All ophthalmologists were well trained and capable of performing major oculoplastic surgeries. The payment rates by our National Health Insurance for oculoplastic and orbital surgeries are relatively low, compared to Medicare payments in the United States. Ophthalmologists should promote the concept that oculoplastic surgeons specialize in periorbital plastic and aesthetic surgeries. However, general ophthalmologists should receive more educational courses on oculoplastic and cosmetic surgery. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eirini, L.; Emmanouil, L.; Othonas, P.; Hans-Guenther, M.; Nikolaos, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we highlight the use of position emission tomography (PET) scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge. (author)

  1. The scope of plastic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... purely aesthetic considerations, while a large proportion is spent on burns and trauma, especially of the limbs and face, as well as excision and reconstruction for neoplasms, especially of the skin and soft tissue, breast, and head and neck. Table 1 provides a list of some of the procedures most frequently ...

  2. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  3. Added Healthcare Charges Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, Michelle R; Johnson, R Michael; Fox, Justin P

    2018-01-31

    A history of smoking confers additional risk of complications following plastic surgical procedures, which may require hospital-based care to address. To determine if patients with a smoking history experience higher rates of complications leading to higher hospital-based care utilization, and therefore greater healthcare charges, after common outpatient plastic surgeries. Using ambulatory surgery data from California, Florida, Nebraska, and New York, we identified adult patients who underwent common facial, breast, or abdominal contouring procedures from January 2009 to November 2013. Our primary outcomes were hospital-based, acute care (hospital admissions and emergency department visits), serious adverse events, and cumulative healthcare charges within 30 days of discharge. Multivariable regression models were used to compare outcomes between patients with and without a smoking history. The final sample included 214,761 patients, of which 10,426 (4.9%) had a smoking history. Compared to patients without, those with a smoking history were more likely to have a hospital-based, acute care encounter (3.4% vs 7.1%; AOR = 1.36 [1.25-1.48]) or serious adverse event (0.9% vs 2.2%; AOR = 1.38 [1.18-1.60]) within 30 days. On average, these events added $1826 per patient with a smoking history. These findings were consistent when stratified by specific procedure and controlled for patient factors. Patients undergoing common outpatient plastic surgery procedures who have a history of smoking are at risk for more frequent complications, and incur higher healthcare charges than patients who are nonsmokers. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Quality of publications in plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornet, O; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I; Bekara, F; Herlin, C; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to describe plastic surgery publications in terms of methodology, level of evidence, approval by institutional review board, method of consent, and subspecialty. The 8 top-ranked plastic surgery journals were selected. We manually reviewed the last 40 original articles in each plastic surgery journal, to represent more than 2 months of publications for all journals (range: 3-17 months). Only clinical original articles on human subjects were included. Each article was read at least twice by two different reviewers to ensure accurate data transcription, and then graded by written criteria. One of the senior authors was asked to make a final decision in case of doubt. Among the articles reviewed, 320 were analyzed. The geographical origin of these publications were Asia (32.5%), Europe (30%), US (28.4%), South America (5.6%), Africa (2.5%), and finally Oceania (1%). Reconstructive surgery remains the specialty area most represented in the journals with almost half of the publications, followed by breast surgery (24%) and plastic surgery (19%). A total of 75.6% were retrospective studies. Nearly 80% of the studies were of low level of evidence. Only 3.5% were randomized trials. Less than 40% of the publications mentioned approval by an institutional committee, and 22.6% a patient's informed consent. This study aimed to analyze the quality of plastic surgery publications, taking into account the criteria of Evidence Based Medicine. This work showed that more than half of the studies did not mention an institutional review board approval (Ethics Committee), and that three quarter of the studies did not indicate the presence of patient's informed consent. Ultimately, over 80% of the studies were of low level of evidence. The top-ranked journals have already imposed guidelines corresponding to the methodology requirements to publish clinical studies in their pages, such as EQUATOR criteria for the PRS journal. Efforts are therefore to be done

  6. Eumorphic Plastic Surgery: Expectation Versus Satisfaction in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Micai, Alessandro; Boriani, Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Eumorphic Plastic Surgery aims at improving the severe psychosocial pain caused by a deformity. Dysmorphopathology is an increasingly relevant problem facing the plastic surgeon. The aim of this study is to describe the perioperative questionnaires created by the senior author and to present a cohort of plastic surgery patients suffering from dysmorphopathies. These patients were prospectively followed and evaluated with the proposed questionnaires through their surgical pathway to explore the degree of satisfaction or disappointment compared to expectations. All candidates for plastic surgery procedures between April 2011 and June 2013 were included in the study. Preoperatively, all patients completed the Patient Expectation Questionnaire (E-pgm). Twelve months postoperatively, they completed the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (S-pgm). The E-pgm and S-pgm were compared to evaluate the consistency between the patient's preoperative expectations and postoperative evaluations. A total of 158 patients were included in the study. Out of them, 79 % experienced an improvement or no variation between preoperative expectations and postoperative satisfaction. With regard to the motivation for undergoing surgery, 91 % showed that the surgical procedure met the motivation. An overall positive perioperative change in life was experienced by 93 % of patients. The E-pgm questionnaire proved to be a valid and reliable tool for the selection of suitable candidates for surgery and for identification of dysmorphophobic patients. Enhancing the doctor-patient relationship and communication can reduce ambiguity and avoid troublesome misunderstandings, litigation and other legal implications. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Plastic Surgery Response in Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Susan; Zimmerman, Amanda; Gaviria, Andres; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2015-06-01

    Disasters cause untold damage and are often unpredictable; however, with proper preparation, these events can be better managed. The initial response has the greatest impact on the overall success of the relief effort. A well-trained multidisciplinary network of providers is necessary to ensure coordinated care for the victims of these mass casualty disasters. As members of this network of providers, plastic surgeons have the ability to efficiently address injuries sustained in mass casualty disasters and are a valuable member of the relief effort. The skill set of plastic surgeons includes techniques that can address injuries sustained in large-scale emergencies, such as the management of soft-tissue injury, tissue viability, facial fractures, and extremity salvage. An approach to disaster relief, the types of disasters encountered, the management of injuries related to mass casualty disasters, the role of plastic surgeons in the relief effort, and resource management are discussed. In order to improve preparedness in future mass casualty disasters, plastic surgeons should receive training during residency regarding the utilization of plastic surgery knowledge in the disaster setting.

  8. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020, previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015, hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001, bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004, and obesity (body mass index ≥30 (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011 to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations.

  9. Maximizing Technological Resources in Plastic Surgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-11-01

    Modern plastic surgery resident education demands the acquisition of an ever-increasing fund of knowledge and familiarity with more surgical techniques than ever before. This all must take place within the context and boundaries of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-mandated restrictions on work hours as well as balance of education and service. Technological resources have been developed and can be used to complement the skills that residents acquire while performing their day-to-day activities such as taking care of patients, reading textbooks and journal articles, and assisting or performing surgical procedures. Those complementary resources provide the benefits of portability and accessibility, and can thus be conveniently incorporated into the hectic daily life of a resident. This article presents a summary of the most commonly used currently available advanced technologies in plastic surgery resident education, and suggestions for integration of those technologies into a curriculum.

  10. Competitive forces and academic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S H

    1998-04-01

    Economic constraints developing as a result of rising health care costs in the United States pose significant challenges for and threats to the survival of academic plastic surgery. Declining clinical revenues, competition for patients and resources from other health care providers, and reductions in support of its education and research efforts necessitate a paradigm shift if it is to survive. Questionnaires were used to collect data from 92 of the 100 postgraduate training program directors of plastic surgery in the United States. The most common source of clinical income on a national basis was indemnity insurance. Sources of clinical income varied by region. The majority of programs, 80 percent, report that at least 75 percent of the income support for faculty came from practice income. Financial support for ancillary and research personnel, in large part, came from this same source. Resident salaries and benefits came largely from other resources. Generally as population density within the metropolitan area in which a program was located increased, so too did the number of competing plastic surgeons, including graduates of the program and nonacademic cosmetic and hand surgeons. However, levels of competition for cosmetic surgery in smaller metropolitan areas of some regions seem to be similar to those reported by programs in larger communities. Plastic surgery programs in very competitive communities received significantly greater amounts of their income from indemnity insurance and self-paying patients than did programs in less competitive metropolitan areas. Internal competition from other surgical and nonsurgical specialists within the same institution is likewise keen. Virtually all respondents, 93 percent, report that their institutions provided patient care in a least one designated center of excellence in the following disciplines: hand, microsurgery, craniofacial, cleft lip and palate, burn, and cosmetic surgery. This study suggests that centers of

  11. Diagnostic value of mammography flowing plastic and reconstructive breast surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardzynska, K.; Wesolowska, E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasm in women. Due to the growing knowledge and self- consciousness about the disease itself as well as regarding treatment options among breast cancer patients. Main indications for reconstruction after mastectomy include fear of both physical and psychological damage and, in a broader sense, the lack of contraindications for the procedure. Altogether, these factors are in fact directly responsible for the increase in the number of reconstructive procedures, which have become one of the important elements in breast cancer treatment. Year by year, the number of plastic surgery procedures has been growing. Assessment of the breast aimed at discerning the presence diminishing procedures. In women with prostheses implanted for cosmetic reasons, mamsaography provides an opportunity to correctly diagnose and confirm implant damage. Women who have undergonew such procedures should be screened mammographically in the same way as the rest of the female population is. The aim of this paper is to summarize the value of diagnostic mammagraphy after plastic and reconstructive surgery. (authors)

  12. [From the French Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery to the French Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2004-04-01

    (The) 3rd December 1952, 11 surgeons and other specialists found the French Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (SFCPR) which was officially published on (the) 28 September 1953. The first congress was during October 1953 and the first president as Maurice Aubry. The first secretary was Daniel Morel Fatio. The symposiums were after about three of four times each year and the thematic subjects were initially according the reconstructive surgery. The review "Annales de chirurgie plastique" was free in 1956. The members of the Society were about 30 initially, but their plastic surgery in the big hospitals at Paris and other big towns in France. The "specialty" of plastic surgery was created in 1971. On "syndicate", one French board of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, the increasing of departments of plastic surgery were the front of increasing of the plastic surgery in French and of the number of the French Society of Plastic Reconstructive surgery (580 in 2003). The French Society organized the International Congress of Plastic Surgery in 1975. The society SFCPR became the French Society of plastic reconstruction and Aesthetic Surgery (SFCPRE) in 1983 and the "logo" (front view) was in the 1994 SOF.CPRE.

  13. Geographic Trends in the Plastic Surgery Match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The integrated plastic surgery match is among the most competitive residency matches in recent years. Although previous studies have correlated applicant characteristics with successful match outcomes, none have comprehensively investigated the role of geography in the match. This study elucidates regional biases in the match. Plastic surgery residents who matched during 2011-2015 were eligible for study inclusion. Names of residents were obtained from official residency program websites and cross-referenced with data obtained from the Student Doctor Network. For each resident, region of residency program and medical school were compared. From 67 programs, 622 residents were identified. Most graduated from US medical schools (97.9%). A total of 94 residents matched at a home institution (15.1%). Half of the residents matched in the same region as their medical school (48.9%). Programs in the South matched the greatest number of residents from the same region (60.8%), whereas West programs matched the least (30.8%, p < 0.001). No regional differences existed regarding residents matching at their home institution (p = 0.268). More women matched at West programs (43.1%) versus East programs (30.6%, p < 0.05). A significant number of residents matched at their home institution. Roughly, half matched at a program in the same region as their medical school. Whether this regional phenomenon stems from applicant or program factors remains unknown. Yet, given the limited number of interviews and the high costs of interviewing, applicants and programs can use these data to help optimize the match process. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduction Mammoplasty: A Comparison Between Operations Performed by Plastic Surgery and General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordahi, Anthony M; Hoppe, Ian C; Lee, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is an often-performed procedure by plastic surgeons and increasingly by general surgeons. The question has been posed in both general surgical literature and plastic surgical literature as to whether this procedure should remain the domain of surgical specialists. Some general surgeons are trained in breast reductions, whereas all plastic surgeons receive training in this procedure. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project provides a unique opportunity to compare the 2 surgical specialties in an unbiased manner in terms of preoperative comorbidities and 30-day postoperative complications. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database was queried for the years 2005-2012. Patients were identified as having undergone a reduction mammoplasty by Current Procedural Terminology codes. RESULTS were refined to include only females with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 611.1 (hypertrophy of breasts). Information was collected regarding age, surgical specialty performing procedure, body mass index, and other preoperative variables. The outcomes utilized were presence of superficial surgical site infection, presence of deep surgical site infection, presence of wound dehiscence, postoperative respiratory compromise, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, perioperative transfusion, operative time, reintubation, reoperation, and length of hospital stay. During this time period, there were 6239 reduction mammaplasties performed within the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database: 339 by general surgery and 5900 by plastic surgery. No statistical differences were detected between the 2 groups with regard to superficial wound infections, deep wound infections, organ space infections, or wound dehiscence. There were no significant differences noted between within groups with regard to systemic postoperative complications. Patients undergoing a procedure by general surgery were more likely

  15. The Safety of Aesthetic Labiaplasty: A Plastic Surgery Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Frank; Mistry, Bhavik D; Singh, Yashoda; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-08-01

    The demand for female aesthetic labiaplasty surgery continues to rapidly increase. Several questions have been raised regarding the safety and effectiveness of female aesthetic genital surgery. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with aesthetic labiaplasty and describe the type and frequency of complications that have been experienced. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who had primary aesthetic labia minora reduction surgery from August 2007 to April 2014. A chart review of the electronic medical record was performed to examine demographic, procedural, and outcome data. In the study period, 113 patients underwent aesthetic labiaplasty. Of these, 29 patients (25.6%) had labiaplasty performed in combination with another procedure. A total of 15 patients (13.3%) reported transient symptoms, including swelling, bruising, and pain. There was one patient (0.8%) that experienced bleeding. Four patients (3.5%) required revision surgery. All revisions were performed to excise further tissue to address persistent redundancy or asymmetry. No major complications were reported. In our experience, aesthetic surgery of the labia minora using an edge excision technique has a very low complication rate and provides satisfactory aesthetic outcomes for our patients. More studies examining the impact of labiaplasty on a woman's self-image and quality of life would add to our understanding of the motivations and expectations of women undergoing this aesthetic surgery. This information will allow us to help our patients make well-informed decisions when considering this aesthetic genital surgery. 4 Risk. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  17. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the procedure...

  18. Operating room waste reduction in plastic and hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mark G; Rothkopf, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Operating rooms (ORs), combined with labour and delivery suites, account for approximately 70% of hospital waste. Previous studies have reported that recycling can have a considerable financial impact on a hospital-wide basis; however, its importance in the OR has not been demonstrated. To propose a method of decreasing cost through judicious selection of instruments and supplies, and initiation of recycling in plastic and hand surgery. The authors identified disposable supplies and instruments that are routinely opened and wasted in common plastic and hand surgery procedures, and calculated the savings that can result from eliminating extraneous items. A cost analysis was performed, which compared the expense of OR waste versus single-stream recycling and the benefit of recycling HIPAA documents and blue wrap. Fifteen total items were removed from disposable plastic packs and seven total items from hand packs. A total of US$17,381.05 could be saved per year from these changes alone. Since initiating single-stream recycling, the authors' institution has saved, on average, US$3,487 per month at the three campuses. After extrapolating at the current savings rate, one would expect to save a minimum of US$41,844 per year. OR waste reduction is an effective method of decreasing cost in the surgical setting. By revising the contents of current disposable packs and instrument sets designated for plastic and hand surgery, hospitals can reduce the amount of opened and unused material. Significant financial savings and environmental benefit can result from this judicious supply and instrument selection, as well as implementation of recycling.

  19. Animal models in plastic and reconstructive surgery simulation-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Charles Yuen Yung; Wang, Aline Yen Ling; Tiong, Vincent Tze Yang; Athanassopoulos, Thanassi; Loh, Meiling; Lim, Philip; Kao, Huang-Kai

    2018-01-01

    The use of live and cadaveric animal models in surgical training is well established as a means of teaching and improving surgical skill in a controlled setting. We aim to review, evaluate, and summarize the models published in the literature that are applicable to Plastic Surgery training. A PubMed search for keywords relating to animal models in Plastic Surgery and the associated procedures was conducted. Animal models that had cross over between specialties such as microsurgery with Neurosurgery and pinnaplasty with ear, nose, and throat surgery were included as they were deemed to be relevant to our training curriculum. A level of evidence and recommendation assessment was then given to each surgical model. Our review found animal models applicable to plastic surgery training in four major categories namely-microsurgery training, flap raising, facial surgery, and hand surgery. Twenty-four separate articles described various methods of practicing microsurgical techniques on different types of animals. Fourteen different articles each described various methods of conducting flap-based procedures which consisted of either local or perforator flap dissection. Eight articles described different models for practicing hand surgery techniques. Finally, eight articles described animal models that were used for head and neck procedures. A comprehensive summary of animal models related to plastic surgery training has been compiled. Cadaveric animal models provide a readily available introduction to many procedures and ought to be used instead of live models when feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The ongoing emergence of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, S; Qassemyar, Q; Leymarie, N; Honart, J-F; Alkhashnam, H; De Fremicourt, K; Conversano, A; Schaff, J-B; Rimareix, F; Kolb, F; Sarfati, B

    2018-04-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is more and more widely used in urology, general surgery and gynecological surgery. The interest of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery, a discipline that operates primarily on surfaces, has yet to be conclusively proved. However, the initial applications of robotic surgery in plastic and reconstructive surgery have been emerging in a number of fields including transoral reconstruction of posterior oropharyngeal defects, nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction, microsurgery, muscle harvesting for pelvic reconstruction and coverage of the scalp or the extremities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Introducing the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies: ICOPLAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhorst, Hinne A; Badran, Hassan; Clarke, Howard M; Cooter, Rodney; Evans, Gregory R D; Kirschbaum, Julio Daniel; Koh, Kyung Suk; Lazier, Carol; Murphy, Robert X; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Piccolo, Nelson Sarto; Perks, Graeme

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the formation of the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies (ICOPLAST) as a novel, transparent, dynamic, and proactive confederation of national plastic surgery societies. ICOPLAST aspires to provide a voice for the entire international community of plastic surgeons. ICOPLAST has been designed to benefit the patient, plastic surgery as a profession, and each individual plastic surgeon. Its principal objective is to enhance international communication, education, and advocacy processes to ultimately improve patient outcomes for plastic surgery patients globally. The new ICOPLAST's focus is to add true value for patients. ICOPLAST's evolution, philosophy, governance, and bylaws are explained and all societies worldwide are encouraged and cordially invited to join. An open and warm invitation is provided. Additional information is found at www.ICOPLAST.org.

  2. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  3. Side effect experiences of South Korean women in their twenties and thirties after facial plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YA

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Young A Kim,1 Hyang-In Cho Chung2 1Department of Nursing, Jeju National University College of Nursing, Jeju-si, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Nursing, Chonnam National University College of Nursing, Gwangju, Republic of Korea Background: Rates of plastic surgery procedures have increased dramatically over the past several decades, especially for the women in South Korea.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of South Korean women in their twenties and thirties with facial plastic surgery (FPS side effects.Participants and methods: Seven women who have suffered from FPS side effects participated in this study. Data were collected from July to September 2015 through individual in-depth interviews using open-ended questions and analyzed using Colaizzi’s method, which is a Husserlian phenomenological approach.Results: Six themes, and 25 subthemes, were found. Major themes were “choosing FPS to gain a new self”, “facing an unintended self”, “trying to accept a changed self”, “making efforts to overcome the situation”, “coming to know a new world”, and “pursuing a new lifestyle”.Conclusion: This study raises social awareness on the risk of plastic surgery side effects, which could prevent unnecessary plastic surgery. It also suggests the need for a deeper understanding of women’s biopsychosocial suffering from plastic surgery side effects. Keywords: cosmetic surgery, aesthetic plastic surgery, qualitative research, interview 

  4. Sources of federal funding in plastic and reconstructive surgery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kelsey E; Gastman, Brian

    2014-05-01

    In the last several years, federal funding has become increasingly difficult to obtain. The purpose of this project was to define the level of federal funding among plastic surgeons in the modern era. The authors evaluated members of the Plastic Surgery Research Council because of their expected invested interested in research. The authors collected information from 1998 to 2012 on funding using curricula vitae and publically available online tools. Data on Plastic Surgery Foundation funding was also collected to determine its role in supporting federally funded investigators. Of 256 individuals, the authors found 41 to be primary investigators on federally funded grants, with the majority receiving one to two awards. Common subtypes of awards included National Institutes of Health R01 (n = 15), K08 (n = 9), and R21 (n = 6). Limited funding from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense was identified. Despite a steady number of available National Institutes of Health awards, plastic surgery recipients have grown in number over the past 15 years. In a review of 20 years of Plastic Surgery Foundation awards, 113 Plastic Surgery Research Council members (44.1 percent) were awardees, averaging 1.8 awards per person. Twenty-nine Plastic Surgery Foundation awardees were also recipients of federal funding; 12 individuals received federal funding without prior Plastic Surgery Foundation funding. A search of plastic surgeons indicates a limited but increasing number of individuals receive federal funding. Plastic Surgery Foundation awards appear to be helpful in supporting investigators as they move to larger federal awards.

  5. Resident operative experience in general surgery, plastic surgery, and urology 5 years after implementation of the ACGME duty hour policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simien, Christopher; Holt, Kathleen D; Richter, Thomas H; Whalen, Thomas V; Coburn, Michael; Havlik, Robert J; Miller, Rebecca S

    2010-08-01

    Resident duty hour restrictions were implemented in 2002-2003. This study examines changes in resident surgical experience since these restrictions were put into place. Operative log data for 3 specialties were examined: general surgery, urology, and plastic surgery. The academic year immediately preceding the duty hour restrictions, 2002-2003, was used as a baseline for comparison to subsequent academic years. Operative log data for graduating residents through 2007-2008 were the primary focus of the analysis. Examination of associated variables that may moderate the relationship between fewer duty hours and surgical volume was also included. Plastic surgery showed no changes in operative volume following duty hour restrictions. Operative volume increased in urology programs. General surgery showed a decrease in volume in some operative categories but an increase in others. Specifically the procedures in vascular, plastic, and thoracic areas showed a consistent decrease. There was no increase in the percentage of programs' graduates falling below minimum requirements. Procedures in pancreas, endocrine, and laparoscopic areas demonstrated an increase in volume. Graduates in larger surgical programs performed fewer procedures than graduates in smaller programs; this was not the case for urology or plastic surgery programs. The reduction of duty hours has not resulted in an across the board decrease in operative volume. Factors other than duty hour reforms may be responsible for some of the observed findings.

  6. Female plastic surgery patients prefer mirror-reversed photographs of themselves: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Runz, Antoine; Boccara, David; Chaouat, Marc; Locatelli, Katia; Bertheuil, Nicolas; Claudot, Frédérique; Bekara, Farid; Mimoun, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The use of a patient's image in plastic surgery is common today. Thus, plastic surgeons should master the use of the image and be aware of the implications of the patients' perception of themselves. The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon in which a person tends to rate things more positively merely because (s)he is familiar with them. Faces are asymmetric, so faces in photos are different from those observed in mirrors. The main objective of this study was to assess whether patients within a plastic surgery population, particularly those undergoing facial aesthetic surgery, preferred standard photographs or mirror-reversed photographs of themselves. A prospective study was conducted in a plastic surgery department, which included women who were admitted to the hospital the day before their procedures. The patients were separated into the following two groups: Group 1 was composed of patients who were undergoing facial aesthetic surgeries, and Group 2 consisted of other patients who presented to the plastic surgery department for surgery. The patients were required to rate their appreciation of their own faces and to choose between standard and mirror-reversed photos of themselves. A total of 214 patients participated. The median age was 47.9 years (interquartile range (IQR): 36.4-60.6), and the median face appreciation was 5 (IQR: 5-7). The preference for the mirror-reversed photograph was significantly different from chance (p < 0.001, binomial (214, 156, 0.5)); 73% of the patients preferred the mirror-reversed photographs. The proportions of patients who preferred the mirror-reversed photograph differed significantly (p = 0.047) between Groups 1 (84%) and 2 (70%). Plastic surgery patients have a significant preference for mirror-reversed photographs of themselves over standard photographs. This preference is even more pronounced among patients who are undergoing facial aesthetic surgery. III. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic

  7. Plastic surgery in Nigeria-Scope and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOG Chukwuanukwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Plastic surgery as a major subspecialty of surgery has existed in Nigeria for several decades but the populace including medical practitioners are yet to fully appreciate its scope. This leads to very late presentation/referral of cases and management of cases that should have been referred by less qualified practitioners with attendant poor outcomes and complications. Most people still regard plastic surgery as being synonymous with cosmetic/aesthetic surgery but the scope goes far beyond this entity. It is therefore important that the public including medical practitioners who are the main sources of referral to the subspecialty are aware of the range of cases handled by plastic surgery units. The plastic surgeon in Nigeria is also faced with a lot of challenges ranging from the arduous task of one having to manage very many different and complicated cases to being very poorly equipped and appreciated. Objectives To educate the populace especially the medical practitioners on the scope of plastic surgery and the extent of development of the subspecialty in Nigeria and solicit for colleague′s cooperation in order to move plastic surgery forward. To also highlight the difficulties faced by the plastic surgeon in Nigeria and seeking help from appropriate quarters which will help to reduce unnecessary referrals abroad while improving the services rendered to patients locally. Conclusion Plastic surgery in Nigeria has developed significantly both in scope and manpower but it is still faced with a lot of challenges. Knowledge of its scope will help to reduce unnecessary referrals abroad while improving services/skill here in Nigeria.

  8. Knowledge and perception of plastic surgery among tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The level of awareness is high in the sampled population with associated increase in acceptance of its practice and willing utilization. All public hospitals should be encouraged to employ the services of plastic surgeons. Appropriate branding of specialized hospitals where plastic surgery service is available will ...

  9. [Plastic surgery treatment techniques for interdisciplinary therapy of pressure sores].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karin; Becker, Frederic; Pfau, Matthias; Werdin, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Pressure sores in geriatric patients represent a challenge for all disciplines involved in the treatment process; however, the prerequisite for successful treatment is the elaboration of an interdisciplinary treatment concept. The treatment goals should be adapted to the individual needs of the patients including the life situation, general condition and local findings. In addition to general basic operative techniques, such as wound cleansing and conditioning, plastic and reconstructive surgery provides a wide range of highly specialized operative techniques for the treatment of these patients by which a definitive defect coverage can be achieved. The aim of this article is to raise awareness for these complex and highly specialized procedures for all disciplines participating in the treatment in order to improve the interdisciplinary cooperation and ultimately the quality of treatment.

  10. [Science and research in academic plastic surgery in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, R E; Machens, H-G

    2009-12-01

    Plastic surgery has passed through a very positive evolution in the last decades on the solid fundament of constantly developing academic plastic surgery. Aim of this paper is an objective evaluation of the current status of academic plastic surgery regarding research topics, currently available ressources and scientific outcome based on a questionnaire. The return rate of the questionnaire in academic departments was 92%. Main topics in research besides wound healing were topics from regenerative medicine such as tissue engineering, biomaterials, genetherapy and angiogenesis with the main focus on skin and fat tissues. In the past five years a total of 25 million Euros of third party research grants were raised. Research relied mainly on interdisciplinary research facilities. Regarding the scientific outcome more than 200 scientific papers were published in basic science research journals having an impactfactor higher than two. These results clearly demonstrate that plastic surgery is scientifically highly productive in academic surroundings where independent departments are established. Considering that independent units of plastic surgery exist in a relatively small number of all 36 university hospitals in germany, it has to be claimed for further independent departments so to provide adequate research facilities for further evolution of academic plastic surgery.

  11. Citation Rate Predictors in the Plastic Surgery Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Calotta, Nicholas; Doshi, Ankur; Soni, Ashwin; Milton, Jacqueline; May, James W; Tufaro, Anthony P

    The purpose of this study is to determine and characterize the scientific and nonscientific factors that influence the rate of article citation in the field of plastic surgery. Cross-sectional study. We reviewed all entries in Annals of Plastic Surgery and Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007; and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. All scientific articles were analyzed and several article characteristics were extracted. The number of citations at 5 years was collected as the outcome variable. A multivariable analysis was performed to determine which variables were associated with higher citations rates. A total of 2456 articles were identified of which only 908 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most studies were publications in the fields of reconstructive (26.3%) or pediatric/craniofacial (17.6%) surgery. The median number of citations 5 years from publication was 8. In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with higher citations rates were subspecialty field (p = 0.0003), disclosed conflict of interest (p = 0.04), number of authors (p = 0.04), and journal (p = 0.02). We have found that higher level of evidence (or other study methodology factors) is not associated with higher citation rates. Instead, conflict of interest, subspecialty topic, journal, and number of authors are strong predictors of high citation rates in plastic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Promise and Limitations of Big Data Research in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Victor Zhang; Tuggle, Charles Thompson; Au, Alexander Francis

    2016-04-01

    The use of "Big Data" in plastic surgery outcomes research has increased dramatically in the last 5 years. This article addresses some of the benefits and limitations of such research. This is a narrative review of large database studies in plastic surgery. There are several benefits to database research as compared with traditional forms of research, such as randomized controlled studies and cohort studies. These include the ease in patient recruitment, reduction in selection bias, and increased generalizability. As such, the types of outcomes research that are particularly suited for database studies include determination of geographic variations in practice, volume outcome analysis, evaluation of how sociodemographic factors affect access to health care, and trend analyses over time. The limitations of database research include data which are limited only to what was captured in the database, high power which can cause clinically insignificant differences to achieve statistical significance, and fishing which can lead to increased type I errors. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project is an important general surgery database that may be useful for plastic surgeons because it is validated and has a large number of patients after over a decade of collecting data. The Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons Program is a newer database specific to plastic surgery. Databases are a powerful tool for plastic surgery outcomes research. It is critically important to understand their benefits and limitations when designing research projects or interpreting studies whose data have been drawn from them. For plastic surgeons, National Surgical Quality Improvement Project has a greater number of publications, but Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons Program is the most applicable database for plastic surgery research.

  13. Capturing Plastic Surgery on Film—Making Reconstruction Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tarek; Sarraf, Namita; Epple, Christian; Schaefer, Kristin Marit; Schaefer, Dirk J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: The Swiss Plastic Surgery Association (https://plasticsurgery.ch/en/) decided to produce a corporate video to illustrate the concept of "plastic surgery of confidence" to the public. We show the diversity of specializations and the vast range of tasks that surgeons passionately handle day in and day out. We wanted to convey 2 main messages: first, that plastic surgery is more than just cosmetic surgery, and second, that plastic surgery in Switzerland is synonymous with quality and confidence. We selected 17 topics that we felt had good filmic potential and would best explain to the public what plastic surgery is about. This included the selection of appropriate patients, experts, and locations from all over the country. We thought it crucial to show the initial preoperative situation, as only in this case would the achievement of reconstruction be evident and comprehensive to the layman audience. The actual production was filmed in 5 different locations and took 5 days of shooting. We recorded 17 surgeons, 9 patients, and about 30 voluntary background actors. From 23 hours of footage, we created a 7 minute, 22 second corporate video, recorded in 3 of the Swiss national languages. The video was presented to the public online in June 2016, on the same day as the National Open Day of Plastic Surgery in Switzerland. The video is available online. We evaluated the impact of the video using a questionnaire for lay people and observed that it could substantially improve the perception of our specialty, especially regarding the reconstructive aspect. We feel that a freely available corporate video is a very useful means to promote plastic surgery and help patients better understand what it is all about. PMID:29062635

  14. Capturing Plastic Surgery on Film—Making Reconstruction Visible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lunger, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. The Swiss Plastic Surgery Association (https://plasticsurgery.ch/en/ decided to produce a corporate video to illustrate the concept of "plastic surgery of confidence" to the public. We show the diversity of specializations and the vast range of tasks that surgeons passionately handle day in and day out. We wanted to convey 2 main messages: first, that plastic surgery is more than just cosmetic surgery, and second, that plastic surgery in Switzerland is synonymous with quality and confidence. We selected 17 topics that we felt had good filmic potential and would best explain to the public what plastic surgery is about. This included the selection of appropriate patients, experts, and locations from all over the country. We thought it crucial to show the initial preoperative situation, as only in this case would the achievement of reconstruction be evident and comprehensive to the layman audience. The actual production was filmed in 5 different locations and took 5 days of shooting. We recorded 17 surgeons, 9 patients, and about 30 voluntary background actors. From 23 hours of footage, we created a 7 minute, 22 second corporate video, recorded in 3 of the Swiss national languages. The video was presented to the public online in June 2016, on the same day as the National Open Day of Plastic Surgery in Switzerland. The video is available online. We evaluated the impact of the video using a questionnaire for lay people and observed that it could substantially improve the perception of our specialty, especially regarding the reconstructive aspect. We feel that a freely available corporate video is a very useful means to promote plastic surgery and help patients better understand what it is all about.

  15. Capturing Plastic Surgery on Film-Making Reconstruction Visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunger, Alexander; Ismail, Tarek; Sarraf, Namita; Epple, Christian; Schaefer, Kristin Marit; Schaefer, Dirk J

    2017-09-01

    The Swiss Plastic Surgery Association (https://plasticsurgery.ch/en/) decided to produce a corporate video to illustrate the concept of "plastic surgery of confidence" to the public. We show the diversity of specializations and the vast range of tasks that surgeons passionately handle day in and day out. We wanted to convey 2 main messages: first, that plastic surgery is more than just cosmetic surgery, and second, that plastic surgery in Switzerland is synonymous with quality and confidence. We selected 17 topics that we felt had good filmic potential and would best explain to the public what plastic surgery is about. This included the selection of appropriate patients, experts, and locations from all over the country. We thought it crucial to show the initial preoperative situation, as only in this case would the achievement of reconstruction be evident and comprehensive to the layman audience. The actual production was filmed in 5 different locations and took 5 days of shooting. We recorded 17 surgeons, 9 patients, and about 30 voluntary background actors. From 23 hours of footage, we created a 7 minute, 22 second corporate video, recorded in 3 of the Swiss national languages. The video was presented to the public online in June 2016, on the same day as the National Open Day of Plastic Surgery in Switzerland. The video is available online. We evaluated the impact of the video using a questionnaire for lay people and observed that it could substantially improve the perception of our specialty, especially regarding the reconstructive aspect. We feel that a freely available corporate video is a very useful means to promote plastic surgery and help patients better understand what it is all about.

  16. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  17. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...... symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...

  18. A study of an assisting robot for mandible plastic surgery based on augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunyong; Lin, Li; Zhou, Chaozheng; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Le; Chai, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Mandible plastic surgery plays an important role in conventional plastic surgery. However, its success depends on the experience of the surgeons. In order to improve the effectiveness of the surgery and release the burden of surgeons, a mandible plastic surgery assisting robot, based on an augmented reality technique, was developed. Augmented reality assists surgeons to realize positioning. Fuzzy control theory was used for the control of the motor. During the process of bone drilling, both the drill bit position and the force were measured by a force sensor which was used to estimate the position of the drilling procedure. An animal experiment was performed to verify the effectiveness of the robotic system. The position error was 1.07 ± 0.27 mm and the angle error was 5.59 ± 3.15°. The results show that the system provides a sufficient accuracy with which a precise drilling procedure can be performed. In addition, under the supervision's feedback of the sensor, an adequate safety level can be achieved for the robotic system. The system realizes accurate positioning and automatic drilling to solve the problems encountered in the drilling procedure, providing a method for future plastic surgery.

  19. Aesthetic Surgery Reality Television Shows: Do they Influence Public Perception of the Scope of Plastic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Araujo, Karin Milleni; Samartine Junior, Hugo; Denadai, Rodrigo; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the influence of aesthetic surgery "reality television" shows viewing on the public's perception of the scope of plastic surgery practice. Perceptions of the scope of plastic surgery (33 scenarios), aesthetic surgery "reality television" viewing patterns ("high," "moderate," or "low" familiarity, similarity, confidence, and influence viewers), sociodemographic data, and previous plastic surgery interaction were collected from 2148 members of the public. Response patterns were created and bivariate and multivariate analyses were applied to assess the possible determinants of overall public choice of plastic surgeons as experts in the plastic surgery-related scenarios. Both "plastic surgeons" and "plastic surgeons alone" were the main response patterns (all p television" viewing negatively influences the public perception of the broad scope of plastic surgery. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  20. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Hultman, MD, MBA, FACS

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care.

  1. [Jean-Louis-Paul Denucé (1824-1889): A forgotten pioneer of plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marck, K W; Martin, D

    2016-02-01

    The authors propose to define as main characterization of plastic reconstructive surgery the conceptual thinking that leads to a rational choice of an operative treatment. Conceptual thinking in plastic surgery started halfway the nineteenth century with the first schematic representations of the operative procedures available at that time, in which Von Ammon and Baumgarten, Szymanowski and Denucé played a prominent role. These four authors and their works are presented with special attention for the less known of them, Jean-Paul Denucé, surgeon in Bordeaux. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Selecting aesthetic gynecologic procedures for plastic surgeons: a review of target methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this article was to assist cosmetic-plastic surgeons in selecting aesthetic cosmetic gynecologic-plastic surgical interventions. Target methodological analyses of pertinent evidence-based scientific papers and anecdotal information linked to surgical techniques for cosmetic-plastic female external genitalia were examined. A search of the existing literature from 1900 through June 2011 was performed by utilizing electronic and manual databases. A total of 87 articles related to cosmetic-plastic gynecologic surgeries were identified in peer-review journals. Anecdotal information was identified in three sources (Barwijuk, Obstet Gynecol J 9(3):2178-2179, 2011; Benson, 5th annual congress on aesthetic vaginal surgery, Tucson, AZ, USA, November 14-15, 2010; Scheinberg, Obstet Gynecol J 9(3):2191, 2011). Among those articles on cosmetic-plastic gynecologic surgical technique that were reviewed, three articles met the criteria for evidence-based medicine level II, one article was level II-1 and two papers were level II-2. The remaining papers were classified as level III. The pertinent 25 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There was no documentation on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic-plastic gynecologic procedures in the scientific literature. All published surgical interventions are not suitable for a cosmetic-plastic practice. The absence of documentation on safety and effectiveness related to cosmetic-plastic gynecologic procedures prevents the establishment of a standard of practice. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be labeled and used as cosmetic-plastic procedures, it is a deceptive practice. Obtaining legal trademarks on traditional gynecologic procedures and creating a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings

  3. Plastic Surgery Complications from Medical Tourism Treated in a U.S. Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kimberly M; Moscoso, Andrea V; Bayer, Lauren R; Rosselli-Risal, Liliana; Orgill, Dennis P

    2018-04-01

    Medical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry fueled by improvements in the global transportation infrastructure. The authors studied patients living in the United States who travel to other countries for plastic surgical procedures and returned to have their complications treated in the authors' center. A retrospective patient evaluation was performed. Patients who had presented to an urban tertiary academic hospital plastic surgery service with complications or complaints associated with plastic surgery performed in a developing country were studied. The authors collected demographic information, types of surgery performed, destinations, insurance coverage, and complications. Seventy-eight patients were identified over 7 years. Most commonly, complications were seen following abdominoplasty (n = 35), breast augmentation (n = 25), and foreign body injections (n = 15). Eighteen patients underwent multiple procedures in one operative setting. The most common destination country was the Dominican Republic (n = 59). Complications included surgical-site infections (n = 14), pain (n = 14), and wound healing complications (n = 12). Eighty-six percent of patients (n = 67) relied on their medical insurance to pay for their follow-up care or manage their complications, with the most common type of health insurance coverage being Massachusetts Medicaid (n = 48). Cosmetic surgery performed in developing countries can carry substantial risks of complications that can be challenging to patients, primary care providers, insurers, and plastic surgical teams not associated with the original surgery. These complications pose significant burdens on our public health systems.

  4. Quality of Life and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Rodrigo; Blaya, Carolina; Tenório, Juliana L C; Saltz, Renato; Ely, Pedro B; Ferrão, Ygor A

    2016-09-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in plastic surgery. However, authors use different scales to address this subject, making it difficult to compare the outcomes. To address this discrepancy, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a random effect meta-analysis. The search was made in two electronic databases (LILACS and PUBMED) using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to aesthetic plastic surgery and QoL. We performed qualitative and quantitative analyses of the gathered data. We calculated a random effect meta-analysis with Der Simonian and Laird as variance estimator to compare pre- and postoperative QoL standardized mean difference. To check if there is difference between aesthetic surgeries, we compared reduction mammoplasty to other aesthetic surgeries. Of 1,715 identified, 20 studies were included in the qualitative analysis and 16 went through quantitative analysis. The random effect of all aesthetic surgeries shows that QoL improved after surgery. Reduction mammoplasty has improved QoL more than other procedures in social functioning and physical functioning domains. Aesthetic plastic surgery increases QoL. Reduction mammoplasty seems to have better improvement compared with other aesthetic surgeries.

  5. Risk of ocular blood splatter during oculofacial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Andrew W; Czyz, Craig N; Kondapalli, Srinivas Sai A; Hill, Robert H; Everman, Kelly R; Cahill, Kenneth V; Foster, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    To assess intraoperative blood splatter to the ocular surface and adnexa during oculofacial surgery. Four surgeons and multiple assistants at three separate locations wore a total of 331 protective eye shields during 131 surgeries. Postoperatively, a luminol blood detection system was used to identify blood splatter on the shields. In the event of positive blood splatter, the total number of blood spots was counted. Controls were used to verify the blood detection protocol. A postoperative questionnaire was given to all surgeons and assistants after each case, and they were asked whether intraoperative blood splatter was noticed. Blood was detected on 61% of eye shields and in a total of 80% of surgical cases. However, only 2% of blood splatters were recognized intraoperatively by the surgical participants. There was no significant difference in the splatter rate between surgeons (64%), assistants (60%), and surgical technicians (58%) (p = 0.69). Shields worn during full-thickness eyelid procedures, direct brow lifting, orbitotomy with bony window, and orbital fracture repairs were more likely to be splattered (p = 0.03), and there was a significant difference between splatter rates among different surgeons (range, 29-90%; p = 0.0004), suggesting that blood splatter rate may be both procedure dependent and surgeon dependent. Mucocutaneous and transconjunctival transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis has been documented. These results suggest that oculofacial plastic surgeons should consider eye protection for patients with known blood-borne diseases and in cases where blood splatter is expected. This precautionary practice is supported by the high incidence (98%) of undetected, intraoperative blood splatter.

  6. Malignant Hyperthermia in Dental and Facial Plastic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Maheri

    2015-04-01

    result in masseter tetany or “jaws of steel” preventing any mouth opening. In cases with exclusively jaws of steel or those with Masseter spasm in combination with the rigidity of other body muscles, the occurrence of MH is almost definite and the surgical procedure should be terminated. Nevertheless, if either the jaw is only slightly resistant to opening or the rigidity of other muscles does not accompany the Masseter spasm, anesthesia might continue with non-triggering agents under proper monitoring including end-tidal CO2, pigmenturia evaluation, and arterial or venous blood sampling for creatine kinase, acid-base status, and electrolyte levels, mainly potassium.      Considering the fact that anesthesiologists do not have access to the head and neck of the patients throughout dental and facial plastic surgeries, the vigilance and awareness of the surgeons in detecting masseter spasms in patients would immensely help with the early diagnosis of MH and save the lives of susceptible patients.

  7. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Yong Oock

    2017-05-01

    Recently, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  8. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Milothridis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Methods: Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Results: Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social networks, their psychological characteristics, such as body image, self-esteem and other personality traits and for specific psychopathology and found that these may either positively or negatively predict their motivation to seek and undergo a cosmetic procedure. Conclusions: The review examined the psychosocial characteristics associated with an interest in cosmetic surgery. Understanding cosmetic patients' characteristics, motivation and expectation for surgery is an important aspect of their clinical care to identify those patients more likely to benefit most from the procedure.

  9. Nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics in plastic surgery: The next frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Chawla, Reema; G, Natasha; Mahdibeiraghdar, Sara; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    The rapid ascent of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics as applied to medicine and surgery has seen an exponential rise in the scale of research generated in this field. This is evidenced not only by the sheer volume of papers dedicated to nanotechnology but also in a large number of new journals dedicated to nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics specifically to medicine and surgery. Aspects of nanotechnology that have already brought benefits to these areas include advanced drug delivery platforms, molecular imaging and materials engineering for surgical implants. Particular areas of interest include nerve regeneration, burns and wound care, artificial skin with nanoelectronic sensors and head and neck surgery. This study presents a review of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics, with focus on its applications and implications in plastic surgery. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  10. Utilization of Body Contouring Procedures Following Weight Loss Surgery: A Study of 37,806 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Park, Jihye; Novikov, David; Kang, Lijuan; Spaniolas, Konstantinos; Bates, Andrew; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora

    2017-11-01

    Bariatric surgery has substantial health benefits; however, some patients desire body contouring (BC) procedures following rapid weight loss. There is a paucity of data regarding the true rate of BC following bariatric procedures. The purpose of our study is to examine the utilization of two common procedures, abdominoplasty, and panniculectomy, following bariatric surgery in New York State. The SPARCS longitudinal administrative database was used to identify bariatric procedures by using ICD-9 and CPT codes between 2004 and 2010. Procedures included sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Using a unique patient identifier, we tracked those patients who subsequently underwent either abdominoplasty or panniculectomy with at least a 4-year follow-up (until 2014). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard model was used to evaluate predictors of follow-up BC surgery. 37,806 patients underwent bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2010. Only 5.58% (n = 2112) of these patients subsequently had a BC procedure, with 143 of them (6.8%) having ≥1 plastic surgery. The average time to plastic surgery after band, bypass, or sleeve was 1134.83 ± 671.09, 984.70 ± 570.53, and 903.02 ± 497.31 days, respectively (P 80%ile in yearly income were more likely to have plastic surgery after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, comorbidities and complications (P values plastic surgery is completed by only 6% of patients following bariatric procedures. As insurance and income are associated with pursuing surgery, improved access may increase the number of patients who are able to undergo these reconstructive procedures.

  11. National Institutes of Health Funding in Plastic Surgery: A Crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Decreasing funding rates and increasing competition for National Institutes of Health research grants have prompted diverse interventions in various fields of biomedicine. Currently, the state of National Institutes of Health funding for plastic surgery research is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the portfolio of National Institutes of Health grants in academic plastic surgery. Plastic surgery faculty at integrated and independent programs were queried individually in the National Institutes of Health RePORTER database for grants awarded in 2014. Funding totals, mechanisms, and institutes were calculated. Abstracts were categorized by research type and field of interest. Characteristics of National Institutes of Health-funded principal investigators were elucidated. Eight hundred sixty-one academic plastic surgeons at 94 programs were queried, and only 18 investigators (2.1 percent) were funded at 12 programs (12.8 percent). National Institutes of Health-funded investigators were predominately male (72 percent), fellowship-trained (61 percent), and aged 49.3 ± 7.8 years. A total of 20 awards amounted to $6,916,886, with an average award of $345,844 ± $222,909. Costs were primarily awarded through the R01 mechanism (77.2 percent). The top three National Institutes of Health institutes awarded 72.9 percent of the entire portfolio. Funding supported clinical (41.1 percent), translational (36.9 percent), and basic science (22.0 percent) research. Craniofacial (20.5 percent), hand (18.7 percent), and breast (16.2 percent) had the greatest funding. Few programs and faculty drive the National Institutes of Health portfolio of plastic surgery research. These data suggest a tenuous funding situation that may be susceptible to future spending cuts. Future research is needed to identify barriers to National Institutes of Health funding procurement in academic plastic surgery.

  12. The Aesthetic Surgery Literature: Do Plastic Surgeons Remain at the Cutting Edge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Roisin T; Zins, James E; Morrison, Colin M

    2016-07-01

    The aesthetic surgery arena has become a competitive marketplace. Recognition as an authority in aesthetic surgery remains a powerful marketing tool for plastic surgeons, but have significant inroads been made by other specialties? The aims of this study were to analyze publication trends relating to the top five most commonly performed aesthetic surgical procedures, and to assess the origins (i.e., source specialty, authorship, institutions, and countries) of published aesthetic surgical research. Based on the seventeenth annual multispecialty data set provided by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, the top five most commonly performed aesthetic surgical procedures were selected. A temporal analysis of publication and citation rates, source institution and country, publishing journal, funding agency trends, and level of evidence was undertaken from 1970 to 2013. Using the search criteria, 7762 articles were identified. There was an 8.8-fold increase in publication volume when the first decade (n = 375) was compared with the last decade (n = 3326). Over the past four decades, 52.2 percent of publications (n = 4053 of 7762) originated from plastic surgery research institutions, with varying contributions from other specialties. Competition was greatest in relation to authorship of blepharoplasty- and rhinoplasty-related publications. Although plastic surgeons continue to maintain a center-stage presence in terms of authorship of aesthetic surgical literature, significant contributions are now made by other specialties. Plastic surgeons must continue to foster high-quality, peer-reviewed research and innovations to maintain their visibility as leaders in the aesthetic surgery literature and sustain a competitive advantage in aesthetic surgery practice.

  13. Wound drainage after plastic and reconstructive surgery of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojkovic, Christa A.; Smeulders, Mark J. C.; van der Horst, Chantal M.; Khan, Sameena M.

    2013-01-01

    Wound drains are often used after plastic and reconstructive surgery of the breast, in order to reduce potential complications. It is unclear whether there is any evidence to support this practice and we therefore undertook a systematic review of the best evidence available. To compare the safety

  14. Wound drainage after plastic and reconstructive surgery of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Sameena M.; Smeulders, Mark J. C.; van der Horst, Chantal M.

    2015-01-01

    Wound drains are often used after plastic and reconstructive surgery of the breast, in order to reduce potential complications. It is unclear whether there is any evidence to support this practice and we therefore undertook a systematic review of the best evidence available. To compare the safety

  15. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Photos Find a Surgeon For Physicians For Facial Plastic Surgery Assistants About the OFPSA OFPSA Officers Become a Member Member of the Year Award For The Media Contact Us Statistics Press Releases In the News Before & After Photos Humanitarian Programs Contact Us AAFPRS ...

