WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic peek poly-ether-ether-ketone

  1. Microwave sintering of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) based coatings deposited on metallic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.; Leparoux, S.; Liao, H.; Coddet, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of microwave (MW) sintering PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) based coatings was investigated. Three coatings were studied: pure PEEK, micron-SiC and nano-SiC particles filled (wt.10%) PEEK coatings. The results indicate that, for the two composite coatings, the SiC particles distributed in the polymer matrix, as a good MW susceptor, could be heated preferentially by MW radiation. Consequently, the polymer matrix was heated by these particles

  2. Biofilm behavior on sulfonated poly(ether-ether-ketone) (sPEEK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, Juan F.D.; Tajiri, Henrique A.; Barra, Guilherme M.O.; Fredel, Márcio C.; Benfatti, Cesar A.M.; Magini, Ricardo S.; Pimenta, Andréa L.; Souza, Júlio C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) has also shown to be very attractive for incorporating therapeutic compounds thanks to a sulfonation process which modifies the material structure resulting in a sulfonated-PEEK (sPEEK). Concerning biomedical applications, the objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of different sulfonation degree of sPEEK on the biofilm growth. PEEK samples were functionalized by using sulphuric acid (98%) and then dissolved into dimethyl-sulfoxide. A dip coating technique was used to synthesize sPEEK thin films. The sulfonation degree of the materials was analyzed by FT-IR, H NMR, TG and IEC. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle analyses. Subsequently, the biofilm formation on sulfonated-PEEK based on Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis was measured by spectrophotometry, colony forming units (CFU mL −1 ) and SEM. Results obtained from thermal and chemical analyses showed an intensification in sulfonation degree for sPEEK at 2 and 2.5 h. The E. faecalis or S. mutans biofilm growth revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between 2 and 3 h sulfonation groups. A significant decrease (p < 0.05) in CFU mL −1 was recorded for S. mutans or E. faecalis biofilm grown on 2.5 or 3 h sPEEK. Regarding the thermal-chemical and microbiologic analyses, the sulfonation degree of sPEEK ranging from 2 up to 3 h was successful capable to decrease the biofilm growth. That revealed an alternative strategy to embed anti-biofilm and therapeutic compounds into PEEK avoiding infections in biomedical applications. - Highlights: • PEEK can be dissolved to incorporate therapeutic compounds. • High sulfonation degree on sPEEK affected the biofilm growth. • The sulfonation degree must be controlled to maintain the properties of sPEEK.

  3. Biofilm behavior on sulfonated poly(ether-ether-ketone) (sPEEK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, Juan F.D. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Tajiri, Henrique A.; Barra, Guilherme M.O.; Fredel, Márcio C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering (EMC), Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Benfatti, Cesar A.M.; Magini, Ricardo S. [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Pimenta, Andréa L. [Integrated Laboratories Technologies (InteLAB), Dept. Chemical Engineering (EQA), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Department of Biologie, Université de Cergy Pontoise, 2, Av. Adolphe Chauvin, 95302 Cergy Pontoise (France); Souza, Júlio C.M., E-mail: julio.c.m.souza@ufsc.br [Center for Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), School of Dentistry (ODT), Federal University of Santa Catarina - UFSC, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Center for Microelectromechanical Systems (CMEMS), Dept. Mechanical Engineering (DEM), Campus Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal)

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) has also shown to be very attractive for incorporating therapeutic compounds thanks to a sulfonation process which modifies the material structure resulting in a sulfonated-PEEK (sPEEK). Concerning biomedical applications, the objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of different sulfonation degree of sPEEK on the biofilm growth. PEEK samples were functionalized by using sulphuric acid (98%) and then dissolved into dimethyl-sulfoxide. A dip coating technique was used to synthesize sPEEK thin films. The sulfonation degree of the materials was analyzed by FT-IR, H NMR, TG and IEC. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle analyses. Subsequently, the biofilm formation on sulfonated-PEEK based on Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis was measured by spectrophotometry, colony forming units (CFU mL{sup −1}) and SEM. Results obtained from thermal and chemical analyses showed an intensification in sulfonation degree for sPEEK at 2 and 2.5 h. The E. faecalis or S. mutans biofilm growth revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between 2 and 3 h sulfonation groups. A significant decrease (p < 0.05) in CFU mL{sup −1} was recorded for S. mutans or E. faecalis biofilm grown on 2.5 or 3 h sPEEK. Regarding the thermal-chemical and microbiologic analyses, the sulfonation degree of sPEEK ranging from 2 up to 3 h was successful capable to decrease the biofilm growth. That revealed an alternative strategy to embed anti-biofilm and therapeutic compounds into PEEK avoiding infections in biomedical applications. - Highlights: • PEEK can be dissolved to incorporate therapeutic compounds. • High sulfonation degree on sPEEK affected the biofilm growth. • The sulfonation degree must be controlled to maintain the properties of sPEEK.

  4. A new interpretation of SAXS peaks in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) membranes for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendil-Jakani, H; Zamanillo Lopez, I; Legrand, P M; Mareau, V H; Gonon, L

    2014-06-21

    The structure of a commercial sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) membrane was analyzed by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) for different water uptakes obtained after immersion in liquid water at various temperatures. For low membrane swelling, the SAXS profile displays only a wide-angle peak in the 0.2-0.3 Å(-1) region. As the membrane swells, two supplementary correlation peaks arise and shift towards small angles, which are the signature of a structural evolution of the membrane, whereas the wide angle peak remains stable. The SAXS spectra of sPEEK membranes can thus display three correlation peaks simultaneously. Therefore we propose a new interpretation of these SAXS spectra which conclude that the two small angle peaks are attributed to the so-called matrix and ionomer peaks and the wide-angle peak is ascribed to the mean separation distance between sulfonic acid groups grafted onto the polymer backbone. This peak attribution implies that the sPEEK nano-phase separation is triggered by an immersion in hot water (ionomer peak apparition). Our new peak attribution was confirmed by studying the impact of temperature, electron density contrast and ionic exchange capacity.

  5. Effect of surface finishing on friction and wear of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK under oil lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Fontoura de Andrade

    Full Text Available Abstract The tribological properties of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK containing 30% of carbon fiber were studied in an oil-lubricated environment and different surface finishing of the metallic counterbody. Four different finishing processes, commonly used in the automotive industry, were chosen for this study: turning, grinding, honing and polishing. The test system used was tri-pin on disc with pins made of PEEK and counterbody made of steel; they were fully immersed in ATF Dexron VI oil. Some test parameters were held constant, such as the apparent pressure of 2 MPa, linear velocity of 2 m/s, oil temperature at 85 °C, and the time - 120 minutes. The lubrication regime for the apparent pressure of 1 MPa to 7 MPa range was also studied at different sliding speeds. A direct correlation was found between the wear rate, friction coefficient and the lubrication regime, wherein wear under hydrodynamic lubrication was, on average, approximately 5 times lower, and the friction coefficient 3 times lower than under boundary lubrication.

  6. Hydrogen storage by functionalised Poly(ether ether ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, R.; Giacoppo, G.; Carbone, A.; Passalacqua, E. [CNR-ITAE, Messina (Italy). Inst. for Advanced Energy Technologies

    2010-07-01

    In this work a functionalised polymer was studied as potential material for hydrogen storage in solid state. A Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) matrix was modified by a manganese oxide in situ formation. Here we report the functionalisation process and the preliminary results on hydrogen storage capability of the synthesised polymer. The polymer was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Gravimetric Hydrogen Adsorption measurements. In the functionalised PEEK, morphological changes occur as a function of oxide precursor concentration and reaction time. Promising results by gravimetric measurements were obtained with a hydrogen sorption of 0.24%wt/wt at 50 C and 60 bar, moreover, reversibility hydrogen adsorption and desorption in a wide range of both temperature and pressure was confirmed. (orig.)

  7. Biaxial deformation behaviour of poly-ether-ether-ketone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Josh; Menary, Gary; Martin, Peter

    2018-05-01

    The biaxial tensile properties of thin poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) films are presented. Investigation into the biaxial mechanical behaviour of PEEK films will provide a preliminary insight into the anticipated stress/strain response, and potential suitability, to the possible fabrication of thin walled parts through stretch blow moulding and thermoforming processes - with the multi-axial state of strain imposed onto the heated thermoplastic sheet representative of the expected strain history experienced during these material forming processes. Following identification of the prospective forming temperature window, the biaxial mechanical behaviour of the material is characterized under differing modes of deformation, at a nominal strain rate of 1 s-1. The temperature dependence is outlined within - with an appreciable increase in flow behaviour correlated with specimen temperature exceeding its glass transition temperature (Tg).

  8. Preparation of poly(ether ether ketone)-based polymer electrolytes for fuel cell membranes using grafting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Shin; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Maekawa, Yasunari

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK)-based polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) was successfully prepared by radiation grafting of a styrene monomer into PEEK films and the consequent selective sulfonation of the grafting chains in the film state. Using milder sulfonation, the sulfonation reactions proceeded at the grafted chains in preference to the phenylene rings of PEEK main chains; as a result, the grafted films could successfully transform to a PEM with conductivity of more than 0.1 S/cm. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) and conductivity of the grafted PEEK electrolyte membranes were controlled to the ranges of 1.2-2.9 mmol/g and 0.03-0.18 S/cm by changing the grafting degree. It should be noted that this is the first example of directly transforming super-engineering plastic films into a PEM using radiation grafting

  9. Porous poly-ether ether ketone (PEEK) manufactured by a novel powder route using near-spherical salt bead porogens: characterisation and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, Abdur R; Kennedy, Andrew R

    2015-02-01

    Porous PEEK structures with approximately 85% open porosity have been made using PEEK-OPTIMA® powder and a particulate leaching technique using porous, near-spherical, sodium chloride beads. A novel manufacturing approach is presented and compared with a traditional dry mixing method. Irrespective of the method used, the use of near-spherical beads with a fairly narrow size range results in uniform pore structures. However the integration, by tapping, of fine PEEK into a pre-existing network salt beads, followed by compaction and "sintering", produces porous structures with excellent repeatability and homogeneity of density; more uniform pore and strut sizes; an improved and predictable level of connectivity via the formation of "windows" between the cells; faster salt removal rates and lower levels of residual salt. Although tapped samples show a compressive yield stress >1 MPa and stiffness >30 MPa for samples with 84% porosity, the presence of windows in the cell walls means that tapped structures show lower strengths and lower stiffnesses than equivalent structures made by mixing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary Investigation of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone Based on Fused Deposition Modeling for Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK fabricated by fused deposition modeling for medical applications was evaluated in terms of mechanical strength and in vitro cytotoxicity in this study. Orthogonal experiments were firstly designed to investigate the significant factors on tensile strength. Nozzle temperature, platform temperature, and the filament diameter were tightly controlled for improved mechanical strength performance. These sensitive parameters affected the interlayer bonding and solid condition in the samples. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometry analysis was secondly conducted to compare the functional groups in PEEK granules, filaments, and printed parts. In vitro cytotoxicity test was carried out at last, and no toxic substances were introduced during the printing process.

  11. Lithiated and sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone) solid state electrolyte films for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, K.-F.; Su, S.-H., E-mail: minimono42@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been synthesised and used as solid-state electrolytes for supercapacitors. In order to increase their ion conductivity, the PEEK films were sulphonated by sulphuric acid, and various amounts of LiClO{sub 4} were added. The solid-state electrolyte films were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The ionic conductivities of the electrolyte films were analysed by performing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained electrolyte films can be sandwiched or directly coated on activated carbon electrodes to form solid-state supercapacitors. The electrochemical characteristics of these supercapacitors were investigated by performing cyclic voltammetry and charge–discharge tests. Under an optimal content of LiClO{sub 4}, the supercapacitor can provide a capacitance as high as 190 F/g. After 1000 cycles, the supercapacitors show almost no capacitance fading, indicating high stability of the solid-state electrolyte films. - Highlights: • Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been used as solid-state electrolytes. • LiClO4 addition can efficiently improve the ionic conductivity. • Supercapacitors using PEEK electrolyte films deliver high capacitance.

  12. Lithiated and sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone) solid state electrolyte films for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.-F.; Su, S.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been synthesised and used as solid-state electrolytes for supercapacitors. In order to increase their ion conductivity, the PEEK films were sulphonated by sulphuric acid, and various amounts of LiClO 4 were added. The solid-state electrolyte films were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The ionic conductivities of the electrolyte films were analysed by performing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The obtained electrolyte films can be sandwiched or directly coated on activated carbon electrodes to form solid-state supercapacitors. The electrochemical characteristics of these supercapacitors were investigated by performing cyclic voltammetry and charge–discharge tests. Under an optimal content of LiClO 4 , the supercapacitor can provide a capacitance as high as 190 F/g. After 1000 cycles, the supercapacitors show almost no capacitance fading, indicating high stability of the solid-state electrolyte films. - Highlights: • Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films have been used as solid-state electrolytes. • LiClO4 addition can efficiently improve the ionic conductivity. • Supercapacitors using PEEK electrolyte films deliver high capacitance

  13. Characterization of melt-blended graphene – poly(ether ether ketone) nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewatia, Arya; Hendrix, Justin; Dong, Zhizhong; Taghon, Meredith; Tse, Stephen; Chiu, Gordon; Mayo, William E.; Kear, Bernard; Nosker, Thomas; Lynch, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Using a high shear melt-processing method, graphene-reinforced polymer matrix composites (G-PMCs) were produced with good distribution and particle–matrix interaction of bi/trilayer graphene at 2 wt. % and 5 wt. % in poly ether ether ketone (2Gn-PEEK and 5Gn-PEEK). The morphology, structure, thermal properties, and mechanical properties of PEEK, 2Gn-PEEK and 5 Gn-PEEK were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), flexural mechanical testing, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Addition of graphene to PEEK induces surface crystallization, increased percent crystallinity, offers a composite that is thermally stable until 550 °C and enhances thermomechanical properties. Results show that graphene was successfully melt-blended within PEEK using this method.

  14. Characterization of melt-blended graphene – poly(ether ether ketone) nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewatia, Arya; Hendrix, Justin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Dong, Zhizhong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Taghon, Meredith [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Tse, Stephen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Chiu, Gordon; Mayo, William E.; Kear, Bernard; Nosker, Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States); Lynch, Jennifer, E-mail: jklynch@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ, 08854 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Using a high shear melt-processing method, graphene-reinforced polymer matrix composites (G-PMCs) were produced with good distribution and particle–matrix interaction of bi/trilayer graphene at 2 wt. % and 5 wt. % in poly ether ether ketone (2Gn-PEEK and 5Gn-PEEK). The morphology, structure, thermal properties, and mechanical properties of PEEK, 2Gn-PEEK and 5 Gn-PEEK were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), flexural mechanical testing, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Addition of graphene to PEEK induces surface crystallization, increased percent crystallinity, offers a composite that is thermally stable until 550 °C and enhances thermomechanical properties. Results show that graphene was successfully melt-blended within PEEK using this method.

  15. Analysis of electron-irradiated poly-ether ether ketone by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyabu, Matashige; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Seguchi, Tadao; Sasuga, Tsuneo; Kudoh, Hisaaki.

    1995-01-01

    Organic polymers used in atomic power plants or space are damaged by ionizing irradiation. Radicals produced by irradiation cause oxidation, chain scission and crosslinking, all of which lead to degradation of the material. In this paper, the surface of electron-irradiated poly-ether ether ketone (PEEK) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The irradiation in air was found to oxidize the PEEK surface producing carboxyl groups, the content of which dependant on the dose. Carboxyl groups were not produced in helium gas. Quantitative spectral analysis indicated that the aromatic structure might be decomposed. Some comparison was made between the semicrystalline and amorphous samples. The oxygen content resulting from irradiation, of semicrystalline PEEK increased more than that of amorphous PEEK. (author)

  16. Enhanced osteogenic activity of poly ether ether ketone using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Qian, Shi; Meng, Fanhao; Ning, Congqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-06-01

    As a promising implantable material, poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) possesses similar elastic modulus to that of cortical bones yet suffers from bio-inertness and poor osteogenic properties, which limits its application as orthopedic implants. In this work, calcium is introduced onto PEEK surface using calcium plasma immersion ion implantation (Ca-PIII). The results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the modified layer with varying contents of calcium are formed on PEEK surfaces. Water contact angle measurements reveal the increasing hydrophobicity of both Ca-PIII treated surfaces. In vitro cell adhesion, viability assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and collagen secretion analyses disclose improved the adhesion, proliferation, and osteo-differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) on Ca-PIII treated surfaces. The obtained results indicate that PEEK surface with enhanced osteogenic activity can be produced by calcium incorporation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes for electric double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wan Ju; Kim, Dong-Won

    2008-01-01

    Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (S-PEEK) with different degree of sulfonation (DS) has been prepared and evaluated as a proton conducting membrane for electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). The polymer electrolytes prepared with S-PEEK membrane exhibited ionic conductivities about 1.2 x 10 -3 -4.5 x 10 -3 S cm -1 at room temperature, which depended on both soaking solvent and degree of sulfonation. The quasi-solid-state EDLCs consisted of activated carbon electrodes and S-PEEK membrane were assembled, and their electrochemical characteristics were studied by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge cycle tests. The effect of DS on the electrochemical performances of EDLCs has been investigated

  18. The failure of poly (ether ether ketone) in high speed contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, B. J.; Stuart, B. H.; Sebastian, S.; Tweedale, P. J.

    1993-04-01

    The paper describes an experimental study, with an associated analysis incorporating supplementary data, of the anti-boundary lubricating action of an alkane-aliphatic carboxylic acid lubricant system in a poly (ether ether ketone)-mild steel contact. The experiments involve progressively increasing the load in a contact formed between a polymer plate and a rotating steel shaft and estimating the frictional work dissipated. Scuffing is identified when a rapid increase in frictional work is noted at a characteristic normal load. It is shown that the additive induces premature scuffing. Subsidiary data is provided using Raman spectroscopy and hardness probes, and confirms that certain additives such as decanoic acid and dodecylamine will induce surface plasticization in poly (ether ether ketone). The trends in the frictional data have been interpreted using the adhesive model of friction in conjunction with temperature-dependent interfacial theology and bulk mechanical property data. It is proposed that the scuffing process is induced prematurely as a consequence of excessive additive-induced subsurface plasticization. Restricted surface plasticization in this system provides an enhanced self-lubricating capacity.

  19. Poly(vinylbenzyl sulfonic acid)-grafted poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Mi-Lim; Choi, Jisun; Woo, Hyun-Su; Kumar, Vinod; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Shin, Junhwa, E-mail: shinj@kaeri.re.kr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • PEEK-g-PVBSA, a polymer electrolyte membrane was prepared by a radiation grafting technique. • Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), an aromatic hydrocarbon polymer was used as a grafting backbone film. • The water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability of the membranes were evaluated. • PEEK-g-PVBSA membranes show considerably lower methanol permeability compared to a Nafion membrane. -- Abstract: In this study, an aromatic hydrocarbon based polymer electrolyte membrane, poly(vinylbenzyl sulfonic acid)-grafted poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK-g-PVBSA), has been prepared by the simultaneous irradiation grafting of vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) monomer onto a PEEK film and subsequent sulfonation. Each chemical conversion was monitored by FT-IR and SEM–EDX instruments. The physicochemical properties including IEC, water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability of the prepared membranes were also investigated and found that the values of these properties increase with the increase of degree of grafting. It was observed that the IEC values of the prepared PEEK-g-PVBSA membranes with 32%, 58%, and 80% DOG values were 0.50, 1.05, and 1.22 meq/g while the water uptakes were 14%, 20%, and 21%, respectively. The proton conductivities (0.0272–0.0721 S/cm at 70 °C) were found to be somewhat lower than Nafion 212 (0.126 S/cm at 70 °C) at a relative humidity of 90%. However, the prepared membranes showed a considerably lower methanol permeability (0.61–1.92 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/s) compared to a Nafion 212 membrane (5.37 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/s)

  20. Mass transport of direct methanol fuel cell species in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, V.S.; Ruffmann, B.; Vetter, S.; Boaventura, M.; Mendes, A.M.; Madeira, L.M.; Nunes, S.P.

    2006-01-01

    Homogeneous membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with different sulfonation degrees (SD) were prepared and characterized. In order to perform a critical analysis of the SD effect on the polymer barrier and mass transport properties towards direct methanol fuel cell species, proton conductivity, water/methanol pervaporation and nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure rise method experiments are proposed. This procedure allows the evaluation of the individual permeability coefficients in hydrated sPEEK membranes with different sulfonation degrees. Nafion[reg] 112 was used as reference material. DMFC tests were also performed at 50 deg. C. It was observed that the proton conductivity and the permeability towards water, methanol, oxygen and carbon dioxide increase with the sPEEK sulfonation degree. In contrast, the SD seems to not affect the nitrogen permeability coefficient. In terms of selectivity, it was observed that the carbon dioxide/oxygen selectivity increases with the sPEEK SD. In contrast, the nitrogen/oxygen selectivity decreases. In terms of barrier properties for preventing the DMFC reactants loss, the polymer electrolyte membrane based on the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with SD lower or equal to 71%, although having slightly lower proton conductivity, presented much better characteristics for fuel cell applications compared with the well known Nafion[reg] 112. In terms of the DMFC tests of the studied membranes at low temperature, the sPEEK membrane with SD = 71% showed to have similar performance, or even better, as that of Nafion[reg] 112. However, the highest DMFC overall efficiency was achieved using sPEEK membrane with SD = 52%

  1. Structuring of poly ether ether ketone by ArF excimer laser radiation in different atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Gottmann, J.; Kreutz, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    Structuring of poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) by 193 nm ArF excimer laser radiation has been investigated. Experiments were carried out in different atmospheres (air, vacuum, Ar, O 2 ) in order to study its influence on the quality of the structures and the formation of the debris. Repetition rate makes little effect on the ablation rate and roughness of the structure in presence of any kind of atmosphere, indicating for the structuring of PEEK by ArF laser radiation a large window of processing. The roughness at the bottom of the structures and the morphology of the side walls are strongly affected by the properties of the atmosphere. The smallest roughness is achieved at 0.6 J/cm 2 for all kinds of processing gases. Debris around the structures can be diminished by structuring in vacuum. Plasma expansion speed has been measured by using high speed photography

  2. Poly (ether ether ketone) derivatives: Synthetic route and characterization of nitrated and sulfonated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, T.F.; Bertolino, J.R.; Barra, G.M.O.; Pires, A.T.N.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrated and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) [SNPEEK] samples were prepared through sulfonation of nitrated PEEK (NPEEK) at different temperatures resulting in polymers with distinct sulfonation degrees (SD). The sulfonation occurred preferentially in the hydroquinone segment even after 81% of this moiety had been nitrated. Sulfonation in the benzophenone moiety was achieved only in 16% of this segment at the reaction temperature of 80 deg. C. The substitution degree was obtained through the TG curves, and values were in agreement with 1 H NMR data when SD is much higher as ND (nitration degree). The highest SD obtained was 72%. Membranes of the sulfonated and nitrated PEEK (SNPEEK) were prepared by casting and showed good ductility depending on the substitution degree, with proton conductivity in the order of 10 -2 S cm -1 , an important characteristic in some applications, such as in fuel cells

  3. Poly (ether ether ketone) derivatives: Synthetic route and characterization of nitrated and sulfonated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, T.F.; Bertolino, J.R. [Grupo de Estudo em Materiais Polimericos-Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Barra, G.M.O. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Pires, A.T.N. [Grupo de Estudo em Materiais Polimericos-Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: alfredotiburcio@pq.cnpq.br

    2009-03-01

    Nitrated and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) [SNPEEK] samples were prepared through sulfonation of nitrated PEEK (NPEEK) at different temperatures resulting in polymers with distinct sulfonation degrees (SD). The sulfonation occurred preferentially in the hydroquinone segment even after 81% of this moiety had been nitrated. Sulfonation in the benzophenone moiety was achieved only in 16% of this segment at the reaction temperature of 80 deg. C. The substitution degree was obtained through the TG curves, and values were in agreement with {sup 1}H NMR data when SD is much higher as ND (nitration degree). The highest SD obtained was 72%. Membranes of the sulfonated and nitrated PEEK (SNPEEK) were prepared by casting and showed good ductility depending on the substitution degree, with proton conductivity in the order of 10{sup -2} S cm{sup -1}, an important characteristic in some applications, such as in fuel cells.

  4. Poly (ether ether ketone) membranes for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero, Jacqueline C.; Gomes, Ailton de S.; Filho, Jose C.D.; Hui, Wang S.; Oliveira, Vivianna S. de

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric membranes were developed using a SPEEK polymer matrix (sulphonated poly (ether ether ketone)), containing hygroscopic particles of zirconia (Zr) (incorporated by sol-gel method), for use as electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. SPEEK with different sulfonation degrees were used: 63 and 86%. The thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) was carried out to characterize the membranes and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to evaluating the proton conductivity of the membranes. Additional analysis were underway in order to characterize these membranes, which include: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to evaluate the influence of zirconia and sulfonation degree on the properties of the membranes. (author)

  5. Enhanced osteoblast responses to poly ether ether ketone surface modified by water plasma immersion ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heying; Lu, Tao; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Poly ether ether ketone (PEEK) offers a set of characteristics superior for human implants; however, its application is limited by the bio-inert surface property. In this work, PEEK surface was modified using single step plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment with a gas mixture of water vapor as a plasma resource and argon as an ionization assistant. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and composition of the modified PEEK surface. The water contact angle and zeta-potential of the surfaces were also measured. Osteoblast precursor cells MC3T3-E1 and rat bone mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on the PEEK samples to evaluate their cytocompatibility. The obtained results show that the hydroxyl groups as well as a "ravined structure" are constructed on water PIII modified PEEK. Compared with pristine PEEK, the water PIII treated PEEK is more favorable for osteoblast adhesion, spreading and proliferation, besides, early osteogenic differentiation indicated by the alkaline phosphatase activity is also up-regulated. Our study illustrates enhanced osteoblast responses to the PEEK surface modified by water PIII, which gives positive information in terms of future biomedical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress shielding and fatigue limits of poly-ether-ether-ketone dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-Taek; Koak, Jai-Young; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kwon, Ho-Beom; Kim, Myung-Joo

    2012-05-01

    The poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) polymer is of great interest as an alternative to titanium in orthopedics because of its biocompatibility and low elastic modulus. This study evaluated the fatigue limits of PEEK and the effects of the low elastic modulus PEEK in relation to existing dental implants. Compressive loading tests were performed with glass fiber-reinforced PEEK (GFR-PEEK), carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK), and titanium rods. Among these tests, GFR-PEEK fatigue tests were performed according to ISO 14801. For the finite element analysis, three-dimensional models of dental implants and bone were constructed. The implants in the test groups were coated with a 0.5-mm thick and 5-mm long PEEK layer on the upper intrabony area. The strain energy densities (SED) were calculated, and the bone resorption was predicted. The fatigue limits of GFR-PEEK were 310 N and were higher than the static compressive strength of GFR-PEEK. The bone around PEEK-coated implants showed higher levels of SED than the bone in direct contact with the implants, and the wider diameter and stiffer implants showed lower levels of SED. The compressive strength of the GFR-PEEK and CFR-PEEK implants ranged within the bite force of the anterior and posterior dentitions, respectively, and the PEEK implants showed adequate fatigue limits for replacing the anterior teeth. Dental implants with PEEK coatings and PEEK implants may reduce stress shielding effects. Dental implant application of PEEK polymer-fatigue limit and stress shielding. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A novel sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and cross-linked membranes for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongtao; Zhang, Gang; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Ke; Han, Miaomiao; Lin, Haidan; Zhu, Jing; Na, Hui [Alan G MacDiarmid Institute, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Qianjin Street 2699, Changchun 130012, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    A novel poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) containing pendant carboxyl groups has been synthesized by a nucleophilic polycondensation reaction. Sulfonated polymers (SPEEKs) with different ion exchange capacity are then obtained by post-sulfonation process. The structures of PEEK and SPEEKs are characterized by both FT-IR and {sup 1}H NMR. The properties of SPEEKs as candidates for proton exchange membranes are studied. The cross-linking reaction is performed at 140 C using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as the cross-linker. In comparison with the non-cross-linked membranes, some properties of the cross-linked membranes are significantly improved, such as water uptake, methanol resistance, mechanical and oxidative stabilities, while the proton conductivity decreases. The effect of PVA content on proton conductivity, water uptake, swelling ratio, and methanol permeability is also investigated. Among all the membranes, SPEEK-C-8 shows the highest selectivity of 50.5 x 10{sup 4} S s cm{sup -3}, which indicates that it is a suitable candidate for applications in direct methanol fuel cells. (author)

  8. Rheological, mechanical and tribological properties of carbon-nanofibre reinforced poly (ether ether ketone composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Altstaedt

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ether ether ketone nanocomposites containing vapour-grown carbon nanofibres (CNF were produced using standard polymer processing techniques. At high shear rates no significant increase in resin viscosity was observed. Nevertheless, the addition of the CNFs results in a higher melt strength at 360°C. Electron microscopy confirmed the homogeneous dispersion and alignment of nanofibres in the polymer matrix. Evaluation of the mechanical composite properties revealed a linear increase in tensile stiffness and strength with nanofibre loading fractions up to 15 wt% whilst matrix ductility was maintained up to 10 wt%. An interpretation of the composite performance by short-fibre theory resulted in rather low intrinsic stiffness properties of the vapour-grown CNF. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate crystallization kinetics and degree of crystallinity. The CNFs were found not to act as nucleating sites. Furthermore, unidirectional sliding tests against two different counterpart materials (100Cr6 martensitic bearing steel, X5CrNi18-10 austenitic stainless steel were performed. The carbon nanofibres were found to reduce the wear rate of PEEK significantly.

  9. Wear resistance of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted carbon fiber reinforced poly(ether ether ketone) liners against metal and ceramic femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Shihori; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Hashimoto, Masami; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Younger, active patients who undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA) have increasing needs for wider range of motion and improved stability of the joint. Therefore, bearing materials having not only higher wear resistance but also mechanical strength are required. Carbon fiber-reinforced poly(ether ether ketone) (CFR-PEEK) is known as a super engineering plastic that has great mechanical strength. In this study, we focused on poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC)-grafted CFR-PEEK and investigated the effects of PMPC grafting and the femoral heads materials on the wear properties of CFR-PEEK liners. Compared with untreated CFR-PEEK, the PMPC-grafted CFR-PEEK surface revealed higher wettability and lower friction properties under aqueous circumstances. In the hip simulator wear test, wear particles generated from the PMPC-grafted CFR-PEEK liners were fewer than those of the untreated CFR-PEEK liners. There were no significant differences in the size and the morphology of the wear particles between the differences of PMPC-grafting and the counter femoral heads. Zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) femoral heads had significantly smoother surfaces compared to cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy femoral heads after the hip simulator test. Thus, we conclude that the bearing combination of the PMPC-grafted CFR-PEEK liner and ZTA head is expected to be a lifelong bearing interface in THA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 1028-1037, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Novel crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanqin; Zieren, Shelley; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2011-07-14

    Novel covalently crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and carboxylated polysulfone exhibit much lower methanol crossover and better performance in direct methanol fuel cells at 65 °C in 1 and 2 M methanol solutions compared to Nafion 115 membranes.

  11. Optical anisotropy, molecular orientations, and internal stresses in thin sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koziara, B.T.; Nijmeijer, K.; Benes, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    The thickness, the refractive index, and the optical anisotropy of thin sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) films, prepared by spin-coating or solvent deposition, have been investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. For not too high polymer concentrations (≤5 wt%) and not too low spin speeds

  12. Optical anisotropy, molecular orientations, and internal stresses in thin sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koziara, Beata; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The thickness, the refractive index, and the optical anisotropy of thin sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) films, prepared by spin-coating or solvent deposition, have been investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. For not too high polymer concentrations (B5 wt%) and not too low spin speeds

  13. Thermal stability of sulfonated Poly(Ether Ether Ketone) films : on the role of Protodesulfonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koziara, B.T.; Kappert, E.J.; Ogieglo, W.; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Hempenius, M.A.; Benes, N.E.

    Thin film and bulk, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) have been subjected to a thermal treatment at 160–250 °C for up to 15 h. Exposing the films to 160 °C already causes partial desulfonation, and heating to temperatures exceeding 200 °C results in increased conjugation in the material,

  14. Nanocomposite Based on Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles and Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone Membranes: Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Venditti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles, capped by 3-mercapto propane sulfonate (Au-3MPS, were synthesized inside a swollen sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone membrane (sPEEK. The formation of the Au-3MPS nanoparticles in the swollen sPEEK membrane was observed by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite containing the gold nanoparticles grown in the sPEEK membrane, showed the plasmon resonance λmax at about 520 nm, which remained stable over a testing period of three months. The size distribution of the nanoparticles was assessed, and the sPEEK membrane roughness, both before and after the synthesis of nanoparticles, was studied by AFM. The XPS measurements confirm Au-3MPS formation in the sPEEK membrane. Moreover, AFM experiments recorded in fluid allowed the production of images of the Au-3MPS@sPEEK composite in water at different pH levels, achieving a better understanding of the membrane behavior in a water environment; the dynamic hydration process of the Au-3MPS@sPEEK membrane was investigated. These preliminary results suggest that the newly developed nanocomposite membranes could be promising materials for fuel cell applications.

  15. Electrochemical investigation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/clay nanocomposite membranes for moderate temperature fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi [Polymer Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Sarikhani, Kaveh [Polymer Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Majedi, Fatemeh S. [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Khanbabaei, Ghader [Polymer Science and Technology Division, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, polyelectrolyte membranes based on partially sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with various degrees of sulfonation are prepared. The optimum degree of sulfonation is determined according to the transport properties and hydrolytic stability of the membranes. Subsequently, various amounts of the organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) are introduced into the sPEEK matrices via the solution intercalation technique. The proton conductivity and methanol permeability measurements of the fabricated composite membranes reveal a high proton to methanol selectivity, even at elevated temperatures. Membrane based on sPEEK and 1 wt% of MMT, as the optimum nanoclay composition, exhibits a high selectivity and power density at the concentrated methanol feed. Moreover, it is found that the optimum nanocomposite membrane not only provides higher performance compared to the neat sPEEK and Nafion {sup registered} 117 membranes, but also exhibits a high open circuit voltage (OCV) at the elevated methanol concentration. Owing to the high proton conductivity, reduced methanol permeability, high power density, convenient processability and low cost, sPEEK/MMT nanocomposite membranes could be considered as the alternative membranes for moderate temperature direct methanol fuel cell applications. (author)

  16. Hardness and wear properties of boron-implanted poly(ether-ether-ketone) and poly-ether-imide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Youngchul; Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of boron beam irradiation on the hardness, friction, and wear of polymer surfaces were investigated. Typical high-performance thermoplastics, poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) and a poly-ether-imide (Ultem) were studied after 200 keV boron ion beam treatment at ambient temperature to doses of 2.3x10 14 , 6.8x10 14 , and 2.2x10 15 ions cm -2 . The hardnesses of pristine and boron-implanted materials were characterized by a conventional Knoop method and a load-depth sensing nanoindentation technique. Both measurements showed a significant increase in hardness with increasing dose. The increase in hardness was also found to depend on the penetration depth of the diamond indenter. Wear and friction properties were characterized by a reciprocating sliding friction tester with an SAE 52100 high-carbon, chrome steel ball at 0.5 and 1 N normal loads. Wear and frictional properties varied in a complex fashion with polymer type and dose, but not much with normal load. A substantial reduction in friction coefficient was observed for PEEK at the highest dose but no reduction was observed for Ultem. The wear damage was substantially reduced at the highest dose for both Ultem and PEEK. For the system studied, the highest dose, 2.2x10 15 ions cm -2 , appears to be optimum in improving wear resistance for both PEEK and Ultem. (orig.)

  17. Effect of chemical etching on the Cu/Ni metallization of poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Lizhi; Liu Bin; Song Jianjing; Shan Dan; Yang Dean

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone)/carbon fiber composites (PEEK/Cf) were chemical etched by Cr 2 O 3 /H 2 SO 4 solution, electroless plated with copper and then electroplated with nickel. The effects of chemical etching time and temperature on the adhesive strength between PEEK/Cf and Cu/Ni layers were studied by thermal shock method. The electrical resistance of some samples was measured. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface composition and functional groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to observe the surface morphology of the composite, the chemical etched sample, the plated sample and the peeled metal layer. The results indicated that C=O bond increased after chemical etching. With the increasing of etching temperature and time, more and more cracks and partially exposed carbon fibers appeared at the surface of PEEK/Cf composites, and the adhesive strength increased consequently. When the composites were etched at 60 deg. C for 25 min and at 70-80 deg. C for more than 15 min, the Cu/Ni metallization layer could withstand four thermal shock cycles without bubbling, and the electrical resistivity of the metal layer of these samples increased with the increasing of etching temperature and time.

  18. Modification of poly(ether ether ketone) by ion irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Havránek, Vladimír; Bočan, Jiří; Macková, Anna; Vacík, Jiří; Švorčík, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 266, č. 2 (2008), s. 283-287 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : PEEK * ion beam modification * polymer degradation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.999, year: 2008

  19. Etched poly(ether ether ketone) jacket stir bar with detachable dumbbell-shaped structure for stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Chenlu; Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Zilin

    2018-06-08

    Development of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) device with high stability and extraction efficiency is critical and challenging by date. In this work, etched poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) tube with high mechanical strength and large specific surface area was used as jacket for SBSE device. By etching with concentrated sulfuric acid, the smooth outer surface of PEEK become porous with plenty of micro holes, which was beneficial for coating of sorbents and significantly improved the extraction performance. After functionalized by bio-polydopamine method, strong hydrophobic p-naphtholbenzein molecular was immobilized onto the chemical resistant PEEK surface (PNB@E-PEEK) as stationary phase. We also firstly developed a simple detachable dumbbell-shaped structure for improving the workability of PEEK jacket stir bar. The dumbbell-shaped construction can eliminate the friction between stir bar and container, and the design of detachable structure make elution can be accomplished easier with small amount of organic solvent. It was interesting that the developed detachable dumbbell-shaped PNB@E-PEEK stir bar showed exceptional stability and extraction efficiency for SBSE enrichment of multiple analytes including several Sudan dyes, triazines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkaloids and flavonoid. By coupling with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV), PNB@E-PEEK stir bar based SBSE-HPLC-UV method was applied for the analysis of common Sudan dye pollutants. The method showed low limits of detection (0.02-0.03 ng/mL), good linearity (R 2  ≥ 0.9979) and good reproducibility (relative standard deviation ≤ 7.96%). It has been successfully applied to determine three dye pollutants in tap and lake water. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dispersibility and chemical bonds between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether ether ketone) in nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanmei, Jin; Haihui, Liu; Ning, Wang; Lichen, Hou; Xing-Xiang, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A series of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)/poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) nanocomposite fibers were fabricated by mixing, melt extruding PEEK with different loadings and species of MWNTs, and melt-spun the blended chips. Nanocomposite fibers were heat-stretched and heat-treated. The morphology and dispersibility of MWNTs in nanocomposite fibers were observed using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The thermal and crystallization behavior of nanocomposite fibers were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Mechanical properties were tested using a tensile strength tester. MWNTs tend to aggregate when the loading exceeds 0.8 wt%. Functional groups on MWNTs improve the hydrophobicity and the dispersibility of MWNTs in PEEK matrix. The enhancement of mechanical properties depends on the loading and species of functional groups. The most effectively reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs (MWNT–COOH) > hydroxyl MWNTs (MWNT–OH) > MWNTs, which can be explained by the strong hydrogen bonding and the affinity between MWNT–COOH and PEEK, MWNT–OH and PEEK, and possible formation of a chemical bond between MWNT–COOH and PEEK. A nanocomposite fiber with excellent mechanical property was fabricated using 0.8 wt% MWNT–COOH as filler. The Young's modulus is 1.7 GPa; and the stress is 648 MPa. -- Highlights: ► Functional groups on MWNTs improve their hydrophobility and dispersability. ► Mechanical properties depend on the content and species of the functional groups. ► The reinforced effect is in the sequence, carboxylic MWNTs > hydroxyl MWNTs > MWNTs. ► The strength behavior was result of hydrogen bond, affinity and chemical bond. ► Dispersability of MWNTs in matrix was analyzed by calculating solubility parameter.

  1. Thermal Stability of Sulfonated Poly(Ether Ether Ketone) Films: on the Role of Protodesulfonation

    OpenAIRE

    Koziara, Beata; Kappert, Emiel; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Thin film and bulk, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) have been subjected to a thermal treatment at 160–250 °C for up to 15 h. Exposing the films to 160 °C already causes partial desulfonation, and heating to temperatures exceeding 200 °C results in increased conjugation in the material, most likely via a slight cross-linking by H-substitution. It is well-known that the sulfonate proton plays a major role in the desulfonation reactions, and exchanging the protons with other cations ...

  2. State of the water in crosslinked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). Two-dimensional differential scanning calorimetry correlation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Lafi, Abdul G. [Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Hay, James N., E-mail: cscientific9@aec.org.sy [The School of Metallurgy and Materials, College of Physical Sciences and Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • 2D-DSC mapping was applied to analyze the heat flow responses of hydrated crosslinked sPEEK. • Two types of loosely bond water were observed. • The first was bond to the sulfonic acid groups and increased with ion exchange capacity. • The second was attributed to the polar groups introduced by ions irradiation and increased with crosslinking degree. • DSC combined with 2D mapping provides a powerful tool for polymer structural determination. - Abstract: This paper reports the first application of two-dimensional differential scanning calorimetry correlation mapping, 2D-DSC-CM to analyze the heat flow responses of sulphonated poly(ether ether ketone), sPEEK, films having different ion exchange capacity and degrees of crosslinks. With the help of high resolution and high sensitivity of 2D-DSC-CM, it was possible to locate two types of loosely bound water within the structure of crosslinked sPEEK. The first was bound to the sulfonic acid groups and dependent on the ion exchange capacity of the sPEEK. The second was bound to other polar groups, either introduced by irradiation with ions and dependent on the crosslinking degree or present in the polymer such as the carbonyl groups or terminal units. The results suggest that the ability of the sulfonic acid groups in the crosslinked sPEEK membranes to adsorb water molecules is increased by crosslinking, probably due to the better close packing efficiency of the crosslinked samples. DSC combined with 2D correlation mapping provides a fast and powerful tool for polymer structural determination.

  3. All solid supercapacitor based on polyaniline and crosslinked sulfonated poly[ether ether ketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, P.; Kushwaha, R.K.; Shashidhara, K.; Hande, V.R.; Thakur, A.P.; Samui, A.B.; Khandpekar, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    All solid supercapacitor based on polyaniline (PANI) and crosslinked sulfonated poly[ether ether ketone] (XSPEEK,) is reported in this paper. The crosslinker used for sulfonated poly[ether ether ketone] (SPEEK) is 1,4-bis(hydroxymethyl) benzene. The XSPEEK is used as both solid electrolyte and separator membrane. Supercapacitors are fabricated using various PANI/XSPEEK weight ratios. These are characterized by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The supercapacitor with PANI/XSPEEK weight ratio 1:0.5, exhibit a specific capacitance of 480 F g -1 of PANI. To the best of authors' knowledge, the value reported here is the highest for a supercapacitor based on a proton conducting solid polymer electrolyte and PANI. Detailed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis is carried out. The analysis shows that the complex capacitance of the supercapacitor depends on the XSPEEK content. The time constant (t 0 ), derived from the imaginary part of complex capacitance decreases with increase in the XSPEEK content in the supercapacitor. Cycle life characteristics of the supercapacitor show a decrease in specific capacitance during initial cycles and get stabilized during later cycles.

  4. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zongshuang; Qiu, Li; Yang, Yongzhen; Chen, Yongkang; Liu, Xuguang

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites incorporating surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers were fabricated in a solution blending method in order to explore the dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites systematically. It is evident that surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on dispersibility of MWCNTs in PEEK, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. Typically, a clear effect of surface modifications of MWCNTs on tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites was observed. A significant reduction in frictional coefficient of MWCNT/PEEK composites with the MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine has been achieved and the self-lubricating film on their worn surfaces was also observed. - Highlights: • The dispersibility of surface modified MWCNTs in PEEK has been studied. • MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine have showed a good dispersion in PEEK. • Surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on both dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. - Abstract: The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e

  5. The surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zongshuang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Qiu, Li [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yang, Yongzhen, E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Material Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Chen, Yongkang, E-mail: y.k.chen@herts.ac.uk [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); University of Hertfordshire, School of Engineering and Technology, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Liu, Xuguang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites incorporating surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers were fabricated in a solution blending method in order to explore the dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites systematically. It is evident that surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on dispersibility of MWCNTs in PEEK, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. Typically, a clear effect of surface modifications of MWCNTs on tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites was observed. A significant reduction in frictional coefficient of MWCNT/PEEK composites with the MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine has been achieved and the self-lubricating film on their worn surfaces was also observed. - Highlights: • The dispersibility of surface modified MWCNTs in PEEK has been studied. • MWCNTs modified with ethanolamine have showed a good dispersion in PEEK. • Surface modifications of MWCNTs have a significant impact on both dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of MWCNT/PEEK composites. - Abstract: The effects of surface modifications of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the morphology, dynamic mechanical and tribological properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly(ether ether ketone) (MWCNT/PEEK) composites have been investigated. MWCNTs were treated with mixed acids to obtain acid-functionalized MWCNTs. Then the acid-functionalized MWCNTs were modified with ethanolamine (named e-MWCNTs). The MWCNT/PEEK composites were prepared by a solution-blending method. A more homogeneous distribution of e-MWCNTs within the composites was found with scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated a clear increase in the storage modulus of e-MWCNT/PEEK composites because of the improved interfacial adhesion strength between e-MWCNTs and PEEK. Furthermore, the presence of e

  6. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe; Sapelkin, Andrei; King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard; Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri

    2014-01-01

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  7. Origin of mechanical modifications in poly (ether ether ketone)/carbon nanotube composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, Ekaterina; Puech, Pascal; Bacsa, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.bacsa@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS and University of Toulouse, 29 Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Boyer, François; Olivier, Philippe [Université de Toulouse, Institut Clément Ader, I.U.T. Université Paul Sabatier - 133C Avenue de Rangueil - B.P. 67701, 31077 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Sapelkin, Andrei [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); King, Stephen; Heenan, Richard [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, OX11 0QX Didcot (United Kingdom); Pons, François; Gauthier, Bénédicte; Cadaux, Pierre-Henri [AIRBUS FRANCE (B.E. M and P Toulouse), 316 Route de Bayonne, 31060 Toulouse (France)

    2014-06-21

    Variations in the hardness of a poly (ether ether ketone) beam electrically modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5%-3%) are investigated. It is shown that both rupture and hardness variations correlate with the changes in carbon nanotube concentration when using micro indentation and extended Raman imaging. Statistical analysis of the relative spectral intensities in the Raman image is used to estimate local tube concentration and polymer crystallinity. We show that the histogram of the Raman D band across the image provides information about the amount of MWCNTs and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the composite. We speculate that we have observed a local modification of the ordering between pure and modified polymer. This is partially supported by small angle neutron scattering measurements, which indicate that the agglomeration state of the MWCNTs is the same at the concentrations studied.

  8. Dihydrogenimidazole modified silica-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) hybrid materials as electrolyte membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, Kimball S.; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports on dihydrogenimidazole modified inorganic-organic mixed matrix membranes for possible application as a proton exchange membrane in direct ethanol fuel cells. The polymeric phase consisted mainly of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with a sulfonation degree of 55%. The inorganic phase was built up from hydrophilic fumed silica particles interconnected with partially hydrolyzed and condensed tetraethoxysilane with a total inorganic loading of 27.3%. This inorganic phase was further modified with N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole (DHIM), which consists of an hydrolyzable inorganic part and a functional organic group. The influence of the modifier on the mixed matrix system was studied by means of various modifier concentrations in various aqueous-ethanolic systems (water, 2 M and 4 M ethanol). Modifier concentration and ethanol concentration of the ethanol-water mixture exhibited significant but opposite effects on the liquid uptake of the mixed matrix membranes. The proton conductivity as well as the proton diffusion coefficient as a function of modifier content showed a linear decrease. The proton conductivity as a function of temperature showed Arrhenius behavior and the activation energy of the mixed matrix membranes was 43.9 ± 2.6 kJ mol -1 . High selectivity of proton diffusion coefficient to ethanol permeability coefficient was obtained with high modifier concentrations. At low modifier concentrations, this selectivity was dominated by ethanol permeation and at high modifier concentrations by proton diffusion. The main electrolyte properties can be optimized by setting the DHIM content in mixed matrix membrane. With this approach, tailor-made membranes can be prepared for possible application in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  9. Composite electrolytes composed of Cs-substituted phosphotungstic acid and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Song-Yul, E-mail: ms089203@tutms.tut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Go [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Muto, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kurume National College of Technology, 1-1-1 Komorino, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-8555 (Japan); Sakai, Mototsugu [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@tutms.tut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Composite electrolytes composed of cesium hydrogen sulfate containing phosphotungstic acids (CsHSO{sub 4}-H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) were prepared by casting the corresponding precursor for application in fuel cells. Partially Cs-substituted phosphotungstic acids (Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}) were formed in the CsHSO{sub 4}-H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} system by mechanochemical treatment. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Flexible composite electrolytes were obtained and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, into the SPEEK matrix. A maximum power density of 213 mW cm{sup -2} was obtained from the single cell test for 50H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}-50CsHSO{sub 4} in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolyte at 80 deg. C and at 80 RH%. Electrochemical properties and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggest that three-dimensional cluster particles were formed and homogeneously distributed in the SPEEK matrix. The mechanochemically synthesized Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. The composite electrolytes were successfully formed with Cs{sub x}H{sub 3-x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, which consist of hydrogen bonding between surface of inorganic solid acids and not only -HSO{sub 4}{sup -} dissociated from CsHSO{sub 4} but also -SO{sub 3}H groups in the SPEEK.

  10. Dihydrogenimidazole modified silica-sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) hybrid materials as electrolyte membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Kimball S.; Hirth, Thomas [Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schiestel, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Schiestel@igb.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-25

    The present study reports on dihydrogenimidazole modified inorganic-organic mixed matrix membranes for possible application as a proton exchange membrane in direct ethanol fuel cells. The polymeric phase consisted mainly of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with a sulfonation degree of 55%. The inorganic phase was built up from hydrophilic fumed silica particles interconnected with partially hydrolyzed and condensed tetraethoxysilane with a total inorganic loading of 27.3%. This inorganic phase was further modified with N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole (DHIM), which consists of an hydrolyzable inorganic part and a functional organic group. The influence of the modifier on the mixed matrix system was studied by means of various modifier concentrations in various aqueous-ethanolic systems (water, 2 M and 4 M ethanol). Modifier concentration and ethanol concentration of the ethanol-water mixture exhibited significant but opposite effects on the liquid uptake of the mixed matrix membranes. The proton conductivity as well as the proton diffusion coefficient as a function of modifier content showed a linear decrease. The proton conductivity as a function of temperature showed Arrhenius behavior and the activation energy of the mixed matrix membranes was 43.9 {+-} 2.6 kJ mol{sup -1}. High selectivity of proton diffusion coefficient to ethanol permeability coefficient was obtained with high modifier concentrations. At low modifier concentrations, this selectivity was dominated by ethanol permeation and at high modifier concentrations by proton diffusion. The main electrolyte properties can be optimized by setting the DHIM content in mixed matrix membrane. With this approach, tailor-made membranes can be prepared for possible application in direct ethanol fuel cells.

  11. L-Arginine modified multi-walled carbon nanotube/sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) nanocomposite films for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hatice; Bulut, Osman; Kamali, Ali Reza; Ege, Duygu

    2018-06-01

    Favorable implant-tissue interactions are crucial to achieve successful osseointegration of the implants. Poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is an interesting alternative to titanium in orthopedics because of its low cost, high biocompatibility and comparable mechanical properties with cancellous bone. Despite these advantages; however, the untreated surface of PEEK fails to osseointegrate due to its bioinert and hydrophobic behavior. This paper deals with the surface modification of PEEK with a novel method. For this, PEEK was first treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to prepare sulfonated PEEK (SPEEK) films using a solvent casting method. Then, 1 and 2 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube was incorporated into SPEEK to form nanocomposite films. The samples were characterized with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy. After successful preparation of the nanocomposite films, L-arginine was covalently conjugated on the nanocomposite films to further improve their surface properties. Subsequently, the samples were characterized using X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurements and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA). Finally, cell culture studies were carried out by using Alamar Blue assay to evaluate the biocompatibility of the films. The results obtained indicate the successful preparation of L-arginine-conjugated MWCNT/SPEEK nanocomposite films. The modified surface shows potential to improve implants' mechanical and biological performances.

  12. Fuel cell performance of pendent methylphenyl sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyu; Stanis, Ronald J.; Song, Yang; Hu, Wei; Cornelius, Chris J.; Shi, Qiang; Liu, Baijun; Guiver, Michael D.

    2017-11-01

    Meta- and para-linked homopolymers bearing 3-methylphenyl (Me) pendent groups were postsulfonated to create sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) (SPEEKK) backbone isomers, which are referred to as Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK. Their thermal and oxidative stability, mechanical properties, dimensional stability, methanol permeability, and proton conductivity are characterized. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK proton conductivities at 100 °C are 116 and 173 mS cm-1, respectively. Their methanol permeabilities are 3.3-3.9 × 10-7 cm2 s-1, and dimensional swelling at 100 °C is 16.4-17.5%. Me-p-SPEEKK and Me-m-SPEEKK were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), and electrochemical properties were evaluated within a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). When O2 is used as the oxidant at 80 °C and 100% RH, the maximum power density of Me-m-SPEEKK reaches 657 mW cm-2, which is higher than those of Nafion 115 (552 mW cm-2). DMFC performance is 85 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with 2.0 M methanol using Me-p-SPEEKK due to its low MeOH crossover. In general, these electrochemical results are comparable to Nafion. These ionomer properties, combined with a potentially less expensive and scalable polymer manufacturing process, may broaden their potential for many practical applications.

