WorldWideScience

Sample records for plastic cold water

  1. Lubricant for cold plastic metal working

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postolov, Yu.M.; Larina, N.F.; Osadchuk, Ye.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Syroyezhko, A.M.; Vikhorev, A.A.; Yakovlev, V.I.

    1980-03-28

    A lubricant is proposed for cold plastic metal working based on fatty acids from the process of pyrolysis of castor oil (ZhKPM) with increased screening properties and which improve the quality of PV of finished parts. The lubricant contains (percent): cyclohexanol 0.5-60, levulinic and/or ketoenanthic acid 0.5-20, ZhKPM up to 100; the content of ketoenanthic acid in mixture with levulinic acid is 20-50 percent. Tests of the number of proposed lubricants were conducted for cold stampling of parts from a metal strip on a 10 ton mechanical press. Tool stability (number of pieces until adhesion) was 1200-1400, purity class Pv-7. In tests under a similar condition of vegetable oil, ZhKPM and a mixture of ZhKPM with esters (nonlubricant) tool stability was 1100, and the purity class Pv-6.

  2. Gas Property Demonstrations Using Plastic Water Bottles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Dean J.; Bannon, Stephen J.; Gunter, Molly M.

    2011-01-01

    Plastic water bottles are convenient containers for demonstrations of gas properties illustrating Boyle's law, Charles's law, and Avogadro's law. The contents of iron-based disposable hand warmer packets can be used to remove oxygen gas from the air within an unfilled plastic water bottle.

  3. Warm fish with cold hearts: thermal plasticity of excitation-contraction coupling in bluefin tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiels, H A; Di Maio, A; Thompson, S; Block, B A

    2011-01-07

    Bluefin tuna have a unique physiology. Elevated metabolic rates coupled with heat exchangers enable bluefin tunas to conserve heat in their locomotory muscle, viscera, eyes and brain, yet their hearts operate at ambient water temperature. This arrangement of a warm fish with a cold heart is unique among vertebrates and can result in a reduction in cardiac function in the cold despite the elevated metabolic demands of endothermic tissues. In this study, we used laser scanning confocal microscopy and electron microscopy to investigate how acute and chronic temperature change affects tuna cardiac function. We examined the temporal and spatial properties of the intracellular Ca2+ transient (Δ[Ca2+]i) in Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) ventricular myocytes at the acclimation temperatures of 14°C and 24°C and at a common test temperature of 19°C. Acute (less than 5 min) warming and cooling accelerated and slowed the kinetics of Δ[Ca2+]i, indicating that temperature change limits cardiac myocyte performance. Importantly, we show that thermal acclimation offered partial compensation for these direct effects of temperature. Prolonged cold exposure (more than four weeks) increased the amplitude and kinetics of Δ[Ca2+]i by increasing intracellular Ca2+ cycling through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). These functional findings are supported by electron microscopy, which revealed a greater volume fraction of ventricular SR in cold-acclimated tuna myocytes. The results indicate that SR function is crucial to the performance of the bluefin tuna heart in the cold. We suggest that SR Ca2+ cycling is the malleable unit of cellular Ca2+ flux, offering a mechanism for thermal plasticity in fish hearts. These findings have implications beyond endothermic fish and may help to delineate the key steps required to protect vertebrate cardiac function in the cold.

  4. Finger and toe temperature response to cold water and cold air exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, N.R. van der; Es, E.M. van; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Subjects with a weak cold-induced vasodilatation response (CIVD) to experimental cold-water immersion of the fingers in a laboratory setting have been shown to have a higher risk for local cold injuries when exposed to cold in real life. Most of the cold injuries in real life, however,

  5. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Robert [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, Peter [BMT Scientific Marine Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shi, Shan [Houston Offshore Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Marinho, Thiago [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). LabOceano

    2014-05-09

    A commercial floating 100-megawatt (MW) ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant will require a cold water pipe (CWP) with a diameter of 10-meter (m) and length of up to 1,000 m. The mass of the cold water pipe, including entrained water, can exceed the mass of the platform supporting it. The offshore industry uses software-modeling tools to develop platform and riser (pipe) designs to survive the offshore environment. These tools are typically validated by scale model tests in facilities able to replicate real at-sea meteorological and ocean (metocean) conditions to provide the understanding and confidence to proceed to final design and full-scale fabrication. However, today’s offshore platforms (similar to and usually larger than those needed for OTEC applications) incorporate risers (or pipes) with diameters well under one meter. Secondly, the preferred construction method for large diameter OTEC CWPs is the use of composite materials, primarily a form of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP). The use of these material results in relatively low pipe stiffness and large strains compared to steel construction. These factors suggest the need for further validation of offshore industry software tools. The purpose of this project was to validate the ability to model numerically the dynamic interaction between a large cold water-filled fiberglass pipe and a floating OTEC platform excited by metocean weather conditions using measurements from a scale model tested in an ocean basin test facility.

  6. Cold water immersion: kill or cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M J; Collier, N; Massey, H; Corbett, J; Harper, M

    2017-08-23

    What is the topic of this review? This is the first review to look across the broad field of 'cold water immersion' and to determine the threats and benefits associated with it as both a hazard and a treatment. What advances does it highlight? The level of evidence supporting each of the areas reviewed is assessed. Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation-related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  7. Cold water inlet in solar tanks - valuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project is to make a proposal for how to value a storage tank with a poor design of the cold water inlet. Based on measurements and calculations a number of curves, which are valid for this valuation, are worked out. Based on a simple test with a uniform heated storage tank the ratio...

  8. When hot water freezes before cold

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2006-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  9. Reduction of the residual stresses in cold expanded thick-walled cylinders by plastic compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.F. SKVORTSOV; A.O. BOZNAK; A.B. KIM; A. Yu ARLYAPOV; A.I. DMITRIEV

    2016-01-01

    We suppose that in order to maintain high accuracy of holes and to lower residual stresses after cold expansion of thick-walled cylinders, which undergo cross-section plastic deformation, it is necessary to perform axial plastic compression and subsequent cold expansion with small interferences. To test this hypothesis, we studied hoop, radial and axial residual stresses in cylinders made of carbon steel AISI 1050 with hole diameter of 5 mm, outer diameter of 15 mm and length of 30 mm by Sachs method as well as accuracy of expanded holes. It is found that double cold expansion with total interference equal to 5.1%generates hoop residual stresses with largest absolute value equal to 284 MPa and ensures high holes accuracy (IT7). After plastic compression with strain equal to 0.5 and 1%the mentioned stresses reduced to 120 and 75 MPa respectively, and accuracy of the holes reduced as well. Subsequent cold expansion with small interference equal to 0.9%helps to restore holes accuracy (IT7) gained by double cold expansion and ensure that absolute value of hoop residual stresses (177 MPa) is lower compared to double cold expansion.

  10. Mechanisms of plastic deformation for powder materials in cold working

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连洪; 李双义

    2003-01-01

    To deal with the discontinuity of particulate media and subsequent uncertainty of stress, based on the probability theory for mechanics of particulate media, Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion of particulate media, and the theory of crystal deformation, we put forward the statistical mechanisms of deformation of powder materials in cold working and mechanism of texture development of the high temperature superconducting wire/tape. A new yield criterion of powder materials is proposed.

  11. 21 CFR 880.6085 - Hot/cold water bottle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hot/cold water bottle. 880.6085 Section 880.6085... Devices § 880.6085 Hot/cold water bottle. (a) Identification. A hot/cold water bottle is a device intended for medical purposes that is in the form of a container intended to be filled with hot or cold...

  12. Generation of Cold Argon Plasma Jet at the End of Flexible Plastic Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Konstantin G; Prysiazhnyi, Vadym

    2014-01-01

    This brief communication reports a new method for generation of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet at the downstream end of a flexible plastic tube. The device consists of a small chamber where dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is ignited in Argon. The discharge is driven by a conventional low frequency AC power supply. The exit of DBD reactor is connected to a commercial flexible plastic tube (up to 4 meters long) with a thin floating Cu wire inside. Under certain conditions an Ar plasma jet can be extracted from the downstream tube end and there is no discharge inside the plastic tube. The jet obtained by this method is cold enough to be put in direct contact with human skin without electric shock and can be used for medical treatment and decontamination.

  13. Transfer of a cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet through a long flexible plastic tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Konstantin G.; Machida, Munemasa; Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Honda, Roberto Y.

    2015-04-01

    This work proposes an experimental configuration for the generation of a cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet at the downstream end of a long flexible plastic tube. The device consists of a cylindrical dielectric chamber where an insulated metal rod that serves as high-voltage electrode is inserted. The chamber is connected to a long (up to 4 m) commercial flexible plastic tube, equipped with a thin floating Cu wire. The wire penetrates a few mm inside the discharge chamber, passes freely (with no special support) along the plastic tube and terminates a few millimeters before the tube end. The system is flushed with Ar and the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is ignited inside the dielectric chamber by a low frequency ac power supply. The gas flow is guided by the plastic tube while the metal wire, when in contact with the plasma inside the DBD reactor, acquires plasma potential. There is no discharge inside the plastic tube, however an Ar plasma jet can be extracted from the downstream tube end. The jet obtained by this method is cold enough to be put in direct contact with human skin without an electric shock. Therefore, by using this approach an Ar plasma jet can be generated at the tip of a long plastic tube far from the high-voltage discharge region, which provides the safe operation conditions and device flexibility required for medical treatment.

  14. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    CERN Document Server

    Jeng, M

    2005-01-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more ...

  15. Cold water inlet in solar tanks - valuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project is to make a proposal for how to value a storage tank with a poor design of the cold water inlet. Based on measurements and calculations a number of curves, which are valid for this valuation, are worked out. Based on a simple test with a uniform heated storage tank the ratio...... between the energy tapped in one storage volume and the energy content in the tank before the tapping is measured. Afterwards the mixing factor, corresponding to the measured ratio, can be determined. It is proposed that the mixing factor is taken into consideration when the governmental subsidy for SDHW...

  16. USE OF THE DEVICE TO INCREASE THE PLASTIC PROPERTIES OF COLD-SHAPED FITTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Akhmetov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subjects of influence of the relationship of a limit of fluidity and full relative lengthening at the maximum load on deformation energy before destruction are considered in the article. Use of the block to decrease of internal tension in production of cold-shaped fittings allows to increase significantly its plastic properties, i. e. a power factor. At the same time combination of such device with the straightening unit similar to one used in production of thin wire and also minimization of specific reduction opens prospects for obtaining all necessary parameters of the fittings of a class «B» produced by cold rolling. 

  17. Power, fresh water, and food from cold, deep sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmer, D F; Roels, O A

    1973-10-12

    Many times more solar heat energy accumulates in the vast volume of warm tropic seas than that produced by all of our power plants. The looming energy crisis causes a renewal of interest in utilizing this stored solar heat to give, in addition to electric power, vast quantities of fresh water. Warm surface water, when evaporated, generates steam, to power a turbine, then fresh water when the steam is condensed by the cold water. A great increase in revenues over that from power and fresh water is shown by a substantial mariculture pilot plant. Deep sea water contains large quantities of nutrients. These feed algae which feed shellfish, ultimately shrimps and lobsters, in shallow ponds. Wastes grow seaweed of value; and combined revenues from desalination, power generation, and mariculture will give substantial profit.

  18. Cold-atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour for improved wood plastics composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekobou, William; Pedrow, Patrick; Englund, Karl; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Plastic composites have become a large class of construction material for exterior applications. One of the main disadvantages of wood plastic composites resides in the weak adhesion between the polar and hydrophilic surface of wood and the non-polar and hydrophobic polyolefin matrix, hindering the dispersion of the flour in the polymer matrix. To improve interfacial compatibility wood flour can be pretreated with environmentally friendly methods such as cold-atmospheric pressure plasma. The objective of this work is therefore to evaluate the potential of plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour to improve the compatibility with polyolefins. This presentation will describe the reactor design used to modify wood flour using acetylene plasma polymerization. The optimum conditions for plasma polymerization on wood particles will also be presented. Finally preliminary results on the wood flour surface properties and use in wood plastic composites will be discussed.

  19. Interfacial molecular restructuring of plasticized polymers in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankett, Jeanne M; Lu, Xiaolin; Liu, Yuwei; Seeley, Emily; Chen, Zhan

    2014-10-07

    Upon water contact, phthalate-plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) surfaces are highly unstable because the plasticizer molecules are not covalently bound to the polymer network. As a result, it is difficult to predict how the surface polymer chains and plasticizers may interact with water without directly probing the plastic/water interface in situ. We successfully studied the molecular surface restructuring of 10 wt% and 25 wt% bis 2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)-plasticized and pure PVC films (deposited on solid substrates) in situ due to water contact using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG spectral signals from both the top and the bottom of the plastic film were obtained simultaneously, so a thin-film model spectral analysis was applied to separately identify the molecular changes of plastics at the surface and the plastic/substrate interface in water. It was found that in water both the structures of the plastic surface and the buried plastic/substrate interface changed. After removing the samples from the water and exposing them to air again, the surface structures did not completely recover. Further SFG experiments confirmed that small amounts of DEHP were transferred into the water. The leached DEHP molecules could reorder and permanently transfer to new surfaces through water contact. Our studies indicate that small amounts of phthalates can transfer from surface to surface through water contact in an overall scope of minutes. This study yields vital new information on the molecular surface structures of DEHP plasticized PVC in water, and the transfer behaviors and environmental fate of plasticizers in polymers.

  20. Bacterial contamination in cold water samples obtained from water dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ishizaki, Naoto; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a basic study in order to evaluate the bacterial contamination in water dispensers. Water samples were obtained from water dispensers from October 2012 to November 2013, and standard plate counts (at 36˚C, 24 h) of the samples, as well as heterotrophic plate counts (at 25˚C, 7 d), were estimated with the standard methods for the examination of drinking water in Japan. Standard plate counts exceeding the water-quality standard (1.0×10(2) CFU/ml) were observed in 42 of the 140 samples (30.0%), with a maximum detected bacterial count of 2.1×10(5) CFU/ml. The rate of the standard plate counts exceeding the water quality standard tended to be higher when using a one-way type method or water dispensers with natural water. Ralstonia spp. was most commonly isolated, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in a few cases. Some opportunistic pathogens were also isolated, suggesting that we should be more concerned about bacterial contamination in cold water supplied from water dispensers.

  1. Supercritical Water Process for the Chemical Recycling of Waste Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Motonobu

    2010-11-01

    The development of chemical recycling of waste plastics by decomposition reactions in sub- and supercritical water is reviewed. Decomposition reactions proceed rapidly and selectively using supercritical fluids compared to conventional processes. Condensation polymerization plastics such as PET, nylon, and polyurethane, are relatively easily depolymerized to their monomers in supercritical water. The monomer components are recovered in high yield. Addition polymerization plastics such as phenol resin, epoxy resin, and polyethylene, are also decomposed to monomer components with or without catalysts. Recycling process of fiber reinforced plastics has been studied. Pilot scale or commercial scale plants have been developed and are operating with sub- and supercritical fluids.

  2. Production of Methane and Water from Crew Plastic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Santiago, Eddie; Parrish, Clyde; Strayer, Richard F.; Garland, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    Recycling is a technology that will be key to creating a self sustaining lunar outpost. The plastics used for food packaging provide a source of material that could be recycled to produce water and methane. The recycling of these plastics will require some additional resources that will affect the initial estimate of starting materials that will have to be transported from earth, mainly oxygen, energy and mass. These requirements will vary depending on the recycling conditions. The degredation products of these plastics will vary under different atmospheric conditions. An estimate of the the production rate of methane and water using typical ISRU processes along with the plastic recycling will be presented.

  3. FDA Throws Cold Water on Whole Body Cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html FDA Throws Cold Water on Whole Body Cryotherapy Exposure to ultra-low temperatures shows no benefits ... evidence that a growing trend called whole body cryotherapy is effective, but it does pose a number ...

  4. Complex of computer models for cold stress evaluation in water

    OpenAIRE

    І. I. Ermakova; N. G. Ivanushkina; A. Yu. Nikolaenko; Yu. N. Solopchuk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Due to the high value of water thermal conductivity comparing to air, stay of man in cold water (water temperature lower than 25 sup>°C) is associated with high life and health hazard. One of the ways to evaluate survival time of human in water is usage of statistics data about survivors and water temperature organized as tables and curves. Another method to evaluate survival time and physiological state of man in water is computer modelling of human thermoregulatory system. ...

  5. Environmental control on cold-water carbonate mounds development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Raddatz, J.; Flögel, S.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Exp. 307 Scientific Party, Iodp

    2009-04-01

    Cold-water coral reefs are very abundant along the European continental margin in intermediate water depths and are able to build up large mound structures. These carbonate mounds particularly occur in distinct mound provinces on the Irish and British continental margins. Previous investigations resulted in a better understanding of the cold-water coral ecology and the development of conceptual models to explain carbonate mound build-up. Two different hypotheses were evoked to explain the origin and development of carbonate mounds, external versus internal control (e.g., Freiwald et al. 2004 versus e.g. Hovland 1990). Several short sediment cores have been obtained from Propeller Mound, Northern Porcupine Seabight, indicating that cold-water corals grew during interglacial and warm interstadial periods of the Late Pleistocene controlled by environmental and climatic variability supporting the external control hypothesis (e.g. Dorschel et al. 2005, R

  6. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Buckle, J. V. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Takakuwa, S., E-mail: eva.wirstrom@chalmers.se [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  7. Differential Response of Grain Quality to Cold Water Irrigation in Cold Tolerant and Sensitive Lines of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Long-zhi; PIAO Zhong-ze; Koh Hee-jong

    2005-01-01

    Three rice varieties and several F3 lines with high and low cold tolerance, selected from F3 segregation lines of two crosses Milyang 23/Tong 88-7 and Milyang 23/TR22183 were used to analyze the effects of cold tolerance on the response of grain quality to cold water irrigation. The result showed that cold water irrigation led to the decrease of rice grain size. The length, length-width ratio and weight of brown rice grain were more sensitively affected by cold water irrigation than the width and thickness. The shape of brown rice grain was not significantly affected by the selection for cold tolerance at the seedling stage (CTS). The gel consistency, amylose content, peak viscosity, cool viscosity, breakdown viscosity and consistency viscosity were decreased, while alkali digestibility value and protein content were increased by cold water irrigation. Under normal irrigation condition the physicochemical properties of milled rice and viscogram components of milled rice flour were not significantly different between lines with high and low cold tolerance. Under cold water irrigation the amylose content, peak viscosity, hot viscosity, final viscosity of rice lines with high CTS or high cold tolerance at the booting stage (CTB) were higher, while the protein content, setback viscosity, breakdown ratio and setback ratio were lower, than those of rice lines with low cold tolerance. This implied that the cold water response of rice grain quality was less sensitive in the lines with high cold tolerance than in the lines with low cold tolerance, and the varietal improvement for cold tolerance would be important for grain quality improvement at the same time.

  8. Neuromuscular function during knee extension exercise after cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-06-23

    Human adaptability to cold environment has been focused on in the physiological anthropology and related research area. Concerning the human acclimatization process in the natural climate, it is necessary to conduct a research assessing comprehensive effect of cold environment and physical activities in cold. This study investigated the effect of cold water immersion on the exercise performance and neuromuscular function during maximal and submaximal isometric knee extension. Nine healthy males participated in this study. They performed maximal and submaximal (20, 40, and 60% maximal load) isometric knee extension pre- and post-immersion in 23, 26, and 34 °C water. The muscle activity of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) was measured using surface electromyography (EMG). The percentages of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) and mean power frequency (MPF) of EMG data were analyzed. The post-immersion maximal force was significantly lower in 23 °C than in 26 and 34 °C conditions (P water temperature conditions at 40 and 60% maximal intensities (P muscle fibers conduction velocity. To compensate for the impairment of each muscle fibers function, more muscle fibers might be recruited to maintain the working load. This might result in the greater amplitude of EMG after the cold immersion.

  9. Self-rescue swimming in cold water: the latest advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Michel B; Lounsbury, David S

    2007-08-01

    According to the 2006 Canadian Red Cross Drowning Report, 2007 persons died of cold-water immersion in Canada between 1991 and 2000. These statistics indicate that prevention of cold-water immersion fatalities is a significant public health issue for Canadians. What should a person do after accidental immersion in cold water? For a long time, aquatic safety organizations and government agencies stated that swimming should not be attempted, even when a personal flotation device (PFD) is worn. The objective of the present paper is to present the recent scientific evidence making swimming a viable option for self-rescue during accidental cold-water immersion. Early studies in the 1960s and 1970s led to a general conclusion that "people are better off if they float still in lifejackets or hang on to wreckage and do not swim about to try to keep warm". Recent evidence from the literature shows that the initial factors identified as being responsible for swimming failure can be either easily overcome or are not likely the primary contributors to swimming failure. Studies over the last decade reported that swimming failure might primarily be related not to general hypothermia, but rather to muscle fatigue of the arms as a consequence of arm cooling. This is based on the general observation that swimming failure developed earlier than did systemic hypothermia, and can be related to low temperature of the arm muscles following swimming in cold water. All of the above studies conducted in water between 10 and 14 degrees C indicate that people can swim in cold water for a distance ranging between about 800 and 1500 m before being incapacitated by the cold. The average swimming duration for the studies was about 47 min before incapacitation, regardless of the swimming ability of the subjects. Recent evidence shows that people have a very accurate idea about how long it will take them to achieve a given swimming goal despite a 3-fold overestimation of the absolute distance to

  10. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  11. Interannual variability of the southern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡敦欣; 王庆业

    2004-01-01

    Temperature data collected in the sections of 34°N, 35°N and 36°N in August from 1975 through2003 were analyzed using Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) to investigate interannual variability of the southern Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). The first mode (EOF1) reveals variations of basin-wide thermocline depth, which is mainly caused by surface heating. The second mode (EOF2) presents fluctuations of vertical circulation, resulting mainly from interannual variability of cold front intensity. In addition, it is found that the upward extent of upwelling in the cold front is basically determined by wind stress curl and the zonal position of the warm water center in the southern Yellow Sea is correlated with spatial difference of net heat flux.

  12. Effect of Cold Water Immersion or Contrast Water Therapy on Muscle Soreness After Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C A Lauber; S Hickle; J Jargstorf; W West

    2017-01-01

    An abstract of a study by Lauber et al determining if post-exercise cold-water immersion decreases muscle soreness compared to contrast water therapy at 48 hours post delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS...

  13. Migration of bisphenol A and nonylphenol from mineral water bottles and disposable plastic containers into water at different temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali Kazemi; Habibollah Younesi; Nader Bahramifar

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: bisphenol A and nonylphenol are xenoestrogen materials used as a monomer of plastics in widely volume in the production of plastic materials especially mineral water bottles and disposable plastic containers...

  14. Survival in Cold Waters: Staying Alive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    James Lind (1762) mentioned the dangers of collapse after rescue (Reference 102), and James Currie (1797) observed deterioration of his subjects...with wave splash. This is a typical scenario for passengers on tourist vessels in Canada’s lakes and rivers in spring and early summer. Sterba et al...Rough Seas. Aviat. Space Environ. Med. 58: 550-8. 1987. 142. Sterba , J.A. and Lundgren, C.A. Influence of Water Temperature on Breath Holding Time in

  15. Factors Influencing Manual Performance in Cold Water Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    impairment as a function of nitrogen narcosis . J. Applied Psychology, 46, 91-95. 12. Mackworth, N. (1953) Cold acclimatization and finger numbness...water. Results show that narcosis did not affect manual performance at 40 msw (p>0.05). In 25 oC water, three fingered neoprene gloves caused a...in 25oC water, and with gloves in 4oC water. Results: Narcosis did not have a significant effect on these components of manual performance (p

  16. Influence of stress path change on the resistance to plastic deformation of cold rolled sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zonghai Ding; Pavel Huml

    2005-01-01

    Flat workpieces have been tested in order to investigate the influence of stress path change (loading mode) while keeping strain path unchanged. These investigations are pertinent to the testing of cold rolled strips and to subsequent forming. The workpieces which first compressed by plane strain compression in thickness direction were then tested in perpendicular direction in order to measure the influence of strain and stress path. The tension workpieces came from flat die compression test at different deformation histories. Two different materials were investigated: 18/8 Ti stainless steel and AW-1050 aluminium. The results show that the plastic flow by tension in lengthwise direction after pre-strain by compression in thickness direction will begin at an appreciably lower stress than that of the workpieces unloaded after pre-compression. Comparing with two materials, it can be seen that both 18/8Ti stainless steel and AW-1050 aluminium behave similarly. The drop in yield stress is lower for AW-1050 aluminium than that for 18/8 Ti stainless steel. However, reloading in different directions than in the precious step results in significantly higher strain hardening.

  17. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment of cellulose based fillers for wood plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekobou, William; Englund, Karl; Pedrow, Patrick; Scudiero, Louis

    2011-10-01

    The main challenge of wood plastic composites (WPC) resides in the low interfacial adhesion due to incompatibility between the cellulose based filler that has a polar surface and most common matrixes, polyolefins which are non-polar. Plasma treatment is a promising technique for surface modification and its implementation into the processing of WPC would provide this industry with a versatile and nearly environmentally benign manufacturing tool. Our investigation aims at designing a cold atmospheric pressure plasma reactor for coating fillers with a hydrophobic material prior to compounding with the matrix. Deposition was achieved with our reactor that includes an array of high voltage needles, a grounded metal mesh, Ar as carrier gas and C2H2 as the precursor molecule. Parameters studied have included gas feed rates and applied voltage; FTIR, ESCA, AFM and SEM imaging were used for film diagnostics. We will also report on deposition rate and its dependence on radial and axial position as well as the effects of plasma-polymerized acetylene on the surface free energy of cellulose based substrates.

  18. Effect of severe plastic deformation on the specific heat and magnetic properties of cold rolled Gd sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskaev, S.; Skokov, K.; Khovaylo, V.; Buchelnikov, V.; Pellenen, A.; Karpenkov, D.; Ulyanov, M.; Bataev, D.; Usenko, A.; Lyange, M.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2015-03-01

    We report on specific heat and magnetic properties of thin Gd sheets obtained by means of a cold rolling technique. At temperatures well below Curie temperature TC, the cold rolling has a minor impact on the specific heat Cp. However, a well defined λ-type anomaly of Cp seen in the vicinity of TC in a polycrystalline Gd sample is markedly suppressed in the severely deformed samples. Depression of the λ peak is due to a large decrease of magnetization that presumably originates in a local magnetic anisotropy induced by the severe plastic deformation. Results of calculation of magnetocaloric effect from the Cp and magnetization data indicate that the magnetocaloric effect gradually decreases as the degree of plastic deformation increases. This trend is further confirmed by the direct measurements of the adiabatic temperature change ΔTad.

  19. Pouring 'Cold Water' on Hot Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    The extensive recrystallization of type-6 OC has been interpreted as having resulted either from prograde thermal metamorphism of initially cold, unequilibrated material [1,2] or from autometamorphism due to slow cooling of material that accreted while still hot (1000-1200 K). Although the physical implausibility of hot accretion has been addressed [3], no comprehensive evaluation has been made of arguments in its favor. As shown below, these arguments are based on incomplete data, flawed experiments or improbable interpretations. Correlation between petrologic type and Ca in low-Ca pyroxene. Models of prograde metamorphism assume that, with increasing temperature, opx acquires Ca at the expense of diopside. Analyses of pyroxene in 10 H chondrites showed no correlation between Ca in pyroxene cores and increasing petrologic type [4], but more extensive data sets show such correlations [1,5,6]. A review of data for 51 OC [7] shows a progressive increase in the Wo content of low-Ca pyroxene with petrologic type: Wo 0.4-1.2 in type-3 and -4; Wo 1.2-1.6 in type-5; and Wo 1.6-2.2 in type-6. Striated opx. Undeformed striated opx were interpreted as having formed from inverted protopyroxene during slow cooling [8]; striated opx from H4 Quenggouk were found to convert into normal opx within 1 week during annealing at 1100 K [9]. Because prograde metamorphism probably lasted ~60 Ma [10], there should be no striated opx remaining in type-4 or -5 OC. However, samples of 99% twinned clinopyroxene (analogous to that in chondrules in type-3 OC) annealed for >3 weeks at Conquista could not have formed during single stage cooling as expected in autometamorphism; a two-stage cooling history involving rapid cooling during chondrule formation followed by parent-body annealing is more plausible. Polycrystalline taenite. Polycrystalline taenite in H/L3 Tieschitz was interpreted as a relict solidification structure that failed to anneal into monocrystalline taenite because of rapid

  20. New Records of Cold-Water Corals from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Im Song

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cold-water coral taxa, Octocorallia in the class Anthozoa and Stylasteridae in the class Hydrozoa, were identified. Deep-water samples were collected in fishing nets at depths ranging between 20 and 200 m along the coasts of the East Sea in Korea from 1976 to 1993. The two species found in this study represent new records for Korea: Paragorgia arborea (Linnaeus, 1758 in the class Anthozoa, and Stylaster profundiporus Broch, 1936 in the class Hydrozoa. Two families, Paragorgiidae and Stylasteridae, are also newly recorded in Korea. Furthermore, the species name of another cold-water gorgonian species, Primnoa pacifica (Kinoshita, 1907 in the family Primnoidae, is amended in this report. The two newly recorded cold-water coral species from Korea are described in detail based on their morphological characteristics. Paragorgia arborea is characterized by its growth form, medulla and cortex, zooid dimorphism, canal system, and spicule composition. Stylaster profundiporus is distinguished by its external skeletal characteristics, such as the coordination of dactylopores and gastropores, presence or absence of gastrostyles and dactylostyles, cyclosystem orientation, ampullar position, gastropore tube shape, and coenosteal texture.

  1. Physical controls on cold-water coral growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, S.; Rueggeberg, A.; Dullo, C.