  16. Patient Selection in Plastic Surgery: Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Sahin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery is a branch of medicine that provides significant improvements to the people with positive changes. But first of all, this branch has a characteristic which requires analysing patients' psychological situation very carefully. Plastic surgeons are often confronted by patients with mental disorders seeking aesthetic surgery. It is imperative for surgeons to recognize possible underlying psychiatric illnesses. Common psychiatric conditions seen in cosmetic surgery patients include body dysmorphic disorder (BDD, narcissistic personality disorder and histrionic personality disorders. BDD is of particular importance to plastic surgeons. Because outrageous dissatisfaction with one's appearance may conceal psychopathologic traits that are not always easily recognizable, and which, if neglected, may result in serious iatrogenic and medicolegal consequences, we hope that this paper will help plastic surgeons in ultimately preventing patient and surgeon dissatisfaction within the population of patients with psychiatric disorders, and should recognize the diagnostic features of body dysmorphic disorder and screen psychologically unstable patients who may never be satisfied with surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 109-115

  17. Paulus Aegineta, a seventh century encyclopedist and surgeon: his role in the history of plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunluoglu, R; Gurunluoglu, A

    2001-12-01

    Paulus Aegineta (625-690 ad), born on the island of Aegina, practiced medicine at Alexandria. The last of the eclectic Greek compilers in the Byzantine period, he wrote an Epitome of medicine in seven books. The sixth book, which is considered the best section of his work, is devoted mainly to surgery. The first edition, "editio princeps," of his Epitome was published in Greek by the Aldine press in Venice in 1528 and later translated into English for the Sydenham Society by Francis Adams of Banchory (1844-1847). Paulus was not only a compiler but also a competent and skillful surgeon. In addition to his achievements in general surgical progress, Paulus Aegineta, especially in the book on surgery, made valuable contributions in the history of plastic surgery. He may be considered as one of the originators of plastic surgery as it is known today. He described procedures varying from the treatment of nasal and jaw fractures to operations for gynecomastia, ganglion, and hypospadias. This Grecian master influenced not only his own but also the subsequent ages. Rhazes, Haly Abbas, Albucasis, Avicenna, and Fabricius ab Aquapendente were the greatest physicians influenced by Paulus Aegineta. Because the work of Paulus Aegineta was the only source for many of the surgical treatises of Arabian authors, his Epitome bridged Western and Eastern medicine and conveyed surgical experience and knowledge, including several plastic surgery procedures, to the subsequent ages.

  18. The scope of plastic surgery | Rogers | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reconstructive procedures, they were not necessarily identified as primary surgeons for procedures that they commonly perform. A significant number of respondents believed that plastic surgeons are seldom the first line of referral, and are more involved in cases with aesthetic rather than functional sequelae. Discussion.

  19. Social media use and impact on plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanian, Andrew J; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Im, Daniel D; Lee, James C; Jarrahy, Reza

    2013-05-01

    Social media platforms have revolutionized the way human beings communicate, yet there is little evidence describing how the plastic surgery community has adopted social media. In this article, the authors evaluate current trends in social media use by practicing plastic surgeons. An anonymous survey on the use of social media was distributed to members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Prevalent patterns of social media implementation were elucidated. One-half of respondents were regular social media users. Reasons for using social media included the beliefs that incorporation of social media into medical practice is inevitable (56.7 percent), that they are an effective marketing tool (52.1 percent), and that they provide a forum for patient education (49 percent). Surgeons with a primarily aesthetic surgery practice were more likely to use social media. Most respondents (64.6 percent) stated that social media had no effect on their practice, whereas 33.8 percent reported a positive impact and 1.5 percent reported a negative impact. This study depicts current patterns of social media use by plastic surgeons, including motivations driving its implementation and impressions on its impact. Many feel that social media are an effective marketing tool that generates increased exposure and referrals. A small number of surgeons have experienced negative repercussions from social media involvement. Our study reveals the presence of a void. There is a definite interest among those surveyed in developing best practice standards and oversight to ensure ethical use of social media platforms throughout the plastic surgery community. Continuing discussion regarding these matters should be ongoing as our experience with social media in plastic surgery evolves.

  20. [Features of skin graft in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoortère, C; François, C; Belkhou, A; Duquennoy-Martinot, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Skin graft is a skin tissue fragment transferred from a donor site to a receiving site with a spontaneous revascularization. Basic process of plastic surgery, skin graft known in children, specific, warnings and refinements. It finds its indication in many pediatric cases: integumental diseases (neavus, hamartoma), acute burns and scars, traumatic loss of substance or surgically induced, congenital malformations of the hands and feet, etc. Specific skin graft techniques in children are developed: donor sites, sampling technique and procedure, early postoperative care. Especially in children, the scalp is a perfect site for split skin graft and technique is actively developed. Refinements and special cases are discussed: use of dermal matrices, allografts, xenografts, negative pressure therapy, prior skin expansion of the donor site. Results of skin graft in children are exposed: taking of graft, growth and shrinkage, pigmentation. Skin graft sometimes allows to stay the complex movement and get the best final benefit, permanent or at least temporary, in a growing being. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of the efficacy of marketing tools in facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavod, Matthew B; Adamson, Peter A

    2008-06-01

    To compare referral sources to a facial plastic surgery practice and to develop models correlating the referral source with the decision for surgery. Retrospective descriptive study. Well-established, metropolitan, private facial plastic surgery practice with training fellowship affiliated with an academic centre. One-thousand eighty-nine new consecutive patients presenting between January 2001 and December 2005 recorded intake data including age, gender, and chief complaint. Final data input was their decision for or against surgery. Main outcome measures included differences in referral sources based on data collected and how those sources related to decision for surgery. A 50% conversion rate was found. Women and older patients were more likely to be referred from magazines, television, and newspapers and for facial rejuvenation. Men and younger patients were more likely to be referred from the website and for rhinoplasty. For facial rejuvenation, both the number of patients interested in and the probability that they agreed to the procedure increased with age. For rhinoplasty, the converse was true. The most likely patients to schedule surgery were those who were referred from other patients, friends, or family members in our practice. The data confirm that word-of-mouth referrals are the most important source for predicting which patients will elect to proceed with surgery in this established facial cosmetic surgery practice.

  2. Pricing of common cosmetic surgery procedures: local economic factors trump supply and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Clare; Mattison, Gennaya; Workman, Adrienne; Gupta, Subhas

    2015-02-01

    The pricing of cosmetic surgery procedures has long been thought to coincide with laws of basic economics, including the model of supply and demand. However, the highly variable prices of these procedures indicate that additional economic contributors are probable. The authors sought to reassess the fit of cosmetic surgery costs to the model of supply and demand and to determine the driving forces behind the pricing of cosmetic surgery procedures. Ten plastic surgery practices were randomly selected from each of 15 US cities of various population sizes. Average prices of breast augmentation, mastopexy, abdominoplasty, blepharoplasty, and rhytidectomy in each city were compared with economic and demographic statistics. The average price of cosmetic surgery procedures correlated substantially with population size (r = 0.767), cost-of-living index (r = 0.784), cost to own real estate (r = 0.714), and cost to rent real estate (r = 0.695) across the 15 US cities. Cosmetic surgery pricing also was found to correlate (albeit weakly) with household income (r = 0.436) and per capita income (r = 0.576). Virtually no correlations existed between pricing and the density of plastic surgeons (r = 0.185) or the average age of residents (r = 0.076). Results of this study demonstrate a correlation between costs of cosmetic surgery procedures and local economic factors. Cosmetic surgery pricing cannot be completely explained by the supply-and-demand model because no association was found between procedure cost and the density of plastic surgeons. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgery: update in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Randy M; Nogan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The indications for prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgery remain controversial. No recent survey has been reported on the use of prophylactic antibiotics by plastic surgeons in clinical practice. This survey was designed to assess the current use of prophylactic antibiotics by plastic surgeons and to compare trends with previous studies. All members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons with an e-mail address on the Society's website were contacted via an e-mail and sent a link to a SurveyMonkey questionnaire. To survey only in those subspecialty areas that they practice in, surgeons were queried only on the procedures that they perform. Within each section, a list of common representative procedures was included, with questions about the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. A total of 3824 American Society of Plastic Surgeons members were contacted. Of the 3613, 910 with working e-mail addresses responded to the survey for a response rate of 25%. And 833 or 91.5% completed the survey. Survey data cover the percentage of surgeons reporting their use of antibiotics in procedures that they currently perform. The percentage of plastic surgeons who use prophylactic antibiotics in almost all procedures studied has increased significantly when compared with earlier studies. The use of prophylactic antibiotics by plastic surgeons has increased considerably since the prior studies by Krizek et al (Plast Reconstr Surg. 1975;55:21-32 and 1985;76:953-963). Some of these uses are appropriate because of the use in procedures involving implants and longer operations. The elevated rates for clean procedures are not part of the evidence-based practice.

  4. A plastic surgery application in evolution: three-dimensional printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstle, Theodore L; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Kim, Peter S; Lee, Bernard T; Lin, Samuel J

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional printing represents an evolving technology still in its infancy. Currently, individuals and small business entities have the ability to manufacture physical objects from digital renderings, computer-aided design, and open source files. Design modifications and improvements in extrusion methods have made this technology much more affordable. This article explores the potential uses of three-dimensional printing in plastic surgery. A review was performed detailing the known uses of three-dimensional printing in medicine. The potential applications of three-dimensional printing in plastic surgery are discussed. Various applications for three-dimensional printing technology have emerged in medicine, including printing organs, printing body parts, bio-printing, and computer-aided tissue engineering. In plastic surgery, these tools offer various prospective applications for surgical planning, resident education, and the development of custom prosthetics. Numerous applications exist in medicine, including the printing of devices, implants, tissue replacements, and even whole organs. Plastic surgeons may likely find this technology indispensable in surgical planning, education, and prosthetic device design and development in the near future.

  5. [A study on English loan words in French plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, E; Tegelberg, E

    2014-10-01

    The French language is less and less used as an international scientific language and many French researchers publish their work in English. Nowadays, Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique is the only international plastic surgical journal published completely in French. The use of English loan words in French plastic surgery has never been studied. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and types of English loan words in French plastic surgery. A corpus consisting of all the articles in a number of Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthethique, chosen by default, was created. The frequency of English loan words was calculated and the types of words were analysed. The corpus contains 367 (0.8%) English loan words. Most of them are non-integrated loan words and calques. The majority of the plastic surgical loan words describe surgical techniques. The French plastic surgical language seems to be influenced by English. The usage of loan words does not always follow the recommendations and the usage is sometimes ambiguous. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Conversional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, R; Bothe, C; Junghans, T; Pratschke, J; Benzing, C; Krenzien, F

    2016-10-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the therapy of choice in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are showing higher rates of treatment failure, reducing obesity-associated morbidity and body weight insufficiently. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can occur refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to RYGB can be reasonable as long as specific conditions are fulfilled.Endoscopic procedures are currently being applied to revise bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20 % of cases. Transoral outlet reduction is the minimally invasive method of choice to reduce gastrojejunal anastomosis of the alimentary limb. The diameter of a gastric sleeve can be unwantedly enlarged as well; that can be reduced by placement of a longitudinal full-thickness suture.Severe hypoglycemic episodes can be present in patients following RYGB. Hypoglycemic episodes have to be diagnosed first and can be treated conventionally. Alternatively, a laparoscopic approach according to Branco-Zorron can be used for non-responders. Hypoglycemic episodes can thus be prevented and body weight reduction can be assured.Conversional and endoscopic procedures can be used in patients with treatment failure following bariatric surgery. Note that non-invasive approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional procedure is performed.

  7. Nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics in plastic surgery: The next frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron; Chawla, Reema; Natasha, G; Mahdibeiraghdar, Sara; Jeyaraj, Rebecca; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Hamblin, Michael R.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The rapid ascent of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics as applied to medicine and surgery has seen an exponential rise in the scale of research generated in this field. This is evidenced not only by the sheer volume of papers dedicated to nanotechnology but also in a large number of new journals dedicated to nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics specifically to medicine and surgery. Aspects of nanotechnology that have already brought benefits to these areas include advanced drug delivery platforms, molecular imaging and materials engineering for surgical implants. Particular areas of interest include nerve regeneration, burns and wound care, artificial skin with nanoelectronic sensors and head and neck surgery. This study presents a review of nanotechnology and regenerative therapeutics, with focus on its applications and implications in plastic surgery. PMID:26422652

  8. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  9. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embrac...

  10. Understanding and Overcoming Implicit Gender Bias in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicole A; Tannan, Shruti C; Kalliainen, Loree K

    2016-11-01

    Although explicit sex-based discrimination has largely been deemed unacceptable in professional settings, implicit gender bias persists and results in a significant lack of parity in plastic surgery and beyond. Implicit gender bias is the result of a complex interplay of cultural and societal expectations, learned behaviors, and standardized associations. As such, both male and female surgeons are subject to its influence. A review of the literature was conducted, examining theories of gender bias, current manifestations of gender bias in plastic surgery and other fields, and interventions designed to address gender bias. Multiple studies demonstrate persistent gender bias that impacts female physicians at all levels of training. Several institutions have enacted successful interventions to identify and address gender bias. Explicit gender bias has largely disappeared, yet unconscious or implicit gender bias persists. A wide-scale commitment to addressing implicit gender bias in plastic surgery is necessary and overdue. Recommendations include immediate actions that can be undertaken on an individual basis, and changes that should be implemented at a national and international level by leaders in the field.

  11. Incorporating Minimally Invasive Procedures into an Aesthetic Surgery Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarasso, Alan; Nikfarjam, Jeremy; Abramowitz, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures in an aesthetic practice have grown over the past decade. Plastic surgery practices are embracing the incorporation of injectables and lasers as adjuncts to their surgical procedures. The use of botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid fillers, and lasers has made a significant impact on the authors' practice. The authors describe the important considerations, consultation goals, and procedural steps with injectables and fillers. The novel use of deoxycholic acid injections is also described. The authors strongly think that as options continue to expand, plastic surgeons will benefit from taking an active role in adopting these new innovations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Plastic surgery and global health: how plastic surgery impacts the global burden of surgical disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semer, Nadine B; Sullivan, Stephen R; Meara, John G

    2010-08-01

    The global burden of surgical disease is estimated as being 11% of the total global burden of disease. In this article we discuss the portion of this burden which could be ameliorated with plastic surgical expertise. Although not necessarily seen as a major player in issues related to global health, plastic surgeons are uniquely qualified to decrease the burden of surgical disease afflicting people in the developing world. Burns, traumatic injuries, and congenital anomalies are some of the areas where the presence of plastic surgical expertise can make a significant difference in patient outcomes and thereby decrease the years of life lost due to disability due to these highly treatable conditions. In light of the severe shortage of plastic surgeons throughout the developing world, it falls to those concentrated in the developed world to harness their skills and address the vast unmet needs of the developing world so as to enhance global health. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plastic surgery marketing in a generation of "tweeting".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wendy W; Gupta, Subhas C

    2011-11-01

    "Social media" describes interactive communication through Web-based technologies. It has become an everyday part of modern life, yet there is a lack of research regarding its impact on plastic surgery practice. The authors evaluate and compare the prevalence of classic marketing methods and social media in plastic surgery. The Web sites of aesthetic surgeons from seven US cities were compared and evaluated for the existence of Facebook, Twitter, or MySpace links and promotions. To find the sites, the authors conducted a Google search for the phrase "plastic surgery" with the name of each city to be studied: Beverly Hills, California; Dallas, Texas; Houston, Texas; Las Vegas, Nevada; Miami, Florida; New York City, New York; and San Francisco, California. The trends of social networking memberships were also studied in each of these cities. In comparison to aesthetic surgeons practicing in other cities, those in Miami, Florida, favored social media the most, with 50% promoting a Facebook page and 46% promoting Twitter. Fifty-six percent of New York City aesthetic surgeons promoted their featured articles in magazines and newspapers, whereas 54% of Beverly Hills aesthetic surgeons promoted their television appearances. An increase in the number of new Facebook memberships among cosmetic providers in the seven cities began in October 2008 and reached a peak in October, November, and December 2009, with subsequent stabilization. The increase in the number of new Twitter memberships began in July 2008 and remained at a steady rate of approximately 15 new memberships every three months. Social media may seem like a new and unique communication tool, but it is important to preserve professionalism and apply traditional Web site-building ethics and principles to these sites. We can expect continued growth in plastic surgeons' utilization of these networks to enhance their practices and possibly to launch direct marketing campaigns.

  14. Uniting Evidence-Based Evaluation with the ACGME Plastic Surgery Milestones: A Simple and Reliable Assessment of Resident Operative Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobraei, Edward M; Bohnen, Jordan D; George, Brian C; Mullen, John T; Lillemoe, Keith D; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Milestones evaluations in plastic surgery reflect a shift toward competency-based training but have created a number of challenges. The authors have incorporated the smartphone application evaluation tool, System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning (SIMPL), that was recently developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative. In this pilot study, the authors hypothesize that SIMPL can improve resident evaluation and also collect granular performance data to simplify compliance with the plastic surgery Milestones. SIMPL was prospectively piloted with a plastic surgery resident and faculty surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital in this institutional review board-approved study. The study period was a 2-month interval corresponding to the resident's rotation. The resident-faculty combination performed 20 cases together. All cases were evaluated with SIMPL. SIMPL evaluations uniformly took under 1 minute to submit. The average time to completed evaluation from surgery completion was 5 hours (technology will support a shared vocabulary between residents and faculty to enhance intraoperative education.

  15. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Chae

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing has been embraced by early adopters to produce medical imaging-guided 3D printed biomodels that facilitate various aspects of clinical practice. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. With increasing accessibility, investigators are now able to convert standard imaging data into Computer Aided Design (CAD files using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography (SLA, multijet modeling (MJM, selective laser sintering (SLS, binder jet technique (BJT, and fused deposition modeling (FDM. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without out-sourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. In this review the existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice, spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative aesthetics, are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, patient and surgical trainee education, and the development of intraoperative guidance tools and patient-specific prosthetics in everyday surgical practice.

  16. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  17. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  18. Self-reported problems and wishes for plastic surgery after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenblast, Lene; Laessoe, Line; Printzlau, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    , since some of the patients will experience problems due to excess skin. Foreign studies estimate that ∼30% of all bariatric surgery patients will at some point seek plastic surgical correction of excess skin. The aim of this study is to investigate to what extent the GB patients themselves consider......In the affluent part of the world, there is an increasing occurrence of obesity with Body Mass Index (BMI) above 40, which has resulted in an increasing number of operations such as gastric bypass (GB). After massive weight loss there will often be a need for subsequent plastic surgical correction...... plastic surgery for removal of excess skin, and their reasons and motivations for this. The investigation was performed as an anonymous questionnaire handed out to 150 patients at the 1-year standard consultation for GB patients at a private hospital. The questionnaire contained information about...

  19. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  20. [Plastic surgery application in artistic studies of breast cosmetic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabié, A; Delay, E; Chavoin, J-P; Soulhiard, F; Seguin, P

    2006-04-01

    As, quest for beauty has always been an aim. There is a need to define the "ideal" beautifull breast with objective caracteristics, usable in plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic surgery. After, we have defined the necessary parameters usable in breast surgery. We realized an anthropomorphic study including 70 volunteer women and one molded model. Multiple pictures have been taken for each volunteer, that were evaluated and noted by five plastic surgeon, five doctors from other speciality, five women, five men. A twenty notation was used for this study. The main values for the ten women that obtained best notation (>or=14/20) were used in order to defined the ideal measures for surgery. Breast arrow and breast arrow over the trunck height were the most significant factors. According statistical studies, this fraction is about 0,387 (P=0,000969). The nice breast has a round shape and look like juvenile breast. Bra size, cup size, base, segments II and III, fraction II/III are not significant in our series of (non operated) natural breast. The ideal breast is in harmony and proportional to the trunck height, with the main fraction of breast arrow on the trunck height about 0,387 in our serie.

  1. The Utility of Outcome Studies in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno, MD, MEng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Outcome studies help provide the evidence-based science rationalizing treatment end results that factor the experience of patients and the impact on society. They improve the recognition of the shortcoming in clinical practice and provide the foundation for the development of gold standard care. With such evidence, health care practitioners can develop evidence-based justification for treatments and offer patients with superior informed consent for their treatment options. Furthermore, health care and insurance agencies can recognize improved cost-benefit options in the purpose of disease prevention and alleviation of its impact on the patient and society. Health care outcomes are ultimately measured by the treatment of disease, the reduction of symptoms, the normalization of laboratory results and physical measures, saving a life, and patient satisfaction. In this review, we outline the tools available to measure outcomes in plastic surgery and subsequently allow the objective measurements of plastic surgical conditions. Six major outcome categories are discussed: (1 functional measures; (2 preference-based measures and utility outcome scores; (3 patient satisfaction; (4 health outcomes and time; (5 other tools: patient-reported outcome measurement information system, BREAST-Q, and Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons; and (6 cost-effectiveness analysis. We use breast hypertrophy requiring breast reduction as an example throughout this review as a representative plastic surgical condition with multiple treatments available.

  2. Medical Ethics in Plastic Surgery: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Azin; Hashem-Zade, Haleh

    2016-09-01

    Currently, cosmetic surgery is spread around the world. Several factors are involved in this rapidly evolving field such as socio-economic development, changes in cultural norms, globalization and the effects of Western culture, advertising, media, and mental disorders. Nowadays the cosmetic surgery is becoming a profitable business, which deals exclusively with human appearance and less from the perspective of beauty based on physical protests and considering factors such as sex, age, and race. The morality of plastic surgery subspecialty has undergone many moral dilemmas in the past few years. The role of the patient regardless of his unrealistic dreams has questionable ethical dimension. The problem is the loss of human values and replacing them with false values, of pride and glory to a charismatic person of higher status, that may underlie some of the posed ethical dilemmas. Cosmetic surgery has huge difference with the general principle of legal liability in professional orientation, because the objective for cosmetic surgeries is different from common therapeutic purposes. To observe excellence in the medical profession, we should always keep in mind that these service providers, often as a therapist (healer) must maintain a commitment and priority for patient safety and prior to any action, a real apply for this service recipient should be present. Also, patient-physician confidentiality is the cornerstone of medical ethics. In this review, we study the issues addressed and the ways that they can be resolved.

  3. Factors Influencing American Plastic Surgery Residents Toward an Academic Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetta, Matthew D; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J; Kasten, Steven J

    2018-02-01

    Plastic surgery residency program directors have an interest in recruiting applicants who show an interest in an academic practice. Medical school achievements (ie, United States Medical Licensing Examination® scores, publications, and Alpha Omega Alpha status) are metrics assessed to grade applicants but may not correlate with ultimately choosing an academic career. This study was designed to investigate factors influencing residents' choices for or against academic careers. A 25-item online questionnaire was designed to measure baseline interest in academic plastic surgery and factors that influence decisions to continue on or abandon that career path. This questionnaire was disseminated to the integrated/combined plastic surgery residents during the 2013 to 2014 academic year. One hundred twenty-five respondents indicated that they were currently interested in pursuing academic practice (n = 78) or had lost interest in academic practice (n = 47). Among all respondents, 92.8% (n = 116) stated they were interested in academic careers at the time of residency application, but one-third (n = 41) subsequently lost interest. Those residents who retained interest in academic careers indicated resident/medical student educational opportunities (57%) and complexity of patients (52%) as reasons. Those who lost interest cited a lack of autonomy (43%), publishing requirements (32%), and income discrepancy (26%) as reasons. Many residents report losing interest in academics during residency. Traditional metrics valued in the recruitment process may not serve as positive predictors of an academic career path. Reasons why residents lose interest are not easily correctable, but mentorship, adequate career counseling, and research opportunities during training remain factors that can be addressed across all residency programs.

  4. Plastic surgery and the biometric e-passport: implications for facial recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ologunde, Rele

    2015-04-01

    This correspondence comments on the challenges of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery on the facial recognition algorithms employed by biometric passports. The limitations of facial recognition technology in patients who have undergone facial plastic surgery are also discussed. Finally, the advice of the UK HM passport office to people who undergo facial surgery is reported.

  5. Obesity is associated with increased health care charges in patients undergoing outpatient plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, Michelle R; Fox, Justin P; Abbott, Lindsay E; Johnson, R Michael

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with greater rates of surgical complications. To address these complications after outpatient plastic surgery, obese patients may seek care in the emergency department and potentially require admission to the hospital, which could result in greater health care charges. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of obesity, postdischarge hospital-based acute care, and hospital charges within 30 days of outpatient plastic surgery. From state ambulatory surgery center databases in four states, all discharges for adult patients who underwent liposuction, abdominoplasty, breast reduction, and blepharoplasty were identified. Patients were grouped by the presence or absence of obesity. Multivariable regression models were used to compare the frequency of hospital-based acute care, serious adverse events, and hospital charges within 30 days between groups while controlling for confounding variables. The final sample included 47,741 discharges, with 2052 of these discharges (4.3 percent) being obese. Obese patients more frequently had a hospital-based acute care encounter [7.3 percent versus 3.9 percent; adjusted OR, 1.35 (95% CI,1.13 to 1.61)] or serious adverse event [3.2 percent versus 0.9 percent; adjusted OR, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30 to 2.29)] within 30 days of surgery. Obese patients had adjusted hospital charges that were, on average, $3917, $7412, and $7059 greater (p Obese patients who undergo common outpatient plastic surgery procedures incur substantially greater health care charges, in part attributable to more frequent adverse events and hospital-based health care within 30 days of surgery. Risk, II.

  6. Gender Authorship Trends of Plastic Surgery Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Wu, Liza C; Lin, Ines C; Serletti, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of women are entering the medical profession, but plastic surgery remains a male-dominated profession, especially within academia. As academic aspirations and advancement depend largely on research productivity, the authors assessed the number of articles authored by women published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Original articles in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery published during the years 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, and 2014 were analyzed. First and senior authors with an M.D. degree and U.S. institutional affiliation were categorized by gender. Authorship trends were compared with those from other specialties. Findings were placed in the context of gender trends among plastic surgery residents in the United States. The percentage of female authors in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery increased from 2.4 percent in 1970 to 13.3 percent in 2014. Over the same time period, the percentage of female plastic surgery residents increased from 2.6 percent to 32.5 percent. By 2014, there were more female first authors (19.1 percent) than senior authors (7.7 percent) (p < 0.001). As a field, plastic surgery had fewer female authors than other medical specialties including pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, general surgery, internal medicine, and radiation oncology (p < 0.05). The increase in representation of female authors in plastic surgery is encouraging but lags behind advances in other specialties. Understanding reasons for these trends may help improve gender equity in academic plastic surgery.

  7. Journal impact factor versus the evidence level of articles published in plastic surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria A; Tedesco, Ana C B; Nahas, Fabio X; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between impact factor and the level of evidence of articles in plastic surgery journals. The four plastic surgery journals with the top impact factors in 2011 were selected. Articles were selected using the PubMed database between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The journal evidence index was calculated by dividing the number of randomized clinical trials by the total number of articles published in the specific journal, multiplied by 100. This index was correlated to the impact factor of the journal and compared with the average of the other journals. Two investigators independently evaluated each journal, followed by a consensus and assessment of the interexaminer concordance. The kappa test was used to evaluate the concordance between the two investigators and Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate which journal presented the highest number of randomized clinical trials. The journal evidence index values were as follows: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 1.70; Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 0.40; Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 0.56; and Annals of Plastic Surgery, 0.35. The impact factors of these journals in 2011 were as follows: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 3.382; Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 1.494; Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 1.407; and Annals of Plastic Surgery, 1.318. After consensus, the quantity of adequate studies was low and similar between these journals; only the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery showed a higher journal evidence index. The journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery exhibited the highest journal evidence index and had the highest impact factor. The number of adequate articles was low in all of the assessed journals.

  8. AN EFFICIENT SELF-UPDATING FACE RECOGNITION SYSTEM FOR PLASTIC SURGERY FACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial recognition system is fundamental a computer application for the automatic identification of a person through a digitized image or a video source. The major cause for the overall poor performance is related to the transformations in appearance of the user based on the aspects akin to ageing, beard growth, sun-tan etc. In order to overcome the above drawback, Self-update process has been developed in which, the system learns the biometric attributes of the user every time the user interacts with the system and the information gets updated automatically. The procedures of Plastic surgery yield a skilled and endurable means of enhancing the facial appearance by means of correcting the anomalies in the feature and then treating the facial skin with the aim of getting a youthful look. When plastic surgery is performed on an individual, the features of the face undergo reconstruction either locally or globally. But, the changes which are introduced new by plastic surgery remain hard to get modeled by the available face recognition systems and they deteriorate the performances of the face recognition algorithm. Hence the Facial plastic surgery produces changes in the facial features to larger extent and thereby creates a significant challenge to the face recognition system. This work introduces a fresh Multimodal Biometric approach making use of novel approaches to boost the rate of recognition and security. The proposed method consists of various processes like Face segmentation using Active Appearance Model (AAM, Face Normalization using Kernel Density Estimate/ Point Distribution Model (KDE-PDM, Feature extraction using Local Gabor XOR Patterns (LGXP and Classification using Independent Component Analysis (ICA. Efficient techniques have been used in each phase of the FRAS in order to obtain improved results.

  9. Gangnam-Style Plastic Surgery: The Science of Westernized Beauty in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, So Yeon

    2017-10-01

    New beauty ideals and particular types of plastic surgery beauty have emerged in South Korea from the early twenty-first century. By defining Gangnam-style plastic surgery as a hybrid of old Westernized beauty ideals and a new science of beauty with variations and contradictions, I intend to twist the simplistic understanding of non-Western plastic surgery as an effort to resemble the white westerner's body. I also draw political implications from a case of monstrous Gangnam-style beauty made by excessive plastic surgery.

  10. Return of the cadaver: Key role of anatomic dissection for plastic surgery resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähenbühl, Swenn Maxence; Čvančara, Paul; Stieglitz, Thomas; Bonvin, Raphaël; Michetti, Murielle; Flahaut, Marjorie; Durand, Sébastien; Deghayli, Lina; Applegate, Lee Ann; Raffoul, Wassim

    2017-07-01

    Successful Plastic Surgery Residency training is subjected to evolving society pressure of lower hourly work weeks imposed by external committees, labor laws, and increased public awareness of patient care quality. Although innovative measures for simulation training of surgery are appearing, there is also the realization that basic anatomy training should be re-enforced and cadaver dissection is of utmost importance for surgical techniques.In the development of new technology for implantable neurostimulatory electrodes for the management of phantom limb pain in amputee patients, a design of a cadaveric model has been developed with detailed steps for innovative transfascicular insertion of electrodes. Overall design for electrode and cable implantation transcutaneous was established and an operating protocol devised.Microsurgery of the nerves of the upper extremities for interfascicular electrode implantation is described for the first time. Design of electrode implantation in cadaver specimens was adapted with a trocar delivery of cables and electrodes transcutaneous and stabilization of the electrode by suturing along the nerve. In addition, the overall operating arena environment with specific positions of the multidisciplinary team necessary for implantable electrodes was elaborated to assure optimal operating conditions and procedures during the organization of a first-in-man implantation study.Overall importance of plastic surgery training for new and highly technical procedures is of importance and particularly there is a real need to continue actual cadaveric training due to patient variability for nerve anatomic structures.

  11. [Photography in plastic surgery: practices, uses and legislation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Runz, A; Simon, E; Brix, M; Sorin, T; Brengard-Bresler, T; Pineau, V; Guyon, G; Claudot, F

    2015-02-01

    Photography in plastic surgery is omnipresent. Through its various uses, it may present both ethical and forensic risks. The objective of this study is to analyze the use of medical photography by the plastic surgeon, the perception of this use by the patient, and consequence of such use. A questionnaire about the use of medical photography was assessed to 629 plastic surgeons. A questionnaire was given to patients, about their perception of the use of photography by their surgeon. One hundred and seventy-six surgeon's questionnaires and 93 patient's questionnaires were analyzed. For 97.7% of the responding surgeons, the proportion of patients refusing to be photographed was less then 1/20. The objective of the photography was especially medicolegal for 62.5% of the surgeons, especially for following the patient progress (87.5%), partially for the formation (72.1%), partially for scientific publications (57.8%) and not at all for the personal publicity (73.1%). Surgeons often share his photographs with others surgeons (71.1%), sometimes with others medical personnel (48.8%). The security and the access to photographs were determined to be correct for 67.6% of the surgeons and perfect for 23.3%. In total, 17.2% of the surgeons obtained a written consent, 41.4% obtained an oral consent, and 38.5% did not request patient consent. It was found that 48.3% of the surgeons and 40.2% of the patients think that the right to the photographic images belong to the patient. Medical photographs expose the plastic surgeon to medico-legal risks. He must know and follow the law in order to prevent eventual legal proceedings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Racial and Ethnic Diversity of U.S. Plastic Surgery Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    Increased diversity of U.S. physicians can improve patient communication and mitigate health disparities for racial minorities. This study analyzes trends in racial and ethnic diversity of plastic surgery residents. Demographic data of surgical residents, medical students, and integrated plastic surgery residency applicants were obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Data for college students and the general population were obtained from the U.S. Census for comparison with plastic surgery. Interspecialty differences and temporal trends in racial composition were analyzed with chi-square tests. From 1995 to 2014, Asian and Hispanic plastic surgery residents increased nearly 3-fold (7.4%-21.7%, p < 0.001) and 2-fold (4.6%-7.9%, p < 0.001), respectively. African American plastic surgery residents did not increase significantly (3.0%-3.5%, p = 0.129). Relative to the U.S. population, Hispanics (range: 0.1-0.5-fold) and African Americans (range: 0.1-0.4-fold) were underrepresented, whereas Asians (range: 2.2-5.3-fold) were overrepresented in plastic surgery. A "bottleneck" existed in the pipeline of African American and Hispanic plastic surgery residents. Significant differences in racial composition existed between plastic surgery and other surgical disciplines, which varied over time. The percentage of Hispanic (10.6% vs 7.0%, p = 0.402) and African American (6.4% vs 2.1%, p < 0.001) plastic surgery residency applicants exceeded those in residency. Hispanics and African Americans are underrepresented in plastic surgery residency relative to whites and Asians. This study underscores the need for greater initiatives to increase diversity in plastic surgery residency. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influences on decision-making for undergoing plastic surgery: a mental models and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darisi, Tanya; Thorne, Sarah; Iacobelli, Carolyn

    2005-09-01

    Research was conducted to gain insight into potential clients' decisions to undergo plastic surgery, their perception of benefits and risks, their judgment of outcomes, and their selection of a plastic surgeon. Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 60 people who expressed interest in plastic surgery. Qualitative analysis revealed their "mental models" regarding influences on their decision to undergo plastic surgery and their choice of a surgeon. Interview results were used to design a Web-based survey in which 644 individuals considering plastic surgery responded. The desire for change was the most direct motivator to undergo plastic surgery. Improvements to physical well-being were related to emotional and social benefits. When prompted about risks, participants mentioned physical, emotional, and social risks. Surgeon selection was a critical influence on decisions to undergo plastic surgery. Participants gave considerable weight to personal consultation and believed that finding the "right" plastic surgeon would minimize potential risks. Findings from the Web-based survey were similar to the mental models interviews in terms of benefit ratings but differed in risk ratings and surgeon selection criteria. The mental models interviews revealed that interview participants were thoughtful about their decision to undergo plastic surgery and focused on finding the right plastic surgeon.

  14. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yafen; Zhang Junmin; Huang Zhiqin

    1993-01-01

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  15. Surgical specialty procedures in rural surgery practices: implications for rural surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticca, Robert P; Mullin, Brady C; Harris, Joel D; Hosford, Clint C

    2012-12-01

    Specialty procedures constitute one eighth of rural surgery practice. Currently, general surgeons intending to practice in rural hospitals may not get adequate training for specialty procedures, which they will be expected to perform. Better definition of these procedures will help guide rural surgery training. Current Procedural Terminology codes for all surgical procedures for 81% of North Dakota and South Dakota rural surgeons were entered into the Dakota Database for Rural Surgery. Specialty procedures were analyzed and compared with the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum to determine whether general surgery training is adequate preparation for rural surgery practice. The Dakota Database for Rural Surgery included 46,052 procedures, of which 5,666 (12.3%) were specialty procedures. Highest volume specialty categories included vascular, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, cardiothoracic, urology, and otolaryngology. Common procedures in cardiothoracic and vascular surgery are taught in general surgical residency, while common procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology are usually not taught in general surgery training. Optimal training for rural surgery practice should include experience in specialty procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Application of conscious sedation with dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in patient for plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jinghu; Deng, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiaowen; Wang, Yuhui; Jin, Jinhua; Wei, Lingxin; Yang, Dong

    2014-03-25

    To observe the effectiveness of conscious sedation with dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in patients for plastic surgery. Forty patients scheduled for elective plastic surgery under conscious sedation were infused 1 µg/kg intravenously within 15 minutes as loading dose followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg·kg⁻¹·h⁻¹) and sufentanil (0.07 µg·kg⁻¹·h⁻¹) respectively. Sufentanil 0.05 µg/kg and midazolam 0.025 mg/kg were administrated intravenously 5 minutes before local infiltration, and then a bolus of sufentanil or midazolam was given as needed to maintain OAA/S score of 11 during the procedure. The drug infusion was discontinued at 5 to 10 min before the end of the surgical procedure. The complications (i.e. anoxemia, apnea, bradycardia, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, crying and excitation), if any, anesthesia duration and drug consumption were recorded. On the first postoperative day, patients were asked to rate their satisfaction with the anesthetic management and whether they would choose to receive the same sedative analgesic medications and should they require a similar surgical procedure in the future. The OAA/S score decreased from 20.0 ± 0 to 11.5 ± 2.5 after patients being infused the loading dose of dexmedetomidine, and was maintained 10.5-11.1 during the procedure. At the end of the procedure, the OAA/S score return to 16.1 ± 2.8. The induction of sedation produced a significant decrease in HR (P 0.05). There were 38 patients completed their procedures under conscious sedation, and there were incident of crying and bradycardia in 5 and 2 patients respectively. The anesthesia duration and consumption of dexmedetomidine, sufentanil and midazolam were (128 ± 47) min, (116 ± 43) µg, (10 ± 5) µg and (2 ± 1) mg respectively. In an interview on the first postoperative day, there were 13 patients complaining no memory, 17 patients complaining fuzzy memory and 8 patients complaining awake during the procedure

  17. Detecting Tweet-Based Sentiment Polarity of Plastic Surgery Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvi Jokhio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sentiment analysis is a growing research these days. Many companies perform this analysis on public opinions to get a general idea about any product or service. This paper presents a novel approach to get views or comments of Twitter users about plastic surgery treatments. The proposed approach uses machine-learning technique embedded with the naïve Bayesian classifier to assign polarities (i.e. positive, negative or neutral to the tweets, collected from ?Twitter micro-blogging website?. The accuracy of the obtained results has been validated using precision, recall and F-score measures. It has been observed from 25000 tweets dataset that people tend to have positive as well as substantial negative opinions regarding particular treatments. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach

  18. Detecting tweet-based sentiment polarity of plastic surgery treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, M.; Mahoto, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Sentiment analysis is a growing research these days. Many companies perform this analysis on public opinions to get a general idea about any product or service. This paper presents a novel approach to get views or comments of Twitter users about plastic surgery treatments. The proposed approach uses machine-learning technique embedded with the naive Bayesian classifier to assign polarities (i.e. positive, negative or neutral) to the tweets, collected from Twitter micro-blogging website. The accuracy of the obtained results has been validated using precision, recall and F-score measures. It has been observed from 25000 tweets dataset that people tend to have positive as well as substantial negative opinions regarding particular treatments. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (author)

  19. A computer-supported management of photographic documentation in plastic surgery - System development and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczak, Karol; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Niedźwiedziński, Marian; Antoszewski, Bogusław

    2017-07-01

    Photographic documentation is very important for plastic, reconstructive, and especially aesthetic surgery procedures. It can be used to improve patient care as well as to carry out scientific research. The results of our previous studies confirmed a strong demand for Information Technology (IT) systems dedicated to plastic surgery. Unfortunately, most of the solutions of this type are not suited to the actual needs. For this reason we decided to develop a reliable system for photographic documentation storage. The Plastic Reconstructive Esthetic Surgery Photo System (PRESsPhoto) was developed and finally deployed in the Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Clinic of the Medical University in Łódź (Poland). Preliminary single-center performance tests proved that the PRESsPhoto system is easy to use and provides, inter alia, rapid data search and data entry as well as data security. In the future the PRESsPhoto system should be able to cooperate with Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The process of development and deployment of the PRESsPhoto system is an example of good cooperation between health care providers and the informatics, which resulted in a system that meets the expectations of plastic surgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plastic Surgery-Related Hashtag Utilization on Instagram: Implications for Education and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Robert G; Vaca, Elbert E; Mahmood, Eitezaz; Fine, Neil A; Schierle, Clark F

    2018-02-15

    Recent data suggest patients are seeking aesthetic surgery to improve their appearance on Instagram and other social media. Despite the rising influence of Instagram in plastic surgery, few academic publications address Instagram, let alone evaluate its utilization in plastic surgery. We set out to answer the following three questions: 1) what plastic surgery-related content is being posted to Instagram; 2) who is posting this content; and 3) what specific hashtags are they using? Our study queried 21 Instagram plastic surgery-related hashtags. Content analysis was used to qualitatively evaluate each of the nine "top" posts associated with each hashtag (189 posts). Duplicate posts and those not relevant to plastic surgery were excluded. A total of 1,789,270 posts utilized the 21 hashtags sampled in this study. Of the top 189 posts for these 21 queried hashtags, 163 posts met inclusion criteria. Plastic surgeons eligible for membership in American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) accounted for only 17.8% of top posts, whereas noneligible physicians accounted for 26.4%. All nonplastic surgery trained physicians marketed themselves as "cosmetic surgeons." Nine top posts (5.5%) were by nonphysicians, including dentists, spas with no associated physician, and a hair salon. The majority of these posts were self-promotional (67.1%) as opposed to educational (32.9%). Board-certified plastic surgeons were significantly more likely to post educational content to Instagram as compared to nonplastic surgeons (62.1% vs 38.1%, P = 0.02). ASAPS eligible board-certified plastic surgeons are underrepresented amongst physicians posting top plastic surgery-related content to Instagram. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Cloud-Based Applications for Organizing and Reviewing Plastic Surgery Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Anna; Momeni, Arash; Lee, Gordon K; Galvez, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Cloud-based applications including Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, Evernote, Notability, and Zotero are available for smartphones, tablets, and laptops and have revolutionized the manner in which medical students and surgeons read and utilize plastic surgery literature. Here we provide an overview of the use of Cloud computing in practice and propose an algorithm for organizing the vast amount of plastic surgery literature. Given the incredible amount of data being produced in plastic surgery and other surgical subspecialties, it is prudent for plastic surgeons to lead the process of providing solutions for the efficient organization and effective integration of the ever-increasing data into clinical practice.

  2. Academic plastic surgery: a study of current issues and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetrenne, Eleonore; Kosins, Aaron M; Wirth, Garrett A; Bui, Albert; Evans, Gregory R D; Wells, James H

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the role of a full-time academic plastic surgeon, (2) to define the indicators predictive of a successful career in academic plastic surgery, and (3) to understand the current issues that will affect future trends in the practice of academic plastic surgery. A questionnaire was developed to evaluate the role of current full-time academic plastic surgeons and to understand the current issues and future challenges facing academic plastic surgery. Each plastic surgery program director in the United States was sent the survey for distribution among all full-time academic plastic surgeons. Over a 6-week period, responses from 143 full-time academic plastic surgeons (approximately 31%) were returned. Fifty-three percent of respondents had been academic plastic surgeons for longer than 10 years. Seventy-three percent of respondents defined academic plastic surgeons as clinicians who are teachers and researchers. However, 53% of respondents believed that academic plastic surgeons were not required to teach or practice within university hospitals/academic centers. The 3 factors reported most frequently as indicative of a successful career in academic plastic surgery were peer recognition, personal satisfaction, and program reputation. Dedication and motivation were the personal characteristics rated most likely to contribute to academic success. Forty-four percent of respondents were unable to identify future academic plastic surgeons from plastic surgery residency applicants, and 27% were not sure. Most (93%) of the respondents believed that academic surgery as practiced today will change. The overall job description of a full-time academic plastic surgeon remains unchanged (teacher and researcher). Whereas peer recognition, personal satisfaction, and program reputation were most frequently cited as indicative of a successful plastic surgery career, financial success was rated the least indicative. Similarly, whereas the

  3. Mathematical Modeling of the Consumption of Low Invasive Plastic Surgery Practices: The Case of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. De la Poza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastic surgery practice grows continuously among the women in Western countries due to their body image dissatisfaction, aging anxiety, and an ideal body image propagated by the media. The consumption growth is so important that plastic surgery is becoming a normal practice among women, like any other cosmetic product, with the risk of suffering psychopathology disorders in the sense that plastic surgery could be employed as an instrument to recover personal self-esteem or even happiness. Plastic surgery practice depends on economic, demographic, and social contagion factors. In this paper, a mathematical epidemiological model to forecast female plastic surgery consumption in Spain is fully constructed. Overconsumer subpopulation is predicted and simulated. Robustness of the model versus uncertain parameters is studied throughout a sensitivity analysis.

  4. The Top 100 Social Media Influencers in Plastic Surgery on Twitter: Who Should You Be Following?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandawarkar, Akash A; Gould, Daniel J; Grant Stevens, W

    2018-03-06

    Recent studies demonstrate that board-certified plastic surgeons are underrepresented amongst individuals posting public-directed marketing plastic surgery-related content on Instagram. However, peer-to-peer and education-based social media influence has not been studied. Twitter is a social media platform has been suggested to be useful for educating the masses and connecting with colleagues. The purpose of this study is to identify the top influencers in plastic surgery on Twitter, characterize who they are, and relate their social media influence to academic influence. Twitter influence scores for the topic search "plastic surgery" were collected in July 2017 using Right Relevance software. The accounts associated with the highest influencer scores were linked to individual names, status as a plastic surgeon, board certification, location, and academic h-index. The top 100 Twitter influencers in plastic surgery are presented. Seventy-seven percent of the top influencers are trained as plastic surgeons or facial plastic surgeons. Sixty-one percent of influencers are board-certified plastic surgeons or board-eligible/future eligible trainees. International plastic surgeons made up 16% of influencers. Other medical doctors made up another 10%. The other 13% of influencers were nonphysicians. Three-quarters of social media influencers were physically located in the United States. Academic h-index of social media influencers ranged from 0 to 62 (mean, 8.6). This study shows that the top plastic surgery social media influencers on Twitter are predominantly board-certified or eligible plastic surgeons and physically based in the United States. This study also provides the influencer network for other plastic surgeons to engage with to improve their own influence within the plastic surgery social media sphere.

  5. Analysis of References on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Zhang, Alicia; Lin, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is a knowledge assessment tool widely used during plastic surgery training in the United States. This study analyzed literature supporting correct answer choices to determine highest yield sources, journal publication lag, and journal impact factors. Digital syllabi of 10 consecutive Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam administrations (2006 to 2015) were reviewed. The most-referenced articles, journals, and textbooks were determined. Mean journal impact factor and publication lag were calculated and differences were elucidated by section. Two thousand questions and 5386 references were analyzed. From 2006 to 2015, the percentage of journal citations increased, whereas textbook references decreased (p < 0.001). Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was cited with greatest frequency (38.5 percent), followed by Clinics in Plastic Surgery (5.6 percent), Journal of Hand Surgery (American volume) (5.1 percent), and Annals of Plastic Surgery (3.8 percent). There was a trend toward less publication lag over the study period (p = 0.05), with a mean publication lag of 9.1 ± 9.0 years for all journal articles. Mean journal impact factor was 2.3 ± 4.3 and lowest for the hand and lower extremity section (1.7 ± 2.8; p < 0.001). The highest yield textbooks were elucidated by section. Plastic surgery faculty and residents may use these data to facilitate knowledge acquisition during residency.

  6. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  7. Pitfalls of nonstandardized photography in facial plastic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Doron D; Mendelsohn, Martyn

    2004-07-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that certain maneuvers (neck flexion/extension and head protrusion/retrusion) alter the appearance of the submental area, jawline, and melolabial groove. They used a questionnaire survey of 20 naïve judges who assessed a standardized photograph album of three subjects. The subjects' faces (frontal and lateral views) were photographed in neutral, neck flexion/extension, and head protrusion/retrusion positions. High Kendall coefficients of correlation were observed in 10 of 12 questions evaluating an improvement in jawline definition with neck extension or head protrusion, as well as in 11 of 12 questions assessing decreased submental soft tissue. All questions relating to the melolabial groove had a correlation coefficient of less than 0.70. Small changes in patient positioning during photodocumentation for facial plastic surgical procedures can cause dramatic changes in the appearance of certain parameters. Standardizing patient positioning for preoperative and postoperative photographs is imperative.

  8. What Do Our Patients Truly Want? Conjoint Analysis of an Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Practice Using Internet Crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cindy; Scott Hultman, C; Diegidio, Paul; Hermiz, Steven; Garimella, Roja; Crutchfield, Trisha M; Lee, Clara N

    2017-01-01

    What do patients want when looking for an aesthetic surgeon? When faced with attributes like reputation, years in practice, testimonials, photos, and pricing, which is more valuable? Moreover, are attributes procedure-specific? Currently, inadequate evidence exists on which attributes are most important to patients, and to our knowledge, none on procedure-specific preferences. First, to determine the most important attributes to breast augmentation, combined breast/abdominal surgery, and facelift patients using conjoint analysis. Second, to test the conjoint using an internet crowdsourcing service (Amazon Mechanical Turk [MTurk]). Anonymous university members were asked, via mass electronic survey, to pick a surgeon for facelift surgery based on five attributes. Attribute importance and preference was calculated. Once pre-tested, the facelift, breast augmentation and combined breast/abdominal surgery surveys were administered worldwide to MTurk. The university facelift cohort valued testimonials (33.9%) as the most important, followed by photos (31.6%), reputation (18.2%), pricing (14.4%), and practice years (1.9%). MTurk breast augmentation participants valued photos (35.3%), then testimonials (33.9%), reputation (15.7%), pricing (12.2%), and practice years (3%). MTurk combined breast/abdominal surgery and facelift participants valued testimonials (38.3% and 38.1%, respectively), then photos (27.9%, 29.4%), reputation (17.5%, 15.8%), pricing (13.9%, 13.9%), practice years (2.4%, 2.8%). Breast augmentation patients placed higher importance on photos; combined breast/abdominal surgery and facelift patients valued testimonials. Conjoint analysis has had limited application in plastic surgery. To our knowledge, internet crowdsourcing is a novel participant recruitment method in plastic surgery. Its unique benefits include broad, diverse and anonymous participant pools, low-cost, rapid data collection, and high completion rate. © 2016 The American Society for

  9. 75 FR 61507 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ...] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice... announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the..., FDA announced that a meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  10. Key textbooks in the development of modern american plastic surgery: the first half of the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Nicholas T; McCarthy, Joseph G

    2013-07-01

    A number of historical texts published during the first half of the twentieth century played a pivotal role in shaping and defining modern plastic surgery in the United States. Blair's Surgery and Diseases of the Mouth and Jaws (1912), John Staige Davis's Plastic Surgery: Its Principles and Practice (1919), Gillies's Plastic Surgery of the Face (1920), Fomon's Surgery of Injury and Plastic Repair (1939), Ivy's Manual of Standard Practice of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Military Surgery Manuals (1943), Padgett and Stephenson's Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (1948), and Kazanjian and Converse's The Surgical Treatment of Facial Injuries (1949) were reviewed. These texts were published at a time when plastic surgery was developing as a distinct specialty. Each work represents a different point in this evolution. All were not inclusive of all of plastic surgery, but all had a lasting impact. Four texts were based on clinical experience from World War I; one included experience from World War II; and two included experience from both. One text became a military surgical handbook in World Wars I and II, playing an important role in care for the wounded. History has demonstrated that times of war spark medical/surgical advancements, and these wars had a dramatic impact on the development of reconstructive plastic surgery. Each of these texts documented surgical advancements and provided an intellectual platform that helped shape and create the independent discipline of plastic surgery during peacetime. For many future leaders of plastic surgery, these books served as their introduction to this new field.