  13. Treatment of two different water resources in desalination and microbial fuel cell processes by poly sulfone/Sulfonated poly ether ether ketone hybrid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, Mostafa; Wan Daud, Wan Ramli; Alam, Javed; Ilbeygi, Hamid; Sedighi, Mehdi; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; Yazdi, Mohammad H.; Aljlil, Saad A.

    2016-01-01

    The PS (Polysulfone)/SPEEK (sulfonated poly ether ether ketone) hybrid membranes were fabricated and modified with low and high DS (degrees of sulfonation) for the desalination of brackish water and proton exchange membrane in microbial fuel cell. The results illustrated that SPEEK has changed the morphology of membranes and increase their hydrophilicity. PS/SPEEK with lower DS (29%) had the rejection percentage of 62% for NaCl and 68% for MgSO_4; while it was 67% and 81% for PS/SPEEK (76%) at 4 bars. Furthermore, the water flux for PS at 10 bar was 12.41 L m"−"2 h"−"1. It was four times higher for PS/SPEEK (29%) which means 49.5 L m"−"2 h"−"1 and 13 times higher for PS/SPEEK (76%) with means 157.76 L m"−"2 h"−"1. However, in MFC (microbial fuel cell), the highest power production was 97.47 mW/m"2 by PS/SPEEK (29%) followed by 41.42 mW/m"2 for PS/SPEEK (76%), and 9.4 mW/m"2 for PS. This revealed that the sulfonation of PEEK (poly ether ether ketone) made it a better additive for PS for desalination, because it created a membrane with higher hydrophilicity, better pore size and better for salt rejection. Although for the separator, the degree of sulfonation was limited; otherwise it made a membrane to transfer some of the unwanted ions. - Highlights: • Fabrication of a composite membrane for desalination and MFC. • PS/SPEEK (76%) had the lowest contact angle (48.8) and highest hydrophilicity than PS and PS/SPEEK (29%). • PS/SPEEK (29%) was the best separator for use in MFC. • PS/SPEEK (76%) had the highest flux (61.3 L m"−"2 h"−"1) for desalination.

  14. Evaluation of atmospheric solid analysis probe ionization coupled to ion mobility mass spectrometry for characterization of poly(ether ether ketone) polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossoul, Emilie; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Sebban, Muriel [Normandie Université, COBRA, UMR6014 and FR3038, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, CNRS, IRCOF, 1 rue Tesnière, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan Cedex (France); Churlaud, Florence [Arkema, Centre d’Etude de Recherche et Développement, 27470 Serquigny (France); Oulyadi, Hassan [Normandie Université, COBRA, UMR6014 and FR3038, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, CNRS, IRCOF, 1 rue Tesnière, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan Cedex (France); Afonso, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.afonso@univ-rouen.fr [Normandie Université, COBRA, UMR6014 and FR3038, Université de Rouen, INSA de Rouen, CNRS, IRCOF, 1 rue Tesnière, 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan Cedex (France)

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • Solvent free approach. • Production of intact small oligomers of PEEK with ASAP ionization. • Comparison of the MS/MS spectra from M{sup +}· and [M + H]{sup +} precursor ions. • Identification of end-groups using tandem mass spectrometry. - Abstract: Recently, the interest of the coupling between atmospheric solid analysis probe (ASAP) and ion mobility–mass spectrometry has been revealed in the field of polymers. This method associates a direct ionization technique with a bi-dimensional separation method. Poly(ether ether ketones) (PEEK) belong to the family of the poly(aryl ether ketones) (PAEK) which are high performance aromatic polymers usually used in aerospace, electronics and nuclear industries. PEEK are important commercial thermoplastics with excellent chemical resistance and good mechanical properties. Because of their low solubility, few structural characterization studies of PEEK have been reported. In mass spectrometry, only MALDI-TOF analyses for polymer synthesis monitoring have been described with the use of strong acids such as sulfuric acid. This work demonstrates that ASAP is particularly efficient for analysis of PEEK in a solvent free approach with the production of intact small oligomers (n ≤ 2). Five types of PEEK oligomers with different end-groups were evidenced. With MALDI-TOF, the same end-groups with almost the same relative abundance were obtained which support the hypothesis that the oligomers detected in ASAP are intact small oligomers and not fragments or pyrolysis products. This is particularly interesting as generally the ASAP analysis of polymers yields pyrolysis products with the loss of end-group information. The end-groups assignments have been confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments on the M{sup +}· molecular ions, which allowed highlighting some specific neutral or radical losses as well as two diagnostic product ions. Thus, ASAP-IM/MS/MS proves to be a fast and efficient

  15. Modified nanocrystal cellulose/fluorene-containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) composites for proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingcong; Shang, Yabei; Ni, Chuangjiang; Zhang, Hanyu; Li, Xiaobai; Liu, Baijun; Men, Yongfeng; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Highly sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) with sulfonation degrees of 2.34 (SFPEEKK5) and 2.48 (SFPEEKK10) were synthesized through the direct sulfonation of a fluorene-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone) under a relatively mild reaction condition. Using the solution blending method, sulfonated nanocrystal cellulose (sNCC)-enhanced SFPEEKK composites (SFPEEKK/sNCC) were successfully prepared for investigation as proton exchange membranes. Transmission electron microscopy showed that sNCC was uniformly distributed in the composite membranes. The properties of the composite membranes, including thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake, swelling ratio, oxidative stability and proton conductivity were thoroughly evaluated. Results indicated that the insertion of sNCC could contribute to water management and improve the mechanical performance of the membranes. Notably, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK5/sNCC-5 was as high as 0.242 S cm-1 at 80 °C. All data proved the potential of SFPEEKK/sNCC composites for proton exchange membranes in medium-temperature fuel cells.

  16. Enhanced response of microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone membrane as a biochemical oxygen demand sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha, E-mail: sangeetha@annauniv.edu

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane in SCMFC used to determine the BOD. • The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm. • This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. • SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}. • Nafion{sup ®} shows high anodic internal resistance (67 Ω) than the SPEEK (39 Ω). - Abstract: The present study is focused on the development of single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) matter present in artificial wastewater (AW). The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm when using artificial wastewater. This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion{sup ®}. The most serious problem in using MFC as a BOD sensor is the oxygen diffusion into the anode compartment, which consumes electrons in the anode compartment, thereby reducing the coulomb yield and reducing the electrical signal from the MFC. SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion{sup ®}, resulting in low internal resistance and substrate loss, thus improving the sensing range of BOD. The system was further improved by making a double membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an increased electrode surface area which provide high surface area for electrically active bacteria.

  17. Preparation and characterization of poly (methyl methacrylate) and sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) blend ultrafiltration membranes for protein separation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthanareeswaran, G.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Raajenthiren, M.

    2009-01-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly (methyl methacrylate)/sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) blend membranes were prepared by phase inversion technique in various composition using N,N'-dimethylformamide as solvent. The prepared membranes were characterized in terms of pure water flux, water content, porosity and thermal stability. The addition of SPEEK to the casting solution resulted in membranes with high pure water flux, water content, porosity and slightly low thermal stability. The cross sectional views of the blend membranes under electron microscope confirm the porosity and water flux results. The effect of the addition of SPEEK into the PMMA matrix on the extent of bovine serum albumin (BSA) separation was studied. It was found that the permeate flux increased significantly while the rejection of BSA from aqueous solution reduced moderately during ultrafiltration (UF) process. The effect was attributed to the increase in porosity and charge of the membrane due to the addition of SPEEK into the PMMA blend solution

  18. Poly (ether ether ketone) membranes for fuel cells; Membranas de poli (eter eter cetona) sulfonado para celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Jacqueline C.; Gomes, Ailton de S.; Filho, Jose C.D., E-mail: jacquecosta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hui, Wang S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Vivianna S. de [Escola Tecnica Rezende-Rammel, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric membranes were developed using a SPEEK polymer matrix (sulphonated poly (ether ether ketone)), containing hygroscopic particles of zirconia (Zr) (incorporated by sol-gel method), for use as electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. SPEEK with different sulfonation degrees were used: 63 and 86%. The thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) was carried out to characterize the membranes and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to evaluating the proton conductivity of the membranes. Additional analysis were underway in order to characterize these membranes, which include: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to evaluate the influence of zirconia and sulfonation degree on the properties of the membranes. (author)

  19. Comparison of Properties among Dendritic and Hyperbranched Poly(ether ether ketones and Linear Poly(ether ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Morikawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ether ether ketone dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers were prepared from 3,5-dimethoxy-4′-(4-fluorobenzoyldiphenyl ether and 3,5-dihydroxy-4′-(4-fluorobenzoyldiphenyl ether through aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. 1-(tert-Butyldimethylsiloxy-3,5-bis(4-fluorobenzoylbenzene was polycondensed with bisphenols, followed by cleavage of the protective group to form linear poly(ether ketones having the same hydroxyl groups in the side chains as the chain ends of the dendrimer and hyperbranched polymers. Their properties, such as solubilities, reduced viscosities, and thermal properties, were compared with one another. Similar comparisons were also carried out among the corresponding methoxy group polymers, and the size of the molecules was shown to affect the properties.

  20. Sulfonated Poly(Ether Ether Ketone)/Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Composite Membrane for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Chuankun; Cheng, Yuanhang; Ling, Xiao; Wei, Guanjie; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2015-01-01

    A novel sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane embedded with the short-carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotube (we name it as SPEEK/SCCT membrane) for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) has been prepared with low capacity loss, low cost and high energy efficiency. The mechanical strength, vanadium ions permeability and performance of the membrane in the VRB single cell were characterized. Results showed that the SPEEK/SCCT membrane possessed low permeability of vanadium ions, accompanied by higher mechanical strength than the Nafion 212 membrane. The VRB single cell with SPEEK/SCCT membrane showed 7% higher coulombic efficiency (CE), 6% higher energy efficiency (EE) but lower capacity loss in comparison with the one with Nafion 212. The good cell performance, low capacity loss and high vanadium ions barrier properties of the blend membrane is of significant interest for VRB applications

  1. Proton conductivity and fuel cell property of composite electrolyte consisting of Cs-substituted heteropoly acids and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.Y.; Yoshida, T.; Kawamura, G.; Sakai, M.; Matsuda, A. [Department of Materials Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Muto, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kurume National College of Technology, 1-1-1 Komorino, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Inorganic-organic composite electrolytes were fabricated from partially Cs{sup +}-substituted heteropoly acids (Cs-HPAs) and sulfonated poly(ether-ether ketone) (SPEEK) for application in fuel cells. Heteropoly acids, such as phosphotungstic acid (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}:WPA), and silicotungstic acid (H{sub 4}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40}:WSiA), were mechanochemically treated with cesium hydrogen sulfate (CsHSO{sub 4}) to obtain the form of Cs-HPAs. SPEEK was prepared from PEEK by sulfonation using concentrated sulfuric acid. Water durability and surface structure of HPAs were modified by introducing Cs{sup +} into HPAs. Flexible and hot water stable composite electrolytes were obtained, and their electrochemical properties were markedly improved with the addition of Cs-HPAs into the SPEEK matrix. Maximum power densities of 245 and 247 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained for 50WPA.50CsHSO{sub 4} and 50WSiA.50CsHSO{sub 4} in SPEEK (1/5 by weight) composite electrolytes, respectively, from single cell tests at 80 C and 80 RH%. These results suggest that a three-dimensional proton-conductive path was formed among homogeneously distributed Cs-HPAs particles in the SPEEK matrix. The Cs-HPAs incorporated into the SPEEK matrix increased the number of protonate sites in the electrolyte. These observations imply that the mechanochemically synthesized Cs-HPAs, which consist of hydrogen bondings between Cs-HPAs and -HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, dissociated from CsHSO{sub 4}, are promising materials as inorganic fillers in inorganic-organic composite. (author)

  2. Preparation and characterization of polymer blend based on sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) and polyetherimide (SPEEK/PEI) as proton exchange membranes for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Nordiana; Ali, Ab Malik Marwan [Ionic Material and Devices Research Laboratory, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Lepit, Ajis; Rasmidi, Rosfayanti [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Sabah, Beg Berkunci 71, 88997 Kota Kinabalu (Malaysia); Subban, Ri Hanum Yahaya [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam (Malaysia); Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan [Faculty of Defence Science & Technology, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Blends of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared in five different weight ratios using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as solvent by the solution cast technique. The degree of sulfonation (DS) of the sulfonated PEEK was determined from deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO-d{sub 6}) solution of the purified polymer using {sup 1}H NMR method. The properties studied in the present investigation includes conductivity, water uptake, thermal stability and structure analysis of pure SPEEK as well as SPEEK-PEI polymer blend membranes. The experimental results show that the conductivity of the membranes increased with increase in temperature from 30 to 80°C, except for that of pure SPEEK membrane which increased with temperature from 30 to 60°C while its conductivity decreased with increasing temperature from 60 to 80°C. The conductivity of 70wt.%SPEEK-30wt.%PEI blend membrane at 80% relative humidity (RH) is found to be 1.361 × 10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1} at 30°C and 3.383 × 10{sup −3} Scm{sup −1} at 80°C respectively. It was also found that water uptake and thermal stability of the membranes slightly improved upon blending with PEI. Structure analysis was carried out using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy which revealed considerable interactions between sulfonic acid group of SPEEK and imide groups of PEI. Modification of SPEEK by blending with PEI shows good potential for improving the electrical and physical properties of proton exchange membranes.

  3. Hydrophilization of poly(ether ether ketone) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has been exploited to hydrophilize PEEK. The ketone groups on the PEEK surface were reduced to hydroxyl groups which were converted to bromoisobutyrate initiating sites for SI-ATRP. The modification steps were followed by contact...... angle measurements and XPS. Moreover, ATR FTIR has been used to confirm the formation of initiating groups. Grafting of PEGMA from PEEK was performed in aqueous solution. The presence of the PPEGMA grafts on PEEK was revealed by the thermograms from TGA whereas investigations with AFM rejected changes...

  4. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether keton)/polyetherimide acid-base blend membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Lihua; Ding, Yue; Liu, Biqian; Han, Xutong; Song, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • SPEEK/PEI acid-base blend membranes are prepared for VRB applications. • The acid-base blend membranes have much lower vanadium ion permeability. • The energy efficiency of SPEEK/PEI maintain around 86.9% after 50 cycles. - Abstract: Novel acid-base blend membranes composed of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyetherimide (PEI) were prepared for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The blend membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The ion exchange capacity (IEC), proton conductivity, water uptake, vanadium ion permeability and mechanical properties were measured. As a result, the acid-base blend membranes exhibit higher water uptake, IEC and lower vanadium ion permeability compared to Nafion117 membranes and all these properties decrease with the increase of PEI. In VRB single cell test, the VRB with blend membranes shows lower charge capacity loss, higher coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) than Nafion117 membrane. Furthermore, the acid-base blend membranes present stable performance up to 50 cycles with no significant decline in CE and EE. All experimental results indicate that the SPEEK/PEI (S/P) acid-base blend membranes show promising prospects for VRB

  5. Novel proton exchange membranes based on structure-optimized poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s and nanocrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chuangjiang; Wei, Yingcong; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Baijun; Sun, Zhaoyan; Gu, Yan; Zhang, Mingyao; Hu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Two sulfonated fluorenyl-containing poly(ether ether ketone ketone)s (SFPEEKKs) were synthesized as the matrix of composite proton exchange membranes by directly sulfonating copolymer precursors comprising non-sulfonatable fluorinated segments and sulfonatable fluorenyl-containing segments. Surface-modified nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was produced as the "performance-enhancing" filler by treating the microcrystalline cellulose with acid. Two families of SFPEEKK/NCC nanocomposite membranes with various NCC contents were prepared via a solution-casting procedure. Results revealed that the insertion of NCC at a suitable ratio could greatly enhance the proton conductivity of the pristine membranes. For example, the proton conductivity of SFPEEKK-60/NCC-4 (SFPEEKK with 60% fluorenyl segments in the repeating unit, and inserted with 4% NCC) composite membrane was as high as 0.245 S cm-1 at 90 °C, which was 61.2% higher than that of the corresponding pure SFPEEKK-60 membrane. This effect could be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bond networks and proton conduction paths through the interaction between -SO3H/-OH groups on the surface of NCC particles and -SO3H groups on the SFPEEKK backbones. Furthermore, the chemically modified NCC filler and the optimized chemical structure of the SFPEEKK matrix also provided good dimensional stability and mechanical properties of the obtained nanocomposites. In conclusion, these novel nanocomposites can be promising proton exchange membranes for fuel cells at moderate temperatures.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Sulfonated Graphene Oxide Reinforced Sulfonated Poly (Ether Ether Ketone (SPEEK Composites for Proton Exchange Membrane Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Cao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As a clean energy utilization device, full cell is gaining more and more attention. Proton exchange membrane (PEM is a key component of the full cell. The commercial-sulfonated, tetrafluoroethylene-based fluoropolymer-copolymer (Nafion membrane exhibits excellent proton conductivity under a fully humidified environment. However, it also has some disadvantages in practice, such as high fuel permeability, a complex synthesis process, and high cost. To overcome these disadvantages, a low-cost and novel membrane was developed. The sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone (SPEEK was selected as the base material of the proton exchange membrane. Sulfonated graphene (SG was cross-linked with SPEEK through the elimination reaction of hydrogen bonds. It was found that the sulfonic acid groups and hydrophilic oxygen groups increased obviously in the resultant membrane. Compared with the pure SPEEK membrane, the SG-reinforced membrane exhibited better proton conductivity and methanol permeability prevention. The results indicate that the SG/SPEEK could be applied as a new proton exchange membrane in fuel cells.

  7. Highly stable ionic-covalent cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Linfeng; Zhu, Xingye; Xu, Jianfeng; Qian, Huidong; Zou, Zhiqing; Yang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    A novel ionic cross-linked sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) containing equal content of sulfonic acid and pendant tertiary amine groups (TA-SPEEK) has been initially synthesized for the application in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). By adjusting the ratio of p-xylene dibromide to tertiary amine groups of TA-SPEEK, a series of ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes (C-SPEEK-x) with tunable degree of cross-linking are prepared. Compared with the pristine membrane, the ionic and ionic-covalent cross-linked proton exchange membranes (PEMs) exhibit reduced methanol permeability and improved mechanical properties, dimensional and oxidative stability. The proton conductivity and methanol selectivity of protonated TA-SPEEK and C-SPEEK-x at 25 °C is up to 0.109 S cm-1 and 3.88 × 105 S s cm-3, respectively, which are higher than that of Nafion 115. The DMFC incorporating C-SPEEK-25 exhibits a maximum power density as high as 35.3 mW cm-2 with 4 M MeOH at 25 °C (31.8 mW cm-2 for Nafion 115). Due to the highly oxidative stability of the membrane, no obvious performance degradation of the DMFC is observed after more than 400 h operation, indicating such cost-effective ionic-covalent cross-linked membranes have substantial potential as alternative PEMs for DMFC applications.

  8. Radiation-induced grafting of vinylbenzyl chloride onto a poly(ether ether ketone) film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Mi-Lim; Song, Ju-Myung; Ko, Beom-Seok; Sohn, Joon-Yong; Nho, Young-Chang; Shin, Junhwa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of various irradiation conditions including solvent, monomer concentration, total dose, and dose rate on the radiation grafting of a VBC monomer onto a PEEK aromatic hydrocarbon film for the preparation of a PVBC-grafted PEEK (PEEK-g-PVBC) film were investigated. The results show that the desired PVBC-grafted PEEK film can be prepared using a simultaneous irradiation grafting method, and that the degree of grafting (DOG) of the film is largely influenced by the irradiation conditions. Among the applied solvents, halogenated solvents, dichloromethane and chloroform, were found to be suitable for grafting. The successful preparation of the grafted film was confirmed using analytical instruments such as FT-IR, TGA, and SEM-EDX.

  9. Mechanical Properties Optimization of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone via Fused Deposition Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to the common selective laser sintering (SLS manufacturing method, fused deposition modeling (FDM seems to be an economical and efficient three-dimensional (3D printing method for high temperature polymer materials in medical applications. In this work, a customized FDM system was developed for polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK materials printing. The effects of printing speed, layer thickness, printing temperature and filling ratio on tensile properties were analyzed by the orthogonal test of four factors and three levels. Optimal tensile properties of the PEEK specimens were observed at a printing speed of 60 mm/s, layer thickness of 0.2 mm, temperature of 370 °C and filling ratio of 40%. Furthermore, the impact and bending tests were conducted under optimized conditions and the results demonstrated that the printed PEEK specimens have appropriate mechanical properties.

  10. Mechanical Properties Optimization of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone via Fused Deposition Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohu; Zeng, Zhi; Peng, Bei; Yan, Shuo; Ke, Wenchao

    2018-01-30

    Compared to the common selective laser sintering (SLS) manufacturing method, fused deposition modeling (FDM) seems to be an economical and efficient three-dimensional (3D) printing method for high temperature polymer materials in medical applications. In this work, a customized FDM system was developed for polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) materials printing. The effects of printing speed, layer thickness, printing temperature and filling ratio on tensile properties were analyzed by the orthogonal test of four factors and three levels. Optimal tensile properties of the PEEK specimens were observed at a printing speed of 60 mm/s, layer thickness of 0.2 mm, temperature of 370 °C and filling ratio of 40%. Furthermore, the impact and bending tests were conducted under optimized conditions and the results demonstrated that the printed PEEK specimens have appropriate mechanical properties.

  11. Mechanical properties of alumina-PEEK unidirectional composite - Compression, shear, and tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, R. D.; Mccolskey, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    An Al2O3 (alumina)-fiber composite with high strain to failure was fabricated with a thermal plastic PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone). The Al2O3-PEEK composite shows a marked improvement over thermally setting composite in that it absorbs 150 percent more elastic-strain energy at 76 K than at room temperature. This increase in fracture toughness at low temperatures can provide improved fatigue performance for thermal isolation straps at low temperature. Other mechanical property results suggest improvements for applications where graphite-epoxy materials are presently being used at low temperatures and where light weight is not a critical issue.

  12. Anhydrous proton exchange membrane of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) enabled by polydopamine-modified silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Bai, Huijuan; Zhang, Haoqin; Zhao, Liping; Chen, Huiling; Li, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept of acid/base pairs was employed to design anhydrous PEMs. • Polydopamine-modified silica particles were uniformly dispersed in SPEEK membrane. • The membranes displayed enhancement in both stability and anhydrous proton conductivity. - Abstract: Novel anhydrous proton exchange membrane is (PEM) facilely prepared by embedding dopamine-modified silica nanoparticles (DSiOis 2 ) into sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) polymer matrix. DSiO 2 bearing -NH 2 /-NH- groups are synthesized inspired by the bioadhesion principle, which are uniformly dispersed within SPEEK membrane due to the good interfacial compatibility. The interfacial electrostatic attractions render unique rearrangement of the nanophase-separated structure and the chain packing of the resultant hybrid membranes. As a result, the thermal and mechanical stabilities as well as structural stability of the hybrid membranes are enhanced when compared to SPEEK control membrane. On the other hand, induced by the attractions, acid–base pairs are formed at the SPEEK/DSiOarewere 2 interface, where fast proton transfer via Grotthuss mechanism is expected. These features confer much higher proton conductivities on the DSiO 2 -filled membranes under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions, compared to those of the SPEEK control membrane and SiO 2 -filled membranes. Particularly, the hybrid membrane with 15 wt% DSiO 2 achieve the highest conductivities of 4.52achieveachieved × 10 −3 S cm −1 at 120 °C under anhydrous condition, which is much higher than the SPEEK control membrane and the commercial Nafion membrane (0.1iswas × 10 −3 S cm −1 ). The membrane with 9 wt% DSiO 2 show an open cell potential of 0.98showshowed V and an optimum power density of 111.7 mW cm −2 , indicative of its potential application in fuel cell under anhydrous condition

  13. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiya, Timothy U; Smit, T; van Royen, B J; Mullender, M

    2011-04-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first randomized prospective study that assesses clinical outcome of PLDLLA cage compared with a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) implant. Twenty-six patients were randomly assigned to undergo instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) whereby either a PEEK cage or a PLDLLA cage was implanted. Clinical outcome based on visual analogue scale scores for leg pain and back pain, as well as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-36 questionnaires were documented and analysed. When compared with preoperative values, all clinical parameters have significantly improved in the PEEK group at 2 years after surgery with the exception of SF-36 general health, SF-36 mental health and SF-36 role emotional scores. No clinical parameter showed significant improvement at 2 years after surgery compared with preoperative values in the PLDLLA patient group. Only six patients (50%) in the PLDLLA group showed improvement in the VAS scores for leg and back pain as well as the ODI, as opposed to 10 patients (71%) in the PEEK group. One-third of the patients in the PLDLLA group actually reported worsening of their pain scores and ODI. Three cases of mild to moderate osteolysis were seen in the PLDLLA group. Following up on our preliminary report, these 2-year results confirm the superiority of the PEEK implant to the resorbable PLDLLA implant in aiding spinal fusion and alleviating symptoms following PLIF in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with either canal stenosis or foramen stenosis or both and emanating from a single lumbar segment.

  14. Crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol)/sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) blend membranes for fuel cell applications - Surface energy characteristics and proton conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanakasabai, P.; Vijay, P.; Deshpande, Abhijit P.; Varughese, Susy [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2011-02-01

    Ionic polymers, their blends and composites are considered potential candidates for application as electrolytes in fuel cells. While developing new materials for membranes, it is important to understand the interactions of these electrolytic materials with electrodes/catalysts and with reactants/products. Some of these interactions can be understood by estimating the surface energy and wettability of the membrane materials. In this work, polyvinyl alcohol with varying degrees of sulfonation and its blend with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) are prepared and studied for their wettability characteristics using goniometry. The surface energy and its components are estimated using different approaches and compared. Properties such as the ion-exchange capacity, the proton conductivity and the water sorption/desorption behaviour are also investigated to understand the relationship with wettability and surface energy and its components. Among the different methods, the van Oss acid-base and the modified Berthelot approaches yield comparable estimates for the total surface energy. (author)

  15. Proton-conducting membranes based on benzimidazole-containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) compared with their carboxyl acid form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongtao; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Chengji; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Ke; Xu, Dan; Lin, Haidan; Han, Miaomiao; Na, Hui [Alan G MacDiarmid Institute, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2009-10-15

    A series of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) containing pendant carboxyl (C-SPEEKs) have been synthesized using a nucleophilic polycondesation reaction. A condensation reaction between 1,2-diaminobenzene and carboxyl resulted in a new series of copolymers containing benzimidazole groups (SPEEK-BIms). The expected structures of the sulfonated copolymers are confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR. The dependence of ion exchange capacity, water uptake, proton conductivity and methanol diffusion coefficient of SPEEK-BIm membranes has been studied and compared with their carboxyl acid form. The results suggest that the introduction of benzimidazole groups may be responsible for many excellent properties of the membranes for fuel cell. It is noticeable that the markedly improved oxidative stability is benefit for the application of membrane. (author)

  16. Effect of degree of sulfonation and casting solvent on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membrane for vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jingyu; Li, Zhaohua; Yu, Lihong; Yin, Bibo; Wang, Lei; Liu, Le; Qiu, Xinping; Chen, Liquan

    2015-07-01

    The properties of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membranes with various degree of sulfonation (DS) and casting solvent are investigated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The optimum DS of SPEEK membrane is firstly confirmed by various characterizations such as physicochemical properties, ion selectivity, and VRFB single-cell performance. Subsequently the optimum casting solvent is selected for the optimum DS SPEEK membrane within N,N‧-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N‧-dimethylacetamide (DMAc), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The different performance of SPEEK membranes prepared with various casting solvents can be attributed to the different interaction between solvent and -SO3H group of SPEEK. In the VRFB single-cell test, the optimum SPEEK membrane with DS of 67% and casting solvent of DMF (S67-DMF membrane) exhibits higher VRFB efficiencies and better cycle-life performance at 80 mA cm-2. The investigation of various DS and casting solvent will be effective guidance on the selection and modification of SPEEK membrane towards VRFB application.

  17. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/poly(vinyl alcohol) sensitizing system for solution photogeneration of small Ag, Au, and Cu crystallites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchev, A S; Shulyak, T S; Slaten, B L; Gale, W F; Mills, G

    2005-04-28

    Illumination of air-free aqueous solutions containing sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and poly(vinyl alcohol) with 350 nm light results in benzophenone ketyl radicals of the polyketone. The polymer radicals form with a quantum yield 0.02 and decay with a second-order rate constant 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of typical alpha-hydroxy radicals. Evidence is presented that the polymeric benzophenone ketyl radicals reduce Ag+, Cu2+, and AuCl4- to metal particles of nanometer dimensions. Decreases in the reduction rates with increasing Ag(I), Cu(II), and Au(III) concentrations are explained using a kinetic model in which the metal ions quench the excited state of the polymeric benzophenone groups, which forms the macromolecular radicals. Quenching is fastest for Ag+, whereas Cu2+ and AuCl4- exhibit similar rate constants. Particle formation becomes more complex as the number of equivalents needed to reduce the metal ions increases; the Au(III) system is an extreme case where the radical reactions operate in parallel with secondary light-initiated and thermal reduction channels. For each metal ion, the polymer-initiated photoreactions produce crystallites possessing distinct properties, such as a very strong plasmon in the Ag case or the narrow size distribution exhibited by Au particles.

  18. Electricity generation and removal performance of a microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) as proton exchange membrane to treat phenol/acetone wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Yu; Guo, Chunyu; Li, Yanbo; Jiang, Nanzhe; Yin, Chengri

    2018-07-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) has emerged as a promising technology for wastewater treatment and energy recovery, but the expensive cost of proton exchange membranes (PEMs) is a problem that need to be solved. In this study, a two-chamber MFC based on our self-made PEM sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) membrane was set up to treat phenol/acetone wastewater and synchronously generate power. The maximum output voltage was 240-250 mV. Using phenol and acetone as substrates, the power generation time in an operation cycle was 289 h. The MFC exhibited good removal performance, with no phenol or acetone detected, respectively, when the phenol concentration was lower than 50 mg/L and the acetone concentration was lower than 100 mg/L. This study provides a cheap and eco-friendly way to treat phenol/acetone wastewater and generate useful energy by MFC technology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial desalination cell with sulfonated sodium poly(ether ether ketone) as cation exchange membranes for enhancing power generation and salt reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno, Francisco Lopez; Rubio, Juan E; Atanassov, Plamen; Cerrato, José M; Arges, Christopher G; Santoro, Carlo

    2018-06-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a bioelectrochemical system capable of oxidizing organics, generating electricity, while reducing the salinity content of brine streams. As it is designed, anion and cation exchange membranes play an important role on the selective removal of ions from the desalination chamber. In this work, sulfonated sodium (Na + ) poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) cation exchange membranes (CEM) were tested in combination with quaternary ammonium chloride poly(2,6-dimethyl 1,4-phenylene oxide) (QAPPO) anion exchange membrane (AEM). Non-patterned and patterned (varying topographical features) CEMs were investigated and assessed in this work. The results were contrasted against a commercially available CEM. This work used real seawater from the Pacific Ocean in the desalination chamber. The results displayed a high desalination rate and power generation for all the membranes, with a maximum of 78.6±2.0% in salinity reduction and 235±7mWm -2 in power generation for the MDCs with the SPEEK CEM. Desalination rate and power generation achieved are higher with synthesized SPEEK membranes when compared with an available commercial CEM. An optimized combination of these types of membranes substantially improves the performances of MDC, making the system more suitable for real applications. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanohybrid membrane by an in situ method for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Cao, Ying; Li, Zhen; He, Guangwei; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanohybrid membranes are prepared by an in situ method using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) as inorganic precursor and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) as modifier. Phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanoparticles with a uniform particle size of ∼50 nm are formed and dispersed homogeneously in the SPEEK matrix with good interfacial compatibility. Accordingly, the nanohybrid membranes display remarkably enhanced proton conduction property due to the incorporation of additional sites for proton transport and the formation of well-connected channels by bridging the hydrophilic domains in SPEEK matrix. The nanohybrid membrane with 6 wt. % of phosphonic acid-functionalized titania nanoparticles exhibits the highest proton conductivity of 0.334 S cm-1 at 65 °C and 100% RH, which is 63.7% higher than that of pristine SPEEK membrane. Furthermore, the as-prepared nanohybrid membranes also show elevated thermal and mechanical stabilities as well as decreased methanol permeability.

  1. Ion-exchange composite membranes pore-filled with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and Engelhard titanosilicate-10 for improved performance of vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Yongkyu; Jeon, Jae-Deok; Kwak, Seung-Yeop

    2018-04-01

    A series of ion-exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs) are prepared by filling the pores of a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate with sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and microporous Engelhard titanosilicate-10 (ETS-10). The effects of ETS-10 incorporation and PTFE reinforcement on membrane properties and VRB single-cell performance are investigated using various characterization tools. The results show that these composite membranes exhibit improved mechanical properties and reduced vanadium-ion permeabilities owing to the interactions between ETS-10 and SPEEK, the suppressed swelling of PTFE, and the unique ETS-10 framework. The composite membrane with 3 wt% ETS-10 (referred to as "SE3/P") exhibits the best membrane properties and highest ion selectivity. The VRB system with the SE3/P membrane exhibits higher cell capacity, higher cell efficiency, and lower capacity decay than that with a Nafion membrane. These results indicate that this composite membrane has potential as an alternative to Nafion in VRB systems.

  2. Properties investigation of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)/polyacrylonitrile acid-base blend membrane for vanadium redox flow battery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaohua; Dai, Wenjing; Yu, Lihong; Liu, Le; Xi, Jingyu; Qiu, Xinping; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-12

    Acid-base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-section morphology as scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy images show. The acid-base interaction of ionic cross-linking and hydrogen bonding between SPEEK and PAN could effectively reduce water uptake, swelling ratio, and vanadium ion permeability, and improve the performance and stability of blend membrane. Because of the good balance of proton conductivity and vanadium ion permeability, blend membrane with 20 wt % PAN (S/PAN-20%) showed higher Coulombic efficiency (96.2% vs 91.1%) and energy efficiency (83.5% vs 78.4%) than Nafion 117 membrane at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) when they were used in VRFB single cell. Besides, S/PAN-20% membrane kept a stable performance during 150 cycles at current density of 80 mA cm(-2) in the cycle life test. Hence the SPEEK/PAN acid-base blend membrane could be used as promising candidate for VRFB application.

  3. Evaluation of crystallization kinetics of poly (ether-ketone-ketone and poly (ether-ether-ketone by DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibran da Cunha Vasconcelos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The poly (aryl ether ketones are used as matrices in advanced composites with high performance due to its high thermal stability, excellent environmental performance and superior mechanical properties. Most of the physical, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of semi-crystalline polymers depend on the degree of crystallinity and morphology of the crystalline regions. Thus, a study on the crystallization process promotes a good prediction of how the manufacturing parameters affect the developed structure, and the properties of the final product. The objective of this work was to evaluate the thermoplastics polymers PEKK e PEEK by DSC, aiming to obtain the relationship between kinetics, content, nucleation and geometry of the crystalline phases, according to the parameters of the Avrami and Kissinger models. The analysis of the Avrami exponents obtained for the studied polymers indicates that both showed the formation of crystalline phases with heterogeneous nucleation and growth geometry of the type sticks or discs, depending on the cooling conditions. It was also found that the PEEK has a higher crystallinity than PEKK.

  4. Research on precise control of 3D print nozzle temperature in PEEK material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Wang, Gong; Huo, Yu; Zhao, Wei

    2017-10-01

    3D printing technology has shown more and more applicability in medication, designing and other fields for its low cost and high timeliness. PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), as a typical high-performance special engineering plastic, become one of the most excellent materials to be used in 3D printing technology because of its excellent mechanical property, good lubricity, chemical resistance, and other properties. But the nozzle of 3D printer for PEEK has also a series of very high requirements. In this paper, we mainly use the nozzle temperature control as the research object, combining with the advantages and disadvantages of PID control and fuzzy control. Finally realize a kind of fuzzy PID controller to solve the problem of the inertia of the temperature system and the seriousness of the temperature control hysteresis in the temperature control of the nozzle, and to meet the requirements of the accuracy of the nozzle temperature control and rapid reaction.

  5. Sulfonated Holey Graphene Oxide (SHGO) Filled Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone) Membrane: The Role of Holes in the SHGO in Improving Its Performance as Proton Exchange Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing; Tian, Xiaoning; Luo, Lijuan; Liu, Meilin

    2017-06-14

    Sulfonated holey graphene oxides (SHGOs) have been synthesized by the etching of sulfonated graphene oxides with concentrated HNO 3 under the assistance of ultrasonication. These SHGOs could be used as fillers for the sulfonated aromatic poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane. The obtained SHGO-incorporated SPEEK membrane has a uniform and dense structure, exhibiting higher performance as proton exchange membranes (PEMs), for instance, higher proton conductivity, lower activation energy for proton conduction, and comparable methanol permeability, as compared to Nafion 112. The sulfonated graphitic structure of the SHGOs is believed to be one of the crucial factors resulting in the higher performance of the SPEEK/SHGO membrane, since it could increase the local density of the -SO 3 H groups in the membrane and induce a strong interfacial interaction between SHGO and the SPEEK matrix, which improve the proton conductivity and lower the swelling ratio of the membrane, respectively. Additionally, the proton conductivity of the membrane could be further enhanced by the presence of the holes in the graphitic planes of the SHGOs, since it provides an additional channel for transport of the protons. When used, direct methanol fuel cell with the SPEEK/SHGO membrane is found to exhibit much higher performance than that with Nafion 112, suggesting potential use of the SPEEK/SHGO membrane as the PEMs.

  6. Polymeric membranes obtained from S-PEEK for application in PEM fuel cells; Caracterizacao de membranas polimericas obtidas a partir dos S-PEEK para aplicacao em celulas combustiveis do tipo PEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Ednardo G.; Fiuza, Raildo A.; Catao, Ronei S.; Jose, Nadia M.; Boaventura, Jaime S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: ednardobarreto@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: raildofiuza@gmail.com, e-mail: roneicatao@ig.com.br, e-mail: nadia@ufba.br, e-mail: bventura@ufba.br; Pepe, Yuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2007-07-01

    This work had the objective to develop and to characterize S-PEEK membranes (sulfonated poly ether ether ketone) through chemical and electrochemical analyses. Conductivity test in function of the frequency and tension had been carried through; as well as, the open circuit tension of a fuel cell using the S-PEEK as electrolyte. Additional tests included TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis), water absorption test, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), as tools to characterize conducting, thermal and mechanical proprieties of polymeric membrane. (author)

  7. FRICTION ANALYSIS ON SCRATCH DEFORMATION MODES OF VISCO-ELASTIC-PLASTIC MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiyana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of abrasion resistance and associated surfaces deformation mechanisms is of primary importance in materials engineering and design. Instrumented scratch testing has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the abrasion resistance of materials. Using a conical indenter in a scratch test may result in different deformation modes, like as elastic deformation, ironing, ductile ploughing and cutting. This paper presents the friction analysis of some deformation modes of visco-elastic-plastic behaving polymer materials, especially PEEK (poly ether ether ketone.In general, it is accepted that the friction consist of an adhesion and a deformation component, which can be assumed to be independent to each others. During a scratch test, the friction coefficient is influenced by some parameters, such as the sharpness of indenter, the deformation modes and the degree of elastic recovery. Results show that the adhesion component strongly influences the friction in the elastic and ironing deformation mode (scratching with a blunt cone, friction for the cutting deformation mode (scratching with a sharp cone is dominantly influenced by the deformation component. From the analysis, it can be concluded that the adhesion friction model is suitable for ironing - elastic deformation mode and the deformation friction model with elastic recovery is good for cutting mode. Moreover, the ductile ploughing mode is combination of the adhesion and plastic deformation friction model. ANALISIS FRIKSI PADA BENTUK DEFORMASI AKIBAT GORESAN PADA MATERIAL VISKO-ELASTIK-PLASTIK. Pemahaman tentang ketahanan abrasi dan deformasi permukaan  yang  menyertainya merupakan hal yang penting dalam rekayasa dan disain material. Peralatan uji gores terbukti ampuh untuk menyatakan ketahanan abrasi dari material. Pemakaian indenter kerucut dalam uji gores akan menghasilkan beberapa bentuk deformasi seperti halnya deformasi elastik, penyetrikaan, plowing dan pemotongan

  8. Free volume study on the miscibility of PEEK/PEI blend using positron annihilation and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, R; Alam, S

    2015-01-01

    High performance polymer blend of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) and poly(ether imide) (PEI) was examined for their free volume behaviour using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis methods. The fractional free volume obtained from PALS shows a negative deviation from linear additivity rule implying good miscibility between PEEK and PEI. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were obtained for the blends at three different frequencies 1, 10 and 100 Hz at temperatures close to and above their glass transition temperature. Applying Time-Temperature-Superposition (TTS) principle to the DMTA results, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature T o and the WLF coefficients c 0 1 and c 0 2 were evaluated. Both the methods give similar results for the dependence of fractional free volume on PEI content in this blend. The results reveal that free volume plays an important role in determining the visco-elastic properties in miscible polymer blends. (paper)

  9. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, V.; Giurea, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK) as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK). One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue. PMID:27766256

  10. Hydrogen ion induced ultralow wear of PEEK under extreme load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuai; Wang, Anying; Fei, Jixiong; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Bin

    2018-03-01

    As a high-performance engineering polymer, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is a perfect candidate material for applications under extreme working conditions. However, its high wear rate greatly shortens its service life. In this study, ultralow friction and wear between PEEK and silicon nitride (Si3N4) under extreme-load conditions (with a mean contact pressure above 100 MPa) are found in acid lubricating solutions. Both friction and wear decrease sharply with decreasing pH. At pH = 1, the friction coefficient decreases by an order of magnitude and the wear rate of the PEEK decreases by two orders of magnitude compared to the results with water lubrication. These reductions in friction and wear occur for different speed, load, and surface roughness conditions. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the formation of hydrogen-ion-induced electrical double layers on the surfaces of PEEK and Si3N4. The combined effect of the resulting repulsive force, electro-viscosity, and low shear strength of the water layer dramatically reduces both friction and wear.

  11. On the PEEK composites reinforced by surface-modified nano-silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.H.; Kuo, M.C.; Huang, J.C.; Chen, M.

    2007-01-01

    The nano-sized silica fillers reinforced poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) composites were fabricated by means of compression molding technique. The nano-sized silica, measuring 30 nm in size, was firstly modified by surface pretreatment with stearic acid. The performances and properties of the resulting PEEK/SiO 2 nanocomposites were examined in terms of tensile loading, hardness, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermomechanical analysis (TMA), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The modified nano-silica was seen to disperse more uniformly than the unmodified counterpart. The XRD patterns of the modified silica reinforced PEEK composites reveal a systematic shift toward higher angles, suggesting the smaller d-spacing of the PEEK crystallites. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) becomes lowered when the content of the nano-silica increases. Furthermore, the CTE of the modified silica filled PEEK nanocomposites shows the higher CTE values. A logic model is proposed. The increment of the dynamic modulus for the PEEK nanocomposites is up to 40% at elevated temperatures from 100 to 250 deg. C, indicating the apparent improvement of elevated temperature mechanical properties

  12. Molecular weight distribution of electron and γ-ray irradiated PEEK measured by very high temperature GPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, H.

    1996-01-01

    Poly(ether ether ketone)(PEEK) films were irradiated with electron beam in air and in helium. Gel fractions of the PEEK samples were determined as the ratio of the weight of insoluble fraction/total weigh by extracting the samples with 1-chloronaphthalene (1-CN) at 260degC. While unirradiated PEEK samples were dissolved in 1-CN completely, PEEK samples highly (10 - 50 MGy) irradiated in air were almost insoluble in the solvent. The weight-average molecular weight M w of soluble fractions of the samples were measured by very high temperature gel permeation chromatography (VHTGPC): it was found that the M w decreases with increasing dose. On the other hand, PEEK samples irradiated in helium gave gel fractions at lower doses (0 - 5 MGy) than in air. The PEEK films were also irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays in the dose range, i.e. from 0 to 5 MGy. The γ-irradiated PEEK samples were completely dissolved in 1-CN at 260degC. Their M w measured by VHTGPC decreases with increasing dose. (author)

  13. Thermal expansion behaviour of high performance PEEK matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, R K; Mulik, U P; Tiwari, A N; Negi, Y S

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion behaviour of high performance poly(ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) composites reinforced with micro- (8 μm) and nano- (39 nm) sized Al 2 O 3 particles was studied. The distribution of Al 2 O 3 in the PEEK matrix was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was reduced from 58 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 for pure PEEK to 22 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 43 vol% micro-Al 2 O 3 and to 23 x 10 -6 deg. C -1 at 12 vol% nano-Al 2 O 3 composites. For a given volume fraction, nano-Al 2 O 3 particles are more effective in reducing the CTE of composites than that of micro-Al 2 O 3 particles. This may be attributed to the much higher interfacial area or volume of nanocomposites than that of microcomposites. The upper limit and lower limit of the Schapery model separately fit closely the CTE of the micro- and nano-composites, respectively. Other models such as the rule of mixture and Kerner and Turner models were also correlated with the data

  14. Elaboration of submicron structures on PEEK polymer by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouti, S.; Beaugiraud, B.; Salvia, M.; Mauclair, C.; Pascale-Hamri, A.; Benayoun, S.; Valette, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We compare PEEK polymer under two crystalline forms: semi-crystalline and amorphous. • We assess topographical modifications of surface morphologies after femtosecond laser irradiation. • At low laser energy regime, there is an influence of the crystallinity rate on topographical features of surface morphologies. • At high laser energy regime, the contribution of the crystallinity tends to disappear. - Abstract: In this work, laser parameters initiating the emergence of periodic structures, so-called ripples on poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK) surfaces, are investigated. PEEK was used in its semi-crystalline and amorphous forms. Polymer surfaces were treated locally by performing a matrix of laser impacts to highlight the influence of the crystallinity in ultrashort laser interaction. Different surface morphologies or ripples were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and optical interferometry. A map of the presence of these different morphologies according to the laser fluence and the number of pulses was established. Analysis by optical interferometry was carried out and led to the calculations of ablation efficiency. Some significant differences were demonstrated between amorphous and semi-crystalline surfaces. This work revealed topographical information on the local behavior of the irradiated material. Finally, the crystallinity rate of polymer surface seems to be a determinant factor for the periodic nanostructured appearance

  15. Elaboration of submicron structures on PEEK polymer by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammouti, S., E-mail: sabrina.hammouti@ec-lyon.fr [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Beaugiraud, B.; Salvia, M. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Mauclair, C. [LaHC, Université Jean Monnet, 18 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Pascale-Hamri, A. [MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Benayoun, S. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Valette, S. [LTDS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); MANUTECH-USD, 20 rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • We compare PEEK polymer under two crystalline forms: semi-crystalline and amorphous. • We assess topographical modifications of surface morphologies after femtosecond laser irradiation. • At low laser energy regime, there is an influence of the crystallinity rate on topographical features of surface morphologies. • At high laser energy regime, the contribution of the crystallinity tends to disappear. - Abstract: In this work, laser parameters initiating the emergence of periodic structures, so-called ripples on poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK) surfaces, are investigated. PEEK was used in its semi-crystalline and amorphous forms. Polymer surfaces were treated locally by performing a matrix of laser impacts to highlight the influence of the crystallinity in ultrashort laser interaction. Different surface morphologies or ripples were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and optical interferometry. A map of the presence of these different morphologies according to the laser fluence and the number of pulses was established. Analysis by optical interferometry was carried out and led to the calculations of ablation efficiency. Some significant differences were demonstrated between amorphous and semi-crystalline surfaces. This work revealed topographical information on the local behavior of the irradiated material. Finally, the crystallinity rate of polymer surface seems to be a determinant factor for the periodic nanostructured appearance.

  16. PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone)-coated nitinol wire: Film stability for biocompatibility applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Nataliia; Kékicheff, Patrick; Marie, Pascal; Schmutz, Marc; Jacomine, Leandro; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne

    2016-12-01

    High quality biocompatible poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) coatings were produced on NiTi shape memory alloy wires using dipping deposition from colloidal aqueous PEEK dispersions after substrate surface treatment. The surface morphology and microstructure were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy at every step of the process from the as-received Nitinol substrate to the ultimate PEEK-coated NiTi wire. Nanoscratch tests were carried out to access the adhesive behavior of the polymer coated film to the NiTi. The results indicate that the optimum process conditions in cleaning, chemical etching, and electropolishing the NiTi, were the most important and determining parameters to be achieved. Thus, high quality PEEK coatings were obtained on NiTi wires, straight or curved (even with a U-shape) with a homogeneous microstructure along the wire length and a uniform thickness of 12 μm without any development of cracks or the presence of large voids. The biocompatibility of the PEEK coating film was checked in fibrobast cultured cells. The coating remains stable in biological environment with negligible Ni ion release, no cytotoxicity, and no delamination observed with time.

  17. Improvement of Plating Characteristics Between Nickel and PEEK by Plasma Treatment and Chemical Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye W.; Lee, Jong K.; Park, Ki Y.

    2009-01-01

    Surface of PEEK(poly-ether-ether-ketone) was modified by chemical etching, plasma treatment and mechanical grinding to improve the plating adhesion. The plating characteristics of these samples were studied by the contact angle, plating thickness, gloss and adhesion. Chemical etching and plasma treatment increased wettability, adhesion and gloss. The contact angle of as-received PEEK was 61 .deg. . The contact angles of chemical etched, plasma treated or both were improved to the range of 15∼33 .deg. . In the case of electroless plating, the thickest layer without blister was 1.6 μm. The adhesion strengths by chemical etching, plasma treatment or both chemical etching and plasma treatment were 75 kgf/cm 2 , 102 kgf/cm 2 , 113 kgf/cm 2 , respectively, comparing to the 24 kgf/cm 2 of as-received. In the case of mechanically ground PEEKs, the adhesion strengths were higher than those unground, with the sacrifice of surface gloss. The gloss of untreated PEEK were greater than mechanically ground PEEKs. Plating thickness increased linearly with the plating times

  18. Blood Compatibility of ZrO2 Particle Reinforced PEEK Coatings on Ti6Al4V Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium (Ti and its alloys are widely used in biomedical devices. As biomaterials, the blood compatibility of Ti and its alloys is important and needs to be further improved to provide better functionality. In this work, we studied the suitability of zirconia (ZrO2 particle reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates for blood-contacting implants. The wettability, surface roughness and elastic modulus of the coatings were examined. Blood compatibility tests were conducted by erythrocytes observation, hemolysis assay and clotting time of recalcified human plasma, to find out correlations between the microstructure of the ZrO2-filled PEEK composite coatings and their blood compatibilities. The results suggested that adding ZrO2 nanoparticles increased the surface roughness and improved the wettability and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov (DMT elastic modulus of PEEK coating. The PEEK composite matrix coated Ti6Al4V specimens did not cause any aggregation of erythrocytes, showing morphological normal shapes. The hemolysis rate (HR values of the tested specimens were much less than 5% according to ISO 10993-4 standard. The values of plasma recalcification time (PRT of the tested specimens varied with the increasing amount of ZrO2 nanoparticles. Based on the results obtained, 10 wt % ZrO2 particle reinforced PEEK coating has demonstrated an optimum blood compatibility, and can be considered as a candidate to improve the performance of existing PEEK based coatings on titanium substrates.

  19. Development and characterization of poli composites (ether ether ketone)(PEEK)(Hydroxyapatite(HA); Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de compositos poli (eter-eter-cetona)(PEEK)/Hidroxiapatita(HA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, V.P.; Santos, F.S.F.; Sa, M.D. de; Fook, M.V.L., E-mail: valeriap.ferreira@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work was to develop PEEK / HA composites, combining the biological activity of the ceramic phase with the properties of the polymer phase, the materials used in this research were Poly (ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) and Hydroxyapatite (HA) (50, 60, 70 and 80% m / v HA), this material was subjected to a load of two tons followed by a thermal treatment at 390 ° for a period of 30 minutes. Then they were characterized by FTIR, DRX and MO. In the physical-chemical characterization of FTIR and XRD, it was not possible to identify significant alterations. In the FTIR spectra of the composites, there is no formation of new identifiable chemical bonds. In the composites XRD diffractograms a profile similar to the ceramic phase was observed, with peaks increasing in intensity and narrowing proportional to the increase of the hydroxyapatite concentration in the composites. In optical microscopy it is possible to observe surfaces with heterogeneous morphology, with signs of roughness and in the cross section we observe a heterogeneous aspect, rich in regions with large agglomerates and lighter particles. Considering the processing aspects, the technique proved to be effective for the development of PEEK /HA composites. (author)

  20. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and characterization of poli composites (ether ether ketone)(PEEK)(Hydroxyapatite(HA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, V.P.; Santos, F.S.F.; Sa, M.D. de; Fook, M.V.L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop PEEK / HA composites, combining the biological activity of the ceramic phase with the properties of the polymer phase, the materials used in this research were Poly (ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) and Hydroxyapatite (HA) (50, 60, 70 and 80% m / v HA), this material was subjected to a load of two tons followed by a thermal treatment at 390 ° for a period of 30 minutes. Then they were characterized by FTIR, DRX and MO. In the physical-chemical characterization of FTIR and XRD, it was not possible to identify significant alterations. In the FTIR spectra of the composites, there is no formation of new identifiable chemical bonds. In the composites XRD diffractograms a profile similar to the ceramic phase was observed, with peaks increasing in intensity and narrowing proportional to the increase of the hydroxyapatite concentration in the composites. In optical microscopy it is possible to observe surfaces with heterogeneous morphology, with signs of roughness and in the cross section we observe a heterogeneous aspect, rich in regions with large agglomerates and lighter particles. Considering the processing aspects, the technique proved to be effective for the development of PEEK /HA composites. (author)

  2. Nano-TiO2/PEEK bioactive composite as a bone substitute material: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomian; Liu, Xiaochen; Wei, Jie; Ma, Jian; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared with titanium (Ti) and other metal implant materials, poly(ether-ether ketone) (PEEK) shows outstanding biomechanical properties. A number of studies have also reported attractive bioactivity for nano-TiO2 (n-TiO2). Methods In this study, n-TiO2/PEEK nanocomposites were prepared, taking advantage of the unique properties of both PEEK polymer and n-TiO2. The in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of these nanocomposites was assessed against a PEEK polymer control. The effect of surface morphology or roughness on the bioactivity of the n-TiO2/PEEK nanocomposites was also studied. n-TiO2/PEEK was successfully fabricated and cut into disks for physical and chemical characterization and in vitro studies, and prepared as cylindrical implants for in vivo studies. Their presence on the surface and dispersion in the composites was observed and analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results Bioactivity evaluation of the nanocomposites revealed that pseudopods of osteoblasts preferred to anchor at areas where n-TiO2 was present on the surface. In a cell attachment test, smooth PEEK showed the lowest optical density value (0.56 ± 0.07) while rough n-TiO2/PEEK exhibited the highest optical density value (1.21 ± 0.34, P PEEK was approximately twice as large as that of PEEK (P PEEK, especially if it has a rough composite surface. A n-TiO2/PEEK composite with a rough surface could be a novel alternative implant material for orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22419869

  3. Hydrophilization of Poly(ether ether ketone) Films by Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    and confirmed by ATR FTIR, water contact ang;le, and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The surface topography was evaluated by "Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the degree of functionalization. The performed modification allowed for successful...