    2009-04-01

    Along the Atlantic European continental margin, living cold-water coral reefs occur over a wide bathymetric and hydrographical range. Focussing on two regions, the Celtic and the Norwegian shelves we found that they are bound to different intermediate water masses. Measurements of the physical and geological properties indicate that parameters such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen content, current intensities, and different substrates do vary in a wide range without impacting the distribution of living cold-water coral reefs to a first degree. Our study shows that cold-water corals in the North Atlantic tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions. The habitat of living reefs comprises a temperature-salinity field with its lower boundary being equivalent to the Intermediate Salinity Maximum (ISM). The ISM on the Celtic margin is represented by Mediterranean Outflow Water, while it is replaced by Atlantic Water on the Norwegian margin. The upper limit corresponds to water mass boundaries of Eastern North Atlantic Water / Mediterranean Outflow Water on the Celtic margin and Norwegian Coastal Water / Atlantic Water on the Norwegian margin. The density of seawater is a frequently used parameter by oceanographers to describe and understand ocean-mixing processes, as it is easier to mix water along a surface of constant density (an ísopycnaĺ) rather than across it. The potential density anomaly sigma-theta is a function of salinity, potential temperature, and pressure at the sea surface. This parameter indicates values of sigma-theta = 27.35 - 27.65 kg m-3 for all living cold-water coral reefs of the Porcupine Seabight, the Rockall Bank, and the Norwegian margin highlighting the importance of physical boundary conditions on cold-water coral growth and distribution. Additional information from literature shows that this value is also valid for reef sites along the Western Atlantic (Nova Scotia, Florida Strait, Brazilian margin) suggesting that this

  2. Plastic mechanism of deformation of garnet-- Water weakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Wen(苏文); CONG; Bolin(从柏林); YOU; Zhendong(游振东); ZHONG; Zengqiu(钟增球); CHEN; Daizhang(陈代章)

    2002-01-01

    The strongly deformed eclogites are well developed in ultra-high pressure jadeite-quartzite zone of the Dabie Mountains, Eastern China, and garnets had been deformed strongly. Observations by transmission electron microscopy identified not only structure of plastic deformation occurring as free dislocation, dislocation loops and dislocation walls, but also clusters of water molecules present in the deformed garnet. Using infrared spectroscopy, two types of hydrous components are identified as the hydroxyl and free-water in the garnet. Based on analysis of microstructure mechanism of deformation in garnets, and experimental data of petrology, the clusters of water molecules were considered to lead strong plastic deformation of garnet by dislocations because of mechanical weakening.

  3. Thermal Pollution Mitigation in Cold Water Stream Watersheds Using Bioretention

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Daniel Lewis

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of bioretention as a strategy to reduce the thermal impact associated with urban stormwater runoff in developing cold water stream watersheds. Temperature and flow data were collected during ten controlled trials at a bioretention facility located in Blacksburg, Virginia. It was determined that bioretention has the ability to reduce the temperature of thermally charged stormwater runoff received from an asphalt surface. Significant reductions in average and peak te...

  4. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  5. Root Cause Analysis of Water Wastage in Hot - Cold Water Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kokane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hot - Cold Water Dispenser is a high end kitchen product mounted on sink of kitchen to meet the requirement of instant hot and cold water as desired. It provides cold water at ambient temperature and hot water at near boiling temperature of about 97ºC to meet the instant water need. It was reported from few users, small amount of unnecessary water get dispensed from the Hot - Cold Water Dispenser during the idle conditions. This is undesirable and affecting on the overall performance of product. This paper briefs the available Root Cause Analysis and process to select the suitable method to find out the root cause of problem. From the available methods, Fault Tree Analysis was found to be most suitable method. The paper describes this method in length. Fault Tree Analysis is used as the scientific approach to find the root cause of problem of water dripping in Hot - Cold Water Dispenser at idle condition. It makes use of a graphical representation of the major faults associated with the product, the causes for the faults, and potential countermeasures. It is found that the FTA tool helps to identify areas of concern for new product design as well as for improvement of existing products.

  6. Time of death of victims found in cold water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Winberg, Olli; Tuominen, Markku

    2008-04-01

    Limited data is available on the application of post-mortem temperature methods to non-standard conditions, especially in problematic real life cases in which the body of the victim is found in cold water environment. Here we present our experience on two cases with known post-mortem times. A 14-year-old girl (rectal temperature 15.5 degrees C) was found assaulted and drowned after a rainy cold night (+5 degrees C) in wet clothing (four layers) at the bottom of a shallow ditch, lying in non-flowing water. The post-mortem time turned out to be 15-16 h. Four days later, at the same time in the morning, after a cold (+/- 0 degrees C) night, a young man (rectal temperature 10.8 degrees C) was found drowned in a shallow cold drain (+4 degrees C) wearing similar clothing (four layers) and being exposed to almost similar environmental and weather conditions, except of flow (7.7 l/s or 0.3 m/s) in the drain. The post-mortem time was deduced to be 10-12 h. We tested the applicability of five practical methods to estimate time of death. Henssge's temperature-time of death nomogram method with correction factors was the most versatile and gave also most accurate results, although there is limited data on choosing of correction factors. In the first case, the right correction factor was close to 1.0 (recommended 1.1-1.2), suggesting that wet clothing acted like dry clothing in slowing down body cooling. In the second case, the right correction factor was between 0.3 and 0.5, similar to the recommended 0.35 for naked bodies in flowing water.

  7. Rare earth elements in scleractinian cold-water corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Liebetrau, V.; Hathorne, E. C.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, W.; Frank, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Rare Earth Elements (REE) have a great potential to trace continental input, particle scavenging and the oxidation state of seawater. These REE are recorded in the skeleton of the cosmopolitan cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa. Here we use an online preconcentration ICP-MS method (Hathorne et al. 2012) to measure REE concentrations in seawater and associated cold-water coral carbonates in order to investigate their seawater origin. Scleractinian cold-water corals were collected in-situ and alive and with corresponding seawater samples covering from the European Continental Margin. The seawater REE patterns are characterized by the typical negative cerium anomaly of seawater, but are distinct for the northern Norwegian Margin and the Oslo Fjord, probably related to continental input. Initial results for the corresponding coral samples suggest that these distinct REE patterns of ambient seawater are recorded by the coral skeletons although some fractionation during incorporation into the aragonite occurs. This indicates that scleractinian cold-water corals can serve as a valuable archive for seawater derived REE signatures, as well radiogenic Nd isotope compositions. In a second step we analysed fossil coral samples from various locations, which were oxidatively and reductively cleaned prior to analysis. Initial results reveal that sediment-buried fossil (early Pleistocene to Holocene) coral samples from the Norwegian Margin and the Porcupine Seabight (Challenger Mound, IODP Site 1317) do not show the expected seawater REE patterns. In particular, the fossil coral-derived REE patterns lack a negative cerium anomaly suggesting that fossil coral-REE patterns do not represent ambient seawater. Thus, we suggest that the oxidative-reductive cleaning method widely used for cleaning of marine carbonates such as foraminifera prior to measurements of seawater-derived trace metal and isotope compositions are not sufficient for REE and Nd isotopes in sediment-buried coral-water

  8. The Mediterranean Plastic Soup: synthetic polymers in Mediterranean surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaria, Giuseppe; Avio, Carlo G.; Mineo, Annabella; Lattin, Gwendolyn L.; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Belmonte, Genuario; Moore, Charles J.; Regoli, Francesco; Aliani, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has been recently proposed as one of the most impacted regions of the world with regards to microplastics, however the polymeric composition of these floating particles is still largely unknown. Here we present the results of a large-scale survey of neustonic micro- and meso-plastics floating in Mediterranean waters, providing the first extensive characterization of their chemical identity as well as detailed information on their abundance and geographical distribution. All particles >700 μm collected in our samples were identified through FT-IR analysis (n = 4050 particles), shedding for the first time light on the polymeric diversity of this emerging pollutant. Sixteen different classes of synthetic materials were identified. Low-density polymers such as polyethylene and polypropylene were the most abundant compounds, followed by polyamides, plastic-based paints, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol. Less frequent polymers included polyethylene terephthalate, polyisoprene, poly(vinyl stearate), ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyepoxide, paraffin wax and polycaprolactone, a biodegradable polyester reported for the first time floating in off-shore waters. Geographical differences in sample composition were also observed, demonstrating sub-basin scale heterogeneity in plastics distribution and likely reflecting a complex interplay between pollution sources, sinks and residence times of different polymers at sea.

  9. How water contributes to pressure and cold denaturation of proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cold- and pressure-denaturation of proteins are matter of debate and are commonly understood as due to water-mediated interactions. Here we study several cases of proteins, with or without a unique native state, with or without hydrophilic residues, by means of a coarse-grain protein model in explicit solvent. We show, using Monte Carlo simulations, that taking into account how water at the protein interface changes its hydrogen bond properties and its density fluctuations is enough to predict protein stability regions with elliptic shapes in the temperature-pressure plane, consistent with previous theories. Our results clearly identify the different mechanisms with which water participates to denaturation and open the perspective to develop advanced computational design tools for protein engineering.

  10. WATER-BLOWN POLYURETHANE RIGID FOAMS MODIFIED BY CHEMICAL PLASTICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ming; XU Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Water-blown polyurethane rigid foams are getting more and more attention, because the traditional blowing agent HCFC141b has already been abolished to prevent the ozone layer from destruction. However, the polyurethane rigid foams blown by water have serious defects, i.e. friability and resulting lower adhesion strength. Thus, the purpose of this study is to resolve the problems by chemical plastication. The maleate was added to polyol-premix containing water or to polyisocyanate,with both of which maleate does not react. To prove the reaction when polyol-premix and polyisocyanate were mixed, the model composite was synthesized and analyzed by IR, NMR and ESI (MS). Furthermore, a series of water-blown polyurethane rigid foams added different amount maleate were successfully prepared. By testing impact strength and adhesion strength of the foams, the actual effect of adding maleate was obtained.

  11. At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

    1979-12-01

    One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

  12. Transmission and Trapping of Cold Electrons in Water Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Cicman, Peter; Field, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiments are reported that show currents of low energy (“cold”) electrons pass unattenuated through crystalline ice at 135 K for energies between zero and 650 meV, up to the maximum studied film thickness of 430 bilayers, showing negligible apparent trapping. By contrast, both porous amorphous...... ice and compact crystalline ice at 40 K show efficient electron trapping. Ice at intermediate temperatures reveals metastable trapping that decays within a few hundred seconds at 110 K. Our results are the first to demonstrate full transmission of cold electrons in high temperature water ice...

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Appendices to final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-20

    NOAA/DOE has selected three concepts for a baseline design of the cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC plants: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physical Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme; (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: (A) fiberglass reinforced plastic cold water pipe (specification and drawingss); (B) specification for polyethylene CWP; (C) elastomer pipe drawings; (D) drawings for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; (E) structural design of OTEC 10/40 CWP support and CWP transitions; (F) universal transition joint for CWP; (G) dynamic spherical seal of CWP; (H) at-sea deployment loads - surface towing loads; (I) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment up-ending loads; (J) cost estimates for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; and (K) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment scenario and cost estimate. (WHK)

  14. Water equivalence of some plastic-water phantom materials for clinical proton beam dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Sulaiti, L., E-mail: l.al-sulaiti@surrey.ac.uk [Physics Department, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Radiation Dosimetry Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Shipley, D.; Thomas, R. [Radiation Dosimetry Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Owen, P. [Physics Department, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Radiation Dosimetry Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom); Kacperek, A. [Douglas Cyclotron, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral (United Kingdom); Regan, P.H. [Physics Department, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Palmans, H. [Radiation Dosimetry Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Plastic-water phantom materials are not exactly water equivalent since they have a different elemental composition and different interaction cross sections for protons than water. Several studies of the water equivalence of plastic-water phantom materials have been reported for photon and electron beams, but none for clinical proton beams. In proton beams, the difference between non-elastic nuclear interactions in plastic-water phantom materials compared to those in water should be considered. In this work, the water equivalence of Plastic Water{sup Registered-Sign} (PW){sup 1}, Plastic Water{sup Registered-Sign} Diagnostic Therapy (PWDT){sup 1} and solid water (WT1){sup 2} phantoms was studied for clinical proton energies of 60 MeV and 200 MeV. This was done by evaluating the fluence correction factor at equivalent depths; first with respect to water and then with respect to graphite by experiment and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using FLUKA. MC simulations showed that the fluence correction with respect to water was less than 0.5% up to the entire penetration depth of the protons at 60 MeV and less than 1% at 200 MeV up to 20 cm depth for PWDT, PW and WT1. With respect to graphite the fluence correction was about 0.5% for 60 MeV and about 4% for 200 MeV. The experimental results for modulated and un-modulated 60 MeV proton beams showed good agreement with the MC simulated fluence correction factors with respect to graphite deviating less than 1% from unity for the three plastic-water phantoms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study plastic-water in clinical proton beams by experiment and Monte Carlo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain fluence correction factors for water and graphite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The correction factor for water was close to 1 at 60 MeV and <0.990 at 200 MeV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The correction factor for graphite was {approx}0.5% at 60 MeV and up to 4% at 200 MeV.

  15. Effective Climate Refugia for Cold-water Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, J. L.; Morelli, T. L.; Torgersen, C.; Isaak, D.; Keenan, D.; Labiosa, R.; Fullerton, A.; Massie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change threatens to create fundamental shifts in in the distributions and abundances of endothermic organisms such as cold-water salmon and trout species (salmonids). Recently published projected declines in mid-latitude salmonid distributions under future climates range from modest to severe, depending on modeling approaches, assumptions, and spatial context of analyses. Given these projected losses, increased emphasis on management for ecosystem resilience to help buffer cold-water fish populations and their habitats against climate change is emerging. Using terms such as "climate-proofing", "climate-ready", and "climate refugia", such efforts stake a claim for an adaptive, anticipatory planning response to the climate change threat. To be effective, such approaches will need to address critical uncertainties in both the physical basis for projected landscape changes in water temperature and streamflow, as well as the biological responses of organisms. Recent efforts define future potential climate refugia based on projected streamflows, air temperatures, and associated water temperature changes. These efforts reflect the relatively strong conceptual foundation for linkages between regional climate change and local hydrological responses and thermal dynamics. Yet important questions remain. Drawing on case studies throughout the Pacific Northwest, we illustrate some key uncertainties in the responses of salmonids and their habitats to altered hydro-climatic regimes currently not well addressed by physical or ecological models. Key uncertainties include biotic interactions, organismal adaptive capacity, local climate decoupling due to groundwater-surface water interactions, the influence of human engineering responses, and synergies between climatic and other stressors. These uncertainties need not delay anticipatory planning, but rather highlight the need for identification and communication of actions with high probabilities of success, and targeted

  16. Influence of localized plasticity on oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under primary water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cissé, Sarata [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laffont, Lydia, E-mail: lydia.laffont@ensiacet.fr [Institut CARNOT, CIRIMAT-ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Lafont, Marie-Christine [Institut CARNOT, CIRIMAT-ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Tanguy, Benoit [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Andrieu, Eric [Institut CARNOT, CIRIMAT-ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-02-15

    The sensitivity of precipitation-strengthened A286 austenitic stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking was studied by means of slow-strain-rate tests. First, alloy cold working by low cycle fatigue (LCF) was investigated. Fatigue tests under plastic strain control were performed at different strain levels (Δε{sub p}/2 = 0.2%, 0.5%, 0.8% and 2%) to establish correlations between stress softening and the deformation microstructure resulting from the LCF tests. Deformed microstructures were identified through TEM investigations. The interaction between oxidation and localized deformation bands was also studied and it resulted that localized deformation bands are not preferential oxide growth channels. The pre-cycling of the alloy did not modify its oxidation behaviour. However, intergranular oxidation in the subsurface under the oxide layer formed after exposure to PWR primary water was shown.

  17. Cold-water coral banks and submarine landslides: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mol, Ben; Huvenne, Veerle; Canals, Miquel

    2009-06-01

    This paper aims to review the relation between cold-water coral bank development and submarine landslides. Both are common features on continental margins, but so far it has not been reviewed which effect—if at all—they may have upon each other. Indirect and direct relations between coral banks and landslides are evaluated here, based on four case studies: the Magellan Mound Province in the Porcupine Seabight, where fossil coral banks appear partly on top of a buried slide deposit; the Sula Ridge Reef Complex and the Storegga landslide both off mid-Norway; and the Mauritania coral bank province, associated with the Mauritanian Slide Complex. For each of these locations, positive and negative relationships between both features are discussed, based on available datasets. Locally submarine landslides might directly favour coral bank development by creating substratum where corals can settle on, enhancing turbulence due to abrupt seabed morphological variations and, in some cases, causing fluid seepage. In turn, some of these processes may contribute to increased food availability and lower sedimentation rates. Landslides can also affect coral bank development by direct erosion of the coral banks, and by the instantaneous increase of turbidity, which may smother the corals. On the other hand, coral banks might have a stabilising function and delay or stop the headwall retrogradation of submarine landslides. Although local relationships can be deduced from these case studies, no general and direct relationship exists between submarine landslides and cold-water coral banks.

  18. Warm water geothermal and cold energy in western Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peachey, B. [New Paradigm Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)]|[Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The Petroleum Technology Alliance of Canada's low carbon futures study was discussed along with a study in which scenarios were developed for three resources, notably bitumen in carbonate reservoirs; conventional heavy oil; and warm water geothermal energy from operating oil wells. The presentation provided an overview of geothermal systems including hot dry rock; dry steam resources; hot water resources; warm water resources; and low temperature systems. A warm water geothermal study for the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) was also presented. Although high quality geothermal energy sources are rare in Canada, there are large warm water geothermal reservoirs, ranging in temperature from 50 to 180 degrees C in the WCSB. This presentation focused on the potential for recovery of the warm water geothermal energy already being brought to surface from the WCSB's oil wells. Several energy approaches were also presented, such as warm geothermal or produced water being used for heating an oil reservoir; using produced mechanical energy for field pumping; and producing renewable electricity from binary plants with propane. Illustrations were also provided for the organic Rankine cycle; low pump geothermal power; and no pump geothermal system. Combined geothermal and oil production were also discussed. Other topics that were presented included industrial cooling; municipal cooling; mined oilsands barriers and tailings; containment of in-situ oilsands; and rural freeze desalination. The report concluded with discussions of the Canadian minerals industry; cold Arctic construction; and ice roads in the North. It was concluded that there is potential for warm water geothermal in existing oilfield operations in Canada. tabs., figs.

  19. Cold welding sealing of copper-water micro heat pipe ends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yong; LU Long-sheng; DENG Da-xiang; YUAN Dong

    2009-01-01

    The quality of micro heat pipe(MHP) is strongly affected by sealing technology. Based on the analysis of requirements of sealing technology, a cold welding technology was presented to seal MHP. In the cold welding process, compression force was used to flatten micro groove copper(MGC) tube. Then the bonding of MGC tube was reached because of intensively plastic deformation of MGC tube under pressure. It is found that the plastic deformation area of the cold welding of MGC tube can be divided into three sections. The deformation of micro grooves in each section was investigated; the influence of the dimensions of cylindrical heads on the weld joint shape and strength was studied; and a comparison between smooth copper tube and MGC tube was done. The results show that a groove compression stage exists in the cold welding of MGC tube besides a flattened stage and a melting stage.

  20. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Davis, A.J.; Lavaleye, M.M.S.; Rosso, S.W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M.J.N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2014-01-01

    The Cape Lookout cold-water coral area off thecoast of North Carolina forms the shallowest and northernmostcold-water coral mound area on the Blake Plateau inthe NW Atlantic. Cold-water coral habitats near Cape Lookoutare occasionally bathed in the Gulf Stream, which is characterisedby oligotrophic

  1. Detailed Design of Cooling Water System for Cold Neutron Source in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I.; Lee, Y. S

    2007-04-15

    To make cold neutron, a cryogenic refrigerator is necessary to transform moderator into cryogenic state so, thermal neutron is changed into cold neutron through heat transfer with moderator. A cryogenic refrigerator mainly consists of two apparatus, a helium compressor and a cold box which needs supply of cooling water. Therefore, cooling water system is essential to operate of cryogenic refrigerator normally. This report is mainly focused on the detailed design of the cooling water system for the HANARO cold neutron source, and describes design requirement, calculation, specification of equipment and water treatment method.

  2. Detailed Design of Cooling Water System for Cold Neutron Source in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, S. I.; Lee, Y. S

    2007-04-15

    To make cold neutron, a cryogenic refrigerator is necessary to transform moderator into cryogenic state so, thermal neutron is changed into cold neutron through heat transfer with moderator. A cryogenic refrigerator mainly consists of two apparatus, a helium compressor and a cold box which needs supply of cooling water. Therefore, cooling water system is essential to operate of cryogenic refrigerator normally. This report is mainly focused on the detailed design of the cooling water system for the HANARO cold neutron source, and describes design requirement, calculation, specification of equipment and water treatment method.

  3. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  4. Microbiological evaluation of cold-water shrimp (Pandalus borealis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatka, F A; Bartolomeo, B

    1973-06-01

    A bacteriological survey of the Maine shrimp industry was conducted to investigate the conditions associated with the production of frozen, raw, peeled shrimp. In-plant samples and finished product units were collected from seven plants. The most probable number of Escherichia coli, coliforms, and coagulase-positive staphylococci, as well as aerobic plate counts (APC), were determined. Freshly harvested shrimp collected from fishing vessels had an APC geometric mean of 510/g, and E. coli, coliforms, and coagulase-positive staphylococci were absent. Subsequent storage and insanitary practices during processing increased the APC and introduced coliforms. However, the low air temperatures (18 to 45 F) in the plants and the large volumes of cold water (34 F) used during processing inhibited significant bacterial buildup in the finished product.

  5. Plastic Mechanisms for Thin-Walled Cold-Formed Steel Members in Eccentric Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungureanu Viorel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Eurocode 3 concerning thin-walled steel members divides members subjected to compression into four classes, considering their ductility. The representatives of the class C4 are short bars, for which the load-capacity corresponds to the maximum compression stresses less than the yield stress. There are bars prone to local buckling in the elastic range and they do not have a real post-elastic capacity. The failure at ultimate stage of such members, either in compression or bending, always occurs by forming a local plastic mechanism. This fact suggests the possibility to use the local plastic mechanism to characterise the ultimate strength of such members. The present paper is based on previous studies and some latest investigations of the authors, as well as the literature collected data. It represents an attempt to study the plastic mechanisms for members in eccentric compression about minor axis and the evolution of plastic mechanisms, considering several types of lipped channel sections.

  6. Cold plasma inactivates salmonella on grape tomatoes in a commercial PET plastic container without affecting quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: The number of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with the consumption of fresh tomatoes has increased. Little research has been conducted on the effects of direct treatment of cold plasma (CP) on the microbial decontamination and preservation of bulk tomatoes packaged in comme...

  7. Linking benthic hydrodynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Observations from numerous cold-water coral locations in the NE Atlantic show energetic near-bottom flow dynamics along the European continental margin at individual coral mounds and mound clusters. Dynamics are largely controlled by tide-topography interaction generating and enhancing periodic motions such as trapped waves, freely propagating internal tides and internal hydraulic jumps. In this study, linkages between key abiotic parameters and cold water coral occurrences are explored acros...

  8. Hot and cold water as a supercritical solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentevilla, Daphne Anne

    This dissertation addresses the anomalous properties of water at high temperatures near the vapor-liquid critical point and at low temperatures in the supercooled liquid region. The first part of the dissertation is concerned with the concentration dependence of the critical temperature, density, and pressure of an aqueous sodium chloride solution. Because of the practical importance of an accurate knowledge of critical parameters for industrial, geochemical, and biological applications, an empirical equation for the critical locus of aqueous sodium chloride solutions was adopted in 1999 by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) as a guideline. However, since this original Guideline on the Critical Locus of Aqueous Solutions of Sodium Chloride was developed, two new theoretical developments occurred, motivating the first part of this dissertation. Here, I present a theory-based formulation for the critical parameters of aqueous sodium chloride solutions as a proposed replacement for the empirical formulation currently in use. This formulation has been published in the International Journal of Thermophysics and recommended by the Executive Committee of IAPWS for adoption as a Revised Guideline on the Critical Locus of Aqueous Solutions of Sodium Chloride. The second part of the dissertation addresses a new concept, considering cold water as a supercritical solvent. Based on the idea of a second, liquid-liquid, critical point in supercooled water, we explore the possibility of supercooled water as a novel supercooled solvent through the thermodynamics of critical phenomena. In 2006, I published a Physical Review letter presenting a parametric scaled equation of state for supercooled-water. Further developments based on this work led to a phenomenological mean-field "two-state" model, clarifying the nature of the phase separation in a polyamorphic single-component liquid. In this dissertation, I modify this two-state model to

  9. Water and Electrolyte Exchange during Exposure to Cold, Altitude and Combined Cold and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-28

    adrenergic receptors may play a dominant role in acclimation to cold in the laboratory rat . Since an increase in the rate of secretion of thyroid hormones...stimulation that accompanies cold acclimation in the laboratory rat . Studies from this laboratory have shown that reduction in thyroid activity reduces

  10. Modeling texture development during cold rolling of IF steel by crystal plasticity finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the consideration of slip deformation mechanism and various slip systems of body centered cubic (BCC) metals,Taylor-type and finite element polycrystai models were embedded into the commercial finite element code ABAQUS to realize crystal plasticity finte element modeling,based on the rate dependent crystal constitutive equations.Initial orientations measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were directly input into the crystal plasticity finite element model to simulate the development of rolling texture of interstitial-flee steel (IF steel) at various reductions.The modeled results show a good agreement with the experimental results.With increasing reduction,the predicted and experimental rolling textures tend to sharper,and the results simulated by the Taylor-type model are stronger than those simulated by finite element model.Conclusions are obtained that rolling textures calculated with 48 {110}+{ 112}+{123} slip systems are more approximate to EBSD results.

  11. Effects of seated and standing cold water immersion on recovery from repeated sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Jonathan D C; van Someren, Ken A; Bell, Phillip G; Spence, John R; Jewell, Andrew P; Gaze, David; Howatson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two different hydrostatic pressures (seated or standing) during cold water immersion at attenuating the deleterious effects of strenuous exercise on indices of damage and recovery. Twenty four male well-trained games players (age 23 ± 3 years; body mass 81.4 ± 8.7 kg: [Formula: see text]O2max 57.5 ± 4.9 ml∙kg(-1)∙min(-1)) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) and were randomly assigned to either a control, seated cold water immersion or a standing cold water immersion (14 min at 14°C). Maximal isometric voluntary contraction, counter-movement jump, creatine kinase, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) were measured before and up to 72 h following the LIST. All dependent variables showed main effects for time (P cold water immersion interventions. Seated cold water immersion was associated with lower DOMS than standing cold water immersion (effect size = 1.86; P = 0.001). These data suggest that increasing hydrostatic pressure by standing in cold water does not provide an additional recovery benefit over seated cold water immersion, and that both seated and standing immersions have no benefit in promoting recovery following intermittent sprint exercise.

  12. OTEC Advanced Composite Cold Water Pipe: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

    2011-09-12

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline

  13. Cold water immersion recovery after simulated collision sport exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointon, Monique; Duffield, Rob

    2012-02-01

    This investigation examined the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) recovery after simulated collision sport exercise. Ten male rugby athletes performed three sessions consisting of a 2 × 30-min intermittent-sprint exercise (ISE) protocol with either tackling (T) or no tackling (CONT), followed by a 20-min CWI intervention (TCWI) or passive recovery (TPASS and CONT) in a randomized order. The ISE consisted of a 15-m sprint every minute separated by self-paced bouts of hard running, jogging, and walking for the remainder of the minute. Every sixth rotation, participants performed 5 × 10-m runs, receiving a shoulder-led tackle to the lower body on each effort. Sprint time and distance covered during ISE were recorded, with voluntary (maximal voluntary contraction; MVC) and evoked neuromuscular function (voluntary activation; VA), electromyogram (root mean square (RMS)), ratings of perceived muscle soreness (MS), capillary and venous blood markers for metabolites and muscle damage, respectively measured before and after exercise, immediately after recovery, and 2 and 24 h after recovery. Total distance covered during exercise was significantly greater in CONT (P = 0.01), without differences between TPASS and TCWI (P > 0.05). TCWI resulted in increased MVC, VA, and RMS immediately after recovery (P muscle damage (P > 0.05), lactate was significantly reduced after recovery compared with TPASS (P = 0.04). CWI also resulted in reduced MS 2 h after recovery compared with TPASS (P muscle contractile properties and perceptions of soreness after collision-based exercise.

  14. Influence of Niobium on the Beginning of the Plastic Flow of Material during Cold Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoja Rešković

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone.

  15. Influence of niobium on the beginning of the plastic flow of material during cold deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rešković, Stoja; Jandrlić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone.

  16. Water Quality Study on the Hot and Cold Water Supply Systems at Vietnamese Hotels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Toyosada

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted as part of the Joint Crediting Mechanism (JCM of the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, and the Ministry of the Environment project’s preparation in Vietnam. Samples were taken from hot and cold water supplies from guest rooms’ faucets in 12 hotels in Hanoi city, Vietnam, and 13 hotels in Japan for comparison. A simple water quality measurement and determination of Legionella was carried out. The results showed that residual effective chlorine—which guarantees bactericidal properties—was not detected in tap water supplied in hotel rooms in Vietnam, and nitrite (an indicator of water pollution was detected in 40% of buildings. In the hotels in Japan, the prescribed residual chlorine concentration met the prescribed levels, and nitrite was not detected. Additionally, while there was no Legionella detected in the Japanese cases, it was detected in most of the Vietnamese hotels, which were found to manage the hot water storage tank at low temperatures of 40–50 °C. It was found that there were deficiencies in cold and hot water supply quality, and that there was no effective system in place for building operation maintenance and management.

  17. Geographic variation and plasticity to water and nutrients in Pelargonium australe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Adrienne B; Hermes, Jacob P; Jones, Cynthia S; Schlichting, Carl D

    2007-01-01

    Here, patterns of phenotypic plasticity and trait integration of leaf characteristics in six geographically discrete populations of the perennial herb Pelargonium australe were compared. It was hypothesized that populations would show local adaptation in trait means, but similar patterns of plasticity and trait integration. Further, it was questioned whether phenotypic plasticity was positively correlated with environmental heterogeneity and whether plasticity for water-use traits in particular was adaptive. Seedlings were grown in a glasshouse at six combinations of water and nutrient availability. Leaf anatomical, morphological and gas exchange traits were measured. High amounts of plasticity in leaf traits were found in response to changes in growth conditions and there was evidence of local adaptation among the populations. While there were significant correlations between plasticity and environmental heterogeneity, not all were positive. Notably, patterns of plasticity and trait integration varied significantly among populations. Despite that variation, some of the observed plasticity was adaptive: fitness was correlated with conservative water use when water was limiting. Pelargonium arrived in Australia approximately 5 million yr ago. It is concluded here that high amounts of plasticity, in some cases adaptive, and weak integration among traits may be key to the spread and success of this species.