  11. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. Materials and Methods: A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Conclusion: Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students. PMID:27013852

  12. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. Materials and Methods: A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P < 0.5 and my choice of plastic surgery will be influenced by my decision to have a family P < 0.5. Conclusion: Factors influencing the decision of medical students to choose plastic surgery were related to the perceived quality of life as a plastic surgeon and the ability of plastic surgeons to provide good role models for medical students. Female medical students were more concerned with gender equity and work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students.

  13. An Assessment of Gender Differences in Plastic Surgery Patient Education and Information in the United States: Are We Neglecting Our Male Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Lam, Gretl; Brownstone, Nicholas D; Steinbrech, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The number of total cosmetic procedures performed yearly has increased by more than 274% between 1997 and 2014, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. However, the vast majority of plastic surgery procedures are still targeted toward women, with little attention toward men. This study sought to quantify the extent of gender discrepancies observed in online plastic surgery marketing in this country. For the 48 contiguous United States, a systematic Google (Mountain View, CA) search was performed for "[state] plastic surgeon." The first 10 solo or group practice websites in each state were analyzed for the gender of the first 10 images featured, presence of a male services section, and which procedures were offered to men. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS Software (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY). A total of 453 websites were analyzed, as 5 states did not have 10 unique solo or group practice websites. Of the 4239 images reviewed, 94.1% were of females, 5.0% were of males, and 0.9% were of a male and female together. A male services page was present in 22% of websites. The most common procedures marketed toward men were gynecomastia reduction (58%), liposuction (17%), blepharoplasty (13%), and facelift (10%). Less than 10% of all websites offered other procedures to males, with a total of 15 other aesthetic procedures identified. Many plastic surgeons choose to ignore or minimize male patients in their online marketing efforts. However, as the number of men seeking cosmetic procedures continues to grow, plastic surgeons will benefit from incorporating male patients into their practice model. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Trends in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Accreditation for Subspecialty Fellowship Training in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) determine the proportion of plastic surgery residents pursuing subspecialty training relative to other surgical specialties, and (2) analyze trends in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation of plastic surgery subspecialty fellowship programs. The American Medical Association provided data on career intentions of surgical chief residents graduating from 2014 to 2016. The percentage of residents pursuing fellowship training was compared by specialty. Trends in the proportion of accredited fellowship programs in craniofacial surgery, hand surgery, and microsurgery were analyzed. The percentage of accredited programs was compared between subspecialties with added-certification options (hand surgery) and subspecialties without added-certification options (craniofacial surgery and microsurgery). Most integrated and independent plastic surgery residents pursued fellowship training (61.8 percent versus 49.6 percent; p = 0.014). Differences existed by specialty from a high in orthopedic surgery (90.8 percent) to a low in colon and rectal surgery (3.2 percent). From 2005 to 2015, the percentage of accredited craniofacial fellowship programs increased, but was not significant (from 27.8 percent to 33.3 percent; p = 0.386). For hand surgery, the proportion of accredited programs that were plastic surgery (p = 0.755) and orthopedic surgery (p = 0.253) was stable, whereas general surgery decreased (p = 0.010). Subspecialty areas with added-certification options had more accredited fellowships than those without (100 percent versus 19.2 percent; p < 0.001). There has been slow adoption of accreditation among plastic surgery subspecialty fellowships, but added-certification options appear to be highly correlated.

  15. Trends and Predictors of National Institutes of Health Funding to Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated low levels of National Institutes of Health funding for surgical research. The authors compared the funding in plastic surgery with the funding for other surgical specialties. A query of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to departments of surgical specialties was performed using the National Institutes of Health RePORTER database (2008 to 2016). Trends in funding were compared by specialty and adjusted for the number of active physicians in each specialty. Plastic surgery residency program characteristics were correlated with funding procurement. Eight hundred eighty-nine faculty at 94 plastic surgery residency programs were queried. Forty-eight investigators (5.4 percent) at 23 programs (24.4 percent) had National Institutes of Health funding. From 2008 to 2016, a total of $84,142,138 was awarded through 81 grants. Funding supported translational (44.6 percent), clinical (26.4 percent), basic science (27.2 percent), and educational (1.7 percent) research. In 2016, plastic surgery received the least amount of National Institutes of Health funding per active physician ($1,530) relative to orthopedic surgery ($3124), obstetrics and gynecology ($3885), urology ($5943), otolaryngology ($9999), general surgery ($11,649), ophthalmology ($11,933), and neurologic surgery ($20,874). Plastic surgery residency program characteristics associated with National Institutes of Health funding were high ranking and had more than 10 clinical faculty (p < 0.05). Plastic surgery receives the least National Institutes of Health funding among the surgical specialties. Departments and divisions of plastic surgery should support investigators applying for research grants to increase future National Institutes of Health funding.

  16. Plastic Surgery and the Breast: A Citation Analysis of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac W. Joyce, MB BCh

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: This study has identified the most influential articles on breast in the plastic surgery literature over the past 68 years and highlighted many important scientific breakthroughs and landmarks that have occurred during this time.

  17. The understanding of plastic and reconstructive surgery amongst Queensland medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Conyard

    2016-06-01

    This study has highlighted the gap between a medical student's perception and reality of the scope of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. It has emphasised the need for greater exposure and education in this surgical subspeciality if future medical practitioners are to better match the requirements of their patients to the skills of the specialist. If plastic surgeons wish to continue to be recognised as specialists in hand, craniofacial and reconstructive surgery, this gap between perception and reality needs to be addressed.

  18. The use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nehme

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Robot-assisted plastic and reconstructive surgery provides clinical outcomes comparable to conventional techniques. Advantages include reported improved cosmesis, functional outcomes and greater surgeon comfort. Disadvantages included longer operating and set-up times, a learning curve, breaking of microneedles, high monetary costs and authors consistently recommended improved end-effectors. All authors were optimistic about the use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  19. Use of silicone implants in reconstructive plastic surgery for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers procedures for reconstructive plastic operations, by using silicone implants, in patients with breast cancer. It analyzes 592 primary breast repairs and evaluates their aesthetic effects and complications. The surgical procedures are described.

  20. A Systematic Review of the Use of Telemedicine in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Krishna S; Hambrick, H Rhodes; Shakir, Afaaf; Morrison, Shane D; Tran, Duy C; Pearson, Keon; Vasconez, Henry C; Mardini, Samir; Gosman, Amanda A; Dobke, Marek; Granick, Mark S

    2017-06-01

    Telemedicine, the use of information technology and telecommunication to provide healthcare at a distance, is a burgeoning field with applications throughout medicine. Given the visual nature of plastic surgery and dermatology, telemedicine has a myriad of potential applications within the field. A comprehensive literature review of articles published on telemedicine since January 2010 was performed. Articles were selected for their relevance to plastic and reconstructive surgery and dermatology, and then reviewed for their discussion of the applications, benefits, and limitations of telemedicine in practice. A total of 3119 articles were identified in the initial query. Twenty-three articles met the inclusion criteria in plastic surgery (7 wound management, 5 burn management, 5 trauma, 4 free flap care, 2 in cleft lip/palate repair). Twenty-three (100%) reported a benefit of telemedicine often related to improved postoperative monitoring, increased access to expertise in rural settings, and cost savings, either predicted or actualized. Eight (35%) reported limitations and barriers to the application of telemedicine, including overdiagnosis and dependence on functional telecommunication systems. Sixty-six articles focused on telemedicine in dermatology and also demonstrated significant promise. Telemedicine holds special promise in increasing the efficiency of postoperative care for microsurgical procedures, improving care coordination and management of burn wounds, facilitating interprofessional collaboration across time and space, eliminating a significant number of unnecessary referrals, and connecting patients located far from major medical centers with professional expertise without impinging on-and in some cases improving-the quality or accuracy of care provided. Teledermatology consultation was found to be safe and has a comparable or superior efficacy to the traditional in-patient consultation. The system was consistently rated as convenient and easy to use

  1. The use of the digital smile design concept as an auxiliary tool in periodontal plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Kamarowski, Stephanie Felice; Lopez, Camilo Andres Villabona; Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Neto, Alexandre Teixeira; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal surgery associated with prior waxing, mock-up, and the use of digital tools to design the smile is the current trend of reverse planning in periodontal plastic surgery. The objective of this study is to report a surgical resolution of the gummy smile using a prior esthetic design with the use of digital tools. A digital smile design and mock-up were used for performing gingival recontouring surgery. The relationship between the facial and dental measures and the incisal plane with the horizontal facial plane of reference were evaluated. The relative dental height x width was measured, and the dental contour drawing was inserted. Complementary lines are drawn such as the gingival zenith, joining lines of the gingival and incisal battlements. The periodontal esthetic was improved according to the established design digital smile pattern. These results demonstrate the importance of surgical techniques and are well accepted by patients and are easy to perform for the professional. When properly planned, they provide the desired expectations. Periodontal Surgical procedures associated with the design digital smile facilitate the communication between the patient and the professional. It is, therefore, essential to demonstrate the reverse planning of the smile and periodontal parameters with approval by the patient to solve the esthetic problem.

  2. Reaching Our Successors: Millennial Generation Medical Students and Plastic Surgery as a Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed; Asuku, Malachy E

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that career choices are made as a result of preconceived ideas and exposure to a specialty. If plastic surgery is to continue to attract the best, factors that may dissuade the millennial generation medical students from pursuing plastic surgery as a career must be identified and addressed. We explored the determinants of interest in plastic surgery as a career choice amongst millennial generation medical students. A survey regarding factors considered important in choosing plastic surgery was conducted amongst final year medical students in September 2011. Participants were asked to rate their agreement or disagreement with 18 statements on a four-point Likert scale (1 = very unimportant; 4 = very important). Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square test to compare categorical variables between male and female medical students. Values of P 3.0 was seen in all the subscales except in gender equity and life style concerns. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students in opinions of a spouse, a significant other, or family members in choosing plastic surgery P work-life balance in selecting plastic surgery compared to male medical students.

  3. Anaphylaxis and allergic reactions during surgery and medical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas J Larrauri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis during anesthesia is an unpredictable, severe, and rare reaction. It has an incidence of 1/10 000 to 1/20 000 surgeries. In most series, the responsible drugs include neuromuscular blocking agents, latex, or antibiotics. The frequency and etiology of systemic allergic reactions in other medical procedures are largely unknown. The identification of responsible drugs of anaphylaxis is a complex task, requiring testing of all medications and substances used during surgery. We describe our experience in a retrospective study of 15 patients. Ten subjects developed anaphylaxis during surgery, two in endoscopic studies and one in a trans-vaginal ultrasound. The remaining two subjects, one in a trans-vaginal ultrasound and another during a dental procedure had a systemic allergic reaction. We studied all patients with all medications administered during the procedures, including latex and detergents and disinfectants. Three surgeries had to be suspended at induction of anesthesia, five were stopped incomplete and two were completed. Both patients that presented a reaction during endoscopy required intensive care unit admission and the rest were observed in a Hospital. The responsible drugs during surgery anaphylaxis were neuromuscular blocking agents, latex, patent blue, and ranitidine. Ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA was identified during endoscopic studies; latex was responsible in transvaginal ultrasounds; and amoxicillin in the dental procedure. The aim of the present article is to review our experience studying allergic systemic reactions and anaphylaxis during general anesthesia and medical procedures, emphasizing the severity of these reactions and the need for causative drug identification.

  4. Robotics in general thoracic surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M Jawad; Park, Bernard J

    2017-01-01

    The use of robotic technology in general thoracic surgical practice continues to expand across various institutions and at this point many major common thoracic surgical procedures have been successfully performed by general thoracic surgeons using the robotic technology. These procedures include lung resections, excision of mediastinal masses, esophagectomy and reconstruction for malignant and benign esophageal pathologies. The success of robotic technology can be attributed to highly magnified 3-D visualization, dexterity afforded by 7 degrees of freedom that allow difficult dissections in narrow fields and the ease of reproducibility once the initial set up and instruments become familiar to the surgeon. As the application of robotic technology trickle downs from major academic centers to community hospitals, it becomes imperative that its role, limitations, learning curve and financial impact are understood by the novice robotic surgeon. In this article, we share our experience as it relates to the setup, common pitfalls and long term results for more commonly performed robotic assisted lung and thymic resections using the 4 arm da Vinci Xi robotic platform (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) to help guide those who are interested in adopting this technology.

  5. Evaluation of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam: Lower Extremity Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Basta, Marten N; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the training of plastic surgery residents, we analyzed a knowledge-based curriculum for plastic and reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity. The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE) is a commonly used tool to assess medical knowledge in plastic surgery. We reviewed the lower extremity content on 6 consecutive score keys (2008-2013). Questions were classified by taxonomy, anatomy, and subject. Answer references were quantified by source and relative year of publication. Totally, 107 questions related to the lower extremity (9.1% of all questions) and 14 questions had an associated image (13.1%). Questions required decision making (49%) over interpretation (36%) and direct recall (15%) skills (p < 0.001). Conditions of the leg (42.1%) and thigh (24.3%) constituted most of the questions. Subject matter focused on flap reconstruction (38.3%), nerve injury (8.4%), and congenital deformity (6.5%). Analysis of 263 citations to 66 unique journals showed that Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (54.9%) was the highest yield primary source. The median year of publication relative to PSITE administration was 6 (range: 1-58) with a mode of 2 years. Plastic Surgery by Mathes et al. was the most referenced textbook (21.9%). These data establish a benchmark for lower extremity training during plastic surgery residency. Study efforts focused on the most common topics and references will enhance trainee preparation for lower extremity PSITE questions. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 42713 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ...] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice... announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the... INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of July 7, 2011, FDA announced that a meeting of the General and Plastic...

  7. Dr. J. F. S. Esser and his influence on the development of plastic and reconstructive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Haeseker (Barend)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractJan F.S. Esser (1877-1946) was a remarkable and gifled Dutch surgeon whose contributions to plastic and reconstructive surgery, made long befare this specialty was recognised as a branch of surgery, are part of our surgical heritage. His interest in the bloodsupply of skin flaps was the

  8. Bariatric Surgery and Endoluminal Procedures: IFSO Worldwide Survey 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisani, L; Santonicola, A; Iovino, P; Vitiello, A; Zundel, N; Buchwald, H; Scopinaro, N

    2017-09-01

    Several bariatric surgery worldwide surveys have been previously published to illustrate the evolution of bariatric surgery in the last decades. The aim of this survey is to report an updated overview of all bariatric procedures performed in 2014.For the first time, a special section on endoluminal techniques was added. The 2014 International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) survey form evaluating the number and the type of surgical and endoluminal bariatric procedures was emailed to all IFSO societies. Trend analyses from 2011 to 2014 were also performed. There were 56/60 (93.3%) responders. The total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures performed in 2014 consisted of 579,517 (97.6%) surgical operations and 14,725 (2.4%) endoluminal procedures. The most commonly performed procedure in the world was sleeve gastrectomy (SG) that reached 45.9%, followed by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) (39.6%), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB) (7.4%). The annual percentage changes from 2013 revealed the increase of SG and decrease of RYGB in all the IFSO regions (USA/Canada, Europe, and Asia/Pacific) with the exception of Latin/South America, where SG decreased and RYGB represented the most frequent procedure. There was a further increase in the total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures in 2014 and SG is currently the most frequent surgical procedure in the world. This is the first survey that describes the endoluminal procedures, but the accuracy of provided data should be hopefully improved in the next future. We encourage the creation of further national registries and their continuous updates taking into account all new bariatric procedures including the endoscopic procedures that will obtain increasing importance in the near future.

  9. Social media in plastic surgery practices: emerging trends in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Chad K; Said, Hakim; Prucz, Roni; Rodrich, Rod J; Mathes, David W

    2011-05-01

    Social media is a common term for web-based applications that offer a way to disseminate information to a targeted audience in real time. In the current market, many businesses are utilizing it to communicate with clients. Although the field of plastic surgery is constantly changing in response to innovative technologies introduced into the specialty, the utilization of social media in plastic surgery practices is currently unclear. The authors evaluate the current attitudes and practices of aesthetic surgeons to emerging social media technology and compare these to attitudes about more traditional modes of communication. A 19-question web-based survey was disseminated by e-mail to all board-certified or board-eligible American plastic surgeons (n = 4817). Respondents were asked to answer questions on three topics: (1) their use of social media in their personal and professional lives, (2) their various forms of practice marketing, and (3) their demographic information. There were 1000 responses (20.8%). Results showed that 28.2% of respondents used social media in their practice, while 46.7% used it in their personal life. Most plastic surgeons managed their social media themselves or through a staff member. The majority of respondents who used social media in their practice claimed that their efforts were directed toward patient referrals. The typical plastic surgery practice that used social media was a solo practice in a large city with a focus on cosmetic surgery. Local competition of plastic surgeons did not correlate with social media use. Most plastic surgeons (88%) advertised, but the form of marketing varied. The most common forms included websites, print, and search engine optimization, but other modalities, such as television, radio, and billboards, were still utilized. Social media represents a new avenue that many plastic surgeons are utilizing, although with trepidation. As social media becomes commonplace in society, its role in plastic surgery

  10. The influence of social media and easily accessible online information on the aesthetic plastic surgery practice: literature review and our own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemurro, Paolo; Porcnik, Ales; Hedén, Per; Otte, Maximilian

    2015-04-01

    Patients interested in aesthetic plastic surgery procedures increasingly seek advice on social media and rely on easily accessible online information. The investigatory goal was to determine the impact of this phenomenon on the everyday aesthetic plastic surgery practice. Five hundred consecutive patients completed a questionnaire prior to their consultation with a plastic surgeon at our clinic. A questionnaire was also completed by 128 plastic surgeons practising in 19 different countries. A literature review was performed. Almost all patients (95%) used the internet to collect information prior to consultation, for 68% of them it being their first search method. Social media were used by 46% of patients and 40% of these were strongly influenced when choosing a specific doctor. The majority of plastic surgeons (85%) thought the information found on social media could lead to unrealistic expectations. However, 45% of plastic surgeons believed that their consultations became easier after the advent of social media, 29% found them more difficult. A literature review showed a high percentage of poor quality internet websites regarding plastic surgery and an increase in use of social media among plastic surgeons. The internet and social media play an important and growing role in plastic surgery. This results in more informed patients but may create unrealistic expectations. Even if the internet provides ample information, it cannot replace the face-to-face consultation, which always should remain a detailed process, covering both risks and limitations of alternative procedures. Available literature on how social media influences the medical practice is still scarce and further research is needed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  11. Is there a digital generation gap for e-learning in plastic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Roger J G; Hamilton, Neil M

    2012-01-01

    Some authors have claimed that those plastic surgeons born between 1965 and 1979 (generation X, or Gen-X) are more technologically able than those born between 1946 and 1964 (Baby Boomers, or BB). Those born after 1980, which comprise generation Y (Gen-Y), might be the most technologically able and most demanding for electronic learning (e-learning) to support their education and training in plastic surgery. These differences might represent a "digital generation gap" and would have practical and financial implications for the development of e-learning. The aim of this study was to survey plastic surgeons on their experience and preferences in e-learning in plastic surgery and to establish whether there was a difference between different generations. Online survey (e-survey) of plastic surgeons within the UK and Ireland was used for this study. In all, 624 plastic surgeons were invited by e-mail to complete an e-survey anonymously for their experience of e-learning in plastic surgery, whether they would like access to e-learning and, if so, whether this should this be provided nationally, locally, or not at all. By stratifying plastic surgeons into three generations (BB, Gen-X, and Gen-Y), the responses between generations were compared using the χ(2)-test for linear trend. A p value learning. These findings refute the claim that there are differences in the experience of e-learning of plastic surgeons by generation. Furthermore, there is no evidence that there are differences in whether there should be access to e-learning and how e-learning should be provided for different generations of plastic surgeons. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) procedures in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoglu, Orhan; Sagiroglu, Julide; Atak, Ibrahim; Kilic, Ali; Eren, Tunc; Caliskan, Mujgan; Bas, Gurhan

    2016-09-01

    Robotics was introduced in clinical practice more than two decades ago, and it has gained remarkable popularity for a wide variety of laparoscopic procedures. We report our results of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) in the most commonly applied general surgical procedures. Ninety seven patients underwent RALS from 2009 to 2012. Indications for RALS were cholelithiasis, gastric carcinoma, splenic tumors, colorectal carcinoma, benign colorectal diseases, non-toxic nodular goiter and incisional hernia. Records of patients were analyzed for demographic features, intraoperative and postoperative complications and conversion to open surgery. Forty six female and 51 male patients were operated and mean age was 58,4 (range: 25-88). Ninety three out of 97 procedures (96%) were completed robotically, 4 were converted to open surgery and there were 15 postoperative complications. There was no mortality. Wide variety of procedures of general surgery can be managed safely and effectively by RALS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. From time-based to competency-based standards: core transitional competencies in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Kristina; Yazdani, Arjang; Ross, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. A list of potential core competencies was generated using a modified Delphi method that included the investigators and 6 experienced, academic plastic surgeons from across Canada and the United States. Generated items were divided into 7 domains: basic surgical skills, anesthesia, hand surgery, cutaneous surgery, esthetic surgery, breast surgery, and craniofacial surgery. Members of the Delphi group were asked to rank particular skills on a 4-point scale with anchored descriptors. Item reduction resulted in a survey consisting of 48 skills grouped into the aforementioned domains. This self-administered survey was distributed to all Canadian program directors (n = 11) via e-mail for validation and further item reduction. The response rate was 100% (11/11). Using the average rankings of program directors, 26 "core" skills were identified. There was agreement of core skills across all domains except for breast surgery and esthetic surgery. Of them, 7 skills were determined to be above the level of a trainee at this stage; a further 15 skills were agreed to be important, but not core, competencies. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as "core" for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Residency in plastic surgery: comparison between the French and the Canadian Royal College programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinna, R; Harris, P G; Danino, A M

    2010-02-01

    Learning plastic surgery in Montreal is different from learning plastic surgery in a French university. In Canada, all residency programs are accredited by a national structure: the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. We tried to highlight the differences that exist between the French and a North American academic system. With the different rules and law that governs academic education in both countries, we analyzed the following elements: the residency selection, the program of plastic surgery (content and organisation), the system of evaluation and the diplomas. The training of a Canadian plastic surgeon is very controlled. The recommendations of the Royal College guarantee to the resident who enters a program to have the means to acquire a complete training in quantity and in quality. On the four studied items, none is completely similar between both countries. Each having advantages and inconveniences as, for example, the selection of residency by interview or by the classifying national exam. Actually, few French plastic surgery programs could satisfy the requirements of the Royal College on several points, however without failing the training of French plastic surgeons. Nevertheless, we could be inspired by several elements (rotation in private practice,grouping together several academic hospitals. . .) to improve our system of training.

  15. A Systematic Review of Smartphone Applications for Plastic Surgery Providers: Target Audience, Uses, and Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusche, Ryan; Buchanan, Patrick J; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Vercler, Christian J

    2016-01-01

    The growth and acceptance of smartphones among clinicians has been remarkable over the last decade. Over 87% of doctors use a smartphone or tablet capable of running third-party software known as applications (apps). In the field of plastic surgery, apps have been designed for personal practice development, education, clinical tools and guidelines, and entertainment. This study reviews the literature on apps related to plastic surgery and determines the number and types of apps available. A systematic review of the literature was performed to find articles written about plastic surgery applications. Queries were run in the Apple iPhone iOS App store and Google Play using the term "plastic surgery." Apps were reviewed for ratings, downloads, and cost. In addition, apps were categorized based on purpose. Categories include practice development, media/literature, clinical tool and guideline apps, or recreation. The literature search yielded 8 articles for review, 2 articles focused on categorizing apps and 6 articles focused on describing useful apps. Searching Apple's iTunes (iOS) store identified 273 and Google Play identified 250 apps related to plastic surgery; since 2013, a 62%, and 580% increase, respectively. The iOS store included practice development (46%), recreation (26%), media/literature (14%), and clinical tool and guideline (11%). Google Play store included recreation apps (44%), practice development (24%), clinical tools and guidelines (11%), and media and literature (9%). Apps related to the field of plastic surgery are increasing in prevalence. The content of these apps are variable, and the majority are intended for marketing and development of private practices. Apps linking to literature, texts, study materials, and clinical tools and guidelines are developed for both practicing plastic surgeons and surgical trainees. Finding "useful" apps takes time because searches are often complicated by a variety of apps.

  16. Self-citation rate and impact factor in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2018-02-01

    Journal ranking based on the impact factor (IF) can be distorted by self-citation. The aim of this study is to investigate the present status of self-citation in the plastic surgery journals and its effect on the journals' IFs. IF, IF without self-citations (corrected IF), self-cited rate, and self-citing rate for 11 plastic surgery journals were investigated from 2009-2015, by reviewing the Journal Citation Report ® . The correlations of the IF with the self-cited rate and the self-citing rate were statistically assessed. In addition, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was compared with 15 top journals from other surgical specialties in 2015. IF was significantly correlated with the self-cited rate (R: 0.594, p = 0.001) and the self-citing rate (R: 0.824, p citation rate positively affects the IF in plastic surgery journals. A high concentration of self-citation of some journals could distort the ranking among plastic surgery journals in general.

  17. Research productivity and gender disparities: a look at academic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Angie M; Mady, Leila J; Villanueva, Nathaniel L; Goljo, Erden; Svider, Peter F; Ciminello, Frank; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2014-01-01

    The h-index has utility in examining the contributions of faculty members by quantifying both the amount and the quality of research output and as such is a metric in approximating academic productivity. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the relationship between h-index and academic rank in plastic surgery and (2) to describe the current gender representation in academic plastic surgery to assess whether there are any gender disparities in academic productivity. The h-index was used to evaluate the research contributions of plastic surgeons from academic departments in the United States. There were 426 (84%) men and 79 (16%) women in our sample. Those in higher academic ranks had higher h-index scores (p productivity between men and women in assistant and associate professor positions (6.4 vs 5.1, respectively; p = 0.04). The h-index is able to objectively and reliably quantify academic productivity in plastic surgery. We found that h-indices increased with higher academic rank, and men had overall higher scores than their female colleagues. Adoption of this metric as an adjunct to other objective and subjective measures by promotions committees may provide a more reliable measure of research relevance and academic productivity in academic plastic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathways to Academic Leadership in Plastic Surgery: A Nationwide Survey of Program Directors, Division Chiefs, and Department Chairs of Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jordan E; Pang, John Henry Y; Losee, Joseph E; Rubin, J Peter; Nguyen, Vu T

    2018-06-01

    Many aspire to leadership in academic plastic surgery yet there is no well-documented pathway. Information regarding plastic surgery residencies and program directors was obtained from the American Medical Association's FREIDA database. The division chief or department chair (academic head) of every academic plastic surgery program was identified. One Internet-based survey was distributed to academic heads; another, to program directors. Ninety academic heads were identified, 35 of whom also serve as program director. Sixty-seven unique program directors were identified. There was a 51 percent academic head response rate and a 65 percent program director response rate. Academic plastic surgery is overwhelmingly administered by midcareer men. The average program director was appointed at age 45 and has served for 7 years. She or he was trained through the independent track, completed additional training in hand surgery, and is a full professor. She or he publishes two or three peer-reviewed manuscripts per year and spends 9 hours per week in administration. The average academic head was appointed at age 45 and has held the position for 12 years. She or he was trained in the independent model, completed fellowship training, and is a full professor. She or he publishes five peer-reviewed manuscripts per year and spends 12 hours per week involved in administration. Program directors and academic heads serve nonoverlapping roles. Few program directors will advance to the role of academic head. Successful applicants to the program director position often serve as an associate program director and are seen as motivated resident educators. In contrast, those faculty members selected for the academic head role are academically accomplished administrators with business acumen.

  19. Impact of an Event Reporting System on Resident Complication Reporting in Plastic Surgery Training: Addressing an ACGME and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project Core Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rajiv P; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Naidoo, Sybill; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2017-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project has identified practice-based learning and improvement, which involves systematically analyzing current practices and implementing changes, as a core competency in residency education. In surgical care, complication reporting is an essential component of practice-based learning and improvement as complications are analyzed in morbidity and mortality conference for quality improvement. Unfortunately, current methods for capturing a comprehensive profile of complications may significantly underestimate the true occurrence of complications. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to evaluate an intervention for complication reporting and compare this to current practice, in a plastic surgery training program. This is a preintervention and postintervention study evaluating resident reporting of complications on a plastic surgery service. The intervention was an online event reporting system developed by department leadership and patient safety experts. The cohorts consisted of all patients undergoing surgery during two separate 3-month blocks bridged by an implementation period. A trained reviewer recorded complications, and this served as the reference standard. Fisher's exact test was used for binary comparisons. There were 32 complications detected in 219 patients from June to August of 2015 and 35 complications in 202 patients from October to December of 2015. The proportion of complications reported in the preintervention group was nine of 32 (28.1 percent). After the intervention, this significantly increased to 32 of 35 (91.4 percent) (p < 0.001). An intervention using an event reporting system, supported by departmental leadership, led to significant improvements in complication reporting by plastic surgery residents.

  20. [Independence in Plastic Surgery - Benefit or Barrier? Analysis of the Publication Performance in Academic Plastic Surgery Depending on Varying Organisational Structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, C D; Leitsch, S; Haertnagl, F; Haas, E M; Giunta, R E

    2015-08-01

    Despite its recognition as an independent specialty, at German university hospitals the field of plastic surgery is still underrepresented in terms of independent departments with a dedicated research focus. The aim of this study was to analyse the publication performance within the German academic plastic surgery environment and to compare independent departments and dependent, subordinate organisational structures regarding their publication performance. Organisational structures and number of attending doctors in German university hospitals were examined via a website analysis. A pubmed analysis was applied to assess the publication performance (number of publications, cumulative impact factor, impact factor/publication, number of publications/MD, number of publications/unit) between 2009 and 2013. In a journal analysis the distribution of the cumulative impact factor and number of publications in different journals as well as the development of the impact factor in the top journals were analysed. Out of all 35 university hospitals there exist 12 independent departments for plastic surgery and 8 subordinate organisational structures. In 15 university hospitals there were no designated plastic surgery units. The number of attending doctors differed considerably between independent departments (3.6 attending doctors/unit) and subordinate organisational structures (1.1 attending doctors/unit). The majority of publications (89.0%) and of the cumulative impact factor (91.2%) as well as most of the publications/MD (54 publications/year) and publications/unit (61 publications/year) were created within the independent departments. Only in departments top publications with an impact factor > 5 were published. In general a negative trend regarding the number of publications (- 13.4%) and cumulative impact factor (- 28.9%) was observed. 58.4% of all publications were distributed over the top 10 journals. Within the latter the majority of articles were published in

  1. Dr Jerome Pierce Webster (1888-1974): Surgeon, historian, campaigner, and 'the father of plastic surgery education'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, Catrin H

    2016-09-28

    Dr Jerome Pierce Webster is best remembered as the 'founder of plastic surgery education in the United States' on the basis of developing his nation's first plastic surgery residency programme, his role in the founding of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and, more generally, his influence in professionalising this subspecialty. He also deserves to be remembered for his extensive missionary work in China, his publications as a successful bibliographer, and as an accomplished historian. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Aligning In-Service Training Examinations in Plastic Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery With Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Benvenuti, Michael A; Drolet, Brian C

    2017-10-01

    In-service training examinations (ITEs) are used to assess residents across specialties. However, it is not clear how they are integrated with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones and competencies. This study explored the distribution of specialty-specific milestones and competencies in ITEs for plastic surgery and orthopaedic surgery. In-service training examinations were publicly available for plastic surgery (PSITE) and orthopaedics (OITE). Questions on the PSITE for 2014-2016 and the OITE for 2013-2015 were mapped to the specialty-specific milestones and the 6 competencies. There was an uneven distribution of milestones and competencies in ITE questions. Nine of the 36 Plastic Surgery Milestones represented 52% (341 of 650) of questions, and 3 were not included in the ITE. Of 41 Orthopaedic Surgery Milestones, 7 represented 51% (201 of 394) of questions, and 5 had no representation on the ITE. Among the competencies, patient care was the most common (PSITE = 62% [403 of 650]; OITE = 59% [233 of 394]), followed by medical knowledge (PSITE = 34% [222 of 650]; OITE = 31% [124 of 394]). Distribution of the remaining competencies differed between the 2 specialties (PSITE = 4% [25 of 650]; OITE = 9% [37 of 394]). The ITEs tested slightly more than half of the milestones for the 2 specialties, and focused predominantly on patient care and medical knowledge competencies.

  3. Insta-grated Plastic Surgery Residencies: The Rise of Social Media Use by Trainees and Responsible Guidelines for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandawarkar, Akash A; Gould, Daniel J; Stevens, W Grant

    2018-02-21

    Ethical guidelines for appropriate use of social media are beginning to be delineated. As social media becomes ingrained in plastic surgery culture, education of residents on appropriate use of social media is increasingly important. Recently, plastic surgery residency programs have begun to utilize social media. This study characterizes the trends and content of plastic surgery residency-associated Instagram accounts. Active individual residency program Instagram accounts were identified for integrated plastic surgery programs. Metrics for each account were retrieved on September 16, 2017, including date of first post, number of posts, and followers. Individual posts were analyzed for content of post. Fourteen of 67 (21%) integrated plastic surgery programs were found to have active Instagram accounts. There has been an exponential growth of programs adopting Instagram since August 2015. A total of 806 posts were created. Thirty-two (3.97%) posts had intraoperative photos and only one (0.12%) showed a patient image. There were 4466 followers of plastic surgery residency programs. A linear correlation was found between number of posts and number of followers, while there was no correlation of number of followers and time since account start. Instagram use by plastic surgery integrated programs continues to grow exponentially, and programs are appropriately using the platform. Active use of the resident social media results in increased influence. Resident use of social media has many benefits. We propose social media guidelines for plastic surgery trainees and advocate for continued appropriate use and auto-regulation by plastic surgery trainees.

  4. The polymerase chain reaction and its application to clinical plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rea, S

    2012-02-03

    Molecular biology has become an essential component in many fields of modern medical research, including plastic surgery. Research into the molecular mechanisms underlying many disease processes offer increased understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and provide exciting therapeutic possibilities. Yet for many clinicians, the presentation of much research into molecular biological processes is couched in confusing terminology and based on scientific techniques, the basis of which are frequently difficult for the clinician to understand. The purpose of this review is to present an introduction to some of the molecular biological techniques currently in use, namely the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and explore its applications to different aspects of plastic surgery. This review explores the role PCR now plays in all aspects of modern plastic surgery practise, with particular emphasis on normal and abnormal wound healing, the diagnosis of craniofacial anomalies, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer including melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and burns.

  5. Knowledge and perception of plastic surgery among tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-16

    Oct 16, 2015 ... tertiary education students in Enugu, South‑East. Nigeria. CM Isiguzo ..... This finding should be a motivation for plastic surgeons who have private ... population of this country some of whom travel abroad to source for these ...

  6. Nursing Casuistry in Heart Surgery : Plastic Mitral Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Topic of this thesis is " Mitral Valvuloplasty". The thesis has been divided into theoretical and practical parts. The theoretical part begins with the classification of heart diseases. Main topic of this thesis is mitral insufficiency - its etiology and pathogenesis, clinical picture, therapy, the possibility of prosthetic valves and post surgery complications. Theoretical part also contains information about the preoperative and post-operative care at cardiac surgery department. The practic...

  7. [Bariatric and plastic surgery in obese adolescents: an alternative treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubern, Béatrice; Tounian, Patrice

    2014-06-01

    The increased frequency of extreme forms of obesity in adolescents and the disappointing results of conventional treatments are now leading pediatricians to consider bariatric or cosmetic surgery as the only real long-term effective therapeutic alternative. The two main techniques currently used for bariatric surgery in adolescents are gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding. Whatever the technique, weight loss is significant with improvement of comorbidities and quality of life. In addition, the complications are identical to those in adults and equally frequent. However, because of the particularities of this age, caution is still required. Adolescence is indeed characterized by specific nutritional needs, but also changes in body image in which surgery could have a negative effect. Currently, all obese teenagers making a request for bariatric surgery should have a comprehensive assessment with global care for at least 6 months. The indication is then discussed on a case-by-case basis by multidisciplinary teams and experts. To date, the type of surgery (gastric banding, gastric sleeve, or bypass) is still widely discussed. Based on experience with adults, we believe that gastric sleeve and bypass should be preferred. In addition, obesity in adolescents almost always involves psychosocial consequences, while somatic complications are rare. Thus, the care of adipo- or gynecomastia, abdominal fat excess, and concealed penis is essential and therefore justifies cosmetic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Plastic Surgery Residency Training in United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianmin; Zhang, Boheng; Yin, Yiqing; Fang, Taolin; Wei, Ning; Lineaweaver, William C; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Residency training is internationally recognized as the only way for the physicians to be qualified to practice independently. China has instituted a new residency training program for the specialty of plastic surgery. Meanwhile, plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States are presently in a transition because of restricted work hours. The purpose of this study is to compare the current characteristics of plastic surgery residency training in 2 countries. Flow path, structure, curriculum, operative experience, research, and evaluation of training in 2 countries were measured. The number of required cases was compared quantitatively whereas other aspects were compared qualitatively. Plastic surgery residency training programs in 2 countries differ regarding specific characteristics. Requirements to become a plastic surgery resident in the United States are more rigorous. Ownership structure of the regulatory agency for residency training in 2 countries is diverse. Training duration in the United States is more flexible. Clinical and research training is more practical and the method of evaluation of residency training is more reasonable in the United States. The job opportunities after residency differ substantially between 2 countries. Not every resident has a chance to be an independent surgeon and would require much more training time in China than it does in the United States. Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States and China have their unique characteristics. The training programs in the United States are more standardized. Both the United States and China may complement each other to create training programs that will ultimately provide high-quality care for all people.

  9. The Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Plastic Surgery: Are They All Created Equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Juan, Ilona; Wu, Adela; Samaha, Georges; Cho, Brian; Luck, J D; Soni, Ashwin; Milton, Jacqueline; May, James W; Tufaro, Anthony P; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several studies have demonstrated that articles that disclose conflicts of interests (COI) are associated with publication of positive results. The purpose of this study was to learn more about the different types of COI as they relate to the general topic of COI in plastic surgery. Specifically, we aimed to examine whether different types of COI are more likely than others to be associated with the presentation of positive findings. We reviewed all original articles in Annals of Plastic Surgery, Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, and Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. All scientific articles were analyzed, and several article characteristics were extracted. Disclosed COI were categorized into the following categories: consultant/employee, royalties/stock options, and research support. The findings reported in each article abstract were blindly graded as reporting a positive, negative, neutral, or not applicable result. A multivariable analysis was performed to determine whether an association existed between certain types of COI and publication of positive conclusions. A total of 3124 articles were identified of which 1185 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Financial COI were reported in 153 studies (12.9%). The most common type of COI was "research support" (7.3%), whereas the least common was "royalties/stock options" (1.2%). Rates of different types of COI varied significantly by plastic surgery subspecialty field (P reported COI are uncommon in plastic surgery research. Our results provide evidence that certain types of financial COI are more likely than others to be associated with the presentation of positive findings. This analysis suggests that certain investigators may be more biased, consciously or unconsciously, by the type of financial benefit offered by industry.

  10. Principles of plastic surgery portrayed by the professional life of Dr John Peter Mettauer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avashia, Yash J; Thaller, Seth R

    2011-11-01

    Regarded as "America's first plastic surgeon," Dr John Peter Mettauer's professional life displays 3 fundamental keystones of plastic surgery: education, innovation, and practice. To fully appreciate the history of our plastic surgery, one must look beyond a purely factual recount of noteworthy actions performed decades ago. Fundamental principles that governed achievements of our predecessors remain applicable even today. Dr Mettauer thrived as a medical student under the influence of distinguished professors in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Later, he continued to propagate their basic tenets when he established his medical institute in 1837. Throughout his life, Dr Mettauer combined ingenuity with scientific inquiry to devise numerous unprecedented surgical techniques and instruments. He was a prolific writer and exquisitely documented his work in medical journals for the benefit of both contemporary and future surgeons. One of Dr Mettauer's momentous achievements in plastic surgery that displays his remarkable capabilities was his contributions to management of both simple and complicated cases of cleft palate. He was the first to describe relaxing lateral incisions for treating complete cleft palates and, incidentally, was the first to successfully treat this in America. He invariably replicated similar success in establishing techniques for treating a wide range of anatomic deformities. Cumulatively, Dr Mettauer's lifelong commitment and diligence have truly laid a foundation for the eventual progress and success in the field of plastic surgery.

  11. Identification of New Tools to Predict Surgical Performance of Novices using a Plastic Surgery Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan, Roy; Viezel-Mathieu, Alex; Cyr, Shantale; Hemmerling, Thomas M; Lin, Samuel J; Gilardino, Mirko S

    2018-04-09

    To identify new tools capable of predicting surgical performance of novices on an augmentation mammoplasty simulator. The pace of technical skills acquisition varies between residents and may necessitate more time than that allotted by residency training before reaching competence. Identifying applicants with superior innate technical abilities might shorten learning curves and the time to reach competence. The objective of this study is to identify new tools that could predict surgical performance of novices on a mammoplasty simulator. We recruited 14 medical students and recorded their performance in 2 skill-games: Mikado and Perplexus Epic, and in 2 video games: Star War Racer (Sony Playstation 3) and Super Monkey Ball 2 (Nintendo Wii). Then, each participant performed an augmentation mammoplasty procedure on a Mammoplasty Part-task Trainer, which allows the simulation of the essential steps of the procedure. The average age of participants was 25.4 years. Correlation studies showed significant association between Perplexus Epic, Star Wars Racer, Super Monkey Ball scores and the modified OSATS score with r s = 0.8491 (p 41 (p = 0.005), and r s = 0.7309 (p < 0.003), but not with the Mikado score r s = -0.0255 (p = 0.9). Linear regressions were strongest for Perplexus Epic and Super Monkey Ball scores with coefficients of determination of 0.59 and 0.55, respectively. A combined score (Perplexus/Super-Monkey-Ball) was computed and showed a significant correlation with the modified OSATS score having an r s = 0.8107 (p < 0.001) and R 2 = 0.75, respectively. This study identified a combination of skill games that correlated to better performance of novices on a surgical simulator. With refinement, such tools could serve to help screen plastic surgery applicants and identify those with higher surgical performance predictors. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sub-specialization in plastic surgery in Sub-saharan Africa: capacities, gaps and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdulrasheed

    2014-01-01

    The skill set of a plastic surgeon, which addresses a broad range of soft tissue conditions that are prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, remains relevant in the unmet need for surgical care. Recently, there has being a major paradigm shift from discipline-based to disease-based care, resulting in an emerging component of patient-centered care; adequate access to subspecialty care in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Given the need for an evolution in sub-specialization, this article focuses on the benefits and future role of differentiation of plastic surgeons into sub-specialty training pathways in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25584125

  13. Electronic Communication in Plastic Surgery: Guiding Principles from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Health Policy Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Perdikis, Galen; Damitz, Lynn; Krochmal, Dan J; Kalliainen, Loree K; Bonawitz, Steven C

    2018-02-01

    With the advancement of technology, electronic communication has become an important mode of communication within plastic and reconstructive surgery. This can take the form of e-mail, text messaging, video conferencing, and social media, among others. There are currently no defined American Society of Plastic Surgeons guidelines for appropriate professional use of these technologies. A search was performed on PubMed and the Cochrane database; terms included "telemedicine," "text messaging," "HIPAA," "metadata," "video conferencing," "photo sharing," "social media," "Facebook," "Twitter," and "Instagram." Initial screening of all identified articles was performed; the level of evidence, limitations, and recommendations were evaluated and articles were reviewed. A total of 654 articles were identified in the level I screening process; after more comprehensive review, 41 articles fit inclusion criteria: social networking, 12; telemedicine, 11; text messaging, 10; metadata, four; video conferencing, three; and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, one. General themes were identified from these articles and guidelines proposed. Electronic communication can provide an efficient method of information exchange for professional purposes within plastic surgery but should be used thoughtfully and with all professional, legal, and ethical considerations.

  14. Low Levels of Evidence on the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Bilici, Nadir; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam is written by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Examinees reasonably infer that tested material reflects the Society's vision for the core curriculum in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of evidence on which credited answers to the examination questions are based. Two recent Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exams (2014 and 2015) were analyzed. Questions were categorized using a taxonomy model. Recommended journal article references for Level III (decision-making) questions were assigned a level of evidence. Exam sections were analyzed for differences in question taxonomy distribution and level of evidence. To look for studies with higher levels of evidence, a PubMed search was conducted for a random sample of 10 questions from each section. One hundred three Level I (25.8 percent), 138 Level II (34.5 percent), and 159 Level III (39.8 percent) questions were analyzed (p < 0.001). The hand and lower extremity section had the highest percentage of Level III questions (50.0 percent; p = 0.005). Journal articles had a mean level of evidence of 3.9 ± 0.7. The number of articles with a low level of evidence (IV and V) (p = 0.624) and the percentage of questions supported by articles with a high level of evidence (I and II) (p = 0.406) did not vary by section. The PubMed search revealed no instances of a higher level of evidence than the recommended reading list. A significant percentage of Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam questions test clinical management, but most are supported with a low level of evidence. Although that is consistent with low level of evidence of plastic surgery literature, educators should recognize the potential for biases of question writers.

  15. Beauty, health and risk in Brazilian plastic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I take up the theme of the volume by analyzing the dynamic and sometimes conflicting relationship between ‘health’ and ‘beauty’ in the practice of cosmetic surgery. Approaching Brazil as a case study, I show how cosmetic and medical rationales are merged within a broader field of

  16. Industry Financial Relationships in Plastic Surgery: Analysis of the Sunshine Act Open Payments Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Albert H; Gangopadhyay, Noopur

    2016-08-01

    Limited data exist regarding industry financial relationships in plastic surgery. The Sunshine Act Open Payments Database currently represents the largest repository of these data, but is limited primarily to queries of individual providers. The purpose of this study was to analyze these data and present them in a manner that better delineates these relationships, and to compare plastic surgery with other surgical subspecialties. A review of the Open Payments Database was performed for the period from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. These data were analyzed with respect to types of payments, characteristics of plastic surgeons and companies, and comparison with other surgical subspecialties. A total of 49,053 payments from 274 companies were identified that were made to 4812 plastic surgeons (475 academic and 4337 private practice). The total value of payments was $17,091,077. Food and beverage represented the most common type of payment (82.2 percent). Royalties and licensing represented the highest valued type of payment (35.7 percent), but were received by only a minority of plastic surgeons (0.5 percent). No significant differences were identified between academic and private practice plastic surgeons in the value or quantity of payments. Plastic surgery (54.5 percent) exhibited the lowest prevalence of industry financial relationships compared with otolaryngology (57.9 percent), orthopedics (62.4 percent), neurosurgery (87.8 percent), and urology (63.1 percent) (p < 0.001). Approximately half of all plastic surgeons have industry financial relationships. The prevalence of these relationships is comparatively less than in other surgical subspecialties.

  17. 78 FR 16684 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  18. 75 FR 1395 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-N-0606] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice...) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices...

  19. 77 FR 20642 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  20. 75 FR 47606 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for August...

  1. 76 FR 14415 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  2. 76 FR 65200 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of... Administration (FDA) is postponing the meeting of the General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical...

  3. 76 FR 62419 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  4. 75 FR 49940 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0001] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  5. 78 FR 30928 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  6. 76 FR 39882 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0478] General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  7. RECONSTRUCTIVE PLASTIC SURGERIES IN PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANCIES OF TONGUE AND FLOOR OF THE MOUTH. TYPES OF PLASTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Radjabova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Issues of tissue defects replacement after radical surgery for tumors of the head and neck do not lose their relevance. The article presents the results of plastics and replacement of the perforating combined defects of the floor of the mouth, portion of the upper and lower lips, the angle of the mouth, cheeks, neck lateral parts with simultaneous reduction of the configuration and function of the operated organs. Depending on the depth and nature of the existing tissue defect various methods of plastics were applied using arterialized flaps on the vascular pedicle in a free and non-free version. Satisfactory cosmetic and functional results were achieved in patients allowing to improve life quality and to adapt socially.

  8. Procedural virtual reality simulation in minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Buzink, Sonja N

    2013-02-01

    Simulation of procedural tasks has the potential to bridge the gap between basic skills training outside the operating room (OR) and performance of complex surgical tasks in the OR. This paper provides an overview of procedural virtual reality (VR) simulation currently available on the market and presented in scientific literature for laparoscopy (LS), flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy (FGE), and endovascular surgery (EVS). An online survey was sent to companies and research groups selling or developing procedural VR simulators, and a systematic search was done for scientific publications presenting or applying VR simulators to train or assess procedural skills in the PUBMED and SCOPUS databases. The results of five simulator companies were included in the survey. In the literature review, 116 articles were analyzed (45 on LS, 43 on FGE, 28 on EVS), presenting a total of 23 simulator systems. The companies stated to altogether offer 78 procedural tasks (33 for LS, 12 for FGE, 33 for EVS), of which 17 also were found in the literature review. Although study type and used outcomes vary between the three different fields, approximately 90 % of the studies presented in the retrieved publications for LS found convincing evidence to confirm the validity or added value of procedural VR simulation. This was the case in approximately 75 % for FGE and EVS. Procedural training using VR simulators has been found to improve clinical performance. There is nevertheless a large amount of simulated procedural tasks that have not been validated. Future research should focus on the optimal use of procedural simulators in the most effective training setups and further investigate the benefits of procedural VR simulation to improve clinical outcome.

  9. [Application advances of three-dimensional bioprinting in burn and plastic surgery field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R B; Li, M X; Guo, G H; Zhang, H Y

    2017-10-20

    Three-dimensional bioprinting is one of the latest and fastest growing technologies in the medical field. It has been implemented to print part of the transplantable tissues and organs, such as skin, ear, and bone. This paper introduces the application status, challenges, and application prospect of three-dimensional bioprinting in burn and plastic surgery field.

  10. 75 FR 70112 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Non-Powered Suction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    .... FDA-2010-N-0513] Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Non-Powered... risks. Adverse tissue reaction Material degradation Improper function of suction apparatus (e.g., reflux.... Material degradation Section 8. Stability and Shelf Life. [[Page 70113

  11. Plastic Surgery Management of Victims of Terrorist Violence in Ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İğde, Murat; Kaplan, Ahmet

    2017-12-01

    Terror attacks have been progressively increasing worldwide through the present era. The management of the consequences of terrorism events is under debate in almost every scientific area. The organization and advancement of health services constitute important components of the crisis management. Similar to other specialty areas in medicine, the medical management of terrorist attacks is becoming important in terms of plastic and reconstructive surgery.Ankara, the capital of Turkey, has been subject to 2 terrorist events in public places within a year. The total number of patients involved in both cases was 434. Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital is a tertiary health care institution and one of the most important trauma centers in the region. A total of 178 Patients exposed to these events referred to our hospital. Of the total, 34 patients were completely or partially treated in the plastic and reconstructive surgery clinic. In this study, we tried to discuss the difficulties encountered in the classification of patients and plastic surgery during the treatment period of patients who experienced these attacks.Data were obtained from The National News Agency, hospital, and our own clinic registries. Patient classification was based on the injured parts of the body. Statistical analysis was performed for all data. In conclusion, the role and the importance of plastic surgery department especially in trauma management have been emphasized in the light of our findings.