  4. Sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based membranes for direct ethanol fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roelofs, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels and the increasing impact of greenhouse gases on the environment lead to an extensive development of more efficient or renewable energy sources. The direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) as a portable energy source is a promising and fast growing technology which meets these demands. Up to now, methanol is mostly studied as a fuel for these devices, however, applying ethanol has some evident advantages over methanol. The major challenges in direct ethanol...

  5. Crosslinked poly(ether ether ketone): cost-effective proton exchange ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... such as their high cost, poor proton conductivity and high fuel permeability at temperature above 80. ◦. C, which stimu- lated the ..... swells or becomes water soluble and loses its dimensional sta- bility. The water uptake of the ...

  6. Analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced PEEK Hinge Mechanism Articulation Components in a Rotating Hinge Knee Design: A Comparison of In Vitro and Retrieval Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronja A. Schierjott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (CFR-PEEK represents a promising alternative material for bushings in total knee replacements, after early clinical failures of polyethylene in this application. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the damage modes and the extent of damage observed on CFR-PEEK hinge mechanism articulation components after in vivo service in a rotating hinge knee (RHK system and to compare the results with corresponding components subjected to in vitro wear tests. Key question was if there were any similarities or differences between in vivo and in vitro damage characteristics. Twelve retrieved RHK systems after an average of 34.9 months in vivo underwent wear damage analysis with focus on the four integrated CFR-PEEK components and distinction between different damage modes and classification with a scoring system. The analysis included visual examination, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, as well as surface roughness and profile measurements. The main wear damage modes were comparable between retrieved and in vitro specimens (n=3, whereby the size of affected area on the retrieved components showed a higher variation. Overall, the retrieved specimens seemed to be slightly heavier damaged which was probably attributable to the more complex loading and kinematic conditions in vivo.

  7. Analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced PEEK Hinge Mechanism Articulation Components in a Rotating Hinge Knee Design: A Comparison of In Vitro and Retrieval Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierjott, Ronja A; Giurea, Alexander; Neuhaus, Hans-Joachim; Schwiesau, Jens; Pfaff, Andreas M; Utzschneider, Sandra; Tozzi, Gianluca; Grupp, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (CFR-PEEK) represents a promising alternative material for bushings in total knee replacements, after early clinical failures of polyethylene in this application. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the damage modes and the extent of damage observed on CFR-PEEK hinge mechanism articulation components after in vivo service in a rotating hinge knee (RHK) system and to compare the results with corresponding components subjected to in vitro wear tests. Key question was if there were any similarities or differences between in vivo and in vitro damage characteristics. Twelve retrieved RHK systems after an average of 34.9 months in vivo underwent wear damage analysis with focus on the four integrated CFR-PEEK components and distinction between different damage modes and classification with a scoring system. The analysis included visual examination, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, as well as surface roughness and profile measurements. The main wear damage modes were comparable between retrieved and in vitro specimens ( n = 3), whereby the size of affected area on the retrieved components showed a higher variation. Overall, the retrieved specimens seemed to be slightly heavier damaged which was probably attributable to the more complex loading and kinematic conditions in vivo.

  8. Sulfonation of PEEK-WC polymer via chloro-sulfonic acid for potential PEM fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iulianelli, A.; Clarizia, G.; Gugliuzza, A.; Ebrasu, D.; Basile, A. [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, c/o University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Bevilacqua, A. [Research Centre Italsistemi S.r.l., Via Avogadro, 88900 Crotone (KR) (Italy); Trotta, F. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Torino, C.So M. D' Azeglio 48, 10125 Torino (TO) (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    The preparation and characterization of thin dense sulfonated poly-ether-ether-ketone with cardo group (PEEK-WC) membranes for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications are described. The sulfonation of PEEK-WC polymer was realized via chloro-sulfonic acid and different kinds of membrane samples were prepared with a sulfonation degree ranging from 67 to 99%. The degree of sulfonation, homogeneity and thickness significantly affect both the membrane transport properties and the electrochemical performances. The dense character of the membranes was confirmed by SEM analysis. Proton conductivity measurements were carried out in a temperature range from 30 to 80 C and at 100% of relative humidity, reaching 5.40 x 10{sup -3} S/cm{sup -1} as best value at 80 C and with a sulfonation degree (DS) of 99%. At the same conditions, a water uptake of 17% was achieved. DSC and TGA characterizations were used in order to determine the thermal stability of the membranes, confirming a T{sub g} ranging between 206 and 216 C depending on the DS, whereas FT-IR yielded indication about intermolecular interactions and water uptake at various sulfonation degrees. (author)

  9. PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone)-coated nitinol wire: Film stability for biocompatibility applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheiko, Nataliia [Institut Charles Sadron, C.N.R.S. UPR 22, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84047, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Kékicheff, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.kekicheff@ics-cnrs.unistra.fr [Institut Charles Sadron, C.N.R.S. UPR 22, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84047, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Marie, Pascal; Schmutz, Marc; Jacomine, Leandro [Institut Charles Sadron, C.N.R.S. UPR 22, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, BP 84047, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne [Faculté de Médecine, INSERM, UMR-S 1121, “Biomaterials and Bioengineering”, Université de Strasbourg, 11 rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A thin (12 μm) homogeneous PEEK film without any defects or voids is deposited on NiTi wires. • The coating remains stable in biological environment with negligible Ni ion release and no cytotoxicity. • Large pressure (>2 GPa) can only disrupt the coating film as shown by nanoscratch tests. • Coated spring wires sustain mechanical stress in continuous cycles of axial compression/stretching for >7 million cycles. - Abstract: High quality biocompatible poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) coatings were produced on NiTi shape memory alloy wires using dipping deposition from colloidal aqueous PEEK dispersions after substrate surface treatment. The surface morphology and microstructure were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy at every step of the process from the as-received Nitinol substrate to the ultimate PEEK-coated NiTi wire. Nanoscratch tests were carried out to access the adhesive behavior of the polymer coated film to the NiTi. The results indicate that the optimum process conditions in cleaning, chemical etching, and electropolishing the NiTi, were the most important and determining parameters to be achieved. Thus, high quality PEEK coatings were obtained on NiTi wires, straight or curved (even with a U-shape) with a homogeneous microstructure along the wire length and a uniform thickness of 12 μm without any development of cracks or the presence of large voids. The biocompatibility of the PEEK coating film was checked in fibrobast cultured cells. The coating remains stable in biological environment with negligible Ni ion release, no cytotoxicity, and no delamination observed with time.

  10. PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone)-coated nitinol wire: Film stability for biocompatibility applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheiko, Nataliia; Kékicheff, Patrick; Marie, Pascal; Schmutz, Marc; Jacomine, Leandro; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A thin (12 μm) homogeneous PEEK film without any defects or voids is deposited on NiTi wires. • The coating remains stable in biological environment with negligible Ni ion release and no cytotoxicity. • Large pressure (>2 GPa) can only disrupt the coating film as shown by nanoscratch tests. • Coated spring wires sustain mechanical stress in continuous cycles of axial compression/stretching for >7 million cycles. - Abstract: High quality biocompatible poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) coatings were produced on NiTi shape memory alloy wires using dipping deposition from colloidal aqueous PEEK dispersions after substrate surface treatment. The surface morphology and microstructure were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy at every step of the process from the as-received Nitinol substrate to the ultimate PEEK-coated NiTi wire. Nanoscratch tests were carried out to access the adhesive behavior of the polymer coated film to the NiTi. The results indicate that the optimum process conditions in cleaning, chemical etching, and electropolishing the NiTi, were the most important and determining parameters to be achieved. Thus, high quality PEEK coatings were obtained on NiTi wires, straight or curved (even with a U-shape) with a homogeneous microstructure along the wire length and a uniform thickness of 12 μm without any development of cracks or the presence of large voids. The biocompatibility of the PEEK coating film was checked in fibrobast cultured cells. The coating remains stable in biological environment with negligible Ni ion release, no cytotoxicity, and no delamination observed with time.

  11. Processing of high performance composites based on peek by aqueous suspension prepregging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Burakowski Nohara

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of polyamic acid (PAA precursor as interphase in polymer composites is one of the many applications of polyimides (PIs. In this work, composites based on poly(ether-ether-ketone (PEEK and carbon fibers were prepared using two manufacturing techniques for thermoplastic composites: hot compression molding, and aqueous polymeric suspension prepregging using PIs as interphase. Two PAAs were synthesized and used as interphases: 3,3'-4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride/oxydianiline (BTDA/ODA and pyromellitic dianhydride/oxydianiline (PMDA/ODA. The PAA/PI systems were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry (TGA, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Results from these analyses confirmed the synthesis of these compounds. Aqueous polymeric suspension prepregging was more efficient than hot compression molding when the PMDA/ODA PAA/PI interphase was used; also, the interlaminar shear strength of composites produced using this technique was 14.5% higher than the one produced using hot compression molding.

  12. The improvement of adhesive properties of PEEK through different pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Lubica; Mehl, Albert; Sereno, Nuno; Hämmerle, Christoph H. F.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the bond strength of the adhesives/composite resin to Poly Ether Ether Ketone (PEEK) based dental polymer after using different surface conditioning methods. PEEK blanks were cut into discs. All disc specimens were polished with 800 grit SiC paper and divided into 6 main groups. Main groups were divided into 2 subgroups. The main groups of 32 specimens each were treated as follow: (1) control specimens (no treatment), (2) piranha solution etching, (3) abraded with 50 μm alumina particles and chemical etching, (4) abraded with 110 μm alumina particles and chemical etching, (5) abraded with 30 μm silica-coated alumina particles and chemical etching, (6) abraded with 110 μm silica-coated alumina particles and chemical etching. Plexiglas tubes filled with a composite resin (RelyX Unicem) were bonded to the specimens. The adhesives used were Heliobond and Clearfil Ceramic Primer. Each specimen was stored in distilled water (37 °C) for 3 days. Tensile bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and failure methods were evaluated. Abraded surface with 50 μm alumina particles followed by etching with piranha solution lead to the highest bond strength of 21.4 MPa when Heliobond like adhesive was used. Tribochemical silica coated/etched PEEK surfaces did not have an effect on the bond strength. Non-treated PEEK surface was not able to establish a bond with composite resin. The proper choice of adhesive/composite resin system leads to a strong bond. ConclusionAirborne particle abrasion in combination with piranha solution etching improves the adhesive properties of PEEK.

  13. Distal radius plate of CFR-PEEK has minimal effect compared to titanium plates on bone parameters in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Joost J A; Lataster, Arno; van Rietbergen, Bert; Arts, Jacobus J; Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Willems, Paul C

    2017-02-27

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (CFR-PEEK) has superior radiolucency compared to other orthopedic implant materials, e.g. titanium or stainless steel, thus allowing metal-artifact-free postoperative monitoring by computed tomography (CT). Recently, high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HRpQCT) proved to be a promising technique to monitor the recovery of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), micro-architecture and biomechanical parameters in stable conservatively treated distal radius fractures. When using HRpQCT to monitor unstable distal radius fractures that require volar distal radius plating for fixation, radiolucent CFR-PEEK plates may be a better alternative to currently used titanium plates to allow for reliable assessment. In this pilot study, we assessed the effect of a volar distal radius plate made from CFR-PEEK on bone parameters obtained from HRpQCT in comparison to two titanium plates. Plates were instrumented in separate cadaveric human fore-arms (n = 3). After instrumentation and after removal of the plates duplicate HRpQCT scans were made of the region covered by the plate. HRpQCT images were visually checked for artifacts. vBMD, micro-architectural and biomechanical parameters were calculated, and compared between the uninstrumented and instrumented radii. No visible image artifacts were observed in the CFR-PEEK plate instrumented radius, and errors in bone parameters ranged from -3.2 to 2.6%. In the radii instrumented with the titanium plates, severe image artifacts were observed and errors in bone parameters ranged between -30.2 and 67.0%. We recommend using CFR-PEEK plates in longitudinal in vivo studies that monitor the healing process of unstable distal radius fractures treated operatively by plating or bone graft ingrowth.

  14. Decreased bacteria activity on Si3N4 surfaces compared with PEEK or titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puckett S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Gorth,1 Sabrina Puckett,1 Batur Ercan,1 Thomas J Webster,1 Mohamed Rahaman,2 B Sonny Bal31School of Engineering and Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, 2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO, 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: A significant need exists for orthopedic implants that can intrinsically resist bacterial colonization. In this study, three biomaterials that are used in spinal implants – titanium (Ti, poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK, and silicon nitride (Si3N4 – were tested to understand their respective susceptibility to bacterial infection with Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphlococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus. Specifically, the surface chemistry, wettability, and nanostructured topography of respective biomaterials, and the effects on bacterial biofilm formation, colonization, and growth were investigated. Ti and PEEK were received with as-machined surfaces; both materials are hydrophobic, with net negative surface charges. Two surface finishes of Si3N4 were examined: as-fired and polished. In contrast to Ti and PEEK, the surface of Si3N4 is hydrophilic, with a net positive charge. A decreased biofilm formation was found, as well as fewer live bacteria on both the as-fired and polished Si3N4. These differences may reflect differential surface chemistry and surface nanostructure properties between the biomaterials tested. Because protein adsorption on material surfaces affects bacterial adhesion, the adsorption of fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin on Ti, PEEK, and Si3N4 were also examined. Significantly greater amounts of these proteins adhered to Si3N4 than to Ti or PEEK. The findings of this study suggest that surface properties of biomaterials lead to differential adsorption of physiologic proteins, and that this

  15. Elastic-plastic analysis of AS4/PEEK composite laminate using a one-parameter plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relations of coupon specimens were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter plasticity model. The results show that the one-parameter plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  16. Nonlinear analysis of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite laminate using a one parameter plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the orthotropic plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The nonlinear stress-strain relations were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter elastic-plastic constitutive model. The results show that the one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  17. Implant Materials Generate Different Peri-implant Inflammatory Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Slosar, Paul J.; Schneider, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study examining factors produced by human mesenchymal stem cells on spine implant materials. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine whether the inflammatory microenvironment generated by cells on titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-alloy, TiAlV) surfaces is affected by surface microtexture and whether it differs from that generated on poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Summary of Background Data. Histologically, implants fabricated from PEEK have a fibrous connectiv...

  18. Effects of Melt Processing on Evolution of Structure in PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Dai, Patrick Shuanghua; Oyebode, Elizabeth; Cebe, Peggy; Capel, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    We report on the effects of melt processing temperature on structure formation in Poly(ether-ether-ketone), PEEK. Real time Small Angle X-ray Scattering, SAXS, and thermal analysis are used to follow the melting behavior after various stages of processing. Assignment of peaks to structural entities within the material, the relative perfection of the crystals, and the possibility of their reorganization, are all influenced by the melt processing history. With the advent of high intensity synchrotron sources of X-radiation, polymer scientists gain a research tool which, when used along with thermal analysis, provides additional structural information about the crystals during growth and subsequent melting. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic polymer with a very high glass transition temperature (145 C) and crystal melting point (337 C). PEEK has been the subject of recent studies by X-ray scattering in which melt and cold crystallization were followed in real-time. X-ray scattering and thermal studies have been used to address the formation of dual endothermic response which has been variously ascribed to lamellar insertion, dual crystal populations, or melting followed by re-crystallization. Another important issue is whether all of the amorphous phase is located in interlamellar regions, or alternatively whether some is located in "pockets" away from the crystalline lamellar stacks. The interpretation of scattering from lamellar stacks varies depending upon whether such amorphous pockets are formed. Some groups believe all of the amorphous phase is interlamellar. This leads to selection of a smaller thickness for the crystals. Other groups suggest that most amorphous phase is not interlamellar, and this leads to the suggestion that the crystal thickness is larger than the amorphous layer within the stacks. To investigate these ideas, we used SAXS and Differential Scanning Calorimetry to compare results of single and dual stage melt crystallization of PEEK using a

  19. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; van Royen, B.J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactideco-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first

  20. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using nonresorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices: a prospective, randomized study to assess fusion and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; Deddens, J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE.: To assess fusion, clinical outcome, and complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Resorbable poly-L- lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages intended to aid spinal interbody fusion have been introduced into clinical practice within

  1. [Custom-designed 3D tibial augmentation for knee replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirman, R; Vavrík, P; Horák, Z

    2009-02-01

    Reconstruction with the use of custom-made implants aims at optimal replacement of lost or damaged bone structures and restoration of their funkction. In this study the development and construction of a custom-made implant and the operative technique used for the treatment of an extensive tibial defect are described. The patient was a 65-year-old man treated for over 20 years for psoriatic arthritis and severe instability of the right knee, particularly in the frontal plane, with a worsening varus deformity. The radiogram showed an extensive destruction of the medial tibial condyle that also deeply involved the lateral condyle. The extent of defect made it impossible to use any commercial tibial augmentation. The geometry of the custom-designed implant for the medial tibial condyle was constructed on the basis of a 3D defect model and the shape of the medial tibial condyle of the collateral knee seen on CT scans. After its correct shape was verified on a plastic model, its coordinates were set in the software of a machine tool, and a titanium augmentation otherwise compatible with a standard knee replacement was produced.The use of such a custom implant to complete standard total knee arthroplasty has so far been demanding in terms of organisation and manufacture. Its production in the future could be facilitated by substituting titanium for plastic material such as poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Key words: custom-made implant, tibial augmentation, knee prosthesis.

  2. Residual stress of particulate polymer composites with reduced thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, T; Kotera, M; Sugiura, Y

    2009-01-01

    Thermal expansion behavior was investigated for tangusten zirconium phosphate (Zr 2 (WO 4 )(PO 4 ) 2 (ZWP)) particulate filled poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) composite. ZWP is known as ceramic filler with a negative thermal expansion. By incorporating ZWP with 40 volume %, the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the PEEK composite was reduced to almost same value (2.53 X 10 -5 K -1 ) with that of aluminum. This decrease was found to be quite effective for the decrease of the residual stress at the interface between aluminum plate and the composite.

  3. Interim report on the activity hold-up, and ease of decontamination of permanent coatings and surface treatments incorporated in a glove box floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.T.; Eccles, E.W.; Sutcliffe, P.W.; Turner, A.D.; Dawson, R.K.

    1987-11-01

    A commercial glass reinforced plastic (GRP) glove box has been equipped with 1 square foot tiles of alternative flooring materials. These comprise highly polished GRP, poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK), electropolished stainless steel, cold-rolled stainless steel foil, bright nickel electroplate on stainless steel and hard chrome electroplate on stainless steel. The natural GRP finish was used as a reference surface. Standard PuO 2 handling and floor abrasion operations have been carried out on a regular basis. Subsequently, the floor tiles have been decontaminated by swabbing with Arklone soaked tissues and a mass balance has determined the fraction of PuO 2 unaccounted to be about 1%. Hard, smooth surfaces are promising to give the best performance in minimizing activity retention under these abrasive conditions to ∼ 100 μg cm -2 . Glove box aerosol concentrations have also been monitored as a function of time after the completion of handling operations by air sampling and by gravity settling. After an initial rapid decrease over ∼ 2 hours, a steady state is reached corresponding to ∼ 1 ng/l of PuO 2 . (author)

  4. Effect of surface modification of fly ash on the mechanical, thermal, electrical and morphological properties of polyetheretherketone composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvaiz, M. Rahail; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K.; Mahanwar, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Preparation of high performance poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/fly ash (FA) composites. → Characterization studies like DMTA, MDSC, FTIR and SEM have been carried out. → Addition of modified FA, decrease T c by 58 deg. C, due to the hindrance in PEEK molecular mobility during the cooling crystallization process. → Modified fly ash filled PEEK composites exhibit higher tensile strength and modulus than the unmodified ones. - Abstract: Poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK)/fly ash (FA) composites were prepared using melt blending technique. To improve the interfacial interaction of fly ash with the PEEK matrix, fly ash was chemically modified with calcium hydroxide, at different concentration. Various characterization studies like dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been carried out to evaluate the storage modulus, tan δ, crystallinity, and morphology in the composites. SEM micrographs showed more uniform dispersion and interaction in the modified composites than unmodified counterpart. Surface modified fly ash improved the interfacial adhesion between fly ash and PEEK which is confirmed also through improved mechanical strength. The dynamic modulus of PEEK composites exhibited over 133% increment at 100-250 deg. C, indicating improvement of elevated temperature mechanical properties. The modified fly ash reinforcements also showed improvement in glass-transition and crystallization temperature.

  5. Protein Compatible Polymer Brushes on Polymeric Substrates Prepared by Surface-Initiated Transfer Radica Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    have been made with model systems of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) films as they can easily be functionalized [1]. Moreover, the inert material polypropylene has successfully beel! activated using a photochemical method [2]. Different polymers including PEG-like matenals have been investigated...... as coating materials. ATR FTIR, water contact angle measurements, Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that hydrophilic polymers have been grafted from the surface. The surface topography which was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) did not change...

  6. Rapid prototyping of polymeric microstructures with a UV laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin F.; McCormack, John E.; Helbo, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    By laser ablation of Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK), a negative master of the microsystem was produced. This master is then used for hot embossing of a number of polystyrene (PS) parts. A few hundred replications can be made without warping and alteration of the dimensions. The possibility of using...... ion implantation of the master tool to prolong the lifetime has also been investigated. For injection moulding, where the pressure and temperature is higher than in hot embossing a positive laser ablated Acrylonitrile-butadien-styrene co-polymer (ABS) structure was used, which subsequently has been...

  7. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Y., E-mail: maekawa.yasunari@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, High Performance Polymer Group, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma-ken 370-1292 (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  8. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  9. Bioactive carbon-PEEK composites prepared by chemical surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Matsunami, Chisato; Shirosaki, Yuki

    2017-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much attention as an artificial intervertebral spacer for spinal reconstruction. Furthermore, PEEK plastic reinforced with carbon fiber has twice the bending strength of pure PEEK. However, the PEEK-based materials do not show ability for direct bone bonding, i.e., bioactivity. Although several trials have been conducted for enabling PEEK with bioactivity, few studies have reported on bioactive surface modification of carbon-PEEK composites. In the present study, we attempted the preparation of bioactive carbon-PEEK composites by chemical treatments with H 2 SO 4 and CaCl 2 . Bioactivity was evaluated by in vitro apatite formation in simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite formation on the carbon-PEEK composite was compared with that of pure PEEK. Both pure PEEK and carbon-PEEK composite formed the apatite in SBF when they were treated with H 2 SO 4 and CaCl 2 ; the latter showed higher apatite-forming ability than the former. It is conjectured that many functional groups able to induce the apatite nucleation, such as sulfo and carboxyl groups, are incorporated into the dispersed carbon phase in the carbon-PEEK composites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reinforcement of poly ether sulphones (PES) with exfoliated graphene oxide for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, K

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials have been used for aerospace for some time now and have gained virtually 100% acceptance as the materials of choice. Speciality polymers like poly ether sulphones (PES), poly ether ether ketones(PEEK), poly ether imides (PEI) are highly preferred materials as plastic matrix due to their superior temperature performance, excellent wear and friction resistance, excellent dimensional accuracy, high tensile strength, high modulus, precise machinability and chemical resistance. In recent years nanoadditives like single and multiwall carbon nanotubes, graphenes and graphene oxides(GO) are finding huge market potential in aerospace and automobile industries. But manufacture related factors such as particle/ matrix interphases, surface activation, mixing process, particle agglomeration, particle size and shape may lead to different property effects. In this research GO/PES composites were prepared by high shear melt blending technique. GO monolayers were exfoliated from natural graphite flake and dispersed homogeneously in PES matrix for the GO content ranging between 0.5 to 2.0 volume percentage with a high shear twin screw batch mixer. These melt blended nanocomposites were injection moulded for mechanical property validation of tensile strength, flexural modulus and impact resistance. Addition of 0.5 volume percentage of GO enhanced the tensile strength and flexural modulus by 40% and 90% respectively. The results show that addition of GO to PES increase mechanical properties due to the formation of continuous network, good dispersion and strong interfacial interactions. The strong interfacial interactions were accounted for the increase in glass transition temperature. Also there was a significant improvement in the impact resistance of the PES/ GO nanocomposite. The injection moulded samples were tested for stealth performance by measuring the electromagnetic shielding property.

  11. EFFICACY OF CAGE PLACEMENT WITHOUT PLATE IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL MYELOPATHY WITH SINGLE-LEVEL AFFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS ALBERTO ZUÑIGA-MAZÓN

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of PEEK (Poly-ether-ether-ketone cage without plate for the treatment of single-level cervical spondylosis. Methods: Ten patients with cervical myelopathy data, with a single-level root condition, seen at the outpatient clinic of the Neurosurgery Service, operated in 2016, mean age 53 years, 6 (60% female, 4 (40% obese, 3 (30% smokers. The Cloward technique was used by anterior approach, discectomy, and PEEK cage placement. Results: At six months of surgery, 100% of the patients had increased intervertebral space, with a 100% reduction in osteophytes; only one patient had dysphagia, no patient had lesion of the adjacent segment and 10% had persistent root pathology. Cervical lordosis was observed in 90% of the patients and arthrodesis in 100% of the cases. Conclusions: Anterior approach arthrodesis using PEEK cage without cervical plate is effective as a treatment of cervical myelopathy in a single level.

  12. Nanostructured Polyelectrolytes Based on SPEEK/TiO2 for Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (DEFCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Dutra Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton-conducting hybrid membranes consisting of poly(ether ether ketone sulfonated (SPEEK and titanium oxide (TiO2 were prepared using the sol-gel technique for application in direct ethanol fuel cells. The effect from TiO2 incorporation on membrane properties such as ethanol uptake, pervaporation and proton conductivity was investigated. The uptake and permeated flux decreased with increasing content of TiO2. The ethanol permeability was about one order of magnitude smaller than Nafion® 117. FTIR spectra indicated that PEEK was sulfonated and the second degradation temperature of SPEEK58 samples confirmed the titanium oxide incorporation. The proton conductivity in ethanol solution was of the order of 10-3 S cm-1 when 4 or 8 wt% TiO2 were added, and generally increased with addition of TiO2.

  13. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotov, Ivan Vladislavov; Orti, Valérie; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Yachouh, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a polyaromatic semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymer with mechanical properties favorable for bio-medical applications. Polyetheretherketone forms: PEEK-LT1, PEEK-LT2, and PEEK-LT3 have already been applied in different surgical fields: spine surgery, orthopedic surgery, maxillo-facial surgery etc. Synthesis of PEEK composites broadens the physicochemical and mechanical properties of PEEK materials. To improve their osteoinductive and antimicrobial capabilities, different types of functionalization of PEEK surfaces and changes in PEEK structure were proposed. PEEK based materials are becoming an important group of biomaterials used for bone and cartilage replacement as well as in a large number of diverse medical fields. The current paper describes the structural changes and the surface functionalization of PEEK materials and their most common biomedical applications. The possibility to use these materials in 3D printing process could increase the scientific interest and their future development as well.

  14. High-Temperature Shape Memory Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Weiss, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    physical conformation changes when exposed to an external stimulus, such as a change in temperature. Such materials have a permanent shape, but can be reshaped above a critical temperature and fixed into a temporary shape when cooled under stress to below the critical temperature. When reheated above the critical temperature (Tc, also sometimes called the triggering or switching temperature), the materials revert to the permanent shape. The current innovation involves a chemically treated (sulfonated, carboxylated, phosphonated, or other polar function group), high-temperature, semicrystalline thermoplastic poly(ether ether ketone) (Tg .140 C, Tm = 340 C) mix containing organometallic complexes (Zn++, Li+, or other metal, ammonium, or phosphonium salts), or high-temperature ionic liquids (e.g. hexafluorosilicate salt with 1-propyl-3- methyl imidazolium, Tm = 210 C) to form a network where dipolar or ionic interactions between the polymer and the low-molecular-weight or inorganic compound forms a complex that provides a physical crosslink. Hereafter, these compounds will be referred to as "additives". The polymer is semicrystalline, and the high-melt-point crystals provide a temporary crosslink that acts as a permanent crosslink just so long as the melting temperature is not exceeded. In this example case, the melting point is .340 C, and the shape memory critical temperature is between 150 and 250 C. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic with a high Young fs modulus, nominally 3.6 GPa. An important aspect of the invention is the control of the PEEK functionalization (in this example, the sulfonation degree), and the thermal properties (i.e. melting point) of the additive, which determines the switching temperature. Because the compound is thermoplastic, it can be formed into the "permanent" shape by conventional plastics processing operations. In addition, the compound may be covalently cross - linked after forming the permanent shape by S-PEEK by applying ionizing

  15. Friction and wear performance of some thermoplastic polymers and polymer composites against unsaturated polyester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, H.; Mimaroglu, A.; Arda, T.

    2006-09-01

    Wear experiments have been carried out with a range of unfilled and filled engineering thermoplastic polymers sliding against a 15% glass fibre reinforced unsaturated polyester polymer under 20, 40 and 60 N loads and 0.5 m/s sliding speed. Pin materials used in this experimental investigation are polyamide 66 (PA 66), poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and aliphatic polyketone (APK), glass fibre reinforced polyamide 46 (PA 46 + 30% GFR), glass fibre reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE + 17% GFR), glass fibre reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK + 20% GFR), glass fibre reinforced poly-phylene-sulfide (PPS + 30% GFR), polytetrafluoroethylene filled polyamide 66 (PA 66 + 10% PTFE) and bronze filled pofytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE + 25% bronze) engineering polymers. The disc material is a 15% glass fibre reinforced unsaturated polyester thermoset polymer produced by Bulk Moulding Compound (BMC). Sliding wear tests were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus under 0.5 m/s sliding speed and load values of 20, 40 and 60 N. The results showed that the highest specific wear rate is for PPS + 30% GFR with a value of 1 × 10 -11 m 2/N and the lowest wear rate is for PTFE + 17% GFR with a value of 9.41 × 10 -15 m 2/N. For the materials and test conditions of this investigation, apart from polyamide 66 and PA 46 + 30% GFR polymers, the coefficient of friction and specific wear rates are not significantly affected by the change in load value. For polyamide 66 and PA 46 + 30% GFR polymers the coefficient of friction and specific wear rates vary linearly with the variation in load values.

  16. Effects of Different pH-Values on the Nanomechanical Surface Properties of PEEK and CFR-PEEK Compared to Dental Resin-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study determines the stability and durability of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and a carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK with 30% short carbon fibers, a dental composite based on Bis-GMA and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA under the influence of different pH-values of the oral environment in vitro. Nanomechanical properties were investigated by nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests before and after incubation of the specimens at 37 °C for 30 days in artificial saliva with pH-values of 3, 7 and 10, respectively. Nanoindentation and nanoscratching tests were performed using the Hysitron TI950 TriboIndenter to evaluate the reduced elastic moduli, nanohardness, viscoelasticity, friction coefficient and residual scratch profiles. After treatment, the nanomechanical properties of unfilled PEEK did not change. The reduced elastic moduli and nanohardness of the carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK increased significantly. The reduced elastic moduli and nanohardness of CHARISMA decreased. The plasticity of all materials except that of the unfilled PEEK increased. This indicates that different pH-values of the artificial saliva solutions had no obvious influences on the nanomechanical properties of the PEEK matrix. Therefore, the aging resistance of the unfilled PEEK was higher than those of other materials. It can be deduced that the PEEK matrix without filler was more stable than with filler in the nanoscale.

  17. Laser surface modification of PEEK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveiro, A., E-mail: ariveiro@uvigo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo ETSII, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Escuela Naval Militar, Plaza de Espana 2, 36920 Marin (Spain); Soto, R.; Comesana, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Val, J. del; Quintero, F.; Lusquinos, F.; Pou, J. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo ETSII, Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, Vigo 36310 (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of laser irradiation wavelength on the surface modification of PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone) was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adequate processing conditions to improve wettability, roughness, and cell adhesion characteristics are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A design of experiments (DOE) methodology was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV (355 nm) radiation is the most promising laser radiation for improving the adhesive surface properties of PEEK. - Abstract: Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is a synthetic thermoplastic polymer with excellent mechanical and chemical properties, which make it attractive for the field of reconstructive surgery. Nevertheless, this material has a poor interfacial biocompatibility due to its large chemical stability which induces poor adhesive bonding properties. The possibilities of enhancing the PEEK adhesive properties by laser treatments have been explored in the past. This paper presents a systematic approach to discern the role of laser irradiation wavelength on the surface modification of PEEK under three laser wavelengths ({lambda} = 1064, 532, and 355 nm) with the aim to determine the most adequate processing conditions to increase the roughness and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants. Overall results show that the ultraviolet ({lambda} = 355 nm) laser radiation is the most suitable one to enhance surface wettability of PEEK.

  18. Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong Gi Hyeon

    1987-04-01

    This book deals with plastic, which includes introduction for plastic, chemistry of high polymers, polymerization, speciality and structure of a high molecule property of plastic, molding, thermosetting plastic, such as polyethylene, polyether, polyamide and polyvinyl acetyl, thermal plastic like phenolic resins, xylene resins, melamine resin, epoxy resin, alkyd resin and poly urethan resin, new plastic like ionomer and PPS resin, synthetic laminated tape and synthetic wood, mixed materials in plastic, reprocessing of waste plastic, polymer blend, test method for plastic materials and auxiliary materials of plastic.

  19. Injection molding of bushes made of tribological PEEK composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK composites have been extensively studied because of the excellent tribological behavior among plastics. However, laboratory specimens and tests are generally discussed, whereas application studies on industrial components are infrequent. In this paper, an injection molded bush made of tribological PEEK was analyzed to correlate wear behavior and molded material structure. Bushes were tested under unlubricated sliding conditions by means of a short wear test. Surface analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and optical microscopy were used to evaluate the distribution of the different composite fillers (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, graphite particles and carbon microfibers and their effect on the final bush behavior. A significant lack of homogeneity was observed in the molded bush and black bands appeared on the shaft surface after testing due to the sliding. The bush geometry and the injection molding process should be optimized to allow the best tribological behavior of the molded material under working conditions.

  20. Study on the Nanomechanical and Nanotribological Behaviors of PEEK and CFRPEEK for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of polyether ether ketone (PEEK-based composites for biomedical applications and to gain a fundamental understanding of the effects of carbon fibers in carbon-fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFRPEEK on the mechanical properties and wear performance in a microscale. Nanoindentation tests with a Berkovich indenter and nanoscratch experiments with a diamond stylus were performed on PEEK and CFRPEEK samples. The nanowear features and mechanisms of the tested samples were analyzed using 3D white-light interfering profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The obtained results indicated that the reinforced carbon fibers increased the nanohardness and elastic modulus and decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate of PEEK. Different to many existing studies where a constant load was used in a nanoscratch test and the normal load was a key factor influencing the scratch performances of the tested specimens, stick–slip phenomena were observed on both PEEK and CFRPEEK in the nanoscratch tests with load increasing progressively. In constant load conditions, it was found that the major nanowear mechanisms of PEEK are adhesion, abrasion, and plastic deformation, while the nanowear mechanisms of CFRPEEK are dominated by severe adhesive wear, abrasive wear and mild fatigue. CFRPEEK has demonstrated superior nanomechanical and nanotribological performances, and hence can be considered a potential candidate for biomedical applications.

  1. Degradation in tensile properties of aromatic polymers by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, T.; Hayakawa, N.; Yoshida, K.; Hagiwara, M.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation effects of ten kinds of polymers containing various aromatic rings linked by functional groups in the main chain (aromatic polymer) were studied with reference to change in tensile properties. The polymers studied were polyimides 'Kapton H', and 'UPILEX', polyetherimide 'ULTEM', polyamides 'A-Film' and 'APH-50 (nomex type paper)', poly-ether-ether-ketone 'PEEK', polyarylate 'U-Polymer', polysulphones 'Udel-Polysulphone' and 'PES', and modified poly(phenylene oxide) 'NORYL'. Irradiation was carried out by use of electron beam at a dose rate of 5 x 10 3 Gy s -1 at room temperature. The elongation at break was the most severely influenced by the irradiation and it decreased with increasing dose. The order of radiation resistivity which was evaluated from the dose required for the elongation to become 50% and 20% of the initial value was as follows: Polyimide > PEEK > polyamide > polyetherimide > polyarylate > polysulphone, poly(phenylene oxide). Based on the above experimental results, an order is proposed for the radiation stability of the aromatic repeating units composing the main chain. (author)

  2. Double-plating of ovine critical sized defects of the tibia: a low morbidity model enabling continuous in vivo monitoring of bone healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearce Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies using sheep critical sized defect models to test tissue engineered products report high morbidity and complications rates. This study evaluates a large bone defect model in the sheep tibia, stabilized with two, a novel Carbon fibre Poly-ether-ether-ketone (CF-PEEK and a locking compression plate (LCP which could sustain duration for up to 6 month with an acceptable low complication rate. Methods A large bone defect of 3 cm was performed in the mid diaphysis of the right tibia in 33 sheep. The defect was stabilised with the CF - PEEK plate and an LCP. All sheep were supported with slings for 8 weeks after surgery. The study was carried out for 3 months in 6 and for 6 months in 27 animals. Results The surgical procedure could easily be performed in all sheep and continuous in vivo radiographic evaluation of the defect was possible. This long bone critical sized defect model shows with 6.1% a low rate of complications compared with numbers mentioned in the literature. Conclusions This experimental animal model could serve as a standard model in comparative research. A well defined standard model would reduce the number of experimental animals needed in future studies and would therefore add to ethical considerations.

  3. Does PEEK/HA Enhance Bone Formation Compared With PEEK in a Sheep Cervical Fusion Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, William R; Pelletier, Matthew H; Bertollo, Nicky; Christou, Chris; Tan, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has a wide range of clinical applications but does not directly bond to bone. Bulk incorporation of osteoconductive materials including hydroxyapatite (HA) into the PEEK matrix is a potential solution to address the formation of a fibrous tissue layer between PEEK and bone and has not been tested. Using in vivo ovine animal models, we asked: (1) Does PEEK-HA improve cortical and cancellous bone ongrowth compared with PEEK? (2) Does PEEK-HA improve bone ongrowth and fusion outcome in a more challenging functional ovine cervical fusion model? The in vivo responses of PEEK-HA Enhanced and PEEK-OPTIMA ® Natural were evaluated for bone ongrowth in the form of dowels implanted in the cancellous and cortical bone of adult sheep and examined at 4 and 12 weeks as well as interbody cervical fusion at 6, 12, and 26 weeks. The bone-implant interface was evaluated with radiographic and histologic endpoints for a qualitative assessment of direct bone contact of an intervening fibrous tissue later. Gamma-irradiated cortical allograft cages were evaluated as well. Incorporating HA into the PEEK matrix resulted in more direct bone apposition as opposed to the fibrous tissue interface with PEEK alone in the bone ongrowth as well as interbody cervical fusions. No adverse reactions were found at the implant-bone interface for either material. Radiography and histology revealed resorption and fracture of the allograft devices in vivo. Incorporating HA into PEEK provides a more favorable environment than PEEK alone for bone ongrowth. Cervical fusion was improved with PEEK-HA compared with PEEK alone as well as allograft bone interbody devices. Improving the bone-implant interface with a PEEK device by incorporating HA may improve interbody fusion results and requires further clinical studies.

  4. Computed-tomography modeled polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implants in revision cranioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Eamon B; Barnett, Sam; Madden, Christopher; Welch, Babu; Mickey, Bruce; Rozen, Shai

    2015-03-01

    Traditional cranioplasty methods focus on pre-operative or intraoperative hand molding. Recently, CT-guided polyether ether ketone (PEEK) plate reconstruction enables precise, time-saving reconstruction. This case series aims to show a single institution experience with use of PEEK cranioplasty as an effective, safe, precise, reusable, and time-saving cranioplasty technique in large, complex cranial defects. We performed a 6-year retrospective review of cranioplasty procedures performed at our affiliated hospitals using PEEK implants. A total of nineteen patients underwent twenty-two cranioplasty procedures. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative data was collected. Nineteen patients underwent twenty-two procedures. Time interval from injury to loss of primary cranioplasty averaged 57.7 months (0-336 mo); 4.0 months (n=10, range 0-19) in cases of trauma. Time interval from primary cranioplasty loss to PEEK cranioplasty was 11.8 months for infection (n=11, range 6-25 mo), 12.2 months for trauma (n=5, range 2-27 mo), and 0.3 months for cosmetic or functional reconstructions (n=3, range 0-1). Similar surgical techniques were used in all patients. Drains were placed in 11/22 procedures. Varying techniques were used in skin closure, including adjacent tissue transfer (4/22) and free tissue transfer (1/22). The PEEK plate required modification in four procedures. Three patients had reoperation following PEEK plate reconstruction. Cranioplasty utilizing CT-guided PEEK plate allows easy inset, anatomic accuracy, mirror image aesthetics, simplification of complex 3D defects, and potential time savings. Additionally, it's easily manipulated in the operating room, and can be easily re-utilized in cases of intraoperative course changes or infection. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PEEK with Reinforced Materials and Modifications for Dental Implant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitria Rahmitasari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK is a semi-crystalline linear polycyclic thermoplastic that has been proposed as a substitute for metals in biomaterials. PEEK can also be applied to dental implant materials as a superstructure, implant abutment, or implant body. This article summarizes the current research on PEEK applications in dental implants, especially for the improvement of PEEK surface and body modifications. Although various benchmark reports on the reinforcement and surface modifications of PEEK are available, few clinical trials using PEEK for dental implant bodies have been published. Controlled clinical trials, especially for the use of PEEK in implant abutment and implant bodies, are necessary.

  6. Dielectric characterization of high-performance spaceflight materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppe, Nathan; Nurge, Mark A.; Bowler, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    As commercial space travel increases, the need for reliable structural health monitoring to predict possible weaknesses or failures of structural materials also increases. Monitoring of these materials can be done through the use of dielectric spectroscopy by comparing permittivity or conductivity measurements performed on a sample in use to that of a pristine sample from 100 μHz to 3 GHz. Fluctuations in these measured values or of the relaxation frequencies, if present, can indicate chemical or physical changes occurring within the material and the possible need for maintenance/replacement. In this work, we establish indicative trends that occur due to changes in dielectric spectra during accelerated aging of various high-performance polymeric materials: ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH), Poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Uses for these materials range from electrical insulation and protective coatings to windows and air- or space-craft parts that may be subject to environmental damage over long-term operation. Samples were prepared by thermal exposure and, separately, by ultraviolet/water-spray cyclic aging. The aged samples showed statistically-significant trends of either increasing or decreasing real or imaginary permittivity values, relaxation frequencies, conduction or the appearance of new relaxation modes. These results suggest that dielectric testing offers the possibility of nondestructive evaluation of the extent of age-related degradation in these materials.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide onto carbon fibers for in-tube solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juanjuan; Wang, Xiuqin; Tian, Yu; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan; Sun, Min

    2017-09-29

    Carbon fibers (CFs) were functionalized with graphene oxide (GO) by an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method for in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME). GO-CFs were filled into a poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) tube to obtain a fibers-in-tube SPME device, which was connected with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment to build online SPME-HPLC system. Compared with CFs, GO-CFs presented obviously better extraction performance, due to excellent adsorption property and large surface area of GO. Using ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model analytes, the important extraction conditions were optimized, such as sample flow rate, extraction time, organic solvent content and desorption time. An online analysis method was established with wide linear range (0.01-50μgL -1 ) and low detection limits (0.001-0.004μgL -1 ). Good sensitivity resulted from high enrichment factors (1133-3840) of GO-CFs in-tube device towards PAHs. The analysis method was used to online determination of PAHs in wastewater samples. Some target analytes were detected and relative recoveries were in the range of 90.2-112%. It is obvious that the proposed GO-CFs in-tube device was an efficient extraction device, and EPD could be used to develop nanomaterials functionalized sorbents for sample preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge. Project Final Technical Report (May 2, 2005-Dec. 31, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabasso, Israel; Yuan, Youxin

    2013-02-27

    Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

  9. Sulfonated PEEK and fluorinated polymer based blends for fuel cell applications: Investigation of the effect of type and molecular weight of the fluorinated polymers on the membrane's properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inan, Tuelay Y.; Dogan, Hacer; Unveren, Elif E. [The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), Marmara Research Center, Chemistry Institute, 41470 Gebze, Kocaeli (Turkey); Eker, Ersoy [Tuerk Demirdoekuem Fabrikalari A.S., 11300 Bozueyuek, Bilecik (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    This work clearly demonstrates the effect of the type and molecular weight of the fluorinated polymer of SPEEK/Fluorinated polymer blends for low temperature (<80 C) Fuel Cell Applications. Comparisons with trademarks (e.g., Nafion {sup registered}) suggests that the membranes we have prepared in this study have good compatibility in all application respects. Membranes were prepared by solution casting method from four different fluorinated polymers; poly (vinylidene fluoride) with three different molecular weights (PVDF, M{sub w}: 180.000, M{sub w}: 275.000, M{sub w}: 530.000); Poli(vinylidene fluoride-co-Hexafluoro propylen) (PVDF-HFP M{sub n}:130.000) and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) with sulfonation degree (SD) of 70. The sulfonation degree (SD) of SPEEK was determined by FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR and ion exchange capacity (IEC) measurements. Thermo-oxidative stability and proton conductivity of the membranes were determined by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and BT-512 BekkTech membrane test systems, respectively. Chemical degradation of SPEEK membranes was investigated via Fenton test. The morphology of the membranes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Water uptake and proton conductivity values decreased with the addition of fluorinated polymers (PVDF, PVDF-HFP) as expected, but proton conductivity values were still comparable to that of Nafion 117 {sup registered} membrane. Addition of fluorinated polymers improved chemical degradation of the blend membranes in all ratios while addition of PVDF-HFP to the SPEEK70 caused phase separations in all ratios. Methanol permeability value of SPEEK70/PVDF(M{sub w} = 275.000) blend membrane (3.13E-07 (cm{sup 2}/s)) was much lower than Nafion 117 {sup registered} (1.21E-06 (cm{sup 2}/s)). PVDF addition to the SPEEK polymers caused increase in elongation of the membranes. Increase in the molecular weight of the PVDF did not show any effect on

  10. Current Strategies to Improve the Bioactivity of PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Tang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic thermoplastic polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is becoming a popular component of clinical orthopedic and spinal applications, but its practical use suffers from several limitations. Although PEEK is biocompatible, chemically stable, radiolucent and has an elastic modulus similar to that of normal human bone, it is biologically inert, preventing good integration with adjacent bone tissues upon implantation. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK to improve the bone-implant interface. Two main strategies have been used to overcome the inert character of PEEK. One approach is surface modification to activate PEEK through surface treatment alone or in combination with a surface coating. Another strategy is to prepare bioactive PEEK composites by impregnating bioactive materials into PEEK substrate. Researchers believe that modified bioactive PEEK will have a wide range of orthopedic applications. PMID:24686515

  11. Decoupling ion conductivity and fluid permeation through optimizing hydrophilic channel morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Peter Po-Jen, E-mail: pjchu@cc.ncu.edu.tw; Fang, Yu-Shin; Tseng, Yu-Chen [Department of Chemistry, National Central University, No. 300, Jhongda Rd., Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32001, Taiwan (R.O.C.) (China)

    2016-05-18

    Approaches to improve membrane ion conductivity usually leads to higher degree of swelling, more serious fuel cross-over and often sacrificed membrane mechanical strength. Preserving all three main membrane properties is a tough challenge in searching high ion conducting fuel cell membrane. The long standing dilemma is resolved by decoupling ion conduction and fluid permeation property by creating optimized channel morphology using external electric field poling. Success of this approach is demonstrated in the proton conducting membrane composed of poly(ether sulfones) (PES) and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK, degree of sulfonation=50%) composites prepared under electric field poling condition. The external field enhanced the aromatic chain ordering from both sPEEK and PES and improved the miscibility. This induced interaction is conducive to the formation of more densely packed amorphous domains that eventually leads to preferentially ordered hydrophilic proton conducting channels having a average dimension (3 nm) smaller than that in generic sPEEK or Nafion. The narrower but more ordered channel displayed much lower methanol permeability (3.17×10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/s), and lower swelling ratio (31.20%), while the conductivity (~10{sup −1} S/cm) is higher than that of Nafion, or sPEEK at higher (64%) degree of sulfonation. The composite is chemically stable and highly durable with improved membrane mechanical strength. Nearly 50% increase of DMFC power output is observed using this membrane, and the best power density is recorded at 155 mA/cm{sup 2} (80 °C, 1M Methanol).

  12. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  13. Development of radiation resistant PEEK insulation cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mio, Keigo; Ogiwara, Norio; Hikichi, Yusuke; Furukori, Hisayoshi; Arai, Hideyuki; Nishizawa, Daiji; Nishidono, Toshiro

    2009-04-01

    Material characterization and development has been carried out for cable insulation suitable for use in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS radiation environment. In spite of its high cost, PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone) has emerged as the leading candidate satisfying requirements of being non-halogen based, highly incombustible and with radiation resistant at least 10 MGy, along with the usual mechanical characteristics such as good elongation at break, which are needed in a cable insulation. Gamma-ray irradiation tests have been done in order to study radiation resistance of PEEK cable. Further, mechanical, electrical and fire retardant characteristics of a complete cable such as would be used at the J-PARC RCS were investigated. As a result, PEEK cables were shown to be not degraded by radiation up to at least 10 MGy, and thus could be expected to operate stably under the 3-GeV RCS radiation environment. (author)

  14. A novel bioactive PEEK/HA composite with controlled 3D interconnected HA network

    OpenAIRE

    Vaezi, Mohammad; Yang, Shoufeng

    2015-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a high-performance thermoplastic biomaterial which is currently used in a variety of biomedical orthopaedic applications. It has comparable tensile and compressive strength to cortical bone with favourable biocompatibility. However, natural grade PEEK-OPTIMA has shown insufficient bioactivity and limited bone integration. Bioactive PEEK composites (e.g., PEEK/calcium phosphates or Bioglass) and porous PEEK have been used to improve bone-implant interface of PEEK...

  15. Applications of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in oral implantology and prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad S; Khurshid, Zohaib; Siddiqui, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a polymer that has many potential uses in dentistry. The aim of this review was to summarize the outcome of research conducted on the material for dental applications. In addition, future prospects of PEEK in the field of clinical dentistry have been highlighted. An electronic search was carried out via the PubMed (Medline) database using keywords 'polyetheretherketone', 'dental' and 'dentistry' in combination. Original research papers published in English language in last fifteen year were considered. The studies relevant to our review were critically analyzed and summarized. PEEK has been explored for a number of applications for clinical dentistry. For example, PEEK dental implants have exhibited lesser stress shielding compared to titanium dental implants due to closer match of mechanical properties of PEEK and bone. PEEK is a promising material for a number of removable and fixed prosthesis. Furthermore, recent studies have focused improving the bioactivity of PEEK implants at the nanoscale. Considering mechanical and physical properties similar to bone, PEEK can be used in many areas of dentistry. Improving the bioactivity of PEEK dental implants without compromising their mechanical properties is a major challenge. Further modifications and improving the material properties may increase its applications in clinical dentistry. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SAXS measurements of crystallization in Me PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberato, C.; Kellerman, G.; Craievich, A.F.; Torriani, I.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Preliminary small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on a variety of methyl-substituted poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (Me PEEK) samples have been performed at the D11AA-SAXS beam line of the Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS).Me PEEK is an industrially important thermoplastic material exhibiting crystallization upon annealing at temperatures between 175 and 200 deg C. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements (Handa Y.P., Roovers, J., Wang, F., Macromolecules 27(19), 551-5516 (1994)) indicate that the presence of supercritical fluids during thermal treatment can have dramatic effects on the melting behavior of Me PEEK when compared to similar data for materials annealed in air. These observations have been made for samples demonstrating no significant differences in the extent of crystallinity suggesting that it is the nature of the crystallites that is affected by the presence of additives during the thermal treatment. In this preliminary study, scattering profiles for three Me PEEK samples (as received, thermally treated in air and thermally treated with supercritical 0.85 CO 2 +C H 3 O H gas) are obtained. The data are analyzed to provide some measure of the variation in crystallite structure between the thermally treated samples. Scattering data obtained in the very small-angle region on the same samples at the High Brilliance Beamline (ID2/BM4) experiments performed by Olivier Diat and M.A. Singh, Dec. 11996) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) is combined with the Brazilian National Laboratory on Synchrotron Light (LNLS) data to provide information over 3 decades of scattering angle. This work is part of a larger study of the use of supercritical fluids to control the level and morphology of crystallization in these materials. (author)

  17. Wide-angle X-ray scattering study of heat-treated PEEK and PEEK composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lowry, Lynn; Chung, Shirley Y.; Yavrouian, Andre; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Samples of poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) neat resin and APC-2 carbon fiber composite were subjected to various heat treatments, and the effect of quenching and annealing treatments was studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering. It is found that high-temperature treatments may introduce disorder into neat resin and composite PEEK when followed by rapid cooling. The disorder is metastable and can revert to ordered state when the material is heated above its glass transition temperature and then cooled slowly. The disorder may result from residual thermal stresses.

  18. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  19. Sulfonated carbon black-based composite membranes for fuel cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composite membranes were then prepared using S–C as fillers and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) as polymer matrix with three different sulfonation degrees (DS = 60, 70 and 82%). Structure and properties of the composite membranes were characterized by FTIR, TGA, scanning electron microscopy, proton ...