  18. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Simon S.; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y.; Choi, Manfi M.; Cheng, Juno C.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration. PMID:26735552

  19. Environmental forcing of the Campeche cold-water coral province, southern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, D.; Wienberg, C.; Wintersteller, P.; Freiwald, A.; Becker, M.; Beuck, L.; Dullo, C.; Eberli, G. P.; Glogowski, S.; Matos, L.; Forster, N.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Taviani, M.

    2014-04-01

    With an extension of > 40 km2 the recently discovered Campeche cold-water coral province located at the northeastern rim of the Campeche Bank in the southern Gulf of Mexico belongs to the largest coherent cold-water coral areas discovered so far. The Campeche province consists of numerous 20-40 m-high elongated coral mounds that are developed in intermediate water depths of 500 to 600 m. The mounds are colonized by a vivid cold-water coral ecosystem that covers the upper flanks and summits. The rich coral community is dominated by the framework-building Scleractinia Enallopsammia profunda and Lophelia pertusa, while the associated benthic megafauna shows a rather scarce occurrence. The recent environmental setting is characterized by a high surface water production caused by a local upwelling center and a dynamic bottom-water regime comprising vigorous bottom currents, obvious temporal variability, and strong density contrasts, which all together provide optimal conditions for the growth of cold-water corals. This setting - potentially supported by the diel vertical migration of zooplankton in the Campeche area - controls the delivering of food particles to the corals. The Campeche cold-water coral province is, thus, an excellent example highlighting the importance of the oceanographic setting in securing the food supply for the development of large and vivid cold-water coral ecosystems.

  20. Field experiment on coalmine heat disaster governance using cold source from surface water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Pingye; Zhu Guolong; Liu Yuqing; Duan Mengmeng; Wu Junyin

    2014-01-01

    Regarding the lack of cold source for underground cooling systems from either mine inflow or return air, field experiments were taken in a high temperature deep coal mine with abundant cold source from surface water. Taking Sanhejian coal mine as an example, this paper introduced the technology scheme of heat disaster governance using surface water cold source. The paper presents the basics of this field experiment at the beginning, following by the design and site layout of the cooling system including the analysis and calculation of cold source. Numerical calculation method is also applied based on the operation parameters to simulate the influence to the surface river ecosystem. The results suggest that the temperature of surface water shall be lower than 34 ?C after heat exchange, and when more cooling capacities are needed in the future, increasing the water flow is more favorable than increasing the cooling range of water, which is better for the ecological environment protection.

  1. Oxytocin decreases colonic motility of cold water stressed rats via oxytocin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Xi, Tao-Fang; Li, Yu-Xian; Wang, Hai-Hong; Qin, Ying; Zhang, Jie-Ping; Cai, Wen-Ting; Huang, Meng-Ting; Shen, Ji-Qiao; Fan, Xi-Min; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Xie, Dong-Ping

    2014-08-21

    To investigate whether cold water intake into the stomach affects colonic motility and the involvement of the oxytocin-oxytocin receptor pathway in rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were used and some of them were ovariectomized. The rats were subjected to gastric instillation with cold (0-4 °C, cold group) or room temperature (20-25 °C, control group) saline for 14 consecutive days. Colon transit was determined with a bead inserted into the colon. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared to investigate the response to oxytocin in vitro. Plasma concentration of oxytocin was detected by ELISA. Oxytocin receptor expression was investigated by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry was used to locate oxytocin receptors. Colon transit was slower in the cold group than in the control group (P muscle contractile response to oxytocin decreased, and the inhibitory effect of oxytocin on muscle contractility was enhanced by cold water intake (0.69 ± 0.08 vs 0.88 ± 0.16, P cold group (P Cold water intake increased blood concentration of oxytocin, but this effect was attenuated in ovariectomized rats (286.99 ± 83.72 pg/mL vs 100.56 ± 92.71 pg/mL, P muscle strips to oxytocin was attenuated. Cold water intake inhibits colonic motility partially through oxytocin-oxytocin receptor signaling in the myenteric nervous system pathway, which is estrogen dependent.

  2. Marine Plastic Pollution in Waters around Australia: Characteristics, Concentrations, and Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Reisser; Jeremy Shaw; Chris Wilcox; Britta Denise Hardesty; Maira Proietti; Michele Thums; Charitha Pattiaratchi

    2013-01-01

    Plastics represent the vast majority of human-made debris present in the oceans. However, their characteristics, accumulation zones, and transport pathways remain poorly assessed. We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories. The 839 marine plastics recorded were predominantly small fragments ("microplastics", median lengt...

  3. The Status Quo of Industrial Development of Cold Water Fishes in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This article first analyzes the status quo of industrial development of cold water fishes in Henan Province. And then it points out the main problems in the process of cold water fish industrialization as follows: the parent fish rearing of cold water fishes and the supply of roe and fry are inadequate; the demand for feed nutrition,research and development of disease prevention and control technology lag behind. In order to provide scientific basis for promoting the industrial independent innovation and international competitiveness,finally the following ideas and recommendations for industrial development of cold water fishes are put forward: strengthening policy support for the enterprises,and striving to create the leading enterprises,to achieve dramatic development; implementing the strategy of developing fishery by relying on science and technology,promoting the industrial independent innovation and competitiveness; creating specialized cooperative organizations,actively improving the supporting system,and expanding the space for development of the industry.

  4. Cold Vacuum Drying facility deionized water system design description (SYS 25)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-02

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) de-ionized water system. The de-ionized water system is used to provide clean, conditioned water, free from contaminants, chlorides and iron for the CVD Facility. Potable water is supplied to the deionized water system, isolated by a backflow prevention device. After the de-ionization process is complete, via a packaged de-ionization unit, de-ionized water is supplied to the process deionization unit.

  5. Cross-Saharan transport of water vapor via recycled cold pool outflows from moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Marsham, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Very sparse data have previously limited observational studies of meteorological processes in the Sahara. We present an observed case of convectively driven water vapor transport crossing the Sahara over 2.5 days in June 2012, from the Sahel in the south to the Atlas in the north. A daily cycle is observed, with deep convection in the evening generating moist cold pools that fed the next day's convection; the convection then generated new cold pools, providing a vertical recycling of moisture. Trajectories driven by analyses were able to capture the direction of the transport but not its full extent, particularly at night when cold pools are most active, and analyses missed much of the water content of cold pools. The results highlight the importance of cold pools for moisture transport, dust and clouds, and demonstrate the need to include these processes in models in order to improve the representation of Saharan atmosphere.

  6. Effects of cold water immersion on lower extremity joint biomechanics during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Claudiane Arakaki; da Rocha, Emmanuel Souza; Stefanyshyn, Darren John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of cryotherapy on lower extremity running biomechanics. Twenty-six healthy male volunteers were randomised into two intervention groups: cold water (cold water at ~11°C) or tepid water (tepid water at ~26°C). They were required to run at 4.0 ± 0.2 m · s(-1) before and after they underwent water immersion for 20 min. Differences between pre- and post-intervention were used to compare the influence of water intervention during running. Peak joint angles, peak joint moments, peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and contact time (CT) were calculated using three-dimensional gait analysis. Independent t-tests were applied with a significant alpha level set at 0.05. Decreased peak propulsive and vertical GRF, decreased plantarflexion moments, increased hip flexion angle and longer CT were observed following cold water immersion. Although cold water immersion (cryotherapy) affected the running movement, none of the alterations have been related to running biomechanical patterns associated with injuries. Therefore, our results indicated that cold water immersion appears safe prior to running activities.

  7. INFLUENCE RESEARCH OF COLD PLASTIC DEFORMATION ON DIFFUSION SATURATION PROCESS BY CARBON AND BORON OF THE LOW-CARBON AND BORON-CONTAINING ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Filonenko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the study of influence of cold prestrain with degree of deformation within the range 0…40 % on diffusion saturation with boron and carbon for low-carbon and boron steels. It is determined that the plastic prestrain with degree of deformation 20 % at temperature 750 °С for the low-carbon steel promote increasing of boron-cementation layer thickness by 25 % and microhardness of perlite layer by 20 %.

  8. Cold-water coral mounds on the Pen Duick Escarpment, Gulf of Cadiz: The MiCROSYSTEMS project approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, D.; Blamart, D.; De Mol, L.; Mienis, F.; Pirlet, H.; Wehrmann, L. M.; Barbieri, R.; Maignien, L.; Templer, S. P.; de Haas, H.; Hebbeln, D.; Frank, N.; Larmagnat, S.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Stivaletta, N.; van Weering, T.; Zhang, Y.; Hamoumi, N.; Cnudde, V.; Duyck, P.; Henriet, J.-P.; The MiCROSYSTEMS MD 169 Shipboard Party

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a case study of three cold-water coral mounds in a juvenile growth stage on top of the Pen Duick Escarpment in the Gulf of Cadiz; Alpha, Beta and Gamma mounds. Although cold-water corals are a common feature on the adjacent cliffs, mud volcanoes and open slope, no actual living cold-

  9. How consumers of plastic water bottles are responding to environmental policies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orset, Caroline; Barret, Nicolas; Lemaire, Aurélien

    2017-03-01

    Although plastic induces environmental damages, almost all water bottles are made from plastic and the consumption never stops increasing. This study evaluates the consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for different plastics used for water packaging. Successive messages emphasizing the characteristics of plastic are delivered to consumers allowing explaining the influence of information on the consumers' WTP. We find that information has a manifest effect on the WTP. We show there is a significant premium associated with recycled plastic packaging and biodegradable bioplastic packaging. As there is no consensus on the plastic which is the most or the least dangerous for the environment, we propose different policies for protecting the environment. We discuss about the impact of these policies on consumer's purchasing decisions: switching one plastic packaging for another, or leaving water plastic bottles market. We present the environmental policies that are effective according to the point of view adopted. Choosing between these policies then depends on the priorities of the regulator and pressure of lobbies.

  10. Air dehumidification by membrane with cold water for manned spacecraft environmental control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yonghong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional condensation dehumidification method requires additional gas-liquid separation and water recovery process in the manned spacecraft humidity control system, which would increase weight and complexity of systems. A new membrane dehumidification with cold water is proposed, which uses water vapor partial pressure difference to promote water vapor transmembrane mass transfer for dehumidification. The permeability of the membrane was measured and the experimental results agree well with the theoretical calculations. Based on the simulation of dehumidification process of cold water-membrane, the influence of module structure and working condition on dehumidification performance was analyzed, which provided reference for the design of membrane module construct. It can be seen from the simulation and experiments that the cold water-membrane dehumidification can effectively reduce the thermal load of the manned spacecraft.

  11. Community challenges when using large plastic bottles for Solar Energy Disinfection of Water (SODIS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borde, Preeti; Elmusharaf, Khalifa; McGuigan, Kevin G; Keogh, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    .... The exposure to sunlight is typically carried out in small volume plastic beverage bottles (up to 2 l). Given the water requirements of consumption and basic personal hygiene, this may not always meet the needs of communities...

  12. Marine plastic pollution in waters around Australia: characteristics, concentrations, and pathways

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reisser, Julia; Shaw, Jeremy; Wilcox, Chris; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Proietti, Maira; Thums, Michele; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2013-01-01

    .... We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories...

  13. Marine Plastic Pollution in Waters around Australia: Characteristics, Concentrations, and Pathways: e80466

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julia Reisser; Jeremy Shaw; Chris Wilcox; Britta Denise Hardesty; Maira Proietti; Michele Thums; Charitha Pattiaratchi

    2013-01-01

    .... We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories...

  14. Linking benthic hydrodynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn, C.; Rengstorf, A.; White, M.; Mienis, F.; Soetaert, K.; Grehan, A.; Duineveld, G.

    2014-01-01

    Observations from numerous cold-water coral locations in the NE Atlantic show energetic near-bottom flow dynamics along the European continental margin at individual coral mounds and mound clusters. Dynamics are largely controlled by tide-topography interaction generating and enhancing periodic moti

  15. Linking benthic hydrodynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn, C.; Rengstorf, A.; White, M.; Mienis, F.; Soetaert, K.; Grehan, A.; Duineveld, G.

    2014-01-01

    Observations from numerous cold-water coral locations in the NE Atlantic show energetic near-bottom flow dynamics along the European continental margin at individual coral mounds and mound clusters. Dynamics are largely controlled by tide-topography interaction generating and enhancing periodic

  16. Cold Water and Pauses in Illumination Reduces Pain During Photodynamic Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Haedersdal, M.; Wulf, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    symmetrical areas and cooled with either cold-water-spray or cold-water-pack (Coo]Pack). Treatment areas were cooled during either the first or second period of illumination, which were separated by a 3-min pause in illumination. Pain intensity was scored from 0 to 10. Water-spray reduced the mean pain score...... by 1.2 points (p=0.030) and CoolPack by 1.3 points (p=0.007) during the first half of the illumination. Pain intensity decreased during the pause by 3.7 points in water-spray patients (p

  17. Heterotrimeric G proteins regulate reproductive trait plasticity in response to water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, Sarah E; Assmann, Sarah M

    2010-02-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of one genotype to display different phenotypes under different environmental conditions. Although variation for phenotypic plasticity has been documented in numerous species, little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity. Given their widespread roles in hormonal and environmental signaling, we examined whether genes which encode heterotrimeric G proteins are plasticity genes. We grew multiple alleles of heterotrimeric G-protein mutants, together with wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana, under different watering regimes to determine the contributions of G-protein genes to phenotypic plasticity for a number of developmental and reproduction-related traits. G-protein mutations did not affect significantly the amount of phenotypic variation within an environment for any trait, but did affect significantly the amount of phenotypic plasticity for certain traits. AGB1, which encodes the beta subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein in Arabidopsis, is a plasticity gene and regulates reproductive trait plasticity in response to water availability, resulting in increased fitness (defined as seed production) under drought stress.

  18. Tensile properties and water absorption of zein sheets plasticized with oleic and linoleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi Santosa, F X; Padua, G W

    1999-05-01

    Corn zein has been investigated for fabrication of biodegradable packaging materials. Our objective was to investigate the effect of added plasticizers, oleic and linoleic acids, on tensile properties and water absorption of zein sheets. Moldable resins were precipitated from aqueous ethanol dispersions of zein and fatty acids and rolled into sheets of approximately 0.5 mm in thickness. To increase plasticization effects, zein-oleic acid sheets were replasticized by heating them in fatty acid baths. Plasticization resulted in flexible sheets of high clarity, low modulus, and high elongation and toughness, although low tensile strength. Water absorption of zein sheets was lowered by plasticization, attributed in part to reduced mass fraction of zein. Polymerization of linoleic acid may have sealed off pores on sheet surfaces, thus slowing water absorption.

  19. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-05-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8-14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8-40%) accompanied by 5-14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella.

  20. Severe brain hypothermia as a factor underlying behavioral immobility during cold-water forced swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taltavull, J F; Chefer, V I; Shippenberg, T S; Kiyatkin, E A

    2003-06-13

    Behavioral immobility during forced swim is usually considered a consequence of inescapable stress, and is used to screen antidepressant drugs. However, immobility in this test may also result from inhibition of neural functions because of brain hypothermia due to body cooling. To explore this possibility, we measured brain temperature dynamics during a 10-min forced swim in cold (25 degrees C) and warm (37 degrees C) water and correlated brain temperatures with behavioral changes. Cold water forced swim resulted in significant brain hypothermia (-6-7 degrees C) and immobility, while no immobility was observed during warm water forced swim, when brain temperature transiently increased (0.5 degrees C) then decreased below baseline in the post-swim period. These data suggest that immobility, which rapidly develops during forced swim in cold water, may result from dramatic inhibition of neural functions because of severe brain hypothermia.

  1. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rix, L.; de Goeij, J.M.; Mueller, C.E.; Struck, U.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Al-Horani, F.A.; Wild, C.; Naumann, M.S.; van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and

  2. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Laura; de Goeij, Jasper M; Mueller, Christina E; Struck, Ulrich; Middelburg, Jack J; van Duyl, Fleur C; Al-Horani, Fuad A; Wild, Christian; Naumann, Malik S; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-01-07

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels on Caribbean reefs via the so-called sponge loop. Coral mucus may be a major DOM source for the sponge loop, but mucus uptake by sponges has not been demonstrated. Here we used laboratory stable isotope tracer experiments to show the transfer of coral mucus into the bulk tissue and phospholipid fatty acids of the warm-water sponge Mycale fistulifera and cold-water sponge Hymedesmia coriacea, demonstrating a direct trophic link between corals and reef sponges. Furthermore, 21-40% of the mucus carbon and 32-39% of the nitrogen assimilated by the sponges was subsequently released as detritus, confirming a sponge loop on Red Sea warm-water and north Atlantic cold-water coral reefs. The presence of a sponge loop in two vastly different reef environments suggests it is a ubiquitous feature of reef ecosystems contributing to the high biogeochemical cycling that may enable coral reefs to thrive in nutrient-limited (warm-water) and energy-limited (cold-water) environments.

  3. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rix, L.; de Goeij, J.M.; Mueller, C.E.; Struck, U.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Al-Horani, F.A.; Wild, C.; Naumann, M.S.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrient

  4. Microbial abundance in the coelenteron and mucus of the cold-water Coral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinbauer, M.G.; Ogier, J.; Maier, C.

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in coral ecology; however, little is known about cold-water coral (CWC) reefs. Microbial abundance in bottom water of Lophelia pertusa-dominated CWC reefs in the Skagerrak, North Sea, was elevated by ca. 40% for prokaryotes and 70 to 90% for viruses compared to

  5. Coral mucus fuels the sponge loop in warm- and cold-water coral reef ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rix, L.; de Goeij, J.M.; Mueller, C.E.; Struck, U.; Middelburg, J.J.; van Duyl, F.C.; Al-Horani, F.A.; Wild, C.; Naumann, M.S.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow warm-water and deep-sea cold-water corals engineer the coral reef framework and fertilize reef communities by releasing coral mucus, a source of reef dissolved organic matter (DOM). By transforming DOM into particulate detritus, sponges play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrient

  6. European Cold-Water Corals: Hydrography and Geochemistry. What is the message?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullo, W.-C.; Rüggeberg, A.; Flögel, S.

    2009-04-01

    Cold-water corals are known to be abundant in the world's oceans forming unique reef structures mainly built up by colonial azooxanthellate scleractinians Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Focusing on the European continental margin, these cold-water coral reefs occur on moraine ridges off Norway to small coral topped mounds and huge coral banks in the Rockall Trough, the Porcupine Seabight, the Gulf of Cadiz, but only have a patchy occurrence in the Mediterranean Sea. Living cold-water coral reefs occur over a wide bathymetric and hydrographical range. We found that cold-water coral reefs are limited to different intermediate water masses. Measurements of the physical and geological properties showed that parameters such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen content, current intensities, and different substrates vary widely without specifically impacting the distribution of living cold-water coral reefs. The habitat of living reefs along the Atlantic European continental margin comprises a temperature-salinity field, with its lower boundary equivalent to the Intermediate Salinity Maximum (ISM). Therefore, cold-water corals of these reefs may report environmental changes, present and past, if the proper geochemical tools are applied. Sr-isotopes seem to be a very promising proxy, since they portray very well the temperature conditions of the ambient seawater from which the coral precipitates. The correlation of established proxies such as ^18O and ^13C with temperature is possible as well, however, it remains difficult since there is no direct temperature equation applicable as in shallow-water corals. Other temperature proxies such as Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca and U/Ca are in?uenced by the complex microstructure of the aragonite skeleton, the rate of calci?cation, and other vital effects observed for coral species. We will present a variety of established and new proxies and will discuss their application and interpretation potential.

  7. Effects of cold front passage on turbulent fluxes over a large inland water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat over a large inland water in southern USA were measured using the eddy covariance method through the year of 2008. In addition, net radiation, air temperatures and relative humidity, and water temperature in different depths were also measured. The specific objective of this study is to examine effects of a cold front passage on the surface energy fluxes. For the typical cold front event selected from April 11 to 14, air temperature decreased by 16°C, while surface temperature only dropped 6°C. Atmospheric vapor pressure decreased by 1.6 kPa, while that in the water-air interface dropped 0.7 kPa. The behavior difference in the water-air interface was caused by the passage of cold, dry air masses immediately behind the cold front. During the cold front event, sensible heat and latent heat flux increased by 171 W m-2 and 284 W m-2, respectively. Linear aggression analysis showed that the sensible heat flux was proportional to the product of wind speed and the temperature gradient of water-air interface, with a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Latent heat flux was proportional to the product of wind speed and vapor pressure difference between the water surface and overlaying atmosphere, with a correlation coefficient of 0.81. Also, the correlations between both fluxes and the wind speed were weak. This result indicated that the strong wind associated with the cold front event contributed to the turbulent mixing, which indirectly enhanced surface energy exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. The relationship between the water heat storage energy and turbulent fluxes was also examined.

  8. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated 1-km cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a short cold water immersion (CWI) intervention on rectal and muscle temperature, isokinetic strength and 1-km cycling time trial performance in the heat. Ten male cyclists performed a 1-km time trial at 35.0+/-0.3 degrees C and 40.0+/-3.0% relative humidity, followed by 20 min recovery sitting in either cold water (14 degrees C) for 5 min or in 35 degrees C air (control); a second 1-km time trial immediately followed. Peak and mean cycling power output were recorded for both time trials. Rectal and muscle temperature, and maximal isokinetic concentric torque of the knee extensors were measured before and immediately after the first and second time trials. Rectal temperature was not different between cold water immersion and control conditions at any time points. After the second time trial, however, muscle temperature was significantly lower (-1.3+/-0.7 degrees C) in cold water immersion compared with the control trial. While peak and mean power decreased from the first to second time trial in both conditions (-86+/-54 W and -24+/-16 W, respectively), maximal isokinetic concentric torque was similar between conditions at all time points. The 5 min cold water immersion intervention lowered muscle temperature but did not affect isokinetic strength or 1-km cycling performance. Copyright (c) 2008 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Disparity in disinfection byproducts concentration between hot and cold tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2015-03-01

    The quality of water entering a distribution system may differ substantially from the quality at the point of exposure to the consumer. This study investigated temporal variations in the levels of regulated and non-regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in cold and hot tap water in a home on a medium-sized municipal water system. In addition, samples were collected directly from the water plant with some being held in accordance with a simulated distribution system (SDS) test protocol. The location for this work was a system in western Massachusetts, USA that uses free chlorine as a final disinfectant. Very little short term variability of DBPs at the point of entry (POE) was observed. The concentration of DBPs in the time-variable SDS test was similar to concentrations in the cold water tap. For most DBPs, the concentrations continued to increase as the cold water tap sample was held for the time-variable SDS incubation period. However, the impact of heating on DBP levels was compound specific. For example, the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloropicrin (CP) were substantially higher in the hot water tap than in the cold water time-variable SDS samples. In contrast, the concentration of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was lower in the heated hot tap water, but about equal to that observed in the cold tap water. The situation was more pronounced for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (TCP), which all showed lower concentrations in the hot water then in either of the cold water samples (instantaneous or time-variable SDS). The latter was viewed as a clear indication of thermally-induced decomposition. The ratio of unknown total organic halide (UTOX) to TOX was substantially lower in the hot tap water as the THM to TOX ratio became correspondingly larger. The results of this study show that DBP exposure in the home is not well represented by

  10. Moving in extreme environments: open water swimming in cold and warm water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Michael; Bradford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Open water swimming (OWS), either 'wild' such as river swimming or competitive, is a fast growing pastime as well as a part of events such as triathlons. Little evidence is available on which to base high and low water temperature limits. Also, due to factors such as acclimatisation, which disassociates thermal sensation and comfort from thermal state, individuals cannot be left to monitor their own physical condition during swims. Deaths have occurred during OWS; these have been due to not only thermal responses but also cardiac problems. This paper, which is part of a series on 'Moving in Extreme Environments', briefly reviews current understanding in pertinent topics associated with OWS. Guidelines are presented for the organisation of open water events to minimise risk, and it is concluded that more information on the responses to immersion in cold and warm water, the causes of the individual variation in these responses and the precursors to the cardiac events that appear to be the primary cause of death in OWS events will help make this enjoyable sport even safer.

  11. How geomorphology and groundwater level affect the spatio-temporal variability of riverine cold water patches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Vincent; Piégay, Hervé; Allemand, Pascal; Vaudor, Lise; Goma, Régis; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Temperature is a key factor for river ecosystems. In summer, patches of cold water are formed in the river by groundwater seepage. These patches have strong ecological significance and extend to the surface water in a well-mixed riverine system. These patches can serve as thermal refuges for some fish species during summer. In this study, the temporal variability and spatial distribution of cold water patches were explored along a 50 km river reach (the lower Ain River, France) using thermal infrared airborne remote sensing. This study examines a new range of processes acting on cold water patches at different scales that have not previously been touched upon in the literature. Three airborne campaigns were conducted during the summers of 2010, 2011 and 2014. Based on these images, a large number of cold water patches were identified using an automated method. Four types of patches were observed: tributary plumes, cold side channels (former channels or point-bar backwater channels), side seeps (located directly in the river channel) and gravel bar seeps (occurring at the downstream end of gravel bars). Logistic regression was used to analyse the longitudinal distribution of cold water patches according to geomorphologic indicators reflecting current or past fluvial process. Side seeps were found to be related to the local geology. Cold side channels were correlated to contemporary and past lateral river mobility. Gravel bar seeps were related to the current development of bars and are more prevalent in wandering reaches than in single-bed incised and paved reaches. The logistic model was subsequently used to evaluate gravel bar seep variability in the past. The model suggests larger numbers of seeps in the mid-20th century when bar surface area was higher. Interannual variability in the occurrence and spatial extent of side seeps and gravel bar seeps appear to be related to groundwater level fluctuations. Cold side channels exhibited greater interannual stability

  12. Hot water treatments delay cold-induced banana peel blackening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Promyou, S.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2008-01-01

    Banana fruit of cv. Gros Michel (Musa acuminata, AAA Group, locally called cv. Hom Thong) and cv. Namwa (Musa x paradisiaca, ABB Group) were immersed for 5, 10 and 15 min in water at 42 degrees C, or in water at 25 degrees C (control), and were then stored at 4 degrees C. Hot water treatment for 15

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring water permeability of optical coatings on plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, U; Kaiser, N

    1997-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has been applied to determine the water content of plastic lenses. An analytical method is presented for monitoring the water permeability of thin layers on plastic optics by utilizing the reversible moisture absorption of organic polymers. As an example, scratch-resistant and antireflective layers on poly[diethylenglycol-bis(allylcarbonate)] lenses are investigated. The measurements demonstrate the relatively high water barrier of coatings deposited by plasma-ion-assisted deposition compared with classical physical vapor deposition coatings and polysiloxane dip coatings.

  14. Cold-water coral growth and mound formation on the Pen Duick Escarpment, Gulf of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienis, Furu; de Stigter, Henko C.; de Haas, Henk; Groot, Diane; Frank, Norbert; van Weering, Tjeerd C. E.

    2010-05-01

    Abundant skeletal remains of cold-water corals in sediments around the Pen Duick Escarpment, southern Gulf of Cadiz, suggest that corals thrived in the area in a relatively recent past. Cold-water coral carbonate mounds with heights of up to 60 m are found at about 550 m water depth on the edge of an elevation delimited by the Pen Duick Escarpment. Coral debris is abundantly present in the sediment on the carbonate mounds as well as on the escarpment, with Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata as most common species. However, living coral is rare, and a mud drape of a few cm to tens of cm thick is usually found covering the coral-bearing sediment. On and off mound sediment cores are presently investigated in detail to determine the timing of the decline of cold-water coral communities on the Pen Duick Escarpment. Planktonic foraminifera oxygen isotope stratigraphy and U/Th datings of coral debris from the on mound core show that the main framework building cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata were present on the mound during glacial periods (Marine Isotope Stage 2, 6 and 8) and the early Holocene, but absent during the late Holocene. During glacial periods a dense framework of cold-water corals existed and sedimentation rates were high. Both on and off mound cores show low magnetic susceptibility values until marine isotope stage 3, after which values are increasing. A large hiatus is found between 36 and 141 kyr. Our finding that cold-water corals on Pen Duick escarpment occurred mostly during glacial times contrasts with that of cold-water corals on the Rockall Trough margins and in the Porcupine Seabight, where they seem to have mainly lived during interglacials. The reason for the late Holocene decline of cold-water corals on Pen Duick escarpment is still a matter of speculation. Observations made with CTD and long-term deployment of benthic landers indicate activity of internal waves in the area with semi-diurnal periodicity, inducing

  15. Spatial and temporal variability of the North Korean Cold Water leading to the near-bottom cold water intrusion in Korea Strait [review article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae-Yul; Magaard, Lorenz; Kim, Kuh; Shin, Chang-Woong; Kim, Cheolsoo; Byun, Sang-Kyung

    2004-01-01

    In the deepest region of Korea Strait, the surface temperature is highest in August (lowest in March), while the near-bottom temperature is lowest in September (highest in May). Cross-spectral analysis of the monthly temperature data between the two layers shows high coherence at the annual frequency with phase of 154°. Why and how does such a nearly opposite phasing occur between the surface and the near-bottom temperatures there? This study aims at answering these questions using historical and recently observed data. Cold and relatively fresh subsurface water flowing southward along the east coast of Korea and, known as the North Korean Cold Water (NKCW), becomes noticeable in April near the Sokcho coast. The zonal temperature gradient there is largest around June. The width of the NKCW becomes larger from April to August. After October, the NKCW retreats back toward the coast. The southward movement of the NKCW is thus strong over a period of six to seven months and weak in winter, especially in February. The NKCW flows southward relatively quickly along the coast in April to October and arrives at the Ulleung Basin within one to two months. Because of the sill between the Ulleung Basin and Korea Strait, this water cannot continue to flow to south, but piles up for about two to three months before it moves over the sill. The convergence of the subsurface cold water in the Ulleung Basin displaces the isopycnals upward and this water then intrudes over the sill along the isopycnals. This explains why in April or May, when this water appears noticeably at the Sokcho coast, the near-bottom water in Korea Strait is warmest and in August or September when the NKCW, which is piled up enough at the southern end of the Ulleung Basin, intrudes to Korea Strait, the near-bottom temperatures there are at their lowest. The origin of the NKCW seems to be the water of salinity less han 34.1 psu and surface density of 27 σθ or higher, which sinks in the northwestern East Sea

  16. Effect of bottling and storage on the migration of plastic constituents in Spanish bottled waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guart, Albert; Bono-Blay, Francisco; Borrell, Antonio; Lacorte, Silvia

    2014-08-01

    Bottled water is packaged in either glass or, to a large extent, in plastic bottles with metallic or plastic caps of different material, shape and colour. Plastic materials are made of one or more monomers and several additives that can eventually migrate into water, either during bottle manufacturing, water filling or storage. The main objective of the present study was to carry out a comprehensive assessment of the quality of the Spanish bottled water market in terms of (i) migration of plastic components or additives during bottling and during storage and (ii) evaluation of the effect of the packaging material and bottle format on the migration potential. The compounds investigated were 5 phthalates, diethylhexyl adipate, alkylphenols and bisphenol A. A set of 362 bottled water samples corresponding to 131 natural mineral waters and spring waters sources and 3 treated waters of several commercial brands were analysed immediately after bottling and after one-year storage (a total of 724 samples). Target compounds were detected in 5.6% of the data values, with diethyl hexyl phthalate and bisphenol A being the most ubiquitous compounds detected. The total daily intake was estimated and a comparison with reference values was indicated.