  12. 75 FR 68972 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Tissue Adhesive With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    .... FDA-2010-N-0512] Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Tissue... running to unintended areas, etc. B. Wound dehiscence C. Adverse tissue reaction and chemical burns D..., Clinical Studies, Labeling. Adverse tissue reaction and chemical Biocompatibility Animal burns. Testing...

  13. Sir Harold Delf Gillies, the otolaryngologist and father of modern facial plastic surgery: review of his rhinoplasty case notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, C R

    2015-06-01

    Sir Harold Gillies, born in New Zealand, is widely considered a British icon and the father of modern plastic surgery. This article provides an overview of his life and the circumstances which led to him laying the foundations of plastic surgery in Britain in the early twentieth century. A hand search and review of case notes from the Gillies Archives at Queen Mary's Hospital in Sidcup, UK, where he made history, was conducted. Gillies' ongoing legacy was found to also include his influence on the development of his cousin Sir Archibald McIndoe's work. Gillies was a talented sportsman who engaged in charitable activities. Additionally, he was a gifted teacher, with his hospital attracting many young surgeons from around the world. He was found to have expressed genius in both the design and execution of the art and science of surgery. He incepted reconstructive techniques ranging from the world's first gender reassignment operation to facial reanimation procedures for the treatment of facial paralysis. His operative work on ex-servicemen in need of complex rhinoplasty and in particular the inception of the tubed pedicle flap are depicted.

  14. Cost analysis of robotic versus laparoscopic general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rana M; Frelich, Matthew J; Bosler, Matthew E; Gould, Jon C

    2017-01-01

    Robotic surgical systems have been used at a rapidly increasing rate in general surgery. Many of these procedures have been performed laparoscopically for years. In a surgical encounter, a significant portion of the total costs is associated with consumable supplies. Our hospital system has invested in a software program that can track the costs of consumable surgical supplies. We sought to determine the differences in cost of consumables with elective laparoscopic and robotic procedures for our health care organization. De-identified procedural cost and equipment utilization data were collected from the Surgical Profitability Compass Procedure Cost Manager System (The Advisory Board Company, Washington, DC) for our health care system for laparoscopic and robotic cholecystectomy, fundoplication, and inguinal hernia between the years 2013 and 2015. Outcomes were length of stay, case duration, and supply cost. Statistical analysis was performed using a t-test for continuous variables, and statistical significance was defined as p robotic procedures. Length of stay did not differ for fundoplication or cholecystectomy. Length of stay was greater for robotic inguinal hernia repair. Case duration was similar for cholecystectomy (84.3 robotic and 75.5 min laparoscopic, p = 0.08), but significantly longer for robotic fundoplication (197.2 robotic and 162.1 min laparoscopic, p = 0.01) and inguinal hernia repair (124.0 robotic and 84.4 min laparoscopic, p = ≪0.01). We found a significantly increased cost of general surgery procedures for our health care system when cases commonly performed laparoscopically are instead performed robotically. Our analysis is limited by the fact that we only included costs associated with consumable surgical supplies. The initial acquisition cost (over $1 million for robotic surgical system), depreciation, and service contract for the robotic and laparoscopic systems were not included in this analysis.

  15. Is Office-Based Surgery Safe? Comparing Outcomes of 183,914 Aesthetic Surgical Procedures Across Different Types of Accredited Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Parikh, Rikesh; Nguyen, Lyly; Afshari, Ashkan; Shack, R Bruce; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-02-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in office-based surgery. However, due to wide variations in regulatory standards, the safety of office-based aesthetic surgery has been questioned. This study compares complication rates of cosmetic surgery performed at office-based surgical suites (OBSS) to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospitals. A prospective cohort of patients undergoing cosmetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the CosmetAssure database (Birmingham, AL). Patients were grouped by type of accredited facility where the surgery was performed: OBSS, ASC, or hospital. The primary outcome was the incidence of major complication(s) requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days postoperatively. Potential risk factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of procedure, and combined procedures were reviewed. Of the 129,007 patients (183,914 procedures) in the dataset, the majority underwent the procedure at ASCs (57.4%), followed by hospitals (26.7%) and OBSS (15.9%). Patients operated in OBSS were less likely to undergo combined procedures (30.3%) compared to ASCs (31.8%) and hospitals (35.3%, P procedures. Plastic surgeons should continue to triage their patients carefully based on other significant comorbidities that were not measured in this present study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The Ethics of Sharing Plastic Surgery Videos on Social Media: Systematic Literature Review, Ethical Analysis, and Proposed Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Robert G; Vaca, Elbert E; Fine, Neil A; Schierle, Clark F

    2017-10-01

    Recent videos shared by plastic surgeons on social media applications such as Snapchat, Instagram, and YouTube, among others, have blurred the line between entertainment and patient care. This has left many in the plastic surgery community calling for the development of more structured oversight and guidance regarding video sharing on social media. To date, no official guidelines exist for plastic surgeons to follow. Little is known about the ethical implications of social media use by plastic surgeons, especially with regard to video sharing. A systematic review of the literature on social media use in plastic surgery was performed on October 31, 2016, with an emphasis on ethics and professionalism. An ethical analysis was conducted using the four principles of medical ethics. The initial search yielded 87 articles. Thirty-four articles were included for analyses that were found to be relevant to the use of social media in plastic surgery. No peer-reviewed articles were found that mentioned Snapchat or addressed the ethical implications of sharing live videos of plastic surgery on social media. Using the four principles of medical ethics, it was determined that significant ethical concerns exist with broadcasting these videos. This analysis fills an important gap in the plastic surgery literature by addressing the ethical issues concerning live surgery broadcasts on social media. Plastic surgeons may use the guidelines proposed here to avoid potential pitfalls.

  17. Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong Gi Hyeon

    1987-04-01

    This book deals with plastic, which includes introduction for plastic, chemistry of high polymers, polymerization, speciality and structure of a high molecule property of plastic, molding, thermosetting plastic, such as polyethylene, polyether, polyamide and polyvinyl acetyl, thermal plastic like phenolic resins, xylene resins, melamine resin, epoxy resin, alkyd resin and poly urethan resin, new plastic like ionomer and PPS resin, synthetic laminated tape and synthetic wood, mixed materials in plastic, reprocessing of waste plastic, polymer blend, test method for plastic materials and auxiliary materials of plastic.

  18. Significance of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations to Plastic Surgery Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Brian J; Zoghbi, Yasmina; Askari, Morad; Birnbach, David J; Shekhter, Ilya; Thaller, Seth R

    2017-09-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) have proven to be a powerful tool. They possess more than a 30-year track record in assessing the competency of medical students, residents, and fellows. Objective structured clinical examinations have been used successfully in a variety of medical specialties, including surgery. They have recently found their way into the subspecialty of plastic surgery. This article uses a systematic review of the available literature on OSCEs and their recent use in plastic surgery. It incorporates survey results assessing program directors' views on the use of OSCEs. Approximately 40% of programs surveyed use OSCEs to assess the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. We found that 40% use OSCEs to evaluate specific plastic surgery milestones. Objective structured clinical examinations are usually performed annually. They cost anywhere between $100 and more than $1000 per resident. Four milestones giving residents the most difficulties on OSCEs were congenital anomalies, noncancer breast surgery, breast reconstruction, and practice-based learning and improvement. It was determined that challenges with milestones were due to lack of adequate general knowledge and surgical ward patient care, as well as deficits in professionalism and system-based problems. Programs were able to remediate weakness found by OSCEs using a variety of methods. Objective structured clinical examinations offer a unique tool to objectively assess the proficiency of residents in key areas of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. In addition, they can be used to assess the specific milestones that plastic surgery residents must meet. This allows programs to identify and improve identified areas of weakness.

  19. [Erectile complications after radical surgery for penile plastic induration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austoni, E; Mantovani, F; Colombo, F; Canclini, L; Mastromarino, G; Vecchio, D; Fenice, O

    1994-02-01

    The radical surgical option we propose for Peyronie's disease consists in removing the sclero-hyalinotic focus of disease and replacing it by an autologous dermal graft taken from the upper outer thigh area. Between 1981 and 1991, we operated 335 patients with IPP, 152 of whom underwent plaque excision and dermal graft. All could be assessed at two-year follow-up. Two main complications were observed: mild penile flexure due to scar retraction of the graft (35% of cases), and partial erectile deficit with decreased corporal rigidity (17% of cases). The degree of the graft retraction is linked to the individual's histologic response. A mild deviation of the penis can occur some months after surgery and is not a relapse flexure due to disease progression (as it should have evolutive characteristics) but is mere scar retraction and will spontaneously regress. As the patient will date the onset of a postoperative erectile deficit from the time of the operation, it is advisable to assess preoperatively the erectile ability of all patients. Furthermore, an impaired erectile response could result from hypoaesthesia of the glans, post-surgical stress, and fibrosis of the erectile tissue. A retrospective assessment of radical surgery cases involving plaque excision and dermal graft lead us to propose this option where precise indications apply, providing the presence of other alterations of the erectile function are pre-operatively assessed.

  20. Preparation of Plaster Moulage (Cast in Plastic Surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique of making casts using alginate compound for negative and dental stone plaster for positive impressions. With certain modifications a cast could be made of any part of the body and one can make a museum of interesting cases. Casts serve as useful teaching material especially in cleft lip and palate patients to study the effect of surgery on growth and development of the cleft lip-palate-nose complex in relation to the remaining face. It also helps in planning reconstruction in cases of facial defects, recording serial changes in multistage surgery, pre-operative and post-operative comparison as in rhinoplasty, ear reconstruction, hand etc; for comparing results before and after treatment in keloid and hypertrophic scars, fabrication of implants and preparation of prosthesis. In spite of newer modalities like 3-D imaging and stereolithography, the usefulness of this old technique in certain interesting cases can not be denied.

  1. Legal issues of computer imaging in plastic surgery: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, A E; Dagum, P; Koch, R J; Newman, J P

    1997-11-01

    Although plastic surgeons are increasingly incorporating computer imaging techniques into their practices, many fear the possibility of legally binding themselves to achieve surgical results identical to those reflected in computer images. Computer imaging allows surgeons to manipulate digital photographs of patients to project possible surgical outcomes. Some of the many benefits imaging techniques pose include improving doctor-patient communication, facilitating the education and training of residents, and reducing administrative and storage costs. Despite the many advantages computer imaging systems offer, however, surgeons understandably worry that imaging systems expose them to immense legal liability. The possible exploitation of computer imaging by novice surgeons as a marketing tool, coupled with the lack of consensus regarding the treatment of computer images, adds to the concern of surgeons. A careful analysis of the law, however, reveals that surgeons who use computer imaging carefully and conservatively, and adopt a few simple precautions, substantially reduce their vulnerability to legal claims. In particular, surgeons face possible claims of implied contract, failure to instruct, and malpractice from their use or failure to use computer imaging. Nevertheless, legal and practical obstacles frustrate each of those causes of actions. Moreover, surgeons who incorporate a few simple safeguards into their practice may further reduce their legal susceptibility.

  2. Herbal medications and plastic surgery: a hidden danger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arvind; Lahiri, Anindya

    2014-04-01

    Herbal medicine is a multibillion-pound industry, and surveys suggest that ~10% of the UK population uses herbal supplements concurrently with prescription medications. Patients and health care practitioners are often unaware of the adverse side effects of herbal medicines. In addition, because many of these herbal supplements are available over the counter, many patients do not disclose these when listing medications to health care providers. A 39-year-old nurse underwent an abdominoplasty with rectus sheath plication after weight loss surgery. Postoperatively, she experienced persistent drain output, and after discharge, a seroma developed requiring repeated drainage in the clinic. After scar revision 10 months later, the woman bled postoperatively, requiring suturing. Again, a seroma developed, requiring repeated drainage. It was discovered that the patient had been taking a herbal menopause supplement containing ingredients known to have anticoagulant effects. Complementary medicine is rarely taught in UK medical schools and generally not practiced in UK hospitals. Many supplements are known to have anticoagulant, cardiovascular, and sedative effects. Worryingly, questions about herbal medicines are not routinely asked in clinics, and patients do not often volunteer such information. With the number and awareness of complementary medications increasing, their usage among the population is likely to increase. The authors recommend specific questioning about the use of complementary medications and consideration of ceasing such medications before surgery. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  3. The Application of Three-Dimensional Surface Imaging System in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqi; Yang, Xin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system has gained popularity worldwide in clinical application. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, it has the ability to capture 3D images with both shape and texture information. This feature has made it quite useful for plastic surgeons. This review article is mainly focusing on demonstrating the current status and analyzing the future of the application of 3D surface imaging systems in plastic and reconstructive surgery.Currently, 3D surface imaging system is mainly used in plastic and reconstructive surgery to help improve the reliability of surgical planning and assessing surgical outcome objectively. There have already been reports of its using on plastic and reconstructive surgery from head to toe. Studies on facial aging process, online applications development, and so on, have also been done through the use of 3D surface imaging system.Because different types of 3D surface imaging devices have their own advantages and disadvantages, a basic knowledge of their features is required and careful thought should be taken to choose the one that best fits a surgeon's demand.In the future, by integrating with other imaging tools and the 3D printing technology, 3D surface imaging system will play an important role in individualized surgical planning, implants production, meticulous surgical simulation, operative techniques training, and patient education.

  4. The Rise of Technology in Plastic Surgery Education: Is the Textbook Dead on Arrival (DOA)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltzman, Joshua T; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Zins, James E

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic rise in the use of technology. Evaluating our use of technology is crucial to advancing the next generation of plastic surgeons. The goals of this study were to assess the current use of technology by residents, help Program Directors allocate financial resources, and predict the future of technology and education. A 17-question online survey was emailed to American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery resident/fellow members (n = 447). The survey evaluated current use of technology, preferred use of educational resources, and directions for the future. Ample space was allocated for free response questions. The response rate was 40%. The average age of respondents was 32 years old (standard deviation 3.7). The majority (86.5%) of residents own iPhones, and 90% of residents own tablets. There was a heavy daily reliance on smartphone technology. Sixty percent of residents used physical textbooks on a weekly basis. The Plastic Surgery Education Network was used on a weekly basis by 42% of residents. In contrast, 78% of residents were not aware of, or had never used, the readily available digital aesthetic resource (RADAR) Resource iPad application. In order to remain at the forefront of education, we as a specialty need to adapt with technology. Program Directors should support integrating technology with electronic access to educational materials. There exists an opportunity in resident education to increase awareness and utilization of the RADAR Resource. The future of plastic surgery education will be reliant on platforms like the iPhone and iPad to conveniently provide large volumes of information with only a finger touch. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Disclosure of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Edward A; Jackman, Carye A

    2017-09-01

    Recent articles in the scientific literature have expressed concerns about financial conflicts of interest in the profession of medicine in general and the specialty of plastic surgery in particular. Disclosure of financial ties to industry has been regarded as an address of a possible bias. The policies of medical journals places responsibility on authors for self-reporting of financial conflicts of interest, yet underreporting of conflicts of interest has occurred. The investigative hypothesis was that authors in the plastic surgery literature, in particular, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, underreported financial conflicts of interest. A review of articles published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery from July of 2015 through April of 2016 for author disclosures was accomplished. The disclosure statements were compared to the information available in the Open Payments database for 2015. The lack of disclosure on the part of an author, when present, was individually examined for relevance of the corporate conflicts of interest to the subject matter of the involved article. A total of 302 articles authored by 1262 individuals were reviewed. One hundred thirty-nine (45.5 percent) had neither a disclosed nor an actual conflict of interest. In 61 articles (20.2 percent), one or more authors disclosed; 105 articles (34.8 percent) did not provide disclosure of a financial conflict of interest. In assessment of relevance, 10 undisclosed conflicts of interest (9.5 percent) were determined relevant, and one-third of that total were non-plastic surgeons. Nondisclosure of financial conflicts of interest is common, but only a small minority pose a potential for harm from bias.

  6. State of the Plastic Surgery Workforce and the Impact of Graduate Medical Education Reform on Training of Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Lindsay; Lanier, Steven T; Evans, Gregory R D; Kasten, Steven J; Hume, Keith M; Gosain, Arun K

    2017-08-01

    Although recent estimates predict a large impending shortage of plastic surgeons, graduate medical education funding through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services remains capped by the 1997 Balanced Budget Act. The authors' aim was to develop a plan to stimulate legislative action. The authors reviewed responses of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association from January of 2015 to a House Energy & Commerce Committee request for input on graduate medical education funding. In addition, all program directors in plastic surgery were surveyed through the American Council of Academic Plastic Surgeons to determine their graduate medical education funding sources. All three organizations agree that current graduate medical education funding is inadequate to meet workforce needs, and this has a significant impact on specialty selection and distribution for residency training. All agreed that funding should be tied to the resident rather than to the institution, but disagreed on whether funds should be divided between direct (allocated to residency training) and indirect (allocated to patient care) pools, as is currently practiced. Program directors' survey responses indicated that only 38 percent of graduate medical education funds comes from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Organized medicine is at risk of losing critically needed graduate medical education funding. Specific legislation to support additional graduate medical education positions and funding (House Resolutions 1180 and 4282) has been proposed but has not been universally endorsed, in part because of a lack of collaboration in organized medicine. Collaboration among major organizations can reinvigorate these measures and implement real change in funding.

  7. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  8. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Surgeon Diagnostic Accuracy in Facial Plastic and Oculoplastic Surgery Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Andrew W; Ishii, Lisa; Joseph, Shannon S; Smith, Jane I; Su, Peiyi; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick; Boahene, Kofi; Papel, Ira; Kontis, Theda; Douglas, Raymond; Nelson, Christine C; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relative contraindication for facial plastic surgery, but formal screening is not common in practice. The prevalence of BDD in patients seeking facial plastic surgery is not well documented. To establish the prevalence of BDD across facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practice settings, and estimate the ability of surgeons to screen for BDD. This multicenter prospective study recruited a cohort of 597 patients who presented to academic and private facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practices from March 2015 to February 2016. All patients were screened for BDD using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ). After each clinical encounter, surgeons independently evaluated the likelihood that a participating patient had BDD. Validated instruments were used to assess satisfaction with facial appearance including the FACE-Q, Blepharoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (BOE), Facelift Outcomes Evaluation (FOE), Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE), and Skin Rejuvenation Outcomes Evaluation (SROE). Across participating practices (9 surgeons, 3 sites), a total of 597 patients were screened for BDD: 342 patients from site 1 (mean [SD] age, 44.2 [16.5] years); 158 patients, site 2 (mean [SD] age, 46.0 [16.2] years), site 3, 97 patients (mean [SD] age, 56.3 [15.5] years). Overall, 58 patients [9.7%] screened positive for BDD by the BDDQ instrument, while only 16 of 402 patients [4.0%] were clinically suspected of BDD by surgeons. A higher percentage of patients presenting for cosmetic surgery (37 of 283 patients [13.1%]) compared with those presenting for reconstructive surgery (21 of 314 patients [6.7%]) screened positive on the BDDQ (odds ratio, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.20-3.68; P = .01). Surgeons were only able to correctly identify 2 of 43 patients (4.7%) who screened positive for BDD on the BDDQ, and the positive likelihood ratio was only 1.19 (95% CI, 0.28-5.07). Patients screening positive for BDD by the BDDQ had lower

  9. The Irish contribution to the plastic surgery literature: 21 years of publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, G; Joyce, C W; Jones, D M; Kelly, J L; Hussey, A J; Regan, P J

    2015-09-01

    The Republic of Ireland has always had an influence on medicine and has produced many renowned doctors who have helped shape its history. Furthermore, many clinical articles that have originated from Ireland have changed clinical practice throughout the world. The Irish have also had an impact on the plastic surgery literature yet it has never specifically been analyzed before. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze all papers that have originated from the plastic surgery units in the Republic of Ireland in the medical literature over the past 21 years. Twenty-four well-known plastic surgery, hand surgery and burns journals were selected for this study. By utilizing Scopus, the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature, we analyzed each of our chosen 24 journals looking for Irish publications. Each paper was examined for article type, authorship, year of publication, institution of origin and level of evidence. Papers from the Republic of Ireland were published in 20 of the 24 journals over the past 21 years. A total of 245 articles from Ireland were published in the plastic surgery, hand surgery and burns literature over the 21-year period. Of these, 111 were original articles and 73 were case reports. The institution that published the most papers over the past 21 years was University Hospital Galway (66 publications) followed by Cork University Hospital with 54 papers. The journal with the most Irish articles was the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery with 56 papers. 2014 was the year with the most publications (28 papers). Authorship numbers also increased over time as the average number of authors in 1994 was 3.5, whereas it was 5.54 in 2014. The number of publications per year continues to increase along with authorship numbers. This mirrors the trend in other specialties. Publications are now no longer required for selection on to a higher surgical training scheme. There is now a fear that the

  10. Aesthetic Breast Surgery and Concomitant Procedures: Incidence and Risk Factors for Major Complications in 73,608 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Yeslev, Max; Winocour, Julian; Bamba, Ravinder; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-05-01

    Major complications following aesthetic breast surgery are uncommon and thus assessment of risk factors is challenging. To determine the incidence and risk factors of major complications following aesthetic breast surgery and concomitant procedures. A prospective cohort of patients who enrolled into the CosmetAssure (Birmingham, AL) insurance program and underwent aesthetic breast surgery between 2008 and 2013 was identified. Major complications (requiring reoperation, readmission, or emergency room visit) within 30 days of surgery were recorded. Risk factors including age, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, type of surgical facility, and combined procedures were evaluated. Among women, augmentation was the most common breast procedure (n = 41,651, 58.6%) followed by augmentation-mastopexy, mastopexy, and reduction. Overall, major complications occurred in 1.46% with hematoma (0.99%) and infection (0.25%) being most common. Augmentation-mastopexy had a higher risk of complications, particularly infection (relative risk [RR] 1.74, P procedures. Age was the only significant predictor for hematomas (RR 1.01, P procedures or abdominoplasty performed alone. Among men, correction of gynecomastia was the most common breast procedure (n = 1613, 64.6%) with a complication rate of 1.80% and smoking as a risk factor (RR 2.73, P = 0.03). Incidence of major complications after breast cosmetic surgical procedures is low. Risk factors for major complications include increasing age and BMI. Combining abdominoplasty with any breast procedure increases the risk of major complications. 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. A funding model for a psychological service to plastic and reconstructive surgery in UK practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A; Lester, K J; Withey, S J; Butler, P E M

    2005-07-01

    Appearance related distress in both clinical and general populations is associated with the increasing identification of surgery as a solution, leading to referrals for cosmetic surgery and pressure on NHS resources. Cosmetic surgery guidelines are designed to control this growing demand, but lack a sound evidence base. Where exceptions are provided on the basis of psychological need, this may recruit patients inappropriately into a surgical pathway, and creates a demand for psychological assessment which transfers the resource problem from one service to another. The model described below evaluates the impact of a designated psychology service to a plastic surgery unit. Developing an operational framework for delivering cosmetic guidelines, which assesses patients using clearly defined and measurable outcomes, has significantly reduced numbers of patients proceeding to the NHS waiting list and provided a systematic audit process. The associated cost savings have provided a way of funding a psychologist within the plastic surgery service so that psychological assessment becomes routine, alternative methods of treatment are easily available and all patients have access to psychological input as part of the routine standard of care.

  12. Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, S; Florescu, IP; Jecan, C

    2010-01-01

    Pressure sores–a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery Pressure sores can be defined as lesions caused by unrelieved pressure resulting in damage of the underlying tissue. They represent a common problem in the pathology of plegic patients and, plastic surgery has a significant role in their treatment. Pressure sores occur over bony prominences and so, they are most commonly seen at the sacrum and trochanters in paralyzed patients and at ischium for the patients who sit in a wheelchair for a long time. For these patients, surgical treatment is very important because on one hand, it stops the loss of nutrients and proteins at the site of the pressure sore, and on the other hand, it permits the initiation of neuromuscular recuperation treatment much faster. PMID:20968200

  13. A core undergraduate curriculum in plastic surgery - a Delphi consensus study in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeland, Stian K; Lindford, Andrew; Berg, Jais Oliver

    2017-01-01

    .00 on a 1-4 Likert scale. Final agreement in the third round resulted in a list of 68 competences with agreement above 80% (31 skills and 37 knowledge items). CONCLUSIONS: This study proposes the first scientifically developed undergraduate core curriculum in plastic surgery. It comprises of a consensus......, there appears to be a need to define the core competences that are to be taught. The aim of this study was to establish a Scandinavian core undergraduate curriculum of competences in plastic surgery, using scientific methods. METHODS: The Delphi technique for group consensus was employed. An expert panel...... of anonymous questionnaires; a final core curriculum competency list was agreed upon based on a consensus agreement level of 80%. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-five competences were suggested in the first round. In the second round, 76 competences (33 skills and 43 knowledge items) received a score ≥3...

  14. Conversion of Plastic Surgery meeting abstract presentations to full manuscripts: a brazilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Pinho, André Silveira; Samartine, Hugo; Denadai, Rodrigo; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    to assess the conversion rate of Plastic Surgery meeting abstract presentations to full manuscript publications and examine factors associated with this conversion. we assessed the abstracts presented at the 47th and 48th Brazilian Congresses of Plastic Surgery by cross-referencing with multiple databases. We analyzed the Abstracts' characteristics associated with full manuscript publications. of the 200 abstracts presented, 50 abstracts were subsequently published in full, giving the conference a conversion rate of 25%. The mean time to publish was 15.00±13.75 months. In total, there were 4.93±1.63 authors per abstract and 67.8±163 subjects per abstract; 43.5% of the abstracts were of retrospective studies; 69% comprised the plastic surgery topics head and neck, and chest and trunk, and 88.5% had no statistical analysis. Overall, 80% of the manuscripts were published in plastic surgery journals, 76% had no impact factor and 52% had no citations. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed the presence of statistical analysis to be the most significant (previstas de Cirurgia Plástica, 76% não exibiam fator de impacto e 52% não possuíam citações. As análises bivariada e multivariada revelaram que a presença de análise estatística foi o fator preditivo significativo (p<0,05) para a conversão de resumos em manuscritos completos. a taxa de conversão deste estudo bibliométrico foi inferior à tendência de conversão descrita em congressos internacionais de Cirurgia Plástica, e a presença de análise estatística foi um determinante para o sucesso de conversão.

  15. Plastic surgery in the undergraduate curriculum: the importance of considering students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Andrew; Chiu, Tor; McNaught, Carmel

    2004-12-01

    As the undergraduate medical curriculum becomes increasingly crowded the competition for time inevitably increases and surgical specialties have decreasing representation. Plastic surgery is regarded with some confusion in terms of its relevance to the generic doctor. Plastic surgeons have no doubt about the relevance of the specialty to undergraduates. Others see this as a very technical specialty dealing with complex reconstructions and surgical interventions or, as a rather indulgent specialty focusing mainly on glamour and cosmesis. This study focuses on students' perceptions of an undergraduate teaching program in plastic surgery. The reality is that highly pressured undergraduates do not have the luxury of time to consider the finer details of the specialties to which they are exposed. Their priority is to pass their examinations and, having addressed that concern, further information becomes an acceptable bonus. The conclusion is that if plastic surgeons are going to gain greater involvement in the undergraduate curriculum they must start with involvement in examinations and assessments. The students will then ensure that adequate and appropriate teaching time is allocated.

  16. Validity, Reliability, and the Questionable Role of Psychometrics in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary: This report examines the meaning of validity and reliability and the role of psychometrics in plastic surgery. Study titles increasingly include the word “valid” to support the authors’ claims. Studies by other investigators may be labeled “not validated.” Validity simply refers to the ability of a device to measure what it intends to measure. Validity is not an intrinsic test property. It is a relative term most credibly assigned by the independent user. Similarly, the word “reliable” is subject to interpretation. In psychometrics, its meaning is synonymous with “reproducible.” The definitions of valid and reliable are analogous to accuracy and precision. Reliability (both the reliability of the data and the consistency of measurements) is a prerequisite for validity. Outcome measures in plastic surgery are intended to be surveys, not tests. The role of psychometric modeling in plastic surgery is unclear, and this discipline introduces difficult jargon that can discourage investigators. Standard statistical tests suffice. The unambiguous term “reproducible” is preferred when discussing data consistency. Study design and methodology are essential considerations when assessing a study’s validity. PMID:25289354

  17. Validity, Reliability, and the Questionable Role of Psychometrics in Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Swanson, MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This report examines the meaning of validity and reliability and the role of psychometrics in plastic surgery. Study titles increasingly include the word “valid” to support the authors’ claims. Studies by other investigators may be labeled “not validated.” Validity simply refers to the ability of a device to measure what it intends to measure. Validity is not an intrinsic test property. It is a relative term most credibly assigned by the independent user. Similarly, the word “reliable” is subject to interpretation. In psychometrics, its meaning is synonymous with “reproducible.” The definitions of valid and reliable are analogous to accuracy and precision. Reliability (both the reliability of the data and the consistency of measurements is a prerequisite for validity. Outcome measures in plastic surgery are intended to be surveys, not tests. The role of psychometric modeling in plastic surgery is unclear, and this discipline introduces difficult jargon that can discourage investigators. Standard statistical tests suffice. The unambiguous term “reproducible” is preferred when discussing data consistency. Study design and methodology are essential considerations when assessing a study’s validity.

  18. Big Data and Machine Learning in Plastic Surgery: A New Frontier in Surgical Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Jonathan; Corban, Jason; Gaster, Richard; Kanevsky, Ari; Lin, Samuel; Gilardino, Mirko

    2016-05-01

    Medical decision-making is increasingly based on quantifiable data. From the moment patients come into contact with the health care system, their entire medical history is recorded electronically. Whether a patient is in the operating room or on the hospital ward, technological advancement has facilitated the expedient and reliable measurement of clinically relevant health metrics, all in an effort to guide care and ensure the best possible clinical outcomes. However, as the volume and complexity of biomedical data grow, it becomes challenging to effectively process "big data" using conventional techniques. Physicians and scientists must be prepared to look beyond classic methods of data processing to extract clinically relevant information. The purpose of this article is to introduce the modern plastic surgeon to machine learning and computational interpretation of large data sets. What is machine learning? Machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence, can address clinically relevant problems in several domains of plastic surgery, including burn surgery; microsurgery; and craniofacial, peripheral nerve, and aesthetic surgery. This article provides a brief introduction to current research and suggests future projects that will allow plastic surgeons to explore this new frontier of surgical science.

  19. New Refractive Surgery Procedures and Their Implications for Aviation Safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakagawara, Van B; Wood, Kathryn J; Montgomery, Ron W

    2006-01-01

    ...., myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism) with corrective surgery. Prior Federal Aviation Administration research studies have shown that the number of civil airmen with refractive surgery continues to increase...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and receptacles...

  1. Plastic freezer bags: a cost-effective method to protect extraction sites in laparoscopic colorectal procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hai P; Musselman, Reilly P; Trottier, Daniel C; Soto, Claudia M; Poulin, Eric C; Mamazza, Joseph; Boushey, Robin P; Auer, Rebecca C; Moloo, Husein

    2013-10-01

    To review surgical-site infection (SSI) and retrieval-site tumor recurrence rates in laparoscopic colorectal procedures when using a plastic freezer bag as a wound protector. Laparoscopic colorectal procedures where a plastic freezer bag used as a wound protector at the extraction site were reviewed between 1991 and 2008 from a prospectively collected database. χ test was used to compare SSI and tumor recurrence rates between groups. Costing data were obtained from the operating room supplies department. A total of 936 cases with 51 (5.45%) surgical-site infections were identified. SSI rates did not differ when comparing groups based on demographic factors, diagnosis, or location of procedure. Retrieval-site tumor recurrence rate was 0.21% (1/474). Cost of plastic freezer bags including sterilization ranged from $0.25 to $3. Plastic freezer bags as wound protectors in laparoscopic colorectal procedures are cost effective and have SSI and retrieval-site tumor recurrence rates that compare favorably to published data.

  2. Surgery planning and navigation by laser lithography plastic replica. Features, clinical applications, and advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuuko; Furuhata, Kentaro

    1995-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional replicas created using laserlithography has recently become popular for surgical planning and intraoperative navigation in plastic surgery and oral maxillofacial surgery. In this study, we investigated many clinical applications that we have been involved in regarding the production of three-dimensional replicas. We have also analyzed the features, application classes, and advantages of this method. As a result, clinical applications are categorized into three classes, which are 'three-dimensional shape recognition', 'simulated surgery', and 'template'. The distinct features of three-dimensional replicas are 'direct recognition', 'fast manipulation', and 'free availability'. Meeting the requirements of surgical planning and intraoperative navigation, they have produced satisfactory results in clinical applications. (author)

  3. Esthetic plastic surgery: Experiencies concerning corporal (reconstructions and implications for nursin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Fernanda Voese

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify reasons which lead healthy subjects to search, for the first time, surgical methods for corporal modifications. Methods: it is a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews which were recorded. The interviews were made with eight women and resulted into four analytic categories. Results: the reasons which took healthy subjects to face surgical risks are regarding the improvement of the satisfaction with their own corporal image aiming at reaching a higher social insertion. It was observed that dissatisfaction concerning physical appearance was generated by inherited characteristics or by marks left after pregnancy. Financial cost, fear and family support, can make the decision to undergo the surgery difficult. Conclusion: the plastic surgery can promote the regain of self-esteem in the subject who makes the surgery.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of skin care protocols for facial resurfacing: lessons learned from the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation's Skin Products Assessment Research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannucci, Christopher J; Reavey, Patrick L; Kaweski, Susan; Hamill, Jennifer B; Hume, Keith M; Wilkins, Edwin G; Pusic, Andrea L

    2011-03-01

    The Skin Products Assessment Research Committee was created by the Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation in 2006. The Skin Products Assessment Research study aims were to (1) develop an infrastructure for Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation-conducted, industry-sponsored research in facial aesthetic surgery and (2) test the research process by comparing outcomes of the Obagi Nu-Derm System versus conventional therapy as treatment adjuncts for facial resurfacing procedures. The Skin Products Assessment Research study was designed as a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. The study was conducted in women with Fitzpatrick type I to IV skin, moderate to severe facial photodamage, and periocular and/or perioral fine wrinkles. Patients underwent chemical peel or laser facial resurfacing and were randomized to the Obagi Nu-Derm System or a standard care regimen. The study endpoints were time to reepithelialization, erythema, and pigmentation changes. Fifty-six women were enrolled and 82 percent were followed beyond reepithelialization. There were no significant differences in mean time to reepithelialization between Obagi Nu-Derm System and control groups. The Obagi Nu-Derm System group had a significantly higher median erythema score on the day of surgery (after 4 weeks of product use) that did not persist after surgery. Test-retest photographic evaluations demonstrated that both interrater and intrarater reliability were adequate for primary study outcomes. The authors demonstrated no significant difference in time to reepithelialization between patients who used the Obagi Nu-Derm System or a standard care regimen as an adjunct to facial resurfacing procedures. The Skin Products Assessment Research team has also provided a discussion of future challenges for Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation-sponsored clinical research for readers of this article.

  5. Use of aesthetic rhinoplasty procedures in reconstructive nasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Alireza; Rübben, Albert; Bohluli, Behnam; Hölzle, Frank; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz

    2015-01-01

    Resection of cancer often involves the excision of underlying hard tissue, and some procedures in aesthetic rhinoplasty can be used in reconstructive nasal surgery to increase the margin of safety while still achieving an acceptable aesthetic and functional outcome. We have used techniques from aesthetic rhinoplasty to shape the nasal framework. Osteotomy and formation of the tip were used in 17 patients with defects (ranging from 1 to 3.5 cm in size) from the nasal root to the tip of the nose. After the underlying bony or cartilaginous framework, or both, had been removed, the resulting open roof deformity had to be corrected by osteotomy of the bony nasal wall and the tip shaped by excision and suturing, including insertion of the tip graft and columellar strut graft. After this, and narrowing of the nose, the defect was smaller and could be closed with local tissue without tension. There were no deformities in the contour, and patency of the airway was maintained. Patients were satisfied with both the aesthetic and functional results. Although the margin of safety was increased, shaping the nasal framework reduced the size of the defect, which allowed tension-free closure with a local flap. The operation requires a thorough knowledge of procedures used in aesthetic rhinoplasty. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MIST VR. A laparoscopic surgery procedures trainer and evaluator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, C; McCloy, R; Middlebrook, A; Chater, P; Wilson, M; Stone, R

    1997-01-01

    The key bimanual instrument tasks involved in laparoscopic surgery have been abstracted for use in a virtual reality surgical skills evaluator and trainer. The trainer uses two laparoscopic instruments mounted on a frame with position sensors which provide instrument movement data that is translated into interactive real time graphics on a PC (P133, 16 Mb RAM, graphics acceleration card). An accurately scaled operating volume of 10 cm3 is represented by a 3D cube on the computer screen. "Camera" position and size of target objects can be varied for different skill levels. Targets appear randomly within the operating volume according to the skill task and can be grasped and manipulated with the instruments. Accuracy and errors during the tasks and time to completion are logged. Mist VR has tutorial, training, examination, analysis and configuration modes. Six tasks have been selected and include combinations of instrument approach, target acquisition, target manipulation and placement, transfer between instruments, target contact with optional diathermy, and controlled instrument withdrawal/replacement. Tasks can be configured for varying degrees of difficulty and the configurations saved to a library for reuse. Specific task configurations can be assigned to individual students. In the examination mode the supervisor can select the tasks, repetitions and order and save to a specific file for that trainee. Progress can be assessed and there is the option for playback of the training session or examination. Data analyses permit overall, including task, and right or left hand performances to be quantified. Mist VR represents a significant advance over the subjective assessment of training performances with existing "plastic box" basic trainers.

  7. Gender Inequality for Women in Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Alexandra; Kamali, Parisa; Phillips, Nicole; Mathijssen, Irene; Rakhorst, Hinne; Lin, Samuel J; Furnas, Heather

    2018-06-01

    Previous research has highlighted the gender-based disparities present throughout the field of surgery. This study aims to evaluate the breadth of the issues facing women in plastic surgery, worldwide. A systematic scoping review was undertaken from October of 2016 to January of 2017, with no restrictions on date or language. A narrative synthesis of the literature according to themed issues was developed, together with a summary of relevant numeric data. From the 2247 articles identified, 55 articles were included in the analysis. The majority of articles were published from the United States. Eight themes were identified, as follows: (1) workforce figures; (2) gender bias and discrimination; (3) leadership and academia; (4) mentorship and role models; (5) pregnancy, parenting, and childcare; (6) relationships, work-life balance, and professional satisfaction; (7) patient/public preference; and (8) retirement and financial planning. Despite improvement in numbers over time, women plastic surgeons continue to be underrepresented in the United States, Canada, and Europe, with prevalence ranging from 14 to 25.7 percent. Academic plastic surgeons are less frequently female than male, and women academic plastic surgeons score less favorably when outcomes of academic success are evaluated. Finally, there has been a shift away from overt discrimination toward a more ingrained, implicit bias, and most published cases of bias and discrimination are in association with pregnancy. The first step toward addressing the issues facing women plastic surgeons is recognition and articulation of the issues. Further research may focus on analyzing geographic variation in the issues and developing appropriate interventions.

  8. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mainly volumetric reduction to significant emphasis on both ... Surgical landmarks that ensured reproducible aesthetic outcomes were described by Penn (1955) and Wise (1956). ... gigantomastia in 1561 and later on Briton William Durston.

  9. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occurs in lower limb injuries, makes the risk of failure very high.3–5 Limb .... prolonged strike, which meant that most of the hospital staff ... limitation to the knee. He was .... of soft tissue defects of the heel with local fasciocutaneous flaps.

  10. Procedure to predict the storey where plastic drift dominates in two-storey building under strong ground motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hibino, Y.; Ichinose, T.; Costa, J.L.D.

    2009-01-01

    A procedure is presented to predict the storey where plastic drift dominates in two-storey buildings under strong ground motion. The procedure utilizes the yield strength and the mass of each storey as well as the peak ground acceleration. The procedure is based on two different assumptions: (1....... The efficiency of the procedure is verified by dynamic response analyses using elasto-plastic model....

  11. Exeretic surgery in complicated peptic ulcer: An inopportune procedure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armas Perez, Barbaro; Reyes Balseiro, Evelio; Garcia Rodriguez, Miguel; Armas Moredo, Karina

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of present study was to analyze the surgical treatment results in the complicated duodenal or gastric chronic peptic ulcer over 15 years. METHODS: A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in patients presenting with complicated peptic ulcer by exeresis. Patients (n=45) were seen by some of us in the ''Amalia Simoni'' Clinical Surgical of Camaguey province from January, 1989 to December, 2004. RESULTS: Disease was more frequent in male sex (82,22%) and in ages from 36 to 50 years (46,67%). The 95,56% of patients treated suffered from duodenal ulcer and the main criterion for surgery was its unmanageable condition (62,22%). Endoscopy was very useful for diagnosis of this entity. All operated on underwent vagotomy with antrectomy; in the 68,89% we performed a Billroth's II anastomosis and in remainder (31,11% it was of Billroth I type. There was a similar figure of early complications related to techniques used and among them prevails the anastomosis bleeding and delay evacuation. There were more late complications in type Billroth II anastomosis than in the Billroth I. Surgical results were excellent and very good in the 89% of cases. The enterocolitis variant has the great percentage of non-satisfactory results (9,09%). Only two patients had poor results, although there wasn't operative mortality. CONCLUSIONS: This kind of surgery is indicated only in cases of complicated peptic ulcer. It is not the choice method in ulcer patients, but in its use it is necessary to know about different techniques and its use. Thus, we must to know a lot about this procedure. (author)

  12. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... dermatology. (a) Identification. (1) A carbon dioxide laser for use in general surgery and in dermatology is a...) An argon laser for use in dermatology is a laser device intended to destroy or coagulate tissue by...

  13. A monitoring tool for performance improvement in plastic surgery at the individual level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Duclos, Antoine; Orgill, Dennis; Carty, Matthew J

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of performance in surgery is expanding significantly. Application of relevant frameworks to plastic surgery, however, has been limited. In this article, the authors present two robust graphic tools commonly used in other industries that may serve to monitor individual surgeon operative time while factoring in patient- and surgeon-specific elements. The authors reviewed performance data from all bilateral reduction mammaplasties performed at their institution by eight surgeons between 1995 and 2010. Operative time was used as a proxy for performance. Cumulative sum charts and exponentially weighted moving average charts were generated using a train-test analytic approach, and used to monitor surgical performance. Charts mapped crude, patient case-mix-adjusted, and case-mix and surgical-experience-adjusted performance. Operative time was found to decline from 182 minutes to 118 minutes with surgical experience (p factors is essential for correct interpretation of performance in plastic surgery at the individual surgeon level. Cumulative sum and exponentially weighted moving average charts represent accurate methods of monitoring operative time to control and potentially improve surgeon performance over the course of a career.

  14. Trends in Orbital Decompression Techniques of Surveyed American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Shani S; Null, Robert C; Timoney, Peter J; Sokol, Jason A

    To assess current members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) regarding preference in surgical techniques for orbital decompression in Graves' disease. A 10-question web-based, anonymous survey was distributed to oculoplastic surgeons utilizing the ASOPRS listserv. The questions addressed the number of years of experience performing orbital decompression surgery, preferred surgical techniques, and whether orbital decompression was performed in collaboration with an ENT surgeon. Ninety ASOPRS members participated in the study. Most that completed the survey have performed orbital decompression surgery for >15 years. The majority of responders preferred a combined approach of floor and medial wall decompression or balanced lateral and medial wall decompression; only a minority selected a technique limited to 1 wall. Those surgeons who perform fat decompression were more likely to operate in collaboration with ENT. Most surgeons rarely remove the orbital strut, citing risk of worsening diplopia or orbital dystopia except in cases of optic nerve compression or severe proptosis. The most common reason given for performing orbital decompression was exposure keratopathy. The majority of surgeons perform the surgery without ENT involvement, and number of years of experience did not correlate significantly with collaboration with ENT. The majority of surveyed ASOPRS surgeons prefer a combined wall approach over single wall approach to initial orbital decompression. Despite the technological advances made in the field of modern endoscopic surgery, no single approach has been adopted by the ASOPRS community as the gold standard.

  15. [Systematic analysis of the readability of patient information on the websites of clinics for plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, B Janghorban; Faron, A; Roth, K S; Schaller, H-E; Medved, F; Lüers, J-C

    2014-12-01

    The Internet is becoming increasing-ly important as a source of information for patients in medical issues. However, many patients have problems to adequately understand texts, especially with medical content. A basic requirement to understand a written text is the read-ability of a text. The aim of the present study was to examine texts on the websites of German -plastic-surgical hospitals with patient information regarding their readability. In this study, the read-ability of texts of 27 major departments of plastic and Hand surgery in Germany was systematically analysed using 5 recognised readability indices. First, texts were searched based on 20 representative key words and themes. Thereafter, texts were assigned to one of 3 major themes in order to enable statistical analysis. In addition to the 5 readability indices, further objective text parameters were also recorded. Overall, 288 texts were found for analyzation. Most articles were found on the topic of "handsurgery" (n=124), less were found for "facial plastic surgery" (n=80) and "flaps, breast and reconstructive surgery" (n=84). Consistently, all readability indices showed a poor readability for the vast majority of analysed texts with the text appearing readable only for readers with a higher educational level. No significant differences in readability were found between the 3 major themes. Especially in the communication of medical information, it is important to consider the knowledge and education of the addressee. The texts studied consistently showed a readability that is understandable only for academics. Thus, a large part of the intended target group is probably not reached. In order to adequately deliver online information material, a revision of the analysed internet texts appears to be recommendable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Experience of plastic surgery registrars in a European Working Time Directive compliant rota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blacam, Catherine; Tierney, Sean; Shelley, Odhran

    2017-08-01

    Surgical training requires exposure to clinical decision-making and operative experience in a supervised environment. It is recognised that learning ability is compromised when fatigued. The European Working Time Directive requires a decrease in working hours, but compliance reduces trainees' clinical exposure, which has profound implications for plastic surgery training. The aim of this study was to evaluate plastic surgery registrars' experience of an EWTD-compliant rota, and to examine its impact on patient care, education, and logbook activity. An electronic survey was distributed to plastic surgery registrars in a university teaching hospital. Registrars were asked to rate 31 items on a five-point Likert scale, including statements on patient care, clinical and operative duties, training, and quality-of-life. Interquartile deviations explored consensus among responses. Operative caseload was objectively evaluated using eLogbook data to compare activity at equal time points before and after implementation of the EWTD rota. Highest levels of consensus among respondents were found in positive statements addressing alertness and preparation for theatre, as well as time to read and study for exams. Registrars agreed that EWTD compliance improved their quality-of-life. However, it was felt that continuity of patient care was compromised by work hours restriction. Registrars were concerned about their operative experience. eLogbook data confirmed a fall-off in mean caseload of 31.8% compared to activity prior to EWTD rota implementation. While EWTD compliant rotas promote trainee quality-of-life and satisfaction with training, attention needs to be paid to optimising operative opportunities.

  17. Away Rotations and Matching in Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency: Applicant and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Brower, Jonathan P; Lifchez, Scott D; Janis, Jeffrey E; Liu, Paul Y

    2016-04-01

    Although nearly all medical students pursuing integrated plastic surgery residency participate in elective rotations away from their home medical school, the value and costs of these "away" rotations have not been well studied. The authors surveyed all integrated plastic surgery program directors and all applicants in the 2015 National Residency Matching Program. Forty-two program directors and 149 applicants (64 percent and 70 percent response rate, respectively) completed the survey. Applicants reported 13.7 weeks spent on plastic surgery rotations during medical school, including a mean of 9.2 weeks on away rotations. Average reported cost for away rotations was $3591 per applicant. Both applicants and program directors most commonly reported "making a good impression" (44.6 percent and 36.6 percent, respectively) or finding a "good-fit" program (27.7 percent and 48.8 percent, respectively) as the primary goal for away rotations. Almost all applicants (91.1 percent) believed an away rotation made them more competitive for matching to a program at which they rotated. Program directors ranked a strong away rotation performance as the most important residency selection criterion. Twenty-seven percent of postgraduate year-1 positions were filled by an away rotatorm and an additional 17 percent were filled by a home medical student. Away rotations appear to be mutually beneficial for applicants and programs in helping to establish a good fit between students and training programs through an extended interaction with the students, residents, and faculty. In addition, making a good impression on a senior elective rotation (home or away) may improve an applicant's chance of matching to a residency program.

  18. Plastic Surgery Inclusion in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum: Perception, Challenges, and Career Choice—A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The undergraduate medical curriculum has been overcrowded with core learning outcomes with no formal exposure to plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to compare medical students from two educational settings for the basic understanding, preferred learning method, and factors influencing a career choice in plastic surgery. Design and Setting. A prospective cohort study based on a web-based anonymous questionnaire sent to final year medical students at Birmingham University (United Kingdom, McGill University (Canada, and a control group (non-medical staff. The questions were about plastic surgery: (1 source of information and basic understanding; (2 undergraduate curriculum inclusion and preferred learning methods; (3 factors influencing a career choice. A similar questionnaire was sent to non-medical staff (control group. The data was analysed based on categorical outcomes (Chi-square χ2 and level of significance p≤0.05. Results. Questionnaire was analysed for 243 students (Birmingham, n=171/332, 52% (McGill n=72/132, 54%. Birmingham students (14% considered the word “plastic” synonymous with “cosmetic” more than McGill students (4%, p<0.025. Teaching was the main source of knowledge for McGill students (39%, p<0.001 while Birmingham students and control group chose the media (70%, p<0.001. McGill students (67% more than Birmingham (49%, p<0.010 considered curriculum inclusion. The preferred learning method was lectures for McGill students (61%, p<0.01 but an optional module for Birmingham (61%. A similar proportion (18% from both student groups considered a career in plastic surgery. Conclusions. Medical students recognised the need for plastic surgery inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. There was a difference for plastic surgery source of information, operations, and preferred method of learning for students. The study highlighted the urgent need to reform plastic surgery undergraduate teaching in

  19. What Effect Does Self-Citation Have on Bibliometric Measures in Academic Plastic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Edward W; Miller, Devin T; Susarla, Srinivas M; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver M; May, James W; Redett, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Research productivity plays a significant role in academic promotions. Currently, various bibliometric measures utilizing citation counts are used to judge an author's work. With increasing numbers of journals, numbers of open access publications, ease of online submission, and expedited indexing of accepted manuscripts, it is plausible that an author could influence his/her own bibliometric measures through self-citation. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of self-citation in academic plastic surgery. A cohort of full-time academic plastic surgeons was identified from 9 U.S. plastic surgery training programs. For all included faculty, academic rank was retrieved from department/division websites, and bibliometric measures were assessed using a subscription bibliographic citation database (Scopus, Reed Elsevier, London, UK). Bibliometric measures included the Hirsch index (h-index, the number of publications h which are cited ≥ h times), total number of publications, and total number of citations. The h-index and total number of citations were collected with and without self-citations. Percent changes in the h-index and total citations were calculated after removal of self-citations and compared across academic ranks and levels of research productivity (total publications, h-index, and total citations). The study cohort consisted of 169 full-time academic plastic surgeons. The h-index and total citations experienced decreases of 2.8 ± 5.0% (P citation. More than half of the cohort (n = 113, 67%) did not experience a change in the h-index after removal of self-citations. These decreases did not vary across academic rank. Surgeons who self-cited at rates greater than 5% were 9.8 times more likely (95% confidence interval, 4.5-21.9; P citation (after adjusting for academic rank). There were weak correlations between percent decreases in the h-index and total citations and various biblimoteric measures (total publications, h-index, total citations

  20. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to m...