  20. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaivars, G. Vol 60 (2007) - Articles Preparation and Characterization of Sulfonated Poly (ether ether ketone)/Phosphated Zirconia Nanoparticles Composite Proton-conducting Membranes Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0379-4350. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  1. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bladergroen, B. Vol 60 (2007) - Articles Preparation and Characterization of Sulfonated Poly (ether ether ketone)/Phosphated Zirconia Nanoparticles Composite Proton-conducting Membranes Abstract PDF · Vol 61 (2008) - Articles Performance and Structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Prepared from Various Ni Precursors for ...

  2. Heat transfer analytical models for the rapid determination of cooling time in crystalline thermoplastic injection molding and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Delaunay; Baptiste, Pignon; Nicolas, Boyard; Vincent, Sobotka

    2018-05-01

    Heat transfer during the cooling of a thermoplastic injected part directly affects the solidification of the polymer and consequently the quality of the part in term of mechanical properties, geometric tolerance and surface aspect. This paper proposes to mold designers a methodology based on analytical models to provide quickly the time to reach the ejection temperature depending of the temperature and the position of cooling channels. The obtained cooling time is the first step of the thermal conception of the mold. The presented methodology is dedicated to the determination of solidification time of a semi-crystalline polymer slab. It allows the calculation of the crystallization time of the part and is based on the analytical solution of the Stefan problem in a semi-infinite medium. The crystallization is then considered as a phase change with an effective crystallization temperature, which is obtained from Fast Scanning Calorimetry (FSC) results. The crystallization time is then corrected to take the finite thickness of the part into account. To check the accuracy of such approach, the solidification time is calculated by solving the heat conduction equation coupled to the crystallization kinetics of the polymer. The impact of the nature of the contact between the polymer and the mold is evaluated. The thermal contact resistance (TCR) appears as significant parameter that needs to be taken into account in the cooling time calculation. The results of the simplified model including or not TCR are compared in the case of a polypropylene (PP) with experiments carried out with an instrumented mold. Then, the methodology is applied for a part made with PolyEtherEtherKetone (PEEK).

  3. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  4. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel – Hardening effects and white etching zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 is performed. • Microstructural changes of the surface are examined by light microscopy and SEM. • Topographical changes are observed using white light interferometry. • Micro-hardness testing show the existence of very hard white etching zones (WEZ). • WEZ are attributed to near-surface reaustenitization and rapid quenching. • Dark etching zones (DEZ) are found at the laser path edges after laser pretreatment. - Abstract: In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1–1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  5. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel – Hardening effects and white etching zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buling, Anna, E-mail: a.buling@hs-osnabrueck.de [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences, 49009 Osnabrück (Germany); Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstrasse 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela [Faculty of Engineering and Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences, 49009 Osnabrück (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Laser surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 is performed. • Microstructural changes of the surface are examined by light microscopy and SEM. • Topographical changes are observed using white light interferometry. • Micro-hardness testing show the existence of very hard white etching zones (WEZ). • WEZ are attributed to near-surface reaustenitization and rapid quenching. • Dark etching zones (DEZ) are found at the laser path edges after laser pretreatment. - Abstract: In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1–1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  6. Neutral atom beam technique enhances bioactivity of PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Sean R.; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E.; Kirkpatrick, Allen; Svrluga, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently gaining popularity in orthopedic and spinal applications but has potential drawbacks in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent; however, it has been shown to be inert and does not integrate well with bone. Recent efforts have focused on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK by modifying the surface to improve the bone-implant interface. We have employed a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam technique (ANAB) to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. ANAB employs an intense beam of cluster-like packets of accelerated unbonded neutral argon (Ar) gas atoms. These beams are created by first producing a highly energetic Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) comprised of van der Waals bonded Ar atoms, then transferring energy to the clusters so as to cause release of most of the interatomic bonds, and finally deflecting away the remaining electrically charged cluster cores of still bonded atoms. We identified that ANAB treatment of PEEK results in nanometer scale surface modifications as well as increased surface hydrophilicity. Human osteoblasts seeded onto the surface of ANAB-treated PEEK exhibited enhanced growth as compared to control PEEK as evidenced by cell proliferation assays and microscopy. This increase in bioactivity resulted in cell proliferation levels comparable to native titanium. An in vivo study using a rat calvarial critical size defect model revealed enhanced osseointegration where bone tissue formation was evident only on the ANAB treated PEEK. Taken together, these data suggest that ANAB treatment of PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, resulting in bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants

  7. Impaction durability of porous polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and titanium-coated PEEK interbody fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Westerlund, L Erik; Foley, Kevin T; Gochuico, Joanna; Lee, Christopher S D; Gall, Ken; Safranski, David L

    2018-05-01

    Various surface modifications, often incorporating roughened or porous surfaces, have recently been introduced to enhance osseointegration of interbody fusion devices. However, these topographical features can be vulnerable to damage during clinical impaction. Despite the potential negative impact of surface damage on clinical outcomes, current testing standards do not replicate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare the impaction durability of conventional smooth polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cervical interbody fusion devices with two surface-modified PEEK devices that feature either a porous structure or plasma-sprayed titanium coating. A recently developed biomechanical test method was adapted to simulate clinically relevant impaction loading conditions during cervical interbody fusion procedures. Three cervical interbody fusion devices were used in this study: smooth PEEK, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated PEEK, and porous PEEK (n=6). Following Kienle et al., devices were impacted between two polyurethane blocks mimicking vertebral bodies under a constant 200 N preload. The posterior tip of the device was placed at the entrance between the polyurethane blocks, and a guided 1-lb weight was impacted upon the anterior face with a maximum speed of 2.6 m/s to represent the strike force of a surgical mallet. Impacts were repeated until the device was fully impacted. Porous PEEK durability was assessed using micro-computed tomography (µCT) pre- and postimpaction. Titanium-coating coverage pre- and postimpaction was assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Changes to the surface roughness of smooth and titanium-coated devices were also evaluated. Porous PEEK and smooth PEEK devices showed minimal macroscopic signs of surface damage, whereas the titanium-coated devices exhibited substantial visible coating loss. Quantification of the porous PEEK deformation

  8. A constitutive model for AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composites under cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yuting; Sun, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the basic and essential features of the elastic-plastic response of the AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite subjected to off-axis cyclic loadings, a simple rate-independent constitutive model is proposed to describe the orthotropic material behavior for cyclic loadings. A one-parameter memory surface is introduced to distinguish the virgin deformation and the subsequent deformation process and to characterize the loading range effect. Cyclic softening is characterized by the change of generalized plastic modulus. By the vanishing yield surface assumption, a yield criterion is not needed and it is not necessary to consider loading and unloading separately. The model is compared with experimental results and good agreement is obtained.

  9. Replication of micro structured surface by injection moulding of PEEK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Sørensen, Søren

    A micro-structured Ni insert was investigated for PEEK injection moulding. The micro features are circular holes 4 μm in diameter and 2 μm deep, with a 2 μm edge-to-edge distance. 6000 moulding cycles was operated. Half of the insert was coated by 200nm CrN. PEEK parts produced by the coated side...

  10. On the structure of poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1984-01-01

    Annealed, hot pressed, and melt-quenched PEEK specimens have been analyzed by wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The analysis suggests, in part, that structural studies based on the reported similarity between the structure of PEEK and that reported for poly(p-phenylene oxide) are valid and may be extended to a structure more in keeping with the chemical structure of the material.

  11. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong, E-mail: cera72@kims.re.kr [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeong-Nam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun-Ee [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon [GENOSS, Gyeonggi R and DB Center, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  12. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  13. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite coated PEEK for spinal fusion surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Woo; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Yoon, Byung-Ho; Jung, In-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much interest as biomaterial for interbody fusion cages due to its similar stiffness to bone and good radio-transparency for post-op visualization. Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating stimulates bone growth to the medical implant. The objective of this work is to make an implant consisting of biocompatible PEEK with an osteoconductive HA surface for spinal or orthopedic applications. Highly dense and well-adhered HA coating was developed on medical-grade PEEK using aerosol deposition (AD) without thermal degradation of the PEEK. The HA coating had a dense microstructure with no cracks or pores, and showed good adhesion to PEEK at adhesion strengths above 14.3 MPa. The crystallinity of the HA coating was remarkably enhanced by hydrothermal annealing as post-deposition heat-treatment. In addition, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of cell adhesion morphology, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone-to-implant contact ratio, were remarkably enhanced by the HA coating through AD.

  14. Bacterial adhesion to orthopaedic implant materials and a novel oxygen plasma modified PEEK surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochford, E. T. J.; Poulsson, A. H. C.; Salavarrieta Varela, J.; Lezuo, P.; Richards, R. G.; Moriarty, T. F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in biomedical applications, information about bacterial adhesion to this biomaterial is limited. This study investigated Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to injection moulded and machined PEEK OPTIMA (R) using a

  15. Oliver Peek: me pole teeninud 100 miljonit ebaseaduslikult / Oliver Peek ; interv. Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peek, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    LHV analüütik Oliver Peek, keda USA väärtpaberituru järelevalveasutus SEC süüdistab infovarguses ja ebaseaduslikus tulu teenimises, põhjendab, miks ta ei näe oma tegevuses midagi seadusevastast. Lisad: Meestel energiat ka eraettevõtluseks; Mõni LHV Traderi kasutaja võib siiski raha kaotada; LHV pensionifondidega pole probleeme; SEC: enamiku kohtuasju võidame. Tabel: Ost ja müük. Vt. samas: LHV tehingute anatoomia. Kommenteerib Tõnu Samuel

  16. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  17. Versatility of PEEK as a fixed partial denture framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nikita; Gupta, Nidhi; Reddy, K Mahendranadh; Shastry, Y M

    2017-01-01

    Materials used for fixed partial denture (FPD) frameworks have had properties of excellent strength, durability, and biocompatibility. Some of the materials which have been used till date include alloys, ceramics, and high-performance polymers such as zirconia, Ni-Cr, lithium disilicate, and so on. All these, though excellent, have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the search has always been on for a better material. One such material, which has made its foray into dentistry in the recent times, is polyetheretherketone (PEEK). It is a semicrystalline thermoplastic material. PEEK has an excellent chemical resistance and mechanical properties that are retained at high temperatures. The versatility of PEEK as a dental material for FPD framework was evaluated in this case report.

  18. Estudo das características de revestimentos poliméricos aplicados por aspersão térmica para proteção contra desgaste e corrosão de substratos metálicos Study of the characteristics of thermally sprayed polymer coatings for wear and corrosion protection of metallic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Camello Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Revestimentos poliméricos vêm sendo crescentemente considerados como solução na proteção de materiais metálicos contra corrosão e desgaste. A tecnologia de aspersão térmica permite a aplicação de polímeros sobre diversos materiais de substrato, em diversas espessuras, para várias condições ambientais. Polímeros depositados por este processo têm potencial, tanto para reduzir custos com materiais, como para melhorar o desempenho do revestimento em ambientes agressivos. Neste trabalho, foram aplicados revestimentos poliméricos poli-éter-éter-cetona (PEEK e Poliamida 12 sobre substratos de aço carbono, utilizando o processo de aspersão térmica a chama de baixa velocidade. Revestimentos de alta qualidade foram obtidos por esta técnica. Foram avaliadas as características dos materiais e dos revestimentos obtidos, especialmente quanto às propriedades mecânicas, de desgaste e corrosão. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, pode-se afirmar que os revestimentos estudados podem ser utilizados com sucesso em aplicações que envolvam desgaste e corrosão, com uma pequena vantagem para o polímero PEEK.Polymer coatings have been widely considered as a solution in the protection of metallic substrates against both wear and corrosion. Thermal spray technology allows the deposition of polymers onto several substrate materials for various thicknesses at several environmental conditions. Thermal sprayed polymers have high potential for material cost reduction as well as to improve coating performance in drastic environments. In this work, poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK and Polyamide 12 were flame sprayed on carbon steel substrates. High quality coatings were obtained. Several tests were carried out to evaluate the coatings mainly related to wear and corrosion performance. According to the obtained results, it can be stated that the studied coatings can be successfully used in applications involving wear and corrosion, with a slight edge

  19. Different PEEK qualities irradiated with light of different wavelengths: Impact on Martens hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lümkemann, Nina; Eichberger, Marlis; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2017-09-01

    To assess the impact of irradiation on Martens hardness parameters of different PEEK qualities filled with titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ), namely PEEK/0%, PEEK/20%, and PEEK/>30%. For Martens hardness (HM) measurements, 40 specimens of each PEEK quality were fabricated and air-abraded with 50μm Al 2 O 3 . HM parameters of PEEK specimens were measured initially and stepwise after irradiating for 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100, 180, 360 and 540s using light units with different wavelength: Elipar S10 (430-480nm), EyeVolutionMAX (385-390nm+465-470nm), Translux CL (380-500nm) and bre.Lux Power Unit (370-500nm). HM parameters of 10 human teeth were measured initially on enamel and dentin. Data was analysed using 3-way ANOVA with partial eta-squared (η P 2 ) and post-hoc Tuckey-HSD-test (phardness (p30% (197.35±19.9N/mm 2 ), followed by PEEK/20% (191.45±15.49 N/mm 2 ) showed significantly higher values for HM than PEEK/0% (189.55±16.89N/mm 2 ). PEEK/>30% (5.49±0.4kN/mm) and PEEK/20% (5.38±0.26kN/mm 2 ) presented higher indentation modulus (E IT ) than PEEK/0% (4.77±0.36kN/mm 2 ). Irradiated with wavelength of 430-480nm (PEEK/0%: 193.28N/mm 2 , PEEK20%: 198.83N/mm 2 , PEEK/>30%: 200.5N/mm 2 ) indicated higher HM compared to specimens irradiated with 380-500nm (PEEK/0%: 186.63N/mm 2 , PEEK20%: 191.05N/mm 2 , PEEK/>30%: 196.13N/mm 2 ). Irradiation using 430-480nm (PEEK/0%: 4.95kN/mm 2 , PEEK20%: 5.52kN/mm 2 , PEEK/>30%: 5.59kN/mm 2 ) and 370-500nm (PEEK/0%: 4.92kN/mm 2 , PEEK20%: 5.43kN/mm 2 , PEEK/>30%: 5.53kN/mm 2 ) indicated higher E IT values compared to specimens irradiated with 380-500nm (PEEK/0%: 4.72kN/mm 2 , PEEK20%: 5.34kN/mm 2 , PEEK/>30%: 5.47kN/mm 2 ). Duration of irradiation presented no impact on results. Enamel (HM: 2263.6±405.16, E IT : 63.16±19.24) and dentin (HM: 468.2±30.77N/mm 2 , E IT : 14.14±4.59kN/mm 2 ) presented significantly higher HM and E IT than the tested PEEK qualities (p<0.001). Irradiation with different wavelength impacted HM

  20. Electron beam irradiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced PEEK composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Hagiwara, Miyuki; Odajima, Tosikazu; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-03-01

    Carbon fiber(CF) reinforced composites, using polyarylether-sulfone (PES) or polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as matrix material, were prepared and their electron beam irradiation effects were studied on the basis of changes in mechanical and dynamic viscoelastic properties and observation of fracture surfaces. The flexural strength of PES-CF composite decreased to 70 % of the initial strength after the irradiation of 3 MGy and 40 % after 15 MGy. The change in the profile of stress-strain (S-S) curves and fractographic observation by electron microscopy indicated that this composite irradiated with over 3 MGy was fractured by delamination caused by to the degradation of matrix polymer. The mechanical properties of PEEK-CF composite were scarcely decreased even after irradiated up to 180 MGy and this composite showed very high radiation resistance. The change in the profile of S-S curves and fractographic observation showed that this composite fractured due to destruction of fiber in the dose range less than 180 MGy, indicating that PEEK was excellent matrix material used in high radiation field. PEEK-PES-CF composite which was composed of the carbon fibers coated with PES solution showed less radiation resistance compared with PEEK-CF composite; the flexural strength decreased to 85 % of the initial value after the irradiation with 90 MGy. It was revealed from the changes in the profile of S-S curve that the specimen irradiated over 120 MGy was fractured due to not only fiber destruction but delamination. Deterioration mechanism of PEEK-PES-CF composite was studied by dynamic viscoelastic measurements in connection with the damage on matrix-fiber interface. It was suggested that the deterioration in mechanical properties of this composite was caused by the degradation of PES that coated on the surface of the carbon fibers. (author)

  1. Load-Deflection and Friction Properties of PEEK Wires as Alternative Orthodontic Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yoshifumi; Hayakawa, Tohru; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2017-08-09

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is now attracting attention as an alternative to metal alloys in the dental field. In the present study, we evaluated the load-deflection characteristics of PEEK wires in addition to their frictional properties. Three types of PEEK wires are used: two sizes of rectangular shape, 0.016 × 0.022 in² and 0.019 × 0.025 in² (19-25PEEK), and rounded shape, diameter 0.016 in (16PEEK). As a control, Ni-Ti orthodontic wire, diameter 0.016 in, was used. The three-point bending properties were evaluated in a modified three-point bending system for orthodontics. The static friction between the orthodontic wire and the bracket was also measured. The load-deflection curves were similar among Ni-Ti and PEEK wires, except for 16PEEK with slot-lid ligation. The bending force of 19-25PEEK wire was comparable with that of Ni-Ti wire. 19-25PEEK showed the highest load at the deflection of 1500 μm ( p 0.05). No significant difference was seen in static friction between all three PEEK wires and Ni-Ti wire ( p > 0.05). It is suggested that 19-25PEEK will be applicable for orthodontic treatment with the use of slot-lid ligation.

  2. Radiation resistance of the carbon fiber reinforced composite material with PEEK as the matrix resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the fast breeder reactor etc. the structural materials are exposed to various environment, i.e., repeated high and low temperature, stress, etc. Irradiation effect (electron radiation) in the mechanical characteristic at low and high temperature has been studied in the PEEK-CF, polyarylether · ether · ketone - carbon fiber composite. Following are the results. (1) Radiation resistance of PEEK-CF is higher than that of PEEK-PES-CF, PEEK - polyethersulfone surface treated CF composite. In PEEK-PES-CF, PES is deteriorated by irradiation so the adhesive power lowers. (2) In the unirradiated PEEK-CF, its mechanical characteristic decreases beyond 140 deg C. With increase of the radiation dose, however, the characteristic rises. (3) Mechanical characteristic of PEEK-CF thus little drops by the heat treatment after the irradiation. (Mori, K.)

  3. Peek ja Lepik soovisid varade aresti alt vabastamist

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    LHV endine töötaja Oliver Peek väidab, et tema vastu esitatud süüdistused on alusetud ja tõendamata ning nõuab oma varade aresti alt vabastamist. Kristjan Lepingu kohtuasja arutamine lükati edasi 21. detsembrile. Endiselt käib uurimine, kui palju väidetavalt teabevargusega raha teeniti

  4. Banaanikoorimise hooaeg on alanud : mõtiskleb seisundiseikleja / Ingrid Peek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peek, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Raadio 2 enam kui kaks aastat raadiosaadet "Hallo, Kosmos!" juhtinud Ingrid Peek mõtiskleb selle saatesarja jooksul käsitletud teemade infoküllusest, erinevusest ja vasturääkivustest ning võrdleb seda söömise ja erinevates söögikohtades pakutava söögikultuuriga

  5. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in cervical applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Roel Frederik Mark Raymond; van Gaalen, Steven M; de Gast, Arthur; Öner, F Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used during the past decade in patients with degenerative disorders of the cervical spine. Their radiolucency and low elastic modulus make them attractive attributes for spinal fusion compared with titanium and bone graft. Still, limitations are seen such as pseudoarthrosis, subsidence, and migration of the cages. Limited evidence on the clinical outcome of PEEK cages is found in the literature other than noncomparative cohort studies with only a few randomized controlled trials. To assess the clinical and radiographic outcome of PEEK cages in the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and/or spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine. Systematic review of all randomized controlled trials and prospective and retrospective nonrandomized comparative studies with a minimum follow-up of 6 months and all noncomparative cohort studies with a long-term follow-up of more than 5 years. The primary outcome variable was clinical performance. Secondary outcome variables consisted of radiographic scores. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched according to the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. No conflict of interest reported. No funding received. A total of 223 studies were identified, of which 10 studies were included. These comprised two randomized controlled trials, five prospective comparative trials, and three retrospective comparative trials. Minimal evidence for better clinical and radiographic outcome is found for PEEK cages compared with bone grafts in the cervical spine. No differences were found between PEEK, titanium, and carbon fiber cages. Future studies are needed to improve methodology to minimize bias. Publication of lumbar interbody fusion studies needs to be promoted because differences in clinical and/or radiographic scores are more likely to be demonstrated in this part

  6. Enhanced bioactivity and osseointegration of PEEK with accelerated neutral atom beam technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Joseph; Maxwell, Melissa; Cherian, Raymond E; Bachand, James; Kurz, Arthur C; Walsh, Michael; Assad, Michel; Svrluga, Richard C

    2017-04-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is growing in popularity for orthopedic, spinal, and trauma applications but has potential significant limitations in use. PEEK is biocompatible, similar in elasticity to bone, and radiolucent, but is inert and therefore does not integrate well with bone. Current efforts are focusing on increasing the bioactivity of PEEK with surface modifications to improve the bone-implant interface. We used a novel Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK. Human osteoblast-like cells seeded on ANAB-treated PEEK result in significantly enhanced proliferation compared with control PEEK. Cells grown on ANAB-treated PEEK increase osteogenic expression of ALPL (1.98-fold, p PEEK implants resulted in enhanced bone-in-contact by 3.09-fold (p PEEK has the potential to enhance its bioactivity, leading to bone formation and significantly decreasing osseointegration time of orthopedic and spinal implants. ANAB treatment, therefore, may significantly enhance the performance of PEEK medical implants and lead to improved clinical outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 531-543, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Improved biotribological properties of PEEK by photo-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaoduo; Xiong, Dangsheng, E-mail: xiongds@163.com; Wang, Kun; Wang, Nan

    2017-06-01

    The keys of biomaterials application in artificial joints are good hydrophilicity and wear resistance. One kind of the potential bio-implant materials is polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has some excellent properties such as non-toxic and good biocompatibility. However, its bioinert surface and inherent chemical inertness hinder its application. In this study, we reported an efficient method for improving the surface wettability and wear resistance for PEEK, a layer of acrylic acid (AA) polymer brushes on PEEK surface was prepared by UV-initiated graft polymerization. The effects of different grafting parameters (UV-irradiation time/AA monomer solution concentration) on surface characteristics were clearly investigated, and the AA-g-PEEK specimens were examined by ATR-FTIR, static water contact angle measurements and friction tests. Our results reveal that AA can be successfully grafted onto the PEEK surface after UV irradiation, the water wettability and tribological properties of AA-g-PEEK are much better than untreated PEEK because that AA is a hydrophilic monomer, the AA layer on PEEK surface can improve its bearing capacity and reduce abrasion. This detailed understanding of the grafting parameters allows us to accurately control the experimental products, and this method of surface modification broadens the use of PEEK in orthopedic implants. - Highlights: • Acrylic acid was successful grafted onto PEEK substrate by UV-initiated graft polymerization. • AA-g-PEEK owned better hydrophilicity than untreated PEEK. • Wear resistance of AA-g-PEEK were significantly improved due to AA brushes could bear high contact stress.

  8. Bioactivity and Osseointegration of PEEK Are Inferior to Those of Titanium: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Shariq; Bds, Zohaib Khurshid; Bds, Sana Zohaib; Bds, Muhammad Sohail Zafar

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been suggested as an alternative to replace titanium as a dental implant material. However, PEEK's bioactivity and osseointegration are debatable. This review has systematically analyzed studies that have compared PEEK (or PEEK-based) implants with titanium implants so that its feasibility as a possible replacement for titanium can be determined. The focused question was: "Are the bioactivity and osseointegration of PEEK implants comparable to or better than titanium implants?" Using the key words "dental implant," "implant," "polyetheretherketone," "PEEK," and "titanium" in various combinations, the following databases were searched electronically: PubMED/MEDLINE, Embase, Google Scholar, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Database. 5 in vitro and 4 animal studies were included in the review. In 4 out of 5 in vitro studies, titanium exhibited more cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, osteoblast maturation, and osteogenesis compared to PEEK; one in vitro study observed comparable outcomes regardless of the implant material. In all animal studies, uncoated and coated titanium exhibited a more osteogenic behavior than did uncoated PEEK, while comparable bone-implant contact was observed in HA-coated PEEK and coated titanium implants. Unmodified PEEK is less osseoconductive and bioactive than titanium. Furthermore, the majority of studies had multiple sources of bias; hence, in its unmodified form, PEEK is unsuitable to be used as dental implant. Significantly more research and long-term trials must focus on improving the bioactivity of PEEK before it can be used as dental implant. More comparative animal and clinical studies are warranted to ascertain the potential of PEEK as a viable alternative to titanium.

  9. Peek-a-What? Infants' Response to the Still-Face Task after Normal and Interrupted Peek-a-Boo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Best, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Infants' sensitivity to the vitality or tension envelope within dyadic social exchanges was investigated by examining their responses following normal and interrupted games of peek-a-boo embedded in a Still-Face Task. Infants 5-6 months old engaged in two modified Still-Face Tasks with their mothers. In one task, the initial interaction ended with…

  10. Multiscale Modeling of PEEK Using Reactive Molecular Dynamics Modeling and Micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, William A.; Radue, Matthew; Chinkanjanarot, Sorayot; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julia A.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2018-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a high-performance, semi-crystalline thermoplastic that is used in a wide range of engineering applications, including some structural components of aircraft. The design of new PEEK-based materials requires a precise understanding of the multiscale structure and behavior of semi-crystalline PEEK. Molecular Dynamics (MD) modeling can efficiently predict bulk-level properties of single phase polymers, and micromechanics can be used to homogenize those phases based on the overall polymer microstructure. In this study, MD modeling was used to predict the mechanical properties of the amorphous and crystalline phases of PEEK. The hierarchical microstructure of PEEK, which combines the aforementioned phases, was modeled using a multiscale modeling approach facilitated by NASA's MSGMC. The bulk mechanical properties of semi-crystalline PEEK predicted using MD modeling and MSGMC agree well with vendor data, thus validating the multiscale modeling approach.

  11. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, John W. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Montelongo, Sergio A.; Ong, Joo L.; Guda, Teja [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Allen, Matthew J. [Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rabiei, Afsaneh, E-mail: arabiei@ncsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18 weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. - Highlights: • Method for improving osseointegration of PEEK implants is analyzed in vivo. • Uniform multilayer coatings were deposited on cylindrical PEEK implants. • Microwave and hydrothermal heat treatments crystallized the hydroxyapatite coating. • Healing response shows coated implants increase bone growth and implant fixation.

  12. Improved biotribological properties of PEEK by photo-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoduo; Xiong, Dangsheng; Wang, Kun; Wang, Nan

    2017-06-01

    The keys of biomaterials application in artificial joints are good hydrophilicity and wear resistance. One kind of the potential bio-implant materials is polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has some excellent properties such as non-toxic and good biocompatibility. However, its bioinert surface and inherent chemical inertness hinder its application. In this study, we reported an efficient method for improving the surface wettability and wear resistance for PEEK, a layer of acrylic acid (AA) polymer brushes on PEEK surface was prepared by UV-initiated graft polymerization. The effects of different grafting parameters (UV-irradiation time/AA monomer solution concentration) on surface characteristics were clearly investigated, and the AA-g-PEEK specimens were examined by ATR-FTIR, static water contact angle measurements and friction tests. Our results reveal that AA can be successfully grafted onto the PEEK surface after UV irradiation, the water wettability and tribological properties of AA-g-PEEK are much better than untreated PEEK because that AA is a hydrophilic monomer, the AA layer on PEEK surface can improve its bearing capacity and reduce abrasion. This detailed understanding of the grafting parameters allows us to accurately control the experimental products, and this method of surface modification broadens the use of PEEK in orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, John W.; Montelongo, Sergio A.; Ong, Joo L.; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J.; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18 weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. - Highlights: • Method for improving osseointegration of PEEK implants is analyzed in vivo. • Uniform multilayer coatings were deposited on cylindrical PEEK implants. • Microwave and hydrothermal heat treatments crystallized the hydroxyapatite coating. • Healing response shows coated implants increase bone growth and implant fixation.

  14. Do Surface Porosity and Pore Size Influence Mechanical Properties and Cellular Response to PEEK?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstrick, F Brennan; Evans, Nathan T; Stevens, Hazel Y; Gall, Ken; Guldberg, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Despite its widespread use in orthopaedic implants such as soft tissue fasteners and spinal intervertebral implants, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) often suffers from poor osseointegration. Introducing porosity can overcome this limitation by encouraging bone ingrowth; however, the corresponding decrease in implant strength can potentially reduce the implant's ability to bear physiologic loads. We have previously shown, using a single pore size, that limiting porosity to the surface of PEEK implants preserves strength while supporting in vivo osseointegration. However, additional work is needed to investigate the effect of pore size on both the mechanical properties and cellular response to PEEK. (1) Can surface porous PEEK (PEEK-SP) microstructure be reliably controlled? (2) What is the effect of pore size on the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP? (3) Do surface porosity and pore size influence the cellular response to PEEK? PEEK-SP was created by extruding PEEK through NaCl crystals of three controlled ranges: 200 to 312, 312 to 425, and 425 to 508 µm. Micro-CT was used to characterize the microstructure of PEEK-SP. Tensile, fatigue, and interfacial shear tests were performed to compare the mechanical properties of PEEK-SP with injection-molded PEEK (PEEK-IM). The cellular response to PEEK-SP, assessed by proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, vascular endothelial growth factor production, and calcium content of osteoblast, mesenchymal stem cell, and preosteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cultures, was compared with that of machined smooth PEEK and Ti6Al4V. Micro-CT analysis showed that PEEK-SP layers possessed pores that were 284 ± 35 µm, 341 ± 49 µm, and 416 ± 54 µm for each pore size group. Porosity and pore layer depth ranged from 61% to 69% and 303 to 391 µm, respectively. Mechanical testing revealed tensile strengths > 67 MPa and interfacial shear strengths > 20 MPa for all three pore size groups. All PEEK-SP groups exhibited > 50% decrease

  15. GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17024 GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES Proceedings of the Composites and Advanced...findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. The citation in this report of the names of commercial firms or commercially available

  16. Rolling contact fatigue testing of peek based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrogalli C.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Rolling contact fatigue phenomenon was investigated on unfilled PEEK and on three different PEEK composites: 10% carbon micro-fiber, graphite and PTFE filled matrix, 30% carbon micro-fiber filled matrix, 30% glass micro-fiber filled matrix. For this aim, roller-shaped specimens were machined from extruded bars of these materials and subjected to rolling contact tests at different contact pressure levels by means of a four roller machine. Contact pressure-life diagrams and wear rates were so obtained and compared, highlighting a relationship with monotonic and hardness materials properties. Microscopic observations of contact surfaces and transversal section of the specimens also allowed observing the damage mechanisms occurred in the materials tested and the effects of the filler. In particular way, deep radial cracks appeared on unfilled PEEK, while spalling and delamination phenomena where found on composites. Diffuse microcracks were found at the filler-matrix interface of the composites specimens, confirming that the fatigue life of these materials is essentially determined by the crack propagation phase, also under rolling contact loading.

  17. Comparison of osteointegration property between PEKK and PEEK: Effects of surface structure and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Cheng, Qinwen; Zhao, Rui; Zhu, Xiangdong; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Kai; Song, Yueming; Zhang, Xingdong

    2018-07-01

    Weak osteointegration affects the long-term stability of polyaryletherketone (PAEK) implants. Surface modification provides a potential solution to improve the osteointegration property of PAEKs. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) are two representative PAEK materials, but the latter has more ketone groups and better potential for surface chemical modification than the former. In this work, porous PEKK (PEKK-P) and PEEK (PEEK-P) were fabricated by a porogen leaching method. The samples were treated with 80% sulfuric acid (PEKK-SP and PEEK-SP) and then simulated body fluid (SBF) incubation (PEKK-BSP and PEEK-BSP). More micropores and higher hydrophilic SO 3 H groups were found on PEKK-SP than PEEK-SP. Likely, more bone-like apatite crystals deposited on PEKK-BSP than PEEK-BSP. To evaluate their osteointegration properties, the samples were implanted in femoral condyle defects (Φ3 × 4 mm 3 ) of rat models, and micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), histology and mechanical analyzes were performed on the retrieved specimens. For control groups, i.e. the dense samples (PEKK-D and PEEK-D), only a handful of bone creeping growth on the implant surface was seen on them. However, with the interconnected macropores, surface micro/nano topography and bone-like apatite, notable bone growth into the inner pores was observed on PEKK-BSP and PEEK-BSP. Furthermore, quantitative analyses confirmed that the newly formed bone in PEKK-BSP was nearly more than doubled than that in PEEK-BSP. The push-out force testing results (PEKK-D ≈ PEEK-D < PEKK-P ≈ PEEK-P < PEEK-BSP < PEKK-BSP) suggested that the surface chemical modification (sulfonation treatment followed by SBF incubation) along with build-in porous structure played more important role in enhancing the mechanical stability of both PAEK materials than just the physical structure change. Our results revealed that PEKK with more ketone groups allowed easier sulfonation and

  18. Characterization of New PEEK/HA Composites with 3D HA Network Fabricated by Extrusion Freeforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Vaezi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Addition of bioactive materials such as calcium phosphates or Bioglass, and incorporation of porosity into polyetheretherketone (PEEK has been identified as an effective approach to improve bone-implant interfaces and osseointegration of PEEK-based devices. In this paper, a novel production technique based on the extrusion freeforming method is proposed that yields a bioactive PEEK/hydroxyapatite (PEEK/HA composite with a unique configuration in which the bioactive phase (i.e., HA distribution is computer-controlled within a PEEK matrix. The 100% interconnectivity of the HA network in the biocomposite confers an advantage over alternative forms of other microstructural configurations. Moreover, the technique can be employed to produce porous PEEK structures with controlled pore size and distribution, facilitating greater cellular infiltration and biological integration of PEEK composites within patient tissue. The results of unconfined, uniaxial compressive tests on these new PEEK/HA biocomposites with 40% HA under both static and cyclic mode were promising, showing the composites possess yield and compressive strength within the range of human cortical bone suitable for load bearing applications. In addition, preliminary evidence supporting initial biological safety of the new technique developed is demonstrated in this paper. Sufficient cell attachment, sustained viability in contact with the sample over a seven-day period, evidence of cell bridging and matrix deposition all confirmed excellent biocompatibility.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of functional peek for ion-exchange membranes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luo, H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The sulfonated and sulfinated polyetheretherketone (SsPEEK) was prepared via a novel method. SsPEEK has two types of functional groups, the functional groups for ion-exchange and the functional groups for further strengthening of the ion...

  20. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) intervertebral cage as a cause of chronic systemic allergy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Naranjo, Andres L; Healy, Andrew T; Kalfas, Iain H

    2015-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is an organic polymer thermoplastic with strong mechanical and chemical resistance properties. It has been used in industry to fabricate items for demanding applications such as bearings, piston parts, compressor plate valves, and cable insulation. Since the early 1980s, polyetheretherketone polymers have been increasingly used in orthopedic and spinal surgery applications. Numerous studies and years of clinical experience have confirmed the biocompatibility of this material. The purpose of the study was to report a case of chronic systemic allergy after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) and implantation of an intervertebral PEEK cage, with resolution of symptoms after removal of PEEK cage. This study is a case report with clinical evidence for allergy to PEEK. The methods involve clinical findings and review of current literature. After ACDF and implantation of an intervertebral PEEK cage, the patient had developed an angioedema-like picture marked by severe redness, itching, swelling of his tongue, and skin thickening. A skin patch test was positive for PEEK. Removal of the implant resulted in the resolution of his allergy symptoms shortly after surgery. Tissue reactions to PEEK are extremely rare. Herein, we present the first report of a chronic allergic response to interbody PEEK material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of New PEEK/HA Composites with 3D HA Network Fabricated by Extrusion Freeforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Mohammad; Black, Cameron; Gibbs, David M R; Oreffo, Richard O C; Brady, Mark; Moshrefi-Torbati, Mohamed; Yang, Shoufeng

    2016-05-26

    Addition of bioactive materials such as calcium phosphates or Bioglass, and incorporation of porosity into polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been identified as an effective approach to improve bone-implant interfaces and osseointegration of PEEK-based devices. In this paper, a novel production technique based on the extrusion freeforming method is proposed that yields a bioactive PEEK/hydroxyapatite (PEEK/HA) composite with a unique configuration in which the bioactive phase (i.e., HA) distribution is computer-controlled within a PEEK matrix. The 100% interconnectivity of the HA network in the biocomposite confers an advantage over alternative forms of other microstructural configurations. Moreover, the technique can be employed to produce porous PEEK structures with controlled pore size and distribution, facilitating greater cellular infiltration and biological integration of PEEK composites within patient tissue. The results of unconfined, uniaxial compressive tests on these new PEEK/HA biocomposites with 40% HA under both static and cyclic mode were promising, showing the composites possess yield and compressive strength within the range of human cortical bone suitable for load bearing applications. In addition, preliminary evidence supporting initial biological safety of the new technique developed is demonstrated in this paper. Sufficient cell attachment, sustained viability in contact with the sample over a seven-day period, evidence of cell bridging and matrix deposition all confirmed excellent biocompatibility.

  2. Impact Damage In Carbon/Epoxy And Carbon/PEEK Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Magold, N. J.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes results of drop-weight impact testing of specimens of carbon-fiber/epoxy and carbon-fiber/polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite materials. Panels made of these materials assembled into lightweight, strong, stiff structures useful in automobiles, aircraft, sporting goods, and many other products. PEEK specimens showed less delamination than epoxy specimens at given impact energy.

  3. Preparation and characterization of bio-composite PEEK/nHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y. S.; Bian, C. C.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Zhao, Y.; Yang, L.

    2017-01-01

    PEEK/nHA composite material, with excellent mechanical property as polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and biological activity as hydroxyapatite (HA), has attracted wide attention of medical experts and materials science experts. The addition of hydroxyapatite was the decisive factor for biological activity in PEEK/nHA composite. In this paper, acicular nanohydroxyapatite was prepared by chemical precipitation method with Ca(NO3)2, (NH4)2HPO4 as raw material; PEEK/nHA composite was prepared by solution blending and vacuum sintering method. The composite was characterized with FT-IR, XRD, DSC, TG and mechanical property test. Results showed that the composite has good thermal stability and compressive property when the mass ratio of PEEK to nHA is 10:3; and high nHA content can improve the biological activity of the composite, which can meet the basic requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  4. Development of high voltage PEEK wire with radiation-resistance and cryogenic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Hirata, T.; Araki, S.; Ohara, H.; Nishimura, H.

    1989-01-01

    High voltage electric wires insulated with highly-refined polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been developed for the wiring in fusion reactors, where the wire is required to withstand high voltage under high vacuum up to 10 -5 Torr. The PEEK wires having the advantages of PEEK resin including superior radiation resistance and cryogenic characteristics are usable over a wide range of temperature and in radiation fields. The results of withstand voltage tests proved that the PEEK wires exceeding 0.8 mm in insulation thickness withstand such specified high voltage conditions as 24 kV for 1 minutes by 10 times and 6.6 kV for 110 hours. The results also revealed that the withstand voltage is improved by providing a jacket layer over the insulation and decreased by periodical voltage charge, by bending of the specimen and by water in the conductor. This paper deal with the withstand voltage test results under varied conditions of the PEEK wires. (author)

  5. The Biologic Response to Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Wear Particles in Total Joint Replacement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton-Powell, Ashley A; Pasko, Kinga M; Brockett, Claire L; Tipper, Joanne L

    2016-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composites are polymers resistant to fatigue strain, radiologically transparent, and have mechanical properties suitable for a range of orthopaedic applications. In bulk form, PEEK composites are generally accepted as biocompatible. In particulate form, however, the biologic response relevant to joint replacement devices remains unclear. The biologic response to wear particles affects the longevity of total joint arthroplasties. Particles in the phagocytozable size range of 0.1 µm to 10 µm are considered the most biologically reactive, particularly particles with a mean size of PEEK-based wear debris from total joint arthroplasties. (1) What are the quantitative characteristics of PEEK-based wear particles produced by total joint arthroplasties? (2) Do PEEK wear particles cause an adverse biologic response when compared with UHMWPE or a similar negative control biomaterial? (3) Is the biologic response affected by particle characteristics? Embase and Ovid Medline databases were searched for studies that quantified PEEK-based particle characteristics and/or investigated the biologic response to PEEK-based particles relevant to total joint arthroplasties. The keyword search included brands of PEEK (eg, MITCH, MOTIS) or variations of PEEK types and nomenclature (eg, PAEK, CFR-PEEK) in combination with types of joint (eg, hip, knee) and synonyms for wear debris or immunologic response (eg, particles, cytotoxicity). Peer-reviewed studies, published in English, investigating total joint arthroplasty devices and cytotoxic effects of PEEK particulates were included. Studies investigating devices without articulating bearings (eg, spinal instrumentation devices) and bulk material or contact cytotoxicity were excluded. Of 129 studies, 15 were selected for analysis and interpretation. No studies were found that isolated and characterized PEEK wear particles from retrieved periprosthetic human tissue samples. In the four studies that

  6. Influence of Layer Thickness and Raster Angle on the Mechanical Properties of 3D-Printed PEEK and a Comparative Mechanical Study between PEEK and ABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenzheng; Geng, Peng; Li, Guiwei; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Haibo; Zhao, Ji

    2015-09-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a rapidly growing 3D printing technology. However, printing materials are restricted to acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) or poly (lactic acid) (PLA) in most Fused deposition modeling (FDM) equipment. Here, we report on a new high-performance printing material, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK), which could surmount these shortcomings. This paper is devoted to studying the influence of layer thickness and raster angle on the mechanical properties of 3D-printed PEEK. Samples with three different layer thicknesses (200, 300 and 400 μm) and raster angles (0°, 30° and 45°) were built using a polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) 3D printing system and their tensile, compressive and bending strengths were tested. The optimal mechanical properties of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) samples were found at a layer thickness of 300 μm and a raster angle of 0°. To evaluate the printing performance of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) samples, a comparison was made between the mechanical properties of 3D-printed polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) parts. The results suggest that the average tensile strengths of polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) parts were 108% higher than those for acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), and compressive strengths were 114% and bending strengths were 115%. However, the modulus of elasticity for both materials was similar. These results indicate that the mechanical properties of 3D-printed polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) are superior to 3D-printed ABS.

  7. Wear of PEEK-OPTIMA® and PEEK-OPTIMA®-Wear Performance articulating against highly cross-linked polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Rebecca H; Briscoe, Adam; Unsworth, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    The idea of all polymer artificial joints, particularly for the knee and finger, has been raised several times in the past 20 years. This is partly because of weight but also to reduce stress shielding in the bone when stiffer materials such as metals or ceramics are used. With this in mind, pin-on-plate studies of various polyetheretherketone preparations against highly cross-linked polyethylene were conducted to investigate the possibility of using such a combination in the design of a new generation of artificial joints. PEEK-OPTIMA(®) (no fibre) against highly cross-linked polyethylene gave very low wear factors of 0.0384 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the polyetheretherketone pins and -0.025 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the highly cross-linked polyethylene plates. The carbon-fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA(®)-Wear Performance) also produced very low wear rates in the polyetheretherketone pins but produced very high wear in the highly cross-linked polyethylene, as might have been predicted since the carbon fibres are quite abrasive. When the fibres were predominantly tangential to the sliding plane, the mean wear factor was 0.052 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the pins and 49.3 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the highly cross-linked polyethylene plates; a half of that when the fibres ran axially in the pins (0.138 × 10(-6) mm(3)/N m for the pins and 97.5 × 10(-6) mm/ N m for the cross-linked polyethylene plates). PEEK-OPTIMA(®) against highly cross-linked polyethylene merits further investigation. © IMechE 2015.

  8. Predictive Models for Different Roughness Parameters During Machining Process of Peek Composites Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mata-Cabrera Francisco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK composite belongs to a group of high performance thermoplastic polymers and is widely used in structural components. To improve the mechanical and tribological properties, short fibers are added as reinforcement to the material. Due to its functional properties and potential applications, it’s impor- tant to investigate the machinability of non-reinforced PEEK (PEEK, PEEK rein- forced with 30% of carbon fibers (PEEK CF30, and reinforced PEEK with 30% glass fibers (PEEK GF30 to determine the optimal conditions for the manufacture of the parts. The present study establishes the relationship between the cutting con- ditions (cutting speed and feed rate and the roughness (Ra , Rt , Rq , Rp , by develop- ing second order mathematical models. The experiments were planned as per full factorial design of experiments and an analysis of variance has been performed to check the adequacy of the models. These state the adequacy of the derived models to obtain predictions for roughness parameters within ranges of parameters that have been investigated during the experiments. The experimental results show that the most influence of the cutting parameters is the feed rate, furthermore, proved that glass fiber reinforcements produce a worse machinability.

  9. Effects of microstructural inclusions on fatigue life of polyether ether ketone (PEEK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsiriwong, Jutima; Shrestha, Rakish; Shamsaei, Nima; Lugo, Marcos; Moser, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of microstructural inclusions on fatigue life of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) was investigated. Due to the versatility of its material properties, the semi-crystralline PEEK polymer has been increasingly adopted in a wide range of applications particularly as a biomaterial for orthopedic, trauma, and spinal implants. To obtain the cyclic behavior of PEEK, uniaxial fully-reversed strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted at ambient temperature and at 0.02 mm/mm to 0.04 mm/mm strain amplitudes. The microstructure of PEEK was obtained using the optical and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the microstructural inclusion properties in PEEK specimen such as inclusion size, type, and nearest neighbor distance. SEM analysis was also conducted on the fracture surface of fatigue specimens to observe microstructural inclusions that served as the crack incubation sites. Based on the experimental strain-life results and the observed microstructure of fatigue specimens, a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model was used to predict the fatigue life of PEEK that includes both crack incubation and small crack growth regimes. Results show that the employed model is applicable to capture microstructural effects on fatigue behavior of PEEK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrophoretic deposition of PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings on stainless steel

    KAUST Repository

    Seuß, Sigrid

    2012-03-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been successfully used to deposit composite coatings composed of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanoparticles on 316L stainless steel substrates. The suspensions of TiO2 nanoparticles and PEEK microparticles for EPD were prepared in ethanol. PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings were optimized using suspensions containing 6wt% PEEK-TiO 2 in ethanol with a 3:1 ratio of PEEK to TiO 2 in weight and by applying a potential difference of 30 V for 1 minute. A heat-treatment process of the optimized PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings was erformed at 335°C for 30 minutes with a heating rate of 10°Cmin -1 to densify the deposits. The EPD coatings were microstructurally evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that EPD is a convenient and rapid method to fabricate PEEK/TiO 2 coatings on stainless steel which are interesting for biomedical applications. © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  11. Hydroxyapatite coating on PEEK implants: Biomechanical and histological study in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, John W; Montelongo, Sergio A; Ong, Joo L; Guda, Teja; Allen, Matthew J; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-11-01

    A bioactive two-layer coating consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was investigated on cylindrical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants using ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). Post-deposition heat treatments via variable frequency microwave annealing with and without subsequent autoclaving were used to crystallize the as-deposited amorphous HA layer. Microstructural analysis, performed by TEM and EDS, showed that these methods were capable of crystallizing HA coating on PEEK. The in vivo response to cylindrical PEEK samples with and without coating was studied by implanting uncoated PEEK and coated PEEK implants in the lateral femoral condyle of 18 rabbits. Animals were studied in two groups of 9 for observation at 6 or 18weeks post surgery. Micro-CT analysis, histology, and mechanical pull-out tests were performed to determine the effect of the coating on osseointegration. The heat-treated HA/YSZ coatings showed improved implant fixation as well as higher bone regeneration and bone-implant contact area compared to uncoated PEEK. The study offers a novel method to coat PEEK implants with improved osseointegration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Sterilization Cycles on PEEK for Medical Device Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Wai Teng; Foo, Soo Leong; Lee, Teck Kheng

    2018-01-01

    The effects of the sterilization process have been studied on medical grade thermoplastic polyetheretherketone (PEEK). For a reusable medical device, material reliability is an important parameter to decide its lifetime, as it will be subjected to the continuous steam sterilization process. A spring nature, clip component was selected out of a newly designed medical device (patented) to perform this reliability study. This clip component was sterilized for a predetermined number of cycles (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20…100) at 121 °C for 30 min. A significant decrease of ~20% in the compression force of the spring was observed after 30 cycles, and a ~6% decrease in the lateral dimension of the clip was observed after 50 cycles. No further significant change in the compression force or dimension was observed for the subsequent sterilization cycles. Vickers hardness and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to characterize the effects of sterilization. DSC results exhibited no significant change in the degree of cure and melting behavior of PEEK before and after the sterilization. Hardness measurement exhibited an increase of ~49% in hardness after just 20 cycles. When an unsterilized sample was heated for repetitive cycles without the presence of moisture (121 °C, 10 and 20 cycles), only ~7% of the maximum change in hardness was observed. PMID:29466289

  13. Effects of Sterilization Cycles on PEEK for Medical Device Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Yap, Wai Teng; Foo, Soo Leong; Lee, Teck Kheng

    2018-02-21

    The effects of the sterilization process have been studied on medical grade thermoplastic polyetheretherketone (PEEK). For a reusable medical device, material reliability is an important parameter to decide its lifetime, as it will be subjected to the continuous steam sterilization process. A spring nature, clip component was selected out of a newly designed medical device (patented) to perform this reliability study. This clip component was sterilized for a predetermined number of cycles (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20…100) at 121 °C for 30 min. A significant decrease of ~20% in the compression force of the spring was observed after 30 cycles, and a ~6% decrease in the lateral dimension of the clip was observed after 50 cycles. No further significant change in the compression force or dimension was observed for the subsequent sterilization cycles. Vickers hardness and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used to characterize the effects of sterilization. DSC results exhibited no significant change in the degree of cure and melting behavior of PEEK before and after the sterilization. Hardness measurement exhibited an increase of ~49% in hardness after just 20 cycles. When an unsterilized sample was heated for repetitive cycles without the presence of moisture (121 °C, 10 and 20 cycles), only ~7% of the maximum change in hardness was observed.

  14. Outcomes following polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cranioplasty: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchak, Maria; Chung, Lawrance K; Lagman, Carlito; Bui, Timothy T; Lazareff, Jorge; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Jarrahy, Reza; Yang, Isaac

    2017-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been used in cranioplasty since the early 2000s. However, there remains limited data that compares its long-term complication rate to autologous grafts and titanium mesh implants. To compare complication and implant failure rates after PEEK, autologous and titanium mesh cranioplasties, the authors of this study conducted a systematic review using the PubMed database. Studies that contained outcome data on complication rates of PEEK cranioplasty patients and studies that compared outcomes of patients who underwent PEEK cranioplasties versus other materials were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios using the Mantel-Haenszel method were used for analysis. Fifteen articles, comprised of 183 PEEK cranioplasty patients were included. Of these patients, 15.3% developed post-operative complications and 8.7% experienced implant failure requiring reoperation. Patients who underwent cranioplasties with PEEK implants had 0.130 times the odds of developing post-operative complications (P=0.065) and 0.574 times the odds of implant failure compared to patients with autologous bone graft cranioplasties (P=0.629). Patients who had undergone PEEK cranioplasties had 0.127 times the odds of developing post-op complications (P=0.360) and 0.170 times the odds of implant failure compared to individuals who had undergone titanium mesh cranioplasties (P=0.168). The analysis was severely limited by the paucity in literature. However, there was a trend toward lower post-operative complication rates following PEEK cranioplasty versus autologous grafts, and lower implant failure rates with PEEK versus titanium mesh implants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. An in vitro investigation of bacteria-osteoblast competition on oxygen plasma-modified PEEK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochford, Edward T. J.; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Moriarty, T. Fintan; Poulsson, Alexandra H. C.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Richards, R. Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) films were oxygen plasma treated to increase surface free energy and characterized by X-ray photoelectron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and water contact angles. A parallel plate flow chamber was used to measure Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus,

  16. Electrophoretic deposition of PEEK-TiO 2 composite coatings on stainless steel

    KAUST Repository

    Seuß , Sigrid; Subhani, Tayyab; Yi Kang, Min; Okudaira, Kenji; Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2012-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been successfully used to deposit composite coatings composed of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium dioxide (TiO 2) nanoparticles on 316L stainless steel substrates. The suspensions of TiO2 nanoparticles

  17. Use of customized polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants in the reconstruction of complex maxillofacial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michael M; Boahene, Kofi D O; Byrne, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    Extensive maxillofacial defects resulting from trauma or oncologic resection present reconstructive challenges. Various autografts and alloplastic materials in conjunction with standard soft-tissue techniques have been used in the reconstruction of these types of defects. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a semicrystalline polyaromatic linear polymer exhibiting an excellent combination of strength, stiffness, durability, and environmental resistance. Recent investigations of PEEK as a biomaterial resulted in the successful treatment of cervical disk disease. We describe a series of 4 patients whose defects were reconstructed using customized PEEK implants. All had excellent postoperative aesthetic and functional results without complications such as infections or extrusions. Because PEEK implants are customizable, easily workable, inert, and nonporous, they represent an ideal alloplastic material for maxillofacial reconstruction.

  18. Outcome in patient-specific PEEK cranioplasty : a two-center cohort study of 40 implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkergouw, J.; van de Vijfeijken, S.E.C.M.; Nout, E.; Theys, T.; Van de Casteele, E.; Folkersma, H.; Depauw, P.R.A.M.; Becking, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The best material choice for cranioplasty following craniectomy remains a subject to discussion. Complication rates after cranioplasty tend to be high. Computer-assisted 3-dimensional modelling of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was recently introduced for cranial reconstruction. The aim of

  19. Cross-lined PEEK proton exchange membranes for fuel cell - Conference Poster

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luo, H

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The low-cost cross-linked Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) proton exchange membranes were prepared via the simple route. The membranes exhibited similar electrochemical properties as compared with commercial Nafion. The membranes were highly proton...