  17. Evaluating four measures of water quality in clay pots and plastic safe storage containers in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Ayers, Tracy L; Knee, Jacqueline; Oremo, Jared; Odhiambo, Aloyce; Faith, Sitnah H; Nyagol, Ronald O; Stauber, Christine E; Lantagne, Daniele S; Quick, Robert E

    2016-11-01

    Household water treatment with chlorine can improve microbiological quality and reduce diarrhea. Chlorination is typically assessed using free chlorine residual (FCR), with a lower acceptable limit of 0.2 mg/L, however, accurate measurement of FCR is challenging with turbid water. To compare potential measures of adherence to treatment and water quality, we chlorinated recently-collected water in rural Kenyan households and measured total chlorine residual (TCR), FCR, oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and E. coli concentration over 72 h in clay and plastic containers. Results showed that 1) ORP served as a useful proxy for chlorination in plastic containers up to 24 h; 2) most stored water samples disinfected by chlorination remained significantly less contaminated than source water for up to 72 h, even in the absence of FCR; 3) TCR may be a useful proxy indicator of microbiologic water quality because it confirms previous chlorination and is associated with a lower risk of E. coli contamination compared to untreated source water; and 4) chlorination is more effective in plastic than clay containers presumably because of lower chlorine demand in plastic. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Water maze learning and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in streptozotocin diabetic rats: effects of insulin treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Biessels, G.J.; Kamal, A.; Urban, I.J.A.; Spruijt, B.M.; Erkelens, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Streptozotocin-diabetic rats express deficits in water maze learning and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. The present study examined whether these deficits could be prevented and/or reversed with insulin treatment. In addition, the water maze learning deficit in diabetic rats was further characteriz

  19. Responses to sudden cold-water immersion in inexperienced swimmers following training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, James L; Button, Chris; Hodge, Ken; Lucas, Samuel J E; Barwood, Martin J; Cotter, James D

    2013-08-01

    When suddenly immersed in cold water, humans typically exhibit the cold shock response, although training can attenuate hyperventilation. This study extends previous findings by considering the influence of physical activity to maintain buoyancy and subsequent swimming performance. Six inexperienced swimmers (three men and three women; mean age 22.8) received 1 wk of cold-water head-out immersions (10 x 3 min at 15 degrees C) alongside mental skills training to improve their treading water technique and to control hyperventilation upon immersion. Six inexperienced control swimmers (four men and two women; mean age 21.8) received immersions in temperate water (27 degrees C). Ventilation, brain blood flow velocity, and blood oxygenation were measured during a physiological test in which participants trod water for 150 s. In a subsequent simulated survival test, performance (swimming duration and distance) and perception of effort were recorded. All the tests were in 10 degrees C water with the head out. There were significant improvements in the intervention group's ability to suppress rapid increases in respiratory frequency; 62 +/- 24 breaths x min(-1) to 33 +/- 12. The drop in brain blood flow was smaller and more transient than that previously reported due to the hypertensive response associated with treading water. Inexperienced swimmers could benefit from cold-water habituation combined with mental skills training in order to improve voluntary control over the respiratory portion of the cold shock response as part of learning to tread water. This may improve survival prospects in a real-life emergency scenario such as an overturned boat.

  20. Static Characteristics of Absorption Chiller-Heater Supplying Cold and Hot Water Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Irie, Tomoyoshi

    Absorption chiller-heaters which can supply both chilled water and hot water at the same time, are used for cooling and heating air conditioning systems. In this paper, we classified absorption cold and hot water generating cycles and control methods, studied these absorption cycles by cycle simulation. In economizer cycle, condensed refrigerant which heats hot water is transported to cooling cycle and used effectively for cooling chilled water, Concerning with transported condensed refrigerant, there are two methods, all condensed refrigerant or required refrigerant for cooling are transported to cooling cycle, and required refrigerant method is better for energy saving. Adding improvement of solution control to this economizer cycle, simultaneous cold and hot water supplying chiller-heaters have good characteristics of energy saving in the all region.

  1. Cold-water immersion versus passive therapy to decrease delayed onset muscular soreness: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Alberto Aguilera Eguía

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Late onset muscle soreness, also known as delayed onset muscle soreness, is a painful musculoskeletal condition that may occur 24-48 and up to 72 hours after the completion of unusual physical or high intensity exercise involving eccentric muscle activity. In the field of physical rehabilitation, immersion in cold water is a common intervention mainly used in sports medicine, to minimize delayed onset muscle soreness and promote recovery after exercise. Objective To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of immersion in cold water after high intensity exercise and answer the following question: In subjects who exercise regularly, can cold-water immersion compared to passive therapy (rest reduce late-onset muscle soreness? Methods The article "Cold Water Immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise," a Cochrane systematic review authored by Bleakley et al (2012, was analyzed. Results Immersion in cold water can decrease delayed onset of muscle pain after high intensity exercise. Twenty-four hours after the intervention, the mean standardized difference was -0.55 (95% CI: -0.84 to -0.27; 48 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.66 (95% CI: -0.97 to -0.35; 72 hours after, the mean standardized difference was -0.93 (95% CI: -1.36 to -0.51 and up to 96 hours after, mean standardized difference was -0.58 (95% CI: -1.00 to -0.16. Conclusion Despite the methodological limitations present in the studies included in the systematic review analyzed, we found the recommendation for cold water immersion (cryotherapy reasonable in individuals with late muscle pain caused by high intensity sports.

  2. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-01-01

    Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

  3. Active diver thermal protection requirements for cold water diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitt, M W; Nuckols, M L

    1983-07-01

    An analysis of the supplemental heating requirements for military divers, both surface-tended and free-swimming, is presented. Specific categories of diver heat loss, including respiratory losses and suit convective losses, are characterized over a range of water temperatures, depths, and breathing gas mixtures. The need for a 1-kW diver heater is identified to accommodate deep dives where the limitation of a surface-supplied hot water source and a long hot water umbilical pose an unacceptable burden. A 0.5-kW heater is shown to be satisfactory to extend the performance of existing closed circuit-breathing apparatuses for shallow water operations in water temperatures as low as 40 degrees F. Substantial benefits in heat savings are shown through the use of passive regenerative breath heaters and alternative suit inflation gases for drysuit use.

  4. Linking benthic hydrodynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; White, Martin; Duineveld, Gerard; Mienis, Furu; Soetaert, Karline; Grehan, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Observations from numerous cold-water coral locations in the NE Atlantic show energetic near-bottom flow dynamics along the European continental margin at individual coral mounds and mound clusters. Dynamics are largely controlled by tide-topography interaction generating and enhancing periodic motions such as trapped waves, freely propagating internal tides and internal hydraulic jumps. In this study, linkages between key abiotic parameters and cold water coral occurrences are explored across entire cold-water coral mound provinces using an integrated modelling and observational approach. The 3-D ocean circulation model ROMS-AGRIF was applied to simulate near-bottom hydrodynamic conditions at three provinces in the NE Atlantic (Logachev mounds, Arc mounds and Belgica mounds) adopting a nested model setup with a central grid resolution of 250 m. Simulations were carried out with a focus on accurate high-resolution topography and tidal forcing. The central model bathymetry was taken from high-resolution INSS (Irish National Seabed Survey) seafloor mapping data. The model was integrated over a full one-year reference period starting from the 1st January 2010. Interannual variability was not considered. Tidal forcing was obtained from a global solution of the Oregon State University (OSU) inverse tidal model. Modelled fields of benthic currents were validated against available independent in situ observations. Coral assemblage patterns (presence and absence locations) were obtained from benthic surveys of the EU FP7 CoralFISH programme and supplemented by data from additional field surveys. Modelled near-bottom currents, temperature and salinity were analysed for a 1-month subset (15th April to 15th May 2010) corresponding to the main CoralFISH survey period. The model results show intensified near-bottom currents in areas where living corals are observed by contrast with coral absence and random background locations. Instantaneous and time-mean current speeds at

  5. Sensitive Limits on the Water Abundance in Cold Low Mass Molecular Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, E A; Bergin, Edwin A.; Snell, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    We present SWAS observations of water vapor in two cold star-less clouds, B68 and Core D in rho Ophiuchus. Sensitive non-detections of the 1(10)-1(01) transition of o-H2O are reported for each source. Both molecular cores have been previously examined by detailed observations that have characterized the physical structure. Using these rather well defined physical properties and a Monte-Carlo radiation transfer model we have removed one of the largest uncertainties from the abundance calculation and set the lowest water abundance limit to date in cold low-mass molecular cores. These limits are < 3 x 10^{-8} (relative to H2) and < 8 x 10^{-9} in B68 and rho Oph D, respectively. Such low abundances confirm the general lack of ortho-water vapor in cold (T < 20 K) cores. Provided that the ortho/para ratio of water is not near zero, these limits are well below theoretical predictions and appear to support the suggestion that most of the water in dense low-mass cores is frozen onto the surfaces of cold dust...

  6. Marine plastic pollution in waters around Australia: characteristics, concentrations, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Julia; Shaw, Jeremy; Wilcox, Chris; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Proietti, Maira; Thums, Michele; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2013-01-01

    Plastics represent the vast majority of human-made debris present in the oceans. However, their characteristics, accumulation zones, and transport pathways remain poorly assessed. We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories. The 839 marine plastics recorded were predominantly small fragments ("microplastics", median length = 2.8 mm, mean length = 4.9 mm) resulting from the breakdown of larger objects made of polyethylene and polypropylene (e.g. packaging and fishing items). Mean sea surface plastic concentration was 4256.4 pieces km(-2), and after incorporating the effect of vertical wind mixing, this value increased to 8966.3 pieces km(-2). These plastics appear to be associated with a wide range of ocean currents that connect the sampled sites to their international and domestic sources, including populated areas of Australia's east coast. This study shows that plastic contamination levels in surface waters of Australia are similar to those in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Maine, but considerably lower than those found in the subtropical gyres and Mediterranean Sea. Microplastics such as the ones described here have the potential to affect organisms ranging from megafauna to small fish and zooplankton.

  7. Marine plastic pollution in waters around Australia: characteristics, concentrations, and pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Reisser

    Full Text Available Plastics represent the vast majority of human-made debris present in the oceans. However, their characteristics, accumulation zones, and transport pathways remain poorly assessed. We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories. The 839 marine plastics recorded were predominantly small fragments ("microplastics", median length = 2.8 mm, mean length = 4.9 mm resulting from the breakdown of larger objects made of polyethylene and polypropylene (e.g. packaging and fishing items. Mean sea surface plastic concentration was 4256.4 pieces km(-2, and after incorporating the effect of vertical wind mixing, this value increased to 8966.3 pieces km(-2. These plastics appear to be associated with a wide range of ocean currents that connect the sampled sites to their international and domestic sources, including populated areas of Australia's east coast. This study shows that plastic contamination levels in surface waters of Australia are similar to those in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Maine, but considerably lower than those found in the subtropical gyres and Mediterranean Sea. Microplastics such as the ones described here have the potential to affect organisms ranging from megafauna to small fish and zooplankton.

  8. Marine Plastic Pollution in Waters around Australia: Characteristics, Concentrations, and Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Julia; Shaw, Jeremy; Wilcox, Chris; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Proietti, Maira; Thums, Michele; Pattiaratchi, Charitha

    2013-01-01

    Plastics represent the vast majority of human-made debris present in the oceans. However, their characteristics, accumulation zones, and transport pathways remain poorly assessed. We characterised and estimated the concentration of marine plastics in waters around Australia using surface net tows, and inferred their potential pathways using particle-tracking models and real drifter trajectories. The 839 marine plastics recorded were predominantly small fragments (“microplastics”, median length = 2.8 mm, mean length = 4.9 mm) resulting from the breakdown of larger objects made of polyethylene and polypropylene (e.g. packaging and fishing items). Mean sea surface plastic concentration was 4256.4 pieces km−2, and after incorporating the effect of vertical wind mixing, this value increased to 8966.3 pieces km−2. These plastics appear to be associated with a wide range of ocean currents that connect the sampled sites to their international and domestic sources, including populated areas of Australia's east coast. This study shows that plastic contamination levels in surface waters of Australia are similar to those in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Maine, but considerably lower than those found in the subtropical gyres and Mediterranean Sea. Microplastics such as the ones described here have the potential to affect organisms ranging from megafauna to small fish and zooplankton. PMID:24312224

  9. Cold water corals of the Northeast Atlantic margin: Archives of intermediate water circulation during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, N.; Paterne, M.; Ayliffe, L.; Lutringer, A.; Blamart, D.; van Weering, T.

    2003-04-01

    We present combined 230Th/U and 14C dating and stable isotope analyses on benthic corals from the northeastern North Atlantic in order to investigate past changes of the thermohaline circulation. The reef forming cold water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata were raised from intermediate depth (˜750m bsl) from carbonate mounds along Rockall and Porcupine Bank and Porcupine Seabight.The 230Th/U ages range from today to 247,400yr. The δ234U, 230Th/232Th, and X-ray images indicate negligible alteration of the investigated corals, i.e. open system behavior. Very young deep-sea corals were accurately dated by means of 230Th/U dating. One in-situ living Lophelia coral yielded a mean age of 1995AD, matching the date of collection in 1999AD. From this coral, the measured and calculated seawater Δ14C values are indistinguishable, and the reservoir age Rinterm of the upper intermediate waters is 710±80 years. Several modern corals, being dated between 1950AD and 1986AD, recorded the atmospheric 14C/12C increase due to the nuclear tests in the early 60s. The modern pre-bomb Δ14C value of the North Atlantic intermediate waters was determined at an average of -65±7o/oo, and the mean reservoir age at 500±50 years. Finally, several investigated benthic coral grew during the second step of the deglaciation and during the Holocene climate optimum (from 10,900 to about 8,000 CAL yr BP). The reservoir age of average 530±65 years is equivalent to that of today indicating that, during the studied coral growth episodes, a modern type oceanic circulation, as well as the air-sea and surface to deeper adjacent water 14CO2 exchanges prevailed in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean.

  10. 207 EFFECTS OF HOT AND COLD WATER PRE- TREATMENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND ENVIRONMENT. VOLUME 2 ... dormancy, these methods include hot water. (FAO .... ASSET Journal Series A, 2: 29-36. FAO 1990. Arabic Gum, FAO Food and. Nutrition. Food and ...

  11. Microbial hitchhikers on marine plastic debris: Human exposure risks at bathing waters and beach environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Anisha; Oliver, David M; Gutierrez, Tony; Quilliam, Richard S

    2016-07-01

    Marine plastic debris is well characterized in terms of its ability to negatively impact terrestrial and marine environments, endanger coastal wildlife, and interfere with navigation, tourism and commercial fisheries. However, the impacts of potentially harmful microorganisms and pathogens colonising plastic litter are not well understood. The hard surface of plastics provides an ideal environment for opportunistic microbial colonisers to form biofilms and might offer a protective niche capable of supporting a diversity of different microorganisms, known as the "Plastisphere". This biotope could act as an important vector for the persistence and spread of pathogens, faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) and harmful algal bloom species (HABs) across beach and bathing environments. This review will focus on the existent knowledge and research gaps, and identify the possible consequences of plastic-associated microbes on human health, the spread of infectious diseases and bathing water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A; Siqueira, A F; Ferreira-Junior, J B; do Carmo, J; Durigan, J L Q; Blazevich, A; Bottaro, M

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of 5 and 15°C cold-water immersion on recovery from exercise resulting in exercise-induced muscle damage. 42 college-aged men performed 5×20 drop-jumps and were randomly allocated into one of 3 groups: (1) 5°C; (2) 15°C; or (3) control. After exercise, individuals from the cold-water immersion groups had their lower limbs immerged in iced water for 20 min. Isometric knee extensor torque, countermovement jump, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h post-exercise. There was no between-group difference in isometric strength recovery (p=0.73). However, countermovement jump recovered quicker in cold-water immersion groups compared to control group (pmuscle soreness (p=0.06) in 15°C group compared to control at 24 h post-exercise. The result suggests that cold-water immersion promote recovery of stretch-shortening cycle performance, but not influence the recovery of maximal contractile force. Immersion at warmer temperature may be more effective than colder temperatures promoting recovery from strenuous exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Estimation of packaged water consumption and associated plastic waste production from household budget surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardrop, Nicola A.; Dzodzomenyo, Mawuli; Aryeetey, Genevieve; Hill, Allan G.; Bain, Robert E. S.; Wright, Jim

    2017-08-01

    Packaged water consumption is growing in low- and middle-income countries, but the magnitude of this phenomenon and its environmental consequences remain unclear. This study aims to quantify both the volumes of packaged water consumed relative to household water requirements and associated plastic waste generated for three West African case study countries. Data from household expenditure surveys for Ghana, Nigeria and Liberia were used to estimate the volumes of packaged water consumed and thereby quantify plastic waste generated in households with and without solid waste disposal facilities. In Ghana, Nigeria and Liberia respectively, 11.3 (95% confidence interval: 10.3-12.4), 10.1 (7.5-12.5), and 0.38 (0.31-0.45) Ml day-1 of sachet water were consumed. This generated over 28 000 tonnes yr-1 of plastic waste, of which 20%, 63% and 57% was among households lacking formal waste disposal facilities in Ghana, Nigeria and Liberia respectively. Reported packaged water consumption provided sufficient water to meet daily household drinking-water requirements for 8.4%, less than 1% and 1.6% of households in Ghana, Nigeria and Liberia respectively. These findings quantify packaged water’s contribution to household water needs in our study countries, particularly Ghana, but indicate significant subsequent environmental repercussions.

  14. Living benthic foraminiferal species as indicators of cold-warm water masses interaction and upwelling areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Patrícia P. B.; Pimenta, Felipe M.; Eichler, Beatriz B.; Vital, Helenice

    2016-03-01

    The western South Atlantic continental margin, between 27° and 37°S, is dominated by four main water masses: cold-fresh Subantarctic Shelf Water (SASW), warm-salty Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), cold upwelled South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and fresh Plata Plume Water (PPW). Despite the large seasonal variability of PPW extension along the shelf, an intense and relatively stable temperature-salinity gradient separates the SASW and the STSW forming the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF) around 32°S. The two dominant shelf water masses (SASW and STSW) arise from the process of mixing of oceanic waters. The SASW originates from the dilution of Subantarctic Water due to excess precipitation and continental runoff, and the STSW consists of modified warm tropical waters and South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) diluted below PPW. A previous article demonstrates distribution of Bulimina marginata, a shelf environment and deep-sea species of benthic foraminifera, is influenced by the front location and it can be used as a proxy of the STSF in sediment core analysis. Here we show three other infaunal living species inhabiting at the Continental margin: Buccella peruviana, Globocassidulina subglobosa and Uvigerina peregrina and their distribution limits show the interaction of Subantartic Shelf Water, Subtropical Shelf Water, and upwelling of SACW, in the bottom sediment of coastal studied areas.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  16. Solar unit for producing hot water and cold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayramov, R.B.; Nazarova, G.R.; Pivovarova, A.P.; Ushakova, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    A unit is described which contains a reserve heater, cooling tower, air moistener, loop for producing hot water which has a tubular boiler arranged in a glass ''hot box,'' and hot water storage, and loop for circulating the solution which includes a generator, whose working surface serves as the outer surface of the boiler, heat exchanger-regenerator with cavities of strong and weak solutions, cooling agent for the strong solution which is also connected to the cooling tower, and absorber which is connected to the air moistener.

  17. Direct visualization of mucus production by the cold-water coral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, E.-M.; Baussant, T.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Lophelia pertusa is the dominant reef-building organism of cold-water coral reefs, and is known to produce significant amounts of mucus, which could involve an important metabolic cost. Mucus is involved in particle removal and feeding processes, yet the triggers and dynamics of mucus product

  18. Sedimentation patterns on a cold-water coral mound off Mauritania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisele, M.; Frank, N.; Wienberg, C.; Titschack, J.; Mienis, F; Beuck, L.; Tisnerat-Laborde, N.; Hebbeln, D.

    2014-01-01

    An unconformity-bound glacial sequence (135 cm thick) of a coral-bearing sediment core collected from the flank of a cold-water coral mound in the Banda Mound Province off Mauritania was analysed. In order to study the relation between coral framework growth and its filling by hemipelagic sediments,

  19. Skeletal growth, respiration rate and fatty acid composition in the cold-water coral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsson, A.I.; Lundälv, T.; van Oevelen, D.

    2013-01-01

    Reefs of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa form biodiversity-rich habitats in the deep ocean, but physiology, reproduction, feeding and growth in this species remain poorly investigated. Food supply to reef sites varies considerably both spatially and temporarily. In this study we investigated t

  20. Discovery of symbiotic nitrogen fixation and chemoautotrophy in cold-water corals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Mueller, C.E.; Veuger, B.; Larsson, A.I.; Form, A.; van Oevelen, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water corals (CWC) are widely distributed around the world forming extensive reefs at par with tropical coral reefs. They are hotspots of biodiversity and organic matter processing in the world’s deep oceans. Living in the dark they lack photosynthetic symbionts and are therefore considered to

  1. Cold-water coral ecosystem (Tisler Reef, Norwegian Shelf) may be a hotspot for carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, M.; Wolff, G.A.; Lundälv, T.; Guihen, D.; Kiriakoulakis, K.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G.

    2012-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are recognised as an important marine benthic eco system at continental margins. Where abundant, they most likely play a role both in the maintenance of biodiversity and in the provision of ecosystem services provided by shelf seas. Here, we directly measure the

  2. Role of long non-coding RNAs in bacterial cold water disease pathogenesis in rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum is one of the major causes of mortality in salmonids. Three genetic lines of rainbow trout designated as ARS-Fp-R (resistant), ARS-Fp-C (control) and ARS-Fp-S (susceptible) have significant differences in survival rate follow...

  3. Unmanned Evaluation of Mares Abyss 22 Navy Open Circuit Scuba Regulator for Cold Water Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    relief valve, a buoyancy inflation device, a submersible pressure gauge, or a dry suit inflation device), the cold water performance of regulators in...the sum of data values divided by the number of data values ark a vat housed within the pressurized testing chamber and used for

  4. Thermoregulation during Cold Water Immersion is Unimpaired by Muscle Glycogen Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    a decrease in plasma glucose oxidation, and a concomitant increase in muscle glycogenolysis as compared to rest (14). Other animal experiments suggest... glycogenolysis . Alternatively, the increased plasma glycerol during cold water immersion in the low-glycogen trial indicates that enhanced lipolysis is

  5. Cold-water coral growth under extreme environmental conditions, the Cape Lookout area, NW Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Lavaleye, M. M. S.; Ross, S. W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Haren, H.; Bergman, M. J. N.; de Haas, H.; Brooke, S.; van Weering, T. C. E.

    2014-05-01

    The Cape Lookout cold-water coral area off the coast of North Carolina forms the shallowest and northernmost cold-water coral mound area on the Blake Plateau in the NW Atlantic. Cold-water coral habitats near Cape Lookout are occasionally bathed in the Gulf Stream, which is characterised by oligotrophic warm water and strong surface currents. Here, we present the first insights into the mound distribution and morphology, sedimentary environment and coral cover and near-bed environmental conditions as recorded by bottom landers from this coral area. The mounds occur between 320 and 550 m water depth and are characterised by high acoustic backscatter indicating the presence of hard structure. Three distinct mound morphologies were observed: (1) a mound with a flattened top at 320 m, (2) multi-summited mounds with a teardrop shape in the middle part of the area and (3) a single mound at 540 m water depth. Echosounder profiles show the presence of a strong reflector underneath all mound structures that forms the base of the mounds. This reflector cropped out at the downstream side of the single mound and consists of carbonate slabs. Video analysis revealed that all mounds are covered by Lophelia pertusa and that living colonies only occur close to the summits of the SSW side of the mounds, which is the side that faces the strongest currents. Off-mound areas were characterised by low backscatter and sediment ripples, indicating the presence of relatively strong bottom currents. Two bottom landers were deployed amidst the coral mounds between December 2009 and May 2010. Both landers recorded prominent events, characterised by large fluctuations in environmental conditions near the seabed as well as in the overlying water column. The period between December and April was characterised by several events of increasing temperature and salinity, coinciding with increased flow and near-bed acoustic backscatter. During these events temperature fluctuated by up to 9 °C within a

  6. Geology as destiny: cold waters run deep in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The summer of 2001 brought the second-worst drought on record in Oregon, resulting in historically low streamflows and reservoir levels, stressed aquatic ecosystems, and even dramatic confrontations between irrigators and federal resource agencies in the Klamath basin. These events underscore the critical and growing importance of water availability and allocation in...

  7. Influence of cold-water immersion on limb blood flow after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Chris; Jones, Helen; Low, David A; Green, Daniel J; Howatson, Glyn; Gregson, Warren

    2017-06-01

    This study determined the influence of cold (8°C) and cool (22°C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow following resistance exercise. Twelve males completed 4 sets of 10-repetition maximum squat exercise and were then immersed, semi-reclined, into 8°C or 22°C water for 10-min, or rested in a seated position (control) in a randomized order on different days. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, muscle temperature, thigh and calf skin blood flow and superficial femoral artery blood flow were measured before and after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure). The colder water reduced thigh skin temperature and deep muscle temperature to the greatest extent (P cold and cool water similarly reduce femoral artery and cutaneous blood flow responses but not muscle temperature following resistance exercise.

  8. Hydrodynamic conditions in a cold-water coral mound area on the Renard Ridge, southern Gulf of Cadiz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; De Stigter, H.C.; de Haas, H.; van der Land, C.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Near-bed hydrodynamic conditions obtained by bottom landers on the Renard Ridge are presented complemented with a data set from repeated CTD casts. On the Renard Ridge cold-water coral mounds were discovered in the last 10 years. Unlike cold-water coral habitats known from the Norwegian and Irish ma

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Appendices to Task 2. Analysis for concept selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    Appendices include (A) TRW CWP/hull dynamics computer model (HULPIPE); (B) environmental data; (C) structural analysis methods; (D) work breakdown structure; (E) costing worksheets; (F) thermal design of the cold water pipe; (G) CWP/Platform transition ROM costs; (H) installation scenarios and costs; (I) cost uncertainty assessment; (J) risk assessment; and (K) OTEC cold water pipe concept catalog. (WHK)

  10. Cold-water coral mounds on the Pen Duick Escarpment, Gulf of Cadiz: The MiCROSYSTEMS project approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, D.; Blamart, D.; De Mol, L.; Mienis, F.; Pirlet, H.; Wehrmann, L. M.; Barbieri, R.; Maignien, L.; Templer, S. P.; de Haas, H.; Hebbeln, D.; Frank, N.; Larmagnat, S.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Stivaletta, N.; van Weering, T.; Zhang, Y.; Hamoumi, N.; Cnudde, V.; Duyck, P.; Henriet, J.-P.; The MiCROSYSTEMS MD 169 Shipboard Party

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a case study of three cold-water coral mounds in a juvenile growth stage on top of the Pen Duick Escarpment in the Gulf of Cadiz; Alpha, Beta and Gamma mounds. Although cold-water corals are a common feature on the adjacent cliffs, mud volcanoes and open slope, no actual living

  11. Hydrodynamic conditions in a cold-water coral mound area on the Renard Ridge, southern Gulf of Cadiz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; De Stigter, H.C.; de Haas, H.; van der Land, C.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Near-bed hydrodynamic conditions obtained by bottom landers on the Renard Ridge are presented complemented with a data set from repeated CTD casts. On the Renard Ridge cold-water coral mounds were discovered in the last 10 years. Unlike cold-water coral habitats known from the Norwegian and Irish

  12. Hydrodynamic conditions in a cold-water coral mound area on the Renard Ridge, southern Gulf of Cadiz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; De Stigter, H.C.; de Haas, H.; van der Land, C.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Near-bed hydrodynamic conditions obtained by bottom landers on the Renard Ridge are presented complemented with a data set from repeated CTD casts. On the Renard Ridge cold-water coral mounds were discovered in the last 10 years. Unlike cold-water coral habitats known from the Norwegian and Irish ma

  13. Mitigation of blast loadings on structures by an anti-blast plastic water wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 陈力; 方秦; 张亚栋

    2016-01-01

    Seven in-situ tests were carried out in far field to study the blast mitigation effect of a kind of water filled plastic wall. Test results show that the mitigation effect of water filled plastic wall is remarkable. The maximum reduction of peak reflected overpressure reaches up to 94.53%, as well as 36.3% of the minimum peak reflected overpressure reduction in the scaled distance ranging from 1.71 m/kg1/3 to 3.42 m/kg1/3. Parametric studies were also carried out. The effects of the scaled gauge height, water/charge scaled distance (the distance between the explosive charge and the water wall), water wall scaled height and water/structure scaled distance (the distance between the water wall and the structure) were systematically investigated and compared with the usual rigid anti-blast wall. It is concluded that these parameters affect the mitigation effects of plastic water wall on blast loadings significantly, which is basically consistent to the trend of usual rigid anti-blast wall. Some formulae are also derived based on the numerical and test results, providing a simple but reliable prediction model to evaluate the peak overpressure of mitigated blast loadings on the structures.