  1. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Choi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  2. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models. PMID:26015880

  3. Microsurgery: the top 50 classic papers in plastic surgery: a citation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Cormac Weekes; Carroll, Sean Michael

    2014-03-01

    The number of citations that a published article has received reflects the importance of the paper in the particular area of practice. In microsurgery, thus far, which journal articles are cited most frequently is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the characteristics of the top 50 papers in the field of microsurgery in the plastic surgery literature. The 50 most cited papers published in high impact plastic surgery and microsurgery journals were identified. The articles were ranked in the order of the number of citations received. These 50 classic papers were analyzed for article type, journal distribution, and geographic and institutional origin. Six international journals contributed to the top 50 papers in microsurgery. The most cited paper reported on the early use of the vascularized bone graft and was cited 116 times. The top 50 papers originated from just 10 countries with the United States producing the most. The Preston and Northcote Community Hospital, Melbourne published 5 papers and this was the most productive institution in the top 50. These papers represent many important milestones in the relatively short history of microsurgery. Furthermore, our citation analysis provides useful information to budding authors as to what makes a paper attain a "classic" status.

  4. 3D Printing: current use in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yen; Dedhia, Raj; Cervenka, Brian; Tollefson, Travis T

    2017-08-01

    To review the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, with a focus on current uses in surgical training, surgical planning, clinical outcomes, and biomedical research. To evaluate the limitations and future implications of 3D printing in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Studies reviewed demonstrated 3D printing applications in surgical planning including accurate anatomic biomodels, surgical cutting guides in reconstruction, and patient-specific implants fabrication. 3D printing technology also offers access to well tolerated, reproducible, and high-fidelity/patient-specific models for surgical training. Emerging research in 3D biomaterial printing have led to the development of biocompatible scaffolds with potential for tissue regeneration in reconstruction cases involving significant tissue absence or loss. Major limitations of utilizing 3D printing technology include time and cost, which may be offset by decreased operating times and collaboration between departments to diffuse in-house printing costs SUMMARY: The current state of the literature shows promising results, but has not yet been validated by large studies or randomized controlled trials. Ultimately, further research and advancements in 3D printing technology should be supported as there is potential to improve resident training, patient care, and surgical outcomes.

  5. Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background: Plastic surgery is the most competitive specialty in medicine. We sought to identify factors associated with the successful match of generation Y applicants into integrated plastic surgery residency. Methods: We utilized the most recent data from the Charting Outcomes in the Match published by the National Resident Matching Program in 2011. We had data on US senior or independent applicant status, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) status, attendance of top 40 medical schools, advanced degree status, and number of contiguous ranks within plastic surgery. Our main outcome measure was match status. Results: A total of 81 out of 197 applicants (41.1%) successfully matched into integrated plastic surgery in the 2011 main match. US seniors matched at a significantly higher rate compared to independent applicants (44.0% vs 24.1%, P = 0.044). Matched US seniors were more likely to have AOA membership compared to unmatched US seniors (45.9% vs 27.7%, P = 0.014) and attend a top 40 medical school (52.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.022). There were no differences in terms of advanced degrees between matched and unmatched US seniors. Unmatched US seniors were more likely to have 3 or fewer contiguous ranks of plastic surgery residency programs than matched US seniors (86.2% vs 68.9%, P = 0.007). Conclusions: US senior status, AOA membership, and attendance at a top 40 medical school are predictors of matching into integrated plastic surgery. Program directors need to be aware of the background of the millennial applicants to recruit and maintain top residents. PMID:25289227

  6. Residency characteristics that matter most to plastic surgery applicants: a multi-institutional analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Mehta, Karan; Squitieri, Lee; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Koeckert, Michael S; Patel, Ashit; Saadeh, Pierre B; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-06-01

    The National Residency Matching Program Match is a very unique process in which applicants and programs are coupled to each other based on a ranking system. Although several studies have assessed features plastic surgery programs look for in applicants, no study in the present plastic surgery literature identifies which residency characteristics are most important to plastic surgery applicants. Therefore, we sought to perform a multi-institutional assessment as to which factors plastic surgery residency applicants consider most important when applying for residency. A validated and anonymous questionnaire containing 37 items regarding various program characteristics was e-mailed to 226 applicants to New York University, Albany, University of Michigan, and University of Southern California plastic surgery residency programs. Applicants were asked to rate each feature on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most important. The 37 variables were ranked by the sum of the responses. The median rating and interquartile range as well as the mean for each factor was then calculated. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare medians in rank order. A total of 137 completed questionnaires were returned, yielding a 61% response rate. The characteristics candidates considered most important were impressions during the interview, experiences during away rotations, importance placed on resident training/support/mentoring by faculty, personal experiences with residents, and the amount of time spent in general surgery. The characteristics candidates considered least important were second-look experiences, compensation/benefits, program reputation from Internet forums, accessibility of program coordinator, opportunity for laboratory research, and fellowship positions available at the program. Applicants value personal contact and time spent in general surgery when selecting residency programs. As the number of integrated programs continues to grow, programs will benefit

  7. Google Trends as a Resource for Informing Plastic Surgery Marketing Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Brittany; Ward, Max; Paskhover, Boris

    2018-04-01

    Celebrities have long influenced the medical decisions of the general population. By analyzing Google search data using Google Trends, we measured the impact of highly publicized plastic surgery-related events on the interest level of the general population in specific search terms. Additionally, we investigated seasonal and geographic trends around interest in rhinoplasties, which is information that physicians and small surgical centers can use to optimize marketing decisions. Google Trends was used to access search data histories for three separate areas of interest: Kylie Jenner and lip fillers, Joan Rivers and plastic surgery, and rhinoplasty, which were then analyzed using two-tailed, two-sample equal variance t-tests. The average interest level in fillers increased by 30.31 points after Kylie Jenner announced that she received Juvéderm lip injections. The interest level in plastic surgery was decreased by 21.3% the month after Joan Rivers' death. Between January 2004 and May 2017, the average interest level for rhinoplasty was significantly different in January/December (67.91 ± 20.68) and June/July (70.12 ± 18.89) from the remaining calendar months (63.58 ± 19.67). Los Angeles, New York City, and Miami showed consistently high interest levels throughout the time period, while Tulsa, OK, showed a major interest increase between 2015 to 2016 of 65 points. A noticeable impact was observed in both celebrity cases on search term volume, and a seasonal effect is apparent for rhinoplasty searches. As many surgeons already employ aggressive Internet marketing strategies, understanding and utilizing these trends could help optimize their investments, increase social engagement, and increase practice awareness by potential patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www

  8. A Computational Model of the Temporal Dynamics of Plasticity in Procedural Learning: Sensitivity to Feedback Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian V. Valentin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evidence is now good that different memory systems mediate the learning of different types of category structures. In particular, declarative memory dominates rule-based (RB category learning and procedural memory dominates information-integration (II category learning. For example, several studies have reported that feedback timing is critical for II category learning, but not for RB category learning – results that have broad support within the memory systems literature. Specifically, II category learning has been shown to be best with feedback delays of 500ms compared to delays of 0 and 1000ms, and highly impaired with delays of 2.5 seconds or longer. In contrast, RB learning is unaffected by any feedback delay up to 10 seconds. We propose a neurobiologically detailed theory of procedural learning that is sensitive to different feedback delays. The theory assumes that procedural learning is mediated by plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses that are modified by dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning. The model captures the time-course of the biochemical events in the striatum that cause synaptic plasticity, and thereby accounts for the empirical effects of various feedback delays on II category learning.

  9. Pressure sores--a constant problem for plegic patients and a permanent challenge for plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuglea, Carmen; Marinescu, Sllviu; Florescu, Ioan Petre; Jecan, Crenguta

    2010-01-01

    Pressure sores can be defined as lesions caused by unrelieved pressure resulting in damage of the underlying tissue. They represent a common problem in the pathology of plegic patients and, plastic surgery has a significant role in their treatment. Pressure sores occur over bony prominences and so, they are most commonly seen at the sacrum and trochanters in paralyzed patients and at ischium for the patients who sit in a wheelchair for a long time. For these patients, surgical treatment is very important because on one hand, it stops the loss of nutrients and proteins at the site of the pressure sore, and on the other hand, it permits the initiation of neuromuscular recuperation treatment much faster.

  10. Does Formal Research Training Lead to Academic Success in Plastic Surgery? A Comprehensive Analysis of U.S. Academic Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ameri, Afshin; Susarla, Srinivas M; Reddy, Sashank; Soni, Ashwin; Tong, J W; Amini, Neda; Ahmed, Rizwan; May, James W; Lee, W P Andrew; Dorafshar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether formal research training has an influence on academic advancement in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether formal research training was associated with higher research productivity, academic rank, and procurement of extramural National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding in plastic surgery, comparing academic surgeons who completed said research training with those without. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic plastic surgeons in the United States. The main predictor variable was formal research training, defined as completion of a postdoctoral research fellowship or attainment of a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The primary outcome was scientific productivity measured by the Hirsh-index (h-index, the number of publications, h that have at least h citations each). The secondary outcomes were academic rank and NIH funding. Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed. A total of 607 academic surgeons were identified from 94 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited plastic surgery training programs. In all, 179 (29.5%) surgeons completed formal research training. The mean h-index was 11.7 ± 9.9. And, 58 (9.6%) surgeons successfully procured NIH funding. The distribution of academic rank was the following: endowed professor (5.4%), professor (23.9%), associate professor (23.4%), assistant professor (46.0%), and instructor (1.3%). In a multiple regression analysis, completion of formal research training was significantly predictive of a higher h-index and successful procurement of NIH funding. Current evidence demonstrates that formal research training is associated with higher scientific productivity and increased likelihood of future NIH funding. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Misconception of Case-Control Studies in the Plastic Surgery Literature: A Literature Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchell, Alexandra C; Farrokhyar, Forough; Choi, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Case-control study designs are commonly used. However, many published case-control studies are not true case-controls and are in fact mislabeled. The purpose of this study was to identify all case-control studies published in the top three plastic surgery journals over the past 10 years, assess which were truly case-control studies, clarify the actual design of the articles, and address common misconceptions. MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for case-control studies in the three highest-impact factor plastic surgery journals (2005 to 2015). Two independent reviewers screened the resulting titles, abstracts, and methods, if applicable, to identify articles labeled as case-control studies. These articles were appraised and classified as true case-control studies or non-case-control studies. The authors found 28 articles labeled as case-control studies. However, only six of these articles (21 percent) were truly case-control designs. Of the 22 incorrectly labeled studies, one (5 percent) was a randomized controlled trial, three (14 percent) were nonrandomized trials, two (9 percent) were prospective comparative cohort designs, 14 (64 percent) were retrospective comparative cohort designs, and two (9 percent) were cross-sectional designs. The mislabeling was worse in recent years, despite increases in evidence-based medicine awareness. The majority of published case-control studies are not in fact case-control studies. This misunderstanding is worsening with time. Most of these studies are actually comparative cohort designs. However, some studies are truly clinical trials and thus a higher level of evidence than originally proposed.

  12. Application of platelet-rich plasma in plastic surgery: clinical and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelli, Valerio; Gentile, Pietro; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Grimaldi, Monica; Casciani, Carlo Umberto; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Orlandi, Augusto

    2009-12-01

    The clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for a wide variety of application has been reportedly employed most prevalently in problematic wounds, maxillofacial and hemi-facial atrophy, Romberg Syndrome, and diabetic foot ulcers. To our knowledge, PRP has never been described in the enhancement of fat grafting during tissue-engineering application in vivo. The authors describe the preparation of PRP and its use in a series of 43 patients who underwent plastic, reconstructive, and maxillofacial surgery for chronic lower extremity ulcers (n = 18) and multiple facial applications (n = 25). PRP mixed with fat grafting was used in 76% patients affected by multiple facial diseases and in 88.9% patients affected by lower extremity ulcers. PRP injection alone was used in the remaining patients. The authors observed that after a 7.1-week and 9.7-week (average) course of twice-daily wound treatment with PRP suspended on a collagen base, 61.1% and 88.9% of chronic lower extremity ulcers underwent to 100% reepithelization compared with 40% and 60% of controls (n = 10) treated with hyaluronic acid and collagen medication. In patients treated with reconstructing three-dimensional projection of face by fat grafting and PRP, we observed a 70% maintenance of contour restoring and three-dimensional volume after 1 year compared to only 31% of controls (n = 10) treated with fat grafting alone. In vitro, PRP induced a significant increase in the number of adipose-tissue-derived stem cells compared to control cultures. These results documented that PRP accelerates chronic skin ulcer reepithelization and improves maintenance and function of fat graft in patients who underwent plastic reconstructive surgery, possibly by stimulating adipose-tissue-derived stem cell proliferation.

  13. Parotitis after epidural anesthesia in plastic surgery: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosique, Marina Junqueira Ferreira; Rosique, Rodrigo Gouvea; Costa, Ilson Rosique; Lara, Brunno Rosique; Figueiredo, Jozé Luiz Ferrari; Ribeiro, Davidson Gomes Barbosa

    2013-08-01

    Acute swelling of the parotid glands after general anesthesia has become known as anesthesia mumps. Its cause is unknown. Only one case of postsurgical parotitis without general anesthesia is reported. This report describes three cases in this setting after plastic surgery. A 37-year-old women underwent breast surgery and abdominoplasty with a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block (bupivacaine 0.5 %). The operative time totaled almost 6 h. Subsequently, 4 h after surgery, the patient experienced painless bilateral parotid swelling without palpable crepitus. The edema resolved completely within 12 h under clinical observation and parenteral hydration. A 45-year-old patient received subglandular breast implants and body contouring with liposuction, all with the patient under a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with 0.5 % marcaine. The total surgical time was 5 h. Subsequently, 3 h after surgery, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. The problem resolved completely in 36 h with clinical observation and parenteral hydration. CASE 3: A 30-year-old patient received a subglandular breast implant and underwent liposuction of the outer thighs using a dual thoracic/lumbar epidural block with lidocaine 1 %. The duration of surgery was 1 h. Subsequently, 5 h postoperatively, the patient experienced a similar clinical presentation. Dexamethasone and parenteral hydration were administered. The problem resolved completely in 48 h without sequelae. The occurrence of parotitis in patients undergoing surgery under epidural anesthesia is a novel situation, which increases the range of possible etiologies for this little known condition. Dehydration leading to transient parotid secretion obstruction may play a significant role. Further reports of parotitis occurring in the regional anesthesia setting are expected to help elucidate its pathophysiology. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of

  14. The Impact of National Institutes of Health Funding on Scholarly Productivity in Academic Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-02-01

    The h-index is an objective measure of an investigator's scholarly impact. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the association between scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, and the procurement of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant funding among academic plastic surgeons. This was a case-control study of NIH-funded plastic surgery faculty identified on the RePORTER database. Non-NIH-funded faculty from the top 10 NIH-funded programs served as a control group. The mean h-index was calculated from Scopus (Elsevier, London, United Kingdom) and compared by funding status, academic rank, and terminal degree(s). The relationship between h-index and career NIH funding was elucidated via Spearman's correlation coefficient. NIH-funded faculty had higher h-indices than nonNIH-funded faculty (23.9 versus 9.9, p 0.05), but investigators with a master's degree exhibited a trend toward greater NIH funding. Higher h-indices correlated with greater NIH funding (r = 0.481, p < 0.001). A strong relationship exists between scholarly impact and the procurement of NIH funding. Faculty with greater funding had greater scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, which suggests that this tool may have utility during the NIH grant application process.

  15. Calciphylaxis – a challenging & solvable task for plastic surgery? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsolakidis Savas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calciphylaxis (calcific uremic arteriolopathy is rare and its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Indeed, Calciphylaxis presents a challenge through the course of its management which involve different specialities but unfortunately this disease so far has a poor prognosis. We herein present, in this case report, a multidisciplinary approach involving plastic surgeons with special regards to reconstructive approach after debridement procedures. Case presentation We present a 21 years old male with a BMI of 38,2, who was transferred to our department from another hospital. Calciphylaxis has been diagnosed after receiving anticoagulation with phenprocoumon after a single event of pulmonary embolism. The INR on admission was 1,79. He had necrotic spots on both sides of the abdominal wall and on both thighs medially. During this time he underwent several reconstructive procedures in our department. Conclusion It can be suggested that this agonizing disease needs indeed a multidisciplinary approach involving Nephrologists, Dermatologists, Intensive Care Physicians and Plastic Surgeons, taking into consideration that surgical correction can achieve further improvement in a specialized centre. Notwithstanding, further cohort studies should be approached clinically to insight the light on this disease with special regard to the prognosis after this approach.

  16. Optimal training design for procedural motor skills: a review and application to laparoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, E.N.; Band, G.P.H.; Hamming, J.F.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2014-01-01

    This literature review covers the choices to consider in training complex procedural, perceptual and motor skills. In particular, we focus on laparoscopic surgery. An overview is provided of important training factors modulating the acquisition, durability, transfer, and efficiency of trained

  17. Novel surgical procedures in glaucoma: advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippopoulos, Theodoros; Rhee, Douglas J

    2008-03-01

    Despite late modifications and enhancements, traditional penetrating glaucoma surgery is not without complications and is reserved for patients in whom pharmacologic treatment and/or laser trabeculoplasty do not suffice to control the intraocular pressure. This article critically reviews recent advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery with particular attention paid to two novel surgical approaches: ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome and implantation of the Ex-PRESS shunt. Ab interno trabeculectomy (Trabectome) achieves a sustained 30% reduction in intraocular pressure by focally ablating and cauterizing the trabecular meshwork/inner wall of Schlemm's canal. It has a remarkable safety profile with respect to early hypotonous or infectious complications as it does not generate a bleb, but it can be associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may necessitate additional glaucoma surgery. The Ex-PRESS shunt is more commonly implanted under a partial thickness scleral flap, and appears to have similar efficacy to standard trabeculectomy offering some advantages with respect to the rate of early complications related to hypotony. Penetrating glaucoma surgery will continue to evolve. As prospective randomized clinical trials become available, we will determine the exact role of these surgical techniques in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium.

  18. Impact of Subspecialty Fellowship Training on Research Productivity Among Academic Plastic Surgery Faculty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Aditya; Therattil, Paul J; Chung, Stella; Lee, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    The impact of subspecialty fellowship training on research productivity among academic plastic surgeons is unknown. The authors' aim of this study was to (1) describe the current fellowship representation in academic plastic surgery and (2) evaluate the relationship between h-index and subspecialty fellowship training by experience and type. Academic plastic surgery faculty (N = 590) were identified through an Internet-based search of all ACGME-accredited integrated and combined residency programs. Research output was measured by h-index from the Scopus database as well as a number of peer-reviewed publications. The Kruskal-Wallis test, with a subsequent Mann-Whitney U test, was used for statistical analysis to determine correlations. In the United States, 72% (n = 426) of academic plastic surgeons had trained in 1 or more subspecialty fellowship program. Within this cohort, the largest group had completed multiple fellowships (28%), followed by hand (23%), craniofacial (22%), microsurgery (15%), research (8%), cosmetic (3%), burn (2%), and wound healing (0.5%). Higher h-indices correlated with a research fellowship (12.5; P productivity compared with their colleagues. Craniofacial-trained physicians also demonstrated a higher marker for academic productivity than multiple other specialties. In this study, we show that the type and number of fellowships influence the h-index and further identification of such variables may help improve academic mentorship and productivity within academic plastic surgery.

  19. Laparoscopy in major abdominal emergency surgery seems to be a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Tengberg, Line Toft; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopy is well established in the majority of elective procedures in abdominal surgery. In contrast, it is primarily used in minor surgery such as appendectomy or cholecystectomy in the emergent setting. This study aimed to analyze the safety and effectiveness of a laparoscopic...

  20. Student Teachers' Evaluations of Slides of Children with Down Syndrome: Impact of Facial Plastic Surgery, Labelling and Factual Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkabetz, R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the impact of facial plastic surgery, labeling (mentally retarded, normal, Down's syndrome), and level of knowledge of Down's syndrome on 127 student teachers' evaluations of slides of persons with such characteristics. Although there was no overall significant main effect for the pre-post operation condition, there was a…

  1. [Strategies to ensure careers of young academics in plastic surgery - analysis of the current situation and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, R E; Vogt, P M; Schaller, H E; Stark, G B; Lehnhardt, M; Kneser, U; Giunta, R E

    2013-08-01

    Recruitment problems in surgical disciplines have become an increasingly debated topic. On the one hand current career prospects appear to be less attractive than those were seen for the previous generation. On the other hand the demands for a so-called "work-life balance" have changed and the proportion of female students and colleagues in medicine has risen and will continue to increase. Although Plastic Surgery currently seems to be less affected by these problems than other surgical disciplines, securing a qualified supply of young academics in Plastic Surgery is a prerequisite for the further development of this discipline. The traditional model of mentoring is discussed and the role of coaching in a sense of helping the mentorees examine what they are doing in the light of their intentions and goals is reflected. The present article tries to analyze the current status of academic Plastic Surgery from the viewpoint of German university senior surgeons in academic plastic surgery, and aims to highlight the specific prospects for young academics against the backdrop of an often one-sided and superficial perception of this profession. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Safely re-integrating silicone breast implants into the plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladfelter, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    In the early 1990s, it was reported that silicone breast implants were possibly responsible for serious damage to women's health. In January 1992, the Food and Drug Administration issued a voluntary breast implant moratorium and, in April, issued a ban on the use of silicone gel-filled implants for cosmetic breast augmentation. Since that time, silicone gel-filled breast implants have been available to women only for select cases: women seeking breast reconstruction or revision of an existing breast implant, women who have had breast cancer surgery, a severe injury to the breast, a birth defect that affects the breast, or a medical condition causing a severe breast deformity. Since the ban on the use of silicone gel-filled breast implants for cosmetic breast augmentation, numerous scientific studies have been conducted. To ensure patient safety, the American Board of Plastic Surgery believes that these scientific studies and the Food and Drug Administration's scrutiny of silicone gel-filled breast implants have been appropriate and necessary.

  3. Telemedicina y Cirugía Plástica Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cabrera Sánchez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La Telemedicina es aplicable a todos los campos médicos, incluyendo la Cirugía. Poca atención se ha prestado a sus aplicaciones diagnósticas, de las que sin embargo, nuestra especialidad, en la que es perfectamente aplicable el antiguo proverbio chino "una imagen vale mil palabras", podría salir muy beneficiada. Esto permitiría una mayor reducción de costes con contundentes mejoras en eficiencia y calidad. Presentamos un modelo de Telemedicina tipo envío y almacenaje (store and forward desarrollado y aplicado en un hospital británico del sureste de Inglaterra desde hace 7 años. Comentamos las ventajas e inconvenientes del sistema y sus posibles aplicaciones en nuestro medio. Es un hecho claro que estas tecnologías van a producir un gran cambio en la sociedad y en el quehacer diario del médico durante la próxima década. Lo que hoy conocemos como Telemedicina, en breve perderá el prefijo "tele" porque la población entenderá este tipo de Medicina y de aplicaciones telemáticas como algo habitual. Sin duda, nuestra especialidad será una de las grandes beneficiadas de la aplicación de estas tecnologías.Telemedicine is available in any medical fields, including Surgery. Poor attention has been showed to diagnosis application. Nevertheless, Plastic Surgery, is a practice in which the application of the old chinese proverb: "A picture is better than thousand words", would be very benefited, reducing costs and improving efficiency and quality. We present a Telemedicine store and forward model developed and worked in a Plastic Surgery Unit of southern England for 7 years. We show system advantages and disvantages and its potential applications in our country. It's clear that this technology will be able to produce a great change in our society and in our daily medical activity in the next years. What today we knows as Telemedicine, in a few time will lose "tele" prefix, because people will understand as usual this kind of Medicine and

  4. Ethical issues in instructions to authors of journals in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery and related specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, Poramate; Bauer, Ute; Dhanuthai, Kittipong; Brückner, Martin; Herve, Christian; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Hemprich, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Ethical standards of biomedical publications are associated with editorial leadership, such as contents of instructions to authors and journal's mechanisms for research and publication ethics. To compare ethical issues in the guidelines for authors in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery (OCM-FPS) journals with those in plastic surgery and otorhinolaryngology/head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) journals, and to evaluate the relationship between journal's impact factor (IF) and ethical issues in the instructions to authors. This study used a cross-sectional study design. The predictor variables were journal's specialty and IF. The outcome variable was the presence of seven ethical issues in the online versions of journal's instructions to authors in October 2009. We included only journals with identifiable IF for 2008, published in English, French, German and Thai. Appropriate descriptive and univariate statistics were computed for all study variables. The level of statistical significance was set at Pjournals: seven OCM-FPS (14.6%), 14 plastic surgery (29.2%) and 27 ORL-HNS (56.2%) journals. Only four journals (8.3%) mentioned all ethical issues in their guidelines for authors. Neither journal's specialty nor IF was linked to completeness of the ethical requirements. The results of this study suggest that ethical issues in the instructions to authors of most IF-indexed journals in OCM-FPS, plastic surgery and ORL-HNS are incomplete, regardless of specialty and IF. There is room for substantial improvement to uphold scientific integrity of these surgical specialties. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Quality of Systematic Reviews in Head and Neck Microsurgery: A Perspective from Plastic Surgery and Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Beatrice J; Tijerina, Jonathan; Nazerali, Rahim S; Lee, Gordon K

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a push to publish higher level of evidence studies in medicine, particularly in plastic surgery. Well-conducted systematic reviews are considered the strongest level of evidence in medicine, recently becoming the key process indicators for quality delivery. A varying quality of systematic reviews, however, has led to concerns of their validity in clinical decision-making. We perform a quality analysis of systematic reviews published in head and neck microsurgery by the surgical specialties of plastic surgery and otolaryngology. An evaluation of systematic reviews published on microsurgery in 13 high-impact surgical journals was conducted by searching PubMed and Scopus. Two authors independently performed searches, screened for eligibility, and extracted data from included articles. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion and consensus. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) criteria were used to assess methodological quality. The initial database search retrieved 166 articles. After removing duplicates, screening titles and abstracts, 26 articles remained for full text review. Seven did not focus on head and neck microsurgery and were further excluded, leaving 19 systematic reviews for final analysis. Of those, 10 systematic reviews were published by otolaryngology, and 9 were published by plastic surgery. Median AMSTAR score was 8 for otolaryngology, 7 for plastic surgery, and 8 overall, reflecting "fair to good" quality. The number of systematic reviews on head and neck microsurgery markedly increased over time. Of note, both the AMSTAR score and the number of systematic reviews published by plastic surgery have steadily increased from 2014 to 2016, whereas those published by otolaryngology have remained relatively stable since 2010. Our review shows a trend toward publishing more systematic reviews. The increasing quantity and quality of systematic reviews published by plastic surgeons indicates recognition in the

  6. Procedural key steps in laparoscopic colorectal surgery, consensus through Delphi methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Frederieke A.; Bosker, Robbert J. I.; Veeger, Nicolaas J. G. M.; van Det, Marc J.; Pierie, Jean Pierre E. N.

    While several procedural training curricula in laparoscopic colorectal surgery have been validated and published, none have focused on dividing surgical procedures into well-identified segments, which can be trained and assessed separately. This enables the surgeon and resident to focus on a

  7. How to successfully implement a robotic pediatric surgery program: lessons learned after 96 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lambert, Guénolée; Fourcade, Laurent; Centi, Joachim; Fredon, Fabien; Braik, Karim; Szwarc, Caroline; Longis, Bernard; Lardy, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    Both our teams were the first to implement pediatric robotic surgery in France. The aim of this study was to define the key points we brought to light so other pediatric teams that want to set up a robotic surgery program will benefit. We reviewed the medical records of all children who underwent robotic surgery between Nov 2007 and June 2011 in both departments, including patient data, installation and changes, operative time, hospital stay, intraoperative complications, and postoperative outcome. The department's internal organization, the organization within the hospital complex, and cost were evaluated. A total of 96 procedures were evaluated. There were 38 girls and 56 boys with average age at surgery of 7.6 years (range, 0.7-18 years) and average weight of 26 kg (range, 6-77 kg). Thirty-six patients had general surgery, 57 patients urologic surgery, and 1 thoracic surgery. Overall average operative time was 189 min (range, 70-550 min), and average hospital stay was 6.4 days (range, 2-24 days). The procedures of 3 patients were converted. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 0.5-43 months). Robotic surgical procedure had an extra cost of 1934 compared to conventional open surgery. Our experience was similar to the findings described in the literature for feasibility, security, and patient outcomes; we had an overall operative success rate of 97 %. Three main actors are concerned in the implementation of a robotic pediatric surgery program: surgeons and anesthetists, nurses, and the administration. The surgeon is at the starting point with motivation for minimally invasive surgery without laparoscopic constraints. We found that it was possible to implement a long-lasting robotic surgery program with comparable quality of care.

  8. Modified rerouting procedure for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulke, R; Hildebrand, F; Panzica, M; Hüfner, T; Krettek, C

    2010-04-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the peroneal tendons following operative treatment is relatively uncommon, but can be difficult to treat. We asked whether subligamental transposition of the peroneus brevis tendon, fibular grooving, and reattachment of the superior peroneal retinaculum for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery would achieve a stable fixation of the peroneal tendons and whether there would be restrictions of ROM or instability of the hindfoot. We reviewed six female patients (mean age, 24.5 years) with general laxity of joints preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Within 1 year postoperatively no recurrence was found. In two ankles the extension was restricted 5 degrees to 10 degrees . In another pronation and supination was restricted 5 degrees each. Stability of the ankle increased in four patients and stayed unchanged in two. AOFAS score increased from a mean value of 36 +/- 20.6 preoperatively to 90 +/- 7 postoperatively at 1 year. We conclude transposition of the peroneus brevis tendon is a reasonable treatment for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery. Level IV, therapeutic study (prospective case series). See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Tissue-Engineered Solutions in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: Principles and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Jessop, Zita M; Al-Sabah, Ayesha; Combellack, Emman; Ibrahim, Amel; Doak, Shareen H; Hart, Andrew M; Archer, Charles W; Thornton, Catherine A; Whitaker, Iain S

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in microsurgery, imaging, and transplantation have led to significant refinements in autologous reconstructive options; however, the morbidity of donor sites remains. This would be eliminated by successful clinical translation of tissue-engineered solutions into surgical practice. Plastic surgeons are uniquely placed to be intrinsically involved in the research and development of laboratory engineered tissues and their subsequent use. In this article, we present an overview of the field of tissue engineering, with the practicing plastic surgeon in mind. The Medical Research Council states that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering "holds the promise of revolutionizing patient care in the twenty-first century." The UK government highlighted regenerative medicine as one of the key eight great technologies in their industrial strategy worthy of significant investment. The long-term aim of successful biomanufacture to repair composite defects depends on interdisciplinary collaboration between cell biologists, material scientists, engineers, and associated medical specialties; however currently, there is a current lack of coordination in the field as a whole. Barriers to translation are deep rooted at the basic science level, manifested by a lack of consensus on the ideal cell source, scaffold, molecular cues, and environment and manufacturing strategy. There is also insufficient understanding of the long-term safety and durability of tissue-engineered constructs. This review aims to highlight that individualized approaches to the field are not adequate, and research collaboratives will be essential to bring together differing areas of expertise to expedite future clinical translation. The use of tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery would result in a paradigm shift but it is important to maintain realistic expectations. It is generally accepted that it takes 20-30 years from the start of basic science research to clinical utility

  10. Two stage study of wound microorganisms affecting burns and plastic surgery inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Ali, Syed N; Jeffery, Steven L A; Thomas, Sunil S

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to identify wound microorganisms and the reasons for differing prevalence between the wards, burns unit and intensive care unit (ICU) in a regional centre for burns and plastic surgery. Antibiotic sensitivities of the 10 most prevalent microorganisms cultured from inpatient wound swabs were also investigated. Inpatient wound swab data were collected retrospectively using notes and departmental database information between January and June 2007. Data were analyzed using chi-squared tests and P-values. Eight hundred five positive wound swabs from 204 swab positive inpatients were analyzed. Stage 1 of this study demonstrated 917 positive swab episodes and 30 varieties of organism. The five most prevalent organisms cultured were Staphylococcus (23.9%), Acinetobacter (21.2%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (20.8%), Pseudomonas (9.7%) and Enterococcus (5.2%). Stage 2 revealed that Acinetobacter baumanni (ABAU) was significantly more prevalent in military over civilian inpatients (P < .001) and that military inpatients had a significantly greater proportion of ABAU over civilian inpatients within the first 24 hours after admission (P < .001). ABAU episodes were significantly higher on the ICU over the burns unit and on the wards (P < .001). MRSA was significantly more prevalent in military inpatients (P < .001); however, no significant difference was observed within the first 24 hours after admission (P = .440). MRSA was more prevalent on the ICU over the burns unit (P = .023). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAER) was significantly more prevalent in military inpatients over civilian inpatients (P < .001), and on the ICU over the burns unit and wards (P = .018). Stage 1 generated a comprehensive, up to date cross section of bacterial flora, with corresponding percentage antibiotic sensitivities, in a regional burns and plastic surgery centre. This will give clinicians a snapshot of organisms affecting inpatient wounds in advance of

  11. Esthetic impact of gingival plastic surgery from the dentistry students’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Erdem; Tan, Enes; Keklik, Hakan; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Celebi, Ahmet Arif; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the this study was to evaluate the perception of smile esthetics and alterations in cases of gingival plastic surgery for correction of a gummy smile, by means of alterations in smile photograph among dentistry degree students. Materials and Methods: A frontal smile photograph of a 40-year-old woman having normal occlusion was used with diverse compositions of gingival exposure level and crown length of maxillary teeth. The eight photographs were evaluated by 216 dentistry students in five class groups (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th classes). Results: The results revealed that almost all of the class’ students perceived differences between images, additionally, the highest percentage of students that answered “no difference” was 12% at 1st class’ students. 1st and 2nd class’ students most liked photograph which is 2.5 mm gingival display and 3rd class students liked two different photographs which are 2.5 mm gingival display and 2 mm gingival display whereas 4th class students preferred two different photographs which are 1.5 mm gingival display and 1 mm gingival display, 5th class students preferred photograph which is 1.5 mm gingival display as the most. Conclusion: Esthetic perception of smile improve as a student passes to higher study classes in terms of gingival exposure. The harmonious display of gingiva exhibits an important effect in the smile esthetics rather than reduced or excessive display. PMID:27403061

  12. Introduction of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery FACE TO FACE Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Manoj T; Rousso, Joseph J; Hu, Shirley; Brown, Ryan F; Moscatello, Augustine L; Finn, J Charles; Patel, Neha A; Kadakia, Sameep P; Wood-Smith, Donald

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery FACE TO FACE database was created to gather and organize patient data primarily from international humanitarian surgical mission trips, as well as local humanitarian initiatives. Similar to cloud-based Electronic Medical Records, this web-based user-generated database allows for more accurate tracking of provider and patient information and outcomes, regardless of site, and is useful when coordinating follow-up care for patients. The database is particularly useful on international mission trips as there are often different surgeons who may provide care to patients on subsequent missions, and patients who may visit more than 1 mission site. Ultimately, by pooling data across multiples sites and over time, the database has the potential to be a useful resource for population-based studies and outcome data analysis. The objective of this paper is to delineate the process involved in creating the AAFPRS FACE TO FACE database, to assess its functional utility, to draw comparisons to electronic medical records systems that are now widely implemented, and to explain the specific benefits and disadvantages of the use of the database as it was implemented on recent international surgical mission trips.

  13. [Plastic surgery for the treatment of gynaecomastia following hormone therapy in prostate carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryssel, H; Germann, G; Köllensperger, E; Riedel, K

    2008-04-01

    Gynecomastia is a potential side effect of hormone therapy for prostate cancer. In large, randomized, placebo controlled studies approximately 50% or more of patients with prostate cancer experienced gynecomastia attributable to various mechanisms. Although it is mostly reported as mild to moderate, gynecomastia is one of the reasons most frequently cited for premature discontinuation of such treatment. Prophylactic radiotherapy and prophylactic tamoxifen have been shown to decrease the incidence of hormone-induced gynecomastia; nevertheless, there are still cases of refractory gynecomastia, and in these plastic surgery is needed for correction. Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, requiring no treatment unless it is a source of embarrassment and/or distress for the adolescent or man affected. The indications for surgical treatment of gynecomastia are founded on two main objectives: restoration of the male chest shape and diagnostic evaluation of suspected breast lesions. The authors believe that the complete circumareolar technique with no further scarring creates the best aesthetic results with fewer complications. When this is used in combination with liposuction very pleasing aesthetic results can be achieved.

  14. Smoking and plastic surgery, part I. Pathophysiological aspects: update and proposed recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluvy, I; Garrido, I; Pauchot, J; Saboye, J; Chavoin, J P; Tropet, Y; Grolleau, J L; Chaput, B

    2015-02-01

    Smoking patients undergoing a plastic surgery intervention are exposed to increased risk of perioperative and postoperative complications. It seemed useful to us to establish an update about the negative impact of smoking, especially on wound healing, and also about the indisputable benefits of quitting. We wish to propose a minimum time lapse of withdrawal in the preoperative and postoperative period in order to reduce the risks and maximize the results of the intervention. A literature review of documents from 1972 to 2014 was carried out by searching five different databases (Medline, PubMed Central, Cochrane library, Pascal and Web of Science). Cigarette smoke has a diffuse and multifactorial impact in the body. Hypoxia, tissue ischemia and immune disorders induced by tobacco consumption cause alterations of the healing process. Some of these effects are reversible by quitting. Data from the literature recommend a preoperative smoking cessation period lasting between 3 and 8 weeks and up until 4 weeks postoperatively. Use of nicotine replacement therapies doubles the abstinence rate in the short term. When a patient is heavily dependent, the surgeon should be helped by a tobacco specialist. Total smoking cessation of 4 weeks preoperatively and lasting until primary healing of the operative site (2 weeks) appears to optimize surgical conditions without heightening anesthetic risk. Tobacco withdrawal assistance, both human and drug-based, is highly recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing Online Patient Education Readability for Spine Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Haws, Brittany E; Khechen, Benjamin; Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Singh, Kern

    2018-03-01

    Increased patient reliance on Internet-based health information has amplified the need for comprehensible online patient education articles. As suggested by the American Medical Association and National Institute of Health, spine fusion articles should be written for a 4th-6th-grade reading level to increase patient comprehension, which may improve postoperative outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine the readability of online health care education information relating to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and lumbar fusion procedures. Online health-education resource qualitative analysis. Three search engines were utilized to access patient education articles for common cervical and lumbar spine procedures. Relevant articles were analyzed for readability using Readability Studio Professional Edition software (Oleander Software Ltd). Articles were stratified by organization type as follows: General Medical Websites (GMW), Healthcare Network/Academic Institutions (HNAI), and Private Practices (PP). Thirteen common readability tests were performed with the mean readability of each compared between subgroups using analysis of variance. ACDF and lumbar fusion articles were determined to have a mean readability of 10.7±1.5 and 11.3±1.6, respectively. GMW, HNAI, and PP subgroups had a mean readability of 10.9±2.9, 10.7±2.8, and 10.7±2.5 for ACDF and 10.9±3.0, 10.8±2.9, and 11.6±2.7 for lumbar fusion articles. Of 310 total articles, only 6 (3 ACDF and 3 lumbar fusion) were written for comprehension below a 7th-grade reading level. Current online literature from medical websites containing information regarding ACDF and lumbar fusion procedures are written at a grade level higher than the suggested guidelines. Therefore, current patient education articles should be revised to accommodate the average reading level in the United States and may result in improved patient comprehension and postoperative outcomes.

  16. The Australian litigation landscape - oral and maxillofacial surgery and general dentistry (oral surgery procedures): an analysis of litigation cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenoch-Jones, E K; White, B P; Lynham, A J

    2016-09-01

    There are persistent concerns about litigation in the dental and medical professions. These concerns arise in a setting where general dentists are more frequently undertaking a wider range of oral surgery procedures, potentially increasing legal risk. Judicial cases dealing with medical negligence in the fields of general dentistry (oral surgery procedure) and oral and maxillofacial surgery were located using the three main legal databases. Relevant cases were analysed to determine the procedures involved, the patients' claims of injury, findings of negligence and damages awarded. A thematic analysis of the cases was undertaken to determine trends. Fifteen cases over a 20-year period were located across almost all Australian jurisdictions (eight cases involved general dentists; seven cases involved oral and maxillofacial surgeons). Eleven of the 15 cases involved determinations of whether or not the practitioner had failed in their duty of care; negligence was found in six cases. Eleven of the 15 cases related to molar extractions (eight specifically to third molar). Dental and medical practitioners wanting to manage legal risk should have regard to circumstances arising in judicial cases. Adequate warning of risks is critical, as is offering referral in appropriate cases. Preoperative radiographs, good medical records and processes to ensure appropriate follow-up are also important. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Minimal invasive single-site surgery in colorectal procedures: Current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Michele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimally invasive single-site (MISS surgery has recently been applied to colorectal surgery. We aimed to assess the current state of the art and the adequacy of preliminary oncological results. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Science databases. Keywords used were "Single Port" or "Single-Incision" or "LaparoEndoscopic Single Site" or "SILS™" and "Colon" or "Colorectal" and "Surgery". Results: Twenty-nine articles on colorectal MISS surgery have been published from July 2008 to July 2010, presenting data on 149 patients. One study reported analgesic requirement. The final incision length ranged from 2.5 to 8 cm. Only two studies reported fascial incision length. There were two port site hernias in a series of 13 patients (15.38%. Two "fully laparoscopic" MISS procedures with preparation and achievement of the anastomosis completely intracorporeally are reported. Future site of ileostomy was used as the sole access for the procedures in three studies. Lymph node harvesting, resection margins and length of specimen were sufficient in oncological cases. Conclusions: MISS colorectal surgery is a challenging procedure that seems to be safe and feasible, but the existing clinical evidence is limited. In selected cases, and especially when an ileostomy is planned, colorectal surgery may be an ideal indication for MISS surgery leading to a no-scar surgery. Despite preliminary oncological results showing the feasibility of MISS surgery, we want to stress the need to standardize the technique and carefully evaluate its application in oncosurgery under ethical committee control.

  18. [Complex surgical procedures in orthopedics and trauma surgery. A contribution to the proposal procedure for the DRG system in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, S; Nabring, J; Luetkes, P; Nast-Kolb, D; Windolf, J

    2008-10-01

    Since the DRG system was introduced in 2003/2004 the system for remuneration has been continually modified in conjunction with input from specialized medical associations. As part of this development of the payment system, the criteria for classification of a diagnosis-related group were further expanded and new functions were added. This contribution addresses the importance of the complex surgical procedures as criteria for subdivision of the DRG case-based lump sums in orthopedics and trauma surgery.

  19. Tissue-Engineered Solutions in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Himdani, Sarah; Jessop, Zita M.; Al-Sabah, Ayesha; Combellack, Emman; Ibrahim, Amel; Doak, Shareen H.; Hart, Andrew M.; Archer, Charles W.; Thornton, Catherine A.; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in microsurgery, imaging, and transplantation have led to significant refinements in autologous reconstructive options; however, the morbidity of donor sites remains. This would be eliminated by successful clinical translation of tissue-engineered solutions into surgical practice. Plastic surgeons are uniquely placed to be intrinsically involved in the research and development of laboratory engineered tissues and their subsequent use. In this article, we present an overview of the field of tissue engineering, with the practicing plastic surgeon in mind. The Medical Research Council states that regenerative medicine and tissue engineering “holds the promise of revolutionizing patient care in the twenty-first century.” The UK government highlighted regenerative medicine as one of the key eight great technologies in their industrial strategy worthy of significant investment. The long-term aim of successful biomanufacture to repair composite defects depends on interdisciplinary collaboration between cell biologists, material scientists, engineers, and associated medical specialties; however currently, there is a current lack of coordination in the field as a whole. Barriers to translation are deep rooted at the basic science level, manifested by a lack of consensus on the ideal cell source, scaffold, molecular cues, and environment and manufacturing strategy. There is also insufficient understanding of the long-term safety and durability of tissue-engineered constructs. This review aims to highlight that individualized approaches to the field are not adequate, and research collaboratives will be essential to bring together differing areas of expertise to expedite future clinical translation. The use of tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery would result in a paradigm shift but it is important to maintain realistic expectations. It is generally accepted that it takes 20–30 years from the start of basic science research to clinical utility

  20. The Anatomy of the Facial Vein: Implications for Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Steinke, Hanno; Schlattau, Alexander; Schlager, Markus; Sykes, Jonathan M; Roth, Malcolm Z; Gaggl, Alexander; Giunta, Riccardo E; Gotkin, Robert H; Schenck, Thilo L

    2017-06-01

    Anatomical knowledge of the facial vasculature is crucial for successful plastic, reconstructive, and minimally invasive procedures of the face. Whereas the majority of previous investigations focused on facial arteries, the precise course, variability, and relationship with adjacent structures of the facial vein have been widely neglected. Seventy-two fresh frozen human cephalic cadavers (32 male and 40 female cadavers; mean age, 75.2 ± 10.9 years; mean body mass index, 24.2 ± 6.6 kg/m; 99 percent Caucasian ethnicity) were investigated by means of layer-by-layer anatomical dissection. In addition, 10 cephalic specimens were investigated using contrast agent-enhanced computed tomographic imaging. The facial vein displayed a constant course in relation to the adjacent anatomical structures. The vein was identified posterior to the facial artery, anterior to the parotid duct, and deep to the zygomaticus major muscle. The angular vein formed the lateral boundary of the deep medial cheek fat and the premaxillary space, and the medial boundary of the deep lateral cheek fat and the sub-orbicularis oculi fat. The mean distance of the inferior and superior labial veins, of the deep facial vein, and of the angular vein from the inferior orbital margin was 51.6 ± 3.1, 42.6 ± 2.3, 27.4 ± 3.0, and 4.2 ± 0.7 mm, respectively. This work provides detailed information on the course of the facial vein in relation to neighboring structures. The presented clinically relevant anatomical observations and descriptions of landmarks will serve as helpful information for plastic, reconstructive, and aesthetic surgeons.

  1. Updated anatomy of the buccal space and its implications for plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Thilo L; Koban, Konstantin C; Schlattau, Alexander; Frank, Konstantin; Sclafani, Anthony P; Giunta, Riccardo E; Roth, Malcolm Z; Gaggl, Alexander; Gotkin, Robert H; Cotofana, Sebastian

    2018-02-01

    The buccal space is an integral deep facial space which is involved in a variety of intra- and extra-oral pathologies and provides a good location for the harvest of the facial artery. The age-related anatomy of this space was investigated and compared to previous reports. We conducted anatomic dissections in 102 fresh frozen human cephalic specimens (45 males, 57 females; age range 50-100 years) and performed additional computed tomographic, magnetic resonance and 3-D surface volumetric imaging studies to visualize the boundaries and the contents of the buccal space after injection of contrast enhancing material. The mean vertical extent of contrast agent injected into the buccal space was 25.2 ± 4.3 mm and did not significantly differ between individuals of different age (p = 0.77) or gender (p = 0.13). The maximal injected volume was 10.02 cc [range: 3.09-10.02] without significant influence of age (p = 0.13) or gender (p = 0.81). The change in surface volume was 3.64 ± 1.04 cc resulting in a mean surface-volume-coefficient of 0.87 ± 0.12 without being statistically significant influenced by age (p = 0.53) or gender (p = 0.78). The facial artery was constantly identified within the buccal space whereas the facial vein was found to course within its posterior boundary. The buccal space did not undergo age-related changes in volume or size which highlights this space is a reliable and predictable landmark for various plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic procedures. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, L J; Konge, L; Schroeder, T V

    2017-01-01

    to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved...... eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. Conclusion A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons......Objectives and background Practical skills training in vascular surgery is facing challenges because of an increased number of endovascular procedures and fewer open procedures, as well as a move away from the traditional principle of “learning by doing.” This change has established simulation...

  3. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, L J; Konge, L; Schroeder, T V; Paltved, C; Lindorff-Larsen, K G; Nielsen, B U; Eiberg, J P

    2017-04-01

    Practical skills training in vascular surgery is facing challenges because of an increased number of endovascular procedures and fewer open procedures, as well as a move away from the traditional principle of "learning by doing." This change has established simulation as a cornerstone in providing trainees with the necessary skills and competences. However, the development of simulation based programs often evolves based on available resources and equipment, reflecting convenience rather than a systematic educational plan. The objective of the present study was to perform a national needs assessment to identify the technical procedures that should be integrated in a simulation based curriculum. A national needs assessment using a Delphi process was initiated by engaging 33 predefined key persons in vascular surgery. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved elimination and ranking of procedures. The response rate for round 1 was 70%, with 36 procedures identified. Round 2 had a 76% response rate and resulted in a preliminary prioritised list after exploring the need for simulation based training. Round 3 had an 85% response rate; 17 procedures were eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological Complications Related to Elective Orthopedic Surgery: Part 1: Common Shoulder and Elbow Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Henry, Patrick D G; Cholvisudhi, Phantila; Chan, Vincent W S; Theodoropoulos, John S; Brull, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Many anesthesiologists are unfamiliar with the rate of surgical neurological complications of the shoulder and elbow procedures for which they provide local anesthetic-based anesthesia and/or analgesia. Part 1 of this narrative review series on neurological complications of elective orthopedic surgery describes the mechanisms and likelihood of peripheral nerve injury associated with some of the most common shoulder and elbow procedures, including open and arthroscopic shoulder procedures, elbow arthroscopy, and total shoulder and elbow replacement. Despite the many articles available, the overall number of studied patients is relatively low. Large prospective trials are required to establish the true incidence of neurological complications following elective shoulder and elbow surgery. As the popularity of regional anesthesia increases with the development of ultrasound guidance, anesthesiologists should have a thoughtful understanding of the nerves at risk of surgical injury during elective shoulder and elbow procedures.