  20. Smart release of doxorubicin loaded on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) surface with 3D porous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liping; Sun, Zhenjie; Wang, Donghui; Qiao, Yuqin; Zhu, Hongqin; Ma, Xiaohan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2018-03-01

    It is important to fabricate an implant possessing environment sensitive drug delivery. In this work, the construction of 3D porous structure on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) surface and pH sensitive polymer, chitosan, was introduced. The smart release of doxorubicin can be realized on the 3D porous surface of PEEK loading chitosan. We give a feasible explanation for the effect of chitosan on smart drug release according to Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Furthermore, the intracellular drug content of the cell cultured on the samples with highest chitosan is significantly higher at pH 4.0, whereas lower at pH 7.4 than other samples. The smart release of doxorubicin via modification with chitosan onto 3D porous PEEK surface paves the way for the application of PEEK in drug loading platform for recovering bone defect caused by malignant bone tumor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibacterial properties of nano-silver coated PEEK prepared through magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuju; Gan, Kang; Liu, Hong; Song, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tianjie; Liu, Chenchen

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity and antibacterial properties of nano-silver-coated polyetheretherketone (PEEK) produced through magnetron sputtering and provide a theoretical basis for its use in clinical applications. The surfaces of PEEKs were coated with nano-silver at varying thicknesses (3, 6, 9, and 12nm) through magnetron sputtering technology. The resulting coated PEEK samples were classified into the following groups according to the thickness of the nano-silver coating: PEEK-3 (3nm), PEEK-6 (6nm), PEEK-9 (9nm), PEEK-12 (12nm), and PEEK control group. The surface microstructure and composition of each sample were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) analysis. The water contact angle of each sample was then measured by contact angle meters. A cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to analyze the cytotoxicity of the mouse fibroblast cells (L929) in the coated groups (n=5) and group test samples (n=6), negative control (polyethylene, PE) (n=6), and positive control group (phenol) (n=6). The antibacterial properties of the samples were tested by co-culturing Streptococcus mutans and Straphylococcus aureus. The bacteria that adhered to the surface of samples were observed by SEM. The antibacterial adhesion ability of each sample was then evaluated. SEM and AFM analysis results showed that the surfaces of control group samples were smooth but compact. Homogeneous silver nano-particles (AgNPs) and nano-silver coating were uniformly distributed on the surface of the coated group samples. Compared with the control samples, the nano-silver coated samples had a significant increase in surface roughness (Pnano-silver coating increased. EDS analysis showed that not only C and O but also Ag were present on the surface of the coated samples. Moreover, the water contact angle of modified samples significantly increased after nano-silver coating modification (Pnano-silver coating can

  2. On compression and damage evolution in PTFE and PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, C.; Parry, S.; Garcea, S. C.; Bourne, N. K.; McDonald, S. A.; Eastwood, D. S.; Brown, E. N.; Withers, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    The well-known Taylor cylinder impact test, that follows the impact of a flat-ended cylindrical rod onto a rigid stationary anvil, is conducted over a range of impact speeds for two polymers, PTFE and PEEK. In previous work experiments and a model were developed to capture the deformation behaviour of the rod after impact. A distinctive feature of these works was that a region in which both spatial and temporal variation of both longitudinal and radial deformation showed evidence of changes in phase within the material. This region is X-ray imaged in a range of impacted targets at the I13 Imaging and Coherence beam line at the Diamond synchrotron. Further techniques were fielded to resolve compressed regions within the recovered polymer cylinders that showed a fracture zone in the impact region. This shows the transit of damage from ductile to brittle failure results from previously undetected internal failure.

  3. Study of crystallization kinetics of peek thermoplastics using Nakamura equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalid, Mochamad; Muhammad Joshua Y., B.; Fikri, Arbi Irsyad; Gregory, Noel; Priadi, Dedi; Fatriansyah, Jaka Fajar

    2018-04-01

    We have simulated the time evolution of relative crystallization of PEEK at various cooling rates (10, 15, 20 °C/min) and made comparison with the experiments. The simulation was conducted using Nakamura model which is a modified Avrami model. The model is a 1 cm radius of circle with the cooling plate which was placed in the upper part of the circle. The cooling plate temperature was varied in order to obtain particular cooling rates. The measurement point is located near upper boundary in order to minimize the heat transfer effect. The general trend of time evolution of crystallization was well captured although some discrepancies occured. These discrepancies may be attributed to the heat transfer effect and secondary crystallization.

  4. Patient-Specific Surgical Implants Made of 3D Printed PEEK: Material, Technology, and Scope of Surgical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Honigmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM is rapidly gaining acceptance in the healthcare sector. Three-dimensional (3D virtual surgical planning, fabrication of anatomical models, and patient-specific implants (PSI are well-established processes in the surgical fields. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK has been used, mainly in the reconstructive surgeries as a reliable alternative to other alloplastic materials for the fabrication of PSI. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate PEEK PSI with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF technology. 3D printing of PEEK using FFF allows construction of almost any complex design geometry, which cannot be manufactured using other technologies. In this study, we fabricated various PEEK PSI by FFF 3D printer in an effort to check the feasibility of manufacturing PEEK with 3D printing. Based on these preliminary results, PEEK can be successfully used as an appropriate biomaterial to reconstruct the surgical defects in a “biomimetic” design.

  5. Patient-Specific Surgical Implants Made of 3D Printed PEEK: Material, Technology, and Scope of Surgical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigmann, Philipp; Sharma, Neha; Okolo, Brando; Popp, Uwe; Msallem, Bilal; Thieringer, Florian M

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is rapidly gaining acceptance in the healthcare sector. Three-dimensional (3D) virtual surgical planning, fabrication of anatomical models, and patient-specific implants (PSI) are well-established processes in the surgical fields. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been used, mainly in the reconstructive surgeries as a reliable alternative to other alloplastic materials for the fabrication of PSI. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate PEEK PSI with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technology. 3D printing of PEEK using FFF allows construction of almost any complex design geometry, which cannot be manufactured using other technologies. In this study, we fabricated various PEEK PSI by FFF 3D printer in an effort to check the feasibility of manufacturing PEEK with 3D printing. Based on these preliminary results, PEEK can be successfully used as an appropriate biomaterial to reconstruct the surgical defects in a "biomimetic" design.

  6. The electron beam deposition of titanium on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and the resulting enhanced biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheol-Min; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Kim, Keung N; Ha, Yoon; Kuh, Sung-Uk

    2010-05-01

    The surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was coated with a pure titanium (Ti) layer using an electron beam (e-beam) deposition method in order to enhance its biocompatibility and adhesion to bone tissue. The e-beam deposition method was a low-temperature coating process that formed a dense, uniform and well crystallized Ti layer without deteriorating the characteristics of the PEEK implant. The Ti coating layer strongly adhered to the substrate and remarkably enhanced its wettability. The Ti-coated samples were evaluated in terms of their in vitro cellular behaviors and in vivo osteointegration, and the results were compared to a pure PEEK substrate. The level of proliferation of the cells (MC3T3-E1) was measured using a methoxyphenyl tetrazolium salt (MTS) assay and more than doubled after the Ti coating. The differentiation level of cells was measured using the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and also doubled. Furthermore, the in vivo animal tests showed that the Ti-coated PEEK implants had a much higher bone-in-contact (BIC) ratio than the pure PEEK implants. These in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the e-beam deposited Ti coating significantly improved the potential of PEEK for hard tissue applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving surface wettability and lubrication of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) by combining with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoduo; Xiong, Dangsheng; Liu, Yuntong

    2018-06-01

    Poor surface wettability and relative high friction coefficients of pristine polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have limited its application in orthopedic implants. In this study, inspired by the structure of natural articular cartilage, we presented a novel method to fabricate a "soft-on-hard" structure on the surface of pristine PEEK specimens, which combined a soft polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel layer and a three-dimensional porous layer with PEEK substrates. A variety of analytical methods were used to evaluate their properties, our results demonstrated that the hydrogel layer could be seamlessly connected with substrate, and the hydrogel-covered PEEK owned a highly hydrophilic surface, a very low water contact angle of 7° could be obtained. The friction coefficients of untreated and hydrogel-covered PEEK surfaces were measured using a tribometer under water lubrication, due to the presence of the top hydrogel layer and the hard substrate could provide excellent aqueous lubrication and bearing capacity, respectively, the friction coefficient could be reduced from 0.292 to 0.021. In addition, the porous layer under PVA hydrogel layer could work as gel reservoirs, the reserved hydrogel would be released after the surface layer was sheared off, and a regenerable lubrication status was obtained. This work provides a new route for the design of improving the surface wettability and tribological properties of PEEK. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tribological behavior of Nano-Al2O3 and PEEK reinforced PTFE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Banghan; Lv, Qiujuan; Hou, Genliang

    2017-01-01

    The Nano-Al2O3 and PEEK particles synergetic filled PTFE composites were prepared by mechanical blending-molding-sintering method. The tribological behavior of composites with different volume fraction of fillers was tested on different test conditions by a MMW-1A block-on-ring friction and wear tester. The transfer film on counterpart 5A06 Aluminum alloy ring was inspected and anslyzed with scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results demonstrated that the lowest friction coefficient was gained when the PTFE composite was filled with only 10% PEEK. The friction coefficient decreases gradually with the increasing content of PEEK. The special wear rate of 10% PEEK/PTFE were decreased clearly with filled different contents of nano-Al2O3 particles. The special wear rate of the sample with 5% nano-Al2O3 and 10% PEEK had the lowest volume wear rate. The sliding speed effect significantly on the tribological behavior of nano-Al2O3/PEEK/PTFE composites.

  9. Segmental kyphosis after cervical interbody fusion with stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages: a comparative study on 2 different PEEK cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae; Sohn, Seil; Lee, Sungjoon

    2015-02-01

    Retrospective comparative study. Two polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages of different designs were compared in terms of the postoperative segmental kyphosis after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Segmental kyphosis occasionally occurs after the use of a stand-alone cage for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Although PEEK material seems to have less risk of segmental kyphosis compared with other materials, the occurrence of segmental kyphosis for PEEK cages has been reported to be from 0% to 29%. There have been a few reports that addressed the issue of PEEK cage design. A total of 41 consecutive patients who underwent single-level anterior discectomy and fusion with a stand-alone cage were included. Either a round tube-type (Solis; 18 patients, S-group) or a trapezoidal tube-type (MC+; 23 patients, M-group) cage was used. The contact area between the cage and the vertebral body is larger in MC+ than in Solis, and anchoring pins were present in the Solis cage. The effect of the cage type on the segmental angle (SA) (lordosis vs. kyphosis) at postoperative month 24 was analyzed. Preoperatively, segmental lordosis was present in 12/18 S-group and 16/23 M-group patients (P=0.84). The SA was more lordotic than the preoperative angle in both groups just after surgery, with no difference between groups (P=0.39). At 24 months, segmental lordosis was observed in 9/18 S-group and 20/23 M-group patients (P=0.01). The patients in M-group were 7.83 times more likely than patients in S-group (P=0.04; odds ratio, 7.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-56.28) not to develop segmental kyphosis. The design of the PEEK cage used may influence the SA, and this association needs to be considered when using stand-alone PEEK cages.

  10. PEEK-OPTIMA? as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components art...

  11. Radiological and clinical outcomes of novel Ti/PEEK combined spinal fusion cages: a systematic review and preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Phan, Kevin; Walsh, William R

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the available clinical studies of Ti/PEEK combined cages in spinal interbody fusion surgeries, focusing on their radiological and clinical outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide a review and evaluation of the in vitro and preclinical studies reported on Ti/PEEK-coated implants. A systematic search of the literature was performed in March 2015 via three databases: Medline, Embase and Cochrane library. The following key search terms were combined with synonyms to identify relevant articles: "spinal fusion," "PEEK," "titanium" and "cage." The novelty of this intervention translates into a paucity of clinical trials, albeit the results of the seven clinical studies that met the criteria for inclusion are promising. All studies reported rate of fusion as a primary outcome. Two studies reported slightly improved fusion in the experimental Ti/PEEK combination cohort, one study identical fusion (91.7 %) and three studies excellent fusion (96, 100 and 94 %) in the Ti/PEEK cohort, although no differences reached statistical significance. Clinical studies at this early stage demonstrate that Ti/PEEK implants are safe and efficacious, exhibiting similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes compared to the current standard PEEK. There is clinical evidence substantiating the improved radiographic fusion of Ti/PEEK, albeit the differences were not significant. This field is promising, gaining substantial popularity, and further clinical trials are needed in the future to establish Ti/PEEK cages as a mainstay of clinical practice.

  12. Pedicle screw anchorage of carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindtner, Richard A; Schmid, Rene; Nydegger, Thomas; Konschake, Marko; Schmoelz, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Pedicle screw loosening is a common and significant complication after posterior spinal instrumentation, particularly in osteoporosis. Radiolucent carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CF/PEEK) pedicle screws have been developed recently to overcome drawbacks of conventional metallic screws, such as metal-induced imaging artifacts and interference with postoperative radiotherapy. Beyond radiolucency, CF/PEEK may also be advantageous over standard titanium in terms of pedicle screw loosening due to its unique material properties. However, screw anchorage and loosening of CF/PEEK pedicle screws have not been evaluated yet. The aim of this biomechanical study therefore was to evaluate whether the use of this alternative nonmetallic pedicle screw material affects screw loosening. The hypotheses tested were that (1) nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resist an equal or higher number of load cycles until loosening than standard titanium screws and that (2) PMMA cement augmentation further increases the number of load cycles until loosening of CF/PEEK screws. In the first part of the study, left and right pedicles of ten cadaveric lumbar vertebrae (BMD 70.8 mg/cm 3  ± 14.5) were randomly instrumented with either CF/PEEK or standard titanium pedicle screws. In the second part, left and right pedicles of ten vertebrae (BMD 56.3 mg/cm 3  ± 15.8) were randomly instrumented with either PMMA-augmented or nonaugmented CF/PEEK pedicle screws. Each pedicle screw was subjected to cyclic cranio-caudal loading (initial load ranging from - 50 N to + 50 N) with stepwise increasing compressive loads (5 N every 100 cycles) until loosening or a maximum of 10,000 cycles. Angular screw motion ("screw toggling") within the vertebra was measured with a 3D motion analysis system every 100 cycles and by stress fluoroscopy every 500 cycles. The nonmetallic CF/PEEK pedicle screws resisted a similar number of load cycles until loosening as the contralateral standard

  13. Titanium vs. polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody fusion: Meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Scott; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Torner, James C; Hitchon, Patrick W

    2017-10-01

    Spinal interbody fusion is a standard and accepted method for spinal fusion. Interbody fusion devices include titanium (Ti) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with distinct biomechanical properties. Titanium and PEEK cages have been evaluated in the cervical and lumbar spine, with conflicting results in bony fusion and subsidence. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we reviewed the available literature evaluating Ti and PEEK cages to assess subsidence and fusion rates. Six studies were included in the analysis, 3 of which were class IV evidence, 2 were class III, and 1 was class II. A total of 410 patients (Ti-228, PEEK-182) and 587 levels (Ti-327, PEEK-260) were studied. Pooled mean age was 50.8years in the Ti group, and 53.1years in the PEEK group. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 4 studies (395 levels) and transforaminal interbody fusion in 2 studies (192 levels). No statistically significant difference was found between groups with fusion (OR 1.16, 95% C.I 0.59-2.89, p=0.686, I 2 =49.7%) but there was a statistically significant the rate of subsidence with titanium (OR 3.59, 95% C.I 1.28-10.07, p=0.015, I 2 =56.9%) at last follow-up. Titanium and PEEK cages are associated with a similar rate of fusion, but there is an increased rate of subsidence with titanium cage. Future prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate these cages using surgical and patient-reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) show slow radiographic fusion that reduces clinical improvement: results from the prospective multicenter "PIERCE-PEEK" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Olaf; Schomaker, Martin; Cabraja, Mario; Danne, Marco; Kombos, Theodoros; Hanna, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a well-established surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Previous studies showed that empty PEEK cages have lower radiographic fusion rates, but the clinical relevance remains unclear. This paper's aim is to provide high-quality evidence on the outcomes of ACDF with empty PEEK cages and on the relevance of radiographic fusion for clinical outcomes. This large prospective multicenter clinical trial performed single-level ACDF with empty PEEK cages on patients with cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy. The main clinical outcomes were VAS (0-10) for pain and NDI (0-100) for functioning. Radiographic fusion was evaluated by two investigators for three different aspects. The median (range) improvement of the VAS pain score was: 3 (1-6) at 6 months, 3 (2-8) at 12 months, and 4 (2-8) at 18 months. The median (range) improvement of the NDI score was: 12 (2-34) at 6 months, 18 (4-46) at 12 months, and 22 (2-44) at 18 months. Complete radiographic fusion was reached by 126 patients (43%) at 6 months, 214 patients (73%) at 12 months, and 241 patients (83%) at 18 months. Radiographic fusion was a highly significant ( p  PEEK cages is slow and insufficient. Lack of complete radiographic fusion leads to less improvement of pain and disability. We recommend against using empty uncoated pure PEEK cages in ACDF. ISRCTN42774128. Retrospectively registered 14 April 2009.

  15. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariq Najeeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords “PEEK dental implants,” “nano,” “osseointegration,” “surface treatment,” and “modification.” A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants.

  16. An in vitro investigation of bacteria-osteoblast competition on oxygen plasma-modified PEEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Edward T J; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Moriarty, T Fintan; Poulsson, Alexandra H C; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Richards, R Geoff

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) films were oxygen plasma treated to increase surface free energy and characterized by X-ray photoelectron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and water contact angles. A parallel plate flow chamber was used to measure Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and U-2 OS osteosarcomal cell-line adhesion to the PEEK films in separate monocultures. In addition, bacteria and U-2 OS cells were cocultured to model competition between osteoblasts and contaminating bacteria for the test surfaces. Plasma treatment of the surfaces increased surface oxygen content and decreased the hydrophobicity of the materials, but did not lead to a significant difference in bacterial or U-2 OS cell adhesion in the monocultures. In the S. epidermidis coculture experiments, the U-2 OS cells adhered in greater numbers on the treated surfaces compared to the untreated PEEK and spread to a similar extent. However, in the presence of S. aureus, cell death of the U-2 OS occurred within 10 h on all surfaces. The results of this study suggest that oxygen plasma treatment of PEEK may maintain the ability of osteoblast-like cells to adhere and spread, even in the presence of S. epidermidis contamination, without increasing the risk of preoperative bacterial adhesion. Therefore, oxygen plasma-treated PEEK remains a promising method to improve implant surface free energy for osseointegration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Microwave assisted coating of bioactive amorphous magnesium phosphate (AMP) on polyetheretherketone (PEEK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yufu; Sikder, Prabaha; Lin, Boren; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2018-04-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) with great thermal and chemical stability, desirable mechanical properties and promising biocompatibility is being widely used as orthopedic and dental implant materials. However, the bioinert surface of PEEK can hinder direct osseointegration between the host tissue and PEEK based implants. The important signatures of this paper are as follows. First, we report for the formation of osseointegrable amorphous magnesium phosphate (AMP) coating on PEEK surface using microwave energy. Second, coatings consist of nano-sized AMP particles with a stacked thickness of 800nm. Third, coatings enhance bioactivity in-vitro and induce significantly high amount of bone-like apatite coating, when soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Fourth, the as-deposited AMP coatings present no cytotoxicity effects and are beneficial for cell adhesion at early stage. Finally, the high levels of expression of osteocalcin (OCN) in cells cultured on AMP coated PEEK samples indicate that AMP coatings can promote new bone formation and hence osseointegration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanosized Hydroxyapatite Coating on PEEK Implants Enhances Early Bone Formation: A Histological and Three-Dimensional Investigation in Rabbit Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Johansson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyether ether ketone (PEEK has been frequently used in spinal surgery with good clinical results. The material has a low elastic modulus and is radiolucent. However, in oral implantology PEEK has displayed inferior ability to osseointegrate compared to titanium materials. One idea to reinforce PEEK would be to coat it with hydroxyapatite (HA, a ceramic material of good biocompatibility. In the present study we analyzed HA-coated PEEK tibial implants via histology and radiography when following up at 3 and 12 weeks. Of the 48 implants, 24 were HA-coated PEEK screws (test and another 24 implants served as uncoated PEEK controls. HA-coated PEEK implants were always osseointegrated. The total bone area (BA was higher for test compared to control implants at 3 (p < 0.05 and 12 weeks (p < 0.05. Mean bone implant contact (BIC percentage was significantly higher (p = 0.024 for the test compared to control implants at 3 weeks and higher without statistical significance at 12 weeks. The effect of HA-coating was concluded to be significant with respect to early bone formation, and HA-coated PEEK implants may represent a good material to serve as bone anchored clinical devices.

  19. Layer-by-layer self-assembled multilayers on PEEK implants improve osseointegration in an osteoporosis rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Han, Fei; Zhao, Peng; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Ye, Xiaojian

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to fabricate and deposit nanoscale multilayers on polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to improve cell adhesion and osseointegration. Bio-activated PEEK constructs were designed with prepared surface of different layers of polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) multilayers. Irregular morphology was found on the 5 and 10-layer PEEK surfaces, while "island-like" clusters were observed for 20-layer (20 L) multilayers. Besides, the 20 L PEEK showed more hydrophilic feature than native PEEK, and the surface contact angle reduced from 39.7° to 21.7° as layers increased from 5 to 20. In vitro, modified PEEK allowed excellent adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells, and induced higher cell growth rate and alkaline phosphatase level. In vivo, this bio-active PEEK exhibited significantly enhanced integration with bone tissue in an osteoporosis rabbit model. This work highlights layer-by-layer self-assembly as a practical method to construct bio-active PEEK implants for enhanced osseointegration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  1. Feasibility of Carbon Fiber/PEEK Composites for Cryogenic Fuel Tank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, K.; Doyle, A.; O Bradaigh, C. M.; Jaredson, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of CF/PEEK composites for manufacture of cryogenic fuel tanks for Next Generation Space Launchers. The material considered is CF/PEEK tape from Suprem SA and the proposed manufacturing process for the fuel tank is Automated Tape Placement. Material characterization was carried out on test laminates manufactured in an autoclave and also by Automated Tape Placement with in-situ consolidation. The results of the two processes were compared to establish if there is any knock down in properties for the automated tape placement process. A permeability test rig was setup with a helium leak detector and the effect of thermal cycling on the permeability properties of CF/PEEK was measured. A 1/10th scale demonstrator was designed and manufactured consisting of a cylinder manufactured by automated tape placement and an upper dome manufactured by autoclave processing. The assembly was achieved by Amorphous Interlayer Bonding with PEI.

  2. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications.

  3. The Use of a Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Implant to Reconstruct the Midface Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rumana N; Clark, Martin; Berry-Brincat, Antonella

    A good functional and cosmetic result after midfacial reconstructive surgical procedures is of paramount importance. We describe the use of a Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implant to reconstruct the midface area, after extensive mutilating surgery due to an infiltrative skin tumor. A 67-year-old male patient underwent multiple and extensive surgeries to the left cheek and lower lid because of a highly aggressive metatypical basal cell carcinoma. Complete resection of the recurrent tumor resulted in a cosmetically evident absent cheek contour and facial deformity. The PEEK implant was used to restore the bony cheek contour, with good aesthetic outcome and restoration of the facial symmetry. Preoperative planning with 3-dimensional CT scans allow for customization of the implant. PEEK implants have been scantily described in the periorbital region. The material has a very low reported morbidity and also has the advantage of improving intraoperative predictability and reducing surgical time in complex reconstructive procedures.

  4. Improving PEEK bioactivity for craniofacial reconstruction using a 3D printed scaffold embedded with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskies, Michael; Jordan, Jack O; Fang, Dongdong; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Hier, Michael P; Mlynarek, Alex; Tamimi, Faleh; Tran, Simon D

    2016-07-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a bioinert thermoplastic that has been investigated for its potential use in craniofacial reconstruction; however, its use in clinical practice is limited by a poor integration with adjacent bone upon implantation. To improve the bone-implant interface, two strategies have been employed: to modify its surface or to impregnate PEEK with bioactive materials. This study attempts to combine and improve upon the two approaches by modifying the internal structure into a trabecular network and to impregnate PEEK with mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, we compare the newly designed PEEK scaffolds' interactions with both bone-derived (BMSC) and adipose (ADSC) stem cells. Customized PEEK scaffolds were designed to incorporate a trabecular microstructure using a computer-aided design program and then printed via selective laser sintering (SLS), a 3D-printing process with exceptional accuracy. The scaffold structure was evaluated using microCT. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate scaffold morphology with and without mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adipose and bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated from rats and cultured on scaffolds. Cell proliferation and differentiation were assessed using alamarBlue and alkaline phosphatase assays, respectively. Cell morphology after one week of co-culturing cells with PEEK scaffolds was evaluated using SEM. SLS 3D printing fabricated scaffolds with a porosity of 36.38% ± 6.66 and density of 1.309 g/cm(2). Cell morphology resembled viable fibroblasts attaching to the surface and micropores of the scaffold. PEEK scaffolds maintained the viability of both ADSCs and BMSCs; however, ADSCs demonstrated higher osteodifferentiation than BMSCs (p PEEK scaffolds that maintain the viability of adipose and bone marrow-derived MSCs and induce the osteodifferentiation of the adipose-derived MSCs. The combination of 3D printed PEEK scaffolds with MSCs could overcome some of the limitations

  5. Comparison of allograft and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage subsidence rates in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yson, Sharon C; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Santos, Edward Rainier G

    2017-04-01

    Structural allografts and PEEK cages are commonly used interbody fusion devices in ACDF. The subsidence rates of these two spacers have not yet been directly compared. The primary aim of this study was to compare the subsidence rate of allograft and PEEK cage in ACDF. The secondary aim was to determine if the presence of subsidence affects the clinical outcome. We reviewed 67 cases (117 levels) of ACDF with either structural allograft or PEEK cages. There were 85 levels (48 cases) with PEEK and 32 levels (19 cases) with allograft spacers. Anterior and posterior disc heights at each operative level were measured at immediate and 6months post-op. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in anterior or posterior disc heights >2mm. NDI of the subsidence (SG) and non-subsidence group (NSG) were recorded. Chi-square test was used to analyze subsidence rates. T-test was used to analyze clinical outcomes (α=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between subsidence rates of the PEEK (29%; 25/85) and allograft group (28%; 9/32) (p=0.69). Overall mean subsidence was 2.3±1.7mm anteriorly and 2.6±1.2mm posteriorly. Mean NDI improvement was 11.7 (from 47.1 to 35.4; average follow-up: 12mos) for the SG and 14.0 (from 45.8 to 31.8; average follow-up: 13mos) for the NSG (p=0.74). Subsidence rate does not seem to be affected by the use of either PEEK or allograft as spacers in ACDF. Furthermore, subsidence alone does not seem to be predictive of clinical outcomes of ACDF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Rods in Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disease: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, D Ryan; Albert, Ladislau; Das, Kaushik

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective case series. The purpose of our study was to retrospectively review the results of posterior lumbar fusion using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods. Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the lumbar spine for degenerative disease. Rigid fixation with titanium rods leads to high fusion rates, but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Thus, some have advocated using semirigid rods made of PEEK. Although the biomechanical properties of PEEK rods have shown improved stress-shielding characteristics and anterior load-sharing properties, there are very few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine. We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 42 patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion from 2007 to 2009 for the treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease using PEEK rods. Reoperation rate was the primary outcome evaluated. Fusion rate was also evaluated. Eight of the 42 patients with PEEK rods required reoperation. Reasons for reoperation mainly included ASD (5/8) and nonunion with cage migration (3/8). Radiographically, documented fusion rate was 86%. Mean follow-up was 31.4 months. No statistical differences were found in fusion rates or reoperation between age above 55 years and younger than 55 years (P=1.00), male and female (P=0.110), single or multilevel fusion (P=0.67), and fusion with and without an interbody graft (P=0.69). Smokers showed a trend towards increased risk of reoperation for ASD or instrumentation failure (P=0.056). PEEK rods demonstrate a similar fusion and reoperation rate in comparison to other instrumentation modalities in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease.

  7. Are PEEK-on-Ceramic Bearings an Option for Total Disc Arthroplasty? An In Vitro Tribology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskey, Ryan; Ciccarelli, Lauren; Lui, Melissa K C; Kurtz, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Most contemporary total disc replacements (TDRs) use conventional orthopaedic bearing couples such as ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (polyethylene) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr). Cervical total disc replacements incorporating polyetheretherketone (PEEK) bearings (specifically PEEK-on-PEEK bearings) have been previously investigated, but little is known about PEEK-on-ceramic bearings for TDR. (1) What is the tribologic behavior of a PEEK-on-ceramic bearing for cervical TDR under idealized, clean wear test conditions? (2) How does the PEEK-on-ceramic design perform under impingement conditions? (3) How is the PEEK-on-ceramic bearing affected by abrasive wear? (4) Is the particle morphology from PEEK-on-ceramic bearings for TDRs affected by adverse wear scenarios? PEEK-on-ceramic cervical TDR bearings were subjected to a 10 million cycle ideal wear test based on ASTM F2423 and ISO 181912-1 using a six-station spine wear simulator (MTS, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) with 5 g/L bovine serum concentration at 23° ± 2° C (ambient temperature). Validated 1 million cycle impingement and 5 million cycle abrasive tests were conducted on the PEEK-on-ceramic bearings based, in part, on retrieval analysis of a comparable bearing design as well as finite element analyses. The ceramic-on-PEEK couple was characterized for damage modes, mass and volume loss, and penetration and the lubricant was subjected to particle analysis. The resulting mass wear rate, volumetric wear rate, based on material density, and particle analysis were compared with clinically available cervical disc bearing couples. The three modes of wear (idealized, impingement, and abrasive) resulted in mean mass wear rates of 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/MC, 1.9 ± 0.5 mg/MC, and 2.8 ± 0.6 mg/MC, respectively. The mass wear rates were converted to volumetric wear rates using density and found to be 0.7 ± 0.1 mm 3 /MC, 1.5 ± 0.4 mm 3 /MC, and 2.1 ± 0.5 mm 3 /MC, respectively. During each test, the PEEK

  8. Plasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lubliner, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The aim of Plasticity Theory is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary state of knowledge in basic plasticity theory and to its applications. It treats several areas not commonly found between the covers of a single book: the physics of plasticity, constitutive theory, dynamic plasticity, large-deformation plasticity, and numerical methods, in addition to a representative survey of problems treated by classical methods, such as elastic-plastic problems, plane plastic flow, and limit analysis; the problem discussed come from areas of interest to mechanical, structural, and

  9. Investigating the compatibility of PEEK polymer for the fabrication of sample cells for use in muon spin spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasena, L; McKenzie, I; Brodovitch, J-C; Mozafari, M; Percival, P W; Cottrell, S P

    2014-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a thermoplastic polymer with a wide range of applications due to its chemical inertness and thermal stability, and for these reasons sample cells for gas and liquid phase μSR have been constructed from PEEK. Muon levelcrossing resonance (μLCR) studies of PEEK revealed a broad, strong μLCR signal that, we hypothesize, is due to multiple overlapping resonances from the various muonium (Mu) adducts of PEEK. To investigate this, two monomer units from PEEK (4,4'-dihydroxybenzophenone and para-dimethoxybenzene) were studied in solution using transverse-field muon spin rotation (TF-μSR) and μLCR. Two different muoniated radicals were formed by Mu addition to 4,4 / - dihydroxybenzophenone and one radical was formed in para-dimethoxybenzene. The μSR spectra were assigned by comparing the experimentally measured muon and proton hyperfine coupling constants with values calculated for the possible structures using Gaussian-09 software with the B3LYP functional and 6-31G basis set. Good agreement was found for cyclohexadienyl- type radicals formed by Mu addition to the benzene rings of the monomer units. We can also infer that these radicals are being formed in PEEK, and based on this we conclude that sample cells made of PEEK are unsuitable for many types of μSR experiment

  10. Comparison of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage and cervical disc prostheses used in anterior cervical microscopic discectomy operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that in the cervical disc prosthesis group (Group A in the early and later postoperative period, intervertebral disk heights were preserved by a statistically significant amount compared to the PEEK cage group (Group B. However, this scenario did not create any significant difference in the clinical evaluation results. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(1.000: 1-8

  11. Fracture Assessment of PEEK under Static Loading by Means of the Local Strain Energy Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Peron

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK has gained interest in many industrial applications due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent heat tolerance and high corrosion resistance. Stress concentrators such as notches and geometrical discontinuities are present in many such components necessitating the reliable assessment of notch sensitivity of PEEK in monotonic tension. Here we evaluate the applicability of the strain energy density (SED approach for the assessment of the fracture strength of experimentally tested notched geometries subject to corrosion. The fracture behavior of neat, circumferentially razor-grooved dog-bone specimens and circumferentially U-notched specimens with different notch radii can be predicted with a discrepancy lower than ±10%. Reliable predictions are shown on two previously published datasets employing both computed and published mechanical properties as inputs for the SED calculations. This report presents the first successful application of SED for PEEK as well as the successful prediction of tensile behavior in corrosive environments. This opens the road towards future applications of PEEK in fields its compliant use is of growing popularity.

  12. A primary study into graphene/polyether ether ketone (PEEK) nanocomposite for laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binling; Berretta, Silvia; Evans, Ken; Smith, Kaylie; Ghita, Oana

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes two methods of preparation of graphene/PEEK powders for Laser Sintering (LS) and investigates their behaviour in relation to their microstructure and their properties. Thin composite films were fabricated in an attempt to replicate the thin layer formation of the powder bed process. Both methods of composite powder preparation (wet and dry) led to enhanced mechanical performance of the composite films at 0.1 and 0.5 wt% graphene nano-platelets (GNP) concentrations. The TEM images show that the GNP act as a nucleation point in crystallisation of PEEK, being at the centre of the spherulites. The hot stage microscopy reveals a 20 s delay in the onset of GNP/PEEK nanocomposite coalescence in comparison with plain PEEK. This is a very important observation for laser sintering, as it will influence the build strategy and specific parameters (e.g. time between layers deposition, multiple exposures). The excellent electrical conductivity properties of graphene were noticeable in the nanocomposite films at concentrations above 1 wt% GNP.

  13. Replication of Micro pillars by PEEK injection moulding with CrN coated Ni tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Sørensen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    A micro-structured nickel insert was investigatedfor polyether ether ketone (PEEK) injection moulding. Themicro-features were circular holes 4 μm in diameter and2 μm deep, with a 2-μm edge-to-edge distance. Six thousand moulding cycles were operated. Half of the insert was coatedby approximately...

  14. Injection molding of micro pillars on vertical side walls using polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Sørensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the replication of microstructures on a vertical wall by PEEK injection molding. A 4-cavity insert was used in the injection molding. Pre-fabricated nickel plates with ø 4 μm micro holes on the surface were glued on vertical walls in the cavities. 3 cavities were coated by...

  15. Enhancement of tribofilm formation from water lubricated PEEK composites by copper nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chuanping; Fan, Shuguang; Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Qihua

    2018-06-01

    A high-performance tribofilm is crucial to enhance the tribological performance of tribomaterials. In order to promote tribofilm formation under water lubrication conditions, copper nanowires as a functional nanomaterial were filled into neat polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and PEEK10SCF8Gr (i.e., PEEK filled with 10 vol.% short carbon fibers and 8 vol.% graphite flakes). The results show that the addition of copper nanowires and a greater applied load can enhance materials transfer and tribofilm formation during sliding process. Moreover, copper nanowires can share a part of applied load, and retard the fatigue effect to some extent. In addition, copper nanowires, carbon fibers and graphite can synergistically improve the tribological performance and the tribofilm formation under water lubrication and severe working conditions. In particular, only 0.5 vol.% copper nanowires can form a high-performance tribofilm, which endows superior lubricating property and wear resistance capacity of the PEEK10SCF8Gr. Furthermore, the surface analysis indicates that the tribofilm contains some transferred materials and the products from tribochemical reactions as well.

  16. Incorporating Si3 N4 into PEEK to Produce Antibacterial, Osteocondutive, and Radiolucent Spinal Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Marin, Elia; Adachi, Tetsuya; Lerussi, Federica; Rondinella, Alfredo; Boschetto, Francesco; Zhu, Wenliang; Kitajima, Takashi; Inada, Kosuke; McEntire, Bryan J; Bock, Ryan M; Bal, B Sonny; Mazda, Osam

    2018-04-24

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a popular polymeric biomaterial which is primarily used as an intervertebral spacer in spinal fusion surgery; but it is developed for trauma, prosthodontics, maxillofacial, and cranial implants. It has the purported advantages of an elastic modulus which is similar to native bone and it can be easily formed into custom 3D shapes. Nevertheless, PEEK's disadvantages include its poor antibacterial resistance, lack of bioactivity, and radiographic transparency. This study presents a simple approach to correcting these three shortcomings while preserving the base polymer's biocompatibility, chemical stability, and elastic modulus. The proposed strategy consists of preparing a PEEK composite by dispersing a minor fraction (i.e., 15 vol%) of a silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) powder within its matrix. In vitro tests of PEEK composites with three Si 3 N 4 variants-β-Si 3 N 4 , α-Si 3 N 4 , and β-SiYAlON-demonstrate significant improvements in the polymer's osteoconductive versus SaOS-2 cells and bacteriostatic properties versus gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria. These properties are clearly a consequence of adding the bioceramic dispersoids, according to chemistry similar to that previously demonstrated for bulk Si 3 N 4 ceramics in terms of osteogenic behavior (vs both osteosarcoma and mesenchymal progenitor cells) and antibacterial properties (vs both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria). © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Improved tribological performance of PEEK polymers by application of diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KTomaszewski, P.; Pei, Y. T.; Verkerke, G. J.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    Overall high mechanical strength, an elastic modulus comparable to bone and low cost make polyetheretherketone (PEEK) an interesting biomaterial. However, high friction coefficient (CoF) and wear restrict its orthopaedic use to non-articulating applications. A solution might be offered by

  18. Outcome in patient-specific PEEK cranioplasty: A two-center cohort study of 40 implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkergouw, J.; van de Vijfeijken, S. E. C. M.; Nout, E.; Theys, T.; van de Casteele, E.; Folkersma, H.; Depauw, P. R. A. M.; Becking, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    The best material choice for cranioplasty following craniectomy remains a subject to discussion. Complication rates after cranioplasty tend to be high. Computer-assisted 3-dimensional modelling of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was recently introduced for cranial reconstruction. The aim of this study

  19. Electron-beam irradiation effects on mechanical properties of PEEK/CF composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao

    1989-01-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced composite (PEEK/CF) using polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as a matrix material was prepared and electron-beam irradiation effects on the mechanical properties at low and high temperatures were studied. The flexural strength and modulus of the unirradiated PEEK/CF were almost the same as those of carbon fibre-reinforced composites with epoxide resin. The mechanical properties at room temperature were little affected by irradiation up to 180 MGy, but in the test at 77K the strength of the specimens irradiated over 100 MGy was slightly decreased. The mechanical properties of the unirradiated specimen decreased with increasing testing temperature, but the high-temperature properties were improved by irradiation, i.e. the strength measured at 413K for the specimen irradiated with 120 MGy almost reached the value for the unirradiated specimen measured at room temperature. It was apparent from the viscoelastic measurement that the improvement of mechanical properties at high temperature resulted from the high-temperature shift of the glass transition of the matrix PEEK caused by radiation-induced cross-linking. (author)

  20. Parent Early Evaluation of Kids: PEEK Outreach Training Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Jane; Twombly, Liz; Yockelson, Sue

    This report describes achievements and activities of the Parent Early Evaluation of Kids (PEEK) Outreach Project at the University of Oregon. This project focused on assisting state agencies, regional and tribal entities, and local health and education programs to develop comprehensive, low-cost systems for child-find and referral. Rural and inner…

  1. Bonding of the Polymer Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) to Human Dentin: Effect of Surface Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Regina Furbino Villefort; Anami, Lilian Costa; Campos, Tiago Moreira Bastos; Melo, Renata Marques de; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção E; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a material suitable for frameworks of fixed dental prostheses. The effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of PEEK bonded to human dentin was evaluated. One hundred PEEK cylinders (3 mm×3 mm) were divided into five groups according to surface treatment: silica coating, sandblasting with 45 μm Al2O3 particles, etching with 98% sulfuric acid for 5, 30 and for 60 s. These cylinders were luted with resin cement onto 50 human molars. First, each tooth was embedded in epoxy resin and the buccal dentin surface was exposed. Then, two delimited dentin areas (Æ:3 mm) per tooth were etched with 35% phosphoric acid and bonded with a two-step self-priming adhesive system. After the luting procedure the specimens were stored in water (24 h/37 °C). Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 0.5 mm/min; load cell 50 kgf) and failure types were assessed. Stress data (MPa) were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Comparison of the proportions of different failure types was performed using the Bonferroni method (pPEEK, resin cement and dentin.

  2. RESULTS OF THE USE OF PEEK CAGES IN THE TREATMENT OF BASILAR INVAGINATION BY GOEL TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Carelli Teixeira da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analysis of the use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages for atlantoaxial facet realignment and distraction for treatment of basilar invagination by Goel technique. Method: Retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of the neurological status, pain, presence of subsidence and bone fusion with the use of PEEK cages in 8 atlantoaxial joints of 4 patients with basilar invagination. All patients were treated with atlantoaxial facet distraction and realignment and subsequent arthrodesis C1-C2 by the technique of Goel modified by the use of PEEK cage. Results: All patients showed improvement in Nurick neurological assessment scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of pain. There were no cases of subsidence, migration, or damage to the vertebral artery during the insertion of the cage. All joints evolved with bone fusion, assessed by dynamic radiographs, and computed tomography. Two patients developed neuropathic pain in dermatome of C2 and one patient had unilateral vertebral artery injury during C2 instrumentation treated with insertion of pedicle screw to control the bleeding. Conclusion: The results of the treatment of basilar invagination by the Goel technique with the use of PEEK cages shown to be effective and safe although further studies are needed to confirm this use.

  3. In Vitro Comparison of Dynesys, PEEK, and Titanium Constructs in the Lumbar Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Matthew S.; Cook, Daniel J.; Cheng, Boyle C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pedicle based posterior dynamic stabilization systems aim to stabilize the pathologic spine while also allowing sufficient motion to mitigate adjacent level effects. Two flexible constructs that have been proposed to act in such a manner, the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and PEEK rod, have yet to be directly compared in vitro to a rigid Titanium rod. Methods. Human lumbar specimens were tested in flexion extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion to evaluate the following conditions at L4-L5: Intact, Dynesys, PEEK rod, Titanium rod, and Destabilized. Intervertebral range of motion, interpedicular travel, and interpedicular displacement metrics were evaluated from 3rd-cycle data using an optoelectric tracking system. Results. Statistically significant decreases in ROM compared to Intact and Destabilized conditions were detected for the instrumented conditions during flexion extension and lateral bending. AT ROM was significantly less than Destabilized but not the Intact condition. Similar trends were found for interpedicular displacement in all modes of loading; however, interpedicular travel trends were less consistent. More importantly, no metrics under any mode of loading revealed significant differences between Dynesys, PEEK, and Titanium. Conclusion. The results of this study support previous findings that Dynesys and PEEK constructs behave similarly to a Titanium rod in vitro. PMID:26366303

  4. Perturbation effects of the carbon fiber-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Raquel

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy, in conjunction with surgical implant fixation, is a common combined treatment in cases of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary nails and plates. The purpose of this work was to investigate the perturbation effects of the new CFR-PEEK screws on radiotherapy dose distributions and to evaluate these effects in comparison with traditional titanium screws. The investigation was performed by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a 6 MV photon beam. The project consisted of two main stages. First, a comparison of measured and MC calculated doses was performed to verify the validity of the MC simulation results for different materials. For this purpose, stainless steel, titanium, and CFR-PEEK plates of various thicknesses were used for attenuation and backscatter measurements in a solid water phantom. For the same setup, MC dose calculations were performed. Next, MC dose calculations for titanium, CFR-PEEK screws, and CFR-PEEK screws with ultrathin titanium coating were performed. For the plates, the results of our MC calculations for all materials were found to be in good agreement with the measurements. This indicates that the MC model can be used for calculation of dose perturbation effects caused by the screws. For the CFR-PEEK screws, the maximum dose perturbation was less than 5%, compared to more than 30% perturbation for the titanium screws. Ultrathin titanium coating had a negligible effect on the dose distribution. CFR-PEEK implants have good prospects for use in radiotherapy because of minimal dose alteration and the potential for more accurate treatment planning. This could favorably influence treatment efficiency and decrease possible over- and underdose of adjacent tissues. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantages

  5. Mechanical property characterization and impact resistance of selected graphite/PEEK composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To use graphite polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material on highly curved surfaces requires that the material be drapable and easily conformable to the surface. This paper presents the mechanical property characterization and impact resistance results for laminates made from two types of graphite/PEEK materials that will conform to a curved surface. These laminates were made from two different material forms. These forms are: (1) a fabric where each yarn is a co-mingled Celion G30-500 3K graphite fiber and PEEK thermoplastic fiber; and (2) an interleaved material of Celion G30-500 3K graphite fabric interleaved with PEEK thermoplastic film. The experimental results from the fabric laminates are compared with results for laminates made from AS4/PEEK unidirectional tape. The results indicate that the tension and compression moduli for quasi-isotropic and orthotropic laminates made from fabric materials are at least 79 percent of the modulus of equivalent laminates made from tape material. The strength of fabric material laminates is at least 80 percent of laminates made from tape material. The evaluation of fabric material for shear stiffness indicates that a tape material laminate could be replaced by a fabric material laminate and still maintain 89 percent of the shear stiffness of the tape material laminate. The notched quasi-isotropic compression panel failure strength is 42 to 46 percent of the unnotched quasi-isotropic laminate strength. Damage area after impact with 20 ft-lbs of impact energy is larger for the co-mingled panels than for the interleaved panels. The inerleaved panels have less damage than panels made from tape material. Residual compression strength of quasi-isotropic panels after impact of 20 ft-lbs of energy varies between 33 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the tape material and 38 percent of the undamaged quasi-isotropic material strength for the co-mingled fabric material.

  6. Properties and Corrosion Performance of Self-reinforced Composite PEEK for Proposed Use as a Modular Taper Gasket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Eric S; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2016-11-01

    Fretting corrosion in medical alloys is a persistent problem, and the need for biomaterials that can effectively suppress mechanically assisted crevice corrosion in modular taper junctions or otherwise insulate metal-on-metal interfaces in mechanically demanding environments is as yet unmet. The purpose of this study is to characterize a novel material, self-reinforced composite polyetheretherketone (SRC-PEEK) and to evaluate its ability to inhibit fretting corrosion in a pin-on-disk metal-on-metal interface test. SRC-PEEK was fabricated by hot compaction of in-house-made PEEK fibers by compacting uniaxial layups at 344°C under a load of 18,000 N for 10 minutes. SRC-PEEK, bulk isotropic PEEK, and the in-house-made PEEK fibers were analyzed for thermal transitions (T g , T m ) through differential scanning calorimetry, crystallinity, crystal size, crystalline orientation (Hermanns orientation parameter) through wide-angle x-ray scattering, and modulus, tensile strength, yield stress, and strain to failure through monotonic tensile testing. SRC-insulated pin-on-disk samples were compared with metal-on-metal control samples in pin-on-disk fretting corrosion experiments using fretting current and fretting mechanics measurements. Fifty-micron cyclic motion at 2.5 Hz was applied to the interface, first over a range of loads (0.5-35 N) while held at -0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl and then over a range of voltages (-0.5 to 0.5 V) at a constant contact stress of 73 ± 19 MPa for SRC-PEEK and 209 ± 41 MPa for metal-on-metal, which were different for each group as a result of changes in true contact area due to variations in modulus between sample groups. Pins, disks, and SRC samples were imaged for damage (on alloy and SRC surfaces) and evidence of corrosion (on alloy pin and disk surfaces). SRC specimens were analyzed for traces of alloy transferred to the surface using energy dispersive spectroscopy after pin-on-disk testing. SRC-PEEK showed improved mechanical properties to

  7. Crystalline morphology of the matrix of PEEK-carbon fiber aromatic polymer composites. I. Assessment of crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, D.J.; Chalmers, J.M.; Mackenzie, M.W.; Gaskin, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The crystallinity of the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix polymer in the Aromatic Polymer Composite APC-2 has been estimated using a combination of techniques based on wide angle x-ray diffraction and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Crystallinity varies systematically with cooling rate and annealing time over the range 20 to 40%. The occurrence of oriented crystal growth of the PEEK relative to the carbon fiber can be monitored by x-ray diffraction. 8 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  8. Nanostructured Polyelectrolytes Based on SPEEK/TiO2 for Direct Ethanol Fuel Cells (DEFCs)

    OpenAIRE

    Dutra Filho, José Carlos; Santos, Tamirys Rodrigues dos; Gomes, Aílton de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Proton-conducting hybrid membranes consisting of poly(ether ether ketone) sulfonated (SPEEK) and titanium oxide (TiO2) were prepared using the sol-gel technique for application in direct ethanol fuel cells. The effect from TiO2 incorporation on membrane properties such as ethanol uptake, pervaporation and proton conductivity was investigated. The uptake and permeated flux decreased with increasing content of TiO2. The ethanol permeability was about one order of magnitude smaller than Nafion® ...

  9. Enhancement of Hybrid SPEEK Based Polymer–Cyclodextrin-Silica Inorganic Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2017-06-01

      Keywords: Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, Poly(ether ether ketone, cyclodextrin-silica, sulfonation, ionic conductivity. Article History: Received January 18th 2017; Received in revised form April 21st 2017; Accepted June 22nd 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Kusworo, T.D., Hakim, M.F. and Hadiyanto, H. (2017 Enhancement of Hybrid SPEEK Based Polymer–Cyclodextrin-Silica Inorganic Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Application. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 6(2, 165-170. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.2.165-170

  10. Positron annihilation and thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiated polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Shinyama, Katsuyoshi; Baba, Makoto [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takenori

    1997-03-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were applied to electron beam irradiated poly(ether-ether-ketone). The lifetime, {tau}{sub 3}, of the ortho-positronium of unirradiated and 5 MGy irradiated specimen became rapidly longer above about 150degC. {tau}{sub 3} of 50 MGy and 100 MGy irradiated specimen was shorter than that of unirradiated one. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) decreased with increasing the dose before voltage application. In the case of voltage application, a TSC peak appeared and the peak value decreased with increased the dose. The correlation between the results of positron annihilation and TSC was investigated. (author)

  11. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) immobilized collagen-coated polyetheretherketone (PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Ye, Xin; Nie, He-Min; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Zeng, Teng-Hui; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates of biomaterials in spinal implant applications. However, as a bioinert material, PEEK plays a limited role in osteoconduction and osseointegration. In this study, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was immobilized onto the surface of collagen-coated PEEK in order to prepare a multi-functional material. After adsorbed onto the PEEK surface by hydrophobic interaction, collagen was cross-linked with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). EDC/NHS system also contributed to the immobilization of rhBMP-2. Water contact angle tests, XPS and SEM clearly demonstrated the surface changes. ELISA tests quantified the amount of rhBMP-2 immobilized and the release over a period of 30 d. In vitro evaluation proved that the osteogenesis differentiation rate was higher when cells were cultured on modified PEEK discs than on regular ones. In vivo tests were conducted and positive changes of major parameters were presented. This report demonstrates that the rhBMP-2 immobilized method for PEEK modification increase bioactivity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its practicability in orthopedic and spinal clinical applications.

  12. Out-of-autoclave manufacturing of a stiffened thermoplastic carbon fibre PEEK panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, M.; Goggins, J.; Doyle, A.; Weafer, B.; Ward, M.; Bizeul, M.; Canavan, R.; O'Bradaigh, C.; Doyle, K.; Harrison, N.

    2017-10-01

    Out-of-Autoclave manufacturing methods, specifically Automated Tape Placement (ATP) and induction welding, used in the fabrication of a stiffened thermoplastic demonstrator panel, are presented in this study. The demonstrator panel consists of two stiffeners induction welded to a flat skin, to form a typical load bearing aerospace sub-component. The skin of the panel is manufactured from uni-directional Carbon Fibre (CF) Polyetheretherkeytone (PEEK) using laser assisted Automated Tape Placement (ATP) and the stiffeners are press formed from woven CF-PEEK. The stiffeners are fusion bonded to the skin using a continuous induction welding process. A susceptor material is used at the interface to ensure the required heating is concentrated at the weldline. Microscopy was used to examine the manufactured coupons for defects. Destructive testing was carried out to evaluate the strength of the overall assembly. The work shows that assemblies manufactured using continuous induction welding and ATP are suitable for load bearing aerospace applications.

  13. Influence of PEEK Coating on Hip Implant Stress Shielding: A Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesica Anguiano-Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress shielding is a well-known failure factor in hip implants. This work proposes a design concept for hip implants, using a combination of metallic stem with a polymer coating (polyether ether ketone (PEEK. The proposed design concept is simulated using titanium alloy stems and PEEK coatings with thicknesses varying from 100 to 400 μm. The Finite Element analysis of the cancellous bone surrounding the implant shows promising results. The effective von Mises stress increases between 81 and 92% for the complete volume of cancellous bone. When focusing on the proximal zone of the implant, the increased stress transmission to the cancellous bone reaches between 47 and 60%. This increment in load transferred to the bone can influence mineral bone loss due to stress shielding, minimizing such effect, and thus prolonging implant lifespan.

  14. Tribological properties of polymers PI, PTFE and PEEK at cryogenic temperature in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihua; Zheng, Fei; Wang, Tingmei

    2016-04-01

    The effects of temperature, sliding speed and load on the tribological properties of polyimide (PI), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) at cryogenic temperature in vacuum were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer. At cryogenic temperature, polymers show higher hardness which results in decreasing contact area between the friction pairs. Moreover, the real surface area in contact between steel ball and polymer disk determines the friction coefficient instead of the formation and adhesion of the transfer film. Thus, the friction coefficients at cryogenic temperatures are lower than at room temperature. On the other hand, wear rates of the three polymers decrease as temperature decreases since molecular mobility and migration are limited at cryogenic temperatures. For the visco-elasticity of PI, PTFE and PEEK, the friction coefficients fall as the load increases.