  14. The Physiological Response to Cold Water Immersion Following a Mixed Martial Arts Training Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Angus; Carr, Sam; Cross, Sean; Petersen, Carl; Lewis, John G; Gieseg, Steven P

    2017-01-17

    Combative sport is one of the most physically intense forms of exercise, yet the effect of recovery interventions has been largely unexplored. We investigated the effect of cold water immersion on structural, inflammatory and physiological stress biomarkers following a mixed martial arts contest preparation training session in comparison to passive recovery. Semi-professional MMA competitors (n=15) were randomly assigned to a cold water immersion (15 min at 10°C) or passive recovery protocol (ambient air) completed immediately following a contest preparation training session. Markers of muscle damage (urinary myoglobin), inflammation/oxidative stress (urinary neopterin + total neopterin (neopterin + 7,8-dihydroneopterin)) and hypothalamic-pituitary axis activation (saliva cortisol) were determined before, immediately post and one, two and 24 hours post-session. Ratings of perceived soreness and fatigue, counter movement jump and gastrointestinal temperature were also measured. Concentrations of all biomarkers increased significantly (p<0.05) post-session. Cold water immersion attenuated increases in urinary neopterin (p<0.05, d = 0.58), total neopterin (p<0.05, d = 0.89) and saliva cortisol after two hours (p<0.05, d = 0.68) and urinary neopterin again at 24 hours (p<0.01, d = 0.57) in comparison to passive recovery. Perceived soreness, fatigue and gastrointestinal temperatures were also lower for the cold water immersion group at several time points post-session whilst counter movement jump did not differ. Combative sport athletes who are subjected to impact-induced stress may benefit from immediate cold water immersion as a simple recovery intervention that reduces delayed onset muscle soreness as well as macrophage and HPA activation whilst not impairing functional performance.

  15. Cassini detection of Enceladus' cold water-group plume ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Wilson, R. J.; Young, D. T.; Crary, F. J.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Paty, C. S.

    2009-07-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O+, OH+, H2O+, H3O+) and heavier water dimer ions (HxO2)+ very close to Enceladus where the plasma begins to emerge from the plume. The data were obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008 and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction exhibiting energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicative of a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enceladus signatures of the plasma interaction with the plume are detected 22 Enceladus radii away.

  16. Effect of cold-water immersion duration on body temperature and muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Ken; Laursen, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    This study compared the effect of 5, 10 and 20 min of cold-water (14 degrees C) immersion on rectal and muscle temperature and neuromuscular function. Twelve cyclists performed four cycling time-to-exhaustion trials in hot conditions (40 degrees C and 40%rh), followed 25 min later by cold-water immersion for 5, 10 or 20 min or 20 min in room temperature (24 degrees C; control). Rectal temperature was measured continuously, and muscle temperature was measured before, immediately after and 45 min after the time-to-exhaustion-test, as well as before and after water immersion. Sixty-second maximal voluntary isometric torque and isokinetic torque of the knee extensors were measured before, immediately after and 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test. A greater rate of decrease in rectal temperature was observed in all water immersion conditions 45-80 min after time-to-exhaustion-test compared with control. Compared with control, muscle temperature 45 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all water immersion conditions; however, muscle temperature was lower for the 10- and 20-min conditions compared with 5 min. Isometric torque measured 55 min after time-to-exhaustion-test was lower for all conditions. Isokinetic torque was lower for all conditions immediately and 55-min post-time-to-exhaustion-test. Of the durations measured, 5 min of cold-water immersion appeared as the most appropriate duration for reducing rectal temperature but limiting decreases in muscle temperature.

  17. Calcification rates and the effect of ocean acidification on Mediterranean cold-water corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, C; Watremez, P; Taviani, M; Weinbauer, M G; Gattuso, J P

    2012-05-07

    Global environmental changes, including ocean acidification, have been identified as a major threat to scleractinian corals. General predictions are that ocean acidification will be detrimental to reef growth and that 40 to more than 80 per cent of present-day reefs will decline during the next 50 years. Cold-water corals (CWCs) are thought to be strongly affected by changes in ocean acidification owing to their distribution in deep and/or cold waters, which naturally exhibit a CaCO(3) saturation state lower than in shallow/warm waters. Calcification was measured in three species of Mediterranean cold-water scleractinian corals (Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and Desmophyllum dianthus) on-board research vessels and soon after collection. Incubations were performed in ambient sea water. The species M. oculata was additionally incubated in sea water reduced or enriched in CO(2). At ambient conditions, calcification rates ranged between -0.01 and 0.23% d(-1). Calcification rates of M. oculata under variable partial pressure of CO(2) (pCO(2)) were the same for ambient and elevated pCO(2) (404 and 867 µatm) with 0.06 ± 0.06% d(-1), while calcification was 0.12 ± 0.06% d(-1) when pCO(2) was reduced to its pre-industrial level (285 µatm). This suggests that present-day CWC calcification in the Mediterranean Sea has already drastically declined (by 50%) as a consequence of anthropogenic-induced ocean acidification.

  18. Theoretical and experimental characterization of novel water-equivalent plastics in clinical high-energy carbon-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A.; Wellock, N.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Kanai, T.; MacDougall, N.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2016-11-01

    Water-equivalent plastics are frequently used in dosimetry for experimental simplicity. This work evaluates the water-equivalence of novel water-equivalent plastics specifically designed for light-ion beams, as well as commercially available plastics in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. A plastic- to-water conversion factor {{H}\\text{pl,w}} was established to derive absorbed dose to water in a water phantom from ionization chamber readings performed in a plastic phantom. Three trial plastic materials with varying atomic compositions were produced and experimentally characterized in a high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed with a Roos ionization chamber, using a broad un-modulated beam of 11  ×  11 cm2, to measure the plastic-to-water conversion factor for the novel materials. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Commercially available plastics were also simulated for comparison with the plastics tested experimentally, with particular attention to the influence of nuclear interaction cross sections. The measured H\\text{pl,w}\\exp correction increased gradually from 0% at the surface to 0.7% at a depth near the Bragg peak for one of the plastics prepared in this work, while for the other two plastics a maximum correction of 0.8%-1.3% was found. Average differences between experimental and numerical simulations were 0.2%. Monte Carlo results showed that for polyethylene, polystyrene, Rando phantom soft tissue and A-150, the correction increased from 0% to 2.5%-4.0% with depth, while for PMMA it increased to 2%. Water-equivalent plastics such as, Plastic Water, RMI-457, Gammex 457-CTG, WT1 and Virtual Water, gave similar results where maximum corrections were of the order of 2%. Considering the results from Monte Carlo simulations, one of the novel plastics was found to be superior in comparison with the plastic materials currently used in dosimetry, demonstrating that it is feasible to tailor plastic

  19. Biogeochemistry and geomicrobiology of cold-water coral carbonate mounds - lessons learned from IODP Expedition 307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdelman, Timothy; Wehrmann, Laura; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kano, Akihiro; Williams, Trevor; Jean-Pierre, Henriet

    2010-05-01

    Large mound structures associated with cold-water coral ecosystems commonly occur on the slopes of continental margins, for instance, west of Ireland in the Porcupine Seabight, the Gulf of Cadiz or the Straits of Florida. In the Porcupine Seabight over 1500 mounds of up to 5 km in diameter and 250 m height lie at water depths of 600 to 900 m. The cold-water coral reef ecosystems associated with these structures are considered to be "hotspots" of organic carbon mineralization and microbial systems. To establish a depositional and biogeochemical/diagenetic model for cold-water carbonate mounds, Challenger Mound and adjacent continental slope sites were drilled in May 2005 during IODP Expedition 307. One major objective was to test whether deep sub-surface hydrocarbon flow and enhanced microbial activity within the mound structure was important in producing and stabilizing these sedimentary structures. Drilling results showed that the Challenger mound succession (IODP Site U1317) is 130 to 150 meters thick, and mainly consists of floatstone and rudstone facies formed of fine sediments and cold-water branching corals. Pronounced recurring cycles on the scales of several meters are recognized in carbonate content (up to 70% carbonate) and color reflectance, and are probably associated with Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. A role for methane seepage and subsequent anaerobic oxidation was discounted both as a hard-round substrate for mound initiation and as a principal source of carbonate within the mound succession. A broad sulfate-methane transition (approximately 50 m thick)within the Miocene sediments suggested that the zone of anaerobic oxidation of methane principally occurs below the moundbase. In the mound sediments, interstitial water profiles of sulfate, alkalinity, Mg, and Sr suggested a tight coupling between carbonate diagenesis and low rates of microbial sulfate reduction. Overall organic carbon mineralization within cold-water coral mound appeared

  20. The numerical investigation of seasonal variation of the cold water mass in the Beibu Gulf and its mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhenhua; QIAO Fangli; XIA Changshui; WANG Gang

    2015-01-01

    A wave-tide-circulation coupled model based on the Princeton Ocean Model is established to explore the seasonal variation of the cold water mass in the Beibu Gulf and its mechanisms. The results show that the cold water mass starts forming in March, reaches the maximum strength during June and July, and fades away since October. Strong mixing in winter transports the cold water from sea surface to bottom. The cold water mass remains in the bottom layer as the thermocline strengthens during spring, except for the shallow water where the themocline is broken by strong tidal mixing, which gradually separate the cold water mass from its surrounding warm water. Further analysis on the ocean current and stream function confirms that the cold water mass in the Beibu Gulf is locally developed, with an anticlockwise circulation caused by a strong temperature gradient. Sensitivity experiments reveal that the cold water mass is controlled by the sea surface heat flux, while the terrain and tidal mixing also play important roles.

  1. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-01-01

    Federal buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water.[2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514.

  2. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  3. SCC crack growth rate of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerre, C.; Raquet, O.; Herms, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECA, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marie, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), DEN/DM2S/SEMT/LISN, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Le Calvar, M. [Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), DSR/SAMS, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2007-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steels (SS) is a significant cause of failure in the pressurized water reactors (PWR). Most of the reported case history failures of SS in PWR can be attributed to pollutants (chloride, sulphate) and / or locally oxygenated environments, even to sensitisation of the SS. However, some failures have been attributed to heavy cold work (CW) of SS. In laboratory tests, SCC initiation of cold-worked SS has been obtained using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in nominal PWR environment. This paper describes constant load and cyclic crack growth rate (CGR) tests on cold-worked SS, on CT specimens. 304L and 316L have been tested with a CW up to 60 %. CW 316L is more prone to cracking than 304L. Over 30 % of CW, 316L is susceptible to crack propagation under constant load. CW is the main controlling parameter for cracking. (author))

  4. WATER RESISTANCE OF WOOD - PLASTIC COMPOSITES MADE FROM WASTE MATERIALS RESULTED IN THE FURNITURE MANUFACTURING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia COŞEREANU; Dumitru LICA; Ioan CURTU; Mariana-Domnica STANCIU

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present innovative wood-plastic composites made from waste materials such as ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) and wood shavings resulted in the furniture manufacturing process. From previous investigations (with regard to physical integrity and compactness of the panels), only mixtures ranging from a ratio of 100% ABS: 0% shavings to 80% ABS: 20% shavings were selected for water resistance testing. Swelling in thickness and water absorption for...

  5. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma generated in DI water on Cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by means of indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma stimulated solution. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of plasma-stimulated media (PSM) on breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). In our experiments, cold atmospheric plasma is generated in water using helium as carrier gas. The plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast and gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment.

  6. Cold-water immersion (cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bleakley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library (2010, Issue 1, Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL, British Nursing Index and archive (BNI, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro. We also searched the reference lists of articles, handsearched journals and conference proceedings and contacted experts. In November 2011, we updated the searches of Central (2011, Issue 4, Medline (up to November Week 3 2011, Embase (to 2011 Week 46 and CINAHL (to 28 November 2011 to check for more recent publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized and quasi-randomized trials comparing the effect of using cold-water immersion after exercise with: passive intervention (rest/no intervention, contrast immersion, warm-water immersion, active recovery, compression, or a different duration/dosage of cold-water immersion. Primary outcomes were pain (muscle soreness or tenderness (pain on palpation, and subjective recovery (return to previous activities without signs or symptoms. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three authors independently evaluated study quality and extracted data. Some of the data were obtained following author correspondence or extracted from graphs in the trial reports. Where possible, data were pooled using the fixed-effect model. MAIN RESULTS: Seventeen small trials were included, involving a total of 366 participants. Study quality was low. The temperature, duration and

  7. Effects of drip irrigation under plastic film with saline water on cotton growth and yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Jin, M.; He, Y.; Zhou, J.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    To study the influence of different irrigation system for drip irrigation under plastic film with saline water on cotton growth and yields, field experiments at key irrigation experiment station of water resources management division in Bayingolin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang, China were set up consist of different irrigation ratio (5250, 4500, 3750, 3000m3/hm2), different irrigation times (24, 12 and 8 times) and different rotation irrigation modes. The results show that: with the larger irrigation ratio, the cotton growth and yields was also better, and the significant influence on cotton growth and yields for irrigation ratio is between 3750-4500 m3/hm2. When the irrigation ratio is smaller (3000m3/hm2), cotton growth and yields for irrigation times of 8 times are higher, When the irrigation ratio is bigger (4500m3/hm2), cotton growth for irrigation times of 12 times are better and its cotton yields are higher correspondingly. According to the growth of cotton, yields and water productivity, the suitable irrigation system of cotton is the irrigation ratio of 4500-3750 m3/ hm2 and the irrigation times of 18 times for drip irrigation under plastic film with saline water. For different rotation drip irrigation experiments with saline water and fresh water, the cotton yields and irrigation water productivity is higher under the disposal of SF (rotation irrigation in first 6 times with saline water irrigation and then 6 times with fresh water irrigation) compared to FS (rotation irrigation in first 6 times with fresh water and then 6 times with saline water) and SSFA (rotation irrigation with twice saline water and once fresh water) compared to SFA (alternative irrigation with saline water and fresh water). Compared to the different alternate irrigation experiments, the cotton yields and water productivity for pure saline water irrigation is higher. In addition, the trend is the larger the irrigation ratio and the higher the yields. It maybe dues to the low

  8. Phosphorus in Cold-Water Corals as a Proxy for Seawater Nutrient Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Paolo; McCulloch, Malcolm; Taviani, Marco; Mazzoli, Claudio; Vendrell, Begoña

    2006-06-01

    Phosphorus is a key macronutrient being strongly enriched in the deep ocean as a result of continuous export and remineralization of biomass from primary production. We show that phosphorus incorporated within the skeletons of the cosmopolitan cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus is directly proportional to the ambient seawater phosphorus concentration and thus may serve as a paleo-oceanographic proxy for variations in ocean productivity as well as changes in the residence times and sources of deep-water masses. The application of this tool to fossil specimens from the Mediterranean reveals phosphorus-enriched bottom waters at the end of the Younger Dryas period.

  9. A picture on the wall: innovative mapping reveals cold-water coral refuge in submarine canyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle A I Huvenne

    Full Text Available Cold-water corals are azooxanthellate species found throughout the ocean at water depths down to 5000 m. They occur in patches, reefs or large mound structures up to 380 m high, and as ecosystem engineers create important habitats for a diverse fauna. However, the majority of these habitats are now within reach of deep-sea bottom trawling. Many have been severely damaged or are under threat, despite recent protection initiatives. Here we present a cold-water coral habitat type that so far has been overlooked--quite literally--and that has received minimal impact from human activities. Vertical and overhanging cliffs in deep-sea canyons, revealed using an innovative approach to marine habitat mapping, are shown to provide the perfect substratum for extensive cold-water coral-based communities. Typical canyon-related processes, including locally enhanced internal tides and focussed downslope organic carbon transport, provide favourable environmental conditions (current regime, food input to sustain the communities, even outside the optimal depth and density envelopes reported elsewhere in the NE Atlantic. Our findings show that deep-sea canyons can form natural refuges for faunal communities sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance, and have the potential to fulfil the crucial role of larval sources for the recolonisation of damaged sites elsewhere on the margin.

  10. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane S. G. Macedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. METHOD: The peak values of the root mean square (RMS were obtained from 35 healthy and active university subjects after the use of a tilt platform to force the ankle into 30° of inversion before, immediately after, and 10, 20, and 30 minutes after water immersion at 4±2°C, for 20 minutes. The Shapiro-Wilk test, repeated measures analysis, Bonferroni's post-hoc, and linear regression analysis provided the results. RESULTS: Peak RMS was significantly lower at all times after cold water immersion, with residual effect of up to 30 minutes, when compared to pre-immersion for all muscles, except for immediate post-immersion for the gluteus medius. CONCLUSIONS: After cold water immersion of the ankle, special care should be taken in activities that require greater neuromuscular control.

  11. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Christiane S G; Alonso, Carolina S; Liporaci, Rogério F; Vieira, Fernando; Guirro, Rinaldo R J

    2014-01-01

    Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. The peak values of the root mean square (RMS) were obtained from 35 healthy and active university subjects after the use of a tilt platform to force the ankle into 30° of inversion before, immediately after, and 10, 20, and 30 minutes after water immersion at 4±2°C, for 20 minutes. The Shapiro-Wilk test, repeated measures analysis, Bonferroni's post-hoc, and linear regression analysis provided the results. Peak RMS was significantly lower at all times after cold water immersion, with residual effect of up to 30 minutes, when compared to pre-immersion for all muscles, except for immediate post-immersion for the gluteus medius. After cold water immersion of the ankle, special care should be taken in activities that require greater neuromuscular control.

  12. Monitoring strategies for drill cutting discharge in the vicinity of cold-water coral ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Autun; Thomsen, Laurenz

    2012-11-01

    Cold-water coral reefs represent some of the most biodiverse and biomass rich ecosystems in the marine environment. Despite this, ecosystem functioning is still poorly understood and the susceptibility of key species to anthropogenic activities and pollutants is unknown. In European waters, cold-water corals are often found in greatest abundance on the continental margin, often in regions rich in hydrocarbon reserves. In this viewpoint paper we discuss some of the current strategies employed in predicting and minimizing exposure of cold-water coral reef ecosystems on the Norwegian margin to waste materials produced during offshore drilling operations by the oil and gas industry. In the light of recent in situ and experimental research conducted with the key reef species Lophelia pertusa, we present some possible improvements to these strategies which may be utilized by industry and managers to further reduce the likelihood of exposure. We further highlight important outstanding research questions in this field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Slow climate velocities of mountain streams portend their role as refugia for cold-water biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Daniel J.; Young, Michael K; Luce, Charles H; Hostetler, Steven W.; Wengerd, Seth J.; Peterson, Erin E.; Ver Hoef, Jay; Groce, Matthew C.; Horan, Dona L.; Nagel, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The imminent demise of montane species is a recurrent theme in the climate change literature, particularly for aquatic species that are constrained to networks and elevational rather than latitudinal retreat as temperatures increase. Predictions of widespread species losses, however, have yet to be fulfilled despite decades of climate change, suggesting that trends are much weaker than anticipated and may be too subtle for detection given the widespread use of sparse water temperature datasets or imprecise surrogates like elevation and air temperature. Through application of large water-temperature databases evaluated for sensitivity to historical air-temperature variability and computationally interpolated to provide high-resolution thermal habitat information for a 222,000-km network, we estimate a less dire thermal plight for cold-water species within mountains of the northwestern United States. Stream warming rates and climate velocities were both relatively low for 1968–2011 (average warming rate = 0.101 °C/decade; median velocity = 1.07 km/decade) when air temperatures warmed at 0.21 °C/decade. Many cold-water vertebrate species occurred in a subset of the network characterized by low climate velocities, and three native species of conservation concern occurred in extremely cold, slow velocity environments (0.33–0.48 km/decade). Examination of aggressive warming scenarios indicated that although network climate velocities could increase, they remain low in headwaters because of strong local temperature gradients associated with topographic controls. Better information about changing hydrology and disturbance regimes is needed to complement these results, but rather than being climatic cul-de-sacs, many mountain streams appear poised to be redoubts for cold-water biodiversity this century.

  14. Pharmacological investigations on adaptation in rats subjected to cold water immersion stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arvind; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether adaptogenic factors may be transferred from stress adapted rats to naïve rats and to explore the nature of endogenous adaptogens by pharmacological modulation. The rats were subjected to cold water immersion stress by placing them individually in a tank of water (depth=15.5cm; temperature=16±2°C) for 5min. The rats were subjected to single episode of cold water immersion stress for acute stress; while for adaptation, the rats were subjected to repeated episodes of same stressor for 5 consecutive days. The plasma of stress adapted rats was administered to naïve rats before subjecting to acute stress. The stress related behavioral alterations were assessed using the actophotometer, the hole board, the open field and the social interaction tests. Acute stress with single episode of cold water immersion was associated with behavioral alterations. However, the behavioral alterations were significantly restored on subjecting repeated episodes of cold water immersion. Administration of plasma of stress adapted rats also attenuated acute stress associated behavioral alterations. Administration of naltrexone abolished the restoration of behavioral changes as a part of adaptive process in repeated stress subjected rats as well as the anti-stress effects of plasma of stress adapted rat. It may be concluded that opioids may be the potential endogenous adaptogens that tend to restore the homeostasis during repeated episodes of stress. Furthermore, the endogenous adaptogens may be transferred in the form of plasma from repeated stress subjected rats to the naïve rats to confer the anti-stress properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plastic Response of Tracheids in Pinus pinaster in a Water-Limited Environment: Adjusting Lumen Size instead of Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana; Nabais, Cristina; Vieira, Joana; Rossi, Sergio; Campelo, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    The formation of wood results from cambial activity and its anatomical properties reflect the variability of environmental conditions during the growing season. Recently, it was found that wood density variations in conifers growing under cold-limited environment result from the adjustment of cell wall thickness (CWT) to temperature. Additionally, it is known that intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) are formed in response to precipitation after the summer drought. Although IADFs are frequent in Mediterranean conifers no study has yet been conducted to determine if these structures result from the adjustment of lumen diameter (LD) or CWT to soil water availability. Our main objective is to investigate the intra-ring variation of wood anatomical features (LD and CWT) in Pinus pinaster Ait. growing under a water-limited environment. We compared the tracheidograms of LD and CWT for the years 2010–2013 in P. pinaster growing in the west coast of Portugal. Our results suggest a close association between LD and soil moisture content along the growing season, reinforcing the role of water availability in determining tracheid size. Compared with CWT, LD showed a higher intra- and inter-annual variability suggesting its strong adjustment value to variations in water availability. The formation of a latewood IADF appears to be predisposed by higher rates of cell production in spring and triggered by early autumn precipitation. Our findings reinforce the crucial role of water availability on cambial activity and wood formation in Mediterranean conifers, and emphasize the high plasticity of wood anatomical features under Mediterranean climate. PMID:26305893

  16. Plastic Response of Tracheids in Pinus pinaster in a Water-Limited Environment: Adjusting Lumen Size instead of Wall Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana; Nabais, Cristina; Vieira, Joana; Rossi, Sergio; Campelo, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    The formation of wood results from cambial activity and its anatomical properties reflect the variability of environmental conditions during the growing season. Recently, it was found that wood density variations in conifers growing under cold-limited environment result from the adjustment of cell wall thickness (CWT) to temperature. Additionally, it is known that intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs) are formed in response to precipitation after the summer drought. Although IADFs are frequent in Mediterranean conifers no study has yet been conducted to determine if these structures result from the adjustment of lumen diameter (LD) or CWT to soil water availability. Our main objective is to investigate the intra-ring variation of wood anatomical features (LD and CWT) in Pinus pinaster Ait. growing under a water-limited environment. We compared the tracheidograms of LD and CWT for the years 2010-2013 in P. pinaster growing in the west coast of Portugal. Our results suggest a close association between LD and soil moisture content along the growing season, reinforcing the role of water availability in determining tracheid size. Compared with CWT, LD showed a higher intra- and inter-annual variability suggesting its strong adjustment value to variations in water availability. The formation of a latewood IADF appears to be predisposed by higher rates of cell production in spring and triggered by early autumn precipitation. Our findings reinforce the crucial role of water availability on cambial activity and wood formation in Mediterranean conifers, and emphasize the high plasticity of wood anatomical features under Mediterranean climate.

  17. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Simon S; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y; Choi, Manfi M; Cheng, Juno C; Yeung, Ella W

    2016-01-01

    Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration.

  18. Chillers and cold water units. Special issue; Chillers en koudwateraggregaten. Thema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zwam, P. [GEA Refrigeration Components Benelux, Den Bosch (Netherlands); Meijer, W. [Daikin Airconditioning Netherlands, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Torsy, E. [Trane Airconditioning, Soest (Netherlands); Berends, E. [GEA Grenco Refrigeration, Den Bosch (Netherlands); Havenaar, D. (ed.)

    2010-05-15

    In five articles attention is paid to several aspects of chillers and cold water units: (1) reduction of refrigerants and increase of the COP; (2) realization of high partial load efficiency in mono-screw compressors; (3) energy efficient innovation for cooling and heat pump systems; (4) application of modern chiller technology for a skating rink of Sportboulevard, Dordrecht, Netherlands; and (5) the use of propane as a refrigerant in air-cooled cold water units. [Dutch] In vijf artikelen wordt aandacht besteed aan verschillende aspecten van chillers en koudwateraggregaten: (1) minimaliseren van koudemiddeleninhoud en verhogen van de COP; (2) realisatie van hoge deellastrendementen met mono-schroefcompressoren; (3) energie efficiente innovaties voor koelmachine- en warmtepompsystemen; (4) toepassing van moderne chillertechnologie in de ijshal van Sportboulevard Dordrecht; en (5) het gebruik van propaan als koudemiddel in luchtgekoelde koudwateraggregaten.

  19. Carbonate budget of a cold-water coral carbonate mound: Propeller Mound, Porcupine Seabight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschel, Boris; Hebbeln, Dierk; Rüggeberg, Andres; Dullo, Christian

    2007-02-01

    High resolution studies from the Propeller Mound, a cold-water coral carbonate mound in the NE Atlantic, show that this mound consists of >50% carbonate justifying the name ‘carbonate mound’. Through the last ~300,000 years approximately one third of the carbonate has been contributed by cold-water corals, namely Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. This coral bound contribution to the carbonate budget of Propeller Mound is probably accompanied by an unknown portion of sediments buffered from suspension by the corals. However, extended hiatuses in Propeller Mound sequences only allow the calculation of a net carbonate accumulation. Thus, net carbonate accumulation for the last 175 kyr accounts for only <0.3 g/cm2/kyr, which is even less than for the off-mound sediments. These data imply that Propeller Mound faces burial by hemipelagic sediments as has happened to numerous buried carbonate mounds found slightly to the north of the investigated area.

  20. Water chemistry in heat and cold supply (district heating/cooling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deelen-Bremer, Marga van; Vos, Frank de; Heijboer, Rob [KEMA Nederland B.V. (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    District heating is seen as an important pillar in the CO{sub 2} reduction. Since the Kyoto protocol with the target for reduction of greenhouse gases, a renewed interest in district heating is visible. District heating and increasingly district cooling can be used for heating/cooling of houses, but also for large buildings and greenhouses. Combined heat and power (CHP), waste incinerator, but also rest heat of industry can provide the heat for district heating. On the other hand cold surface water, groundwater, but also rest heat can be used for district cooling. With the growing heat/cold supply market, also an even larger growth in cases of damages in district heating systems is wittnessed. Damages were chemistry can play an preventing role. A good conditioning of the district heating water, combined with proper monitoring, will safeguard the integrity of the system. (orig.)

  1. Plasticity in leaf-level water relations of tropical rainforest trees in response to experimental drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Oliver; Meir, Patrick; Rowland, Lucy; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva; de Oliveira, Alex Antonio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Leandro; Christoffersen, Bradley; Nardini, Andrea; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The tropics are predicted to become warmer and drier, and understanding the sensitivity of tree species to drought is important for characterizing the risk to forests of climate change. This study makes use of a long-term drought experiment in the Amazon rainforest to evaluate the role of leaf-level water relations, leaf anatomy and their plasticity in response to drought in six tree genera. The variables (osmotic potential at full turgor, turgor loss point, capacitance, elastic modulus, relative water content and saturated water content) were compared between seasons and between plots (control and through-fall exclusion) enabling a comparison between short- and long-term plasticity in traits. Leaf anatomical traits were correlated with water relation parameters to determine whether water relations differed among tissues. The key findings were: osmotic adjustment occurred in response to the long-term drought treatment; species resistant to drought stress showed less osmotic adjustment than drought-sensitive species; and water relation traits were correlated with tissue properties, especially the thickness of the abaxial epidermis and the spongy mesophyll. These findings demonstrate that cell-level water relation traits can acclimate to long-term water stress, and highlight the limitations of extrapolating the results of short-term studies to temporal scales associated with climate change.

  2. Cold water immersion of the ankle decreases neuromuscular response of lower limb after inversion movement

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane S. G. Macedo; Alonso,Carolina S.; Liporaci, Rogério F.; Fernando Vieira; Guirro,Rinaldo R. J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy has been associated with a significant decrease in nerve conduction velocity and muscle contraction with possible effects on exercise and physical training. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the electromyographic response of the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibularis longus, rectus femoris and gluteus medius to ankle inversion following cold water immersion. METHOD: The peak values of the root mean square (RMS) were obtained from 35 healthy and active univ...

  3. Effect of cold-water immersion on skeletal muscle contractile properties in soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Matoso, Darío; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; Sarmiento, Samuel; de Saa, Yves; Calderón, Javier

    2011-05-01

    This study was designed to analyze changes in muscle response after cold-water immersion. The vastus lateralis of the dominant leg was analyzed in 12 professional soccer players from the Spanish 2nd Division B using tensiomyography, before and after four cold-water immersions at 4°C lasting 4 mins each. Core temperature, skin temperature, and heart rate were monitored. A significant interaction (P ≤ 0.05) was found in muscle deformation between control conditions (5.12 ± 2.27 mm) and (1) immersion 3 (3.64 ± 2.27 mm) and (2) immersion 4 (3.38 ± 1.34 mm). A steady decrease was also observed in response velocity (immersion 1, -7.3%; immersion 2, -25.9%; immersion 3, -30.0%; immersion 4, -36.6%) and contraction velocity (immersion 1, -11.5%; immersion 2, -22.1%; immersion 3, -35.0%; immersion 4, -41.9%), with statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in relation to the reference values commencing with the third immersion. No significant differences were found between control conditions in subsequent exposures to cold water for the values of response time and contraction time. Sustained time and reaction time showed an increase during repeated exposures and with longer exposure time, although the increase was not statistically significant. This study shows that repeated cold-water immersions (4 × 4 mins at 4°C) cause considerable alterations to muscle behavior. These alterations significantly affect the state of muscles and their response capacity, particularly in relation to muscle stiffness and muscle contraction velocity.