  5. Trends in statistical methods in articles published in Archives of Plastic Surgery between 2012 and 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyunghwa; Jung, Inkyung

    2018-05-01

    This review article presents an assessment of trends in statistical methods and an evaluation of their appropriateness in articles published in the Archives of Plastic Surgery (APS) from 2012 to 2017. We reviewed 388 original articles published in APS between 2012 and 2017. We categorized the articles that used statistical methods according to the type of statistical method, the number of statistical methods, and the type of statistical software used. We checked whether there were errors in the description of statistical methods and results. A total of 230 articles (59.3%) published in APS between 2012 and 2017 used one or more statistical method. Within these articles, there were 261 applications of statistical methods with continuous or ordinal outcomes, and 139 applications of statistical methods with categorical outcome. The Pearson chi-square test (17.4%) and the Mann-Whitney U test (14.4%) were the most frequently used methods. Errors in describing statistical methods and results were found in 133 of the 230 articles (57.8%). Inadequate description of P-values was the most common error (39.1%). Among the 230 articles that used statistical methods, 71.7% provided details about the statistical software programs used for the analyses. SPSS was predominantly used in the articles that presented statistical analyses. We found that the use of statistical methods in APS has increased over the last 6 years. It seems that researchers have been paying more attention to the proper use of statistics in recent years. It is expected that these positive trends will continue in APS.

  6. The best marketing strategy in aesthetic plastic surgery: evaluating patients' preferences by conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsidi, Nick; van den Bergh, Maurice W H M; Luijendijk, Roland W

    2014-01-01

    To provide the best marketing strategy for a private clinic, knowledge of patients' preferences is essential. In marketing, conjoint analysis has been frequently used to calculate which attributes of a product are most valuable to consumers. This study investigates the relative importance of attributes that influence the selection and decision-making process when choosing an aesthetic private clinic, using conjoint analysis. The following attributes were chosen by the senior author (R.W.L.) and a marketing and communications director after a preselection of 25 randomly selected people: relative cost of the procedure, travel time, experience of the plastic surgeon, size of the clinic, method of referral, and online presentation. The attributes were then divided into levels. Using a random factor conducted by SPSS, 18 different scenarios were created and rated online by 150 potential patients before their potential visit or consultation. The patients could rate these scenarios on a scale from 1 to 7 with respect to the likeliness of visiting the clinic. The most important attribute was experience of the surgeon (35.6 percent), followed by method of referral (21.5 percent), travel time (14.2 percent), cost of procedure (12.9 percent), online presentation (9.7 percent), and size of the clinic (6.1 percent). Six of 16 levels gave a negative influence on the decision making. The authors' study shows that the two most important attributes are the experience of the surgeon and the method of referral and that conjoint analysis is effective in determining patients' preferences. It also shows which levels positively or negatively contribute per attribute.

  7. Osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis surgery: a combined ocular-oral procedure for ocular blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, A B G; Tan, D T H; Lye, K W; Theng, J; Parthasarathy, A; Por, Y-M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the oral procedures used in osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) surgery, and the demographics and oral findings of candidate patients in Singapore. The OOKP procedure utilizes an autologous tooth-bone complex to mount a poly-methylmethacrylate optical cylinder, as an artificial cornea, stabilized by an overlying autologous buccal mucosal graft. Consecutive patients referred over 3 years for dental evaluation prior to OOKP surgery were included. A total of 21 patients underwent oral clinical and radiographic evaluation. The aetiology of blindness included Stevens-Johnson's syndrome (11 cases), chemical burns (9 cases) and multiple failed corneal grafts (1 case). Evaluation revealed that 12 patients were suitable for OOKP surgery, 8 were at risk of complication or failure and 1 had no usable teeth. Fourteen patients have undergone unilateral OOKP Stage 1 surgery successfully. Complications included fracture of a tooth from its lingual bone necessitating the harvesting of a second tooth (1 case), oronasal perforation (1 case), exposure of adjacent roots (5 teeth), lower lip paresthesia (2 cases) and submucosal scar band formation in the buccal mucosal graft donor site (10 cases). Thirteen patients have completed Stage 2 surgery, with attainment of their best possible visual potential following OOKP surgery.

  8. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after bariatric surgery - comparison between procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Soto, María L; Martín-Leyva, Ana; González-Jiménez, Amalia; García-Rubio, Jesús; Cózar-Ibáñez, Antonio; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Leyva-Martínez, María S; Jiménez-Ríos, Jose A; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernándo

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the mid-term type 2 diabetes mellitus recovery patterns in morbidly obese patients by comparing some relevant physiological parameters of patients of bariatric surgery between two types of surgical procedures: mixed (roux-en-Y gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion) and restrictive (sleeve gastrectomy). This is a prospective and observational study of co-morbid, type 2 diabetes mellitus evolution in 49 morbidly obese patients: 37 underwent mixed surgery procedures and 12 a restrictive surgery procedure. We recorded weight, height, body mass index, and glycaemic, lipid, and nutritional blood parameters, prior to procedure, as well as six and twelve months post-operatively. In addition, we tested for differences in patient recovery and investigated predictive factors in diabetes remission. Both glycaemic and lipid profiles diminished significantly to healthy levels by 6 and 12 months post intervention. Type 2 diabetes mellitus showed remission in more than 80% of patients of both types of surgical procedures, with no difference between them. Baseline body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, and insulin intake, among others, were shown to be valuable predictors of diabetes remission one year after the intervention. The choice of the type of surgical procedure did not significantly affect the remission rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus in morbidly obese patients. (Endokrynol Pol 2017; 68 (1): 18-25).

  9. Modified nuss procedure in concurrent repair of pectus excavatum and open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco Casamassima, Maria Grazia; Wong, Ling Ling; Papandria, Dominic; Abdullah, Fizan; Vricella, Luca A; Cameron, Duke E; Colombani, Paul M

    2013-03-01

    Pectus excavatum (PE) can be associated with congenital and acquired cardiac disorders that also require surgical repair. The timing and specific surgical technique for repair of PE remains controversial. The present study reports the experience of combined repair of PE and open heart surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A retrospective case review was conducted of all patients who presented for repair of PE deformity while undergoing concurrent open heart surgery from 1998 through 2011. A total of 9 patients met inclusion criteria. All patients had a connective tissue disorder. Repair of PE was performed by modified Nuss technique after completion of the cardiac procedure, performed through a median sternotomy. Open heart procedures were either aortic root replacement or mitral valvuloplasty. Eight patients had bar removal after an average period of 30.3 months. No PE recurrence, bar displacement, or upper sternal depression was reported in 7 patients. Postoperatively, 1 patient exhibited pectus carinatum after a separate spinal fusion surgery for scoliosis. One patient died of unrelated cardiac complications before bar removal. Simultaneous repair of PE and open heart surgery is safe and effective. We recommend that the decision to perform a single-stage versus a multistage procedure should be reserved until after the cardiac procedure has been completed. In such cases, the Nuss technique allows for correction of the pectus deformity with good long-term cosmetic and functional results. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceived age change after aesthetic facial surgical procedures quantifying outcomes of aging face surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nitin; Warner, Jeremy P; Adamson, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the degree of perceived age change after aesthetic facial surgical procedures to provide an objective measure of surgical success. Sixty patients undergoing various aging face surgical procedures were randomly chosen for analysis. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were evaluated. Raters were presented with photographs in a random assortment and were asked to estimate the age of the patient. Perceived age difference was defined as the difference between the chronological age and the estimated age, and the change in this value after surgery was the chief outcome of interest. Statistical models were designed to account for any effects of interrater differences, preoperative chronological age, rater group, photograph order, or surgical procedure performed. Our patient population was divided into the following 3 groups based on the surgical procedure performed: group 1 (face- and neck-lift [22 patients]), group 2 (face- and neck-lift and upper and lower blepharoplasty [17 patients]), and group 3 (face- and neck-lift, upper and lower blepharoplasty, and forehead-lift [21 patients]). Adjusted means demonstrated that patient ages were estimated to be 1.7 years younger than their chronological age before surgery and 8.9 years younger than their chronological age after surgery. The effect was less substantial for group 1 patients and was most dramatic for group 3 patients, who had undergone all 3 aging face surgical procedures. Our study is novel in that it quantifies the degree of perceived age change after aging face surgical procedures and demonstrates a significant and consistent reduction in perceived age after aesthetic facial surgery. This effect is more substantial when the number of surgical procedures is increased, an effect unrelated to the preoperative age of a patient and unaffected by other variables that we investigated. The ability to perceive age correctly is accurate and consistent.

  11. Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire for screening children and adolescents for plastic surgery: cross-cultural validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucupira, Eduardo; Sabino, Miguel; Lima, Edson Luiz de; Dini, Gal Moreira; Brito, Maria José Azevedo de; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2017-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measurements assessing the emotional state of children and adolescents who seek plastic surgery are important for determining whether the intervention is indicated or not. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (child/adolescent and parent versions) for Brazilian Portuguese, test its psychometric properties and assess the emotional state of children and adolescents who seek plastic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-cultural validation study conducted in a plastic surgery outpatient clinic at a public university hospital. A total of 124 consecutive patients of both sexes were selected between September 2013 and February 2014. Forty-seven patients participated in the cultural adaptation of the questionnaire. The final version was tested for reliability on 20 patients. Construct validity was tested on 57 patients by correlating the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (child/adolescent and parent versions) with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale. The child/adolescent and parent versions of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire showed Cronbach's alpha of 0.768 and 0.874, respectively, and had good inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.757 and ICC = 0.853, respectively) and intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.738 and ICC = 0.796, respectively). The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire is a reproducible instrument with face, content and construct validity.The mood state and feelings among children and adolescents seeking cosmetic surgery were healthy.

  12. Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire for screening children and adolescents for plastic surgery: cross-cultural validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sucupira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Patient-reported outcome measurements assessing the emotional state of children and adolescents who seek plastic surgery are important for determining whether the intervention is indicated or not. The aim of this study was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (child/adolescent and parent versions for Brazilian Portuguese, test its psychometric properties and assess the emotional state of children and adolescents who seek plastic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-cultural validation study conducted in a plastic surgery outpatient clinic at a public university hospital. METHODS: A total of 124 consecutive patients of both sexes were selected between September 2013 and February 2014. Forty-seven patients participated in the cultural adaptation of the questionnaire. The final version was tested for reliability on 20 patients. Construct validity was tested on 57 patients by correlating the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (child/adolescent and parent versions with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale. RESULTS: The child/adolescent and parent versions of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire showed Cronbach’s alpha of 0.768 and 0.874, respectively, and had good inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.757 and ICC = 0.853, respectively and intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.738 and ICC = 0.796, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire is a reproducible instrument with face, content and construct validity.The mood state and feelings among children and adolescents seeking cosmetic surgery were healthy.

  13. Do single-use medical devices containing biopolymers reduce the environmental impacts of surgical procedures compared with their plastic equivalents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Scott R; Hottle, Troy A; Hobbs, Shakira R; Thiel, Cassandra L; Campion, Nicole; Bilec, Melissa M; Landis, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Background While petroleum-based plastics are extensively used in health care, recent developments in biopolymer manufacturing have created new opportunities for increased integration of biopolymers into medical products, devices and services. This study compared the environmental impacts of single-use disposable devices with increased biopolymer content versus typically manufactured devices in hysterectomy. Methods A comparative life cycle assessment of single-use disposable medical products containing plastic(s) versus the same single-use medical devices with biopolymers substituted for plastic(s) at Magee-Women's Hospital (Magee) in Pittsburgh, PA and the products used in four types of hysterectomies that contained plastics potentially suitable for biopolymer substitution. Magee is a 360-bed teaching hospital, which performs approximately 1400 hysterectomies annually. Results There are life cycle environmental impact tradeoffs when substituting biopolymers for petroplastics in procedures such as hysterectomies. The substitution of biopolymers for petroleum-based plastics increased smog-related impacts by approximately 900% for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies, and increased ozone depletion-related impacts by approximately 125% for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies. Conversely, biopolymers reduced life cycle human health impacts, acidification and cumulative energy demand for the four hysterectomy procedures. The integration of biopolymers into medical products is correlated with reductions in carcinogenic impacts, non-carcinogenic impacts and respiratory effects. However, the significant agricultural inputs associated with manufacturing biopolymers exacerbate environmental impacts of products and devices made using biopolymers. Conclusions The integration of biopolymers into medical products is correlated with reductions in carcinogenic impacts, non-carcinogenic impacts and respiratory effects; however, the significant agricultural inputs associated

  14. One-Stop Clinic Utilization in Plastic Surgery: Our Local Experience and the Results of a UK-Wide National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Mark; Coelho, James; Gujral, Sameer; McKay, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. “See and treat” one-stop clinics (OSCs) are an advocated NHS initiative to modernise care, reducing cancer treatment waiting times. Little studied in plastic surgery, the existing evidence suggests that though they improve care, they are rarely implemented. We present our experience setting up a plastic surgery OSC for minor skin surgery and survey their use across the UK. Methods. The OSC was evaluated by 18-week wait target compliance, measures of departmental capacity, and patient satisfaction. Data was obtained from 32 of the 47 UK plastic surgery departments to investigate the prevalence of OSCs for minor skin cancer surgery. Results. The OSC improved 18-week waiting times, from a noncompliant mean of 80% to a compliant 95% average. Department capacity increased 15%. 95% of patients were highly satisfied with and preferred the OSC to a conventional service. Only 25% of UK plastic surgery units run OSCs, offering varying reasons for not doing so, 42% having not considered their use. Conclusions. OSCs are underutilised within UK plastic surgery, where a significant proportion of units have not even considered their benefit. This is despite associated improvements in waiting times, department capacity, and levels of high patient satisfaction. We offer our considerations and local experience instituting an OSC service. PMID:26236502

  15. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery and Dermatology Patients: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael Vilela Eiras

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in plastic surgery and dermatology patients, by performing a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. The most relevant studies published originally in any language were analyzed. The literature search was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Scielo databases. The final sample comprised 33 publications that were submitted to meta-analysis. The study verified that 15.04% of plastic surgery patients had body dysmorphic disorder (range 2.21-56.67%); patient mean age was 34.54 ± 12.41 years, and most were women (74.38%). Among dermatology patients, 12.65% (range 4.52-35.16%) had body dysmorphic disorder; patient mean age was 27.79 ± 9.03 years, and most were women (76.09%). Both plastic surgeons and dermatologists must adequately assess their patients to identify those with a higher likelihood of body dysmorphic disorder and should arrange multidisciplinary care for such individuals. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  16. Use, cost, complications, and mortality of robotic versus nonrobotic general surgery procedures based on a nationwide database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Muhammad; Bell, Theodore; Martin, Jennifer; Bhuva, Kalpesh; Grim, Rod; Ahuja, Vanita

    2013-06-01

    Since its introduction in 1997, robotic surgery has overcome many limitations, including setup costs and surgeon training. The use of robotics in general surgery remains unknown. This study evaluates robotic-assisted procedures in general surgery by comparing characteristics with its nonrobotic (laparoscopic and open) counterparts. Weighted Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample data (2008, 2009) were used to identify the top 12 procedures for robotic general surgery. Robotic cases were identified by Current Procedural Terminology codes 17.41 and 17.42. Procedures were grouped: esophagogastric, colorectal, adrenalectomy, lysis of adhesion, and cholecystectomy. Analyses were descriptive, t tests, χ(2)s, and logistic regression. Charges and length of stay were adjusted for gender, age, race, payer, hospital bed size, hospital location, hospital region, median household income, Charlson score, and procedure type. There were 1,389,235 (97.4%) nonrobotic and 37,270 (2.6%) robotic cases. Robotic cases increased from 0.8 per cent (2008) to 4.3 per cent (2009, P robotic surgery had significantly shorter lengths of stay (4.9 days) than open surgery (6.1 days) and lower charges (median $30,540) than laparoscopic ($34,537) and open ($46,704) surgery. Fewer complications were seen in robotic-assisted colorectal, adrenalectomy and lysis of adhesion; however, robotic cholecystectomy and esophagogastric procedures had higher complications than nonrobotic surgery (P robotic surgery had a lower mortality rate (0.097%) than nonrobotic surgeries per 10,000 procedures (laparoscopic 0.48%, open 0.92%; P robotic surgery is generally considered a prohibitive factor. In the present study, when overall cost was considered, including length of stay, robotic surgery appeared to be cost-effective and as safe as nonrobotic surgery except in cholecystectomy and esophagogastric procedures. Further study is needed to fully understand the long-term implications of

  17. The price of surgery: markup of operative procedures in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Faiz; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2017-02-01

    Despite cost containment efforts, the price for surgery is not subject to any regulations. We sought to characterize and compare variability in pricing for commonly performed major surgical procedures across the United States. Medicare claims corresponding to eight major surgical procedures (aortic aneurysm repair, aortic valvuloplasty, carotid endartectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting, esophagectomy, pancreatectomy, liver resection, and colectomy) were identified using the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File for 2013. For each procedure, total charges, Medicare-allowable costs, and total payments were recorded. A procedure-specific markup ratio (MR; ratio of total charges to Medicare-allowable costs) was calculated and compared between procedures and across states. Variation in MR was compared using a coefficient of variation (CoV). Among all providers, the median MR was 3.5 (interquartile range: 3.1-4.0). MR was noted to vary by procedure; ranging from 3.0 following colectomy to 6.0 following carotid endartectomy (P < 0.001). MR also varied for the same procedure; varying the least after liver resection (CoV = 0.24), while coronary artery bypass grafting pricing demonstrated the greatest variation in MR (CoV = 0.53). Compared with the national average, MR varied by 36% between states ranging from 1.8 to 13.0. Variation in MR was also noted within the same state varying by 15% within the state of Arkansas (CoV = 0.15) compared with 51% within the state of Wisconsin (CoV = 0.51). Significant variation was noted for the price of surgery by procedure as well as between and within different geographical regions. Greater scrutiny and transparency in the price of surgery is required to promote cost containment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparing the 810nm diode laser with conventional surgery in orthodontic soft tissue procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ize-Iyamu, I N; Saheeb, B D; Edetanlen, B E

    2013-09-01

    To compare the use of the 810nm diode laser with conventional surgery in the management of soft tissue mucogingival problems associated with orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic patients requiring different soft tissue surgical procedures were randomly assigned to receive conventional surgery or soft tissue diode laser, (wavelength 810 nm). Parameters documented include the type of anaesthesia used, intra and post operative pain, bleeding, the use of scalpel and sutures. The chi-squared test was used to test for significance at 95% confidence level. Probability values (p-values) less than 0.05 were regarded as significant. Only 2(16.7%) of the procedures carried out with the soft tissue laser required infiltration anaesthesia compared to 10 (90.9%) with conventional surgery and this was significant (Pdiode laser (Pdiode laser. No sutures were used in all soft tissue cases managed with the diode laser and this was significant (Plaser compared with conventional surgery. Orthodontic patients treated with the diode laser required less infiltration anaesthesia, had reduced bleeding during and after surgery, rapid postoperative haemostasis, elimination of the need for sutures and an improved postoperative comfort and healing.

  19. Development of a Virtual Reality Simulator for Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) Cholecystectomy Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woojin; Dargar, Saurabh; Halic, Tansel; Lee, Jason; Li, Baichun; Pan, Junjun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Roberts, Kurt; De, Suvranu

    2014-01-01

    The first virtual-reality-based simulator for Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) is developed called the Virtual Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery Trainer (VTESTTM). VTESTTM aims to simulate hybrid NOTES cholecystectomy procedure using a rigid scope inserted through the vaginal port. The hardware interface is designed for accurate motion tracking of the scope and laparoscopic instruments to reproduce the unique hand-eye coordination. The haptic-enabled multimodal interactive simulation includes exposing the Calot's triangle and detaching the gall bladder while performing electrosurgery. The developed VTESTTM was demonstrated and validated at NOSCAR 2013.

  20. Sinonasal imaging after Caldwell-Luc surgery: MDCT findings of an abandoned procedure in times of functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Peloschek, Philipp; Koelblinger, Claus; Mehrain, Sheida; Krestan, Christian Robert; Czerny, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is performed in most of the patients with sinonasal inflammatory disease. The postoperative imaging findings of FESS in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) considerably differ from those of historic Caldwell-Luc (CL) maxillary sinus surgery which is an uncommon procedure today. Thus, the postoperative CL imaging findings may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation. Therefore, this study explicitly presents the MDCT findings of post-CL patients which have not been described previously. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with clinically suspected sinusitis and documented history of CL-procedure underwent 16 row MDCT (MDCT Mx8000 IDT Philips) with multiplanar reconstructions of the paranasal sinuses in the axial plane. The following parameters were used: 140 kV, 50 mAs; 16 mm x 0.75 mm detector collimation; 1 mm reconstructed slice thickness; 0.5 mm increment. The studies were reconstructed with a bone algorithm (W3000/L600; 1 mm slice thickness) in axial plane and coronal plane (3 mm slice thickness). The images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of normal surgery-related and pathological findings. Results: Surgery-related imaging characteristics presented as follows: an anterior and a medial bony wall defect and sclerosis and sinus wall thickening were observed in all 28/28 cases (100%). Collaps of the sinus cavity was seen in 26/28 cases (92.9%). Furthermore, inflammatory disease of the operated sinus(es) was found in 23/28 cases (82.1%): 14/28 patients (50%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening of the operated sinus(es) as well as of other sinonasal cavities and 9/28 patients (32.1%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening limited to the operated sinus(es). A postoperative mucocele was depicted in 3/28 cases (10.7%). 2/28 patients (7.1%) showed neither maxillary nor other mucosal swelling. Conclusion: MDCT with multiplanar reconstructions is a precise method to evaluate

  1. Robotic assisted surgery in pediatric gynecology: promising innovation in mini invasive surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Ghassan; Calcaterra, Valeria; Scorletti, Federico; Romano, Piero; Goruppi, Ilaria; Mencherini, Simonetta; Avolio, Luigi; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    Robotic assisted surgery is not yet widely applied in the pediatric field. We report our initial experience regarding the feasibility, safety, benefits, and limitations of robot-assisted surgery in pediatric gynecological patients. Descriptive, retrospective report of experience with pediatric gynecological patients over a period of 12 months. Department of Pediatric Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation. Children and adolescents, with a surgical diagnosis of ovarian and/or tubal lesions. Robot assembly time and operative time, days of hospitalization, time to cessation of pain medication, complication rate, conversion rate to laparoscopic procedure and trocar insertion strategy. Six children and adolescents (2.4-15 yrs), weighing 12-55 kg, underwent robotic assisted surgery for adnexal pathologies: 2 for ovarian cystectomy, 2 for oophorectomy, 1 for right oophorectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy for gonadal disgenesis, 1 for exploration for suspected pelvic malformation. Mean operative time was 117.5 ± 34.9 minutes. Conversion to laparatomy was not necessary in any of the cases. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Initial results indicate that robotic assisted surgery is safely applicable in the pediatric gynecological population, although it is still premature to conclude that it provides better clinical outcomes than traditional laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, prospective, comparative studies will help characterize the advantages and disadvantages of this new technology in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of standardized patients in the plastic surgery residency curriculum: teaching core competencies with objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Drew; Lee, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    As of 2006, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education had defined six "core competencies" of residency education: interpersonal communication skills, medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Objective structured clinical examinations using standardized patients are becoming effective educational tools, and the authors developed a novel use of the examinations in plastic surgery residency education that assesses all six competencies. Six plastic surgery residents, two each from postgraduate years 4, 5, and 6, participated in the plastic surgery-specific objective structured clinical examination that focused on melanoma. The examination included a 30-minute videotaped encounter with a standardized patient actor and a postencounter written exercise. The residents were scored on their performance in all six core competencies by the standardized patients and faculty experts on a three-point scale (1 = novice, 2 = moderately skilled, and 3 = proficient). Resident performance was averaged for each postgraduate year, stratified according to core competency, and scored from a total of 100 percent. Residents overall scored well in interpersonal communications skills (84 percent), patient care (83 percent), professionalism (86 percent), and practice-based learning (84 percent). Scores in medical knowledge showed a positive correlation with level of training (86 percent). All residents scored comparatively lower in systems-based practice (65 percent). The residents reported unanimously that the objective structured clinical examination was realistic and educational. The objective structured clinical examination provided comprehensive and meaningful feedback and identified areas of strengths and weakness for the residents and for the teaching program. The examination is an effective assessment tool for the core competencies and a valuable adjunct to residency training.

  3. Validity, reliability and support for implementation of independence-scaled procedural assessment in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Kelvin H; van Det, Marc J; Veeger, Nic J G M; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N

    2016-06-01

    There is no widely used method to evaluate procedure-specific laparoscopic skills. The first aim of this study was to develop a procedure-based assessment method. The second aim was to compare its validity, reliability and feasibility with currently available global rating scales (GRSs). An independence-scaled procedural assessment was created by linking the procedural key steps of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy to an independence scale. Subtitled and blinded videos of a novice, an intermediate and an almost competent trainee, were evaluated with GRSs (OSATS and GOALS) and the independence-scaled procedural assessment by seven surgeons, three senior trainees and six scrub nurses. Participants received a short introduction to the GRSs and independence-scaled procedural assessment before assessment. The validity was estimated with the Friedman and Wilcoxon test and the reliability with the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). A questionnaire was used to evaluate user opinion. Independence-scaled procedural assessment and GRS scores improved significantly with surgical experience (OSATS p = 0.001, GOALS p < 0.001, independence-scaled procedural assessment p < 0.001). The ICCs of the OSATS, GOALS and independence-scaled procedural assessment were 0.78, 0.74 and 0.84, respectively, among surgeons. The ICCs increased when the ratings of scrub nurses were added to those of the surgeons. The independence-scaled procedural assessment was not considered more of an administrative burden than the GRSs (p = 0.692). A procedural assessment created by combining procedural key steps to an independence scale is a valid, reliable and acceptable assessment instrument in surgery. In contrast to the GRSs, the reliability of the independence-scaled procedural assessment exceeded the threshold of 0.8, indicating that it can also be used for summative assessment. It furthermore seems that scrub nurses can assess the operative competence of surgical trainees.

  4. Interactive navigation-guided ophthalmic plastic surgery: navigation enabling of telescopes and their use in endoscopic lacrimal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Javed Ali,1 Swati Singh,1 Milind N Naik,1 Swathi Kaliki,2 Tarjani Vivek Dave1 1The Institute of Dacryology, 2The Operation Eyesight Universal Institute for Eye Cancer, L.V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India Purpose: The aims of this study were to report the preliminary experience of using telescopes, which were enabled for navigation guidance, and their utility in complex endoscopic lacrimal surgeries. Methods: Navigation enabling of the telescope was achieved by using the AxiEM™ malleable neuronavigation shunt stylet. Image-guided dacryolocalization was performed in five patients using the intraoperative image-guided StealthStation™ system in the electromagnetic mode. The “look ahead” protocol software was used to assist the surgeon in assessing the intraoperative geometric location of the endoscope and what lies ahead in real time. All patients underwent navigation-guided powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy. The utility of uninterrupted navigation guidance throughout the surgery with the endoscope as the navigating tool was noted. Results: Intraoperative geometric localization of the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct could be easily deciphered. Constant orientation of the lacrimal drainage system and the peri-lacrimal anatomy was possible without the need for repeated point localizations throughout the surgery. The “look ahead” features could accurately alert the surgeon of anatomical structures that exists at 5, 10 and 15 mm in front of the endoscope. Good securing of the shunt stylet with the telescope was found to be essential for constant and accurate navigation. Conclusion: Navigation-enabled endoscopes provide the surgeon with the advantage of sustained stereotactic anatomical awareness at all times during the surgery. Keywords: telescope, endoscope, image guidance, navigation, lacrimal surgery, powered endoscopic DCR

  5. Plastic Surgery Overseas: How Much Should a Physician Risk in the Pursuit of Higher-Quality Continuity of Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikart, Scott

    2018-04-01

    In this article I discuss medical tourism, whereby patients go overseas for plastic surgery treatment in order to save money. However, if malpractice occurs abroad, there are several barriers that make it difficult for patients to recover damages. I explain these legal barriers and then discuss the possible causes of action patients can have over their "domestic physician" (their personal physician who might have referred surgery abroad or who gives postoperative follow-up care) and how these causes of action can create avenues of legal recovery not otherwise available. The possible liability of the domestic physician in the context of surgical malpractice abroad creates an ethical tension in the pursuit of higher-quality continuity of care, as the more involved the physician becomes in the process, the more likely he or she will assume liability. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Is there inter-procedural transfer of skills in intraocular surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; la Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    surgery on a virtual-reality simulator until passing a test with predefined validity evidence (cataract trainees) or to (2) no cataract surgery training (novices). Possible skill transfer was assessed using a test consisting of all 11 vitreoretinal modules on the EyeSi virtual-reality simulator. All...... participants repeated the test of vitreoretinal surgical skills until their performance curve plateaued. Three experienced vitreoretinal surgeons also performed the test to establish validity evidence. Analysis with independent samples t-tests was performed. RESULTS: The vitreoretinal test on the Eye......, p = 0.265), or maximum scores (785 ± 162 points versus 805 ± 73 points, p = 0.791). CONCLUSION: Pretraining in cataract surgery did not demonstrate any measurable effect on vitreoretinal procedural performance. The results of this study indicate that we should not anticipate extensive transfer...

  7. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  8. Wound healing in plastic surgery: does age matter? An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Efstathios; Osgood, Geoff; Siddiqui, Aamir; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2015-03-01

    Increasing age has traditionally been associated with impairment in wound healing after operative interventions. This is based mostly on hearsay and anecdotal information. This idea fits with the authors’ understanding of biology in older organisms. This dictum has not been rigorously tested in clinical practice. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was retrospectively queried for all patients undergoing plastic surgery from 2005 to 2010. Variables extracted included basic demographics, comorbidities, previous steroid and tobacco use, wound classification at the end of the surgery, and development of postoperative surgical-site infections. Multivariate analyses were used to investigate the impact of aging in wound dehiscence. A total of 25,967 patients were identified. Overall, the incidence of wound dehiscence was 0.75 percent (n = 196). When patients younger than 30 years were compared to older patient groups, no difference in the probability of developing wound dehiscence was noted. Specifically, the groups of patients aged 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years did not have statistically significant wound healing deficiencies [adjusted OR, 0.63 (95 percent CI, 0.11 to 3.63), adjusted p = 0.609; 2.79 (0.55 to 14.18), adjusted p = 0.217, for 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years, respectively]. Factors independently associated with wound dehiscence included postoperative abscess development, paraplegia, quadriplegia, steroid and tobacco use, deep surgical-site infection development, increasing body mass index, and wound classification at the end of surgery. In patients undergoing plastic surgery, wound dehiscence is a rare complication (0.75 percent). Aging is not associated with an increased incidence of wound dehiscence. Risk, III.

  9. Laparoscopy is safe among patients with congestive heart failure undergoing general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Paul J; Ganapathi, Asvin M; Englum, Brian R; Vaslef, Steven N

    2014-08-01

    Over the past 2 decades, laparoscopy has been established as a superior technique in many general surgery procedures. Few studies, however, have examined the impact of the use of a laparoscopic approach in patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Because pneumoperitoneum has known effects on cardiopulmonary physiology, patients with CHF may be at increased risk. This study examines current trends in approaches to patients with CHF and effects on perioperative outcomes. The 2005-2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant User File was used to identify patients who underwent the following general surgery procedures: Appendectomy, segmental colectomy, small bowel resection, ventral hernia repair, and splenectomy. Included for analysis were those with newly diagnosed CHF or chronic CHF with new signs or symptoms. Trends of use of laparoscopy were assessed across procedure types. The primary endpoint was 30-day mortality. The independent effect of laparoscopy in CHF was estimated with a multiple logistic regression model. A total of 265,198 patients were included for analysis, of whom 2,219 were identified as having new or recently worsened CHF. Of these patients, there were 1,300 (58.6%) colectomies, 486 (21.9%) small bowel resections, 216 (9.7%) ventral hernia repairs, 141 (6.4%) appendectomies, and 76 (3.4%) splenectomies. Laparoscopy was used less frequently in patients with CHF compared with their non-CHF counterparts, particularly for nonelective procedures. Baseline characteristics were similar for laparoscopy versus open procedures with the notable exception of urgent/emergent case status (36.4% vs 71.3%; P surgery procedures, particularly in urgent/emergent cases. Despite these patterns and apparent preferences, laparoscopy seems to offer a safe alternative in appropriately selected patients. Because morbidity and mortality were considerable regardless of approach, further understanding of appropriate management in this

  10. Using virtual reality to control preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients: A pilot study in maxillofacial and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Hersant, B; Sidahmed-Mezi, M; Dhonneur, G; Meningaud, J P

    2018-01-06

    Preoperative anxiety may lead to medical and surgical complications, behavioral problems and emotional distress. The most common means of prevention are based on using medication and, more recently, hypnosis. The aim of our study was to determine whether a virtual reality (VR) program presenting natural scenes could be part of a new therapy to reduce patients' preoperative anxiety. Our prospective pilot study consisted of a single-blind trial in skin cancer surgery at the Henri-Mondor teaching hospital in France. In the outpatient surgery department, 20 patients with a score of >11 on the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) were virtually immersed into a natural universe for 5minutes. Their stress levels were assessed before and after this experience by making use of a visual analog scale (VAS), by measuring salivary cortisol levels, and by determining physiological stress based on heart coherence scores. The VAS score was significantly reduced after the simulation (P<0.009) as was the level of salivary cortisol (P<0.04). Heart coherence scores remained unchanged (P=0.056). VR allows patients to be immersed in a relaxing, peaceful environment. It represents a non-invasive way to reduce preoperative stress levels with no side effects and no need for additional medical or paramedical staff. Our results indicate that VR may provide an effective complementary technique to manage stress in surgery patients. Randomized trials are necessary to determine precise methods and benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [A role for hypnosis in cataract surgery: Report of 171 procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, E; Pernod, C; El Chehab, H; Russo, A; Haxaire, M; Dot, C

    2016-03-01

    To study the effectiveness of relaxation hypnosis in outpatient cataract surgery. Prospective study of 171 patients undergoing cataract surgery under hypnosis, performed by the same nurse anesthetist. The procedures were performed by 2 senior surgeons, A and B (A=78 surgeries, and B=93 surgeries) under topical anesthesia and with a 2.2-mm mini-incision. The hypnosis group (n=102) was compared to a control group (n=69) according to quantitative, objective criteria: hemodynamic changes and the need for intravenous medication in operating room, as well as subjective, qualitative criteria: surgical comfort, effectiveness of hypnosis, and patient satisfaction. Subgroup analyses by surgeon, 1st and 2nd eye surgery, were performed. Hemodynamic parameters were not significantly different between the 2 groups: systolic blood pressure (P=0.06) and maximum heart rate (P=0.25). However, the use of intraoperative intravenous medication was significantly higher in the control group (49.3% versus 21.6%, Phypnosis group reported a mean comfort rating of 8.4/10, and 100% were satisfied with this hypnosis experience. Preliminary results of this study are very positive for all three parties: patient/anesthetist/surgeon. They are leading to an expanded university training program for operating room personnel in order to improve quality of care and reduce premedication in elderly patients so as to facilitate their return to home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety profile of antibiotic prophylaxis usage in clean and clean-contaminated plastic and reconstructive surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Dong, Jiasheng; Qiao, Yufei; He, Jinguang; Wang, Tao; Ma, Sunxiang

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus with regard to antibiotic prophylaxis usage in clean and clean-contaminated plastic and reconstructive surgery. This meta-analysis sought to assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis and to determine appropriate duration of prophylaxis. An English language literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Collaboration for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluate the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) in patients undergoing clean and clean-contaminated plastic and reconstructive surgery. Data from intention-to-treat analyses were used where available. For the dichotomous data, results for each study were odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and combined for meta-analysis using the Mantel-Haenszel method or the DerSimonian and Laird method. Study quality was critically appraised by 2 reviewers using established criteria. STATA version 12 was used for meta-analyses. Twelve RCTs involving 2395 patients were included, of which 8 trials were considered to be of high methodological quality. Effect of antibiotic prophylaxis in plastic and reconstructive surgery was found favorable over placebo in SSI prevention (13 studies; 2449 participants; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.4-0.7; P plastic surgeries with high-risk factors and clean-contaminated plastic surgeries. Besides, a short-course administration regimen seemed to be of adequate efficacy and safety. High-quality prospective trials on larger scale are needed to further confirm these findings.

  13. Multiaxial mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of human adipose tissue: a basis for preoperative simulations in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Gerhard; Eder, Maximilian; Kovacs, Laszlo; Pathak, Heramb; Bonitz, Lars; Mueller, Christoph; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-11-01

    A preoperative simulation of soft tissue deformations during plastic and reconstructive surgery is desirable to support the surgeon's planning and to improve surgical outcomes. The current development of constitutive adipose tissue models, for the implementation in multilayer computational frameworks for the simulation of human soft tissue deformations, has proved difficult because knowledge of the required mechanical parameters of fat tissue is limited. Therefore, for the first time, human abdominal adipose tissues were mechanically investigated by biaxial tensile and triaxial shear tests. The results of this study suggest that human abdominal adipose tissues under quasi-static and dynamic multiaxial loadings can be characterized as a nonlinear, anisotropic and viscoelastic soft biological material. The nonlinear and anisotropic features are consequences of the material's collagenous microstructure. The aligned collagenous septa observed in histological investigations causes the anisotropy of the tissue. A hyperelastic model used in this study was appropriate to represent the quasi-static multiaxial mechanical behavior of fat tissue. The constitutive parameters are intended to serve as a basis for soft tissue simulations using the finite element method, which is an apparent method for obtaining promising results in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of in-situ simulation to improve safety in the plastic surgery office: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Fred E; Pawlowski, John B; Rosenberg, Noah M; Liu, Xiaoxia; Feinstein, David M; Urman, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Simulation-based interventions and education can potentially contribute to safer and more effective systems of care. We utilized in-situ simulation to highlight safety issues, regulatory requirements, and assess perceptions of safety processes by the plastic surgery office staff. A high-fidelity human patient simulator was brought to an office-based plastic surgery setting to enact a half-day full-scale, multidisciplinary medical emergency. Facilitated group debriefings were conducted after each scenario with special consideration of the principles of team training, communication, crisis management, and adherence to evidence-based protocols and regulatory standards. Abbreviated AHRQ Medical Office Safety Culture Survey was completed by the participants before and after the session. The in-situ simulations had a high degree of acceptance and face validity according to the participants. Areas highlighted by the simulation sessions included rapid communication, delegation of tasks, location of emergency materials, scope of practice, and logistics of transport. The participant survey indicated greater awareness of patient safety issues following participation in simulation and debriefing exercises in 3 areas (P issue (100% vs 75%), openness to ideas about improving office processes (100% vs 88%), and the need to discuss ways to prevent errors from recurring (88% vs 62%). Issues of safety and regulatory compliance can be assessed in an office-based setting through the short-term (half-day) use of in-situ simulation with facilitated debriefing and the review of audiovisual recordings by trained facilities inspectors.

  15. General surgery residents' perception of robot-assisted procedures during surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farivar, Behzad S; Flannagan, Molly; Leitman, I Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the continued expansion of robotically assisted procedures, general surgery residents continue to receive more exposure to this new technology as part of their training. There are currently no guidelines or standardized training requirements for robot-assisted procedures during general surgical residency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this new technology on general surgery training from the residents' perspective. An anonymous, national, web-based survey was conducted on residents enrolled in general surgery training in 2013. The survey was sent to 240 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved general surgery training programs. Overall, 64% of the responding residents were men and had an average age of 29 years. Half of the responses were from postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 residents, and the remainder was from the PGY3 level and above. Overall, 50% of the responses were from university training programs, 32% from university-affiliated programs, and 18% from community-based programs. More than 96% of residents noted the availability of the surgical robot system at their training institution. Overall, 63% of residents indicated that they had participated in robotic surgical cases. Most responded that they had assisted in 10 or fewer robotic cases with the most frequent activities being assisting with robotic trocar placement and docking and undocking the robot. Only 18% reported experience with operating the robotic console. More senior residents (PGY3 and above) were involved in robotic cases compared with junior residents (78% vs 48%, p robotic case. Approximately 64% of residents reported that formal training in robotic surgery was important in residency training and 46% of residents indicated that robotic-assisted cases interfered with resident learning. Only 11% felt that robotic-assisted cases would replace conventional laparoscopic surgery in the future. This study illustrates that although the most residents

  16. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  17. Soft Lithographic Procedure for Producing Plastic Microfluidic Devices with View-ports Transparent to Visible and Infrared Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryana, Mona; Shanmugarajah, Jegan V; Maniam, Sivakumar M; Grenci, Gianluca

    2017-08-17

    Infrared (IR) spectro-microscopy of living biological samples is hampered by the absorption of water in the mid-IR range and by the lack of suitable microfluidic devices. Here, a protocol for the fabrication of plastic microfluidic devices is demonstrated, where soft lithographic techniques are used to embed transparent Calcium Fluoride (CaF2) view-ports in connection with observation chamber(s). The method is based on a replica casting approach, where a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold is produced through standard lithographic procedures and then used as the template to produce a plastic device. The plastic device features ultraviolet/visible/infrared (UV/Vis/IR) -transparent windows made of CaF2 to allow for direct observation with visible and IR light. The advantages of the proposed method include: a reduced need for accessing a clean room micro-fabrication facility, multiple view-ports, an easy and versatile connection to an external pumping system through the plastic body, flexibility of the design, e.g., open/closed channels configuration, and the possibility to add sophisticated features such as nanoporous membranes.

  18. All-Arthroscopic Revision Eden-Hybinette Procedure for Failed Instability Surgery: Technique and Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakos, Antonios; Vezeridis, Peter S; Schwartz, Daniel G; Jany, Richard; Lafosse, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    To describe the technique of an all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for treatment of a failed instability procedure, particularly after failed Latarjet, as well as to present preliminary results of this technique. Between 2007 and 2011, 18 shoulders with persistent instability after failed instability surgery were treated with an arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette technique using an autologous bicortical iliac crest bone graft. Of 18 patients, 12 (9 men, 3 women) were available for follow-up. The average follow-up was 28.8 months (range, 15 to 60 months). A Latarjet procedure was performed as an index surgery in 10 patients (83%). Two patients (17%) had a prior arthroscopic Bankart repair. Eight patients (67%) obtained a good or excellent result, whereas 4 patients (33%) reported a fair or poor result. Seven patients (58%) returned to sport activities. A positive apprehension test persisted in 5 patients (42%), including 2 patients (17%) with recurrent subluxations. The Rowe score increased from 30.00 to 78.33 points (P Instability Index score showed a good result of 28.71% (603 points). The average anterior flexion was 176° (range, 150° to 180°), and the average external rotation was 66° (range, 0° to 90°). Two patients (16.67%) showed a progression of glenohumeral osteoarthritic changes, with each patient increasing by one stage in the Samilson-Prieto classification. All 4 patients (33%) with a fair or poor result had a nonunion identified on postoperative computed tomography scan. An all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for failed instability surgery, although technically demanding, is a safe, effective, and reproducible technique. Although the learning curve is considerable, this procedure offers all the advantages of arthroscopic surgery and allows reconstruction of glenoid defects and restoration of shoulder stability in this challenging patient population. In our hands, this procedure yields good

  19. [Analysis of the application and funding projects of National Natural Science Foundation of China in the field of burns and plastic surgery from 2010 to 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Dou, D; Wang, X Y; Xie, D H; Yan, Z C

    2017-02-20

    We analyzed the data of application and funding projects of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2016 in the field of burns and plastic surgery and summarized the NSFC funding pattern, the research hotspots, and weaknesses in this field. The NSFC has funded 460 projects in the field of burns and plastic surgery, with total funding of RMB 227.96 million. The scientific issues involved in the funding projects include orthotherapy against malformations, wound repair, basic research of burns, skin grafting, scars prevention, and regeneration of hair follicle and sweat glands. The research techniques involved in the funding projects are diversified. NSFC plays an important role in the scientific research and talents training in the field of burns and plastic surgery.

  20. WW II "guinea pigs" played crucial role in refining plastic surgery in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Wilton, P

    1998-01-01

    When WW II started, Canada had only 4 plastic surgeons. One of them, Dr. Ross Tilley, would treat hundreds of Allied airmen whose bodies needed massive reconstruction because of war injuries. These men became known as the guinea pigs, and Tilley would bring the lessons he learned on them back to Canada.

  1. Components of Hospital Perioperative Infrastructure Can Overcome the Weekend Effect in Urgent General Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N; Zapf, Matthew A C; Blackwell, Robert H; Markossian, Talar; Chang, Victor; Mi, Zhiyong; Gupta, Gopal N; Kuo, Paul C

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that perioperative hospital resources could overcome the "weekend effect" (WE) in patients undergoing emergent/urgent surgeries. The WE is the observation that surgeon-independent patient outcomes are worse on the weekend compared with weekdays. The WE is often explained by differences in staffing and resources resulting in variation in care between the week and weekend. Emergent/urgent surgeries were identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Database (Florida) from 2007 to 2011 and linked to the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey Database to determine hospital level characteristics. Extended median length of stay (LOS) on the weekend compared with the weekdays (after controlling for hospital, year, and procedure type) was selected as a surrogate for WE. Included were 126,666 patients at 166 hospitals. A total of 17 hospitals overcame the WE during the study period. Logistic regression, controlling for patient characteristics, identified full adoption of electronic medical records (OR 4.74), home health program (OR 2.37), pain management program [odds ratio (OR) 1.48)], increased registered nurse-to-bed ratio (OR 1.44), and inpatient physical rehabilitation (OR 1.03) as resources that were predictors for overcoming the WE. The prevalence of these factors in hospitals exhibiting the WE for all 5 years of the study period were compared with those hospitals that overcame the WE (P surgery procedures. Improved hospital perioperative infrastructure represents an important target for overcoming disparities in surgical care.

  2. Child drawings and salivary cortisol in children undergoing preoperative procedures associated with day surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennström, Berith; Törnhage, Carl-Johan; Hedelin, Hans; Nasic, Salmir; Bergh, Ingrid

    2013-12-01

    Perioperative procedures in children can impair their emotional status negatively with stress and/or anxiety. Cortisol concentrations and drawings could be helpful in gaining information about a child's levels of stress and/or anxiety when attending the hospital for surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of anxiety and stress as well as to explore the association between objective measures of stress (cortisol concentration in saliva) and subjective assessment of hospital anxiety (children's drawings) as interpreted by the Swedish version of the Child Drawing: Hospital manual. A total of 93 children scheduled for day surgery were included. Salivary cortisol was sampled preoperatively on the day of surgery at which time the children were also requested to make a drawing of a person at the hospital. Results showed no association between salivary cortisol concentration and the CD:H score. The drawings and salivary cortisol concentration preoperatively on the day of surgery reflect different components of the conditions of fear, anxiety, or stress emerging in the situation. Copyright © 2013 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient access in plastic surgery: an operational and financial analysis of service-based interventions to improve ambulatory throughput in an academic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Gilland, Wendell G; Weir, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    Inefficient patient throughput in a surgery practice can result in extended new patient backlogs, excessively long cycle times in the outpatient clinics, poor patient satisfaction, decreased physician productivity, and loss of potential revenue. This project assesses the efficacy of multiple throughput interventions in an academic, plastic surgery practice at a public university. We implemented a Patient Access and Efficiency (PAcE) initiative, funded and sponsored by our health care system, to improve patient throughput in the outpatient surgery clinic. Interventions included: (1) creation of a multidisciplinary team, led by a project redesign manager, that met weekly; (2) definition of goals, metrics, and target outcomes; 3) revision of clinic templates to reflect actual demand; 4) working down patient backlog through group visits; 5) booking new patients across entire practice; 6) assigning a physician's assistant to the preoperative clinic; and 7) designating a central scheduler to coordinate flow of information. Main outcome measures included: patient satisfaction using Press-Ganey surveys; complaints reported to patient relations; time to third available appointment; size of patient backlog; monthly clinic volumes with utilization rates and supply/demand curves; "chaos" rate (cancellations plus reschedules, divided by supply, within 48 hours of booked clinic date); patient cycle times with bottleneck analysis; physician productivity measured by work Relative Value Units (wRVUs); and downstream financial effects on billing, collection, accounts receivable (A/R), and payer mix. We collected, managed, and analyzed the data prospectively, comparing the pre-PAcE period (6 months) with the PAcE period (6 months). The PAcE initiative resulted in multiple improvements across the entire plastic surgery practice. Patient satisfaction increased only slightly from 88.5% to 90.0%, but the quarterly number of complaints notably declined from 17 to 9. Time to third

  4. Creation of an emergency surgery service concentrates resident training in general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hesham M; Gale, Stephen C; Tinti, Meredith S; Shiroff, Adam M; Macias, Aitor C; Rhodes, Stancie C; Defreese, Marissa A; Gracias, Vicente H

    2012-09-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is increasingly being provided by academic trauma surgeons in an acute care surgery model. Our tertiary care hospital recently changed from a model where all staff surgeons (private, subspecialty academic, and trauma academic) were assigned EGS call to one in which an emergency surgery service (ESS), staffed by academic trauma faculty, cares for all EGS patients. In the previous model, many surgeries were "not covered" by residents because of work-hour restrictions, conflicting needs, or private surgeon preference. The ESS was separate from the trauma service. We hypothesize that by creating a separate ESS, residents can accumulate needed and concentrated operative experience in a well-supervised academic environment. A prospectively accrued EGS database was retrospectively queried for the 18-month period: July 2010 to June 2011. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) databases were queried for operative numbers for our residency program and for national resident data for 2 years before and after creating the ESS. The ACGME operative requirements were tabulated from online sources. ACGME requirements were compared with surgical cases performed. During the 18-month period, 816 ESS operations were performed. Of these, 307 (38%) were laparoscopy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and appendectomy were most common (138 and 145, respectively) plus 24 additional laparoscopic surgeries. Each resident performed, on average, 34 basic laparoscopic cases during their 2-month rotation, which is 56% of their ACGME basic laparoscopic requirement. A diverse mixture of 70 other general surgical operations was recorded for the remaining 509 surgical cases, including reoperative surgery, complex laparoscopy, multispecialty procedures, and seldom-performed operations such as surgery for perforated ulcer disease. Before the ESS, the classes of 2008 and 2009 reported that only 48% and 50% of cases were performed at the main academic

  5. Piezosurgery in Bone Augmentation Procedures Previous to Dental Implant Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Gabriel Leonardo; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The piezosurgery has been used with increasing frequency and applicability by health professionals, especially those who deal with dental implants. The concept of piezoelectricity has emerged in the nineteenth century, but it was applied in oral surgery from 1988 by Tomaso Vercellotti. It consists of an ultrasonic device able to cut mineralized bone tissue, without injuring the adjacent soft tissue. It also has several advantages when compared to conventional techniques with drills and saws, such as the production of a precise, clean and low bleed bone cut that shows positive biological results. In dental implants surgery, it has been used for maxillary sinus lifting, removal of bone blocks, distraction osteogenesis, lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve, split crest of alveolar ridge and even for dental implants placement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of piezosurgery in bone augmentation procedures used previously to dental implants placement. PMID:26966469

  6. Does procedure profitability impact whether an outpatient surgery is performed at an ambulatory surgery center or hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotzke, Michael Robert; Courtemanche, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are small (typically physician owned) healthcare facilities that specialize in performing outpatient surgeries and therefore compete against hospitals for patients. Physicians who own ASCs could treat their most profitable patients at their ASCs and less profitable patients at hospitals. This paper asks if the profitability of an outpatient surgery impacts where a physician performs the surgery. Using a sample of Medicare patients from the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, we find that higher profit surgeries do have a higher probability of being performed at an ASC compared to a hospital. After controlling for surgery type, a 10% increase in a surgery's profitability is associated with a 1.2 to 1.4 percentage point increase in the probability the surgery is performed at an ASC. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Are Quantitative Measures of Academic Productivity Correlated with Academic Rank in Plastic Surgery? A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Miller, Devin; O'Brien-Coon, Devin; Zins, James E; Serletti, Joseph M; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Manson, Paul N; Gordon, Chad R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among full-time academic plastic surgeons. Bibliometric indices were computed for all full-time academic plastic surgeons in the United States. The primary study variable was academic rank. Bibliometric predictors included the Hirsch index, I-10 index, number of publications, number of citations, and highest number of citations for a single publication. Descriptive, bivariate, and correlation analyses were computed. Multiple comparisons testing was used to calculate adjusted associations for subgroups. For all analyses, a value of p productivity. Although academic promotion is the result of success in multiple different areas, bibliometric measures may be useful adjuncts for assessment of research productivity.