  15. Effect of electron-irradiation on the free volume of PEEK studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Haraya, K.; Hattori, S.; Sasuga, T.

    1994-01-01

    A good linear correlation was found between the size of a cavity where ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilates by the pick-off mechanism and the total free volume of molecular liquids and polymers. Based on the correlation, the free volume of poly(aryl ether-ether ketone) (PEEK) was evaluated as a function of electron irradiation dose and the result was compared with that obtained from gas diffusivity measurements. It was found that the effect of irradiation on the free volume of PEEK was rather small; the free volume was decreased only by a few percent (relative value) when the samples were irradiated with a dose of 50 MGy in air. ((orig.))

  16. Melt state behaviour of PEEK and processing window interpretation for fast compression moulding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessard, Emeline; De Almeida, Olivier; Bernhart, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Fast mould heating is nowadays possible by using induction technology for example with the Cage System registered developed by RocTool. It allows heating and cooling kinetics of about 100 deg. C per minute and new perspectives are thus possible to optimize the compression moulding process of long fibre reinforced thermoplastic composites. Indeed, a high forming temperature may favour polymer creep and so on composite consolidation. Nevertheless, the processing time of PEEK composite above melt temperature must be reduced to a few minutes due to the fast thermal degradation of the matrix. On the other hand, high cooling rates may have negative effect on matrix crystallinity. The proposed procedure consist in performing a few minutes isotherm around 300 deg. C during the fast cooling. It would favour a high degree of crystallinity of PEEK without extending the cycle time.

  17. The Effect of the PEEK Cage on the Cervical Lordosis in Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Gulsen

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: We achieved better cervical lordotic angles at the postoperative period by implanting one-level, two-level, three-level or four-level PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix. Also, the causes of cervical root and or medulla spinalis impingement were different in group1 and 2. While extruded cervical disc impingement was the first pathology in group 1, osteophyte formation was the first pathology in group 2.

  18. Covalent attachment of polymeric monolith to polyether ether ketone (PEEK) tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chunguang; Heiter, Jaana; Haljasorg, Tõiv; Leito, Ivo

    2016-08-17

    A new method of reproducible preparation of vinylic polymeric monolithic columns with a key step of covalently anchoring the monolith to PEEK surface is described. In order to chemically attach the polymer monolith to the tube wall, methacrylate functional groups were introduced onto PEEK surface by a three-step procedure, including surface etching, surface reduction and surface methacryloylation. The chemical state of the modified tubing surface was characterized by attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. It was found that the etching step is the key to successfully modifying the PEEK tubing surface. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) monoliths were in situ synthesized by thermally initiated free radical copolymerization within the confines of surface-vinylized PEEK tubings of dimensions close to ones conventionally used in HPLC and UHPLC (1.6 mm internal diameter, 10.0-12.5 cm length). Adhesion test was done by measuring the operating pressure drop, which the prepared stationary phases can withstand. Good pressure resistance, up to 140 bar/10 cm (flow rate 0.5 mL min(-1), acetonitrile as a mobile phase), indicates strong bonding of monolith to the tubing wall. The monolithic material was proven to have a permeability of 1.7 × 10 (-14) m(2), applying acetonitrile-water 70:30 (v/v) as a mobile phase. The column performance was reproducible from column to column and was evaluated via the isocratic separation of a series of alkylbenzenes in the reversed-phase mode (acetonitrile-water 70:30, v/v). The numbers of plates per meter at optimal flow rate were found to be between 26 000 and 32 000 for the different analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers.

  20. Il trauma come “valore aggiunto”. L’opera letteraria di Gustaaf Peek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Beltrami Gottmer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gustaaf Peek is a Dutch writer and poet who translates art into words. His works are often harsh, difficult to understand for the reader and complicated. He hunts for unknown facts in history as well as in daily life, for instance, in his first novel Armin, with the monstrosity of the Lebensborn project in Nazi Germany, or in his second novel Dover where he discusses the reality of illegal immigration and warlords living in complete freedom in western towns. It is art for art’s sake. But the novels written by Peek also contain the red thread of traumatic experiences. All of his characters suffer from one or many traumas, and act consequently. To the author this was a kind of wake-up call, a new way to consider his work and a new way to engage in the literary world. The aim of this article is to try to explain where Peek wrote about trauma and how. His topics and writing methods have also been illustrated.

  1. Derivation of cesium-137 residual radioactive material guidelines for the Peek Street site, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for cesium-137 were derived for the Peek rk. The derivation was based on the requirement that the Street site in Schenectady, New York. The derivation was based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Peek Street site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site on the assumption that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site wig be utilized without radiological restrictions. The scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. Results indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for cesium-137 within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of cesium-137 at the Peek Street site does not exceed the following levels: 98 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario), 240 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario), and 34 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer ingesting food produced in the decontaminated area: a plausible scenario)

  2. Zirconia implants and peek restorations for the replacement of upper molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Parmigiani-Izquierdo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the disadvantages of the zirconia implants is the lack of elasticity, which is increased with the use of ceramic or zirconia crowns. The consequences that could result from this lack of elasticity have led to the search for new materials with improved mechanical properties. Case presentation A patient who is a 45-year-old woman, non-smoker and has no medical record of interest with a longitudinal fracture in the palatal root of molar tooth 1.7 and absence of tooth 1.6 was selected in order to receive a zirconia implant with a PEEK-based restoration and a composite coating. The following case report describes and analyses treatment with zirconia implants in molars following a flapless surgical technique. Zirconia implants are an alternative to titanium implants in patients with allergies or who are sensitive to metal alloys. However, one of the disadvantages that they have is their lack of elasticity, which increases with the use of ceramic or zirconia crowns. The consequences that can arise from this lack of elasticity have led to the search for new materials with better mechanical properties to cushion occlusal loads. PEEK-based restoration in implant prosthetics can compensate these occlusal forces, facilitating cushioning while chewing. Conclusion This procedure provides excellent elasticity and resembles natural tooth structure. This clinical case suggests that PEEK restorations can be used in zirconia implants in dentistry.

  3. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1 which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device.

  4. PEEK: An excellent precursor for activated carbon production for high temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cansado, I.P.P.; Goncalves, F.A.M.M.; Nabais, J.M.V.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L.; Carrott, P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of activated carbons (AC) with high apparent surface area and very high micropore volumes were prepared from granulated PEEK (poly[oxy-1,4-phenylene-oxy-1,4-phenylene-carbonyl-1,4-phenylene]) by physical activation with CO 2 at different temperatures and different activation times. The carbonisation yields at 873, 1073 and 1173 K were 57, 52 and 51%. As the activation temperature increased, between 873 and 1173 K, the burn-off, the micropore volume and mean pore size increased too. Those prepared at 1173 K, with 74% burn-off, present an extremely high apparent surface area (2874 m 2 g - 1 ) and a very high micropore volume (1.27 cm 3 g - 1 ). The presence of pyrone groups, identified by FTIR, on the AC surface corroborates the prevalence of a basic point of zero charge, always higher than 9.2. The thermal stability was checked by thermogravimetric analysis and as the carbonisation temperature increased the thermal stability of the char increased too. All AC obtained from PEEK by physical activation at 1173 K are thermally resistant, as at 1073 K the loss of the initial mass was less than 15%. The collective results confirm that PEEK is an excellent precursor for preparing AC with a high carbonisation yield, a high micropore volume and apparent surface area and a very high resistance at elevated temperature. (author)

  5. In vitro response of pre-osteoblastic cells to laser microgrooved PEEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, D; López-Álvarez, M; Rodríguez-Valencia, C; Serra, J; Chiussi, S; González, P

    2013-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is currently being used in implants as an alternative to titanium, due to its mechanical properties, cytocompatibility and inertness. Several studies have demonstrated that certain patterning on the implants promotes the oriented cell growth of osteoblasts, favouring the formation of bone tissue. This patterning improves the implant's osteointegration in the bone and its mechanical stability. Therefore, the objective of this work is to micro-structure PEEK by laser radiation and to carry out an exhaustive study of the orientation of pre-osteoblast cells that grow on this material. Parallel microgrooves were obtained using an ArF excimer laser coupled with a mask projection unit with distances of 25, 50, 75 and 100 µm between grooves. The cell growth on these PEEK surfaces was studied, in order to compare the effect of different distances between grooves on the biological response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells. Preferential cell orientation was observed for all studied distances, which was more pronounced in the 25 and 50 µm ones. (paper)

  6. Automated Fiber Placement of PEEK/IM7 Composites with Film Interleaf Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce; Banks, William I., III; Pipes, R. Byron; Tiwari, Surendra N.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Clinton, R. G., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of thin discrete layers of resin between plies (interleafing) has been shown to improve fatigue and impact properties of structural composite materials. Furthermore, interleafing could be used to increase the barrier properties of composites used as structural materials for cryogenic propellant storage. In this work, robotic heated-head tape placement of PEEK/IM7 composites containing a PEEK polymer film interleaf was investigated. These experiments were carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center automated fiber placement facility. Using the robotic equipment, an optimal fabrication process was developed for the composite without the interleaf. Preliminary interleaf processing trials indicated that a two-stage process was necessary; the film had to be tacked to the partially-placed laminate then fully melted in a separate operation. Screening experiments determined the relative influence of the various robotic process variables on the peel strength of the film-composite interface. Optimization studies were performed in which peel specimens were fabricated at various compaction loads and roller temperatures at each of three film melt processing rates. The resulting data were fitted with quadratic response surfaces. Additional specimens were fabricated at placement parameters predicted by the response surface models to yield high peel strength in an attempt to gage the accuracy of the predicted response and assess the repeatability of the process. The overall results indicate that quality PEEK/lM7 laminates having film interleaves can be successfully and repeatability fabricated by heated head automated fiber placement.

  7. Characterization of PEEK, PET and PI implanted with Mn ions and sub-sequently annealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Miksova, R.; Pupikova, H.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Slepicka, P.; Gombitová, A.; Kovacik, L.; Svorcik, V.; Matousek, J.

    2014-04-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils were implanted with 80 keV Mn+ ions at room temperature at fluencies of 1.0 × 1015-1.0 × 1016 cm-2. Mn depth profiles determined by RBS were compared to SRIM 2012 and TRIDYN simulations. The processes taking place in implanted polymers under the annealing procedure were followed. The measured projected ranges RP differ slightly from the SRIM and TRIDYN simulation and the depth profiles are significantly broader (up to 2.4 times) than those simulated by SRIM, while TRIDYN simulations were in a reasonable agreement up to the fluence 0.5 × 1016 in PEEK. Oxygen and hydrogen escape from the implanted layer was examined using RBS and ERDA techniques. PET, PEEK and PI polymers exhibit oxygen depletion up to about 40% of its content in virgin polymers. The compositional changes induced by implantation to particular ion fluence are similar for all polymers examined. After annealing no significant changes of Mn depth distribution was observed even the further oxygen and hydrogen desorption from modified layers appeared. The surface morphology of implanted polymers was characterized using AFM. The most significant change in the surface roughness was observed on PEEK. Implanted Mn atoms tend to dissipate in the polymer matrix, but the Mn nanoparticles are too small to be observed on TEM micrographs. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the implanted and sub-sequently annealed polymers were investigated by sheet resistance measurement and UV-Vis spectroscopy. With increasing ion fluence, the sheet resistance decreases and UV-Vis absorbance increases simultaneously with the decline of optical band gap Eg. The most pronounced change in the resistance was found on PEEK. XPS spectroscopy shows that Mn appears as a mixture of Mn oxides. Mn metal component is not present. All results were discussed in comparison with implantation experiment using the various ion species (Ni, Co

  8. Characterization of PEEK, PET and PI implanted with Mn ions and sub-sequently annealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackova, A.; Malinsky, P.; Miksova, R.; Pupikova, H.; Khaibullin, R.I.; Slepicka, P.; Gombitová, A.; Kovacik, L.; Svorcik, V.; Matousek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils were implanted with 80 keV Mn + ions at room temperature at fluencies of 1.0 × 10 15 –1.0 × 10 16 cm −2 . Mn depth profiles determined by RBS were compared to SRIM 2012 and TRIDYN simulations. The processes taking place in implanted polymers under the annealing procedure were followed. The measured projected ranges R P differ slightly from the SRIM and TRIDYN simulation and the depth profiles are significantly broader (up to 2.4 times) than those simulated by SRIM, while TRIDYN simulations were in a reasonable agreement up to the fluence 0.5 × 10 16 in PEEK. Oxygen and hydrogen escape from the implanted layer was examined using RBS and ERDA techniques. PET, PEEK and PI polymers exhibit oxygen depletion up to about 40% of its content in virgin polymers. The compositional changes induced by implantation to particular ion fluence are similar for all polymers examined. After annealing no significant changes of Mn depth distribution was observed even the further oxygen and hydrogen desorption from modified layers appeared. The surface morphology of implanted polymers was characterized using AFM. The most significant change in the surface roughness was observed on PEEK. Implanted Mn atoms tend to dissipate in the polymer matrix, but the Mn nanoparticles are too small to be observed on TEM micrographs. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the implanted and sub-sequently annealed polymers were investigated by sheet resistance measurement and UV–Vis spectroscopy. With increasing ion fluence, the sheet resistance decreases and UV–Vis absorbance increases simultaneously with the decline of optical band gap E g . The most pronounced change in the resistance was found on PEEK. XPS spectroscopy shows that Mn appears as a mixture of Mn oxides. Mn metal component is not present. All results were discussed in comparison with implantation experiment using the various ion

  9. Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in the surgical treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a prospective, randomized, control study with over 7-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Xinwei; Lu, Xuhua; Yang, Lili; Yang, Haisong; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Deyu

    2013-07-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium- or polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-cage reconstruction is widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study was to compare outcomes of titanium and PEEK cages in the treatment of multilevel CSM. Between November 2002 and December 2004, a total of 80 patients with 3-level CSM were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to titanium group and PEEK group. The overall follow-up period of the patients ranged from 86 to 116 months (average 99.7 months). Clinical and radiological results were compared between titanium group and PEEK group. At the final follow-up, the clinical outcomes including JOA score, NDI score, and the excellent and good rates of clinical outcomes in the PEEK group were better than those in the titanium group. More loss of the Cobb angles and the intervertebral height was observed in the titanium group, resulting in the radiological parameters in the titanium group becoming inferior to the PEEK group at the final follow-up. Cage subsidence rates were 34.5 and 5.4% in the titanium and PEEK groups, respectively. Fusion was observed in all patients of two groups at the final follow-up. Two patients presented with cage dislocation without clinical symptoms in the titanium group. In surgical treatment of multilevel CSM, PEEK cage is superior to titanium cage in maintenance of intervertebral height and cervical lordosis, resulting in better clinical outcomes in the long-term follow-up.

  10. Plastic dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Shiro; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1988-01-01

    The report outlines major features and applications of plastic dosimeters. Some plastic dosimeters, including the CTA and PVC types, detect the response of the plastic material itself to radiations while others, such as pigment-added plastic dosimeters, contain additives as radiation detecting material. Most of these dosimeters make use of color centers produced in the dosimeter by radiations. The PMMA dosimeter is widely used in the field of radiation sterilization of food, feed and medical apparatus. The blue cellophane dosimeter is easy to handle if calibrated appropriately. The rad-color dosimeter serves to determine whether products have been irradiated appropriately. The CTA dosimeter has better damp proofing properties than the blue cellophane type. The pigment-added plastic dosimeter consists of a resin such as nylon, CTA or PVC that contains a dye. Some other plastic dosimeters are also described briefly. Though having many advantages, these plastic dosimeter have disadvantages as well. Some of their major disadvantages, including fading as well as large dependence on dose, temperature, humidity and anviroment, are discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  11. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, ... We report on a pilot study on the use of a circumareolar excision and the use of .... and 1 gynecomastia patient) requested reduction in NAC size.

  12. Cross-sectional examination of the damage zone in impacted specimens of carbon/epoxy and carbon/PEEK composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Magold, N. J.

    1990-01-01

    Drop weight impact testing was utilized to inflict damage on eight-ply bidirectional and unidirectional samples of carbon/epoxy and carbon/PEEK (polyetheretherketone) test specimens with impact energies ranging from 0.80 J to 1.76 J. The impacting tip was of a smaller diameter (4.2-mm) than those used in most previous studies, and the specimens were placed with a diamond wheel wafering saw through the impacted area perpendicular to the outer fibers. Photographs at 12 x magnification were taken of these cross-sections and examined. The results on the bidirectional samples show little damage until 1.13 J, at which point delaminations were seen in the epoxy specimens. The PEEK specimens showed less delamination than the epoxy specimens for a given impact energy level. The unidirectional specimens displayed more damage than the bidirectional samples for a given impact energy, with the PEEK specimens showing much less damage than the epoxy material.

  13. Plastic Fishes

    CERN Multimedia

    Trettnak, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness. The slideshow below gives you a taste of the artworks by Wolfgang Trettnak and Margarita Cimadevila.

  14. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage filled with cancellous allograft in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2007-01-01

    From July 2004 to June 2005, 19 patients with 25 discs underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) in which polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages were filled with freeze-dried cancellous allograft bone. This kind of bone graft was made from femoral condyle that was harvested during total knee arthroplasty. Patient age at surgery was 52.9 (28–68) years. All patients were followed up at least 1 year. We measured the height of the disc and segmental sagittal angulation by pre-operative and post-operative radiographs. CT scan of the cervical spine at 1 year was used to evaluate fusion rates. Odom's criteria were used to assess the clinical outcome. All interbody disc spaces achieved successful union at 1-year follow-up. The use of a PEEK cage was found to increase the height of the disc immediately after surgery (5.0 mm pre-operatively, 7.3 mm immediately post-operatively). The final disc height was 6.2 mm, and the collapse of the disc height was 1.1 mm. The segmental lordosis also increased after surgery (2.0° pre-operatively, 6.6° immediately post-operatively), but the mean loss of lordosis correction was 3.3° at final follow-up. Seventy-four percent of patients (14/19) exhibited excellent/good clinical outcomes. Analysis of the results indicated the cancellous allograft bone-filled PEEK cage used in ACDF is a good choice for patients with cervical disc disease, and avoids the complications of harvesting iliac autograft. PMID:17639386

  15. Clinical experience using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) intervertebral structural cage for anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Manish K; O'Toole, John E

    2014-02-01

    Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) is commonly performed for various pathologies involving the cervical spine. Although polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), clinical literature demonstrating its efficacy following ACCF is sparse. A retrospective review of patients enrolled in a prospective database who underwent single/multi-level ACCF was performed. Fifty-nine patients were identified who underwent corpectomy reconstruction with PEEK cages for symptomatic degenerative, neoplastic, infectious, or traumatic pathologies of the cervical spine. Thirty-five patients having at least 6 months follow-up (FU) were included in the final analysis. The mean age of patients was 51 years (range, 18-81 years) with FU ranging from 6 to 33 months (mean, 6.6 months). None of the patients had dysphagia at last FU. There was no implant failure with fusion occurring in all patients. While 57% of patients (20/35) remained stable with no progression of myelopathy, 43% (15/35) improved one (11 patients) or two (four patients) Nurick grades after surgery. The use of PEEK cages packed with autograft or allograft is safe and effective following anterior cervical corpectomy, demonstrating high fusion rates and good clinical results. This synthetic material obviates the morbidity associated with autograft harvest and possible infectious risks of allograft. The wide array of cage dimensions facilitates ease of use in patients of all sizes and appears safe for use in the typical pathologic conditions encountered in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GREEN PLASTIC: A NEW PLASTIC FOR PACKAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Pankaj Kumar*, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief idea about a new type of plastic called as bio-plastic or green plastic. Plastic is used as a packaging material for various products, but this plastic is made up of non renewable raw materials. There are various disadvantages of using conventional plastic like littering, CO2 production, non-degradable in nature etc. To overcome these problems a new type of plastic is discovered called bio-plastic or green plastic. Bio-plastic is made from renewable resources and also...

  17. SILICOMB PEEK Kirigami cellular structures: mechanical response and energy dissipation through zero and negative stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virk, K; Marsh, M; Monti, A; Trehard, T; Hazra, K; Boba, K; Remillat, C D L; Scarpa, F; Farrow, I R

    2013-01-01

    The work describes the manufacturing, testing and parametric analysis of cellular structures exhibiting zero Poisson’s ratio-type behaviour, together with zero and negative stiffness effects. The cellular structures are produced in flat panels and curved configurations, using a combination of rapid prototyping techniques and Kirigami (Origami and cutting) procedures for PEEK (Polyether Ether Ketone) thermoplastic composites. The curved cellular configurations show remarkable large deformation behaviours, with zero and negative stiffness regimes depending also on the strain rate applied. These unusual stiffness characteristics lead to a large increase of energy absorption during cyclic tests. (paper)

  18. Bonding of composite resins to PEEK: the influence of adhesive systems and air-abrasion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Taufall, Simon; Roos, Malgorzata; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lümkemann, Nina

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the tensile bond strength (TBS) to polyaryletheretherketone (PEEK) after different pretreatment and conditioning methods. Four hundred PEEK specimens were fabricated and allocated to the following air-abrasion methods (n 1  = 80/pretreatment): (i) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (ii) 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); (iii) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.05 MPa); (iv) 110 μm Al 2 O 3 (0.35 MPa); and (v) Rocatec 110 μm (0.28 MPa). These pretreatments were combined with the following conditioning methods (n 2  = 20/pretreatment/conditioning): (a) visio.link (VL); (b) Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH); (c) Scotchbond Universal (SU); and (d) dialog bonding fluid (DB). After veneering of all specimens with dialog occlusal and aging (28 days H 2 O, 37 °C + 20,000 thermal cycles, 5/55 °C), TBS was measured. Data was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Breslow-Gehan test and Cox-regressions. The major impact on TBS showed the conditioning, followed by the air-abrasion-pressure, while the grain size of the air-abrasion powder did not show any effect. Specimens air-abraded at 0.35 MPa showed the highest survival rates. However, within VL groups, this observation was not statistically significant. Within MH groups, pretreatment using 110 μm Al 2 O 3 and 0.05 MPa resulted in higher survival rates compared to groups treated with 50 and 110 μm Al 2 O 3 using a pressure of 0.35 MPa. The use of VL showed the highest survival rates between the adhesive systems and the TBS values higher than 25 MPa independent of the pretreatment method. As an exception, only VL showed significantly higher survival rates when compared to MH. The adequate choice of the adhesive system and higher pressures improved the TBS between PEEK and veneering resin composite. The particle size had no major impact. According to this study, best veneering of PEEK with dialog occlusal can be achieved by conditioning with visio.link in combination with

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The GALFA-HI survey data release 2 (Peek+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, J. E. G.; Babler, B. L.; Zheng, Y.; Clark, S. E.; Douglas, K. A.; Korpela, E. J.; Putman, M. E.; Stanimirovic, S.; Gibson, S. J.; Heiles, C.

    2018-03-01

    The GALFA-HI survey is conducted with the William E. Gordon Arecibo Observatory 305m telescope, located south of Arecibo Puerto Rico. This survey owes its name to the instrument with which it was conducted, the ALFA, a 7-beam array of heterodyne detectors, sensitive from 1225 to 1525MHz. The observational strategy of DR2 is one of the significant differences from DR1 (Peek+ 2011ApJS..194...20P); see section 2.2. Region North-1 was included in DR1, but otherwise all of the Arecibo HI data presented in this work are new. (3 data files).

  20. Accelerated simulations of aromatic polymers: application to polyether ether ketone (PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Richard J.; Spencer, James S.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Sutton, Adrian P.

    2014-10-01

    For aromatic polymers, the out-of-plane oscillations of aromatic groups limit the maximum accessible time step in a molecular dynamics simulation. We present a systematic approach to removing such high-frequency oscillations from planar groups along aromatic polymer backbones, while preserving the dynamical properties of the system. We consider, as an example, the industrially important polymer, polyether ether ketone (PEEK), and show that this coarse graining technique maintains excellent agreement with the fully flexible all-atom and all-atom rigid bond models whilst allowing the time step to increase fivefold to 5 fs.

  1. MoS2-Filled PEEK Composite as a Self-Lubricating Material for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Geraldine; Gradt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    At BAM, several projects were conducted in the past years dealing with the tribological properties of friction couples at cryogenic temperature and in vacuum environment. Promising candidates for vacuum application are MoS2-filled PEEK/PTFE composites, which showed a friction coefficient as low as 0.03 in high vacuum. To complete the tribological profile of these composites, further tests were performed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. In this paper, friction and stick slip behavior, as well as outgassing characteristics during the test are presented.

  2. Mode II interlaminar fracture of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L. A.; Gillespie, J. W.; Trethewey, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The end notched flexure (ENF) specimen is employed in an investigation of the interlaminar fracture toughness in Mode II (skew symmetric shear) loading of unidirectional graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Important experimental parameters such as the influence of precracking and the data reduction scheme for the Mode II toughness are discussed. Nonlinear load-deflection response is significant for the tough thermoplastic resin composite but is also present for the brittle thermoset composite. The observed nonlinearities, which are highly rate dependent, are attributed to a combination of slow stable crack growth preceding unstable crack growth and material inelastic behavior in the process zone around the crack tip.

  3. Response of notched AS4/PEEK laminates to tension/compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Robert A.; Stinchcomb, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    Fatigue life, damage-initiation and propagation, and residual strength data are presently examined to ascertain the response of notched AS4/PEEK specimens to fully reversed tension/compression loading. Stiffness measurements made during the low-level fatigue history show that compression stiffness and tension stiffness degrade throughout the fatigue life. Damage to specimens fatigued at higher cyclic stresses developed primarily in the direction perpendicular to the loading. As in the case of specimens fatigued at lower stress levels, residual compressive stress decreased with damage development.

  4. Temperature rise due to mechanical energy dissipation in undirectional thermoplastic composites(AS4/PEEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgious, I. T.; Sun, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    The history of temperature rise due to internal dissipation of mechanical energy in insulated off-axis uniaxial specimens of the unidirectional thermoplastic composite (AS4/PEEK) has been measured. The experiment reveals that the rate of temperature rise is a polynomial function of stress amplitude: It consists of a quadratic term and a sixth power term. This fact implies that the specific heat of the composite depends on the stretching its microstructure undergoes during deformation. The Einstein theory for specific heat is used to explain the dependence of the specific heat on the stretching of the microstructure.

  5. Characterization of elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, K. J.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The elastic-viscoplastic properties of an AS4/PEEK (APC-2) thermoplastic composite were characterized at 24 C (75 F) and 121 C (250 F) by using a one-parameter viscoplasticity model. To determine the strain-rate effects, uniaxial tension tests were performed on unidirectional off-axis coupon specimens with different monotonic strain rates. A modified Bodner and Partom's model was also used to describe the viscoplasticity of the thermoplastic composite. The experimental results showed that viscoplastic behavior can be characterized quite well using the one-parameter overstress viscoplasticity model.

  6. Dissipation of mechanical work and temperature rise in AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, I.; Sun, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The dissipated mechanical work per cycle of sinusoidal stress in the thermoplastic composite material AS4/PEEK was measured as a function of stress amplitude for fixed frequency and fiber orientation. The experimental result shows that the dissipated work per cycle is proportional to the square of the stress amplitude. Using the concept of the equivalent isotropic material, it is shown that the relaxation modulus satisfies a proportionality condition. Also, the rate of temperature rise due to sinusoidal stresses has been measured as a function of stress amplitude. The result shows that the rate of temperature rise is not proportional to the square of the stress amplitude.

  7. Cross-linked PEEK-WC proton exchange membrane for fuel cell

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lou, H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available was added to the 15 wt% of SsPEEK-WC solution in NMP with magnetic stir. The solution was cast on a glass Petri dish. The solvent was then removed in a vacuum oven at 130 °C. The membrane was peeled off from the Petri dish. Thereafter, the membrane... and polyetherketone for fuel cell applications. Journal of Membrane Science, 2001. 185(1): p. 41-58. [6] Kerres, J.A., Development of ionomer membranes for fuel cells. Journal of Membrane Science, 2001. 185(1): p. 3-27. [7] Basile, A.; Paturzo, L.; Iulianelli, A...

  8. Plastic condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Only simple equipment, simple technology and low initial capital investment are needed in their manufacture. The condoms can be made by people who were previously unskilled or only semi-skilled workers. Plastic condoms differ from those made of latex rubber in that the nature of the plastic film allows unlimited shelf-life. Also, the plastic has a higher degree of lubricity than latex rubber; if there is a demand for extra lubrication in a particular market, this can be provided. Because the plastic is inert, these condoms need not be packaged in hermetically sealed containers. All these attributes make it possible to put these condoms on the distributors' shelves in developing countries competitively with rubber condoms. The shape of the plastic condom is based on that of the lamb caecum, which has long been used as luxury-type condom. The plastic condom is made from plastic film (ethylene ethyl acrilate) of 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) thickness. In addition, a rubber ring is provided and sealed into the base of the condom for retention during coitus. The advantage of the plastic condom design and the equipment on which it is made is that production can be carried out either in labour-intensive economy or with varying degrees of mechanization and automation. The uniform, finished condom if made using previously untrained workers. Training of workers can be done in a matter of hours on the two machines which are needed to produce and test the condoms. The plastic film is provided on a double wound roll, and condom blanks are prepared by means of a heat-sealing die on the stamping machine. The rubber rings are united to the condom blanks on an assembly machine, which consists of a mandrel and heat-sealing equipment to seal the rubber ring to the base of the condom. Built into the assembly machine is a simple air-testing apparatus that can detect the smallest pinhole flaw in a condom. The manufacturing process is completed by unravelling the condom from the assembly

  9. [Clinical application of stand-alone MC+PEEK cage in the anterior cervical fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Cao, Yan-Qing; Pan, Hong; Zhu, Cheng-Run; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Tao, Yue-Feng; Liu, Zhen

    2015-04-01

    To explore the effect of clinical application of stand-alone MC+PEEK cage in anterior cervical fusion. From January 2011 to January 2014,50 patients were treated with the MC+PEEK cage filled with autogenous cancellous illic-bone graft after anterior cervical discectomy. There were 22 patients with cervical spondylosis,26 patients with traumatic cervical disc herniation, 2 patients with cervical instability in these patients. There were 32 males and 18 females, aged from 30 to 79 years old with an average of 53.30 years old. There were 32 patients with single segment, 15 patients with double segments and 3 patients with three segments. Cervical AP and lateral and the flexion-extension X-rays were regularly taken in order to assess the cervical physiological curvature, the graft fusion and internal fixation related complications. Nerve function, clinical effect and bone fusion were respectively evaluated according to Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA), Otani grade and Suk method. All patients were followed up from 6 to 36 months with an average of 20 months. No correlated surgical complications were found and all patients obtained bony fusion with an average time of 4.30 months. JOA score had significantly improvement after surgery (P cervical fusion can obtain satisfactory clinical effect with less operation injury and reduce the complications. It is a better fusion method in anterior cervical fusion.

  10. Radiological survey results for the Peek Street site properties, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The Peek Street Industrial Facility, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1955. A variety of operations using radioactive materials were conducted at the site, but the main activities were to design an intermediate breeder reactor and to develop a chemical process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent reactor fuel. Nonradioactive beryllium metal was machined on the site for breeder reactor application. The 4.5-acre site was decommissioned and released in October 1955. A radiological survey was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in November 1989. The survey included scan and grid point measurements of direct radiation levels outdoors on the five properties and inside the factory building, and radionuclide analysis of samples collected from each property. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples from each property and in dust, debris, and structural materials from inside the factory building. Auger holes were logged to assess location and extent of possible subsurface residual soil radioactivity. Radionuclide concentrations were deter-mined in both indoor and outdoor water samples and in selected samples of vegetation. The presence of fixed and transferable surface residual radioactivity was investigated inside the factory building and on discarded materials outdoors on the property. High-volume air samples as well as additional selected indoor and outdoor soil samples were analyzed to determine levels of elemental beryllium

  11. Magical Engineering Plastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-15

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  12. Magical Engineering Plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ung

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces engineering plastic about advantage of engineering plastic, plastic material from processing method, plastic shock, plastic until now, background of making of engineering plastic, wonderful engineering plastic science such as a high molecule and molecule, classification of high molecule, difference between metal and high molecule, heat and high molecule materials, and property of surface, engineering plastic of dream like from linseed oil to aramid, small dictionary of engineering plastic.

  13. Polyetheretherketon (PEEK) - II. část: Poznatky o využití v klinické praxi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, D.; Fulín, P.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Jahoda, D.; Landor, I.; Sosna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 6 (2010), s. 470-478 ISSN 0001-5415 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyetheretherketone * PEEK * joint replacement Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.628, year: 2009 http://www.achot.cz/detail.php?stat=411

  14. Polyetheretherketon (PEEK) - I. část: Perspektivní materiál pro ortopedickou a traumatologickou praxi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Zdeněk; Pokorný, D.; Fulín, P.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Jahoda, D.; Sosna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 6 (2010), s. 463-469 ISSN 0001-5415 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : PAEK * PEEK * polyetheretherketone Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.628, year: 2009 http://www.achot.cz/detail.php?stat=412

  15. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shoufeng; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. We considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  16. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  17. Pervasive plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Human manipulation of hydrocarbons — as fuel and raw materials for modern society — has changed our world and the indelible imprint we will leave in the rock record. Plastics alone have permeated our lives and every corner of our planet.

  18. Plastic fish

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In terms of weight, the plastic pollution in the world’s oceans is estimated to be around 300,000 tonnes. This plastic comes from both land-based and ocean-based sources. A lecture at CERN by chemist Wolfgang Trettnak addressed this issue and highlighted the role of art in raising people’s awareness.   Artwork by Wolfgang Trettnak. Packaging materials, consumer goods (shoes, kids’ toys, etc.), leftovers from fishing and aquaculture activities… our oceans and beaches are full of plastic litter. Most of the debris from beaches is plastic bottles. “PET bottles have high durability and stability,” explains Wolfgang Trettnak, a chemist by education and artist from Austria, who gave a lecture on this topic organised by the Staff Association at CERN on 26 May. “PET degrades very slowly and the estimated lifetime of a bottle is 450 years.” In addition to the beach litter accumulated from human use, rivers bring several ki...

  19. Plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.

    1937-01-01

    § 1. Plastic deformation of solid matter under high confining pressures has been insufficiently studied. Jeffreys 1) devotes a few paragraphs to deformation of solid matter as a preface to his chapter on the isostasy problem. He distinguishes two properties of solid matter with regard to its

  20. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-11-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA ™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA ™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components articulating against all-polyethylene tibial components was carried out under two kinematic conditions: 3 million cycles under intermediate kinematics (maximum anterior-posterior displacement of 5 mm) followed by 3 million cycles under high kinematic conditions (anterior-posterior displacement 10 mm). The wear of the GUR1020 ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was assessed by gravimetric analysis; for both material combinations under each kinematic condition, the mean wear rates were low, that is, below 5 mm 3 /million cycles. Specifically, under intermediate kinematic conditions, the wear rate of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was 0.96 ± 2.26 mm 3 /million cycles and 2.44 ± 0.78 mm 3 /million cycle against cobalt chrome and PEEK-OPTIMA ™ implants, respectively (p = 0.06); under high kinematic conditions, the wear rates were 2.23 ± 1.85 mm 3 /million cycles and 4.44 ± 2.35 mm 3 /million cycles, respectively (p = 0.03). Following wear simulation, scratches were apparent on the surface of the PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components. The surface topography of the femoral components was assessed using contacting profilometry and showed a statistically significant increase in measured surface roughness of the PEEK-OPTIMA ™ femoral components compared to the cobalt chrome implants. However, this did not appear to influence the wear rate, which remained linear over the duration of

  1. PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of total knee replacement: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Raelene M; Briscoe, Adam; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    PEEK-OPTIMA™ (Invibio Ltd, UK) has been considered as an alternative joint arthroplasty bearing material due to its favourable mechanical properties and the biocompatibility of its wear debris. In this study, the potential to use injection moulded PEEK-OPTIMA™ as an alternative to cobalt chrome in the femoral component of a total knee replacement was investigated in terms of its wear performance. Experimental wear simulation of three cobalt chrome and three PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components articulating against all-polyethylene tibial components was carried out under two kinematic conditions: 3 million cycles under intermediate kinematics (maximum anterior-posterior displacement of 5 mm) followed by 3 million cycles under high kinematic conditions (anterior-posterior displacement 10 mm). The wear of the GUR1020 ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was assessed by gravimetric analysis; for both material combinations under each kinematic condition, the mean wear rates were low, that is, below 5 mm3/million cycles. Specifically, under intermediate kinematic conditions, the wear rate of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene tibial components was 0.96 ± 2.26 mm3/million cycles and 2.44 ± 0.78 mm3/million cycle against cobalt chrome and PEEK-OPTIMA™ implants, respectively (p = 0.06); under high kinematic conditions, the wear rates were 2.23 ± 1.85 mm3/million cycles and 4.44 ± 2.35 mm3/million cycles, respectively (p = 0.03). Following wear simulation, scratches were apparent on the surface of the PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components. The surface topography of the femoral components was assessed using contacting profilometry and showed a statistically significant increase in measured surface roughness of the PEEK-OPTIMA™ femoral components compared to the cobalt chrome implants. However, this did not appear to influence the wear rate, which remained linear over the duration of the study. These

  2. Clinical and biomechanical researches of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid lumbar fusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Jian-Yong; Yan, Kai-Zhong; Shen, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Zhen-Rong

    2018-04-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion using rigid rods is a common surgical technique. However, adjacent segment disease and other adverse effects can occur. Dynamic stabilization devices preserve physiologic motion and reduce painful stress but have a high rate of construct failure and reoperation. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid fusions have a similar stiffness and adequate stabilization power compared with titanium rods, but with improved load sharing and reduced mechanical failure. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the clinical and biomechanical performance of PEEK rods. A systematic review of clinical and biomechanical studies was conducted. A literature search using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases identified studies that met the eligibility criteria. Eight clinical studies and 15 biomechanical studies were included in this systematic review. The visual analog scale and the Oswestry disability index improved significantly in most studies, with satisfactory fusion rates. The occurrence of adjacent segment disease was low. In biomechanical studies, PEEK rods demonstrated a superior load-sharing distribution, a larger adjacent segment range of motion, and reduced stress at the rod-screw/screw-bone interfaces compared with titanium rods. The PEEK rod construct was simple to assemble and had a reliable in vivo performance compared with dynamic devices. The quality of clinical studies was low with confounding results, although results from mechanical studies were encouraging. There is no evidence strong enough to confirm better outcomes with PEEK rods than titanium rods. More studies with better protocols, a larger sample size, and a longer follow-up time are needed.

  3. Effects of Material Combinations on Friction and Wear of PEEK/Steel Pairs under Oil-Lubricated Sliding Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagaki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kawabata, M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of material combinations on the friction and wear of PEEK/steel pairs are studied using blocks on a ring wear tester under oil-lubricated conditions. The rings are made of forged steel (SF540A) and a PEEK composite filled with 30 wt% carbon fibre. The surface roughness is 0.15 and 0.32 μm Ra, respectively. The blocks are also made of the same materials as the rings: the forged steel and the PEEK composite. Finished with an emery paper of #600, the surface roughness is 0.06 and 0.23 μm Ra, respectively. Sliding tests for 4 combinations of two materials are conducted. The load is increased up to 1177 N at 1 N s-1. The sliding velocity is varied in the range of 10 to 19 m s-1. In some cases, the ring temperature is measured with a thermocouple with a diameter of 0.5 mm, located 1 mm below the frictional surface. Results indicate that the forged steel’s ring and the PEEK composite’s block is the best combination among 4 combinations, because seizure does not occur under the increasing load up to 1177 N at the sliding velocity of 10-19 m s-1. In contrast, seizure occurs at 15 and 19 m s-1 in the other three combinations. However, the PEEK composite’s ring shows a lower friction coefficient as compared to the forged steel’s ring, when seizure does not occur. Wear scars are observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seizure mechanisms are then discussed.

  4. plastic waste recycling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ahmed

    incinerators is increasing around the world. Discarded plastic products ... Agency (EPA) estimated that the amount of plastics throw away is. 50 % greater in the ... The waste plastics were identified using the Society of the Plastic. Industry (SPI) ...

  5. Fracture Strength and Failure Mode of Maxillary Implant-Supported Provisional Single Crowns : A Comparison of Composite Resin Crowns Fabricated Directly Over PEEK Abutments and Solid Titanium Abutments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santing, H.J.; Meijer, Henny J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Ozcan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. Purpose: The objectives of this

  6. Evaluation of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) titanium composite interbody spacer in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model: biomechanical, microcomputed tomographic, and histologic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilvray, Kirk C; Waldorff, Erik I; Easley, Jeremiah; Seim, Howard B; Zhang, Nianli; Linovitz, Raymond J; Ryaby, James T; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-12-01

    The most commonly used materials used for interbody cages are titanium metal and polymer polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Both of these materials have demonstrated good biocompatibility. A major disadvantage associated with solid titanium cages is their radiopacity, limiting the postoperative monitoring of spinal fusion via standard imaging modalities. However, PEEK is radiolucent, allowing for a temporal assessment of the fusion mass by clinicians. On the other hand, PEEK is hydrophobic, which can limit bony ingrowth. Although both PEEK and titanium have demonstrated clinical success in obtaining a solid spinal fusion, innovations are being developed to improve fusion rates and to create stronger constructs using hybrid additive manufacturing approaches by incorporating both materials into a single interbody device. The purpose of this study was to examine the interbody fusion characteristic of a PEEK Titanium Composite (PTC) cage for use in lumbar fusion. Thirty-four mature female sheep underwent two-level (L 2 -L 3 and L 4 -L 5 ) interbody fusion using either a PEEK or a PTC cage (one of each per animal). Animals were sacrificed at 0, 8, 12, and 18 weeks post surgery. Post sacrifice, each surgically treated functional spinal unit underwent non-destructive kinematic testing, microcomputed tomography scanning, and histomorphometric analyses. Relative to the standard PEEK cages, the PTC constructs demonstrated significant reductions in ranges of motion and a significant increase in stiffness. These biomechanical findings were reinforced by the presence of significantly more bone at the fusion site as well as ingrowth into the porous end plates. Overall, the results indicate that PTC interbody devices could potentially lead to a more robust intervertebral fusion relative to a standard PEEK device in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Master plot analysis of microcracking in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Bark, Jong Song

    1993-01-01

    We used a variational stress analysis and an energy release rate failure criterion to construct a master plot analysis of matrix microcracking. In the master plot, the results for all laminates of a single material are predicted to fall on a single line whose slope gives the microcracking toughness of the material. Experimental results from 18 different layups of AS4/3501-6 laminates show that the master plot analysis can explain all observations. In particular, it can explain the differences between microcracking of central 90 deg plies and of free-surface 90 deg plies. Experimental results from two different AS4/PEEK laminates tested at different temperatures can be explained by a modified master plot that accounts for changes in the residual thermal stresses. Finally, we constructed similar master plot analyses for previous literature microcracking models. All microcracking theories that ignore the thickness dependence of the stresses gave poor results.

  8. Fatigue data for polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under fully-reversed cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rakish; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    In this article, the data obtained from the uniaxial fully-reversed fatigue experiments conducted on polyether ether ketone (PEEK), a semi-crystalline thermoplastic, are presented. The tests were performed in either strain-controlled or load-controlled mode under various levels of loading. The data are categorized into four subsets according to the type of tests, including (1) strain-controlled fatigue tests with adjusted frequency to obtain the nominal temperature rise of the specimen surface, (2) strain-controlled fatigue tests with various frequencies, (3) load-controlled fatigue tests without step loadings, and (4) load-controlled fatigue tests with step loadings. Accompanied data for each test include the fatigue life, the maximum (peak) and minimum (valley) stress-strain responses for each cycle, and the hysteresis stress-strain responses for each collected cycle in a logarithmic increment. A brief description of the experimental method is also given.

  9. Effect of MWNTs and SiC-Coated MWNTs on Properties of PEEK/LCP Blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chandra Nayak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were modified with polycarbosilane-derived silicon carbide (SiC to improve its dispersion in the polymer matrix. PEEK/LCP/MWNTs nanocomposites were prepared by melt blending. TEM images show the improved dispersion of SiC-coated MWNTs against agglomerated structure of pure MWNTs in the blend. FESEM images shows better fibrillation of LCP in presence of SiC-coated MWNTs. TGA reveals that nanocomposites with SiC-coated MWNTs shows higher thermal stability than MWNTs filled blend system. Based on enhanced dispersion, storage modulus, tensile modulus and tensile strength were increased drastically with the incorporation of SiC-coated MWNTs. Glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites shows significant improvement with the incorporation of MWNTs.

  10. PEEK Cages versus PMMA Spacers in Anterior Cervical Discectomy: Comparison of Fusion, Subsidence, Sagittal Alignment, and Clinical Outcome with a Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Marie T.; Sircar, Ronen; Kogias, Evangelos; Scholz, Christoph; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare radiographic and clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease using PEEK cages or PMMA spacers with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Methods. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 107 patients in one or two levels using empty PEEK cages (51 levels), Sulcem PMMA spacers (49 levels) or Palacos PMMA spacers (41 levels) between January, 2005 and February, 2009. Bony fusion, subsidence, and sagittal alignment were retrospectively assessed in CT scans and radiographs at follow-up. Clinical outcome was measured using the VAS, NDI, and SF-36. Results. Bony fusion was assessed in 65% (PEEK cage), 57% (Sulcem), and 46% (Palacos) after a mean follow-up of 2.5 years. Mean subsidence was 2.3–2.6 mm without significant differences between the groups. The most pronounced loss of lordosis was found in PEEK cages (−4.1°). VAS was 3.1 (PEEK cage), 3.6 (Sulcem), and 2.7 (Palacos) without significant differences. Functional outcome in the PEEK cage and Palacos group was superior to the Sulcem group. Conclusions. The substitute groups showed differing fusion rates. Clinical outcome, however, appears to be generally not correlated with fusion status or subsidence. We could not specify a superior disc substitute for anterior cervical discectomy. This trial is registered with DRKS00003591. PMID:25110734

  11. PEEK versus titanium locking plates for proximal humerus fracture fixation: a comparative biomechanical study in two- and three-part fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Seifert, Robert; Theisen, Christina; Gehweiler, Dominic; Wähnert, Dirk; Schulze, Martin; Raschke, Michael J; Weimann, Andre

    2017-01-01

    The high rigidity of metal implants may be a cause of failure after fixation of proximal humerus fractures. Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) plates with a modulus similar to human cortical bone may help to overcome this problem. The present study assesses the biomechanical behavior of a PEEK plate compared with a titanium locking plate. Unstable two- and three-part fractures were simulated in 12 pairs of cadaveric humeri and were fixed with either a PEEK or a titanium locking plate using a pairwise comparison. With an optical motion capture system, the stiffness, failure load, plate bending, and the relative motion at the bone-implant interface and at the fracture site were evaluated. The mean load to failure for two- and three-part fracture fixations was, respectively, 191 N (range 102-356 N) and 142 N (range 102-169 N) in the PEEK plate group compared with 286 N (range 191-395 N) and 258 N (range 155-366 N) in the titanium locking plate group. The PEEK plate showed significantly more bending in both the two- and three-part fractures (p PEEK plate showed lower fixation strength and increased motion at the bone-implant interface compared with a titanium locking plate.

  12. Bioactive glass-chitosan composite coatings on PEEK: Effects of surface wettability and roughness on the interfacial fracture resistance and in vitro cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Guo, Fangwei; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Ping

    2018-05-01

    To improve the osteointegration of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) spinal fusions, the 45S5 bioactive glass® (BG)-chitosan (CH) composite was used to coat the PEEK by a dip-coating method at room temperature. A robust bonding between the BG-CH composite coating and the PEEK was achieved by a combined surface treatment of sand blasting and acid etching. The effects of surface wettability and surface roughness on the adhesion of the BG-CH composite coating were characterized by fracture resistance (Gc), respectively, measured by four-point bending tests. Compared with the surface polar energy (wettability), the surface roughness (>3 μm) played a more important role for the increase in Gc values by means of crack shielding effect under the mixed mode stress. The maximum adhesion strength (σ) of the coatings on the modified PEEK measured by the tensile pull-off test was about 5.73 MPa. The in vitro biocompatibilities of PEEK, including cell adhesion, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bioactivity in the stimulated body fluid (SBF), were enhanced by the presence of BG-CH composite coatings, which also suggested that this composite coating method could provide an effective solution for the weak PEEK-bone integration.

  13. Fracture strength and failure mode of maxillary implant-supported provisional single crowns: a comparison of composite resin crowns fabricated directly over PEEK abutments and solid titanium abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santing, Hendrik Jacob; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) temporary abutments have been recently introduced for making implant-supported provisional single crowns. Little information is available in the dental literature on the durability of provisional implant-supported restorations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the fracture strength of implant-supported composite resin crowns on PEEK and solid titanium temporary abutments, and to analyze the failure types. Three types of provisional abutments, RN synOcta Temporary Meso Abutment (PEEK; Straumann), RN synOcta Titanium Post for Temporary Restorations (Straumann), and Temporary Abutment Engaging NobRplRP (Nobel Biocare) were used, and provisional screw-retained crowns using composite resin (Solidex) were fabricated for four different locations in the maxilla. The specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until fracture occurred. The failure types were analyzed and further categorized as irreparable (Type 1) or reparable (Type 2). No significant difference was found between different abutment types. Only for the position of the maxillary central incisor, composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments showed significantly lower (p Provisional crowns on PEEK abutments showed similar fracture strength as titanium temporary abutments except for central incisors. Maxillary right central incisor composite resin crowns on PEEK temporary abutments fractured below the mean anterior masticatory loading forces reported to be approximately 206 N. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. As(III) oxidation by MnO{sub 2} coated PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuoli, Alessandra, E-mail: a.criscuoli@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Majumdar, Swachchha [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Figoli, Alberto, E-mail: a.figoli@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Sahoo, Ganesh C. [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Bafaro, Patrizia [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 42/A, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Bandyopadhyay, Sibdas [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Drioli, Enrico [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 42/A, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful preparation of PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules coated by MnO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preliminary tests of As(III) oxidation carried out in batch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complete oxidation obtained for feed concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 ppm. - Abstract: PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules were prepared by the phase inversion technique and used as support for the coating of a manganese dioxide layer. The coating was done by a chemical treatment of the capsules followed by a thermal one. The presence of the MnO{sub 2} layer was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), back scattering electron (BSE), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The produced capsules were, then, tested for As(III) oxidation in batch. The experiments consisted in treating 165 ml of As(III) solution with 1 g of coated capsules at fixed temperature (15 Degree-Sign C) and pH (5.7-5.8). In particular, the efficiency of the system was investigated for different As(III) concentrations (0.1, 0.3, 0.7 and 1 ppm). For feeds at lower As(III) content (0.1-0.3 ppm), tests lasted for 8 h, while prolonged runs (up to 48 h) were carried out on more concentrated solutions (0.7 and 1 ppm). The produced capsules were able to oxidize As(III) into As(V) leading to complete conversion after 3 and 4 h for feed concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 ppm, respectively.

  15. Acceptability, Usability, and Views on Deployment of Peek, a Mobile Phone mHealth Intervention for Eye Care in Kenya: Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Vaishali; Karanja, Sarah; Lees, Shelley; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2016-05-09

    The Portable Eye Examination Kit (Peek) is a mobile phone-based ophthalmic testing system that has been developed to perform comprehensive eye examinations. Shortages in ophthalmic personnel, the high cost, and the difficulty in transporting equipment have made it challenging to offer services, particularly in rural areas. Peek offers a solution for overcoming barriers of limited access to traditional ophthalmic testing methods and has been pilot tested on adults in Nakuru, Kenya, and compared with traditional eye examination tools. This qualitative study evaluated the acceptability and usability of Peek in addition to perceptions regarding its adoption and nationwide deployment. Semistructured interviews were conducted with patients and analyzed using a framework approach. This included analysis of interviews from 20 patients, 8 health care providers (HCPs), and 4 key decision makers in ophthalmic health care provision in Kenya. The participants were purposefully sampled. The coding structure involved predefined themes for assessing the following: (1) the context, that is, environment, user, task, and technology; (2) patient acceptability, that is, patients' perceived benefits, patient preference, and patient satisfaction; (3) usability, that is, efficiency, effectiveness, learnability, and flexibility and operability of Peek; and (4) the benefits of Peek in strengthening eye care provision, that is, capabilities enhancer, opportunity creator, social enabler, and knowledge generator. Emerging themes relating to the objectives were explored from the data using thematic analysis. Patients found Peek to be acceptable because of its benefits in overcoming the barriers to accessing ophthalmic services. Most thought it to be fast, convenient, and able to reach a large population. All patients expressed being satisfied with Peek. The HCPs perceived it to satisfy the criteria for usability and found Peek to be acceptable based on the technology acceptance model. Peek was

  16. Suitability of Secondary PEEK Telescopic Crowns on Zirconia Primary Crowns: The Influence of Fabrication Method and Taper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Susanne; Wagner, Christina; Stock, Veronika; Eichberger, Marlis; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-11-08

    This study investigates the retention load (RL) between ZrO₂ primary crowns and secondary polyetheretherketone (PEEK) crowns made by different fabrication methods with three different tapers. Standardized primary ZrO₂ crowns were fabricated with three different tapers: 0°, 1°, and 2° ( n = 10/group). Ten secondary crowns were fabricated (i) milled from breCam BioHPP blanks (PM); (ii) pressed from industrially fabricated PEEK pellets (PP) (BioHPP Pellet); or (iii) pressed from granular PEEK (PG) (BioHPP Granulat). One calibrated operator adjusted all crowns. In total, the RL of 90 secondary crowns were measured in pull-off tests at 50 mm/min, and each specimen was tested 20 times. Two- and one-way ANOVAs followed by a Scheffé's post-hoc test were used for data analysis ( p impact on the results. Within the 2° taper, the fabrication method had no influence on the RL. Within the PM group, the 2° taper showed significantly higher retention load compared with the 1° taper. The taper with 0° was in the same range value as the 1° and 2° tapers. No impact of the taper on the retention value was observed between the PP groups. Within the PG groups, the 0° taper presented significantly lower RL than the 1° taper, whereas the 2° taper showed no differences. The fabrication method of the secondary PEEK crowns and taper angles showed no consistent effect within all tested groups.