  4. The effects of cold-water immersion on power output and heart rate in elite cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniepp, Jason; Campbell, Teri S; Powell, Kasey L; Pincivero, Danny M

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cold-water immersion on power output, heart rate, and time to peak power in 10 well-trained cyclists. The Compu-trainer Professional Model 8001 computerized stationary trainer was used to evaluate maximum power, average power, and time to peak power during a simulated cycling sprint. The heart rate was measured using a Polar heart rate monitor. Subjects performed 2 maximum-effort sprints (for approximately 30 seconds) separated by either an experimental condition (15 minutes of cold-water immersion at 12 degrees C up to the level of the iliac crest) or a control condition (15 minutes of quiet sitting). All subjects participated under both control and experimental conditions in a counterbalanced design in which 5 subjects performed the experimental condition first and the other 5 subjects performed the control condition first. Each condition was separated by at least 2 days. The time to peak power was not different between the 2 conditions. Maximum and average powers declined by 13.7 and 9.5% for the experimental condition but only by 4.7 and 2.3% for the control condition, respectively. The results also demonstrated a significantly greater decline in maximum heart rate after cold-water immersion (8.1%) than under the control condition (2.4%). Average heart rate showed a decrease of 4.2% under the experimental condition, as compared with an increase of 1.5% under the control condition. The major findings of this study suggest that a relatively brief period of cold-water immersion can manifest significant physiological effects that can impair cycling performance.

  5. Cold-water immersion versus passive therapy to decrease delayed onset muscular soreness: a CAT

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Late onset muscle soreness, also known as delayed onset muscle soreness, is a painful musculoskeletal condition that may occur 24-48 and up to 72 hours after the completion of unusual physical or high intensity exercise involving eccentric muscle activity. In the field of physical rehabilitation, immersion in cold water is a common intervention mainly used in sports medicine, to minimize delayed onset muscle soreness and promote recovery after exercise. Objective To ass...

  6. Calcification of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa, under ambient and reduced pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa is one of the few species able to build reef-like structures and a 3-dimensional coral framework in the deep oceans. Furthermore, deep cold-water coral bioherms may be among the first marine ecosystems to be affected by ocean acidification. Colonies of L. pertusa were collected during a cruise in 2006 to cold-water coral bioherms of the Mingulay reef complex (Hebrides, North Atlantic. Shortly after sample collection onboard these corals were labelled with calcium-45. The same experimental approach was used to assess calcification rates and how those changed due to reduced pH during a cruise to the Skagerrak (North Sea in 2007. The highest calcification rates were found in youngest polyps with up to 1% d−1 new skeletal growth and average rates of 0.11±0.02% d−1±S.E.. Lowering pH by 0.15 and 0.3 units relative to the ambient level resulted in calcification being reduced by 30 and 56%. Lower pH reduced calcification more in fast growing, young polyps (59% reduction than in older polyps (40% reduction. Thus skeletal growth of young and fast calcifying corallites suffered more from ocean acidification. Nevertheless, L. pertusa exhibited positive net calcification (as measured by 45Ca incorporation even at an aragonite saturation state (Ωa below 1.

  7. Physiological response of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to thermal stress and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Andrea; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Hennige, Sebastian J; Murray, Fiona; Rottier, Cécile; Wicks, Laura C; Roberts, J Murray

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures and ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic carbon emissions threaten both tropical and temperate corals. However, the synergistic effect of these stressors on coral physiology is still poorly understood, in particular for cold-water corals. This study assessed changes in key physiological parameters (calcification, respiration and ammonium excretion) of the widespread cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus maintained for ∼8 months at two temperatures (ambient 12 °C and elevated 15 °C) and two pCO2 conditions (ambient 390 ppm and elevated 750 ppm). At ambient temperatures no change in instantaneous calcification, respiration or ammonium excretion rates was observed at either pCO2 levels. Conversely, elevated temperature (15 °C) significantly reduced calcification rates, and combined elevated temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced respiration rates. Changes in the ratio of respired oxygen to excreted nitrogen (O:N), which provides information on the main sources of energy being metabolized, indicated a shift from mixed use of protein and carbohydrate/lipid as metabolic substrates under control conditions, to less efficient protein-dominated catabolism under both stressors. Overall, this study shows that the physiology of D. dianthus is more sensitive to thermal than pCO2 stress, and that the predicted combination of rising temperatures and ocean acidification in the coming decades may severely impact this cold-water coral species.

  8. Risk-Based Reanalysis of the Effects of Climate Change on US Cold-water Habitat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, B.L. [Pew Center on Global Climate Change, 2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 550, Arlington, Virginia 22201 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A probabilistic risk assessment was conducted for the effects of future climate change on U.S. cold-water habitat. Damage functions for the loss of current cold-water fish habitat in the United States and the Rocky Mountain region were integrated with probability distributions for U.S. June/July/August (JJA) temperature change using Monte Carlo techniques. Damage functions indicated temperature thresholds for incipient losses (=5%) of cold-water habitat in the United States and the Rocky Mountains of 0.6 and 0.4C, respectively. Median impacts associated with different temperature distributions suggested habitat loss in 2025, 2050, and 2100 of approximately 10, 20, and 30%, respectively, for the United States and 20, 35, and 50%, respectively, in the Rocky Mountains. However, 2100 losses in excess of 60% and 90% were possible for the United States and the Rocky Mountains, respectively, albeit at low probabilities. The implementation of constraints on greenhouse gas emissions conforming to the WRE750/550/350 stabilization scenarios had little effect on reducing habitat loss out to 2050, but median effects in 2100 were reduced by up to 20, 30, and 60%, respectively. Increased focus on probabilistic risk assessment may be a profitable mechanism for enhancing understanding and communication of climate change impacts and, subsequently, risk management.

  9. Cold-water immersion alters muscle recruitment and balance of basketball players during vertical jump landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Christiane de Souza Guerino; Vicente, Rafael Chagas; Cesário, Mauricio Donini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cold-water immersion on the electromyographic (EMG) response of the lower limb and balance during unipodal jump landing. The evaluation comprised 40 individuals (20 basketball players and 20 non-athletes). The EMG response in the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus, rectus femoris, hamstring and gluteus medius; amplitude and mean speed of the centre of pressure, flight time and ground reaction force (GRF) were analysed. All volunteers remained for 20 min with their ankle immersed in cold-water, and were re-evaluated immediately post and after 10, 20 and 30 min of reheating. The Shapiro-Wilk test, Friedman test and Dunn's post test (P < 0.05) were used. The EMG response values decreased for the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus and rectus femoris of both athletes and non-athletes (P < 0.05). The comparison between the groups showed that the EMG response was lower for the athletes. Lower jump flight time and GRF, greater amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure were predominant in the athletes. Cold-water immersion decreased the EMG activity of the lower limb, flight time and GRF and increased the amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure.

  10. Postexercise cold-water immersion improves intermittent high-intensity exercise performance in normothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avina; Mulligan, James; Egaña, Mikel

    2016-11-01

    A brief cold water immersion between 2 continuous high-intensity exercise bouts improves the performance of the latter compared with passive recovery in the heat. We investigated if this effect is apparent in normothermic conditions (∼19 °C), employing an intermittent high-intensity exercise designed to reflect the work performed at the high-intensity domain in team sports. Fifteen young active men completed 2 exhaustive cycling protocols (Ex1 and Ex2: 12 min at 85% ventilatory threshold (VT) and then an intermittent exercise alternating 30-s at 40% peak power (Ppeak) and 30 s at 90% Ppeak to exhaustion) separated by 15 min of (i) passive rest, (ii) 5-min cold-water immersion at 8 °C, and (iii) 10-min cold-water immersion at 8 °C. Core temperature, heart rate, rates of perceived exertion, and oxygen uptake kinetics were not different during Ex1 among conditions. Time to failure during the intermittent exercise was significantly (P intermittent high-intensity exercise compared with passive rest in normothermia due, at least in part, to reductions in core temperature, circulatory strain, and effort perception.

  11. Use of fly ash with no water consumption for cold regions transportation infrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan Baykal

    2015-01-01

    The construction period in cold regions is very short due to problems related to excavation and use of frozen soils in embankment construction, which leads to excessive deformations upon thawing. Also, handling of compaction water is critical due to freezing temperatures. Coalburning thermal power plants are very common in cold regions to supply electricity. The inorganic part of the pulverized coal after burning produces fly ash, which is available in large volumes. Due to excavation difficulties and the poor engineering behavior of frozen soils in cold regions, the utilization of fly ash when it is readily available must be promoted. Any construction technique which utilizes alternative materials like fly ash and minimizes water consumption has a potential to extend the short construction season and even allow service and maintenance during extreme weather conditions. This paper presents two potential techniques to solve the moisture affinity of silt-sized materials like fly ash. One technique involves in-plant production of fly ash pellets using cold-bonding pelletization to manufacture aggregates of up to 40,000-μm diameter from 15-to 60-μm-diameter fly ash grains. Large disc pelletizers have annual production capacities of up to one million ton at a reasonable cost. The product has adequate strength for embankment construction even when no water is used and no compaction is applied. The second technique is an in situ mixing technique which uses snow instead of compaction water for fly ash. The snow is the main element in this technique to compact the embankment. Water is needed for the hydration reactions to form cementitious minerals in fly ash. The slower the hydration reaction, the greater the crystal growth of cementitious minerals. In the proposed technique, in situ snow is mixed with fly ash and is compacted on-site. The temperature increase due to the hydration reaction of fly ash upon contact with snow crystals provides water for continued long

  12. Cotton’s Water Demand and Water-Saving Benefits under Drip Irrigation with Plastic Film Mulch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingyu YAN; Juyan LI

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to give suitable irrigation program according to the growth period and water requirement.A cotton field experiment with mulched drip irrigation was conducted at the National Field Observation and Research Station for Oasis Farmland Ecosystem in Aksu of Xinjiang in 2008.Water balance method was adopted to study the water requirement and water consumption law of cotton under mulched drip irrigation in Tarim Irrigated Area.Statistical analysis of experimental data of irrigation indicates that the relationship between yield of cotton and irrigation presents a quadratic parabola.We fit the model of cotton water production on the basis of field experimental data of cotton.And the analysis on water saving benefit of cotton under mulched drip irrigation was done.Results indicate that water requirements for the irrigated cotton are 543 mm in Tarim Irrigated Area.The water requirements of seedling stage is 252 mm,budding stage is 186 mm,bolling stage is 316 mm and wadding stage is 139 mm.the irrigation amount determines the spatial distribution of soil moisture and water consumption during cotton life cycle.However,water consumption at different growth stages was inconsistent with irrigation.Quantitatively,the water consumed by cotton decreases upon the increase of irrigation amount.From the perspective of water saving,the maximal water use efficiency can reach 3 091 m3/ha.But the highest cotton yield needs 3464 m3/ha irrigation water.In summary,compared to the conventional drip irrigation,a number of benefits in water saving and yield increase were observed when using plastic mulch.At the same amount of irrigation,the cotton yield with plastic mulch was 30.2% higher than conventional approaches,and the efficiency of water utilization increased by30.2%.While at the same yield level,29.3% water was saved by using plastic mulch,and the efficiency increased by 41.5%.

  13. Influence of cold water immersion on limb and cutaneous blood flow at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Warren; Black, Mark A; Jones, Helen; Milson, Jordon; Morton, James; Dawson, Brian; Atkinson, Greg; Green, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    Cold water immersion reduces exercise-induced muscle damage. Benefits may partly arise from a decline in limb blood flow; however, no study has comprehensively investigated the influence of different degrees of cooling undertaken via cold water immersion on limb blood flow responses. To determine the influence of cold (8°C) and cool (22°C) water immersion on lower limb and cutaneous blood flow. Controlled laboratory study. Nine men were placed in a semireclined position and lowered into 8°C or 22°C water to the iliac crest for two 5-minute periods interspersed with 2 minutes of nonimmersion. Rectal and thigh skin temperature, deep and superficial muscle temperature, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, thigh cutaneous blood velocity (laser Doppler), and superficial femoral artery blood flow (duplex ultrasound) were measured during immersion and for 30 minutes after immersion. Indices of vascular conductance were calculated (flux and blood flow/mean arterial pressure). Reductions in rectal temperature (8°C, 0.2° ± 0.1°C; 22°C, 0.1° ± 0.1°C) and thigh skin temperature (8°C, 6.2° ± 0.5°C; 22°C, 3.2° ± 0.2°C) were greater in 8°C water than in 22°C (P water compared with 22°C (P = .01). These data suggest that immersion at both temperatures resulted in similar whole limb blood flow but, paradoxically, more blood was distributed to the skin in the colder water. This suggests that colder temperatures may be associated with reduced muscle blood flow, which could provide an explanation for the benefits of cold water immersion in alleviating exercise-induced muscle damage in sports and athletic contexts. Colder water temperatures may be more effective in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle damage and injury rehabilitation because of greater reductions in muscle blood flow.

  14. Germination season and watering regime, but not seed morph, affect life history traits in a cold desert diaspore-heteromorphic annual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Lu

    Full Text Available Seed morph, abiotic conditions and time of germination can affect plant fitness, but few studies have tested their combined effects on plasticity of plant life history traits. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that seed morph, germination season and watering regime influence phenotypic expression of post-germination life history traits in the diaspore-heteromorphic cold desert winter annual/spring ephemeral Diptychocarpus strictus. The two seed morphs were sown in watered and non-watered plots in late summer, and plants derived from them were watered or not-watered throughout the study. Seed morph did not affect phenology, growth and morphology, survival, dry mass accumulation and allocation or silique and seed production. Seeds in watered plots germinated in autumn (AW and spring (SW but only in spring for non-watered plots (SNW. A high percentage of AW, SW and SNW plants survived and reproduced, but flowering date and flowering period of autumn- vs. spring-germinated plants differed. Dry mass also differed with germination season/watering regime (AW > SW > SNW. Number of siliques and seeds increased with plant size (AW > SW > SNW, whereas percent dry mass allocated to reproduction was higher in small plants: SNW > SW > AW. Thus, although seed morph did not affect the expression of life history traits, germination season and watering regime significantly affected phenology, plant size and accumulation and allocation of biomass to reproduction. Flexibility throughout the life cycle of D. strictus is an adaptation to the variation in timing and amount of rainfall in its cold desert habitat.

  15. Washing Habits and Machine with Intake of hot and cold Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bente Lis; Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    Domestic washing machines typically spend around 80% of the electricity on heating water. Most of this can be replaced by more appropriate heat sources like district heat from combined heat and power production, or gas heating system. In recent years some washing machine manufacturers have marketed...... machines which can take in both hot and cold water and mix it to the temperature wanted. Such one machine has been tested in daily household use over 5 months, with habits of very few hot water washes. The result is an electricity consumption corresponding to 67 kWh per year for an average household...... with slightly adapted washing habits, or 17% of normal today. If the heat is supplied from combined heat and power production as in the actual experiment, CO2-emission is reduced by 81%. With hot water from oil or gas heaters the reduction will be slightly lower, while with solar hot water it will be larger....

  16. Effect of cold work hardening on stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in primary water of pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.; Herms, E. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/DPC, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Vaillant, F.; Couvant, T.; Boursier, J.M. [EDF/Les Renardieres, R and D/MMC, 77250 Moret sur Loing (France)

    2004-07-01

    A R and D program is carried out in CEA and EDF laboratories to investigate separately the effects of factors which could contribute to IASCC mechanism. In the framework of this study, the influence of cold work on SCC of ASSs in primary water is studied to supply additional knowledge concerning the contribution of radiation hardening on IASCC of ASSs. Solution annealed ASSs, essentially of type AISI 304(L) and AISI 316(L), are generally considered very resistant to SCC in nominal primary water. However, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERTs), performed on cold pressed humped specimens in nominal primary water at 360 deg. C, reveal that these materials can exhibit a high SCC susceptibility: deepest cracks reach 1 mm (mean crack growth rate about 1 {mu}m.h{sup -1}) and propagation is mainly intergranular for 304L and mainly transgranular for 316L. Indeed, work hardening in conjunction with high localized deformation can promote SCC. The influence of the nature of the cold work (shot peening, reaming, cold rolling, counter sinking, fatigue work hardening and tensile deformation) is investigated by means of screening CERTs performed with smooth specimens in 304L at 360 deg. C. For a given cold work hardening level, the susceptibility to crack initiation strongly depends on the cold working process, and no propagation is observed for a hardness level lower than 300 {+-}10 HV(0.49N). The propagation of cracks is observed only for dynamic loadings like CERT, traction/relaxation tests and crack growth rate tests performed with CT specimens under trapezoidal loading. Although crack initiation is observed for constant load and constant deformation tests, crack propagation do not seem to occur under these mechanical solicitations for 17000 hours of testing, even for hardness levels higher than 450 HV(0.49N). The mean crack growth rate increases when the hardness increases. An important R and D program is in progress to complement these results and to develop a SCC model for

  17. Simulation of global ocean acidification and chemical habitats of shallow- and cold-water coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Di Zheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the UVic Earth System Model, this study simulated the change of seawater chemistry and analyzed the chemical habitat surrounding shallow- and cold-water coral reefs from the year 1800 to 2300 employing RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0, and RCP8.5 scenarios. The model results showed that the global ocean will continue to absorb atmospheric CO2. Global mean surface ocean temperature will rise 1.1–2.8 K at the end of the 21st century across RCP scenarios. Meanwhile, the global mean surface ocean pH will drop 0.14–0.42 and the ocean surface mean concentration of carbonate will decrease 20%–51% across the RCP scenarios. The saturated state of sea water with respect to calcite carbonate minerals (Ω will decrease rapidly. During the pre-industrial period, 99% of the shallow-water coral reefs were surrounded by seawater with Ω > 3.5 and 87% of the deep-sea coral reefs were surrounded by seawater with aragonite supersaturation. Within the 21st century, except for the high mitigation scenario of RCP2.6, almost none shallow-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with Ω > 3.5. Under the intensive emission scenario of RCP8.5, by the year 2100, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise to 308 m under the sea surface from 1138 m at the pre-industrial period, thus 73% of the cold-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with aragonite undersaturation. By the year 2300, only 5% of the cold-water coral reefs will be surrounded by seawater with aragonite supersaturation.

  18. WATER RESISTANCE OF WOOD - PLASTIC COMPOSITES MADE FROM WASTE MATERIALS RESULTED IN THE FURNITURE MANUFACTURING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia COŞEREANU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present innovative wood-plastic composites made from waste materials such as ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and wood shavings resulted in the furniture manufacturing process. From previous investigations (with regard to physical integrity and compactness of the panels, only mixtures ranging from a ratio of 100% ABS: 0% shavings to 80% ABS: 20% shavings were selected for water resistance testing. Swelling in thickness and water absorption for 2h and 24h were determined for the proposed wood-plastic composites. The results have shown that only a participation of up to 10% of wood shavings in the tested panels conducted to a good performance

  19. Criticality safety evaluation report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility`s process water handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roblyer, S.D.

    1998-02-12

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified. The effectiveness of equipment design and operation controls in preventing criticality occurrences during normal and abnormal conditions is evaluated and documented in this report. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is removed from existing canisters in both the K East and K West Basins and loaded into a multicanister overpack (MCO) in the K Basin pool. The MCO is housed in a shipping cask surrounded by clean water in the annulus between the exterior of the MCO and the interior of the shipping cask. The fuel consists of spent N Reactor and some single pass reactor fuel. The MCO is transported to the CVDF near the K Basins to remove process water from the MCO interior and from the shipping cask annulus. After the bulk water is removed from the MCO, any remaining free liquid is removed by drawing a vacuum on the MCO`s interior. After cold vacuum drying is completed, the MCO is filled with an inert cover gas, the lid is replaced on the shipping cask, and the MCO is transported to the Canister Storage Building. The process water removed from the MCO contains fissionable materials from metallic uranium corrosion. The process water from the MCO is first collected in a geometrically safe process water conditioning receiver tank. The process water in the process water conditioning receiver tank is tested, then filtered, demineralized, and collected in the storage tank. The process water is finally removed from the storage tank and transported from the CVDF by truck.

  20. The acoustic bubble: Ocean, cetacean and extraterrestrial acoustics, and cold water cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, T. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the content of a plenary lecture on the author’s personal research into the interactions between bubbles and sound fields, covering particular topics involving the climatically important gas exchange between atmosphere and ocean, the implications of bubbly ocean water to marine mammals that use sound, and the opportunities afforded by incorporating acoustical sensors onto probes launched to investigate other worlds in our solar system. It closes with recent data on the opportunities of bubble acoustics to investigate methods of cold water cleaning.

  1. Climate, invasive species and land use drive population dynamics of a cold-water specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ryan P.; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Whited, Diane C.; Schmetterling, David A.; Dux, Andrew M; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is an additional stressor in a complex suite of threats facing freshwater biodiversity, particularly for cold-water fishes. Research addressing the consequences of climate change on cold-water fish has generally focused on temperature limits defining spatial distributions, largely ignoring how climatic variation influences population dynamics in the context of other existing stressors.We used long-term data from 92 populations of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus – one of North America's most cold-adapted fishes – to quantify additive and interactive effects of climate, invasive species and land use on population dynamics (abundance, variability and growth rate).Populations were generally depressed, more variable and declining where spawning and rearing stream habitat was limited, invasive species and land use were prevalent and stream temperatures were highest. Increasing stream temperature acted additively and independently, whereas land use and invasive species had additive and interactive effects (i.e. the impact of one stressor depended on exposure to the other stressor).Most (58%–78%) of the explained variation in population dynamics was attributed to the presence of invasive species, differences in life history and management actions in foraging habitats in rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Although invasive fishes had strong negative effects on populations in foraging habitats, proactive control programmes appeared to effectively temper their negative impact.Synthesis and applications. Long-term demographic data emphasize that climate warming will exacerbate imperilment of cold-water specialists like bull trout, yet other stressors – especially invasive fishes – are immediate threats that can be addressed by proactive management actions. Therefore, climate-adaptation strategies for freshwater biodiversity should consider existing abiotic and biotic stressors, some of which provide potential and realized opportunity for conservation

  2. Analysis Technique on Water Permeability in Concrete with Cold Joint considering Micro Pore Structure and Mineral Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Jin Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold joint in concrete due to delayed concrete placing may cause a reduced shear resistance and increased water permeation. This study presents an analytical model based on the concept of REV (Representative Element Volume to assess the effect of water permeability in cold joint concrete. Here, OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement concrete samples with cold joint are prepared and WPT (Water Permeability Test is performed on the samples cured for 91 days. In order to account for the effect of GGBFS (Granulated Ground Blast Furnace Slag on water permeability, concrete samples with the same W/B (Water to Binder ratio and 40% replacement ratio of GGBFS are tested as well. Utilizing the previous models handling porosity and saturation, the analysis technique for equivalent water permeability with effective cold joint width is proposed. Water permeability in cold joint increases to 140.7% in control case but it decreases to 120.7% through GGBFS replacement. Simulation results agree reasonably well with experimental data gathered for sound and cold joint concrete.

  3. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life.

  4. The Effects of Ribose on Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of Cold Water Fish Gelatin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Javadian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Native fish gelatin has some disadvantages such as high hydrophilic, and solubility in cold water. Mixing with other biopolymers and crosslinking by sugars may improve functional properties of fish gelatin. So in this research, the effects of ribose were investigated on moisture sorption isotherm, solubility in water, and mechanical properties of cold water fish gelatin (CWFG films. Ribose sugar was incorporated into CWFG solutions at different concentrations (e.g. 0, 2, 4, and 6% w/w dried gelatin. Physicochemical properties such as water solubility, moisture sorption isotherm and mechanical properties of the films were measured according to ASTM standards. Results showed that incorporation of ribose sugar significantly improved functional properties of CWFG films. Solubility, moisture content and monolayer water content of the matrixes were decreased by increasing the ribose contents. Mechanical properties of biocomposites were improved more than 20% and moisture sorption isotherm curve significantly shifted to lower moisture contents. The results of this study could be explored for commercial use, depending on industrial needs for either production of edible films or for packaging purposes.

  5. Diversity of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the potential use of its phages for protection against bacterial cold water disease in salmonids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, D.; Higuera, G.; Villa, M.

    2012-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum causes rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS) and cold water disease (CWD) in salmonid aquaculture. We report characterization of F. psychrophilum strains and their bacteriophages isolated in Chilean salmonid aquaculture. Results suggest that under laboratory conditions ph...

  6. Low-Frequency Variability of the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass Identified from the China Coastal Waters and Adjacent Seas Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Seas Reanalysis ( CORA ) data to investigate the interannual and decadal variability of the Yellow Sea cold watermass (YSCWM) and its relationship to...Waters and Adjacent Seas Reanalysis ( CORA ) data to investigate the interannual and decadal variability of the Yellow Sea cold water mass (YSCWM) and...China Coastal Waters and Adjacent Seas Reanalysis ( CORA ) data. CORA assimi- lated the in situ observed temperature and salinity profiles collected by the

  7. What is the biochemical and physiological rationale for using cold-water immersion in sports recovery? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, Chris M; Davison, Gareth W

    2010-02-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) is a popular recovery intervention after exercise. The scientific rationale is not clear, and there are no clear guidelines for its use. The aim of this review was to study the physiological and biochemical effect of short periods of CWI. A computer-based literature search, citation tracking and related articles searches were undertaken. Primary research studies using healthy human participants, immersed in cold water (sports recovery still remains unclear.

  8. Recycling ground water in Waushara County, Wisconsin : resource management for cold-water fish hatcheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitzki, R.P.

    1976-01-01

    Recycling water within the local ground-water system can increase the quantity of water available for use, control or avoid environmental pollution, and control temperature of the water supply. Pumped ground water supplied a fish-rearing facility for 15 months, and the waste water recharged the local ground-water system through an infiltration pond. Eighty-three percent of the recharged water returned to the well (recycled). Make-up water from the ground-water system provided the remaining 17 percent.

  9. Neutron diffraction analysis of Cr-Ni-Mo-Ti austenitic steel after cold plastic deformation and fast neutrons irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, V. I.; Valiev, E. Z.; Berger, I. F.; Goschitskii, B. N.; Proskurnina, N. V.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Kataeva, N. F.

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative assessment is presented of the dislocation density and relative fractions of edge and screw dislocations in reactor-steel samples 16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-1Ti subjected to preliminary cold deformation by rolling and subsequent fast neutron irradiation using neutron diffraction analysis. The Williamson-Hall modified method was used for calculations. It is shown that the fast neutron irradiation leads to a decrease in the density of dislocations that appeared after samples deformation. The applicability of neutron diffraction analysis to the examination of dislocation structure of deformed and irradiated materials is shown.

  10. Arsenic and other trace elements in thermal springs and in cold waters from drinking water wells on the Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormachea Muñoz, Mauricio; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Sracek, Ondra; Ramos Ramos, Oswaldo; Quintanilla Aguirre, Jorge; Bundschuh, Jochen; Maity, Jyoti Prakash

    2015-07-01

    Numerous hot springs and fumaroles occur along the Andes Mountains, in the Bolivian Altiplano, where people use thermal springs for recreational purposes as pools, baths and also for consumption as drinking water and irrigation once it is mixed with natural surface waters; most of these thermal springs emerge from earth surface and flow naturally into the rivers streams which drain further into the Poopó Lake. Physicochemical characteristics of the thermal water samples showed pH from 6.3 to 8.3 with an average of 7.0, redox potential from +106 to +204 mV with an average of +172 mV, temperatures from 40 to 75 °C with an average of 56 °C and high electrical conductivity ranging from 1.8 to 75 mS/cm and averaged 13 mS/cm. Predominant major ions are Na+ and Cl- and the principal water types are 37.5% Na-Cl type and 37.5% Na-Cl-HCO3 type. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 7.8 to 65.3 μg/L and arsenic speciation indicate the predominance of As(III) species. Sediments collected from the outlets of thermal waters show high iron content, and ferric oxides and hydroxides are assumed to be principal mineral phases for arsenic attenuation by adsorption/co-precipitation processes. Arsenic concentrations in cold water samples from shallow aquifers are higher than those in thermal springs (range < 5.6-233.2 μg/L), it is likely that thermal water discharge is not the main source of high arsenic content in the shallow aquifer as they are very immature and may only have a small component corresponding to the deep geothermal reservoir. As people use both thermal waters and cold waters for consumption, there is a high risk for arsenic exposure in the area.

  11. Immunobiosensor for fast detection of bacteria in water using plastic optical fiber (POF) bended

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Domingos M. C.; Lopes, Rafaela N.; Queiroz, Vanessa M.; Allil, Regina C. S. B.; Werneck, Marcelo M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an immunobiosensor of fast response time to detection of bacteria, made by Plastic Optical Fiber. Probes were tested in U-shaped and Meander-shaped to investigate the best sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability. During calibration was used for sucrose solutions refractive index (RI) from 1.33 to 1.39. This is equivalent to IR range of the water and the highest concentration of bacteria, respectively. Immunobiosensor was able to detecting the presence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in water from suspensions of different concentrations of 106 and 104 colonies forming units per millilitre (CFU/mL) in twenty minutes.

  12. Effects of sports massage and intermittent cold-water immersion on recovery from matches by basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, Anne; Calleja-González, Julio; Hippocrate, Audrey; Clarke, Neil David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intermittent cold-water immersion and massage on perceptual and performance markers of recovery by basketball players after competitive matches. Eight men (age 23 ± 3 years; stature 190.5 ± 8.9 cm; body mass 90.3 ± 9.6 kg; body fat 12.8 ± 4.8%) and eight women (age 22 ± 2 years; stature 179.0 ± 8.5 cm; body mass 77.6 ± 9.2 kg; body fat 22.5 ± 6.6%) basketball players participated. Massage, cold-water immersion or control were applied immediately after competitive matches, followed by assessments of perceptual measures of recovery and physical performance, countermovement jump and repeated-sprint ability 24 h after intervention. There was lower perception of fatigue overall and in the legs immediately after the massage and cold-water immersion condition (P recovery interventions on repeated-sprint measures (P at best 0.067, η²(P) at best 0.68). The results suggest that both massage and cold-water immersion improve perceptual measures of recovery. Furthermore, cold-water immersion improves jump performance although neither such immersion nor massage had an effect on repeated-sprint ability. This suggests that, overall, cold-water immersion is more useful than massage in the recovery from basketball matches, especially in women.