  8. Procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids vs traditional surgery for outlet obstructive constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Bo; Liu, Yang; Liu, Qing; Wen, Hao

    2015-07-14

    To compare the clinical efficacies of two surgical procedures for hemorrhoid rectal prolapse with outlet obstruction-induced constipation. One hundred eight inpatients who underwent surgery for outlet obstructive constipation caused by internal rectal prolapse and circumferential hemorrhoids at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 2012 to June 2013 were prospectively included in the study. The patients with rectal prolapse hemorrhoids with outlet obstruction-induced constipation were randomly divided into two groups to undergo either a procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids (PPH) (n = 54) or conventional surgery (n = 54; control group). Short-term (operative time, postoperative hospital stay, postoperative urinary retention, postoperative perianal edema, and postoperative pain) and long-term (postoperative anal stenosis, postoperative sensory anal incontinence, postoperative recurrence, and postoperative difficulty in defecation) clinical effects were compared between the two groups. The short- and long-term efficacies of the two procedures were determined. In terms of short-term clinical effects, operative time and postoperative hospital stay were significantly shorter in the PPH group than in the control group (24.36 ± 5.16 min vs 44.27 ± 6.57 min, 2.1 ± 1.4 d vs 3.6 ± 2.3 d, both P hemorrhoids.

  9. Surgical resident involvement is safe for common elective general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Warren H; Jin, Leah; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R; Khatri, Vijay P; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Bold, Richard J; Wisner, David; Taylor, Sandra; Chen, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    Outcomes of surgical resident training are under scrutiny with the changing milieu of surgical education. Few have investigated the effect of surgical resident involvement (SRI) on operative parameters. Examining 7 common general surgery procedures, we evaluated the effect of SRI on perioperative morbidity and mortality and operative time (OpT). The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2005 to 2007) was used to identify 7 cases of nonemergent operations. Cases with simultaneous procedures were excluded. Logistic regression was performed across all procedures and within each procedure incorporating SRI, OpT, and risk-stratifying American College of Surgery National Surgical Quality Improvement Program morbidity and mortality probability scores, which incorporate multiple prognostic individual patient factors. Procedure-specific, SRI-stratified OpTs were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. A total of 71.3% of the 37,907 cases had SRI. Absolute 30-day morbidity for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 3.0% and 1.0%, respectively (p < 0.001); absolute 30-day mortality for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 0.1% and 0.08%, respectively (p < 0.001). After multivariate analysis by specific procedure, SRI was not associated with increased morbidity but was associated with decreased mortality during open right colectomy (odds ratio 0.32; p = 0.01). Across all procedures, SRI was associated with increased morbidity (odds ratio 1.14; p = 0.048) but decreased mortality (odds ratio 0.42; p < 0.001). Mean OpT for all procedures was consistently lower for cases without SRI. SRI has a measurable impact on both 30-day morbidity and mortality and OpT. These data have implications to the impact associated with surgical graduate medical education. Further studies to identify causes of patient morbidity and prevention strategies in surgical teaching environments are warranted. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons

  10. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Shabeer Ahmad; Rabah, Sari M; Alfadil, Sara; Dewanjee, Nancy; Najmi, Yahya

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  11. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeer Ahmad Wani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. Results: During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. Conclusions: This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative outcomes of audience response systems as an educational tool in a plastic surgery residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Narasimhan, Kailash; Bouwman, David; Bridge, Patrick D

    2009-12-01

    In-training evaluations in graduate medical education have typically been challenging. Although the majority of standardized examination delivery methods have become computer-based, in-training examinations generally remain pencil-paper-based, if they are performed at all. Audience response systems present a novel way to stimulate and evaluate the resident-learner. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes of audience response systems testing as compared with traditional testing in a plastic surgery residency program. A prospective 1-year pilot study of 10 plastic surgery residents was performed using audience response systems-delivered testing for the first half of the academic year and traditional pencil-paper testing for the second half. Examination content was based on monthly "Core Quest" curriculum conferences. Quantitative outcome measures included comparison of pretest and posttest and cumulative test scores of both formats. Qualitative outcomes from the individual participants were obtained by questionnaire. When using the audience response systems format, pretest and posttest mean scores were 67.5 and 82.5 percent, respectively; using traditional pencil-paper format, scores were 56.5 percent and 79.5 percent. A comparison of the cumulative mean audience response systems score (85.0 percent) and traditional pencil-paper score (75.0 percent) revealed statistically significantly higher scores with audience response systems (p = 0.01). Qualitative outcomes revealed increased conference enthusiasm, greater enjoyment of testing, and no user difficulties with the audience response systems technology. The audience response systems modality of in-training evaluation captures participant interest and reinforces material more effectively than traditional pencil-paper testing does. The advantages include a more interactive learning environment, stimulation of class participation, immediate feedback to residents, and immediate tabulation of results for the

  13. Remote Digital Preoperative Assessments for Cleft Lip and Palate May Improve Clinical and Economic Impact in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher; Campbell, Jacob; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; McCormack, Susan; Silverman, Richard; Lalikos, Janice; Babigian, Alan; Castiglione, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Reconstructive surgical care can play a vital role in the resource-poor settings of low- and middle-income countries. Telemedicine platforms can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of surgical care. The purpose of this study is to determine whether remote digital video evaluations are reliable in the context of a short-term plastic surgical intervention. The setting for this study was a district hospital located in Latacunga, Ecuador. Participants were 27 consecutive patients who presented for operative repair of cleft lip and palate. We calculated kappa coefficients for reliability between in-person and remote digital video assessments for the classification of cleft lip and palate between two separate craniofacial surgeons. We hypothesized that the technology would be a reliable method of preoperative assessment for cleft disease. Of the 27 (81.4%) participants, 22 received operative treatment for their cleft disorder. Mean age was 11.1 ± 8.3 years. Patients presented with a spectrum of disorders, including cleft lip (24 of 27, 88.9%), cleft palate (19 of 27, 70.4%), and alveolar cleft (19 of 27, 70.4%). We found a 95.7% agreement between observers for cleft lip with substantial reliability (κ = .78, P cleft palate, with a moderate interrater reliability (κ = .55, P = .01). We found only a 47.8% agreement between observers for alveolar cleft with a nonsignificant, weak kappa agreement (κ = .06, P = .74). Remote digital assessments are a reliable way to preoperatively diagnose cleft lip and palate in the context of short-term plastic surgical interventions in low- and middle-income countries. Future work will evaluate the potential for real-time, telemedicine assessments to reduce cost and improve clinical effectiveness in global plastic surgery.

  14. Mixed reality simulation of rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halic, Tansel; Kockara, Sinan; Bayrak, Coskun; Rowe, Richard

    2010-10-07

    Until quite recently spinal disorder problems in the U.S. have been operated by fusing cervical vertebrae instead of replacement of the cervical disc with an artificial disc. Cervical disc replacement is a recently approved procedure in the U.S. It is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in the medical field due to the deficiencies in available diagnostic tools and insufficient number of surgical practices For physicians and surgical instrument developers, it is critical to understand how to successfully deploy the new artificial disc replacement systems. Without proper understanding and practice of the deployment procedure, it is possible to injure the vertebral body. Mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) surgical simulators are becoming an indispensable part of physicians' training, since they offer a risk free training environment. In this study, MR simulation framework and intricacies involved in the development of a MR simulator for the rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery are investigated. The major components that make up the MR surgical simulator with motion tracking system are addressed. A mixed reality surgical simulator that targets rasping procedure in the artificial cervical disc replacement surgery with a VICON motion tracking system was developed. There were several challenges in the development of MR surgical simulator. First, the assembly of different hardware components for surgical simulation development that involves knowledge and application of interdisciplinary fields such as signal processing, computer vision and graphics, along with the design and placements of sensors etc . Second challenge was the creation of a physically correct model of the rasping procedure in order to attain critical forces. This challenge was handled with finite element modeling. The third challenge was minimization of error in mapping movements of an actor in real model to a virtual model in a process called

  15. Ischemic Conditioning as a Hemostatic Intervention in Surgery and Cardiac Procedures: A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    did not increase operative bleeding. In conclusion, ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activity without increasing the risk of bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. Limited evidence supports the proposal that ischemic conditioning reduces the incidence of arterial......Ischemic conditioning induced by nonlethal cycles of tissue ischemia and reperfusion attenuates ischemia–reperfusion injury. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of local and remote ischemic conditioning on laboratory parameters of hemostasis and the clinical outcomes......, thromboembolism, and bleeding were extracted for qualitative synthesis. In total, 69 studies were included; of these, 53 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 11 were meta-analyses. Local and remote ischemic conditioning reduced platelet activation in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Local ischemic...

  16. Robotic general surgery experience: a gradual progress from simple to more complex procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naami, M; Anjum, M N; Aldohayan, A; Al-Khayal, K; Alkharji, H

    2013-12-01

    Robotic surgery was introduced at our institution in 2003, and we used a progressive approach advancing from simple to more complex procedures. A retrospective chart review. Cases included totalled 129. Set-up and operative times have improved over time and with experience. Conversion rates to standard laparoscopic or open techniques were 4.7% and 1.6%, respectively. Intraoperative complications (6.2%), blood loss and hospital stay were directly proportional to complexity. There were no mortalities and the postoperative complication rate (13.2%) was within accepted norms. Our findings suggest that robot technology is presently most useful in cases tailored toward its advantages, i.e. those confined to a single space, those that require performance of complex tasks, and re-do procedures. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Traditional couching is not an effective alternative procedure for cataract surgery in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schémann, J F; Bakayoko, S; Coulibaly, S

    2000-12-01

    In Mali, more cataract patients receive sight-restoring surgery using a traditional "couching" procedure (the lens inside the vitreous body) than by modern cataract surgery. In order to evaluate the relative effectiveness and other outcomes of the traditional procedure compared to the modern surgical intervention, we conducted a population-based survey in a rural district of Mali in 1996. A total of 99,800 persons from 160 villages were eligible to be included in the sample. All individuals operated for cataract by a modern procedure were checked for visual acuity and questioned regarding their clinical history, the cost of the surgery and their satisfaction with the surgery immediately following the operation and presently. Each patient was paired with one person operated by a traditional cataract surgical procedure. From a total population of 99,800 we found 85 individuals (0.085%) who had been operated by intracapsular extraction (ICCE) without lens implantation and we paired these with 82 individuals operated by the traditional method and by a local healer. In both groups, males were predominant (74.4% in the modern group and 61.3% in the traditional) and the median age was 65 and 68 years, respectively. Men with a higher social status (defined as administrative or religious authority) were slightly more common among those operated by ICCE (18.9%) than among those operated by the traditional healer (4.4%). Nearly half (47.6%) of the patients operated by couching did not know that a modern alternative existed. The mean cost to the patient of the two procedures was similar; with traditional couching costing on average US$ 42.10 and modern surgery (including transport and drugs) costing US$ 52.40. The traditional healer was often paid partially in kind and the price paid varied according to the patient's ability to pay. The clinical results differed greatly between the two methods. After aphakic correction of eyes operated by ICCE, 5.3% had good vision (33/18), 76

  18. Single visit surgery for pediatric ambulatory surgical procedures: a satisfaction and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jacob K; Deming, Lisa A; King, Denis R; Rager, Terrence M; Gartner, Sarah; Huibregtse, Natalie; Moss, R Lawrence; Besner, Gail E

    2017-10-10

    Single visit surgery (SVS) consists of same-day pre-operative assessment and operation with telephone post-operative follow-up. This reduces family time commitment to 1 hospital trip rather than 2-3. We began SVS for ambulatory patients with clear surgical indications in 2013. We sought to determine family satisfaction, cost savings to families, and institutional financial feasibility of SVS. SVS patients were compared to age/case matched conventional surgery (CS) patients. Satisfaction was assessed by post-operative telephone survey. Family costs were calculated as the sum of lost revenue (based on median income) and transportation costs ($0.50/mile). Satisfaction was high in both groups (98% for SVS vs. 93% for CS; p=0.27). 40% of CS families indicated that they would have preferred SVS, whereas no SVS families indicated preference for the CS option (p<0.001). Distance from the hospital did not correlate with satisfaction. Estimated cost savings for an SVS family was $188. Reimbursement, hospital and physician charges, and day-of-surgery cancellation rates were similar. SVS provides substantial cost savings to families while maintaining patient satisfaction and equivalent institutional reimbursement. SVS is an effective approach to low-risk ambulatory surgical procedures that is less disruptive to families, facilitates access to pediatric surgical care, and reduces resource utilization. Cost Effectiveness Study. Level II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plastic paradise: transforming bodies and selves in Costa Rica's cosmetic surgery tourism industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sara L

    2010-10-01

    Long popular as a nature tourism destination, Costa Rica has recently emerged as a haven for middle class North Americans seeking inexpensive, state-of-the-art cosmetic surgery. This paper examines "cosmetic surgery tourism" in Costa Rica as a form of medicalized leisure, situated in elite private spaces and yet inextricably linked to a beleaguered national medical program. Through historical context and ethnographic analysis of activities at medical hotels and clinics, I describe how the recovery industry operates on the embodied subjectivities of visiting patients and their local caretakers. Recovery sociality and healing landscapes facilitate patients' transition through a period of post-surgical liminality and provide nostalgic transport to an imagined medical arcadia, while clinicians are attracted by a neoliberal promise of prosperity and autonomy. Ultimately, Costa Rica's transformation into a paradise of medical consumption and self-optimization is contingent on a mythology that obscures growing uncertainties and inequities in the nation's broader medical landscape.

  20. Plastic surgeons' self-reported operative infection rates at a Canadian academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wendy Ky; Kaur, Manraj Nirmal; Thoma, Achilleas

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection rates are of great interest to patients, surgeons, hospitals and third-party payers. While previous studies have reported hospital-acquired infection rates that are nonspecific to all surgical services, there remain no overall reported infection rates focusing specifically on plastic surgery in the literature. To estimate the reported surgical site infection rate in plastic surgery procedures over a 10-year period at an academic hospital in Canada. A review was conducted on reported plastic surgery surgical site infection rates from 2003 to 2013, based on procedures performed in the main operating room. For comparison, prospective infection surveillance data over an eight-year period (2005 to 2013) for nonplastic surgery procedures were reviewed to estimate the overall operative surgical site infection rates. A total of 12,183 plastic surgery operations were performed from 2003 to 2013, with 96 surgical site infections reported, corresponding to a net operative infection rate of 0.79%. There was a 0.49% surgeon-reported infection rate for implant-based procedures. For non-plastic surgery procedures, surgical site infection rates ranged from 0.04% for cataract surgery to 13.36% for high-risk abdominal hysterectomies. The plastic surgery infection rate at the study institution was found to be site infection rates. However, these results do not report patterns of infection rates germane to procedures, season, age groups or sex. To provide more in-depth knowledge of this topic, multicentre studies should be conducted.

  1. Wall Street's assessment of plastic surgery--related technology: a clinical and financial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M; Shaw, W W

    2000-02-01

    Many plastic surgeons develop technologies that are manufactured by Wall Street-financed companies. Others participate in the stock market as investors. This study examines the bioengineered skin industry to determine whether it integrates clinical and financial information as Wall Street tenets would predict, and to see whether the financial performance of these companies provides any lessons for practicing plastic surgeons. In efficient markets, the assumptions on which independent financial analysts base their company sales and earnings projections are clinically reasonable, the volatility of a company's stock price does not irrationally differ from that of its industry sector, and the buy/sell recommendations of analysts are roughly congruent. For the companies in this study, these key financial parameters were compared with a benchmark index of 69 biotech companies of similar age and annual revenues (Student's t test). Five bioengineered skin companies were included in the study. Analysts estimated that each company would sell its product to between 24 and 45 percent of its target clinical population. The average stock price volatility was significantly higher for study companies than for those in the benchmark index (p companies were significantly less congruent than those for the benchmark companies (p invest in the stock market, because of their unique clinical experience, may sometimes be in the position to evaluate new technologies and companies better than Wall Street experts. Well-timed trades that use this expertise can result in opportunities for profit.

  2. 'Any questions?'--Clinicians' usage of invitations to ask questions (IAQs) in outpatient plastic surgery consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Patrick, Peter L

    2014-12-01

    To explore use of 'Invitations to Ask Questions' (IAQs) by plastic surgeons in outpatient consultations, and consider how type of IAQ impacts on patients' responses to, and recollection of, IAQs. Descriptive study: 63 patients were audio recorded in consultation with 5 plastic surgeons, and completed a brief questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Consultation transcripts were analyzed using inductive qualitative methods of Discourse Analysis and compared with questionnaire findings. A taxonomy of IAQs was developed, including three types of IAQ (Overt, Covert, and Borderline). Overt IAQs were rarely identified, and almost all IAQs occurred in the closing stages of the consultation. However, when an overt IAQ was used, patients always recollected being asked if they had any questions after the consultation. Patients are rarely explicitly offered the opportunity to ask questions. When this does occur, it is often in the closing stages of the consultation. Clinicians should openly encourage patients to ask questions frequently throughout the consultation, and be mindful that subtle differences in construction of these utterances may impact upon interpretation. Clear communication, of message and intention, is essential in clinical encounters to minimize misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or missed opportunities for patients to raise concerns. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Body dysmorphic disorder: prevalence and outcomes in an oculofacial plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Austin J; Perry, Julian D

    2015-06-01

    To determine the prevalence, associated factors, and surgical outcomes of patients with body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgery practice. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a consecutive case series. Participants consisted of a consecutive series of 728 patients who completed the Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire in an oculofacial surgery practice at The Cole Eye Institute between November 2013 and June 2014. A questionnaire score ≥9 was used as a positive screen for body dysmorphic disorder. Three control patients scoring ≤8 in the same month were randomly selected for each positive-screening patient. Main outcome measures included number of reoperations, surgical complications, and follow-up visits; preoperative and postoperative pain scores; and the technician word count. Categorical variables were analyzed with Pearson χ(2) tests or Fisher exact tests, while continuous variables were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests or t tests. A total of 728 patients completed the questionnaire and 50 (6.9%) scored 9 or more. Using a confidence interval of 95%, patients in the positive questionnaire screen group were younger (P = .004), had more eyelid surgeries (P = .007), experienced higher rates of complications after surgery (P = .002), reported higher postoperative pain scores (P = .034), required more reoperations (P = .050), and had a higher technician word count compared to the control group (P = .003). The prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in an oculofacial surgical setting matches reports from other surgical specialties, and is significantly higher than in the general population. Patients screening positively for body dysmorphic disorder tend to have higher postoperative pain scores and more postoperative complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Innovation drive is the original motive force of discipline construction: the developing road of Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery in the 309th Hospital of PLA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C Y

    2018-03-20

    Discipline construction is a systematic project, covering clinic, teaching, scientific research, management, and humanity. Based on the perspective of innovation drive, from the aspects of discipline structure setting, specialized laboratory construction, sub-specialty formation, clinical characteristic and advantage formation, and management concept update, this article summarizes the growth process of Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery in the 309th Hospital of PLA.

  5. [Establishment of the database of the 3D facial models for the plastic surgery based on network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Zheng-Guo; Qiao, Qun

    2008-07-01

    To collect the three-dimensional (3D) facial data of 30 facial deformity patients by the 3D scanner and establish a professional database based on Internet. It can be helpful for the clinical intervention. The primitive point data of face topography were collected by the 3D scanner. Then the 3D point cloud was edited by reverse engineering software to reconstruct the 3D model of the face. The database system was divided into three parts, including basic information, disease information and surgery information. The programming language of the web system is Java. The linkages between every table of the database are credibility. The query operation and the data mining are convenient. The users can visit the database via the Internet and use the image analysis system to observe the 3D facial models interactively. In this paper we presented a database and a web system adapt to the plastic surgery of human face. It can be used both in clinic and in basic research.

  6. Procedural key steps in laparoscopic colorectal surgery, consensus through Delphi methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Frederieke A; Bosker, Robbert J I; Veeger, Nicolaas J G M; van Det, Marc J; Pierie, Jean Pierre E N

    2015-09-01

    While several procedural training curricula in laparoscopic colorectal surgery have been validated and published, none have focused on dividing surgical procedures into well-identified segments, which can be trained and assessed separately. This enables the surgeon and resident to focus on a specific segment, or combination of segments, of a procedure. Furthermore, it will provide a consistent and uniform method of training for residents rotating through different teaching hospitals. The goal of this study was to determine consensus on the key steps of laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy among experts in our University Medical Center and affiliated hospitals. This will form the basis for the INVEST video-assisted side-by-side training curriculum. The Delphi method was used for determining consensus on key steps of both procedures. A list of 31 steps for laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and 37 steps for laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy was compiled from textbooks and national and international guidelines. In an online questionnaire, 22 experts in 12 hospitals within our teaching region were invited to rate all steps on a Likert scale on importance for the procedure. Consensus was reached in two rounds. Sixteen experts agreed to participate. Of these 16 experts, 14 (88%) completed the questionnaire for both procedures. Of the 14 who completed the first round, 13 (93%) completed the second round. Cronbach's alpha was 0.79 for the right hemicolectomy and 0.91 for the sigmoid colectomy, showing high internal consistency between the experts. For the right hemicolectomy, 25 key steps were established; for the sigmoid colectomy, 24 key steps were established. Expert consensus on the key steps for laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy was reached. These key steps will form the basis for a video-assisted teaching curriculum.

  7. Plasticity of cognitive functions before and after awake brain tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaina Satoer

    2015-04-01

    Results: P1 and P2 showed opposite preoperative cognitive profiles. P1 obtained normal cognitive results and P2 had clinically significant impairments in all cognitive domains, (language, memory, attentional and executive deficits (z-score ≥-1.50. P3 and P4 also demonstrate opposite preoperative profiles. P4 obtained intact cognitive results, whereas P3 was impaired in memory and executive functions (z-score ≥-1.50. Intraoperatively, in both P3 and P4 positive language sites were found (left inferior frontal gyrus and left parietal lobe. At 3 months postoperatively, P3 presented language deficits followed by recovery at 12 months, whereas P4 appeared to have recovered at 3 months postoperatively from the observed premorbid impairments in memory and executive functioning (z-score <-1.50. Pathological examination revealed a slow growing brain tumor (low-grade in P1 and P3 and a fast growing brain tumor (high-grade in P2 and P4. Conclusion: In patients with similar brain tumor localizations, we found distinct cognitive profiles, possibly affected by different neural plasticity processes. Preoperatively, a favorable plasticity effect on cognition was found in P1 (temporoparietal area, potentially affected by tumor grade. Preserved cognitive functions was possibly facilitated by the slow growth rate of a low-grade tumor allowing functional reorganization (Mandonnet et al., 2003. However, P2 with a brain tumor in the same area showed preoperative deficits in several domains (language, memory and attention/executive functions. A faster growth rate of a high-grade tumor could have more aggressively affected cognition. In P3 and P4 with the same localization (insula, we found a different effect on the cognitive recovery process; at short term (3 months, improvement of the preoperatively observed cognitive impairments in a low-grade tumor P3, whereas a more gradual functional reorganization was found in language (3-12 months in P4, a high-grade tumor, contrasting Habets

  8. Sometimes you can't make it on your own: the impact of a professionalism curriculum on the attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of an academic plastic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Halvorson, Eric G; Kaye, Donna; Helgans, Richard; Meyers, Michael O; Rowland, Pamela A; Meyer, Anthony A

    2013-03-01

    Professionalism is now recognized as a core competency for graduate medical education and maintenance of certification. However, few models exist in plastic surgery that define, teach, and assess professionalism as a competency. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a professionalism curriculum in an academic plastic surgery practice. We created and conducted a 6-wk, 12-h course for health care professionals in plastic surgery (faculty, residents, nurses, medical students). Teaching methods included didactic lectures, journal club, small group discussions, and book review. Topics included: (1) Professionalism in Our Culture, (2) Leadership Styles, (3) Modeling Professional Behavior, (4) Leading Your Team, (5) Managing Oneself, and (6) Leading While You Work. Using Kirkpatrick methodology to assess perception of the course (level 1 data), learning of the material (level 2 data), effect on behavior (level 3 data), and impact on the organization (level 4 data), we compiled participant questionnaires, scores from pre- and post-tests, and such metrics as incidence of sentinel events (defined as infractions requiring involvement by senior administrators), number of patient complaints reported to Patient Relations, and patient satisfaction (Press Ganey surveys), for the 6 mo before and after the course. Thirty health care professionals participated in a 6-wk course, designed to improve professionalism in plastic surgery. Level 1 data: Although only 56.5% of respondents felt that the course was a "good use of my time," 73.9% agreed that the course "will help me become a better professional" and 82.6% "would recommend the course to others." Level 2 data: Post-test scores increased from 48% to 70% (P teaching, and influencing professionalism in plastic surgery are very valuable and should be pursued by educators to help satisfy Graduate Medical Education/Maintenance of Certification requirements and to improve the performance of the organization

  9. Mandibular marginal contouring in oriental aesthetic surgery: refined surgical concept and operative procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kaneshige; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-01

    In aesthetic mandibular contouring surgery, which is often conducted in Asians, the operative procedure is thought to deliver a more aesthetic mandibular shape by means of contouring conducted as a whole from the ramus to the symphysis. The authors describe the refined concept and operative procedures of mandibular marginal contouring. For the 7-year period from 2004 to 2011, mandibular marginal contouring has been used in 57 consecutive series of Japanese subjects. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 33 years, and the subjects included 15 men and 42 women. The surgery was carried out by cutting off the protruding deformed mandibular margin from the ramus to the symphysis. In 53 of 57 cases, the focus was on angle contouring. Concomitant genioplasty by horizontal osteotomy of the chin was conducted in 42 of 57 cases (recession, advancement, shortening, elongation, and correction of the shift variously). In 22 materials exhibiting bulk around the mandibular, the ramus to the body was excised sagittally and thinned. In all the patients, mandibular marginal contouring from the ramus to the symphysis was completed. Partial masseter muscle resection was conducted in 11 of 57 cases. Mandibular contouring effectively achieved a highly satisfactory result in all cases. The upper portion of the peripheral branch of the trunk of the mental nerve was dissected by an electric scalpel in 1 case but sutured immediately using an 8-0 nylon stitch. Transient palsy of the mental nerve was noticed in a few cases but subsided in 1 to 2 months. No particular complications were encountered. No secondary revision was required in this series. In mandibular angle plasty, mandibular marginal contouring from the ramus to the symphysis should be carried out by cutting off the angle keeping in mind the entire mandibular shape. This concept and the procedure can deliver greater patient satisfaction.

  10. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimation of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Wayne J; DeMaria, Eric J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Mattar, Samer G; Rosenthal, Raul J; Morton, John M

    2018-03-01

    Bariatric surgery, despite being the most successful long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity, remains underused as only approximately 1% of all patients who qualify for surgery actually undergo surgery. To determine if patients in need are receiving appropriate therapy, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery created a Numbers Taskforce to specify annual rate of use for obesity treatment interventions. The objective of this study was to determine metabolic and bariatric procedure trends since 2011 and to provide the best estimate of the number of procedures performed in the United States in 2016. United States. We reviewed data from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. In addition, data from industry and outpatient centers were used to estimate outpatient center activity. Data from 2016 were compared with the previous 5 years of data. Compared with 2015, the total number of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in 2016 increased from approximately 196,000 to 216,000. The sleeve gastrectomy trend is increasing, and it continues to be the most common procedure. The gastric bypass and gastric band trends continued to decrease as seen in previous years. The percentage of revision procedures and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch procedures increased slightly. Finally, intragastric balloons placement emerged as a significant contributor to the cumulative total number of procedures performed. There is increasing use of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States from 2011 to 2016, with a nearly 10% increase noted from 2015 to 2016. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Donald R

    2015-06-01

    International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients.The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated.Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries ("Plan B"), approaches 100%.The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries.Furthermore, the academic visiting professor ("Plan A": hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model ("Plan C": to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance.The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful.

  12. Globalization of Craniofacial Plastic Surgery: Foreign Mission Programs for Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract International Humanitarian Interchanges are a bona fide component of surgery and medicine. Additionally, these programs also provide substantial benefit both to the doers and the recipients. The foreign mission program is potentially a weapon of foreign policy which is underutilized and underestimated. Physician job dissatisfaction is increasing. However, the happiness and satisfaction of the participants in the short-term multidisciplinary trips, repeated, well-organized and respectful, with rather complete integration of the surgical system of the sister countries (“Plan B”), approaches 100%. The theory of the International Humanitarian Interchanges is based on substance, on medical theory. These trips are particularly successful in interchanges with medium-resourced countries. Furthermore, the academic visiting professor (“Plan A”: hi-resource place to hi-resource place), the One Man Can Save the World model (“Plan C”: to the low-resource place), and the intriguing Horton Peace Plan have possibilities for long-term benefit to the doer, recipient, the field of surgery, and the body of knowledge. In all of these, our country and the family of nations advance. The theoretical basis is not always religious nor the grand strategy plan; both have either proselytizing or political dominance as primary motives, and are mentioned as historically helpful. PMID:26080114

  13. The effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Duty Hours Policy on plastic surgery resident education and patient care: an outcomes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Chandrasekhar Bob; Chen, Li-Mei; Hollier, Larry H; Shenaq, Saleh M

    2004-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Work-Hours Duty Policy became effective on July 1, 2003, mandating the reduction of resident duty work hours. The Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program instituted a resident duty work-hours policy on July 1, 2002 (1 year ahead of the national mandate). Outcomes data are needed to facilitate continuous improvements in plastic surgical residency training while maintaining high-quality patient care. To assess the effect of this policy intervention on plastic surgery resident education as measured through the six core competencies and patient/resident safety, the investigators surveyed all categorical plastic surgery residents 6 months after implementation of the policy. This work represents the first empiric study investigating the effect of duty hours reduction on plastic surgery training and education. The categorical plastic surgery residents at the Baylor College of Medicine Multi-Institutional Integrated Plastic Surgery Program completed a 68-item survey on a five-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree). Residents were asked to rate multiple parameters based on the ACGME six core competencies, including statements on patient care and clinical/operative duties, resident education, resident quality of life, and resident perceptions on this policy. All surveys were completed anonymously. The sample size was n = 12 (program year 3 through program year 6), with a 100 percent response rate. Univariate and bivariate statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS version 10.0 statistical software. Specifically, interquartile deviations were used to find consensus among resident responses to each statement. Descriptive statistics indicated higher percentages of agreement on a majority of statements in three categories, including patient care and clinical/operative duties, academic duties, and resident quality of life. Using interquartile

  14. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography after plastic surgery by thin-needle puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, M.; Fiegler, W.; Claussen, C.; Koehler, D.; Felix, R.; Hepp, W.

    1984-01-01

    Over the period of a year (1983), 44 intraarterial digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) via direct thin-needle puncture of a vascular bypass or following vascular graft were carried the rough. The only complication that occured: paravasal injection, was clinically insignificant and could be avoided by a change in the puncture-technique. It was possible to carry through the investigation in out-patients. In all cases, diagnostically useful picture material for a possible surgical intervention was obtained. The pictures always were high-grade, independently of the patient's circulation time. Because this is a simple investigation and because of the small risk of complications, it has come to be regularly carried through as a routine in the authors' clinic. According to investigations carried through on the collective of patients of a vascular surgery department, occlusions or anastomotic aneurismus account for most of the angiological disorders. (orig.) [de

  15. Current use of imaging and electromagnetic source localization procedures in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthaan, Brian E; Rados, Matea; Barsi, Péter; Boon, Paul; Carmichael, David W; Carrette, Evelien; Craiu, Dana; Cross, J Helen; Diehl, Beate; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Francione, Stefano; Gaskin, Vladislav; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Grigoreva, Elena; Guekht, Alla; Hirsch, Edouard; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Jung, Julien; Kalviainen, Reetta; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios; Kobulashvili, Teia; Krsek, Pavel; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Larsson, Pål G; Leitinger, Markus; Lossius, Morten I; Luzin, Roman; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Marusic, Petr; Metin, Baris; Özkara, Cigdem; Pecina, Hrvoje; Quesada, Carlos M; Rugg-Gunn, Fergus; Rydenhag, Bertil; Ryvlin, Philippe; Scholly, Julia; Seeck, Margitta; Staack, Anke M; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Stepanov, Valentin; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Uzan, Mustafa; Vogt, Viola L; Vos, Sjoerd B; Vulliémoz, Serge; Huiskamp, Geertjan; Leijten, Frans S S; Van Eijsden, Pieter; Braun, Kees P J

    2016-05-01

    In 2014 the European Union-funded E-PILEPSY project was launched to improve awareness of, and accessibility to, epilepsy surgery across Europe. We aimed to investigate the current use of neuroimaging, electromagnetic source localization, and imaging postprocessing procedures in participating centers. A survey on the clinical use of imaging, electromagnetic source localization, and postprocessing methods in epilepsy surgery candidates was distributed among the 25 centers of the consortium. A descriptive analysis was performed, and results were compared to existing guidelines and recommendations. Response rate was 96%. Standard epilepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols are acquired at 3 Tesla by 15 centers and at 1.5 Tesla by 9 centers. Three centers perform 3T MRI only if indicated. Twenty-six different MRI sequences were reported. Six centers follow all guideline-recommended MRI sequences with the proposed slice orientation and slice thickness or voxel size. Additional sequences are used by 22 centers. MRI postprocessing methods are used in 16 centers. Interictal positron emission tomography (PET) is available in 22 centers; all using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Seventeen centers perform PET postprocessing. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is used by 19 centers, of which 15 perform postprocessing. Four centers perform neither PET nor SPECT in children. Seven centers apply magnetoencephalography (MEG) source localization, and nine apply electroencephalography (EEG) source localization. Fourteen combinations of inverse methods and volume conduction models are used. We report a large variation in the presurgical diagnostic workup among epilepsy surgery centers across Europe. This diversity underscores the need for high-quality systematic reviews, evidence-based recommendations, and harmonization of available diagnostic presurgical methods. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Road to recovery after transvaginal surgery for urethral mesh perforation: evaluation of outcomes and subsequent procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Casey G; Cohn, Joshua A; Kakos, Andrea; Lang, Patrick; Reynolds, W Stuart; Kaufman, Melissa R; Karram, Mickey M; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2018-01-29

    Urethral injury resulting from transvaginal mesh slings is a rare complication with an estimated incidence of surgical management and functional outcomes of women presenting with urethral mesh perforation following midurethral sling (MUS) placement. This was a retrospective multicenter review of women who from January 2011 to March 2016 at two institutions underwent mesh sling excision for urethral perforation with Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship-trained surgeons. Data comprising preoperative symptoms, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were collected by telephone (n 13) or based on their last follow-up appointment. Nineteen women underwent transvaginal sling excision for urethral mesh perforation. Eight (42%) patients had undergone previous sling revision surgery. Sixty percent of women had resolution of their pelvic pain postoperatively. At follow-up, 92% reported urinary incontinence (UI), and three had undergone five additional procedures for vaginal prolapse mesh exposure (n 1), incontinence (onabotulinum toxin injection n 1, rectus fascia autologous sling n 1), prolapse (colpopexy n 1), and pain (trigger-point injection n 1). Patient global impression of improvement data was available for 13 patients, of whom seven (54%) rated their postoperative condition as Very much better or Much better. The management of urethral mesh perforation is complex. Most women reported resolution of their pelvic pain and a high rate of satisfaction with their postoperative condition despite high rates of incontinence.

  17. Micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS: a review of surgical procedures using stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillunat LE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lutz E Pillunat,1 Carl Erb,2 Anselm GM Jünemann,3 Friedemann Kimmich4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, 2Augenklinik am Wittenbergplatz, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany; 4eyecons, Karlsruhe, Germany Abstract: Over the last decade several novel surgical treatment options and devices for glaucoma have been developed. All these developments aim to cause as little trauma as possible to the eye, to safely, effectively, and sustainably reduce intraocular pressure (IOP, to produce reproducible results, and to be easy to adopt. The term “micro-invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS” was used for summarizing all these procedures. Currently MIGS is gaining more and more interest and popularity. The possible reduction of the number of glaucoma medications, the ab interno approach without damaging the conjunctival tissue, and the probably safer procedures compared to incisional surgical methods may explain the increased interest in MIGS. The use of glaucoma drainage implants for lowering IOP in difficult-to-treat patients has been established for a long time, however, a variety of new glaucoma micro-stents are being manufactured by using various materials and are available to increase aqueous outflow via different pathways. This review summarizes published results of randomized clinical studies and extensive case report series on these devices, including Schlemm’s canal stents (iStent®, iStent® inject, Hydrus, suprachoroidal stents (CyPass®, iStent® Supra, and subconjunctival stents (XEN. The article summarizes the findings of published material on efficacy and safety for each of these approaches. Keywords: glaucoma, micro-invasive glaucoma surgery, MIGS, iStent, iStent inject, CyPass, Hydrus, XEN

  18. Bacterial recolonization of the skin and wound contamination during cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial of the use of plastic adhesive drape compared with bare skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Brynhildsen, K; Söderquist, B; Friberg, O; Nilsson, U G

    2013-06-01

    Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery is a serious complication. Various perioperative strategies, including plastic adhesive drapes, are used to reduce bacterial contamination of surgical wounds. To compare plastic adhesive drape to bare skin regarding bacterial growth in wound and time to recolonization of the adjacent skin intraoperatively, in cardiac surgery patients. This single-blinded randomized controlled trial (May 2010 to May 2011) included 140 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. The patients were randomly allocated to the adhesive drape (chest covered with plastic adhesive drape) or bare skin group. Bacterial samples were taken preoperatively and intraoperatively every hour during surgery until skin closure. Disinfection with 0.5% chlorhexidine solution in 70% alcohol decreased coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), while the proportion colonized with Propionibacterium acnes was not significantly reduced and was still present in more than 50% of skin samples. P. acnes was significantly more common in men than in women. Progressive bacterial recolonization of the skin occurred within 2-3 h. At 120 min there were significantly more positive cultures in the adhesive drape group versus bare skin group for P. acnes (63% vs 44%; P = 0.034) and for CoNS (45% vs 24%; P = 0.013). The only statistically significant difference in bacterial growth in the surgical wound was higher proportion of CoNS at the end of surgery in the adhesive drape group (14.7% vs 4.4%; P = 0.044). Plastic adhesive drape does not reduce bacterial recolonization. P. acnes colonized men more frequently, and was not decreased by disinfection with chlorhexidine solution in alcohol. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Return hospital visits and morbidity within 60 days after day surgery: a retrospective study of 18,736 day surgical procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbaek, J; Bartholdy, J; Hjortsø, Carsten Nico Portefée

    2006-01-01

    As day surgery includes more extensive procedures focus should be put on late outcome. The frequency of day surgery-related return visits and the associated morbidity were examined to identify suitable indicators of quality....

  20. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  1. [Contribution of the physical and rehabilitation medicine in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, L; Devinck, F; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Physical, non-painful processes guide the scar reshaping in children in order to prevent growth anomalies due to cutaneous shrinkage. The objective of the surgical treatment, coordinated with the reeducation care, is to improve the physical abilities of the skin, to restore the function and avoid the deformations. Reeducation uses various techniques (i.e. sensitive-motility, massage and mobilizations) with or without physical agent (water, aspiration and touch-drive technique). Posture and positioning rely on the small or major aids, from orthosis to prosthesis. Compression is obtained by the adjustment of aids on molding and compression garment. Indications of the reeducation treatment depend on the timing of cutaneous covering and the advance of the healing process. It also depends on the underlying condition including skin traumas (frictions, wounds, burns), skin surgeries (purpura fulminans consequences, skin graft reconstruction after giant nevus resection, malignant lesion or vascular malformations). The final goal is the rehabilitation and development of the child and the adolescent in its entire somatopsychic dimension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Robotic-Assisted Procedures in Pediatric Surgery: A Critical Appraisal of the Current Best Evidence in Comparison to Conventional Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmacher, Florian; Till, Holger

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the use of robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) has expanded within pediatric surgery. Although increasing numbers of pediatric RAS case-series have been published, the level of evidence remains unclear, with authors mainly focusing on the comparison with open surgery rather than the corresponding laparoscopic approach. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the published literature comparing pediatric RAS with conventional minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in order to evaluate the current best level of evidence. A systematic literature-based search for studies comparing pediatric RAS with corresponding MIS procedures was performed using multiple electronic databases and sources. The level of evidence was determined using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria. A total of 20 studies met defined inclusion criteria, reporting on five different procedures: fundoplication (n=8), pyeloplasty (n=8), nephrectomy (n=2), gastric banding (n=1), and sleeve gastrectomy (n=1). Included publications comprised 5 systematic reviews and 15 cohort/case-control studies (OCEBM Level 3 and 4, respectively). No studies of OCEBM Level 1 or 2 were identified. Limited evidence indicated reduced operative time (pyeloplasty) and shorter hospital stay (fundoplication) for pediatric RAS, whereas disadvantages were longer operative time (fundoplication, nephrectomy, gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy) and higher total costs (fundoplication and sleeve gastrectomy). There were no differences reported for complications, success rates, or short-term outcomes between pediatric RAS and conventional MIS in these procedures. Inconsistency was found in study design and follow-up with large clinical heterogeneity. The best available evidence for pediatric RAS is currently OCEBM Level 3, relating only to fundoplication and pyeloplasty. Therefore, higher-quality studies and comparative data for other RAS procedures in pediatric surgery are required.

  3. Operator competence in fetoscopic laser surgery for twin-twin transfusion syndrome: validation of a procedure-specific evaluation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, S H P; Akkermans, J; Bustraan, J; Middeldorp, J M; Lopriore, E; Devlieger, R; Lewi, L; Deprest, J; Oepkes, D

    2016-03-01

    Fetoscopic laser surgery for twin-twin transfusion syndrome is a procedure for which no objective tools exist to assess technical skills. To ensure that future fetal surgeons reach competence prior to performing the procedure unsupervised, we developed a performance assessment tool. The aim of this study was to validate this assessment tool for reliability and construct validity. We made use of a procedure-specific evaluation instrument containing all essential steps of the fetoscopic laser procedure, which was previously created using Delphi methodology. Eleven experts and 13 novices from three fetal medicine centers performed the procedure on the same simulator. Two independent observers assessed each surgery using the instrument (maximum score: 52). Interobserver reliability was assessed using Spearman correlation. We compared the performance of novices and experts to assess construct validity. The interobserver reliability was high (Rs  = 0.974, P performed by experts and in 9/13 (69%) procedures performed by novices (P = 0.005). Multivariable analysis showed that the checklist score, independent of age and gender, predicted competence. The procedure-specific assessment tool for fetoscopic laser surgery shows good interobserver reliability and discriminates experts from novices. This instrument may therefore be a useful tool in the training curriculum for fetal surgeons. Further intervention studies with reassessment before and after training may increase the construct validity of the tool. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Plastic surgery residency graduate outcomes: a 43-year experience at a single institution and the first "integrated" training program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Shelley S; Lee, Gordon K

    2012-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education emphasizes outcome-based residency education. This project is an outcomes study on graduates of the Stanford University Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency. A survey assessing various outcomes, including practice profile, financial, personal, and educational issues, was electronically distributed to all 130 graduates between 1966 and 2009. There was a 65% response rate. Nearly all respondents are currently in practice. Popular fellowships included hand and microsurgery. Most respondents participated in research and held leadership roles. Adequate residency education was noted in areas of patient care, board preparation, and ethical and legal issues. Inadequate residency education was noted in areas of managing a practice, coding, and cost-effective medicine. This is the first long-term outcomes study of plastic surgery graduates. Most are in active, successful practice. We have incorporated educational content related to running a small business, contract negotiating, and marketing to better prepare our residents for future practice.

  5. [Body modifications and sexual health : Impact of tattoos, body piercing and esthetic genital plastic surgery on the sexual health of women and men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, Aglaja Valentina; Zannoni, Ronja

    2017-09-01

    The present paper addresses the psychological impact of body modifications (e.g. tattoos, body piercing and esthetic genital plastic surgery) on the sexual health of individuals and refers to past and present research insights. Body modifications are understood as invasive interventions on the human body, especially interventions on the human skin which result in (semi-)permanent changes. Tattoos and body piercing (in particular genital piercing) positively affect the sexual satisfaction and the sexual appeal of men and women but there is a controversial association with high risk sexual behavior. Moreover, this article focuses on esthetic genital plastic surgery based on the increasing interest and insights of the impact on female genital self-perception and sexual behavior.

  6. Consecutive operative procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome up to 28 years after initial aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puluca, Nazan; Burri, Melchior; Cleuziou, Julie; Krane, Markus; Lange, Rüdiger

    2018-02-28

    Most patients (75%) with Marfan syndrome present with aortic root dilatation that may require surgical intervention. However, associated cardiovascular disorders are not limited to the aortic root. These patients frequently require consecutive operations on the remaining thoracic aorta or the heart valves. Our intent was to characterize the spectrum of such procedures. Data from all patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root surgery at our centre between 1988 and 2016 were analysed retrospectively. Overall, 73 patients (26 women) were selected for the study. The median age at 1st operation was 30 years (3-68 years). Indications for aortic root surgery were aneurysm (78%) and dissection (22%). Initially, 33 Bentall procedures and 40 valve-sparing root replacement procedures were performed, with a 97% rate of follow-up completion. The median follow up was 8 years (0-28 years). Survival at 1, 10 and 15 years was 100%, 85% and 82%, respectively. During follow-up monitoring, 48 subsequent procedures were performed in 33 patients (aorta, 23; aortic valve, 11; mitral valve, 7 and combined procedures, 7). The 30-day mortality rate after subsequent procedures was 4.2%. Freedom from subsequent operation and death (combined end-point) after 5, 10 and 15 years was 70%, 53% and 34%, respectively. After the initial surgery, subsequent procedures required in the setting of Marfan syndrome most often involve the remaining native aorta, followed by the aortic and mitral valves. The continued need for additional operative procedures remains high, even decades after the initial surgeries are undertaken. Therefore, long-term patient monitoring at specialized centres is imperative.

  7. Fast neutron personnel dosimetry by CR-39 plastics a new electrochemical etching procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djeffal, S.

    1984-07-01

    In the first part of this work a brief description of solid state nuclear track detectors, the principles of track registration and the different reading techniques are given. In the experimental part of the present work we systematically analysed different etching procedures and set a new electrochemical etching method, which enables us to develop a new fast neutron dosimeter. This fast neutron dosimeter makes possible the measurement of low neutron doses in the energy range from 10 Kev to 20 Mev with a reasonably flat energy response. These new developments are very attractive in personnel neutron dosimetry where nuclear emulsions are still used despite their insensitivity to neutron energies down to 500 Kev (i.e. the energy range one often encounters around nuclear facilities)

  8. Peristeen anal irrigation as a substitute for the MACE procedure in children who are in need of reconstructive bladder surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Husain; Alhazmi, Hamdan; Trbay, Mahmoud; Khattab, Amna; Neel, Khalid Fouda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy of the Peristeen (Coloplast A/S, Kokkedal, Denmark) transanal irrigation (TAI) system, as a stool cleansing mechanism, to gain stool continence in children who need reconstructive bladder surgery and have fecal incontinence. Methods: We prospectively evaluated children with neuropathic bladder and bowel dysfunction who were intended for reconstructive bladder surgery and the Malone antegrade continence enema (MACE) procedure. All patients were started on the Peristeen TAI system at least 3 months before surgery to assess their response. Each patient’s bowel function, frequency of using the system, satisfaction (and that of their parents) and diaper independency were evaluated before and after reconstructive surgery. Results: We included 18 patients (11 female, 7 male) who were evaluated from April 2006 to the present. The mean age of the group was 7.6 years (range: 4–15). Fifteen patients (83.3%) showed complete dryness from stools. Of the 15 patients, 8 (53.3%) were able to be diaper-free, while 6 continued wearing diapers due to fear of soiling and 1 due to urinary incontinence. The patients underwent reconstructive bladder surgery and continued to use the Peristeen TAI system with the same results postoperatively. The main limitation of this study is the small number of patients included, although this is a very specific patient group. Conclusion: Our initial results suggest that the Peristeen TAI system is a successful conservative substitute for the MACE procedure in children who require reconstructive bladder surgery. PMID:24454594

  9. FROM COMPLEX EVOLVING TO SIMPLE: CURRENT REVISIONAL AND ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES FOLLOWING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, Ricardo; Galvão-Neto, Manoel Passos; Campos, Josemberg; Branco, Alcides José; Sampaio, José; Junghans, Tido; Bothe, Claudia; Benzing, Christian; Krenzien, Felix

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a standard therapy in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding, although with good results in the literature, are showing higher rates of treatment failure to reduce obesity-associated morbidity and body weight. Other problems after bariatric may occur, as band erosion, gastroesophageal reflux disease and might be refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to a RYGB can be an effective alternative, as long as specific indications for revision are fulfilled. The objective of this study was to analyse own and literature data on revisional bariatric procedures to evaluate best alternatives to current practice. Institutional experience and systematic review from the literature on revisional bariatric surgery. Endoscopic procedures are recently applied to ameliorate failure and complications of bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20%. Transoral outlet reduction is currently an alternative method to reduce the gastrojejunal anastomosis. The diameter and volume of sleeve gastrectomy can enlarge as well, which can be reduced by endoscopic full-thickness sutures longitudinally. Dumping syndrome and severe hypoglycemic episodes (neuroglycopenia) can be present in patients following RYGB. The hypoglycemic episodes have to be evaluated and usually can be treated conventionally. To avoid partial pancreatectomy or conversion to normal anatomy, a new laparoscopic approach with remnant gastric resection and jejunal interposition can be applied in non-responders alternatively. Hypoglycemic episodes are ameliorated while weight loss is sustained. Revisional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery in patients with collateral symptomatic or treatment failure can be applied. Conventional non-surgical approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional surgery will be indicated. Former complex surgical revisional procedures are evolving to less

  10. Cox-Maze III procedure with valvular surgery in an autopneumonectomized patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wi Jin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Destructive pulmonary inflammation can leave patients with only a single functional lung, resulting in anatomical and physiological changes that may interfere with subsequent cardiac surgeries. Such patients are vulnerable to perioperative cardiopulmonary complications. Herein, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of an autopneumonectomized patient who successfully underwent a modified Cox-Maze III procedure combined with valvular repairs. The three major findings in this case can be summarized as follows: (1 a median sternotomy with peripheral cannulations, such as femoral cannulations, can provide an optimal exposure and prevent the obstruction of vision that may occur as a result of multiple cannulations through a median sternotomy; (2 a modified septal incision combined with biatrial incisions facilitate adequate exposure of the mitral valve; and (3 the aggressive use of intraoperative ultrafiltration may be helpful for the perioperative managements as decreasing pulmonary water contents, thereby avoiding the pulmonary edema associated with secretion of inflammatory cytokines during a cardiopulmonary bypass. We also provide several suggestions for achieving similar satisfactory surgical outcomes in patients with a comparable condition.