  17. Suitability of Secondary PEEK Telescopic Crowns on Zirconia Primary Crowns: The Influence of Fabrication Method and Taper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Merk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the retention load (RL between ZrO2 primary crowns and secondary polyetheretherketone (PEEK crowns made by different fabrication methods with three different tapers. Standardized primary ZrO2 crowns were fabricated with three different tapers: 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/group. Ten secondary crowns were fabricated (i milled from breCam BioHPP blanks (PM; (ii pressed from industrially fabricated PEEK pellets (PP (BioHPP Pellet; or (iii pressed from granular PEEK (PG (BioHPP Granulat. One calibrated operator adjusted all crowns. In total, the RL of 90 secondary crowns were measured in pull-off tests at 50 mm/min, and each specimen was tested 20 times. Two- and one-way ANOVAs followed by a Scheffé’s post-hoc test were used for data analysis (p < 0.05. Within crowns with a 0° taper, the PP group showed significantly higher retention load values compared with the other groups. Among the 1° taper, the PM group presented significantly lower retention loads than the PP group. However, the pressing type had no impact on the results. Within the 2° taper, the fabrication method had no influence on the RL. Within the PM group, the 2° taper showed significantly higher retention load compared with the 1° taper. The taper with 0° was in the same range value as the 1° and 2° tapers. No impact of the taper on the retention value was observed between the PP groups. Within the PG groups, the 0° taper presented significantly lower RL than the 1° taper, whereas the 2° taper showed no differences. The fabrication method of the secondary PEEK crowns and taper angles showed no consistent effect within all tested groups.

  18. Safety and efficacy of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation in pyogenic spinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Janssen, Insa; da Cunha, Pedro Ribeiro; Rainer, Jessica; Stoffel, Michael; Lehmberg, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    To date, there is growing consensus that PEEK material may be used for interbody fusion in spinal infections. Data supporting that claim are however restricted to a few very small clinical series. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of surgical treatment of pyogenic spinal infections with PEEK cages in combination with posterior pedicel screw fixation. Between 2006 and 2013, a total of 211 patients suffering from spondylodiscitis underwent surgical debridement and instrumentation. There were 52 cases where PEEK cages were used. Laboratory and physical examinations were assessed at a 3-month follow-up. Last follow-up was performed with at a minimum of 12 months after surgery via a telephone interview. Mean age at presentation was 67 years, with 19 (37 %) male patients and 33 (63 %) female. Distribution of the infection was lumbar in 29 (56 %%), thoracic in 3 (6 %) and cervical in 11 (21 %) cases. Nine patients (17 %) had concomitant non-contiguous spondylodiscitis. Epidural abscess was found in 17 patients (33 %); 48 (92 %%) had pain; neurological deficits were found in 20 patients (38 %). All patients in this series underwent surgical debridement with instrumentation of the spine. Postoperative intravenous antibiotics were administered for 15.4 ± 6.8 days followed by 2.9 ± 0.5 months of oral antibiotics. Complete resolution of the infection was achieved in all cases. Of the 28 patients with neurological deficits, 6 had full recovery and 10 had improved incompletely after surgery. One patient suffered from a pulmonary embolism postoperatively. There were no mortalities. Use of PEEK cages for interbody fusion is feasible and safe in patients suffering from a pyogenic spinal infection.

  19. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  20. Plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeshchev, E.A.; Kilin, S.F.; Kavyrzina, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    A plastic scintillator for ionizing radiation detectors with high time resolution is suggested. To decrease the scintillation pulse width and to maintain a high light yield, the 4 1 , 4 5 -dibromo-2 1 , 2 5 , 5 1 , 5 5 -tetramethyl-n-quinquiphenyl (Br 2 Me 4 Ph) in combination with n-terphenyl (Ph 3 ) or 2, 5-diphenyloxadiazol-1, 3, 4 (PPD) is used as a luminescent addition. Taking into consideration the results of a special study, it is shown, that the following ratio of ingradients is the optimum one: 3-4 mass% Ph 3 or 4-7 mas% PPD + 2-5 mass% Br 2 Me 4 Ph + + polymeric base. The suggested scintillator on the basis of polystyrene has the light yield of 0.23-0.26 arbitrary units and the scintillation pulse duration at half-height is 0.74-0.84 ns

  1. Results of the radiological and beryllium verification survey at the Peek Street Site, Schenectady, New York (SY001V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.; Carrier, R.F.; Allred, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent verification radiological and non-radioactive beryllium survey at the Peek Street site, located at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York. The purpose of the survey, conducted during 1993 and continuing through January 1994, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any beryllium concentrations or radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at one meter indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the structure, and the collection of soil, dust and debris samples and smears for radionuclide and beryllium analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological and beryllium measurements on the property were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on all data collected, the industrial property at 425 Peek Street and the adjacent state-owned bike path in Schenectady, New York, conforms to all applicable radiological and non-radioactive beryllium guidelines established for this site by DOE and approved by the State of New York

  2. Nucleation and growth of apatite on NaOH-treated PEEK, HDPE and UHMWPE for artificial cornea materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, M; Stingelin, N; Tanner, K E

    2008-11-01

    The skirt of an artificial cornea must integrate the implant to the host sclera, a major failure of present devices. Thus, it is highly desirable to encourage the metabolic activity of the cornea by using more bioactive, flexible skirt materials. Here we describe attempts to increase the bioactivity of polyether ether ketone (PEEK), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) films. The effectiveness of different strength NaOH pre-treatments to initiate apatite deposition on PEEK, HDPE and UHMWPE is investigated. We find that exposure of PEEK, HDPE and UHMWPE films to NaOH solutions induces the formation of potential nuclei for apatite (calcium phosphate), from which the growth of an apatite coating is stimulated when subsequently immersing the polymer films in 1.5 strength Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). As immersion time in SBF increases, further nucleation and growth produces a thicker and more compact apatite coating that can be expected to be highly bioactive. Interestingly, the apatite growth is found to also be dependent on both the concentration of NaOH solution and the structure of the polymer surface.

  3. Molecular motions of non-crystalline poly(aryl ether-ether-ketone) PEEK and influence of electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, T.; Hagiwara, M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical relaxation of non-crystalline poly(aryl ether-ether-ketone) PEEK and the one irradiated with electron beam were studied. The three distinct γ, β, α' relaxation maxima were observed in unirradiated PEEK from low to high temperature. It was revealed from the study on the irradiation effects that three different molecular processes are overlapped in γ relaxation peak, i.e., molecular motion of water bound to main chain, local motion of main chain, and local mode of the aligned and/or oriented moiety. The β relaxation connected with the glass transition occurred at 150 deg C and it shifted to higher temperature by irradiation. The α' relaxation which can be attributed to rearrangement of molecular chain due to crystallization was observed in unirradiated PEEK approx. 180 deg C and its magnitude decreased with the increase in irradiation dose. This effect indicates the formation of structures inhibiting crystallization such as crosslinking and/or short branching during irradiation. A new relaxation, β', appeared in the temperature range of 40 deg to 100 deg C by irradiation and its magnitude increased with dose. This relaxation was attributed to rearrangement of molecular chain from loosened packing around chain ends, which were introduced into the non-crystalline region by chain scission under irradiation, to more rigid molecular packing. (author)

  4. Effects of electron beam irradiation on mechanical properties at low and high temperature of fiber reinforced composites using PEEK as matrix material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Seguchi, Tadao; Sakai, Hideo; Odajima, Toshikazu; Nakakura, Toshiyuki; Masutani, Masahiro.

    1987-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite (PEEK-CF) using polyarylether-ether-ketone (PEEK) as a matrix material was prepared and the electron beam radiation effects on the mechanical properties at low and high temperature and the effects of annealing after irradiation were studied. Cooling down to 77 K, the flexural strength of PEEK-CF increased to about 20 % than that at room temperature. The data of flexural strength for the irradiated specimens showed some scattering, but the strength and modulus at 77 K were changed scarcely up to 120 MGy. The flexural strength and modulus in the unirradiated specimen decreased with increasing of measurement temperature, and the strength at 140 deg C, which is the just below temperature of the glass transition of PEEK, was to 70 % of the value at room temperature. For the irradiated specimens, the strength and modulus increased with dose and the values at 140 deg C for the specimen irradiated with 120 MGy were nearly the same with the unirradiated specimen measured at room temperature. The improvement of mechanical properties at high temperature by irradiation was supported by a viscoelastic measurement in which the glass transition shifted to the higher temperature by the radiation-induced crosslinking. A glass fiber reinforced PEEK composite (PEEK-GF) was prepared and its irradiation effects by electron beam was studied. Unirradiated PEEK-GF showed the same performance with that for GFRP of epoxide resin as matrix material, but by irradiation the flexual strength and modulus decreased with dose. It was revealed that this composite was destroyed by delamination because inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) decreased with dose and analysis of the profile of S-S curve showed typical delamination. Fractoglaphy by electron microscopy supported the delamination which is caused by the lowering of adhesion on interface between the fiber and matrix with increase of dose. (author)

  5. Toxicological Threats of Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastics pose both physical (e.g., entanglement, gastrointestinal blockage, reef destruction) and chemical threats (e.g., bioaccumulation of the chemical ingredients of plastic or toxic chemicals sorbed to plastics) to wildlife and the marine ecosystem.

  6. Usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with plate augmentation for anterior arthrodesis in traumatic cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Jin; Choi, Byung-Wan; Kim, Gyu-Hyung; Song, Ji-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Even though many clinical reports about cages have been documented in patients with degenerative disorders, reports were scarce for traumatic injury cases, and those cases using metal cages were restricted to only one-level injury. To evaluate the usefulness of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and plate construction in anterior interbody fusions (AIF) for traumatic cervical spine injuries by analyzing radiographic changes and clinical outcomes. Retrospective study. Fifty-eight patients (91 levels) underwent cage and plate construction for treatment of traumatic cervical spine injury. The fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes were assessed as a radiographic outcome. Clinical analysis includes the recovery rate on the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale and the presence of the complications. We evaluated 58 patients (91 levels) who underwent surgery and had at least 24 months in follow-up study. Radiographic evaluation included the assessment of interbody fusion rate, fusion time, changes of Cobb angle, subsidence rate, and adjacent level changes. Clinical assessment was done by analyzing recovery state of ASIA impairment scale from preoperative period to the last follow-up and by evaluating complications. Fifty-four cases showed bony fusion within 3 months after the surgery. The mean Cobb angle between the vertebral bodies was 2.54 degrees before operation, 9.13 degrees after operation, and 8.39 degrees at the latest follow-up. The mean intervertebral disc height was increased by 3.01 mm after the operation, but the mean height was 2.17 mm shorter at the last follow-up than after postoperation. In terms of clinical results, five Grade A cases and one Grade B case as assessed by the ASIA impairment scale were unchanged until the last follow-up. Twenty-three cases of Grade C, 16 cases of Grade D, and 13 cases of Grade E improved to seven cases, 26 cases, and 19 cases, respectively. Three

  7. Wear studies on ZrO2-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO 2 composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO 2 composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5 wt.% ZrO 2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Graphical abstract: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a type of biomaterial which might be used in surface modification. In this study, the wettabilities, composition, hardness, friction and wear characteristics of PEEK/ZrO 2 coatings were investigated, compared with bare Ti6Al4V sample. After comprehensive evaluation, 5 wt.% ZrO 2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Highlights: • PEEK coating were filled by ZrO 2 nanoparticles with different weight percentage. • The lubrication regime of all the tested samples are boundary lubrication. • Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear were the dominant wear

  8. Wear studies on ZrO{sub 2}-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Yuhong, E-mail: liuyuhong@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Tyagi, Rajnesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU) Varanasi, Varanasi 221005 (India); Liu, Weiqiang, E-mail: weiqliu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5 wt.% ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Graphical abstract: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a type of biomaterial which might be used in surface modification. In this study, the wettabilities, composition, hardness, friction and wear characteristics of PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} coatings were investigated, compared with bare Ti6Al4V sample. After comprehensive evaluation, 5 wt.% ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Highlights: • PEEK coating were filled by ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles with different weight percentage. • The lubrication regime of all the tested samples are boundary lubrication. • Adhesive wear and mild abrasive

  9. Supplementary radiological and beryllium characterization of the facility at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Allred, J.F.; Carrier, R.F.

    1994-10-01

    At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a radiological survey of the Peek Street industrial facility, the adjacent state-owned bike path, and two nearby residential properties was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in November 1989. The results indicated small isolated areas that exceeded DOE guidelines. These areas totaled approximately 0.2 m 2 of floor area and approximately 3 m 2 of wall area inside the building, and two small areas totaling approximately 5 m 2 outside the building. A small section of one of these areas extended beyond the fence on the east side of the industrial property onto the state-owned property. No residual radioactive material or elevated radiation levels were detected on any portion of the paved section of the bike path or the residential properties adjacent to the site. Because the elevated radiation levels were localized and limited in extent, any credible use scenario, including current use conditions, indicated that no significant radiation exposures would accrue to individuals frequenting the area. Samples were also analyzed for elemental beryllium since that material had formerly been used at the site. In conjunction with the planned remediation at the facility, a supplementary characterization survey was performed to further define the areas containing beryllium in excess of the identified guidelines. Additional radiological characterization of Ra-226, Th-232, and U-238 was also performed in areas that were largely inaccessible prior to the remediation efforts

  10. Characterization of Mode I and Mode II delamination growth and thresholds in AS4/PEEK composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen Bostaph

    1990-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  11. Characterization of Mode 1 and Mode 2 delamination growth and thresholds in graphite/peek composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen B.

    1988-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  12. Reflectance measurements of PTFE, Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light for the LZ detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Haefner, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Morton, D.; Neff, A.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; LZ Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LZ (LUX-Zeplin) is an international collaboration that will look for dark matter candidates, WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), through direct detection by dual-phase time projection chamber (TPC) using liquid xenon. The LZ detector will be located nearly a mile underground at SURF, South Dakota, shielded from cosmic background radiation. Seven tons active mass of liquid xenon will be used for detecting the weak interaction of WIMPs with ordinary matter. Over three years of operation it is expected to reach the ultimate sensitivity of 2x10-48 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 50 GeV. As for many other rare event searches, high light collection efficiency is essential for LZ detector. Moreover, in order to achieve greater active volume for detection as well as reduce potential backgrounds, thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance are desired. Reflectance measurements of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light (178 nm), conducted at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Xenon Detector (MiX) will be presented. The University of Michigan, LZ Collaboration, The US Department of Energy.

  13. Recycling of Plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Plastic is produced from fossil oil. Plastic is used for many different products. Some plastic products like, for example, wrapping foil, bags and disposable containers for food and beverage have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of most waste. Other plastic products like...

  14. Investigation of subsurface fatigue crack in PEEK shaft under one-point rolling contact by using 2.5D layer observation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOIKE Hitonobu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface fatigue cracks under rolling contact area of the PEEK shaft against an alumina bearing’s ball were investigated for application of frictional part in mechanical element in special situations such as chemical environments. In order to explore the flaking process of the PEEK shaft, the rolling contact fatigue tests were carried out by using a one-point radial loading rolling contact machine. The flaking occurred on the rolling track of the PEEK shaft at approximate 4⨉105 fatigue cycles. The subsurface fatigue crack propagation was investigated by using 2.5-Dimension layer observation method. The flaking was caused by the propagations of surface cracks and subsurface shear cracks, and the flaking shape was half-ellipse. Moreover, beach marks as fatigue crack propagation in the flaking were observed.

  15. Enhancement of mechanical and tribotechnical properties of polymer composites with thermoplastic UHMWPE and PEEK matrices by loading carbon nanofibers/nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Anh, Nguyen Duc; Alexenko, V. O.; Ivanova, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    For comparative evaluation of the influence of carbon nanofiber/nanotube loading in two different thermoplastic matrices (UHMWPE and PEEK), some mechanical and tribotechnical properties of the nanocomposites have been studied. It is shown that mechanical properties of nanocomposites change in various manners with increasing loading of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes. Herewith, the wear resistance of the "UHMWPE+1 wt% CNF and PEEK + 1 wt% CNF" composites under dry sliding friction is doubled. It is shown that, regardless of various effects on permolecular structure formation, the studied nanofillers enhance the wear resistance of the composites in a similar manner. A comparative analysis of the influence of nanofillers on the modification of mechanical and tribotechnical properties of UHMWPE- and PEEK-based matrices is made.

  16. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  17. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of Polyetheretherketone (PEEK as a Core Material and a Comparison with Gold Standard Core Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Stawarczyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the colorimetric properties of different veneering materials on core materials. Standardized specimens (10 mm × 10 mm × 1.5 mm reflecting four core (polyetheretherketone (PEEK, zirconia (ZrO2, cobalt–chromium–molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo, and titanium oxide (TiO2; thickness: 1.5 mm and veneering materials (VITA Mark II, IPS e.max CAD, LAVA Ultimate and VITA Enamic, all in shade A3; thickness: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2 mm, respectively were fabricated. Specimens were superimposed to assemblies, and the color was determined with a spectrophotometer (CieLab-System or a chair-side color measurement device (VITA EasyShade, respectively. Data were analyzed using three-, two-, and one-way ANOVA, a Chi2-test, and a Wilson approach (p < 0.05. The measurements with EasyShade showed A2 for VITA Mark II, A3.5 for VITA Enamic, B2 for LAVA Ultimate, and B3 for IPS e.max CAD. LabE-values showed significant differences between the tested veneering materials (p < 0.001. CieLab-System and VITA EasyShade parameters of the different assemblies showed a significant impact of core (p < 0.001, veneering material (p < 0.001, and thickness of the veneering material (p < 0.001. PEEK as core material showed comparable outcomes as compared to ZrO2 and CoCrMo, with respect to CieLab-System parameters for each veneering material. The relative frequency of the measured VITA EasyShade parameters regarding PEEK cores also showed comparable results as compared to the gold standard CoCrMo, regardless of the veneering material used.

  18. Effectiveness of a novel mobile health education intervention (Peek) on spectacle wear among children in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morjaria, Priya; Bastawrous, Andrew; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata Satyanarayana; Evans, Jennifer; Gilbert, Clare

    2017-04-08

    Uncorrected refractive errors are the commonest cause of visual loss in children despite spectacle correction being highly cost-effective. Many affected children do not benefit from correction as a high proportion do not wear their spectacles. Reasons for non-wear include parental attitudes, overprescribing and children being teased/bullied. Most school programmes do not provide health education for affected children, their peers, teachers or parents. The Portable Eye Examination Kit (Peek) will be used in this study. Peek has applications for measuring visual acuity with software for data entry and sending automated messages to inform providers and parents. Peek also has an application which simulates the visual blur of uncorrected refractive error (SightSim). The hypothesis is that higher proportion of children with uncorrected refractive errors in schools allocated to the Peek educational package will wear their spectacles 3-4 months after they are dispensed, and a higher proportion of children identified with other eye conditions will access services, compared with schools receiving standard school screening. Cluster randomized, double-masked trial of children with and without uncorrected refractive errors or other eye conditions. Government schools in Hyderabad, India will be allocated to intervention (Peek) or comparator (standard programme) arms before vision screening. In the intervention arm Peek will be used for vision screening, SightSim images will be used in classroom teaching and will be taken home by children, and voice messages will be sent to parents of children requiring spectacles or referral. In both arms the same criteria for recruitment, prescribing and dispensing spectacles will be used. After 3-4 months children dispensed spectacles will be followed up to assess spectacle wear, and uptake of referrals will be ascertained. The cost of developing and delivering the Peek package will be assessed. The cost per child wearing their spectacles or

  19. Using modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK) as an alternative material for endocrown restorations: A short-term clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoidis, Panagiotis; Bakiri, Eleonora; Polyzois, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    A modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK) framework material veneered with indirect light-polymerized composite resin was used as an alternative material for the fabrication of an endocrown restoration for an extensively damaged molar. The elastic modulus of the polyetheretherketone framework (4 GPa) veneered with indirect composite resin could dampen the occlusal forces protecting tooth structures better than ceramic materials. This is important in the restoration of extensively damaged molars with weak roots. Long-term clinical evidence is required before recommending the application as a substitute material. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of the heating/quenching process on the mechanical, optical and thermodynamic properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodden, Lisa; Lümkemann, Nina; Köhler, Valerie; Eichberger, Marlis; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a heating/quenching process on the optical, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of filled (20%_4000) and unfilled PEEK films (0%_2000 and 0%_4000). Heating/quenching was performed to simulate thermoforming as possible method to process thermoplastic polymers for dental application. For the investigation, films of different PEEK qualities (0%_2000, 0%_4000, 20%_4000) were produced using isostatic pressing (n=10/quality). From each PEEK film, round specimens (n=20/PEEK film) with a diameter of 34mm were cut and following parameters were determined: translucency (T%), Martens-Hardness (HM), indentation modulus (E IT ), glass transition temperature (T G ), melting temperature (T M ) and enthalpy of fusion (ΔH f ). Same specimens were exposed to heating/quenching using defined parameters. Afterwards, T%, HM, E IT , TG, TM and ΔH f were determined again. Data were analysed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, univariate ANOVA followed by post-hoc Scheffé test with partial eta squared (η p 2 ), Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U test. Level of significance was defined to 95%. Materials showed significant differences for all investigated parameters in the initial state, except of T G (p=0.249). The heating/quenching process showed a significant increase on T% for the unfilled materials 0%_2000 and 0%_4000. HM and E IT decreased significantly through heating/quenching for all materials. Moreover, heating/quenching showed a reduction of T G for 0%_2000 and 20%_4000, while T M decreased for 0%_2000 and 0%_4000. ΔH f confirms different crystallinities of tested materials. The heating/quenching process showed a significant impact on all investigated parameters. The highest impact was found for mechanical properties resulting in decreased values of HM and E IT . Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Complex skull defects reconstruction with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Predictable and stable functional and aesthetic result is the aim of priority for the neurosurgeon dealing with the reconstruction of large cranial bone defects and complex-formed skull defects involving cranio-orbital region. the paper presents the experience with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants for complex-formed and large skull bone defects reconstruction. Between 2005 and 2013 nine patients (5 females and 4 males) underwent cranioplasty and cranio-facial reconstruction with insertion of the customized САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants. Computer-assisted preoperative planning was undertaken by the surgeon and the engineer together in 3 cases to provide accurate implant design. Eight patients had complex-formed and large posttraumatic defects of fronto-orbital (7 cases) and parietal (one case) regions. In two of these cases one-step reconstruction surgery for posttraumatic fronto-orbital defects combined with adjacent orbital roof (one case) and orbito-zygomatic (one case) deformities was performed. One patient underwent one-step primary cranioplasty after cranio-orbital fibrous dysplasia focus resection. Titanium implants were used in 4 cases while PEEK implants - in 5 ones. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months till 8,5 years (median 4,4 years). The accuracy of the implant intraoperative fit was perfect in all cases. Postoperative wounds healed primary and there were no any complications in the series presented. Post-op clinical assessment and CT data testified to high implants precision, good functional and aesthetic outcomes in all patients. САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants application should allow for optimal reconstruction in the challenging patients with complex-formed and large skull bone defects providing predictable good functional and aesthetic result together with surgery morbidity and duration reduction. Computer-assisted preoperative planning should be undertaken for САD/САМ implants creation in

  2. Derivation of beryllium guidelines for use in establishing cleanup levels at the Peek Street and Sacandaga sites, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, H.M.; Avci, H.I.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1992-02-01

    Guideline levels are derived for beryllium in soil and on indoor surfaces at the Peek Street and Sacandaga sites in the state of New York. On the basis of highly conservative assumptions, the soil beryllium concentration that corresponds to a 10 - 4 carcinogenic risk level is estimated to be 13 mg/kg at both sites. Calculations indicate that the proposed US Department of Energy guideline of 2 μg/ft 2 for beryllium in dust on indoor surfaces would be sufficiently protective of human health. For occupational protection of workers during cleanup operations, Office of Safety and Health Administration standards for beryllium are referenced and restated

  3. Wood-plastic combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudy, R.

    1978-02-01

    A review on wood-plastic combinations is given including the production (wood and plastic component, radiation hardening, curing), the obtained properties, present applications and prospects for the future of these materials. (author)

  4. DESIGNERS’ KNOWLEDGE IN PLASTICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    The Industrial designers’ knowledge in plastics materials and manufacturing principles of polymer products is very important for the innovative strength of the industry, according to a group of Danish plastics manufacturers, design students and practicing industrial designers. These three groups ...

  5. Assessment of a polyelectrolyte multilayer film coating loaded with BMP-2 on titanium and PEEK implants in the rabbit femoral condyle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, R.; Pignot-Paintrand, I.; Lavaud, J.; Decambron, A.; Bourgeois, E.; Josserand, V.; Logeart-Avramoglou, D.; Viguier, E.; Picart, C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of titanium implants (Ti-6Al-4V, noted here TA6V) and poly(etheretherketone) PEEK implants induced by a BMP-2-delivering surface coating made of polyelectrolyte multilayer films. The in vitro bioactivity of the polyelectrolyte film-coated implants was assessed using the alkaline phosphatase assay. BMP-2-coated TA6V and PEEK implants with a total dose of 9.3 µg of BMP-2 were inserted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand white rabbits and compared to uncoated implants. Rabbits were sacrificed 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Histomorphometric analyses on TA6V and PEEK implants and microcomputed tomography on PEEK implants revealed that the bone-to-implant contact and bone area around the implants were significantly lower for the BMP-2-coated implants than for the bare implants. This was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy imaging. This difference was more pronounced at 4 weeks in comparison to the 8-week time point. However, bone growth inside the hexagonal upper hollow cavity of the screws was higher in the case of the BMP-2 coated implants. Overall, this study shows that a high dose of BMP-2 leads to localized and temporary bone impairment, and that the dose of BMP-2 delivered at the surface of an implant needs to be carefully optimized. PMID:26965394

  6. Plastic value chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baxter, John; Wahlstrom, Margareta; Zu Castell-Rüdenhausen, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing plastic value chains is regarded as an important measure in order to increase recycling of plastics in an efficient way. This can also lead to improved awareness of the hazardous substances contained in plastic waste, and how to avoid that these substances are recycled. As an example......, plastics from WEEE is chosen as a Nordic case study. The project aims to propose a number of improvements for this value chain together with representatives from Nordic stakeholders. Based on the experiences made, a guide for other plastic value chains shall be developed....

  7. Biodegradability of Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tokiwa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.. In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  8. Biodegradability of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  9. Standard practice for infrared flash thermography of composite panels and repair patches used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a procedure for detecting subsurface flaws in composite panels and repair patches using Flash Thermography (FT), in which an infrared (IR) camera is used to detect anomalous cooling behavior of a sample surface after it has been heated with a spatially uniform light pulse from a flash lamp array. 1.2 This practice describes established FT test methods that are currently used by industry, and have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of composite structures during post-manufacturing and in-service examinations. 1.3 This practice has utility for testing of polymer composite panels and repair patches containing, but not limited to, bismaleimide, epoxy, phenolic, poly(amide imide), polybenzimidazole, polyester (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(ether ether ketone), poly(ether imide), polyimide (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(phenylene sulfide), or polysulfone matrices; and alumina, aramid, boron, carbon, glass, quartz, or silicon carbide fibers. Typical as-fabricate...

  10. Sulfonation degree effect on ion-conducting SPEEK-titanium oxide membranes properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Jacqueline Costa; Gomes, Ailton de Souza; Dutra Filho, José Carlos, E-mail: jacquecosta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoléculas Professora Eloisa Mano; Hui, Wang Shu [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais; Oliveira, Vivianna Silva de [Escola Técnica Rezende Rammel (ETRR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Polymeric membranes were developed using a SPEEK (sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)) polymer matrix, containing titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) (incorporated by sol-gel method). SPEEK with different sulfonation degrees (SD): 63% and 50% were used. The influence of sulfonation degree on membrane properties was investigated. The thermal analysis (TGA and DTGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were carried out to characterize the membranes and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to evaluate the proton conductivity of the membranes. The proton conductivities in water were of 3.25 to 37.08 mS.cm{sup -1}. Experimental data of impedance spectroscopy were analyzed with equivalent circuits using the Zview software, and the results showed that, the best fitted was at 80 °C. (author)

  11. Challenges in plastics recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Jakobsen, L. G.; Eriksen, Marie Kampmann

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of waste plastics still remains a challenging area in the waste management sector. The current and potential goals proposed on EU or regional levels are difficult to achieve, and even to partially fullfil them the improvements in collection and sorting should be considerable. A study...... was undertaken to investigate the factors affecting quality in plastics recycling. The preliminary results showed factors primarily influencing quality of plastics recycling to be polymer cross contamination, presence of additives, non-polymer impurities, and polymer degradation. Deprivation of plastics quality......, with respect to recycling, has been shown to happen throughout the plastics value chain, but steps where improvements may happen have been preliminary identified. Example of Cr in plastic samples analysed showed potential spreading and accumulation of chemicals ending up in the waste plastics. In order...

  12. The Biotribology of PEEK-on-HXLPE Bearings Is Comparable to Traditional Bearings on a Multidirectional Pin-on-disk Tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Doruk; Siskey, Ryan S; Underwood, Richard J; Briscoe, Adam; Kurtz, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    All-polymer bearings involving polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been proposed for orthopaedic applications because they may reduce stress shielding, reduce weight of the implants, reduce wear and risk of osteolysis, and prevent release of metal ions by replacing the metal articulating components. Little is known about the biotribology of all-polymer PEEK bearings, including the effects of cross-shear, which are relevant for implant longevity, especially in the hip, and increased temperature that may affect lubricant proteins and, hence, lubrication in the joint. Using pin-on-disk in vitro testing, we asked: (1) Can all-polymer bearing couples involving PEEK have a comparable or lower wear rate than highly crosslinked UHMWPE (HXLPE) on CoCr bearing couples? (2) Is the wear rate of PEEK bearing couples affected by the amount of cross-shear? (3) Is there a difference in wear mechanism and surface morphology for all-polymer bearing surfaces compared with UHMWPE (HXLPE) on CoCr? We simultaneously tested a total of 100 pin-on-disk couples (n = 10 per bearing couple) consisting of three traditional metal-on-UHMWPE and seven polymer-on-polymer bearings for 2 million cycles under physiologically relevant conditions and in accordance with ASTM F732. Using analysis of variance, we analyzed the effect of bearing surface topography and cross-shear on wear rate. The changes in surface topography were evaluated using optical microscopy. Sample size was sufficient to provide 80% power to detect a difference of 1.4 mm 3 /MC in average wear rates of bearing couples. The combined wear rates of all-polymer bearing couples were not different than traditional bearing couples. With the numbers available, the PEEK and HXLPE bearing couple had a mean wear rate (WR: mean ± SD) of 0.9 ± 1.1 mm 3 /MC (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-1.5 mm 3 /MC), which was not different than the wear rate of the CoCr and HXLPE bearing couple (1.6 ± 2.0 mm 3 /MC; 95% CI, 0.4-2.8 mm 3 /MC; mean difference

  13. Clinical and radiological outcome after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Gapon, Karina; Wostrack, Maria; Meyer, Bernhard; Lehmberg, Jens

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate long-term results after one-, two-, and three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive patient cohort that underwent ACDF with stand-alone empty PEEK cages between 2007 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Radiographic follow-up included static and flexion/extension radiographs. Changes in the operated segments were measured and compared to radiographs directly after surgery. Clinical outcome was evaluated by a physical examination, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) using the EuroQOL questionnaire (EQ-5D). Analysis of associations between fusion, subsidence, cervical alignment, and clinical outcome parameters were performed. Of 407 consecutive cases, 318 met all inclusion criteria. Follow-up data were obtained from 265 (83 %) cases. The mean age at presentation was 55 years and 139 patients were male (52 %). In the sample, 127, 125, and 13 patients had one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively; 132 (49 %) presented with spondylotic cervical myelopathy and 133 (50 %) with cervical radiculopathy. Fusion was achieved in 85, 95, and 94 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. Non-fusion was associated with higher VAS pain levels. Radiographic adjacent segment disease (ASD) was observed in 20, 29, and 15 % in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. ASD was associated with lower HRQL. Subsidence was observed in 25, 27, and 15 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. However, this had no influence on clinical outcome. Follow-up operations for symptomatic adjacent disc disease and implant failure at index level were needed in 16 (6 %) and four (1.5 %) cases, respectively. Younger age was associated with better clinical outcome. Multilevel surgery favored better myelopathy outcomes and fusion reduced overall

  14. Membranes optimization of the basis of S-peek with different degrees of sulfonation for PEMFC; Otimizacao de membranas a base de S-peek com diferentes graus de sulfonacao para PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, E.B.; Fiuza, R.A.; Jose, N.M.; Boaventura, J.S.; Carvalho, L.F.V. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (IQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Grupo de Energia e Ciencia dos Materiais

    2008-07-01

    With the growing concern emission of polluting gases in the atmosphere and search for alternative sources of clean energy that can meet the future shortage of oil, the fuel cells have become the target of scientific research in everyone. Among the various types of fuel cells includes the PEMFC (Polymer exchange membrane fuel cell), in the case of a device with high efficiency, without emission of pollutants. This work was to produce membranes and optimizing the basis of S-PEEK (poly-ether-ether-sulfonate) with varying degrees of sulfonation to be applied as electrolytes in fuel cells to the type PEMFC. The membranes were characterized chemically, by thermal analysis, and electrochemistry. (author)

  15. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  16. Our plastic age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation.

  17. Our plastic age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard C.; Swan, Shanna H.; Moore, Charles J.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  18. Plastic Pollution from Ships

    OpenAIRE

    Čulin, Jelena; Bielić, Toni

    2016-01-01

    The environmental impact of shipping on marine environment includes discharge of garbage. Plastic litter is of particular concern due to abundance, resistance to degradation and detrimental effect on marine biota. According to recently published studies, a further research is required to assess human health risk. Monitoring data indicate that despite banning plastic disposal at sea, shipping is still a source of plastic pollution. Some of the measures to combat the problem are discussed.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUE-PLASTIC

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Shakle

    2017-01-01

    Polythene is the most common plastic, the annual global production is approximately 60 million tones, and its primary use is in packing. Plastic bags pollute soil and waters and kill thousands of marine generalize plastic bags are not biodegradable they clog water ways, spoil the land scape and end up in landfills. Where they may take 1000 year or more to break down into ever smaller particals that continue to pollution the soil and water.

  20. Our plastic age

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Richard C.; Swan, Shanna H.; Moore, Charles J.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste pl...

  1. Plasticity: modeling & computation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borja, Ronaldo Israel

    2013-01-01

    .... "Plasticity Modeling & Computation" is a textbook written specifically for students who want to learn the theoretical, mathematical, and computational aspects of inelastic deformation in solids...

  2. Synaptic Plasticity and Nociception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenJianguo

    2004-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is one of the fields that progresses rapidly and has a lot of success in neuroscience. The two major types of synaptie plasticity: long-term potentiation ( LTP and long-term depression (LTD are thought to be the cellular mochanisms of learning and memory. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that, besides serving as a cellular model for learning and memory, the synaptic plasticity involves in other physiological or pathophysiological processes, such as the perception of pain and the regulation of cardiovascular system. This minireview will focus on the relationship between synaptic plasticity and nociception.

  3. Plastics and health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halden, Rolf U

    2010-01-01

    By 2010, the worldwide annual production of plastics will surpass 300 million tons. Plastics are indispensable materials in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health (e.g., disposable syringes, intravenous bags). However, plastics also pose health risks. Of principal concern are endocrine-disrupting properties, as triggered for example by bisphenol A and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Opinions on the safety of plastics vary widely, and despite more than five decades of research, scientific consensus on product safety is still elusive. This literature review summarizes information from more than 120 peer-reviewed publications on health effects of plastics and plasticizers in lab animals and humans. It examines problematic exposures of susceptible populations and also briefly summarizes adverse environmental impacts from plastic pollution. Ongoing efforts to steer human society toward resource conservation and sustainable consumption are discussed, including the concept of the 5 Rs--i.e., reduce, reuse, recycle, rethink, restrain--for minimizing pre- and postnatal exposures to potentially harmful components of plastics.

  4. Effect of pores formation process and oxygen plasma treatment to hydroxyapatite formation on bioactive PEEK prepared by incorporation of precursor of apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabutsuka, Takeshi; Fukushima, Keito; Hiruta, Tomoko; Takai, Shigeomi; Yao, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    When bioinert substrates with fine-sized pores are immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) and the pH value or the temperature is increased, fine particles of calcium phosphate, which the authors denoted as 'precursor of apatite' (PrA), are formed in the pores. By this method, hydroxyapatite formation ability can be provided to various kinds of bioinert materials. In this study, the authors studied fabrication methods of bioactive PEEK by using the above-mentioned process. First, the fine-sized pores were formed on the surface of the PEEK substrate by H 2 SO 4 treatment. Next, to provide hydrophilic property to the PEEK, the surfaces of the PEEK were treated with O 2 plasma. Finally, PrA were formed in the pores by the above-mentioned process, which is denoted as 'Alkaline SBF' treatment, and the bioactive PEEK was obtained. By immersing in SBF with the physiological condition, hydroxyapatite formation was induced on the whole surface of the substrate within 1day. The formation of PrA directly contributed to hydroxyapatite formation ability. By applying the O 2 plasma treatment, hydroxyapatite formation was uniformly performed on the whole surface of the substrate. The H 2 SO 4 treatment contributed to a considerable enhancement of adhesive strength of the formed hydroxyapatite layer formed in SBF because of the increase of surface areas of the substrate. As a comparative study, the sandblasting method was applied as the pores formation process instead of the H 2 SO 4 treatment. Although hydroxyapatite formation was provided also in this case, however, the adhesion of the formed hydroxyapatite layer to the substrate was not sufficient even if the O 2 plasma treatment was conducted. This result indicates that the fine-sized pores should be formed on the whole surface of the substrate uniformly to achieve high adhesive strength of the hydroxyapatite layer. Therefore, it is considered that the H 2 SO 4 treatment before the O 2 plasma and the 'Alkaline SBF' treatment

  5. Comparison Between Acrylic Cage and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage in Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid R; Nikoo, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Hosseini, Khadijeh

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, single-blind randomized-controlled clinical study. To compare polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with a novel Acrylic cage to find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical outcomes following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is considered a standard neurosurgical treatment for degenerative diseases of cervical intervertebral disks. There are many options, including bone grafts, bone cement, and spacers made of titanium, carbon fiber, and synthetic materials, used to restore physiological disk height and enhance spinal fusion, but the ideal device, which would provide immediate structural support and subsequent osteointegration and stability, has not been identified yet. To overcome this, we designed a new, inexpensive Acrylic cage. A total of 64 patients were eligible to participate and were randomly allocated to undergo ACDF either with Acrylic interbody fusion cage filled with bone substitute (n=32) or PEEK cage (n=32). Nurick's grading was used for quantifying the neurological deficit. Clinical and radiologic outcome was assessed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and subsequently at 2, 6, and 12 months of follow-up using Odom's criteria and dynamic radiographs (flexion-extension) and computed tomography scans, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of the Acrylic cage group compared with the PEEK cage group (mean difference: -0.438; 95% confidence interval, -0.807 to -0.068; P=0.016). There was a statistically significant difference in disk space height increase between the 2 groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. The Acrylic cage achieved higher fusion rate (good fusion) than the PEEK cage (96.9% vs. 93.8%). Intervertebral angle demonstrated a significant difference among the 2 treated groups throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that the use of Acrylic cage is associated with good clinical and radiologic outcomes and it can be therefore a

  6. Investigation of the peeks creek debris flow of September 2004 and its relationship to landslide hazard mapping in Macon County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca Latham; Rick Wooten; Anne Witt; Ken Gillon; Tommy Douglas; Stephen Fuemmeler; Jennifer Bauer; Scott Brame

    2007-01-01

    On September 16,2004 the remnants of Hurricane Ivan dumped heavy rain on Macon County, North Carolina, triggering a debris slide near the top of Fishhawk Mountain (figure 1) at an elevation of 4,420 ft around 10: 10 PM. This slide quickly mobilized into a debris flow that traveled approximately 2.25 miles and dropped 2,000 ft colliding with the Peeks Creek community...

  7. First Results of a New Vacuum Plasma Sprayed (VPS Titanium-Coated Carbon/PEEK Composite Cage for Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hoppe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a new vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS titanium-coated carbon/polyetheretherketone (PEEK cage under first use clinical conditions. Forty-two patients who underwent a one or two segment transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF procedure with a new Ca/PEEK composite cage between 2012 and 2016 were retrospectively identified by an electronic patient chart review. Fusion rates (using X-ray, patient’s satisfaction, and complications were followed up for two years. A total of 90.4% of the patients were pain-free and satisfied after a follow up (FU period of 29.1 ± 9 (range 24–39 months. A mean increase of 3° in segmental lordosis in the early period (p = 0.002 returned to preoperative levels at final follow-ups. According to the Bridwell classification, the mean 24-month G1 fusion rate was calculated as 93.6% and the G2 as 6.4%. No radiolucency around the cage (G3 or clear pseudarthrosis could be seen (G4. In conclusion, biological properties of the inert, hydrophobic surface, which is the main disadvantage of PEEK, can be improved with VPS titanium coating, so that the carbon/PEEK composite cage, which has great advantages in respect of biomechanical properties, can be used safely in TLIF surgery. High fusion rates, good clinical outcome, and low implant-related complication rates without the need to use rhBMP or additional iliac bone graft can be achieved.

  8. PEEK tube-based online solid-phase microextraction-high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of yohimbine in rat plasma and its application in pharmacokinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xiaowei; Shang, Bing; Wang, Xiaozheng; Chen, Qinhua

    2017-04-01

    Yohimbine is a novel compound for the treatment of erectile dysfunction derived from natural products, and pharmacokinetic study is important for its further development as a new medicine. In this work, we developed a novel PEEK tube-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-HPLC method for analysis of yohimbine in plasma and further for pharmacokinetic study. Poly (AA-EGDMA) was synthesized inside a PEEK tube as the sorbent for microextraction of yohimbine, and parameters that could influence extraction efficiency were systematically investigated. Under optimum conditions, the PEEK tube-based SPME method exhibits excellent enrichment efficiency towards yohimbine. By using berberine as internal standard, an online SPME-HPLC method was developed for analysis of yohimbine in human plasma sample. The method has wide linear range (2-1000 ng/mL) with an R 2 of 0.9962; the limit of detection was determined and was as low as 0.1 ng/mL using UV detection. Finally, a pharmacokinetic study of yohimbine was carried out by the online SPME-HPLC method and the results have been compared with those of reported methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Titanium and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) patient-specific sub-periosteal implants: two novel approaches for rehabilitation of the severely atrophic anterior maxillary ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounir, M; Atef, M; Abou-Elfetouh, A; Hakam, M M

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess two new protocols for single-stage rehabilitation of the severely atrophic maxillary ridge using customized porous titanium or polyether ether ketone (PEEK) sub-periosteal implants. Ten patients with a severely atrophic anterior maxillary alveolar ridge were divided randomly into two groups (five patients in each) to receive customized sub-periosteal implants fabricated via CAD/CAM technology: group 1, porous titanium implants; group 2, PEEK implants. Prosthetic loading with fixed acrylic bridges was performed 1 month postoperative. The implants were followed-up for 12 months and evaluated for the presence of any sign of radiographic bone resorption, mobility, infection, prosthetic fracture, or implant exposure. The immediate postoperative period was uneventful except for one case complicated by wound dehiscence in group 1. At 12 months, all implants were functionally stable and the patients were comfortable with the prostheses. No signs of radiographic bone resorption, mobility, infection, or prosthetic fracture were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the application of customized porous titanium and PEEK sub-periosteal implants produced through CAD/CAM technology appears to be an acceptable method for single-stage prosthetic rehabilitation of the severely atrophic edentulous anterior maxilla. This study was awarded the best case study at the academy of osseintegration annual meeting 2017, Orlando, Florida. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (≥ 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ≥ 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ≥ 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ≤ 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ≥ 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97

  11. Stem cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipathy, Uma; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The central dogma in stem cell biology has been that cells isolated from a particular tissue can renew and differentiate into lineages of the tissue it resides in. Several studies have challenged this idea by demonstrating that tissue specific cell have considerable plasticity and can cross-lineage restriction boundary and give rise to cell types of other lineages. However, the lack of a clear definition for plasticity has led to confusion with several reports failing to demonstrate that a single cell can indeed differentiate into multiple lineages at significant levels. Further, differences between results obtained in different labs has cast doubt on some results and several studies still await independent confirmation. In this review, we critically evaluate studies that report stem cell plasticity using three rigid criteria to define stem cell plasticity; differentiation of a single cell into multiple cell lineages, functionality of differentiated cells in vitro and in vivo, robust and persistent engraft of transplanted cells.

  12. Plastics and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenas, P.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic organic polymers, such as plastics, PVC, polyamides etc are considered less ecological than natural materials such as wood. Other artificial materials such as metals, glass or biodegradable plastics have also a better image than petroleum products. This short paper demonstrates that the manufacturing or the transport of every material uses energy and that the complete energy balance sheet of a plastic bottle, for instance, is more favourable than the one of a glass bottle. Plastic materials are also easily valorized and recycled and part of the energy spent during manufacturing can be recovered during incineration for district heating. During the life-cycle of such a synthetic material, the same petroleum quantity can be used twice which leads to less negative effects on the environment. Finally, the paper focusses on the problem of biodegradable materials which are not degradable when buried under several meters of wastes and which are a nuisance to recycling. (J.S.)

  13. Plastics: Friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O P Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plastics has been playing a very significant role in our life. Being light weight, inexpensive and heving good insulating properties it is being used in all aspects of life, from clothes to contact lenses and from mobile phones to automobiles as well as in medical equipments, However it is not biodegradable, and while degrading to fragments it gets converted in to microplastics and nanoplastics The plastic waste is being recognized as an environmental hazard, since these micr- and nanoplastics find way from landfills to water and foods, It is said that we are not only using, but we are eating, drinking and even braething the plastics. These microplastics in body release certain hazardous chemicals and found to be disrupting functions of certain endocrine organs. Whether the rising prevalence of Diabetes, thyroid disorders or infirtility etc., are realated to the plastics?

  14. Recycling of plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, W; Menzel, J; Sinn, H

    1976-01-01

    Considering the shortage of raw materials and environmental pollution, the recycling of plastic waste is a very important topic. Pilot plants for research in Funabashi Japan, Franklin (Ohio) U.S.A., and the R 80-process of Krauss Maffei, W. Germany, have demonstrated the possibility of reclaiming plastics from refuse. Old tires and waste from the plastic producing and manufacturing industries are readily available. The pyrolysis of plastic yields gaseous and liquid products, and the exploitation of this cracking reaction has been demonstrated by pilot plants in Japan and Great Britain. Further laboratory scale experiments are taking place in W. Germany. In continuous fluidized beds and in molten salts, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinylchloride, polystyrene and rubber are pyrolysed and better than 98 percent conversion is obtained. Up to 40 percent of the feed can be obtained as aromatic compounds, and a pilot plant is under construction. As a first step PVC-containing material can be almost quantitatively dehydrochlorinated.

  15. A Plastic Menagerie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Bobble heads had become quite popular, depicting all sorts of sports figures, animals, and even presidents. In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made bobble head sculptures out of empty plastic drink bottles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  16. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  17. Characterization on impact damage resistance of CF/PEEK laminates under low and high velocity impact tests; Teisoku/kosoku shogeki shiken ni yoru CF/PEEK no taishogeki sonshosei no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, H; Hamamoto, A [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, T; Nishimori, K; Matsumoto, H [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-04-15

    Experiments were conducted to learn the impact damage on jet engine CFRP components for sucking birds or others. A great mass low velocity collision experiment using a falling weight and a small mass high velocity collision experiment using an air gun were conducted. The damages inflicted upon CF/PEEK (polyetheretherketone) laminates in the respective experiments were compared with each other by using the ultrasonic flaw detection method (C-Scan). There was a linear relationship in both experiments between the projected damaged area DA measured by C-Scan and the impact energy IE, enabling the relative evaluation of impact-withstanding damage characteristics by using the DA/IE ratios. DA/IE in the high velocity impact was higher than that in the low velocity impact, but the DA/IE ratio between the high velocity impact and the low velocity impact remained approximately the same, not dependent on the fiber orientation. The lamination parameter {beta} defined on the basis of the difference in-plane rigidity between the layers constituting the laminate is proportional to DA/IE, with {beta} enabling the generalized numerical expression of the impact of the fiber orientation upon the impact-withstanding damage characteristics. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  19. Recycling of packing plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gintenreiter-Koegl, S.

    2001-05-01

    The ordinance on the avoidance of packaging waste was a serious intervention in the public and private waste management in Austria. Above all the high expenses for an overall packaging waste collection and the recycling of packaging plastics were criticized. The landfill ordinance comes into force in 2004 and this means another major change in the Austrian waste management system. In the course of this change the overall collection and the recycling and recovery of waste streams, especially of the high caloric plastics waste, have to be discussed again. The goal of this work was on the one hand to develop and adapt the hydrocracking process for the recovery of mixed plastics waste and to show a possible application in Austria. On the other hand the work shows the technical, ecological and economical conditions for packaging plastics recycling and recovery in order to find optimum applications for the processes and to examine their contribution to a sustainable development. A hydrocracking test plant for the processing of mixed plastic wastes was built and had been running for about three years. The tests were carried out successfully and the suitability of the technology for the recovery of packaging plastics could be shown. Results show at least a 35 % yield of fuel. The hydrocracking technology is quite common in the oil industries and therefore an integration on a refinery site is suggested. (author)

  20. Water absorption in PEEK and PEI matrices. Contribution to the understanding of water-polar group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, E.; Bicaba, Y.; Colin, X.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in two aromatic linear polymers (PEEK and PEI) was studied between 10% and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. It was found that these polymers display classical Henry and Fick's behaviors. Moreover, they have very close values of equilibrium water concentration C∞ and water diffusivity D presumably because their respective polar groups establish molecular interactions of the same nature with water. This assumption was checked from a literature compilation of values of C∞ and D for a large variety of linear and tridimensional polymers containing a single type of polar group. It was then evidenced that almost all types of carbonyl group (in particular, those belonging to imides, amides and ketones) have the same molar contribution to water absorption, except those belonging to esters which are much less hydrophilic. Furthermore, hydroxyl and sulfone groups are much more hydrophilic than carbonyl groups so that their molar contribution is located on another master curve. On this basis, semi-empirical structure/water transport property relationships were proposed. It was found that C∞ increases exponentially with the concentration of polar groups (presumably because water is doubly bonded), but also with the intensity of their molecular interactions with water. In contrast, D is inversely proportional to C∞, which means that polar group-water interactions slow down the rate of water diffusion.

  1. A Conservative Formulation for Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    concepts that apply to a broad class of macroscopic models: plastic deformation and plastic flow rule. CONSERVATIVE PLASTICITY 469 3a. Plastic Defrrnation...temperature. We illustrate these concepts with a model that has been used to describe high strain-rate plastic flow in metals [11, 31, 32]. In the case...JOURDREN, AND P. VEYSSEYRE. Un Modele ttyperelastique- Plastique Euldrien Applicable aux Grandes Dtformations: Que/ques R~sultats 1-D. preprint, 1991. 2. P

  2. The plasticity of clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group, F.F.

    1905-01-01

    (1) Sand injures plasticity little at first because the grains are suspended in a plastic mass. It is only when grains are abundant enough to come in contact with their neighbors, that the effect becomes serious, and then both strength and amount of possible flow are injured. (2) Certain rare organic colloids increase the plasticity by rendering the water viscous. (3) Fineness also tends to increase plasticity. (4) Plane surfaces (plates) increase the amount of possible flow. They also give a chance for lubrication by thinner films, thus increasing the friction of film, and the strength of the whole mass. The action of plates is thus twofold ; but fineness may be carried to such an extent as to break up plate-like grains into angular fragments. The beneficial effects of plates are also decreased by the fact that each is so closely surrounded by others in the mass. (5) Molecular attraction is twofold in increasing plasticity. As the attraction increases, the coherence and strength of the mass increase, and the amount of possible deformation before crumbling also increases. Fineness increases this action by requiring more water. Colloids and crystalloids in solution may also increase the attraction. It is thus seen to be more active than any other single factor.

  3. Plastics control paraffin buildup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-06-01

    Paraffin buildup in producing oil wells has been virtually eliminated by the use of plastic-coated sucker rods. The payout of the plasticing process is generally reached in less than a year, and the paraffin buildup may be inhibited for 10 yr or longer. Most of the plants applying plastic coatings to sucker rods are now fully automated, though a few still offer the hand-sprayed coating that some operators prefer. The several steps involved are described. The ideal plastic for the job is resistant to chemicals at high and low temperatures, flexible, has good adhesion, abrasion resistance, impact resistance, and a smooth glossy finish. The phenol aldehyde and epoxy resins presently offered by the industry fulfill these specifications very well; the multicoating and multibaking techniques improve their performance. Due to wide variations in the severity of the paraffin problem from one oil field to another, there is no general rule to estimate the possible savings from using plastic-coated sucker rods. The process, however, does appear to do a remarkable job in controlling paraffin buildup wherever it is a problem in producing oil by pump.

  4. What is hidden in the pannexin treasure trove: the sneak peek and the guesswork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Oxana; Tiunova, Anya; Connell-Alberts, Yvette; Panchin, Yuri; Baranova, Ancha

    2006-01-01

    Connexins had been considered to be the only class of the vertebrate proteins capable of gap junction formation; however, new candidates for this function with no homology to connexins, termed pannexins were discovered. So far three pannexins were described in rodent and human genomes: Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3. Expressions of pannexins can be detected in numerous brain structures, and now found both in neuronal and glial cells. Hypothetical roles of pannexins in the nervous system include participating in sensory processing, hippocampal plasticity, synchronization between hippocampus and cortex, and propagation of the calcium waves supported by glial cells, which help maintain and modulate neuronal metabolism. Pannexin also may participate in pathological reactions of the neural cells, including their damage after ischemia and subsequent cell death. Recent study revealed non-gap junction function of Panx1 hemichannels in erythrocytes, where they serve as the conduits for the ATP release in response to the osmotic stress. High-throughput studies produced some evidences of the pannexin involvement in the process of tumorigenesis. According to brain cancer gene expression database REMBRANDT, PANX2 expression levels can predict post diagnosis survival for patients with glial tumors. Further investigations are needed to verify or reject hypotheses listed.