  13. Calcification is not the Achilles' heel of cold-water corals in an acidifying ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Montagna, Paolo; Aliani, Stefano; Borghini, Mireno; Canese, Simonepietro; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Foggo, Andy; Milazzo, Marco; Taviani, Marco; Houlbrèque, Fanny

    2015-06-01

    Ocean acidification is thought to be a major threat to coral reefs: laboratory evidence and CO2 seep research has shown adverse effects on many coral species, although a few are resilient. There are concerns that cold-water corals are even more vulnerable as they live in areas where aragonite saturation (Ωara ) is lower than in the tropics and is falling rapidly due to CO2 emissions. Here, we provide laboratory evidence that net (gross calcification minus dissolution) and gross calcification rates of three common cold-water corals, Caryophyllia smithii, Dendrophyllia cornigera, and Desmophyllum dianthus, are not affected by pCO2 levels expected for 2100 (pCO2  1058 μatm, Ωara 1.29), and nor are the rates of skeletal dissolution in D. dianthus. We transplanted D. dianthus to 350 m depth (pHT 8.02; pCO2  448 μatm, Ωara 2.58) and to a 3 m depth CO2 seep in oligotrophic waters (pHT 7.35; pCO2  2879 μatm, Ωara 0.76) and found that the transplants calcified at the same rates regardless of the pCO2 confirming their resilience to acidification, but at significantly lower rates than corals that were fed in aquaria. Our combination of field and laboratory evidence suggests that ocean acidification will not disrupt cold-water coral calcification although falling aragonite levels may affect other organismal physiological and/or reef community processes.

  14. Hydrophobic collapse and cold denaturation in the Jagla model of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V; Weiner, Saul [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, 500 West 185th Street, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Kumar, Pradeep [Center for Studies in Physics and Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1167 (United States); Sastry, Srikanth [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064, Karnataka (India); Eugene Stanley, H [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-07-21

    The Jagla model is a coarse-grained model of water which describes interactions between groups of water molecules by a spherically symmetric potential characterized by a hard core, a linear repulsive ramp and a long-range attractive ramp. The Jagla model qualitatively reproduces the thermodynamics and dynamics of liquid water including density and diffusion anomalies as well as certain chemical properties such the increase of solubility of small hydrophobic particles upon cooling. We examine, via molecular dynamics simulation, the behavior of the bead-on-a-string polymers of various lengths in the Jagla model. We find that such polymers exhibit swelling upon cooling similar to cold denaturation of proteins in water. We show that while for short polymers the swelling is gradual, longer polymers exhibit a first-order-like phase transition between a globular phase at high temperatures to a random coil state at cold temperatures. This transition is associated with the formation of a liquid-polymer phase boundary surrounding the globule and complete dewetting of the central parts of the globule at high temperatures. We study thermodynamics of this transition and find that the entropy, volume, and potential energy of the solvent-random coil system is lower than those of the globule-solvent system. Accordingly the slope of the coil-globule transition line on a PT plane has positive slope. We present simple thermodynamic considerations similar to classical nucleation theory, which relate the temperature of the cold swelling transition to polymer length and relate the dewetting of the globule to its diameter and to the Egelstaff-Widom length scale.

  15. Hydrophobic collapse and cold denaturation in the Jagla model of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Sastry, Srikanth; Stanley, H. Eugene; Weiner, Saul

    2010-07-01

    The Jagla model is a coarse-grained model of water which describes interactions between groups of water molecules by a spherically symmetric potential characterized by a hard core, a linear repulsive ramp and a long-range attractive ramp. The Jagla model qualitatively reproduces the thermodynamics and dynamics of liquid water including density and diffusion anomalies as well as certain chemical properties such the increase of solubility of small hydrophobic particles upon cooling. We examine, via molecular dynamics simulation, the behavior of the bead-on-a-string polymers of various lengths in the Jagla model. We find that such polymers exhibit swelling upon cooling similar to cold denaturation of proteins in water. We show that while for short polymers the swelling is gradual, longer polymers exhibit a first-order-like phase transition between a globular phase at high temperatures to a random coil state at cold temperatures. This transition is associated with the formation of a liquid-polymer phase boundary surrounding the globule and complete dewetting of the central parts of the globule at high temperatures. We study thermodynamics of this transition and find that the entropy, volume, and potential energy of the solvent-random coil system is lower than those of the globule-solvent system. Accordingly the slope of the coil-globule transition line on a PT plane has positive slope. We present simple thermodynamic considerations similar to classical nucleation theory, which relate the temperature of the cold swelling transition to polymer length and relate the dewetting of the globule to its diameter and to the Egelstaff-Widom length scale.

  16. Variability in cold front activities modulating cool-season evaporation from a southern inland water in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heping; Blanken, Peter D.; Weidinger, Tamas; Nordbo, Annika; Vesala, Timo

    2011-04-01

    Understanding seasonal variations in the evaporation of inland waters (e.g., lakes and reservoirs) is important for water resource management as well as the prediction of the hydrological cycles in response to climate change. We analyzed eddy covariance-based evaporation measurements from the Ross Barnett Reservoir (32°26'N, 90°02'W which is always ice-free) in central Mississippi during the cool months (i.e., September-March) of 2007 and 2008, and found that the variability in cold front activities (i.e., passages of cold fronts and cold/dry air masses behind cold fronts) played an important role in modulating the exchange of sensible (H) and latent (λE) heat fluxes. Our analysis showed that 2007's warmer cool season had smaller mean H and λE than 2008's cooler cool season. This implies that the warmer cool season did not accelerate evaporation and heat exchange between the water surface and the atmosphere. Instead, more frequent cold fronts and longer periods of cold/dry air masses behind the cold fronts in 2008 resulted in overall larger H and λE as compared with 2007, this primarily taking the form of sporadic short-term rapid 'pulses' of H and λE losses from the water's surface. These results suggest that future climate-induced changes in frequency of cold fronts and the meteorological properties of the air masses behind cold fronts (e.g., wind speeds, temperature, and humidity), rather than other factors of climate change, would produce significant variations in the water surface's energy fluxes and subsequent evaporation rates.

  17. Effects of 20-week intermittent cold-water-immersion on phenotype and myonuclei in single fibers of rat hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Han, E Y; Kang, M S; Kawano, F; Kim, H J; Ohira, Y; Kim, C K

    2004-08-01

    The effects of 20 weeks of intermittent cold-water-immersion on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression,cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number, and myonuclear domain size in isolated single fiber of soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were studied in male Wistar rats. Cold exposure was accomplished by submerging the rats in shoulder-deep water, maintained at approximately 18 degrees C, for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week and for 20 weeks. Cold exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of body and soleus muscle weight gain. The percent type IIa MHC fibers of EDL muscle was increased, whereas that of type IIa + b MHC fibers was less in cold-exposed group than controls (p muscle in cold-exposed group were significantly less than controls. Myonuclear domain in type IIa fibers of EDL in the cold-exposed group was greater than controls (p cold exposure causes the fiber-type-specific adaptation in rat hindlimb muscles. It is further indicated that cold-exposure-related modulation of myonuclear number was closely related to reduction of fiber CSA, not the shift of fiber phenotype.

  18. Persistent Intermediate Water Warming during Cold Stadials in the SE Nordic Seas during the Last 65 Kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, T. L.; Ezat, M.; Groeneveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the Nordic seas, conversion of inflowing warm Atlantic surface water to deep cold water through convection is closely linked with climate. During the last glacial period climate underwent rapid millennial-scale variability known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, consisting of warm interstadials and cold stadials. Here we present the first benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca-d18O record from the Nordic seas in order to reconstruct the ocean circulation on DO timescales. The record confirms that modern-like convection took place in the Nordic seas during interstadials with cold bottom water temperatures (BWT) close to modern temperatures. The results show gradual and pronounced BWT increases by 2-5 °C during stadials indicating a stop or near-stop in convection. The BWT peaks are followed by an abrupt drop in temperature at the onset of interstadials indicating the abrupt start of convection and renewed generation of cold deep water. The rise in BWT during stadials confirms earlier interpretations of subsurface inflow of warm Atlantic water below a halocline reaching >1.2 km water depth. The results suggest that warm Atlantic Water never ceased to flow into the Nordic seas during the glacial period with inflow at the surface during the Holocene and warm interstadials switching to subsurface and intermediate inflow during cold stadials. Our results suggest that it is the vertical shifts in the position of the warm Atlantic Water that cause the abrupt surface warmings.

  19. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane J. Hayter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI and cold air therapy (CAT on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10 and female (n = 10 participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24, 48 (T48 and 72 (T72 h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05. However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90, T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64 and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76. The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone.

  20. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Generated in Water and its Potential Use in Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this letter we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP produced in a water using three gases as carrier (argon, helium and nitrogen). Plasma stimulated water was applied to human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT assays tests showed that using argon plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of the reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water in the case of argon plasma.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma discharged in water and its potential use in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this study we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP discharged in deionized (DI) water using three gases as carriers (argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2)). Plasma stimulated water was applied to the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay tests showed that using Ar plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water.

  2. Mechanical factors in primary water stress corrosion cracking of cold-worked stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammadi, Rashid Al, E-mail: rashid.alhammadi@fanr.gov.ae [Nuclear Security Division, Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Yi, Yongsun, E-mail: yongsun.yi@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Zaki, Wael, E-mail: wael.zaki@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cho, Pyungyeon, E-mail: pyungyeon.cho@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • PWSCC of cold-worked austenitic stainless steel was studied. • Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen. • Mechanical fields near a crack tip were evaluated using FEA. • The dependence of mechanical factors on K{sub I} and yield stress was investigated. • The crack tip normal stress was identified as a main factor controlling PWSCC. - Abstract: Finite element analysis was performed on a compact tension specimen to determine the stress and strain distributions near a crack tip. Based on the results, the crack tip stain rates by crack advance and creep rates near crack tip were estimated. By comparing the dependence of the mechanical factors on the stress intensity factor and yield stress with that of the SCC crack growth rates, it was tried to identify the main mechanical factor for the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels. The analysis results showed that the crack tip normal stress could be the main mechanical factor controlling the PWSCC, suggesting that the internal oxidation mechanism might be the most probable PWSCC mechanism of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels.

  3. Molecular beam studies of HCl dissolution and dissociation in cold salty water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brastad, Susan M; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2011-05-14

    Gas-liquid scattering experiments are used to explore collisions and reactions of HCl and DCl with 12 mol% LiBr solutions of H(2)O and D(2)O at 208-218 K. These ∼6 M aqueous salt solutions have vapor pressures just below 0.01 Torr, requiring special consideration of the effects of gas-vapor collisions. We find that impinging HCl molecules readily equilibrate on the surface of the solution even at incident energies of 90 kJ mol(-1). Approximately 90% of the thermalized HCl molecules dissolve and dissociate for long times in the cold salty solution, while the remaining 10% desorb from the surface intact. There is no evidence for rapid, interfacial conversion of HCl into DCl, in striking contrast to previous observations of distinct submicrosecond DCl→HCl exchange in collisions of DCl with salty glycerol at 292 K. These results indicate that cold salty water efficiently captures impinging HCl molecules and suppresses interfacial proton exchange, most likely because of the long interaction times of the HCl molecules in contact with the cold surface and because of facile transport of H(+) and Cl(-) from the interfacial region into the bulk solution.

  4. Consequences of prolonged total body immersion in cold water on muscle performance and EMG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulange, Mathieu; Hug, François; Kipson, Nathalie; Robinet, Claude; Desruelle, Anne Virginie; Melin, Bruno; Jimenez, Chantal; Galland, François; Jammes, Yves

    2006-04-01

    The consequences of a prolonged total body immersion in cold water on the muscle function have not been documented yet, and they are the object of this French Navy research program. Ten elite divers were totally immerged and stayed immobile during 6 h in cold (18 and 10 degrees C) water. We measured the maximal voluntary leg extension (maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) and evoked compound muscle potential (M wave) in vastus lateralis and soleus muscles at rest, after a submaximal (60% MVC) isometric extension allowing the measurement of the endurance time (Tlim). The power spectrum of surface electromyograms (EMG) was computed during 60% MVCs. MVCs and 60% MVC maneuvers were repeated four times during the immersion. Data were compared with those obtained in a control group studied in dry air condition during a 6-h session. Total body cooling did not affect MVC nor Tlim. The M wave duration increased in the coolest muscle (soleus), but only at 10 degrees C at rest. There were no further fatigue-induced M wave alterations in both muscles. During 60% the MVCs, a time-dependant increase in the leftward shift of the EMG spectrum occurred at the two temperatures. These EMG changes were absent in the control group of subjects studied in dry air. The plasma lactate concentration was elevated throughout the 18 and mostly the 10 degrees C immersion conditions. Throughout the 18 degrees C immersion study, the resting potassium level did not significantly vary, whereas at 10 degrees C, a significant potassium increase occurred soon and persisted throughout the study. Thus, total body immersion in cold water did not affect the global contractile properties of leg muscles during static efforts but elicited significant alterations in electromyographic events which may be related to the variations of interstitial fluid composition.

  5. Why cold water delays the onset of vestibular vertigo-An functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: zhiwang76@gmail.com; Chen Min [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Gong Xia; Huang Weining [Department of E.N.T., Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Xu Liang [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhou Cheng [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: chengzhou2000@yahoo.com

    2008-09-15

    The mechanism of vertigo is unclear. Generally, the peak time or the latency of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect is about 6 s. However, clinically, the latency of vertigo or nystagmus induced by caloric stimulations is much longer than 6 s, commonly about 30 s induced by water of 30 deg. C or 44 deg. C. We hypothesize that there is an inhibitive power or mechanism for the occurrence of vestibular vertigo, since it is an unpleasant feeling. The caloric test was performed in healthy volunteers during the BOLD fMRI scanning. The overlaid results of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) showed that three brain regions showed neural activation during vestibular dizziness while deactivation occurred in response to cold water simulation: (1) supplementary motor area (SMA); (2) middle temporal area/medial superior temporal area (MT/MST); (3) visual association area (BA19). The time course of the regions further demonstrated that the signal decreased during the cold-water stimulation and increased during the period of vertigo. We therefore further hypothesize that there may be two forces for the production of vertigo: inhibitory power (IP) and promotive power (PP). The delayed onset of vertigo was the result of the interaction between IP and PP. All of our findings, for the first time, suggested such an original mechanism of vertigo.

  6. Embryogenesis and larval biology of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann I Larsson

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral reefs form spectacular and highly diverse ecosystems in the deep sea but little is known about reproduction, and virtually nothing about the larval biology in these corals. This study is based on data from two locations of the North East Atlantic and documents the first observations of embryogenesis and larval development in Lophelia pertusa, the most common framework-building cold-water scleractinian. Embryos developed in a more or less organized radial cleavage pattern from ∼ 160 µm large neutral or negatively buoyant eggs, to 120-270 µm long ciliated planulae. Embryogenesis was slow with cleavage occurring at intervals of 6-8 hours up to the 64-cell stage. Genetically characterized larvae were sexually derived, with maternal and paternal alleles present. Larvae were active swimmers (0.5 mm s(-1 initially residing in the upper part of the water column, with bottom probing behavior starting 3-5 weeks after fertilization. Nematocysts had developed by day 30, coinciding with peak bottom-probing behavior, and possibly an indication that larvae are fully competent to settle at this time. Planulae survived for eight weeks under laboratory conditions, and preliminary results indicate that these planulae are planktotrophic. The late onset of competency and larval longevity suggests a high dispersal potential. Understanding larval biology and behavior is of paramount importance for biophysical modeling of larval dispersal, which forms the basis for predictions of connectivity among populations.

  7. Bioeconomic study of a two agent fishery with consideration on the valuation of goods and services by cold-water corals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xianwen

    2009-01-01

    This thesis makes four contributions on the economic analysis of fisheries in cold-water corals contained waters. The first contribution is the proposal of theoretical framework on the links among cold-water corals, fauna fish species, fisheries, and public. The interactions among these four parts are illustrated in the framework. The second contribution is the identification and classification of goods and services by cold-water corals. The work of identification and classification hel...

  8. High-Speed Imaging of a Water Droplet Impacting a Super Cold Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Narimane

    2016-08-01

    Frost formation is of a major research interest as it can affect many industrial processes. Frost appears as a thin deposit of ice crystals when the temperature of the surface is below the freezing point of the liquid. The objective of this research is to study icing with hope to propose new anti-icing and deicing methods. In the beginning of the research, cracking of the ice layer was observed when a deionized water droplet impacts a ?50 oC cooled sphere surface that is in contact with dry ice. To further investigate the cracks occurrence, multiple experiments were conducted. It was observed that the sphere surface temperature and droplet temperature (ranges from 10-80 oC) have no effect on the crack formation. On the other hand, it was observed that formation of a thin layer of frost on the sphere before the drop impact leads the lateral cracking of the ice. Thus, attempts to reproduce the cracks on clean super cold sphere surfaces were made using scratched and sandblasted spheres as well as superhydrophobized and polymer particle coated spheres. Furthermore, innovative methods were tried to initiate the cracks by placing epoxy glue bumps and ice-islands coatings on the surface of the spheres. All of these attempts to reproduce the crack formation without the presence of frost, failed. Nonetheless, the adding of isolated frost on the sphere surfaces always leads to the crack formation. Generally, frost forms on the small spheres faster than it does on the bigger ones. Additionally, the cold water droplet produces thicker water and ice layer compared to a hot water droplet; and the smaller the sphere the larger its water and ice layer thicknesses.

  9. Aging Behaviour of Al-Mg-Si Alloys Subjected to Severe Plastic Deformation by ECAP and Cold Asymmetric Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farè

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out on aging behaviour of a 6082 alloy processed by two different severe plastic deformation techniques: ECAP and asymmetric rolling. Both techniques were able to generate an ultrafine-grained structure in samples processed at room temperature. It was stated that severe straining promotes marked changes in the postdeformation aging kinetics. The peaks of β′′/β′ transition phases were anticipated and of progressively reduced intensity over the coarse grained alloy. A further peak accounting for onset of recrystallization also appeared in the most severely deformed samples. Full consistency in peak shape and position was found when comparing materials processed by ECAP and asymmetric rolling. Isothermal aging treatments performed at 180°C revealed that in the severely deformed samples, aging became so fast that the hardness curves continuously decreased due to overwhelming effects of structure restoration. On the contrary, aging at 130°C offers good opportunities for fully exploiting the precipitate hardening effects in the ultrafine-grained alloy.

  10. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  11. Characteristics of the cold-water belt formed off Soya Warm Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, Miho; Kitade, Yujiro; Matsuyama, Masaji

    2008-12-01

    We examined the data obtained by acoustic Doppler current profiler, conductivity-temperature-depth profiler, and expendable bathythermograph observations, which were collected in the summers of 2000, 2001, and 2002, to clarify the characteristics of the cold-water belt (CWB), i.e., lower-temperature water than the surrounding water extending from the southwest coast of Sakhalin along the offshore side of Soya Warm Current (SWC) and to confirm one of the formation mechanisms of the CWB as suggested by our previous study, i.e., the upwelling due to the convergence of bottom Ekman transport off the SWC region. The CWB was observed at about 30 km off the coast, having a thickness of 14 m and a minimum temperature of 12°C at the sea surface. The CWB does not have the specific water mass, but is constituted of three representative water types off the northeast coast of Hokkaido in summer, i.e., SWC water, Fresh Surface Okhotsk Sea Water, and Okhotsk Sea Intermediate Water. In a comparison of the horizontal distributions of current and temperature, the CWB region is found to be advected to the southeast at an average of 40 ± 29% of the maximum current velocity of the SWC. The pumping speed due to the convergence of the bottom Ekman transport is estimated as (1.5-3.0) × 10-4 m s-1. We examined the mixing ratio of the CWB, and the results implied that the water mass of the CWB is advected southeastward and mixes with a water mass upwelling in a different region off SWC.

  12. Selective Adsorption on Fluorinated Plastic Enables the Optical Detection of Molecular Pollutants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranco, R.; Giavazzi, F.; Salina, M.; Tagliabue, G.; Di Nicolò, E.; Bellini, T.; Buscaglia, M.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous fluorinated plastic can be produced with a refractive index similar to that of water, a condition that makes it essentially invisible when immersed in aqueous solutions. Because of this property, even a small amount of adsorbed molecules on the plastic-water interface provides a detectable optical signal. We investigate two distinct substrates made of this material, characterized by different interface areas: a prism and a microporous membrane. We demonstrate that both substrates enable the label-free detection of molecular compounds in water even without any surface functionalization. The adsorption of molecules on the planar surface of the prism provides an increase of optical reflectivity, whereas the adsorption on the internal surface of the microporous membrane yields an increase of scattered light. Despite the different mechanisms, we find a similar optical response upon adsorption. We confirm this result by a theoretical model accounting for both reflection and scattering. We investigate the spontaneous adsorption process for different kinds of molecules: surfactants with different charges, a protein (lysozyme), and a constituent of gasoline (hexane). The measured equilibrium and kinetic constants for adsorption differ by orders of magnitudes among the different classes of molecules. By suitable analytical models, accounting for the effects of mass limitation and transport, we find a simple and general scaling of the adsorption parameters with the molecular size.

  13. Gelatinization and retrogradation phenomena in starch/montmorillonite nanocomposites plasticized with different glycerol/water ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Sandra Camila; Salcedo, Felipe

    2016-10-20

    This study aims to gain insights into the intermolecular interactions present in thermoplastic starch (TPS)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites prepared using water and/or glycerol as plasticizers. Specifically, the impact of using different glycerol/water proportions on the nature of gelatinization and retrogradation processes is studied. Nanocomposites were characterized by rheometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-rays diffraction (XRD). It is shown that clay tactoids preferentially interact with glycerol molecules rather than starch macromolecules. Consequently, the effects of MMT incorporation strongly depend on the glycerol/water ratio; when a ratio of 0.5 is used minor variations were observed on the starch gelatinization process-although stronger clays-starch interactions were evident-whereas at higher ratios the addition of clays significantly increased the gelatinization temperature, up to values over 100°C. In the gelatinization process of starch in TPS samples having only glycerol as a plasticizer, the leaching of amylose and the melting of amylopectin crystalline domains seem to occur simultaneously. This different gelatinization mechanism produces a TPS having a substantially different morphology, which exhibited reduced retrogradation characteristics.

  14. The Cutting Front Side Geometry in The Applications of D3 Cold Work Tool Steel Material Via Abrasive Water Jet

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan AKKURT

    2013-01-01

    Abrasive water jet cutting that is used as cold cutting technology in industrial applications is preferred as most productive method when especially metallurgic and mechanic specialties of materials are taken into consideration. When the surface quality, speed of processing period and part cost are taken into consideration, which are targeted in D3 cold work tool steel materials used frequently in especially metal industry, it appears that the most appropriate method is ab...

  15. Environmental changes and growth history of a cold-water carbonate mound (Propeller Mound, Porcupine Seabight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Dullo, Christian; Dorschel, Boris; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2007-02-01

    On- and off-mound sediment cores from Propeller Mound (Hovland Mound province, Porcupine Seabight) were analysed to understand better the evolution of a carbonate mound. The evaluation of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from the off-mound position helps to determine the changes of the environmental controls on Propeller Mound in glacial and interglacial times. Two different assemblages describe the Holocene and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 and late MIS 3 (˜31 kyr BP). The different assemblages are related to changes in oceanographic conditions, surface productivity and the waxing and waning of the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) during the last glacial stages. The interglacial assemblage is related to a higher supply of organic material and stronger current intensities in water depth of recent coral growth. During the last glaciation the benthic faunas showed high abundances of cassidulinid species, implying cold bottom waters and a reduced availability of organic matter. High sedimentation rates and the domination of Elphidium excavatum point to shelf erosion related to sea-level lowering (˜50 m) and the progradation of the BIIS onto the shelf. A different assemblage described for the on-mound core is dominated by Discanomalina coronata, Gavelinopsis translucens, Planulina ariminensis, Cibicides lobatulus and to a lower degree by Hyrrokkin sarcophaga. These species are only found or show significantly higher relative abundances in on-mound samples and their maximum contribution in the lower part of the record indicates a higher coral growth density on Propeller Mound in an earlier period. They are less abundant during the Holocene, however. This dataset portrays the boundary conditions of the habitable range for the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa, which dominates the deep-water reefal ecosystem on the upper flanks of Propeller Mound. The growth of this ecosystem occurs during interglacial and interstadial periods, whereas a retreat of corals is documented in

  16. ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIVITY OF COLD WATER EXTRACT OF DESMODIUM TRIFLORUM IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanigasekara Daya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine antinociceptive potential of cold water extract (CWE of Desmodium triflorum (Family: Fabaceae / Leguminosae plant. One of four doses of CWE (dose 4000 mg/ml, 2000 mg/ml and 1000 mg/ml or 1 ml tap water was orally administered to male wistar rats and antinociceptive activity was ascertained using tail flik and hot plate techniques. The results showed that CWE possessed marked antinociceptive activity when evaluated in the hot plate test but not in the tail flick test. Antinociceptive action was dose-dependent. Further, it had a rapid onset (1h and a short duration (3h of action. The CWE was safe and was not accompanied with side effects even after sub chronic administration. The antinociception action was mediated by supraspinal mechanisms, possibly via alkaloids and flavonoids. It is concluded that CWE of D. triflorum may be used as a cheap, orally active safe antinociceptive drug.

  17. Dynamics of nutrients, total organic carbon, prokaryotes and viruses in onboard incubations of cold-water corals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, C.; de Kluijver, A.; Agis, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; van Duyl, F.C.; Weinbauer, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The potential influence of the cold-water corals (CWCs) Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata on the dynamics of inorganic nutrient and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses in bottom water was assessed in onboard incubation experiments. Ammonium, n

  18. Water and nitrogen uptake patterns following moisture pulses in a cold desert community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, R.L.E.; Ehleringer, J.R.

    2000-05-01

    Variation in the ability to utilize pulses of both water and nitrogen (N) is one possible mechanism allowing the coexistence of species in the cold desert community on the Colorado Plateau. The authors simulated 25-mm precipitation events and used stable isotope tracers ({sup 2}H and {sup 15}N) to follow water and N uptake patterns in six dominant perennials (Artemisia filifolia, Coleogyne ramosissima, Cryptantha flava, Ephedra viridis, Quercus havardii, and Vanclevea stylosa) at different times of the growing season. Water pulse utilization varied on a seasonal basis and was to some extent different among species during the summer. Carbon isotope discrimination was negatively related to both plant use of moisture in upper soil layers and foliar N concentration. Species that were similar in water pulse utilization patterns differed in the natural abundance of {sup 15}N, suggesting partitioning in N sources. All species were able to utilize N pulses after rain events, but there were temporal differences in the response among species. The authors also found that water and N uptake in shallow roots do not necessarily occur simultaneously. Artemisia, Cryptantha, and Quercus showed significant uptake of both water and N from the upper soil layers. In contrast, Coleogyne and Ephedra showed the capacity to utilize the water pulse, but not the N pulse. Vanclevea only took up N. The results indicate that different parts of the root system may be responsible for the acquisition of water and N. Their results also suggest that N and water partitioning could contribute to the coexistence of species in highly variable environments such as the Colorado Plateau desert system.

  19. Food selectivity and processing by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oevelen, Dick; Mueller, Christina E.; Lundälv, Tomas; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2016-10-01

    Cold-water corals form prominent reef ecosystems along ocean margins that depend on suspended resources produced in surface waters. In this study, we investigated food processing of 13C and 15N labelled bacteria and algae by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa. Coral respiration, tissue incorporation of C and N and metabolically derived C incorporation into the skeleton were traced following the additions of different food concentrations (100, 300, 1300 µg C L-1) and two ratios of suspended bacterial and algal biomass (1 : 1, 3 : 1). Respiration and tissue incorporation by L. pertusa increased markedly following exposure to higher food concentrations. The net growth efficiency of L. pertusa was low (0.08 ± 0.03), which is consistent with its slow growth rate. The contribution of algae and bacteria to total coral assimilation was proportional to the food mixture in the two lowest food concentrations, but algae were preferred over bacteria as a food source at the highest food concentration. Similarly, the stoichiometric uptake of C and N was coupled in the low and medium food treatment, but was uncoupled in the high food treatment and indicated a comparatively higher uptake or retention of bacterial carbon as compared to algal nitrogen. We argue that behavioural responses for these small-sized food particles, such as tentacle behaviour, mucus trapping and physiological processing, are more likely to explain the observed food selectivity as compared to physical-mechanical considerations. A comparison of the experimental food conditions to natural organic carbon concentrations above CWC reefs suggests that L. pertusa is well adapted to exploit temporal pulses of high organic matter concentrations in the bottom water caused by internal waves and downwelling events.

  20. Evaluation of the water-equivalence of plastic materials in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A; Shipley, D; Wellock, N; Thomas, R; Bouchard, H; Kacperek, A; Fracchiolla, F; Lorentini, S; Schwarz, M; MacDougall, N; Royle, G; Palmans, H

    2017-05-21

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the water-equivalence of new trial plastics designed specifically for light-ion beam dosimetry as well as commercially available plastics in clinical proton beams. The water-equivalence of materials was tested by computing a plastic-to-water conversion factor, [Formula: see text]. Trial materials were characterized experimentally in 60 MeV and 226 MeV un-modulated proton beams and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. For the high-energy beam, a comparison between the trial plastics and various commercial plastics was also performed using FLUKA and Geant4 Monte Carlo codes. Experimental information was obtained from laterally integrated depth-dose ionization chamber measurements in water, with and without plastic slabs with variable thicknesses in front of the water phantom. Fluence correction factors, [Formula: see text], between water and various materials were also derived using the Monte Carlo method. For the 60 MeV proton beam, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] factors were within 1% from unity for all trial plastics. For the 226 MeV proton beam, experimental [Formula: see text] values deviated from unity by a maximum of about 1% for the three trial plastics and experimental results showed no advantage regarding which of the plastics was the most equivalent to water. Different magnitudes of corrections were found between Geant4 and FLUKA for the various materials due mainly to the use of different nonelastic nuclear data. Nevertheless, for the 226 MeV proton beam, [Formula: see text] correction factors were within 2% from unity for all the materials. Considering the results from the two Monte Carlo codes, PMMA and trial plastic #3 had the smallest [Formula: see text] values, where maximum deviations from unity were 1%, however, PMMA range differed by 16% from that of water. Overall, [Formula: see text] factors were deviating more from unity than [Formula: see text] factors

  1. Spring maize yield, soil water use and water use efficiency under plastic film and straw mulches in the Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Liu, Wenzhao; Xue, Qingwu

    2016-12-01

    To compare the soil water balance, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of spring maize under different mulching types in the Loess Plateau, a 7-year field experiment was conducted in the Changwu region of the Loess Plateau. Three treatments were used in this experiment: straw mulch (SM), plastic film mulch (PM) and conventional covering without mulch (CK). Results show that the soil water change of dryland spring maize was as deep as 300 cm depth and hence 300 cm is recommended as the minimum depth when measure the soil water in this region. Water use (ET) did not differ significantly among the treatments. However, grain yield was significantly higher in PM compared with CK. WUE was significantly higher in PM than in CK for most years of the experiment. Although ET tended to be higher in PM than in the other treatments (without significance), the evaporation of water in the fallow period also decreased. Thus, PM is sustainable with respect to soil water balance. The 7-year experiment and the supplemental experiment thus confirmed that straw mulching at the seedling stage may lead to yield reduction and this effect can be mitigated by delaying the straw application to three-leaf stage.