  11. “Inscrutable Intelligence”: The Case against Plastic Surgery in the Works of Jean Stafford and Sylvia Plath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Cuenca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean Stafford’s short story “The Interior Castle” (1946 and Sylvia Plath’s “Face Lift” and “The Plaster”, written in the early 1960s but published posthumously in Crossing the Water (1971, dwell on a theme which is rarely tackled in Postwar American literature: plastic surgery. Using a markedly mnemonic tone, both authors trace in detail the passive submission of female bodies to male (reconstruction. While the history of women in early Cold War America is usually associated with the patriarchal mystifying of housewifery, the myth of ideal, domestic femininity was also intimately related to bodily beauty. The demand for physical “perfection” which resulted from constructing women as, primarily, objects of male desire was mirrored in popular magazines, such as Ladies’ Home Journal, which endorsed women’s seeking medical aid to model themselves into “ideal” sexual mates (Meyerowitz in Meyerowitz ed., 244. Women’s submission to the notion that they should use any means necessary to become aesthetic objects to be appraised by men was thus represented as desirable. In this paper, I shall trace how both Stafford and Plath adopted a confessional style of writing in the abovementioned pieces in order to denounce the cultural construction of women as passive bodies to be moulded at will, instead of as active, thinking subjects. I shall argue that by reproducing the recollections and thoughts of the women being stitched, sewn and bandaged in their pieces, both authors articulated an alternative protofeminist aesthetics based on the beauty of what Stafford described as “inscrutable intelligence”.

  12. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improvement in treating injuries and chronic wounds.Materials and methodsIn this study, we present the recent experience of the Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery of the University Hospital Center of Avicenne in Rabat. This therapy was used for the first time this year (in 2014, in three young patients who presented with chronic wounds associated with local and general factors that are unfavorable for the healing process.ResultsIn all three of our cases we obtained highly satisfactory clinical results.TNP allows wounds to bud in a shorter time, as well as a fast healing by second intention due to controlled wound healing or split-skin graft without using flaps. This enables to decrease the margin of error, the time and the number of dressing replacements, and to reduce the length of hospital stay.ConclusionThis is an expensive and specific equipment. However, the cost-benefit ratio analysis shows that it is an essential method that should be part of our therapeutic strategies.Keywords: loss of substance, negative pressure, budding, healing.  

  13. Deliberate Self-Harm and the Elderly: A Volatile Combination—An Overview from the Plastic Surgery Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Packer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the factors associated with the DSH in the elderly group of 60 years and above and to recommend changes to be implemented in order to improve the management in this specific group. Materials and Methods. Five-year retrospective study was undertaken from July 2005 to July 2010 in the Plastic Surgery Department of the Royal Preston Hospital, NHS Trust. A Performa was designed to collect data about the inpatient admission and included certain areas of key information. The case notes for all patients were extensively analysed in order to gather adequate information for the devised Performa. Results. DSH is getting more common in the elderly group, and males are more affected than females. 60% of the patients had a previous history of DSH. A large number (80% of patients had a previous history of mental illness. 60% of those DSH patients were living with family. Almost all patients (90% were reviewed by the Psychiatry Liaison Team. The timing of patients being assessed was highly variable. Conclusions. Marriage is not a protective factor in the prevention of the DSH in the elderly group. A mental health team referral in the early phases of the management would be of huge benefit and a likely step to prevent possible future admissions. The Department would benefit from the creation of a protocol for the management of these patients. There should be a joint effort of the professionals in the management of DSH in the elderly, and GPs play a very important role in the prevention of DSH in the later life.

  14. Evaluating Coding Accuracy in General Surgery Residents' Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Procedural Case Logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Fadi; Garwe, Tabitha; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Stamile, Tessa; Kim, Jennifer; Mahnken, Heidi; Lees, Jason

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case log captures resident operative experience based on Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes and is used to track operative experience during residency. With increasing emphasis on resident operative experiences, coding is more important than ever. It has been shown in other surgical specialties at similar institutions that the residents' ACGME case log may not accurately reflect their operative experience. What barriers may influence this remains unclear. As the only objective measure of resident operative experience, an accurate case log is paramount in representing one's operative experience. This study aims to determine the accuracy of procedural coding by general surgical residents at a single institution. Data were collected from 2 consecutive graduating classes of surgical residents' ACGME case logs from 2008 to 2014. A total of 5799 entries from 7 residents were collected. The CPT codes entered by residents were compared to departmental billing records submitted by the attending surgeon for each procedure. Assigned CPT codes by institutional American Academy of Professional Coders certified abstract coders were considered the "gold standard." A total of 4356 (75.12%) of 5799 entries were identified in billing records. Excel 2010 and SAS 9.3 were used for analysis. In the event of multiple codes for the same patient, any match between resident codes and billing record codes was considered a "correct" entry. A 4-question survey was distributed to all current general surgical residents at our institution for feedback on coding habits, limitations to accurate coding, and opinions on ACGME case log representation of their operative experience. All 7 residents had a low percentage of correctly entered CPT codes. The overall accuracy proportion for all residents was 52.82% (range: 43.32%-60.07%). Only 1 resident showed significant improvement in accuracy during his/her training (p = 0

  15. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as ...

  16. Interdisciplinary evaluation of consecutive patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate at age 6, 15, and 25 years: a concurrent standardized procedure and documentation by plastic surgeon; speech and language pathologist; ear, nose, and throat specialist; and orthodontist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindlund, Rolf S; Holmefjord, Anders; Eriksson, Jens-Christian Haug; Johnson, Gunnar E; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate surgical results, speech, hearing, and craniofacial morphology after primary cleft repair performed from 1973 to 1979. During the years 1972 to 1985, all primary cleft surgeries were performed by 1 plastic surgeon, using Tennison lip closure combined with a periosteoplasty on the clefted alveolus at age 3 months. By mobilizing mucoperiosteal flaps, bony bridges were induced in the alveolar process in approximately 60% of the cases. All patients had the soft palate closed at age 24 months by a pushback technique. All children with complete unilateral clefts without soft tissue bands (unilateral cleft lip and palate) primary operated on 1973 to 1979 were included in the material, except 3 patients with a syndrome and 2 patients of foreign ethnicity. The material involved 30 consecutive patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (20 boys and 10 girls; 16 left-sided and 14 right-sided clefts) who were operated on. Standardized records including photos, radiographs, lateral cephalograms, plaster model, and recording of speech and hearing were collected according to the treatment protocol at age 6, 15, and approximately 25 years. Evaluation included craniofacial descriptive cephalometric analysis, dentoalveolar morphology, dentofacial aesthetics, speech concerning articulation and nasality, and hearing status. Number of surgical interventions after primary surgery was recorded. Secondary revisions and candidates for orthognathic surgery are reported. Ten consecutive patients (case nos. 11-20) are demonstrated as clinical reports. : This longitudinal study shows how a multidisciplinary evaluation adequate for intercenter comparison can be performed when standardized procedures, registrations, and documentations are available.

  17. Ear Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inquiries Find an ENT News About Us Our Campaigns Foundation Governance Diversity Honorary Awards & Lectures Employment Opportunities Renting Space Advocacy Medicare Advocacy Legislative & Political Affairs ENT PAC foundation Guidelines Patient Health Quality ...

  18. Aesthetic Surgery of the Female Genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Dobbeleir, Julie M.L.C.L.; Landuyt, Koenraad Van; Monstrey, Stan J.

    2011-01-01

    Aesthetic genital surgery seems to have become a fashionable issue nowadays. Many procedures and techniques have been described these last years, but very few long-term results or follow up studies are available. The novelty of this aspect of plastic surgery and the lack of evidence-based interventions, have led to a comparison with female genital mutilation. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the possible surgical procedures as well as the general principles of aesthetic sur...

  19. Trepanation Procedures/Outcomes: Comparison of Prehistoric Peru with Other Ancient, Medieval, and American Civil War Cranial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, David S; Verano, John W; Titelbaum, Anne R

    2018-06-01

    More prehistoric trepanned crania have been found in Peru than any other location worldwide. We examine trepanation practices and outcomes in Peru over nearly 2000 years from 400 BC to provide a perspective on the procedure with comparison with procedures/outcomes of other ancient, medieval, and American Civil War cranial surgery. Data on trepanation demographics, techniques, and survival rates were collected through the scientific analysis of more than 800 trepanned crania discovered in Peru, through field studies and the courtesy of museums and private collections in the United States and Peru, over nearly 3 decades. Data on procedures and outcomes of cranial surgery ancient, medieval, and during 19th-century through the American Civil war were obtained via a literature review. Successful trepanations from prehistoric times through the American Civil War likely involved shallow surgeries that did not pierce the dura mater. Although there are regional and temporal variations in ancient Peru, overall long-term survival rates for the study series were about 40% in the earliest period (400-200 BC), with improvement to a high of 91% in samples from AD 1000-1400, to an average of 75%-83% during the Inca Period (AD 1400s-1500). In comparison, the average cranial surgery mortality rate during the American Civil war was 46%-56%, and short- and long-term survival rates are unknown. The contrast in outcomes highlights the astonishing success of ancient cranial surgery in Peru in the treatment of living patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a diagnosis- and procedure-based risk model for 30-day outcome after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Brown, Kate L; Pagel, Christina; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Cunningham, David; Gibbs, John; Bull, Catherine; Franklin, Rodney; Utley, Martin; Tsang, Victor T

    2013-05-01

    The study objective was to develop a risk model incorporating diagnostic information to adjust for case-mix severity during routine monitoring of outcomes for pediatric cardiac surgery. Data from the Central Cardiac Audit Database for all pediatric cardiac surgery procedures performed in the United Kingdom between 2000 and 2010 were included: 70% for model development and 30% for validation. Units of analysis were 30-day episodes after the first surgical procedure. We used logistic regression for 30-day mortality. Risk factors considered included procedural information based on Central Cardiac Audit Database "specific procedures," diagnostic information defined by 24 "primary" cardiac diagnoses and "univentricular" status, and other patient characteristics. Of the 27,140 30-day episodes in the development set, 25,613 were survivals, 834 were deaths, and 693 were of unknown status (mortality, 3.2%). The risk model includes procedure, cardiac diagnosis, univentricular status, age band (neonate, infant, child), continuous age, continuous weight, presence of non-Down syndrome comorbidity, bypass, and year of operation 2007 or later (because of decreasing mortality). A risk score was calculated for 95% of cases in the validation set (weight missing in 5%). The model discriminated well; the C-index for validation set was 0.77 (0.81 for post-2007 data). Removal of all but procedural information gave a reduced C-index of 0.72. The model performed well across the spectrum of predicted risk, but there was evidence of underestimation of mortality risk in neonates undergoing operation from 2007. The risk model performs well. Diagnostic information added useful discriminatory power. A future application is risk adjustment during routine monitoring of outcomes in the United Kingdom to assist quality assurance. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What Are the Real Procedural Costs of Bariatric Surgery? A Systematic Literature Review of Published Cost Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Brett; Wordsworth, Sarah; Rogers, Chris A; Welbourn, Richard; Byrne, James; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to evaluate the current literature on the procedural costs of bariatric surgery for the treatment of severe obesity. Using a published framework for the conduct of micro-costing studies for surgical interventions, existing cost estimates from the literature are assessed for their accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness based on their consideration of seven 'important' cost components. MEDLINE, PubMed, key journals and reference lists of included studies were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies had to report per-case, total procedural costs for any type of bariatric surgery broken down into two or more individual cost components. A total of 998 citations were screened, of which 13 studies were included for analysis. Included studies were mainly conducted from a US hospital perspective, assessed either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding procedures and considered a range of different cost components. The mean total procedural costs for all included studies was US$14,389 (range, US$7423 to US$33,541). No study considered all of the recommended 'important' cost components and estimation methods were poorly reported. The accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness of the existing cost estimates are, therefore, questionable. There is a need for a comparative cost analysis of the different approaches to bariatric surgery, with the most appropriate costing approach identified to be micro-costing methods. Such an analysis will not only be useful in estimating the relative cost-effectiveness of different surgeries but will also ensure appropriate reimbursement and budgeting by healthcare payers to ensure barriers to access this effective treatment by severely obese patients are minimised.

  2. Basic Microvascular Anastomosis Simulation Hub Microsurgery Course: An Innovative Competency-Based Approach to Microsurgical Training for Early Year's Plastic Surgery Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Stephen

    2018-04-01

    Early year's plastic surgery trainees are faced with a large choice of microsurgery courses to select from. In the context of dwindling study budgets and busy on-call rotas, the pressure to select a high yield course that delivers value for money is of paramount importance.The Basic Microvascular Anastomosis Simulation Hub Microsurgery Course is a GBP £600 (US $790) 5-day 40-hour course based at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry increasing in popularity among junior trainees to fit this brief.

  3. “Lumps and Bumps”: A practical guide to minor surgery for the Core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to ensure that procedures are performed safely. General principles of minor surgery - “What to cut, ... decide whether the procedure can be performed under local anaesthesia or warrants sub-speciality referral. ... produce good aesthetic results operating around the eyes or nose. Referral to Plastic Surgery is warranted to ...

  4. One-Stage Gender-Confirmation Surgery as a Viable Surgical Procedure for Female-to-Male Transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Borko; Bizic, Marta; Bencic, Marko; Kojovic, Vladimir; Majstorovic, Marko; Jeftovic, Milos; Stanojevic, Dusan; Djordjevic, Miroslav L

    2017-05-01

    Female-to-male gender-confirmation surgery (GCS) includes removal of breasts and female genitalia and complete genital and urethral reconstruction. With a multidisciplinary approach, these procedures can be performed in one stage, avoiding multistage operations. To present our results of one-stage sex-reassignment surgery in female-to-male transsexuals and to emphasize the advantages of single-stage over multistage surgery. During a period of 9 years (2007-2016), 473 patients (mean age = 31.5 years) underwent metoidioplasty. Of these, 137 (29%) underwent simultaneous hysterectomy, and 79 (16.7%) underwent one-stage GCS consisting of chest masculinization, total transvaginal hysterectomy with bilateral adnexectomy, vaginectomy, metoidioplasty, urethral lengthening, scrotoplasty, and implantation of bilateral testicular prostheses. All surgeries were performed simultaneously by teams of experienced gynecologic and gender surgeons. Primary outcome measurements were surgical time, length of hospital stay, and complication and reoperation rates compared with other published data and in relation to the number of stages needed to complete GCS. Mean follow-up was 44 months (range = 10-92). Mean surgery time was 270 minutes (range = 215-325). Postoperative hospital stay was 3 to 6 days (mean = 4). Complications occurred in 20 patients (25.3%). Six patients (7.6%) had complications related to mastectomy, and one patient underwent revision surgery because of a breast hematoma. Two patients underwent conversion of transvaginal hysterectomy to an abdominal approach, and subcutaneous perineal cyst, as a consequence of colpocleisis, occurred in nine patients. There were eight complications (10%) from urethroplasty, including four fistulas, three strictures, and one diverticulum. Testicular implant rejection occurred in two patients and testicular implant displacement occurred in one patient. Female-to-male transsexuals can undergo complete GCS, including mastectomy

  5. Applications for a hybrid operating room in thoracic surgery: from multidisciplinary procedures to --image-guided video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Andrade, Juliano Ribeiro; Mariani, Alessandro Wasum; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; Succi, Jose Ernesto; Soares, Andrey; Zimmer, Paulo Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a hybrid operating room represents the union of a high-complexity surgical apparatus with state-of-the-art radiological tools (ultrasound, CT, fluoroscopy, or magnetic resonance imaging), in order to perform highly effective, minimally invasive procedures. Although the use of a hybrid operating room is well established in specialties such as neurosurgery and cardiovascular surgery, it has rarely been explored in thoracic surgery. Our objective was to discuss the possible applications of this technology in thoracic surgery, through the reporting of three cases. RESUMO O conceito de sala híbrida traduz a união de um aparato cirúrgico de alta complexidade com recursos radiológicos de última geração (ultrassom, TC, radioscopia e/ou ressonância magnética), visando a realização de procedimentos minimamente invasivos e altamente eficazes. Apesar de bem estabelecido em outras especialidades, como neurocirurgia e cirurgia cardiovascular, o uso da sala hibrida ainda é pouco explorado na cirurgia torácica. Nosso objetivo foi discutir as aplicações e as possibilidades abertas por essa tecnologia na cirurgia torácica através do relato de três casos.

  6. An analysis of general surgery-related complications in a series of 412 minilaparotomic anterior lumbosacral procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byung-Uk; Choi, Won-Chul; Lee, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Sang Hyeop; Park, Jong Dae; Maeng, Dae Hyeon; Choi, Young-Geun

    2009-01-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery is associated with certain perioperative visceral and vascular complications. The aim of this study was to document all general surgery-related adverse events and complications following minilaparotomic retroperitoneal lumbar procedures and to discuss strategies for their management or prevention. The authors analyzed data obtained in 412 patients who underwent anterior lumbosacral surgery between 2003 and 2005. The series comprised 114 men and 298 women whose mean age was 56 years (range 34-79 years). Preoperative diagnoses were as follows: isthmic spondylolisthesis (32%), degenerative spondylolisthesis (24%), instability/stenosis (15%), degenerative disc disease (15%), failed-back surgery syndrome (7%), and lumbar degenerative kyphosis or scoliosis (7%). A single level was exposed in 264 patients (64%), 2 in 118 (29%), and 3 or 4 in 30 (7%). The average follow-up period was 16 months. Overall, 52 instances of complications and adverse events occurred in 50 patients (12.1%), including sympathetic dysfunction in 25 (6.06%), vascular injury repaired with/without direct suture in 12 (2.9%), ileus lasting > 3 days in 5 (1.2%), pleural effusion in 4 (0.97%), wound dehiscence in 2 (0.49%), symptomatic retroperitoneal hematoma in 2 (0.49%), angina in 1 (0.24%), and bowel laceration in 1 patient (0.24%). There was no instance of retrograde ejaculation in male patients, and most complications had no long-term sequelae. This report presents a detailed analysis of complications related to anterior lumbar surgery. Although the incidence of complications appears low considering the magnitude of the procedure, surgeons should be aware of these potential complications and their management.

  7. Readmission After Gynecologic Surgery: A Comparison of Procedures for Benign and Malignant Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Lori; Latif, Nawar; Brensinger, Colleen; Zhang, Xiaochen; Giuntoli, Robert L; Burger, Robert A; Morgan, Mark; Ko, Emily

    2017-08-01

    To compare 30-day postsurgical readmission rates and associated risk factors for readmission among women undergoing gynecologic surgery for benign and malignant conditions. In a retrospective cohort study, we identified patients after surgery for benign and malignant gynecologic conditions in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012. Data collected included surgical factors, perioperative characteristics, surgical complications, and 30-day readmissions. The primary study outcome was readmission rates after gynecologic surgery for benign and oncologic conditions. Secondary study outcomes were risk factors associated with readmission among gynecologic surgeries performed for benign and oncologic conditions. Approximately 3% (1,444/46,718) compared with 8.2% (623/7,641) of patients who underwent gynecologic surgery for benign and malignant indications, respectively, were readmitted (P<.01). Compared with patients with benign surgical indications, those with uterine cancer (readmission rate 6.6%; odds ratio [OR] 2.21, 95% CI 1.95-2.51), ovarian cancer (readmission rate 10.9%; OR 3.82, 95% CI 3.29-4.45), and cervical cancer (readmission rate 10.1%; OR 3.51, 95% CI 2.71-4.53) were more likely to be readmitted. In multivariable models, independent risk factors for readmission for gynecologic cancer surgery included worse preoperative conditions (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.17-1.90) and major complications (OR 17.84, 95% CI 14.19-22.43). In comparison, independent risk factors for readmission after surgery for benign indications included comorbid conditions (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.18-1.57), operative time (15-59 minutes: referent; 60 minutes or greater: 1.37, 95% CI 1.14-1.63) and major complications (OR 53.91, 95% CI 46.98-61.85). Among gynecologic surgeries, those performed for oncologic indications were associated with readmission rates 2.8 times that of surgeries performed for benign indications. In adjusted models

  8. The Impact of Osseous Malalignment and Realignment Procedures in Knee Ligament Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Thomas; Paul, Jochen; Pape, Dietrich; Hirschmann, Michael T; Imhoff, Andreas B; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Feucht, Matthias J

    2017-03-01

    Failure rates of knee ligament surgery may be high, and the impact of osseous alignment on surgical outcome remains controversial. Basic science studies have demonstrated that osseous malalignment can negatively affect ligament strain and that realignment procedures may improve knee joint stability. The purpose of this review was to summarize the clinical evidence concerning the impact of osseous malalignment and realignment procedures in knee ligament surgery. The hypotheses were that lower extremity malalignment would be an important contributor to knee ligament surgery failure and that realignment surgery would contribute to increased knee stability and improved outcome in select cases. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. According to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, a systematic electronic search of the PubMed database was performed in November 2015 to identify clinical studies investigating (A) the influence of osseous alignment on postoperative stability and/or failure rates after knee ligament surgery and (B) the impact of osseous realignment procedures in unstable knees with or without additional knee ligament surgery on postoperative knee function and stability. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence and the Coleman Methodological Score (CMS). Of the 1466 potentially relevant articles, 28 studies fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Average study quality was poor (CMS, 40). For part A, studies showed increased rerupture rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in patients with increased tibial slope. Concerning the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)/posterolateral corner (PLC)/lateral collateral ligament (LCL), varus malalignment was considered a significant risk factor for failure. For part B, studies showed decreased anterior tibial translation after slope-decreasing high tibial

  9. Association of Otolaryngology Resident Duty Hour Restrictions With Procedure-Specific Outcomes in Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Braden, Lauren; Wan, Jim

    2017-01-01

    Importance Graduate medical education has undergone a transformation from traditional long work hours to a restricted plan to allow adequate rest for residents. The initial goal of this restriction is to improve patient outcomes. Objective To determine whether duty hour restrictions had any impact on surgery-specific outcomes by analyzing complications following thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed before and after duty hour reform. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS).The NIS was queried for procedure codes associated with thyroid and parathyroid procedures for the years 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008. Hospitals were divided based on teaching status into 3 groups: nonteaching hospitals (NTHs), teaching hospitals without otolaryngology programs (THs), and teaching hospitals with otolaryngology programs (THs-OTO). Main Outcomes and Measures Procedure-specific complication rates, length of stay, and mortality rates were collected. SAS statistical software (version 9.4) was used for analysis with adjustment using Charlson comorbidity index. Results Total numbers of head and neck endocrine procedures were 34 685 and 39 770 (a 14.7% increase), for 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008, respectively. THs-OTO contributed a greater share of procedures in 2006 to 2008 (from 18% to 25%). With the earlier period serving as the reference, length of stay remained constant (2.1 days); however, total hospital charges increased (from $12 978 to $23 708; P otolaryngology programs. PMID:28196195

  10. Regional anesthesia for pediatric knee surgery: a review of the indications, procedures, outcomes, safety, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhly WT

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wallis T Muhly, Harshad G Gurnaney, Arjunan GaneshDepartment of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USAAbstract: The indications for surgery on the knee in children and adolescents share some similarity to adult practice in that there are an increasing number of sports-related injuries requiring surgical repair. In addition, there are some unique age-related conditions or congenital abnormalities that may present as indications for orthopedic intervention at the level of the knee. The efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs for postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery has been well established in adults. Recent studies have also demonstrated earlier functional recovery after surgery in patients who received PNBs. In children, PNB is gaining popularity, and increasing data are emerging to demonstrate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety in this population. In this paper, we will review some of the most common indications for surgery involving the knee in children and the anatomy of knee, associated dermatomal and osteotomal innervation, and the PNBs most commonly used to produce analgesia at the level of the knee. We will review the evidence in support of regional anesthesia in children in terms of both the quality conferred to the immediate postoperative care and the role of continuous PNBs in maintaining effective analgesia following discharge. Also we will discuss some of the subtle challenges in utilizing regional anesthesia in the pediatric patient including the use of general anesthesia when performing regional anesthesia and the issue of monitoring for compartment syndrome. Finally, we will offer some thoughts about areas of practice that are in need of further investigation.Keywords: pediatric surgery, regional anesthesia, analgesia, knee surgery

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  12. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  13. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  14. Computer-assisted preoperative simulation for positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage procedure combining maxillary advancement by distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Suenaga

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The implementation of the computer-assisted preoperative simulation for the positioning and fixation of plate in 2-stage orthognathic procedure using distraction technique and mandibular setback surgery yielded good results.

  15. Intraoperative blood loss in bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with multisegmental Le Fort I osteotomies and additional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, W B; Baciut, G; Bacuit, Mihaela; Zoder, W; Wangerin, K

    2010-06-01

    Autologous blood donation is not currently recommended by most authors for routine bimaxillary osteotomies. There are few data about bimaxillary procedures with multisegmental maxillary osteotomies. Our aim was to investigate the effect of additional osteotomies and iliac crest grafts on operative blood loss. A total of 225 consecutive patients having bimaxillary multisegmental osteotomies during a three-year period (January 2006-January 2009) were examined to see if their haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume were reduced. The influence of iliac crest grafts, additional osteotomies (genioplasty, malar osteotomy, iliac crest graft, anterior mandibular segmental osteotomy), operating time, age, and sex were assessed. Neither age nor sex influenced blood loss, whereas operating time correlated significantly with reductions in haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume. Blood loss was significantly higher in the group who had additional procedures (p 0.001 for haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume) than in the group who had no additional procedures, whereas there were no significant differences among the three subgroups who had additional procedures (additional osteotomies, iliac crest grafts, or both procedures). Four patients who had additional procedures required transfusion, whereas no blood was given in the group who had no additional procedures. Because the transfusion rate was so low, we could make no general recommendation for preoperative blood donation in such cases. Copyright 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of clinical application of the modified maze procedure as concomitant surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Robbert C.; Akin, Sakir; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Kik, Charles; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Bogers, Ad J.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The classic cut-and-sew maze procedure is successful in 85–95% of patients. However, the technical complexity has prompted modifications of the maze procedure. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of the maze treatment performed at our institution. METHODS From March 2001 until February 2009, 169 patients underwent a modified maze procedure for atrial fibrillation at the Erasmus MC, Rotterdam. Patient characteristics, surgical procedure and follow-up data were obtained by reviewing the medical charts and consulting with the referring physicians. The efficacy of the procedure as measured by AF recurrence was analysed with a repeated measurements model. The quality of life of the patients was assessed with the SF-36 (a short-form health survey with 36 questions) questionnaire and compared with that of the general Dutch population. RESULTS Of the 169 patients who underwent a modified maze procedure, 163 had their maze procedure as a concomitant procedure. The 30-day mortality rate was 4.7% (n = 8). The rate of post-procedural AF recurrence varied significantly over time (P < 0.0001). Decreased left ventricular function, increased age and higher preoperative creatinine levels were predictors of AF recurrence. Quality of life, as measured with the SF-36 questionnaire, was comparable with that of the Dutch population for all health domains. CONCLUSIONS Concomitant maze is a relatively safe treatment that eliminates atrial fibrillation in the majority of patients, although the probability of recurrent AF increases with the passage of time. Decreased left ventricular function, increased age and higher preoperative creatinine levels are associated with an increased risk of AF recurrence. PMID:23103720

  17. Regional anesthesia procedures for shoulder and upper arm surgery upper extremity update--2005 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Ramprasad; Bowens, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    This review of the literature since 2005 assesses developments of RA techniques commonly used for shoulder surgery, and their effectiveness for postoperative analgesia. Advantages of regional techniques include site-specific anesthesia and decreased postoperative opioid use. For shoulder surgeries, the ISB provides effective analgesia with minimal complications, whereas the impacts of IA single-injections remain unclear. When combined with GA, ISB can be used in lower volumes and reducing the complications for shoulder and proximal upper extremity. USG ISB and SCB are both effective and safe for shoulder surgery with a low incidence of complications, especially PONS.53 When compared with intravenous patient-controlled opioid analgesia, a perineural LA infusion using a disposable pump with patient-controlled LA bolus function has led to better pain relief and functional recovery while decreasing the need for rescue analgesics and the number of adverse events after ambulatory orthopedic surgery. The most remarkable advance in RA in the past 5 years is the increased usage of USG. Although there are no large-scale prospective studies to show the safety, efficacy, and success and complication rates for USG blocks, USG RA theoretically could have less risk for neurologic symptoms, except for those induced by LA (less likely perineurally, much more likely intraneurally). The next "quantum leap" lies in reducing LA concentrations and augmenting anesthetic-analgesic effects with perineural additives (including clonidine, buprenorphine, and likely low-dose dexamethasone). Since 2005, perineural catheters have been an analgesic option that offers improved pain relief among other benefits, and are now being used at home. It is clear that patients benefit greatly from a single injection and continuous nerve block for postoperative pain management,but the financial and logistical aspects need to be resolved, not to mention the phrenic hemiparesis coin toss. Whether combined

  18. Propofol Effect on Stress Response and Free Radicals in Patient during Surgery and Sedation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Monica Rahardjo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Propofol is an intravenous anesthetic used worldwide as an anesthesia induction and maintenance agent. Propofol also used as sedation agent in Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Despite it’s usual anesthesia properties, propofol has an unique pharmacologic characteristic, especially as antioxidant and stress response reduction. These advantages suggested propofol has positive effects when used as an anesthesia agent in surgery or sedation in ICU in conditions when high stress and free radical level are released. CONTENT: Stress response and free radical can be elevated in various conditions including surgery or during care in ICU, especially critical ill patient. Cortisol is a major stress hormone that influences metabolism, cardiovascular and central nervous system, either in acute or chronic phase. Oxidative stress was marked by free radical elevation called Radical Oxygen Species (ROS. Combination of both elements (cortisol and ROS can worsen patient condition. Propofol with anti-stress and antioxidant properties could be used to reduce stress response and attenuate free radical level in order to improve patient condition. SUMMARY: The anti-stress and antioxidant properties of Propofol are interesting, because these benefits can be added as adjunctive therapy when propofol was used as an anesthetic agent in surgery and a sedation in ICU. KEYWORDS: propofol, stress response, antioxidant.

  19. Computer aided planning of orthopaedic surgeries: the definition of generic planning steps for bone removal procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, David; Moctezuma, Jose Luis; Nogler, Michael

    2017-11-01

    An increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons are using computer aided planning tools for bone removal applications. The aim of the study was to consolidate a set of generic functions to be used for a 3D computer assisted planning or simulation. A limited subset of 30 surgical procedures was analyzed and verified in 243 surgical procedures of a surgical atlas. Fourteen generic functions to be used in 3D computer assisted planning and simulations were extracted. Our results showed that the average procedure comprises 14 ± 10 (SD) steps with ten different generic planning steps and four generic bone removal steps. In conclusion, the study shows that with a limited number of 14 planning functions it is possible to perform 243 surgical procedures out of Campbell's Operative Orthopedics atlas. The results may be used as a basis for versatile generic intraoperative planning software.

  20. How robotic-assisted surgery can decrease the risk of mucosal tear during Heller myotomy procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballouhey, Quentin; Dib, Nabil; Binet, Aurélien; Carcauzon-Couvrat, Véronique; Clermidi, Pauline; Longis, Bernard; Lardy, Hubert; Languepin, Jane; Cros, Jérôme; Fourcade, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    We report the first description of robotic-assisted Heller myotomy in children. The purpose of this study was to improve the safety of Heller myotomy by demonstrating, in two adolescent patients, the contribution of the robot to the different steps of this procedure. Due to the robot's freedom of movement and three-dimensional vision, there was an improvement in the accuracy, a gain in the safety regarding different key-points, decreasing the risk of mucosal perforation associated with this procedure.

  1. Real-time simulation of soft tissue deformation and electrocautery procedures in laparoscopic rectal cancer radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yuan; Pan, Jun J; Qin, Hong; Liu, Hao; Lu, Yun

    2017-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery (LS), also referred to as minimally invasive surgery, is a modern surgical technique which is widely applied. The fulcrum effect makes LS a non-intuitive motor skill with a steep learning curve. A hybrid model of tetrahedrons and a multi-layer triangular mesh are constructed to simulate the deformable behavior of the rectum and surrounding tissues in the Position-Based Dynamics (PBD) framework. A heat-conduction based electric-burn technique is employed to simulate the electrocautery procedure. The simulator has been applied for laparoscopic rectum cancer surgery training. From the experimental results, trainees can operate in real time with high degrees of stability and fidelity. A preliminary study was performed to evaluate the realism and usefulness. This prototype simulator has been tested and verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believed both the visual and the haptic performance of the simulation are realistic and helpful to enhance laparoscopic skills. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Efficacy of Lavender Aromatherapy in Reducing Preoperative Anxiety in Ambulatory Surgery Patients Undergoing Procedures in General Otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotman, Michael; Levinger, Joshua; Leung, Lillian; Kallush, Aron; Mauer, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Preoperative anxiety is a common problem in hospitals and other health care centers. This emotional state has been shown to negatively impact patient satisfaction and outcomes. Aromatherapy, the therapeutic use of essential oils extracted from aromatic plants, may offer a simple, low‐risk and cost‐effective method of managing preoperative anxiety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lavender aromatherapy in reducing preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients undergoing procedures in general otolaryngology. Methods A prospective and controlled pilot study was conducted with 100 patients who were admitted to New York‐Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center for ambulatory surgery from January of 2015 to August of 2015. The subjects were allocated to two groups; the experimental group received inhalation lavender aromatherapy in the preoperative waiting area while the control group received standard nursing care. Both groups reported their anxiety with a visual analog scale (VAS) upon arriving to the preoperative waiting area and upon departure to the operating room. Results According to a Welch's two sample t‐test, the mean reduction in anxiety was statistically greater in the experimental group than the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion Lavender aromatherapy reduced preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. This effect was modest and possibly statistically significant. Future research is needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of lavender aromatherapy. Level of Evidence 2b PMID:29299520

  3. Clinical use of a 15-W diode laser in small animal surgery: results in 30 varied procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Dennis T.; Swalander, David; Hittenmiller, Donald; Newton, Jenifer

    1999-06-01

    The use of a 15-watt diode laser (CeramOptec)in 30 surgical procedures in dogs and cats was reviewed. Ease of use, operator safety, hemostasis control, wound healing, surgical time, complication rate, and pain control were observed and recorded. Procedures performed were partial pancreatectomy, nasal carcinoma ablation, medial meniscus channeling, perianal and anorectal mass removal (5), hemangioma and hemangiopericytoma removal from two legs, benign skin mass removal (7), liver lobectomy, partial prostatectomy, soft palate resection, partial arytenoidectomy, partial ablation of a thyroid carcinoma, photo-vaporization of the tumor bed following malignant tumor resection (4), neurosheath tumor removal from the tongue, tail sebaceous cyst resection, malignant mammary tumor and mast cell tumor removal. The laser was found to be very simple and safe to use. Hemostasis was excellent in all but the liver and prostate surgeries. The laser was particularly effective in preventing hemorrhage during perianal, anal, and tongue mass removal. It is estimated that a time and blood loss savings of 50% over that of conventional surgery occurred with the use of the laser. All external wounds made by laser appeared to heal faster and with less inflammation than those made with a conventional or electrosurgical scalpel.

  4. Surgery of language-eloquent tumors in patients not eligible for awake surgery: the impact of a protocol based on navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation on presurgical planning and language outcome, with evidence of tumor-induced intra-hemispheric plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giovanni; Quattropani, Maria C; Scibilia, Antonino; Conti, Alfredo; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; Esposito, Felice; Sindorio, Carmela; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    Awake surgery and intraoperative monitoring represent the gold standard for surgery of brain tumors located in the perisylvian region of the dominant hemisphere due to their ability to map and preserve the language network during surgery. Nevertheless, in some cases awake surgery is not feasible. This could increase the risk of postoperative language deficit. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) and nTMS-based DTI fiber tracking (DTI-FT) provide a preoperative mapping and reconstruction of the cortico-subcortical language network. This can be used to plan and guide the surgical strategy to preserve the language function. The objective if this study is to describe the impact of a non-invasive preoperative protocol for mapping the language network through the nTMS and nTMS-based DTI-FT in patients not eligible for awake surgery and thereby operated under general anesthesia for suspected language-eloquent brain tumors. We reviewed clinical data of patients not eligible for awake surgery and operated under general anaesthesia between 2015 and 2016. All patients underwent nTMS language cortical mapping and nTMS-based DTI-FT of subcortical language fascicles. The nTMS findings were used to plan and guide the maximal safe resection of the tumor. The impact on postoperative language outcome and the accuracy of the nTMS-based mapping in predicting language deficits were evaluated. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study. The nTMS-based reconstruction of the language network was successful in all patients. Interestingly, we observed a significant association between tumor localization and the cortical distribution of the nTMS errors (p = 0.004), thereby suggesting an intra-hemispheric plasticity of language cortical areas, probably induced by the tumor itself. The nTMS mapping disclosed the true-eloquence of lesions in 12 (60%) of all suspected cases. In the remaining 8 cases (40%) the suspected eloquence of the lesion was disproved. The n

  5. When Is Advertising a Plastic Surgeon's Individual "Brand" Unethical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carly P; George, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Advertising a plastic surgery practice on social media is fraught with both practical and ethical challenges. We use an institutional betrayal framework to explore the range of potential harms to patient well-being while also considering the pitfalls of social media activity, especially marketing, for practitioners. We also give consideration to the relative benefits that such online patient-clinician relationships can provide. In our analysis, we draw on specific examples of plastic surgery procedures prominently featured on social media, including the Vampire Facelift ® . © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  6. [52th Commemoration of French Journal of Plastic Aesthetic Surgery (1956-2007). Fifty-four years of editorial; five Editors-in-chief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-08-01

    The french Society of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (SOF.CPRE) is born December 3th 1952. Initially without "aesthetic", this "key-word" is agreed in 1983 and the symbols are advanced since: SFCPR, SFCPRE, SOF.CPRE. Its official organ, formerly included in Annales de chirurgie (1954-1955), become Annales de chirurgie plastique in 1956, Annales de chirurgie plastique et esthétique in 1983 and finally Annales de chirurgie plastique esthétique (ACPE) in 1992. Since the origin, five Editors-in-chief succeded: Claude Dufourmentel, Raymond Vilain, Jean-Pierre Lalardrie, Claude Lê-Quang, Jean-Luc Cariou. Four of them are alive, Raymond Vilain is dead. The author relate here the natural story of these five editors who had all a triple route: personnal, surgical and editorial.

  7. Technical procedures for template-guided surgery for mandibular reconstruction based on digital design and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-feng; Xu, Liang-wei; Zhu, Hui-yong; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao

    2014-05-23

    The occurrence of mandibular defects caused by tumors has been continuously increasing in China in recent years. Conversely, results of the repair of mandibular defects affect the recovery of oral function and patient appearance, and the requirements for accuracy and high surgical quality must be more stringent. Digital techniques--including model reconstruction based on medical images, computer-aided design, and additive manufacturing--have been widely used in modern medicine to improve the accuracy and quality of diagnosis and surgery. However, some special software platforms and services from international companies are not always available for most of researchers and surgeons because they are expensive and time-consuming. Here, a new technical solution for guided surgery for the repair of mandibular defects is proposed, based on general popular tools in medical image processing, 3D (3 dimension) model reconstruction, digital design, and fabrication via 3D printing. First, CT (computerized tomography) images are processed to reconstruct the 3D model of the mandible and fibular bone. The defect area is then replaced by healthy contralateral bone to create the repair model. With the repair model as reference, the graft shape and cutline are designed on fibular bone, as is the guide for cutting and shaping. The physical model, fabricated via 3D printing, including surgical guide, the original model, and the repair model, can be used to preform a titanium locking plate, as well as to design and verify the surgical plan and guide. In clinics, surgeons can operate with the help of the surgical guide and preformed plate to realize the predesigned surgical plan. With sufficient communication between engineers and surgeons, an optimal surgical plan can be designed via some common software platforms but needs to be translated to the clinic. Based on customized models and tools, including three surgical guides, preformed titanium plate for fixation, and physical models of

  8. Safe introduction of new procedures and emerging technologies in surgery: education, credentialing, and privileging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ajit K; Russell, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    Ongoing horizon scanning is needed to identify new procedures and emerging technologies that should be evaluated for introduction into surgical practice. Following evidence-based evaluation, if a new modality is found ready for adoption in practice, surgeons need education in the safe and effective use of the new modality. The educational experience should include structured teaching and learning, verification of new knowledge and skills, preceptoring or proctoring, and monitoring of outcomes. Credentialing and privileging to perform a new procedure or use an emerging technology should be based on evaluation of knowledge and skills and outcomes of surgical care, and not merely on the numbers of procedures performed. Education of the surgical team is also essential. The entire process involving education, verification of knowledge and skills, credentialing, and privileging must be transparent. Patients need to play a central role in making informed decisions regarding their care that involves use of a new procedure or an emerging technology, and they should participate actively in their perioperative care.

  9. Time Savings and Surgery Task Load Reduction in Open Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Fixation Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjoy; Hammond, Jeffrey; Panish, Jessica; Shnoda, Pullen; Savidge, Sandy; Wilson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study assessed the reduction in surgeon stress associated with savings in procedure time for mechanical fixation of an intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) compared to a traditional suture fixation in open ventral hernia repair. Study Design. Nine general surgeons performed 36 open IPOM fixation procedures in porcine model. Each surgeon conducted two mechanical (using ETHICON SECURESTRAPTM Open) and two suture fixation procedures. Fixation time was measured using a stopwatch, and related surgeon stress was assessed using the validated SURG-TLX questionnaire. T-tests were used to compare between-group differences, and a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference in stress levels was established using nonparametric methodology. Results. The mechanical fixation group demonstrated an 89.1% mean reduction in fixation time, as compared to the suture group (p Open demonstrated a significant reduction in fixation time and surgeon stress, which may translate into improved operating efficiency, improved performance, improved surgeon quality of life, and reduced overall costs of the procedure. PMID:26240834

  10. Time Savings and Surgery Task Load Reduction in Open Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Fixation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study assessed the reduction in surgeon stress associated with savings in procedure time for mechanical fixation of an intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM compared to a traditional suture fixation in open ventral hernia repair. Study Design. Nine general surgeons performed 36 open IPOM fixation procedures in porcine model. Each surgeon conducted two mechanical (using ETHICON SECURESTRAPTM Open and two suture fixation procedures. Fixation time was measured using a stopwatch, and related surgeon stress was assessed using the validated SURG-TLX questionnaire. T-tests were used to compare between-group differences, and a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference in stress levels was established using nonparametric methodology. Results. The mechanical fixation group demonstrated an 89.1% mean reduction in fixation time, as compared to the suture group (p<0.00001. Surgeon stress scores measured using SURG-TLX were 55.5% lower in the mechanical compared to the suture fixation group (p<0.001. Scores in five of the six sources of stress were significantly lower for mechanical fixation. Conclusions. Mechanical fixation with ETHICON SECURESTRAPTM Open demonstrated a significant reduction in fixation time and surgeon stress, which may translate into improved operating efficiency, improved performance, improved surgeon quality of life, and reduced overall costs of the procedure.

  11. Evaluation of Procedural Simulation as a Training and Assessment Tool in General Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure, but few training models have been described for it. We examined a virtual reality module for practising a laparoscopic appendectomy. METHODS: A prospective cohort study with the following 3 groups of surgeons (n = 45...

  12. Professionalism in plastic surgery: attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors in medical students compared to surgeons in training and practice--one, but not the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Wagner, Ida Janelle

    2015-06-01

    Professionalism is now recognized as a core competency of surgical education and is required for certification and licensure. However, best teaching methods remain elusive, because (1) ethical standards are not absolute, and (2) learning and teaching styles vary considerably-both of which are influenced by cultural and generational forces. We sought to compare attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors in fourth year medical students, compared to surgeons in training and practice, focusing on issues related to professionalism in plastic surgery. Fourth year medical students participating in a capstone course (n = 160), surgical residents (n = 219), and attending surgeons (n = 99) at a single institution were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding surgical professionalism. Participants (1) identified components of professionalism, (2) cited examples of unprofessional behavior, (3) ranked the egregiousness of 30 scenarios, and (4) indicated best educational practices. Cohorts were compared using t test and χ, with statistical significance assigned to P values less than 0.05. Compared to surgeons in training or practice, medical students were younger (27.8 vs 38.0 years, P ethics" as the defining component of professionalism. Respondents from both groups agreed that professionalism could be taught, learned, and assessed. Surgeons (94.3%) had observed unprofessional behavior, as did 88.0% of students; "poor anger management," "dishonesty," and "bullying" were the most common examples. Compared to students, however, surgeons were more likely to witness substance and physical abuse (P company whose product the surgeon uses" (33% vs 13%, P behavioral aspects of professionalism. The fact that some clearly egregious behaviors are not viewed as unethical by individual students, trainees, and surgeons, and that such behavior continues to be observed, indicates the need to improve our efforts in promoting professionalism in plastic surgery.

  13. [Contribution of computer-aided design for the conception of custom-made implants in Pectus Excavatum surgical treatment. Experience of the Nantes plastic surgery unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilliet Le Dentu, H; Lancien, U; Sellal, O; Duteille, F; Perrot, P

    2018-02-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital chest malformation and is a common reason for consultation in plastic surgery. Our attitude is most often a filling of the depression with a custom-made silicone prosthesis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the interest of computer-aided design (CAD) of implants compared to the conventional plaster molds method. We have collected all the cases of custom-made silicone implants to treat funnel chests in our plastic surgery department. The quality of the results was evaluated by the patient, and in a blind manner by the surgical team using photographs and standardized surveys. The pre-operative delays, the operating time and length of hospital stays, the number of surgical recoveries, and the post-operative surgical outcomes were recorded. Between 1990 and 2016, we designed 29 silicone thoracic implants in our department. Before 2012, implants were made from plaster chest molds (n=13). After this date, implants were designed by CAD (n=16). Patients rated their results as "good" or "excellent" in 77% and 86% of cases respectively in the plaster and CAD groups. The surgical team's ratings for CAD implant reconstructions were better than in the plaster group: 8.17 versus 6.96 (P=0.001). CAD implants were significantly less detectable than the plaster group implants. The operating time was reduced in the CAO group: 60.2 compared to 74.7minutes in the plaster group (P=0.04), as was the length of hospitalization: 3.5 versus 5.3 days (P=0.01). There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of post-operative complications. The management of pectus excavatum by a custom-made silicone implant is a minimally invasive method that provides good cosmetic results. The design of these implants is facilitated and qualitatively improved by CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of procedure on the post-operative infection risk of patients after elective colon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzer, David N; Davis, John M; Ahmed, Nasim; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Kuo, Yen-Liang

    2014-12-01

    Post-operative infection impacts the quality of patient care, prolongs the length of hospital stay, and utilizes more health care resources. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of surgical site infection among three major surgical procedures for treating patients with colon pathology. The location of colon resection impacts the post-operative infection rate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using the 2006 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Adult patients (age ≥18 yr) with colon diseases are the population of interest. The disease status and procedures were categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulosis of the colon without hemorrhage (ICD-9-CM codes: 562.11 and 562.12) or malignant neoplasm of the colon (ICD-9-CM codes: 153.x, where x represents the possible digits within this ICD-9-CM code category), with procedures of open and other right hemicolectomy (ORH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.73) or open and other left hemicolectomy (OLH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.75), or open and other sigmoidectomy (OS; ICD-9-CM code: 45.76) were included for this study. The primary measured outcome for the study was surgical site infection. There were an estimated 26,381 ORH procedures, 9,558 OLH procedures, and 31,656 OS procedures performed in 2006. There was a significant difference among procedures with respect to their age distributions (mean [standard error]: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=70.5 [0.2] vs. 63.8 [0.3] vs. 59.5 [0.2] yr, pinfection rates: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=2.9% vs. 5.6% vs. 4.9%, pinfection for OLH (AOR [95% CI]: 1.31 [1.04-1.64], p=0.02) compared with OS. Different sites of colon operations were associated with different risks of surgical site infections. Accordingly, appropriate pre-operative measures should address these differences.

  15. Effect of three different bariatric obesity surgery procedures on nutrient and energy digestibility using a swine experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandarillas, Mónica; Hodgkinson, Suzanne Marie; Riveros, José Luis; Bas, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    Morbid obesity is a worldwide health concern that compromises life quality and health status of obese human subjects. Bariatric surgery for treating morbid obesity remains as one of the best alternatives to promote excess weight loss and to reduce co-morbidities. We have not found studies reporting nutrients and energy balance considering digestibility trials in humans following surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine protein, lipid, fiber, energy, calcium, and phosphorous digestibility in a swine model that underwent ileal transposition (IT), sleeve gastrectomy with ileal transposition (SGIT), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and with sham operated animals (SHAM). Thirty-two pigs were randomly assigned to four laparoscopic procedures: IT (n = 8), RYGBP (n = 8), SGIT (n = 8), and Sham-operated pigs (n = 8). From day 0 postsurgery to 130, pigs were weighed monthly to determine live weight and weight gain was calculated for each month postsurgery until day 130. Food intake in a metabolic weight basis was calculated by measuring ad libitum food intake at day 130. Swine were fitted into metabolic crates to determine digestibility coefficients of dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ash, energy, calcium, and phosphorous from day 130. A one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls were used to detect differences in weight, food intake, and digestibility coefficients. Digestibility values for dry matter, fiber, phosphorus, and energy showed no differences among groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were encountered among groups for fat, protein, ash, and calcium digestibilities. The RYGBP procedure, when applied to the pig model, significantly reduced calcium, fat, and ash digestibility, which did not occur with SGIT or IT procedure, when compared with Sham-operated animals. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. Effect of a multimedia-assisted informed consent procedure on the information gain, satisfaction, and anxiety of cataract surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipotsch-Maca, Saskia M; Varsits, Ralph M; Ginzel, Christian; Vecsei-Marlovits, Pia V

    2016-01-01

    To assess whether a multimedia-assisted preoperative informed con