  5. Investigation into Plastic Cards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neringa Stašelytė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the strength of laminating plastic cards at different lamination temperatures. For investigation purposes, two types of plastic substrate and films have been used. Laminate strength has been tested (CMYK to establish the impact of colours on the strength of laminate. The paper compares inks supplied by two different producers. The colour characteristics of CIE L*a*b* space before and after the lamination process have been found. According to lamination strength and characteristics of the colours, the most suitable inks, temperature and films have been chosen.

  6. Joining by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Ken-ichiro; Bay, Niels; Fratini, Livan

    2013-01-01

    As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating opportuni......As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating...

  7. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  8. PEEK Primary Crowns with Cobalt-Chromium, Zirconia and Galvanic Secondary Crowns with Different Tapers—A Comparison of Retention Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Stock

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In prosthetic dentistry, double crown systems have proved their suitability as retainers for removable partial dentures. However, investigations in this context, regarding polyetheretherketone, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the retention force (RF between polyetheretherketone (PEEK primary and cobalt-chromium (CoCr, zirconia (ZrO2 and galvanic (GAL secondary crowns with three different tapers. Primary PEEK-crowns were milled with the tapers 0°, 1°, and 2° (n = 10/taper, respectively. Afterwards, 90 secondary crowns were fabricated: (i 30 CoCr-crowns milled from Ceramill Sintron (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria (n = 10/taper, (ii 30 ZrO2-crowns milled from Ceramill ZI (AmannGirrbach, Koblach, Austria (n = 10/taper, and (iii 30 GAL-crowns made using electroforming (n = 10/taper. RF was measured in a pull-off test (20 pull-offs/specimen and data were analyzed using 2-/1-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Honestly Significant Difference (HSD post hoc test and linear regression analyses (p < 0.05. The measured mean RF values ranged between 9.6 and 38.2 N. With regard to the 0°, 1°, and 2° tapered crowns, no statistically significant differences between CoCr and ZrO2 were observed (p > 0.141. At 0° taper, no differences in retention forces between GAL, CrCr, and ZrO2 crowns were found (p = 0.075. However, at 1° and 2° taper, lower RF for GAL-crowns were observed (p < 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively. According to this laboratory study, PEEK might be a suitable material for primary crowns, regardless of the taper and the material of secondary crown. Long-term results, however, are still necessary.

  9. Análise química, microscópica e microbiológica de poli-éter-éter-cetona (PEEK) funcionalizado para incorporação de antibiofilmes orgânicos

    OpenAIRE

    Dumes Montero, Juan Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia, Florianópolis, 2015. (Poli-éter-éter-cetona) PEEK representa atualmente uma alternativa para implantes ortopédicos devido à sua biocompatibilidade e baixo módulo de elasticidade quando comparado ao titânio. PEEK tem mostrado ser muito atraente para a incorporação de compostos, graças ao processo de sulfonação que promove um balanço entre as propriedades me...

  10. Plastic flashtube chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisken, W.R.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given of the use and operation of plastic flashtube chambers. Gas leaks, electric pulsing, the glow discharge, and readout methods are considered. Three distinct problems with high rate applications deal with resolving time, dead time, and polarization/neutralization of the chamber

  11. Plastic Surgery: Tackling Misconceptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    will succeed. First impressions tend to last, and if young people's first impression of plastic surgeons is that they spend much of their time doing cosmetic surgery then this is a first impression that might be long ... Res 2014;4 Suppl S3:169‑70. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: www.amhsr.org. DOI:.

  12. Biobased Plastics 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolck, C.H.; Ravenstijn, J.; Molenveld, K.; Harmsen, P.F.H.

    2011-01-01

    Dit boek geeft inzicht in de huidige op de markt verkrijgbare biobased plastics en de te verwachten ontwikkelingen. Er wordt gekeken naar zowel thermoplastische als thermohardende materialen. Het boek biedt inzicht in de productie, verwerking en eigenschappen van de verschillende types. Daarnaast

  13. New plastic recycling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greater than 60% of the total plastic content of municipal solid waste is comprised of polyolefins (high-density, low-density, and linear polyethylene and polypropylene. Polyethylene (PE) is the largest-volume component but presents a challenge due to the absence of low-energy de...

  14. Reliability of Plastic Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1989-01-01

    In the paper it is shown how upper and lower bounds for the reliability of plastic slabs can be determined. For the fundamental case it is shown that optimal bounds of a deterministic and a stochastic analysis are obtained on the basis of the same failure mechanisms and the same stress fields....

  15. Individual differences in behavioural plasticities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamps, Judy A

    2016-05-01

    Interest in individual differences in animal behavioural plasticities has surged in recent years, but research in this area has been hampered by semantic confusion as different investigators use the same terms (e.g. plasticity, flexibility, responsiveness) to refer to different phenomena. The first goal of this review is to suggest a framework for categorizing the many different types of behavioural plasticities, describe examples of each, and indicate why using reversibility as a criterion for categorizing behavioural plasticities is problematic. This framework is then used to address a number of timely questions about individual differences in behavioural plasticities. One set of questions concerns the experimental designs that can be used to study individual differences in various types of behavioural plasticities. Although within-individual designs are the default option for empirical studies of many types of behavioural plasticities, in some situations (e.g. when experience at an early age affects the behaviour expressed at subsequent ages), 'replicate individual' designs can provide useful insights into individual differences in behavioural plasticities. To date, researchers using within-individual and replicate individual designs have documented individual differences in all of the major categories of behavioural plasticities described herein. Another important question is whether and how different types of behavioural plasticities are related to one another. Currently there is empirical evidence that many behavioural plasticities [e.g. contextual plasticity, learning rates, IIV (intra-individual variability), endogenous plasticities, ontogenetic plasticities) can themselves vary as a function of experiences earlier in life, that is, many types of behavioural plasticity are themselves developmentally plastic. These findings support the assumption that differences among individuals in prior experiences may contribute to individual differences in behavioural

  16. Plasticity characteristic obtained by indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mil'man, Yu.V.; Chugunova, S.I.; Goncharova, I.V.

    2011-01-01

    Methods for determination plasticity characteristic δH in the measurement of hardness and nanohardness are considered. Parameter δH characterizes the plasticity of a material by the part of plastic deformation in the total elastic-plastic deformation. The value of δH is defined for metals with different types of crystal lattice, covalent and partially covalent crystals, intermetallics, metallic glasses and quasicrystals. It is discussed the dependence of the plasticity characteristic δH on structural factors and temperature. Parameter δH allows to analyze and compare the plasticity of materials which are brittle at standard mechanical tests. The combination of hardness H, as the strength characteristic, and the plasticity characteristic δH makes possible the better characterization of mechanical behavior of materials than only the hardness H. The examples of plasticity characteristic δH application are represented.

  17. Plastic pollutants in water environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mrowiec Bożena

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, wide applications of plastics result in plastic waste being present in the water environment in a wide variety of sizes. Plastic wastes are in water mainly as microplastics (the size range of 1 nm to < 5 mm). Microplastics have been recognized as an emerging threat, as well as ecotoxicological and ecological risk for water ecosystems. In this review are presented some of the physicochemical properties of plastic materials that determine their toxic effect on the aquatic environment....

  18. Introduction to Computational Plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, P

    2006-01-01

    The focus of the book on computational plasticity embodies techniques of relevance not only to academic researchers, but also of interest to industrialists engaged in the production of components using bulk or sheet forming processes. Of particular interest is the guidance on how to create modules for use with the commercial system Abaqus for specific types of material behaviour. The book is in two parts, the first of which contains six chapters, starting with microplasticity, but predominantly on continuum plasticity. The first chapter on microplasticty gives a brief description of the grain structure of metals and the existence of slip systems within the grains. This provides an introduction to the concept of incompressibility during plastic deformation, the nature of plastic yield and the importance of the critically resolved shear stress on the slip planes (Schmid's law). Some knowledge of the notation commonly used to describe slip systems is assumed, which will be familiar to students of metallurgy, but anyone with a more general engineering background may need to undertake additional reading to understand the various descriptions. Chapter two introduces one of several yield criteria, that normally attributed to von Mises (though historians of mechanics might argue over who was first to develop the theory of yielding associated with strain energy density), and its two or three-dimensional representation as a yield surface. The expansion of the yield surface during plastic deformation, its translation due to kinematic hardening and the Bauschinger effect in reversed loading are described with a direct link to the material stress-strain curve. The assumption, that the increment of strain is normal to the yield surface, the normality principle, is introduced. Uniaxial loading of an elastic-plastic material is used as an example in which to develop expressions to describe increments in stress and strain. The full presentation of numerous expressions, tensors and

  19. Risk factors for subsidence in anterior cervical fusion with stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages: a review of 82 cases and 182 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ting-Hsien; Wu, Chen-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Hsien-Te; Chen, Wen-Hsien; Tsou, Hsi-Kai

    2014-10-01

    To determine risk factors for subsidence in patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. Records of patients with degenerative spondylosis or traumatic disc herniation resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy between C2 and C7 who underwent ACDF with stand-alone PEEK cages were retrospectively reviewed. Cages were filled with autogenous cancellous bone harvested from iliac crest or hydroxyapatite. Subsidence was defined as a decrease of 3 mm or more of anterior or posterior disc height from that measured on the postoperative radiograph. Eighty-two patients (32 males, 50 females; 182 treatment levels) were included in the analysis. Most patients had 1-2 treatment levels (62.2 %), and 37.8 % had 3-4 treatment levels. Treatment levels were from C2-7. Of the 82 patients, cage subsidence occurred in 31 patients, and at 39 treatment levels. Multivariable analysis showed that subsidence was more likely to occur in patients with more than two treatment levels, and more likely to occur at treatment levels C5-7 than at levels C2-5. Subsidence was not associated with postoperative alignment change but associated with more disc height change (relatively oversized cage). Subsidence is associated with a greater number of treatment levels, treatment at C5-7 and relatively oversized cage use.

  20. Comparison of Long terms Follow up Results in Patients with Cervical Disk DiseaseTreated With Anterior PEEK CageImplantation and Without it in Rasoul Akram Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Abolfazl Motiei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Anterior interbody fusion of the cervical spine have become the gold standard for treating spinal diseases, hence the aim of this study was to compare long term follow up results in patients with cervical disk disease treated with anterior PEEK cage implantation and without it in anterior approach. Methods: Retrospectively 63 patients with known cervical discogenic disorders who went under surgery with and without cage implantation were enrolled. The neurological examination and neurologic function were assessed by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA scoring system and neurological cervical spine scale (NCSS before and 8 years after surgery in each patient and at the end all complications were recorded. Results: In the first group, there were 15 males and 14 females (mean age: 49±10 years and in the second group there were 27 male and 7 female (mean age: 47±9 years. The NCSS score was significantly different between two groups after surgery (p=0.035 but there was no significant difference before surgery (p=0.163. No statistical significance difference was also observed in JOA score and complications before and after procedure, but JOA post surgery score between two groups had significant difference (p=0.047 . Conclusion: In conclusion, present study showed that PEEK cage implantation is a highly useful alternative to the conventional treatment methods.

  1. Plasticity modeling & computation

    CERN Document Server

    Borja, Ronaldo I

    2013-01-01

    There have been many excellent books written on the subject of plastic deformation in solids, but rarely can one find a textbook on this subject. “Plasticity Modeling & Computation” is a textbook written specifically for students who want to learn the theoretical, mathematical, and computational aspects of inelastic deformation in solids. It adopts a simple narrative style that is not mathematically overbearing, and has been written to emulate a professor giving a lecture on this subject inside a classroom. Each section is written to provide a balance between the relevant equations and the explanations behind them. Where relevant, sections end with one or more exercises designed to reinforce the understanding of the “lecture.” Color figures enhance the presentation and make the book very pleasant to read. For professors planning to use this textbook for their classes, the contents are sufficient for Parts A and B that can be taught in sequence over a period of two semesters or quarters.

  2. Sub-nanosecond plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.; Caldwell, S.E.; Hocker, L.P.; Crandall, D.G.; Zagarino, P.A.; Cheng, J.; Tirsell, G.; Hurlbut, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    Quenched plastic scintillators have been developed that yield much faster short decay components and greatly reduced long decay components compared to conventional plastic scintillators. The plastics are produced through the addition of selected quench agents to NE111 plastic scintillator that result in reduced total light output. Eight different agents have been studied. Benzophenone and piperidine are two of the most effective quench agents. Data are presented both for short and long decay components. The plastics are expected to make significant contributions in areas of plasma diagnostics

  3. Sub-nanosecond plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.; Caldwell, S.E.; Hocker, L.P.; Crandall, D.G.; Zagarino, P.A.; Cheng, J.; Tirsell, G.; Hurlbut, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    Quenched plastic scintillators have been developed that yield much faster short decay components and greatly reduced long decay components compared to conventional plastic scintillators. The plastics are produced through the addition of selected quench agents to NE111 plastic scintillator that result in reduced total light output. Eight different agents have been studied. Benzophenone and piperidine are two of the most effective quench agents. Data are presented both for short and long decay components. The plastics are expected to make significant contributions in areas of plasma diagnostics

  4. Compensatory plasticity: time matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa eLazzouni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioural outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioural enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with neurochemical and morphological changes; both intrinsic connectivity and functional coupling at rest are altered but are likewise dependent on different sensory

  5. Mesocycles in conserving plastics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    driven by the need to balance the requirements for reversibility in conservation practices with the artist’s intent and significance. Developments within each of the three mesocycles from the 1990s to date are discussed in this article. Environmental science and toxicology of waste plastics offer a novel...... source of information about real time degradation in terrestrial and marine microenvironments that seems likely to contribute to the conservation of similar materials in contemporary artworks....

  6. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties.

  7. Plastic waste disposal apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kito, S

    1972-05-01

    A test plant plastic incinerator was constructed by the Takuma Boiler Manufacturing Co. for Sekisui Chemical Industries, and the use of a continuous feed spreader was found to be most effective for prevention of black smoke, and the use of a venturi scrubber proved to be effective for elimination of hydrogen chloride gas. The incinerator was designed for combustion of polyvinyl chloride exclusively, but it is also applicable for combustion of other plastics. When burning polyethylene, polypropylene, or polystyrene, (those plastics which do not produce toxic gases), the incinerator requires no scrubber for the combustion gas. The system may or may not have a pretreatment apparatus. For an incinerator with a pretreatment system, the flow chart comprises a pit, a supply crane, a vibration feeder, a metal eliminator, a rotation shredder, a continuous screw feeder with a quantitative supply hopper, a pretreatment chamber (300 C dry distillation), a quantitative supply hopper, and the incinerator. The incinerator is a flat non-grid type combustion chamber with an oil burner and many air nozzles. From the incinerator, ashes are sent by an ash conveyor to an ash bunker. The combustion gas goes to the boiler, and the water supplied the boiler water pump creates steam. The heat from the gas is sent back to the pretreatment system through a heat exchanger. The gas then goes to a venturi scrubber and goes out from a stack.

  8. Investigations of mode I crack propagation in fibre-reinforced plastics with real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, A.; Nordstrom, R.; Flueeler, P.

    1992-01-01

    The described investigation of crack formation and crack propagation in mode I (tensile stress) in fibre-reinforced plastic samples, especially uni-directional carbon fibre reinforced polyether-ether ketone (PEEK) has several aims. On the one hand, the phenomena of crack formation and crack propagation in these materials are to be studied, and on the other hand, the draft standards for these tests are to be checked. It was found that the combination of real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis is excellently suited for the basic examination of crack formation and crack propagation in DCB samples. With the aid of picture processing and analysis of the video representation, consistent crack lengths and resulting G IC values can be determined. (orig./RHM) [de

  9. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance of molded plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen, N.S.; Leman, V.E.; Solomonov, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of molded plastic scintillators is studied. The plastic scintillators studied were formed by transfer molding and intrusion from a scintillation composition consisting of polystyrene and a standard system of luminescent additives: 2 mass % of paraterphenyl + 0.06 mass % 1,4-di-/2-[5-phenyloxazoyly]/benzene and a plasticizer. The combined effect of mechanical load and temperature was studied. The effect of radiation on molded plastic scintillators was studied using gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. The studies show that the main operating characteristics of molded plastic scintillators are on a par with those of polymerized plastic scintillators. At the same time, molded plastic scintillators are superior in thermal stability at temperatures below the glass transition temperature and with respect to their working temperature range

  11. Atmospheric Rivers and Historic California Floods: A Look in the Past and a Peek in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershunov, A.; Shulgina, T.; Ralph, F. M.; Polade, S. D.; Chellappan, S.

    2016-12-01

    The extent to which Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) have been responsible for historic floods in California is examined using a new catalog of ARs that made landfall at the west coast of North America during 1851-2012. This catalog based on the NOAA 20th Century Reanalysis V2c (SIO-N2) provides a large array of variables that can be used to examine AR cases and their climate-scale variability in exceptional detail. The new record of AR activity provides a perspective on the seasonal - inter-decadal variability of AR activity affecting the hydroclimate of the North American West. AR links to extreme precipitation and flooding are demonstrated using high-resolution observational precipitation data and an extensive record of historic floods compiled by the California Department of Water Resources and the US Army Corps of Engineers. We will discuss the climatic links of AR activity and flooding as well as the detailed role of ARs in driving specific historical floods. Peeking into the future, we apply our automated AR Detection Scheme to choice CMIP5 GCMs and study modeled ARs in conjunction with statistically downscaled precipitation, we validate AR activity diagnosed in GCMs against that derived from Reanalyses as follows. We assess the realism of the seasonal march of AR landfalls from the Gulf of Alaska coastline in late summer-early fall to California by the late fall-early winter as well as the contribution of AR-related precipitation to seasonal totals and especially extremes. We also validate linkages between seasonal AR activity and climate variability expressed in Pacific sea surface temperatures. Using the most successful GCMs, we will assess projected trends in land-falling AR behavior along with their contribution to projected extreme precipitation trends over California. In California's Mediterranean climate, the precipitation regime is projected to progressively favor extreme precipitation events at the expense of the moderate events. Meanwhile, the atmospheric

  12. Plastics in the Marine Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kara Lavender

    2017-01-03

    Plastics contamination in the marine environment was first reported nearly 50 years ago, less than two decades after the rise of commercial plastics production, when less than 50 million metric tons were produced per year. In 2014, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats, in sizes from microns to meters. In response, concerns about risks to marine wildlife upon exposure to the varied forms of plastic debris have increased, stimulating new research into the extent and consequences of plastics contamination in the marine environment. Here, I present a framework to evaluate the current understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics. Despite remaining knowledge gaps in mass budgeting and challenges in investigating ecological impacts, the increasing evidence of the ubiquity of plastics contamination in the marine environment, the continued rapid growth in plastics production, and the evidence-albeit limited-of demonstrated impacts to marine wildlife support immediate implementation of source-reducing measures to decrease the potential risks of plastics in the marine ecosystem.

  13. Plastics in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kara Lavender

    2017-01-01

    Plastics contamination in the marine environment was first reported nearly 50 years ago, less than two decades after the rise of commercial plastics production, when less than 50 million metric tons were produced per year. In 2014, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats, in sizes from microns to meters. In response, concerns about risks to marine wildlife upon exposure to the varied forms of plastic debris have increased, stimulating new research into the extent and consequences of plastics contamination in the marine environment. Here, I present a framework to evaluate the current understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics. Despite remaining knowledge gaps in mass budgeting and challenges in investigating ecological impacts, the increasing evidence of the ubiquity of plastics contamination in the marine environment, the continued rapid growth in plastics production, and the evidence—albeit limited—of demonstrated impacts to marine wildlife support immediate implementation of source-reducing measures to decrease the potential risks of plastics in the marine ecosystem.

  14. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  15. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  16. Plastics pipe couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J.B.

    1980-07-01

    A method is described of making a pipe coupling of the type comprising a plastics socket and a resilient annular sealing member secured in the mouth thereof, in which the material of at least one component of the coupling is subjected to irradiation with high energy radiation whereby the material is caused to undergo cross-linking. As examples, the coupling may comprise a polyethylene or plasticised PVC socket the material of which is subjected to irradiation, and the sealing member may be moulded from a thermoplastic elastomer which is subjected to irradiation. (U.K.)

  17. Plastic pollutants in water environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrowiec Bożena

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, wide applications of plastics result in plastic waste being present in the water environment in a wide variety of sizes. Plastic wastes are in water mainly as microplastics (the size range of 1 nm to < 5 mm. Microplastics have been recognized as an emerging threat, as well as ecotoxicological and ecological risk for water ecosystems. In this review are presented some of the physicochemical properties of plastic materials that determine their toxic effect on the aquatic environment. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs are mentioned as one of main sources of microplastics introduced into fresh water, and rivers are the pathways for the transportation of the pollutants to seas and oceans. But, effluents from tertiary wastewater treatment facilities can contain only minimally microplastic loads. The issue of discharge reduction of plastic pollutants into water environment needs activities in the scope of efficient wastewater treatment, waste disposal, recycling of plastic materials, education and public involvement.

  18. Plastic food packaging and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raika Durusoy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plastics have a wide usage in our daily lives. One of their uses is for food packaging and food containers. The aim of this review is to introduce different types of chemicals that can leach from food packaging plastics into foods and cause human exposure and to mention their effects on health. The types of plastics were reviewed under the 13 headings in Turkish Codex Alimentarius and plastics recycling symbols were provided to enable the recognition of the type of plastic when applicable. Chemicals used during the production and that can cause health risks are investigated under the heading of the relevant type of plastic. The most important chemicals from plastic food packaging that can cause toxicity are styrene, 1,3-butadiene, melamine, formaldehyde, acrylamide, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, di-2-ethylhexyl adipate, vinyl chloride and bisphenol A. These chemicals have endocrine disrupting, carcinogenic and/or development disrupting effects. These chemicals may leach into foods depending on the chemical properties of the plastic or food, temperature during packaging, processing and storage, exposure to UV and duration of storage. Contact with fatty/oily or acidic foods, heating of the food inside the container, or drinking hot drinks from plastic cups, use of old and scratched plastics and some detergents increase the risk of leaching. The use of plastic containers and packaging for food and beveradges should be avoided whenever possible and when necessary, less harmful types of plastic should be preferred. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 87-96

  19. New polyvinylchloride plasticizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAZITOVA Aliya Karamovna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main large-capacity polymers of modern chemical industry is polyvinylchloride (PVC. Polyvinylchloride is characterized by many useful engineering properties – chemical firmness in different environments, good electric properties, etc. It explains immensely various use of materials on the basis of PVC in different engineering industries. It is cable, building, light industries, mechanical engineering and automotive industry where PVC is widely applied. One of the reasons why PVC production is dramatically growing is that there is no yet other polymer which could be subjected to such various modifying as it is done with PVC. However under normal temperature this polymer is fragile and isn't elastic that limits the field of its application. Rapid growth of production of polyvinylchloride is explained by its ability to modify properties, due to introduction of special additives when processing. Introduction of plasticizers – mostlly esters of organic and inorganic acids – into PVC allows significant changing properties of polymer. Plasticizers facilitate process of receiving polymeric composition, increase flexibility and elasticity of the final polymeric product due to internal modification of polymeric molecule.

  20. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.; Abelairas, A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of 241 Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of 241 Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of 241 Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  1. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  2. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, F; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Abelairas, A

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of (241)Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of (241)Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of (241)Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  4. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  5. The influence of nominal stress on wear factors of carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA® Wear Performance) against zirconia toughened alumina (Biolox® delta ceramic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew; Horton, Henrietta; Unsworth, Anthony; Briscoe, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone is an attractive alternative to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene in artificial joints, but little has been published on the influence of stress on the wear factor. We know that in ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, the wear factor reduces as the normal stress increases, which is counter-intuitive but very helpful in the case of non-conforming contacts. In this study, carbon fibre-reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK-OPTIMA ® Wear Performance) has been investigated in a pin-on-plate machine under steady loads and under stresses typical of hip and knee joints. At stresses below about 6 MPa, wear factors are between 10 and a 100 times lower than for ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene but at higher stresses the wear factors increase substantially. © IMechE 2014.

  6. Sustainable reverse logistics for household plastic waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bing, X.

    2014-01-01

    Summary of the thesis titled “Sustainable Reverse Logistics for Household Plastic Waste”

    PhD Candidate: Xiaoyun Bing

    Recycled plastic can be used in the manufacturing of plastic products to reduce the use of virgin plastics material. The cost of recycled plastics is usually lower

  7. Single anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using self- locking stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage: evaluation of pain and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Thomaidis, Tryfon; Charitoudis, George; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Theodosiadis, Panagiotis; Gkasdaris, Grigorios

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) constitutes the conventional treatment of cervical disc herniation due to degenerative disc disease (DDD). ACDF with plating presents a variety of complications postoperatively and stand-alone cages are thought to be a promising alternative. The aim of this study was firstly, to analyze prospectively collected data from a sample of patients treated with single ACDF using C-Plus self-locking stand-alone PEEK cage system, without the use of plates or screws, in order to evaluate pain levels of patients, utilizing Neck and Arm Pain scale as an expression of visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondly, we aimed to evaluate health-related quality of life, via the short-form 36 (SF-36) and Neck Disability Index (NDI). Thirty-six patients (19 male and 17 female) with mean age 49.6±7 years old who underwent successful single ACDF using self-locking stand-alone PEEK cage for symptomatic cervical DDD were selected for the study. Neck and Arm pain, as well as SF-36 and NDI were estimated preoperatively and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Patients underwent preoperative and postoperative clinical, neurological and radiological evaluation. The clinical and radiological outcomes were satisfactory after a minimum 1-year follow-up. All results were statistically important (P<0.05), excluding improvement in NDI measured between 6 and 12 months. SF-36, Neck Pain, as well as Arm Pain featured gradual and constant improvement during follow-up, with best scores presenting at 12 months after surgery, while NDI reached its best at 6 months postoperatively. Generally, all scores showed improvement postoperatively during the different phases of the follow-up. Subsequently, ACDF using C-Plus cervical cage constitutes an effective method for cervical disc herniation treatment, in terms of postoperative improvement on pain levels and health-related quality of life and a safe alternative to the conventional method of treatment for cervical DDD.

  8. Plastics for corrosion inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Goldade, Victor A; Makarevich, Anna V; Kestelman, Vladimir N

    2005-01-01

    The development of polymer composites containing inhibitors of metal corrosion is an important endeavour in modern materials science and technology. Corrosion inhibitors can be located in a polymer matrix in the solid, liquid or gaseous phase. This book details the thermodynamic principles for selecting these components, their compatibility and their effectiveness. The various mechanisms of metal protection – barrier, inhibiting and electromechanical – are considered, as are the conflicting requirements placed on the structure of the combined material. Two main classes of inhibited materials (structural and films/coatings) are described in detail. Examples are given of structural plastics used in friction units subjected to mechano-chemical wear and of polymer films/coatings for protecting metal objects against corrosion.

  9. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  10. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled

  11. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roenning Paal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK. Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD. Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS. Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8 years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05, neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30 and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55. Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage, sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain, previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78% patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11% classified the surgical result as a failure

  12. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery has its objectives in publishing original articles about developments in all areas related to plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as to trauma surgery. It also serves as a means of providing a forum for correspondence, information and discussion. It also accepts review articles that ...

  13. Architecture of European Plastic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, J. -P. A.; Banic, A.; Molea, G.; Mazzola, R.; Poell, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    The architecture of European Plastic Surgery was published in 1996 [Nicolai JPA, Scuderi N. Plastic surgical Europe in an organogram. Eur J Plast Surg 1996; 19: 253-6.] It is the objective of this paper to update information of that article. Continuing medical education (CME), science, training,

  14. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Kou; Armin Iraji

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy;however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrat-ed both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the ifeld is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treat-ment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plas-ticity investigation.

  15. Size effects in crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    Numerical analyses of plasticity size effects have been carried out for different problems using a developed strain gradient crystal plasticiy theory. The theory employs higher order stresses as work conjugates to slip gradients and uses higher order boundary conditions. Problems on localization...... of plastic flow in a single crystal, grain boundary effects in a bicrystal, and grain size effects in a polycrystal are studied. Single crystals containing micro-scale voids have also been analyzed at different loading conditions with focus on the stress and deformation fields around the voids, on void...... growth and interaction between neighboring voids, and on a comparison between the developed strain gradient crystal plasticity theory and a discrete dislocation plasticity theory. Furthermore, voids and rigid inclusions in isotropic materials have been studied using a strain gradient plasticity theory...

  16. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems...... of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically...... oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale....

  17. Grain Interactions in Crystal Plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, K.P.; Curtin, W.A.

    2005-01-01

    The plastic response of a sheet metal is governed by the collective response of the underlying grains. Intragranular plasticity depends on intrinsic variables such as crystallographic orientation and on extrinsic variables such as grain interactions; however, the role of the latter is not well understood. A finite element crystal plasticity formulation is used to investigate the importance of grain interactions on intragranular plastic deformation in initially untextured polycrystalline aggregates. A statistical analysis reveals that grain interactions are of equal (or more) importance for determining the average intragranular deviations from the applied strain as compared to the orientation of the grain itself. Furthermore, the influence of the surrounding grains is found to extend past nearest neighbor interactions. It is concluded that the stochastic nature of the mesoscale environment must be considered for a proper understanding of the plastic response of sheet metals at the grain-scale

  18. When Do Managers Peek?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Anders Ryom; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg; Mols, Niels Peter

    decision makers deliberately obtain information about other organizations to possibly imitate them in the future. In a survey of Danish municipal managers facing important and complex make-or-buy decisions we test hypotheses about three types of perceived uncertainty, and find that technological......This study investigates a central proposition of institutional theory that uncertainty leads to organizational isomorphism. Contrary to most previous studies we apply an individual level approach, and relate the perceived uncertainty of decision makers to mimetic action, which we define as when...... uncertainty, through mimetic action, is connected to organizational isomorphism, and highlight that future studies of mimetic isomorphism should pay attention to the multidimensionality of uncertainty....

  19. Tiggr muuvi / Ingrid Peek

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Peek, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm A.A. Milne'i lasteraamatu "Karupoeg Puhh" ainetel "Tiigrifilm" ("The Tiger Movie") ja kõik selle tegelased. režissöör Jun Falkenstein : Ameerika Ühendriigid, The Walt Disney Company 2000

  20. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  1. Plasticity and beyond microstructures, crystal-plasticity and phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Hackl, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The book presents the latest findings in experimental plasticity, crystal plasticity, phase transitions, advanced mathematical modeling of finite plasticity and multi-scale modeling. The associated algorithmic treatment is mainly based on finite element formulations for standard (local approach) as well as for non-standard (non-local approach) continua and for pure macroscopic as well as for directly coupled two-scale boundary value problems. Applications in the area of material design/processing are covered, ranging from grain boundary effects in polycrystals and phase transitions to deep-drawing of multiphase steels by directly taking into account random microstructures.

  2. International policies to reduce plastic marine pollution from single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads): A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthos, Dirk; Walker, Tony R

    2017-05-15

    Marine plastic pollution has been a growing concern for decades. Single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads) are a significant source of this pollution. Although research outlining environmental, social, and economic impacts of marine plastic pollution is growing, few studies have examined policy and legislative tools to reduce plastic pollution, particularly single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads). This paper reviews current international market-based strategies and policies to reduce plastic bags and microbeads. While policies to reduce microbeads began in 2014, interventions for plastic bags began much earlier in 1991. However, few studies have documented or measured the effectiveness of these reduction strategies. Recommendations to further reduce single-use plastic marine pollution include: (i) research to evaluate effectiveness of bans and levies to ensure policies are having positive impacts on marine environments; and (ii) education and outreach to reduce consumption of plastic bags and microbeads at source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Water Vapor Permeation in Plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS) (referred to as “plastic scintillator”) are used for gamma ray detectors. A significant decrease in radiation detection performance has been observed in some PVT-based gamma-ray detectors in systems in outdoor environments as they age. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator can undergo an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects gamma ray detection performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in sensitivity has been seen in some gamma-ray detectors in some systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. The objective of this report is to document the phenomenon of permeability of plastic scintillator to water vapor and to derive the relationship between time, temperature, humidity and degree of water penetration in plastic. Several conclusions are documented about the properties of water permeability of plastic scintillator.

  4. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alain D.; Rykalin, Viktor V.

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R andD program at Fermilab

  5. Space Plastic Recycling System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Techshot's proposed Space Plastic Recycler (SPR) is an automated closed loop plastic recycling system that allows the automated conversion of disposable ISS...

  6. Durability of wood plastic composites manufactured from recycled plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Turku

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of accelerated weathering, xenon-arc light and freeze-thaw cycling on wood plastic composites extruded from a recycled plastic was studied. The results showed that, in general, weathering had a stronger impact on samples made from plastic waste compared to a sample made from virgin material. After weathering, the mechanical properties, tensile and flexural, were reduced by 2–30%, depending on the plastic source. Wettability of the samples was shown to play a significant role in their stability. Chemical analysis with infrared spectroscopy and surface observation with a scan electron microscope confirmed the mechanical test results. Incorporation of carbon black retained the properties during weathering, reducing the wettability of the sample, diminishing the change of mechanical properties, and improving color stability. Keywords: Environmental science, Mechanical engineering, Materials science

  7. Phenotypic plasticity, costs of phenotypes, and costs of plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Hilary S; Maughan, Heather; Steiner, Uli

    2008-01-01

    Why are some traits constitutive and others inducible? The term costs often appears in work addressing this issue but may be ambiguously defined. This review distinguishes two conceptually distinct types of costs: phenotypic costs and plasticity costs. Phenotypic costs are assessed from patterns...... of covariation, typically between a focal trait and a separate trait relevant to fitness. Plasticity costs, separable from phenotypic costs, are gauged by comparing the fitness of genotypes with equivalent phenotypes within two environments but differing in plasticity and fitness. Subtleties associated with both...... types of costs are illustrated by a body of work addressing predator-induced plasticity. Such subtleties, and potential interplay between the two types of costs, have also been addressed, often in studies involving genetic model organisms. In some instances, investigators have pinpointed the mechanistic...

  8. Developmental plasticity: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Karin B

    2017-01-01

    Developmental plasticity - the concept that adaptation to changing and unfavorable environmental conditions are possible but may come at the price of compromised health potentials - has evolutionary grounding as it facilitates survival but dissents with fundamental evolutionary principles in that it may advance the lesser fit. It is an important cornerstone of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD). Unlike evolutionary adaptation developmental plasticity may be short-lived and restricted to one or few generations and inheritance is uncertain. Potential mechanisms include epigenetic modifications adopted in utero which may not transmit to the next generation; future insights may allow adjustments of the outcomes of developmental plasticity.

  9. Radiation damage in plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results of radiation damage studies in plastic scintillators are reviewed and critically analyzed from the point of view of applications of plastic scintillators in calorimetric detectors for the SSC. Damage to transmission and to fluorescent yield in different conditions is discussed. New directions in R ampersand D are outlined. Several examples are given of the most recent data on the new scintillating materials made with old and new plastics and fluors, which are exhibiting significantly improved radiation resistance. With a present rate of a vigorous R D programme, the survival limits in the vicinity of 100 MRad seem to be feasible within a couple of years

  10. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to pro...

  11. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  12. Wood plastic combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunanan, S.A.; Bonoan, L.S.; Verceluz, F.P.; Azucena, E.A.

    1976-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve the physical and mechaniproperties of local inferior quality wood species by radiation-induced graft polymerization with plastic monomers. The process involves the following: 1) Preparation of sample; 2) Impregnation of sample with the monomers; 3) Irradiation of the impregnated sample with the use of 20,000 curie Co-60 as gamma-source; 4) Drying of irradiated sample to remove the unpolymerized monomer. Experimentation on different wood species were undertaken and the results given. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that the monomers systems MMA, MMA-USP, and styrene-USP are suitable for graft polymerization with the wood species almon, apitong, bagtikan, mayapis, red lauan, and tanguile. This is shown by their maximum conversion value which range from 86% to 96% with the optimum dose range of 1 to 2 Mrads. However, in the application of WPC process, properties that are required in a given wood product must be considered, thus aid in the selection of the monomer system to be used with a particular wood species. Some promising applications of WPC is in the manufacture of picker sticks, shuttles, and bobbins for the textile industry. However, there is a need for a pilot plant scale study so that an economic assessment of the commercial feasibility of this process can be made

  13. Helene: A Plastic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; White, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    Helene, the Saturnian L4 Trojan satellite co-orbiting Dionne and sitting within the E-ring, possesses an unusual morphology characteristic of broad km-scale basins and depressions and a generally smooth surface patterned with streaks and grooves which are indicative of non-typical mass transport. Elevation angles do not appear to exceed 10o at most. The nature and origin of the surface materials forming these grooved patterns is unknown. Given the low surface gravity (plastic-like flow like a Bingham fluid, we setup and test a number of likely scenarios to explain the observations. The numerical results qualitatively indicate that treating the mass-wasting materials as a Bingham material reproduces many of the qualitative features observed. We also find that in those simulations in which accretion is concomitant with Bingham mass-wasting, the long time-evolution of the surface flow shows intermittency in the total surface activity (defined as total surface integral of the absolute magnitude of the mass-flux). Detailed analyses identify the locations where this activity is most pronounced and we will discuss these and its implications in further detail.

  14. Comparison of a zero-profile anchored spacer (ROI-C) and the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with an anterior plate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijie; Wang, Heng; Li, Xuefeng; Chen, Jie; Sun, Han; Wang, Genlin; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Weimin

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical and radiographic efficacy of a new zero-profile anchored spacer called the ROI-C in anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, radiological outcomes and complications of multilevel ACDF with the ROI-C or with the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages with an anterior plate. From April 2011 to April 2014, 60 patients with MCSM were operated on using ACDF, with the ROI-C in 28 patients and PEEK cages with an anterior plate in 32 patients. The operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and clinical and radiological results were compared between the ROI-C group and the cage-plate group. The mean follow-up time was 23.8 ± 6.6 months, ranging from 12 to 36 months. At the first month and the last follow-up, the neck disability index (NDI) scores were decreased, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores were significantly increased, compared with the presurgical measurements in both groups. There were no significant differences in NDI scores or JOA scores between the two groups (P > 0.05), but there were significant differences in the operation time, blood loss and the presence of dysphagia (P PEEK cage with an anterior plate.

  15. Energy recovery from plastic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, A; Atzger, J

    1983-07-01

    The conversion of plastic wastes to energy is suggested as a practicable and advantageous alternative to recycling. A two-stage pilot gasification plant for the pyrolysis of wastes is described and the utilization of the resulting fuel gas discussed.

  16. Plasticity and creep of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Rusinko, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Here is a systematic presentation of the postulates, theorems and principles of mathematical theories of plasticity and creep in metals, and their applications. Special attention is paid to analysis of the advantages and shortcomings of the classical theories.

  17. Neuromodulation, development and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foehring, R C; Lorenzon, N M

    1999-03-01

    We discuss parallels in the mechanisms underlying use-dependent synaptic plasticity during development and long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in neocortical synapses. Neuromodulators, such as norepinephrine, serotonin, and acetylcholine have also been implicated in regulating both developmental plasticity and LTP/LTD. There are many potential levels of interaction between neuromodulators and plasticity. Ion channels are substrates for modulation in many cell types. We discuss examples of modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels and the consequences for neocortical pyramidal cell firing behaviour. At the time when developmental plasticity is most evident in rat cortex, the substrate for modulation is changing as the densities and relative proportions of various ion channels types are altered during ontogeny. We discuss examples of changes in K+ and Ca2+ channels and the consequence for modulation of neuronal activity.

  18. WEATHERABILITY OF ENHANCED DEGRADABLE PLASTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objective of this study was to assess the performance and the asociated variability of several selected enhanced degradable plastic materials under a variety of different exposure conditions. Other objectives were to identify the major products formed during degradation ...

  19. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour.......How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  20. Biocide Usage in Plastic Products

    OpenAIRE

    Kavak, Nergizhan; Çakır, Ayşegül; Koltuk, Fatmagül; Uzun, Utku

    2015-01-01

    People’s demand of improving their life quality caused to the term of hygiene become popular and increased the tendency to use more reliable and healthy products. This tendency makes the continuous developments in the properties of the materials used in manufactured goods compulsory. It is possible to create anti-bacterial plastic products by adding biocidal additives to plastic materials which have a wide-range of application in the areas such as health (medicine), food and many other indust...

  1. Interhemispheric plasticity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobágyi, Tibor; Richardson, Sarah Pirio; Lomarev, Mikhael; Shamim, Ejaz; Meunier, Sabine; Russman, Heike; Dang, Nguyet; Hallett, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Chronic unimanual motor practice increases the motor output not only in the trained but also in the nonexercised homologous muscle in the opposite limb. We examined the hypothesis that adaptations in motor cortical excitability of the nontrained primary motor cortex (iM1) and in interhemispheric inhibition from the trained to the nontrained M1 mediate this interlimb cross education. Healthy, young volunteers (n=12) performed 1000 submaximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) at 80% MVC during 20 sessions. Trained FDI's MVC increased 49.9%, and the untrained FDI's MVC increased 28.1%. Although corticospinal excitability in iM1, measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after every fifth session, increased 6% at rest, these changes, as those in intracortical inhibition and facilitation, did not correlate with cross education. When weak and strong TMS of iM1 were delivered on a background of a weak and strong muscle contraction, respectively, of the right FDI, excitability of iM1 increased dramatically after 20 sessions. Interhemispheric inhibition decreased 8.9% acutely within sessions and 30.9% chronically during 20 sessions and these chronic reductions progressively became more strongly associated with cross education. There were no changes in force or TMS measures in the trained group's left abductor minimi digiti and there were no changes in the nonexercising control group (n=8). The findings provide the first evidence for plasticity of interhemispheric connections to mediate cross education produced by a simple motor task.

  2. Development of a Plastic Stabilizer for the M865 Training Projectile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garner, James

    1999-01-01

    .... This preliminary stabilizer (flare) is made from polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and is expected to handle the in-bore and out-of-bore aerothermal environments sufficiently to conform to the performance of the present M865 flare...

  3. ARE PLASTIC GROCERY BAGS SACKING THE ENVIRONMENT?

    OpenAIRE

    Mangal Gogte

    2009-01-01

    This paper is oriented on analysis impacts of plastic bags on environment. In this paper is analyzed did plastic bags are so harmful, and what are the main ingredients of it. One part of this paper is oriented on effects of plastic bags and management of their usage. There is also made comparative analysis between impacts of plastic and paper bags on environment.

  4. Experiments with elasto-plastic oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup-thomsen, Søren; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1996-01-01

    Plastic displacements of a Gaussian white noise excited three degrees of freedom non-ideal elasto-plastic oscillator are measured in laboratory experiments and the plastic displacements are compared to computer simulated results for the corresponding ideal elasto-plastic oscillator. The comparative...

  5. Experiments with elasto-plastic oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup-Thomsen, S.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1999-01-01

    Plastic displacements of a Gaussian white noise excited three degrees of freedom non-ideal elasto-plastic oscillator are measured in laboratory experiments and the plastic displacements are compared to computer simulated results for the corresponding ideal elasto-plastic oscillator. The comparative...

  6. Plastic zonder olie : lesmodule voor nieuwe scheikunde

    OpenAIRE

    Langejan, B.; Klein Douwel, C.; Horst, ter, J.J.; Tijdink, K.; Marle, van, N.; Klaasen, P.; Coolen, R.; Assenbergh, van, P.; Sijbers, J.P.J.; Mast, A.

    2013-01-01

    Lesmodule voor nieuwe scheikunde voor leerlingen uit 5 en 6 vwo. Bioplastics worden gemaakt uit natuurlijke grondstoffen. Als ze de synthetische plastics vervangen kan de voorraad aardolie ontzien worden. Omdat veel bioplastics afbreekbaar zijn, kan ook de berg plastic afval krimpen. Maar zijn bioplastics in staat om ons de reguliere plastics te doen vergeten? Hoe maken we bioplastics met dezelfde veelzijdige eigenschappen als plastic? Waar komen de uiteenlopende eigenschappen van plastics ei...

  7. Elimination of Plastic Polymers in Natural Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez-Ekner, Sofia; Bidstrup, Marie Juliane Svea; Brusen, Nicklas Hald; Rugaard-Morgan, Zsa-Zsa Sophie Oona Ophelia

    2017-01-01

    Plastic production and consumption continues to rise and subsequently plastic waste continues to accumulates in natural environments, causing harm to ecosystems.The aim of this paper was to come up with a way to utilize organisms, that have been identified to produce plastic degrading enzymes, as a waste disposal technology. This review includes accounts of plastic production rates, the occurrence of plastic in natural environments and the current waste management systems to create an underst...

  8. Avalanches and plastic flow in crystal plasticity: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Cui, Yinan; Ghoniem, Nasr

    2018-01-01

    Crystal plasticity is mediated through dislocations, which form knotted configurations in a complex energy landscape. Once they disentangle and move, they may also be impeded by permanent obstacles with finite energy barriers or frustrating long-range interactions. The outcome of such complexity is the emergence of dislocation avalanches as the basic mechanism of plastic flow in solids at the nanoscale. While the deformation behavior of bulk materials appears smooth, a predictive model should clearly be based upon the character of these dislocation avalanches and their associated strain bursts. We provide here a comprehensive overview of experimental observations, theoretical models and computational approaches that have been developed to unravel the multiple aspects of dislocation avalanche physics and the phenomena leading to strain bursts in crystal plasticity.

  9. Plasticity characteristic obtained by indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milman, Yu V

    2008-01-01

    A dimensionless parameter δ H = ε p /ε t (where ε p and ε t are the average values of plastic and total deformation of material on the contact area indenter-specimen) may be used as the plasticity characteristic of materials, which made it possible to characterize the plasticity of materials that are brittle in standard mechanical tests. δ H may be calculated from the values of microhardness HM, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν. In instrumented indentation the plasticity characteristic δ A = A p /A t (A p and A t are the work of plastic and total deformation during indentation) may be calculated. δ A ∼ δ H for materials with δ H > 0.5, i.e. for all metals and the majority of ceramic materials. In this case, the theoretical equation δ A ∼ δ H = 1-10.2 · (1 - ν - 2ν 2 )(HM/E) is satisfied in experiments with the Berkovich indenter. The influence of the temperature and structural parameters (dislocation density and grain size including nanostructured materials) on δ H is discussed

  10. Mechanisms of GABAergic Homeostatic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wenner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic plasticity ensures that appropriate levels of activity are maintained through compensatory adjustments in synaptic strength and cellular excitability. For instance, excitatory glutamatergic synapses are strengthened following activity blockade and weakened following increases in spiking activity. This form of plasticity has been described in a wide array of networks at several different stages of development, but most work and reviews have focussed on the excitatory inputs of excitatory neurons. Here we review homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic neurons and their synaptic connections. We propose a simplistic model for homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic components of the circuitry (GABAergic synapses onto excitatory neurons, excitatory connections onto GABAergic neurons, cellular excitability of GABAergic neurons: following chronic activity blockade there is a weakening of GABAergic inhibition, and following chronic increases in network activity there is a strengthening of GABAergic inhibition. Previous work on GABAergic homeostatic plasticity supports certain aspects of the model, but it is clear that the model cannot fully account for some results which do not appear to fit any simplistic rule. We consider potential reasons for these discrepancies.

  11. Neurogenomic mechanisms of social plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Sara D; Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2015-01-01

    Group-living animals must adjust the expression of their social behaviour to changes in their social environment and to transitions between life-history stages, and this social plasticity can be seen as an adaptive trait that can be under positive selection when changes in the environment outpace the rate of genetic evolutionary change. Here, we propose a conceptual framework for understanding the neuromolecular mechanisms of social plasticity. According to this framework, social plasticity is achieved by rewiring or by biochemically switching nodes of a neural network underlying social behaviour in response to perceived social information. Therefore, at the molecular level, it depends on the social regulation of gene expression, so that different genomic and epigenetic states of this brain network correspond to different behavioural states, and the switches between states are orchestrated by signalling pathways that interface the social environment and the genotype. Different types of social plasticity can be recognized based on the observed patterns of inter- versus intra-individual occurrence, time scale and reversibility. It is proposed that these different types of social plasticity rely on different proximate mechanisms at the physiological, neural and genomic level. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of ionomers as polymer electrolytes for energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyukkeun

    group and a poly(ether ether ketone) backbone showed the highest proton conductivity and proton diffusion coefficient among the three ionomers, demonstrating the effect of the perfluorinated side chains. The proton conductivity of the novel ionomer was comparable to that of Nafion over a wide humidity range and temperature. A lithium perfluorosulfonate ionomer based on aromatic poly(arylene ether)s with pendant lithium perfluoroethyl sulfonates was prepared by ion exchange of the perlfuorosulfonic acid ionomer, and subsequently incoroporated into a lithium-ion battery cell as a single-ion conducting electrolyte. The microporous polymer film saturated with organic carbonates exhibited a nearly unity Li + transfer number, high ionic conductivity (e.g. > 10-3 S m-1 at room temperature) over a wide range of temperatures, high electrochemical stability, and excellent mechanical properties. Excellent cyclability with almost identical charge and discharge capacities have been demonstrated at ambient temperature in the batteries assembled from the prepared single-ion conductors. The mechanical stability of the polymer film was attributed to the rigid polymer backbone which was largely unaffected by the presence of plasticizing organic solvents, while the porous channels with high concentration of the perfluorinated side chains resulted in high ionic conductivity. The expected high charge-rate performance was not achieved, however, due to the high interfacial impedance present between the polymer electrolyte and the electrodes. Several procedural modifications were employed in order to decrease the interfacial impedance of the battery cell. The poly(arylene ether) based ionomer was saturated with an ionic liquid mixture, in order to explore the possibility of its application as a safe, inflammable electrolyte. A low-viscosity ionic liquid with high ionic conductivity, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate which has never been successfully utilized as an electrolyte for lithium

  14. Exercise and plasticize the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mala, Hana; Wilms, Inge

    Neuroscientific studies continue to shed light on brain’s plasticity and its innate mechanisms to recover. The recovery process includes re-wiring of the existing circuitry, establishment of new connections, and recruitment of peri-lesional and homologous areas in the opposite hemisphere....... The plasticity of the brain can be stimulated and enhanced through training, which serves as a fundamental element of neurorehabilitative strategies. For instance, intensive cognitive and physical training promote the activation of processes that may help the brain to adapt to new conditions and needs. However...... neurorehabilitation is to understand and define how to stimulate the injured brain to elicit the desired adaptation. Research focuses on uncovering specific elements relevant for training planning and execution in order to create an environment that stimulates and maximizes the exploitation of the brain’s plastic...

  15. Surface properties of beached plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2015-07-01

    Studying plastic characteristics in the marine environment is important to better understand interaction between plastics and the environment. In the present study, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephalate (PET), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) samples were collected from the coastal environment in order to study their surface properties. Surface properties such as surface functional groups, surface topography, point of zero charge, and color change are important factors that change during degradation. Eroded HDPE demonstrated an altered surface topography and color and new functional groups. Eroded PET surface was uneven, yellow, and occasionally, colonized by microbes. A decrease in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) peaks was observed for eroded PET suggesting that degradation had occurred. For eroded PVC, its surface became more lamellar and a new FTIR peak was observed. These surface properties were obtained due to degradation and could be used to explain the interaction between plastics, microbes, and pollutants.

  16. The Prism Plastic Calorimeter (PPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This proposal supports two goals: \\\\ \\\\ First goal:~~Demonstrate that current, widely used plastic technologies allow to design Prism Plastic Calorimeter~(PPC) towers with a new ``liquid crystal'' type plastic called Vectra. It will be shown that this technique meets the requirements for a LHC calorimeter with warm liquids: safety, hermeticity, hadronic compensation, resolution and time response. \\\\ \\\\ Second goal:~~Describe how one can design a warm liquid calorimeter integrated into a LHC detector and to list the advantages of the PPC: low price, minimum of mechanical structures, minimum of dead space, easiness of mechanical assembly, accessibility to the electronics, possibility to recirculate the liquid. The absorber and the electronic being outside of the liquid and easily accessible, one has maximum flexibility to define them. \\\\ \\\\ The R&D program, we define here aims at showing the feasibility of these new ideas by building nine towers of twenty gaps and exposing them to electron and hadron beams.

  17. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  18. Constraints on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murren, Courtney J; Auld, Josh R.; Callahan, Hilary S

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and generally regarded as a key mechanism for enabling organisms to survive in the face of environmental change. Because no organism is infinitely or ideally plastic, theory suggests that there must be limits (for example, the lack of ability to produce...... an optimal trait) to the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, or that plasticity may have inherent significant costs. Yet numerous experimental studies have not detected widespread costs. Explicitly differentiating plasticity costs from phenotype costs, we re-evaluate fundamental questions of the limits...... to the evolution of plasticity and of generalists vs specialists. We advocate for the view that relaxed selection and variable selection intensities are likely more important constraints to the evolution of plasticity than the costs of plasticity. Some forms of plasticity, such as learning, may be inherently...

  19. Plasticity Theory of Fillet Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    a safe and statically admissible stress distribution is established. The plasticity solutions are compared with tests carried out at the Engineering Academy of Denmark, Lyngby, in the early nineties, and old fillet weld tests. The new failure conditions are in very good agreement with the yield load......This paper deals with simple methods for calculation of fillet welds based on the theory of plasticity. In developing the solutions the lower-bound theorem is used. The welding material and parts of the base material are subdivided into triangular regions with homogeneous stress fields; thereby...... tests, but not so good agreement with the old failure load tests....

  20. The Plastic Tension Field Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a calculation method for steel plate girders with transverse web stiffeners subjected to shear. It may be used for predicting the failure load or, as a design method, to determine the optimal amount of internal web stiffeners. The new method is called the plastic tension field...... method. The method is based on the theory of plasticity and is analogous to the so-called diagonal compression field method developed for reinforced concrete beams with transverse stirrups, which is adopted in the common European concrete code (Eurocode 2). Many other theories have been developed...