  2. Physiological plasticity to water flow habitat in the damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus: linking phenotype to performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Binning

    Full Text Available The relationships among animal form, function and performance are complex, and vary across environments. Therefore, it can be difficult to identify morphological and/or physiological traits responsible for enhancing performance in a given habitat. In fishes, differences in swimming performance across water flow gradients are related to morphological variation among and within species. However, physiological traits related to performance have been less well studied. We experimentally reared juvenile damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, under different water flow regimes to test 1 whether aspects of swimming physiology and morphology show plastic responses to water flow, 2 whether trait divergence correlates with swimming performance and 3 whether flow environment relates to performance differences observed in wild fish. We found that maximum metabolic rate, aerobic scope and blood haematocrit were higher in wave-reared fish compared to fish reared in low water flow. However, pectoral fin shape, which tends to correlate with sustained swimming performance, did not differ between rearing treatments or collection sites. Maximum metabolic rate was the best overall predictor of individual swimming performance; fin shape and fish total length were 3.3 and 3.7 times less likely than maximum metabolic rate to explain differences in critical swimming speed. Performance differences induced in fish reared in different flow environments were less pronounced than in wild fish but similar in direction. Our results suggest that exposure to water motion induces plastic physiological changes which enhance swimming performance in A. polyacanthus. Thus, functional relationships between fish morphology and performance across flow habitats should also consider differences in physiology.

  3. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Zhang, Yulong; Sun, Zhanxiang; Zheng, Jiaming; Bai, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Feng, Liangshan; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Ning; Evers, Jochem B.; Zhang, Lizhen

    2017-08-01

    A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L.) production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root and shoot growth and the consequences for maize grain yield, above- and below-ground dry matter, water uptake (WU) and water use efficiency (WUE). Pot experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 with a mobile rain shelter to achieve conditions of no, mild or severe water stress. Maize yield was not affected by mild water stress over 2 years, while severe stress reduced yield by 56 %. Both water stress levels decreased root biomass slightly but shoot biomass substantially. Mild water stress decreased root length but increased root diameter, resulting in no effect on root surface area. Due to the morphological plasticity in root growth and the increase in root / shoot ratio, WU under water stress was decreased, and overall WUE for both above-ground dry matter and grain yield increased. Our results demonstrate that an irrigation system might be not economically and ecologically necessary because the frequently occurring mild water stress did not reduce crop yield much. The study helps us to understand crop responses to water stress during a critical water-sensitive period (middle of the crop-growing season) and to mitigate drought risk in dry-land agriculture.

  4. Paper versus plastic, water versus carbon and sustainable agriculture in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, L. C.

    2011-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that food and energy security are inextricably linked to climate and climate change, resulting in the so-called climate, energy, food nexus, with the water cycle at its hub. The ability to provide sufficient and consistent energy and food for this generation, while not depleting soil, climate and water resources for future generations involves interconnected feedbacks along the paths of this wheel. In the US corn belt, for example, agricultural water management in the form of subsurface drainage lowers the regional water table to enhance crop production, while at the same time providing a conduit for the more efficient export of nitrate-nitrogen to the Gulf of Mexico and increasing rates of decomposition and subsidence in organic-rich soils. The use of control structures to regulate drainage water has the potential to reduce nitrate and carbon dioxide losses, while at the same time increasing the emissions of other greenhouse gases. Increased biofuels production offers the potential to increase domestic energy security, but at the cost of increased water demand and threats to food security. Just as budding US consumer environmentalists of the last decade struggled with the question of paper versus plastic for bagging their groceries, today's informed consumers are being asked to tacitly choose between water and carbon. The local foods movement encourages consumption of locally-produced foods as a means of reducing carbon emissions associated with food transportation, among other perceived benefits. At the same time, the concept of virtual water trade recognizes that importing the water embedded in production in the form of food can balance a local water deficit. Taking into account the virtual water of food production and carbon emissions of food transportation, the spatial arrangement of the current US crop portfolio minimizes neither water nor carbon footprints. Changes in crop distribution result in trade-offs between the per capita

  5. Sr/Ca ratios in cold-water corals - a 'low-resolution' temperature archive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Riethdorf, Jan-Rainer; Raddatz, Jacek; López Correa, Matthias; Montagna, Paolo; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Freiwald, André

    2010-05-01

    One of the basic data to understand global change and past global changes is the measurement and the reconstruction of temperature of marine water masses. E.g. seawater temperature controls the density of seawater and in combination with salinity is the major driving force for the oceans circulation system. Geochemical investigations on cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Desmophyllum cristagalli indicated the potential of these organisms as high-resolution archives of environmental parameters from intermediate and deeper water masses (Adkins and Boyle 1997). Some studies tried to use cold-water corals as a high-resolution archive of temperature and salinity (Smith et al. 2000, 2002; Blamart et al. 2005; Lutringer et al. 2005). However, the fractionation of stable isotopes (delta18O and delta13C) and element ratios (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, U/Ca) are strongly influenced by vital effects (Shirai et al. 2005; Cohen et al. 2006), and difficult to interpret. Nevertheless, ongoing studies indicate the potential of a predominant temperature dependent fractionation of distinct isotopes and elements (e.g. Li/Ca, Montagna et al. 2008; U/Ca, Mg/Ca, delta18O, Lòpez Correa et al. 2008; delta88/86Sr, Rüggeberg et al. 2008). Within the frame of DFG-Project TRISTAN and Paläo-TRISTAN (Du 129/37-2 and 37-3) we investigated live-collected specimens of cold-water coral L. pertusa from all along the European continental margin (Northern and mid Norwegian shelves, Skagerrak, Rockall and Porcupine Bank, Galicia Bank, Gulf of Cadiz, Mediterranean Sea). These coral samples grew in waters characterized by temperatures between 6°C and 14°C. Electron Microprobe investigations along the growth direction of individual coral polyps were applied to determine the relationship between the incorporation of distinct elements (Sr, Ca, Mg, S). Cohen et al. (2006) showed for L. pertusa from the Kosterfjord, Skagerrak, that ~25% of the coral's Sr/Ca ratio is related to temperature, while 75% are influenced

  6. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure and clonal distribution of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, M. P.; Pereyra, R. T.; Lundälv, T.; André, C.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the spatial genetic structure within and among cold-water coral populations is crucial to understanding population dynamics, assessing the resilience of cold-water coral communities and estimating genetic effects of habitat fragmentation for conservation. The spatial distribution of genetic diversity in natural populations depends on the species' mode of reproduction, and coral species often have a mixed strategy of sexual and asexual reproduction. We describe the clonal architecture of a cold-water coral reef and the fine-scale population genetic structure (Asexual reproduction was found to be a highly important mode of reproduction for L. pertusa: 35 genetic individuals were found on the largest reef, with the largest clone covering an area of nearly 300 m2.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF SPATIOTEMPORAL VARIABILITY AND CONTAMINATION OF PLASTIC MARINE DEBRIS IN QATAR’S COASTAL WATERS

    OpenAIRE

    Abayomi, Oyebamiji Abib

    2015-01-01

    There has been a tremendous proliferation in plastic production in the last five decades due to its low cost and versatile applications. Plastic debris dominates the marine litter globally and has been found in the most pristine environment including the abysmal region of the ocean. Studies show that over 8 million tons of plastics are dumped in the ocean annually. Plastics are persistent in the environment and take several decades to degrade especially in the ocean. Large plastic debris can ...

  8. Robustness of plastic scintillation microspheres in the continuous measurement of different river waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarancón, A; Novella, O; Batlle, M; Pujadas, M; Cros, J; García, J F

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) represent one of the most promising options for monitoring alpha and beta radioactivity in river water. For that reason, a study of the stability of PSm packed into a cell against the continuous flow of river water with different degrees of turbidity was performed over a period of 100h. The results showed that the volume of the cell became stable after 15h of pumping and continued to be stable throughout the 100h of the experiment. During this period of time, the detection efficiency of the PSm, in terms of efficiency*volume, presented mean values of 0.75(3)% for (3)H and 272(11)% for (90)Sr/(90)Y. No dependence on flow time or river water type was observed. The background was also constant for 100h and for the different water types, although (222)Rn should be removed from the water beforehand to prevent its accumulation in the PSm. Since PSm did not present any degradation throughout the whole experiment, PSm can undoubtedly be used for monitoring radioactivity with low reagent consumption, low waste generation and low maintenance costs.

  9. The effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Espinoza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don.Area of study: Seedlings of 69 families of P. radiata belonging to five different sites in Central Chile, ranging from coastal range to fothills of the Andes, were grown in controlled conditions to evaluate differences in response to watering.Material and methods: The seedlings were subjected to two watering regimes: well-watered treatment, in which seedlings were watered daily, and water stress treatment in which seedlings were subjected to three cyclic water deficits by watering to container capacity on 12 days cycles each. After twenty-eight weeks root collar diameter, height, shoot dry weight (stem + needles, root dry weight, total dry weight, height/diameter ratio and root/shoot ratio were recorded. Patterns and amounts of phenotypic changes, including changes in biomass allocation, were analyzed.Main results: Families from coastal sites presented high divergence for phenotypic changes, allocating more biomass to shoots, and those families from interior sites presented low phenotypic plasticity, allocating more biomass to roots at the expense of shoots. These changes are interpreted as a plastic response and leads to the conclusion that the local landrace of P. radiata in Chile originating from contrasting environments possess distinct morphological responses to water deficit which in turn leads to phenotypic plasticity.Research highlights: Families belonging to sandy soil sites must be considered for tree breeding in dry areas, selecting those with high root: shoot ratio.Key words: early testing; environmental interaction; ontogeny; plasticity index; water stress.

  10. The effect of active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery on subsequent knee extension and flexion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Strejcová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recovery is an important aspect of every physical activity. Many athletes train hard without giving their body time to recover which can lead to overreaching, burnout or poor performance. Currently cold-water immersion recovery and active recovery have emerged as some of the most popular interventions enabling faster recovery. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of three kinds of recovery (active recovery, cold water immersion, passive recovery on medium-term knee strength in the extension and flexion. METHODS: Fourteen athletes at the age of 26.6 ± 4.4 years performed, in a random cross-over design, 3 sessions with 3 repeated medium-term isokinetic tests. The effect of active recovery, passive rest and cold water immersion were assessed by 3 × 3 (time × recovery repeated-measure ANOVA, respectively. The dependent variables were – peak torque, total work and average power. RESULTS: We found significantly lower absolute differences between the first and third trial in knee extension for peak torque after the active recovery (↑ 0.9 N × m than after the cold water immersion (↓ 14.6 N × m or the passive recovery (↓ 13.9 N × m. The decrease of the average power was significantly lower differences after the active recovery (↓ 5 W than after the cold water immersion (↓ 23.7 W or passive recovery (↓ 25.9 W. The changes in total work were not significant. We did not found any changes in the isokinetic strength for the knee flexors after different kinds of recovery. Maximal heart rate (HRmax was significantly higher during the active recovery than during the cold water immersion and the passive recovery (173 ± 14, 166 ± 14 and 167 ± 14 rpm. We have found significant differences in the average heart rates (HRavg during active recovery, cold water immersion and passive recovery (124 ± 8, 97 ± 9 and 107 ± 12 rpm. CONCLUSION: We found the positive effect of the active recovery on the subsequent medium-term performance for

  11. Cold-water coral ecosystems in the Penmarc’h and Guilvinec canyons (Bay of Biscay): deep-water versus shallow water settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mol, L.; van Rooij, D.; Pirlet, H.; Quemmerais, F.; Greinert, J.; Frank, N.; Henriet, J.

    2009-12-01

    In 1948, Le Danois reported for the first time the occurrence of “massifs coralliens” along the European Atlantic continental margin. Within the framework of the EC FP6 IP HERMES and ESF EuroDIVERSITY MiCROSYSTEMS projects, the R/V Belgica BiSCOSYSTEMS cruise was set out to rediscover these cold-water corals in the Penmarc’h and Guilvinec canyons along the Gascogne margin of the Bay of Biscay. During this cruise, an area of 560 km2 was studied using swath bathymetry (EM1002), high-resolution reflection seismic profiling, CTD casts, ROV observations and USBL-guided boxcoring. Based on the multibeam data and the ROV video images, two different cold-water coral reef settings were distinguished. In water depths ranging from 260 to 350 m, mini-mounds up to 10 m high, covered by dead cold-water coral rubble, were observed. In between these mounds, an alternation of rippled and unrippled seabed with a patchy distribution of dropstones was observed. The second setting features both living and dead cold-water corals (predominantly Madrepora oculata) in water depths of 700 to 950 m. At certain locations, they form dense coral fields with a size of about 10-60 m, characterized by mostly dead corals and a few living ones. In this area also hard substrate with cracks, ridges, cliffs and oyster banks was noticed. Both the shallow area with the mini mounds (SE flank of the Guilvinec canyon) and the living and dead corals in the deeper setting were sampled with boxcores. These boxcores were used to determine the different sedimentary facies and to identify coral species present on the site. For this purpose, grain size analysis, U/Th dating of coral fragments, C14 datings of foraminifera and phylogenetic/genomic studies on living species were established. The cold-water corals from the deeper area occur in a density envelope (sigma-theta) of 27.3 - 27.4 kg.m-3, falling within the range of values which are considered to be a prerequisite for the development, growth and

  12. Reproduction of the cold-water coral Primnoella chilensis (Philippi, 1894)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Ashley M.; Waller, Rhian G.; Försterra, Gunter

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the reproduction of a cold-water coral, Primnoella chilensis (Philippi, 1894) from the Comau and Reñihué fjords in Chilean Patagonia. Samples were collected in September and November of 2012 and April, June, and September of 2013 from three sites within the two fjords. The sexuality, reproductive mode, spermatocyst stage, oocyte size, and fecundity were determined using histological techniques. This species is gonochoristic with one aberrant hermaphrodite identified in this study. Reproduction was found to be seasonal, with the initiation of oogenesis in September and suggested a broadcast spawning event between June and September. The maximum oocyte size was 752.96 μm, suggesting a lecithotrophic larvae. The maximum fecundity was 36 oocytes per polyp. Male individuals were only found in April and June. In June, all four spermatocyst stages were present. This suggests that spermatogenesis requires less time than oogenesis in P. chilensis.

  13. Intermittent cold water swim stress increases immobility and interferes with escape performance in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Drugan, Robert C

    2005-11-30

    The behavioral consequences of intermittent, 5 s cold-water swims (15 degrees C) or confinement were assessed 24 h after stress in a 5 min forced swim test or an instrumental swim escape test (SET). The SET was conducted with temporal and instrumental parameters similar to the shock-motivated shuttle escape test. The tests detected significantly increased immobility in the forced swim test and increased latency to escape in the SET. These results extend previous findings with intermittent swim stress and provide evidence that intermittent swim stress produces behavioral deficits similar to other stress models. This new model may be a useful tool for exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying the stress response.

  14. Cardiorespiratory responses and reduced apneic time to cold-water face immersion after high intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Sylvia; Soultanakis, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Apnea after exercise may evoke a neurally mediated conflict that may affect apneic time and create a cardiovascular strain. The physiological responses, induced by apnea with face immersion in cold water (10 °C), after a 3-min exercise bout, at 85% of VO2max,were examined in 10 swimmers. A pre-selected 40-s apnea, completed after rest (AAR), could not be met after exercise (AAE), and was terminated with an agonal gasp reflex, and a reduction of apneic time, by 75%. Bradycardia was evident with immersion after both, 40-s of AAR and after AAE (Pexercise without apnea was not equally elevated. The activation of neurally opposing functions as those elicited by the diving reflex after high intensity exercise may create an autonomic conflict possibly related to oxygen-conserving reflexes stimulated by the trigeminal nerve, and those elicited by exercise.

  15. On the influence of cold-water coral mound size on flow hydrodynamics, and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Frédéric; Haren, Hans; Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerard; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Using a combination of in situ observations and idealistic 2-D nonhydrostatic numerical simulations, the relation between cold-water coral (CWC) mound size and hydrodynamics is explored for the Rockall Bank area in the North Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that currents generated by topographically trapped tidal waves in this area cause large isopycnal depressions resulting from an internal hydraulic control above CWC mounds. The oxygen concentration distribution is used as a tracer to visualize the flow behavior and the turbulent mixing above the mounds. By comparing two CWC mounds of different sizes and located close to each other, it is shown that the resulting mixing is highly dependent on the size of the mound. The effects of the hydraulic control for mixing, nutrient availability, and ecosystem functioning are also discussed.

  16. A survey on ectoparasite fauna of cold water fish farms in Mazandaran Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mehdizadeh Mood

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available the important areas of this industry in Iran. The present study was carried out to survey onectoparasite fauna of cold water fish farms in Mazandaran Province (Iran during a period of 12 months.For this aim 500 samples were obtained from 50 fish farms and after arriving to laboratory the parasiteexamination started immediately. From the total of 500 specimens, 182 fish (36.4% were infected withectoparasites. Through the parasitic examinations five species of parasites were detected, namely:Ichthyophthirius multifillis, Trichodina sp., Chilodonella sp., Gyrodactylus sp. and Dactylogyrus sp. Theresults showed that, from total percentage (36.4% of detection, 31.4% of detected parasites wereprotozoan (16.4% Ichthyophthirius multifillis, 14% Trichodina sp., and 1% Chilodonella sp. and 5% weremonogenean trematodes (3% Dactylogyrus sp. and 2% Gyrodactylus sp.. The highest prevalence ofparasites in our study belonged to the Ichthyophthirius multifiliis causative agent of White Spot Disease.

  17. Portable standoff Raman system for fast detection of homemade explosives through glass, plastic, and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Acosta, Tayro E.; Porter, John N.; Lucey, Paul G.; Bates, David E.

    2012-06-01

    The University of Hawaii has been developing portable remote Raman systems capable of detecting chemicals in daylight from a safe standoff distance. We present data on standoff detection of chemicals used in the synthesis of homemade explosives (HME) using a portable standoff Raman system utilizing an 8-inch telescope. Data show that good-quality Raman spectra of various hazardous chemicals such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, sulfur, nitrobenzene, benzene, acetone, various organic and inorganic chemicals etc. could be easily obtained from remote distances, tested up to 120 meters, with a single-pulse laser excitation and with detection time less than 1 μs. The system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser source (532 nm, 100 mJ/pulse, 15 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) capable of firing a single or double pulse. The double-pulse configuration also allows the system to perform standoff LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) at 50 m range. In the standoff Raman detection, the doublepulse sequence simply doubles the signal to noise ratio. Significant improvement in the quality of Raman spectra is observed when the standoff detection is made with 1s integration time. The system uses a 50-micron slit and has spectral resolution of 8 cm-1. The HME chemicals could be easily detected through clear and brown glass bottles, PP and HDPE plastic bottles, and also through fluorescent plastic water bottles. Standoff Raman detection of HME chemical from a 10 m distance through non-visible concealed bottles in plastic bubble wrap packaging is demonstrated with 1 s integration time. Possible applications of the standoff Raman system for homeland security and environmental monitoring are discussed.

  18. Mapping cold seeps with high-resolution deep water multibeam echosounders in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintersteller, P.; dos Santos Ferreira, C.; Klaucke, I.; Ivanov, M.; Sahling, H.; Bohrmann, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cold seeps are locations at the seafloor where gas and/or fluids are emitting. In contrast to mud volcanoes, which distinctly change the seafloor morphology, cold seeps often lack significant relief. However, in comparison with surrounding sediments seep locations on the sea floor are often characterized by high acoustic backscatter intensity. This was documented during several investigations with deep towed side-scan sonar (SSS) systems in recent years. Authigenic carbonates, free gas and gas hydrates, as evidenced by ground truthing, are responsible for the high backscatter values. Last year's upgrade of the 1°x2° KONGSBERG deep water echosounder EM120 to EM122 on RV Meteor enhanced the system to almost 4 times the previous resolution due to multi-ping and high density signal processing. Based on the physics of sound propagation in the water column, multibeam echosounders (MBES) for deep water use relatively low frequencies of about 12-15 kHz. Apparently highly water-saturated sediments are penetrated by these signals and can cause artificial offsets in bottom detection in comparison to high-frequency echosounders. Nevertheless the effect of the slightly penetrating signal has a useful side effect on the backscatter. Investigations on several seep sites in the Black Sea, carried out with both EM122 and EM710 during Meteror cruise M84-2, resulted in maps of remarkable bathymetric resolution but also showed multibeam backscatter information of a 12 kHz signal to be an excellent tool to map seep-influenced seafloor areas. New seep locations have been mapped in regions of the western Turkish continental margin close to Eregli and of the eastern Turkish margin off Samsun. In both areas high backscatter patches were mapped with nearly comparable resolution as achieved by deep-tow SSS systems. At Eregli the new data is compared with data from a deep-towed EdgeTech SSS system recorded with a frequency of 75 kHz. At Samsun the results are compared with data from a MAK-1

  19. Sedimentation patterns on a cold-water coral mound off Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Markus; Frank, Norbert; Wienberg, Claudia; Titschack, Jürgen; Mienis, Furu; Beuck, Lydia; Tisnerat-Laborde, Nadine; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2014-01-01

    An unconformity-bound glacial sequence (135 cm thick) of a coral-bearing sediment core collected from the flank of a cold-water coral mound in the Banda Mound Province off Mauritania was analysed. In order to study the relation between coral framework growth and its filling by hemipelagic sediments, U-series dates obtained from the cold-water coral species Lophelia pertusa were compared to 14C dates of planktonic foraminifera of the surrounding matrix sediments. The coral ages, ranging from 45.1 to 32.3 ka BP, exhibit no clear depositional trend, while on the other hand the 14C dates of the matrix sediment provide ages within a much narrower time window of <3000 yrs (34.6-31.8 cal ka BP), corresponding to the latest phase of the coral growth period. In addition, high-resolution computer tomography data revealed a subdivision of the investigated sediment package into three distinct parts, defined by the portion and fragmentation of corals and associated macrofauna as well as in the density of the matrix sediments. Grain size spectra obtained on the matrix sediments show a homogeneous pattern throughout the core sediment package, with minor variations. These features are interpreted as indicators of redeposition. Based on the observed structures and the dating results, the sediments were interpreted as deposits of a mass wasting event, namely a debris flow. During this event, the sediment unit must have been entirely mixed; resulting in averaging of the foraminifera ages from the whole unit and giving randomly distributed coral ages. In this context, for the first time mass wasting is proposed to be a substantial process of mound progradation by exporting material from the mound top to the flanks. Hence, it may not only be an erosional feature but also widening the base of the mound, thus allowing further vertical mound growth.

  20. Central and peripheral adjustments during high-intensity exercise following cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Coombes, Jeff S; Buchheit, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the acute effects of cold water immersion (CWI) or passive recovery (PAS) on physiological responses during high-intensity interval training (HIIT). In a crossover design, 14 cyclists completed 2 HIIT sessions (HIIT1 and HIIT2) separated by 30 min. Between HIIT sessions, they stood in cold water (10 °C) up to their umbilicus, or at room temperature (27 °C) for 5 min. The natural logarithm of square-root of mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals (ln rMSSD) was assessed pre- and post-HIIT1 and HIIT2. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (Q), O2 uptake (VO2), total muscle hemoglobin (t Hb) and oxygenation of the vastus lateralis were recorded (using near infrared spectroscopy); heart rate, Q, and VO2 on-kinetics (i.e., mean response time, MRT), muscle de-oxygenation rate, and anaerobic contribution to exercise were calculated for HIIT1 and HIIT2. ln rMSSD was likely higher [between-trial difference (90% confidence interval) [+13.2% (3.3; 24.0)] after CWI compared with PAS. CWI also likely increased SV [+5.9% (-0.1; 12.1)], possibly increased Q [+4.4% (-1.0; 10.3)], possibly slowed Q MRT [+18.3% (-4.1; 46.0)], very likely slowed VO2 MRT [+16.5% (5.8; 28.4)], and likely increased the anaerobic contribution to exercise [+9.7% (-1.7; 22.5)]. CWI between HIIT slowed VO2 on-kinetics, leading to increased anaerobic contribution during HIIT2. This detrimental effect of CWI was likely related to peripheral adjustments, because the slowing of VO2 on-kinetics was twofold greater than that of central delivery of O2 (i.e., Q). CWI has detrimental effects on high-intensity aerobic exercise performance that persist for ≥ 45 min.

  1. Cold-water coral distributions in the Drake Passage area from towed camera observations - Initial interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rhian G.; Catanach, Kathryn Scanlon; Robinson, Laura F.

    2011-01-01

    Seamounts are unique deep-sea features that create habitats thought to have high levels of endemic fauna, productive fisheries and benthic communities vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts. Many seamounts are isolated features, occurring in the high seas, where access is limited and thus biological data scarce. There are numerous seamounts within the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean), yet high winds, frequent storms and strong currents make seafloor sampling particularly difficult. As a result, few attempts to collect biological data have been made, leading to a paucity of information on benthic habitats or fauna in this area, particularly those on primarily hard-bottom seamounts and ridges. During a research cruise in 2008 six locations were examined (two on the Antarctic margin, one on the Shackleton Fracture Zone, and three on seamounts within the Drake Passage), using a towed camera with onboard instruments to measure conductivity, temperature, depth and turbidity. Dominant fauna and bottom type were categorized from 200 randomized photos from each location. Cold-water corals were present in high numbers in habitats both on the Antarctic margin and on the current swept seamounts of the Drake Passage, though the diversity of orders varied. Though the Scleractinia (hard corals) were abundant on the sedimented margin, they were poorly represented in the primarily hard-bottom areas of the central Drake Passage. The two seamount sites and the Shackleton Fracture Zone showed high numbers of stylasterid (lace) and alcyonacean (soft) corals, as well as large numbers of sponges. Though data are preliminary, the geological and environmental variability (particularly in temperature) between sample sites may be influencing cold-water coral biogeography in this region. Each area observed also showed little similarity in faunal diversity with other sites examined for this study within all phyla counted. This manuscript highlights how little is understood of these isolated

  2. Hydrodynamic controls on cold-water coral growth in the Gulf of Mexico: Long term in situ seabed lander observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerard; Davies, Andrew J.; van Weering, Tjeerd C. E.; Ross, Steve W.; Roberts, Murray; Seim, Harvey E.; Bane, John M.

    2010-05-01

    Cold-water coral reefs and mounds are a common feature on the continental slopes of the North East Atlantic Ocean. On the European continental margin mound structures that are many kilometers long and wide have been discovered, often colonized by a thriving coral community. Similar structures have been found in the West Atlantic on the continental slope between 300-800 m water depth, along the slope from North Carolina to Florida. Presently detailed studies on the environmental constraints in cold-water coral areas are limited to cold-water coral areas in the North East Atlantic. This is the first study showing long term environmental variability in a cold-water coral habitat in the Gulf of Mexico, West Atlantic and the data highlight novel observations of short term environmental variability in a cold-water coral habitat. In the Gulf of Mexico Lophelia pertusa occurrences are scattered and form less dense communities than those situated on the Atlantic margins. The Viosca Knoll (VK826) area is the most extensive cold-water coral area presently known in the Gulf of Mexico, with Lophelia pertusa being the most common coral species. Broadly two characteristic coral habitats can be described on Viosca Knoll. Firstly, a dense coral cover that resembles a biogenic reef and secondly authigenic carbonate blocks with sparse coral coverage. Two benthic landers were deployed for over a year in the vicinity of the corals to measure the local environmental conditions. Both landers measured the current velocity and direction, temperature, salinity, fluorescence, optical backscatter and were equipped with a sediment trap. Furthermore CTD transects were made across the cold-water coral area. Transects showed no fluorescence signal below 150 m water depth and an oxygen minimum zone at the depth of the corals. A prominent intermediate nepheloid layer was present at 300-400 m water depth. Long term deployments of benthic landers of a period over 12 months revealed intra annual

  3. Selection of potential cold water marine species for testing of oil dispersants, and chemically dispersed oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R.A. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A study regarding marine species for toxicity testing for Alaska conditions was presented and the potential adverse impacts of a large marine oil spill in cold water were discussed with the objective to determine if the spill should be treated by the use of oil dispersants. Without dispersion, the oil can pollute marine epifauna and can deposit on beaches. The decision to apply dispersants to a marine oil spill requires knowledge of the toxicity of the undispersed oil to pelagic marine life occurring via natural dispersion as opposed to the toxicity of the oil-dispersant mixture. Most standard toxicity tests apply to warm water species. This paper discussed the need to have a standard test species relevant to Alaska waters for toxicity testing. In this study, toxicity testing was done according to the methods of the Chemical Response to Oil Spills : Ecological Effects Research Forum (CROSERF). The testing included capturing adult species in the winter and holding them until larval hatching. Toxicity testing was completed in a narrow time frame before hatching ceased. Many chemical samples were tested. Topsmelt, urchins, shellfish, mysids, copepods, pink salmon fry, and tidepool sculpin were considered by the author to be the most useful for certain types of toxicity testing. 29 refs.

  4. Pathological and electron microscopic studies on cold water disease among cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss Walbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Mesalhy Aly

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of cold water disease among cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss Walbaum reared at low water temperature on a private farm, and propose preventive and control measures to prevent the recurrence of the disease and its spread to the neighboring farms or to other countries. The disease is caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum and is characterized clinically by high mortality rates (25% with necrotizing skin and fin lesions. Septicemia with muscular and gill involvement is observed in severely affected cases. The histopathological and ultrastructure alterations in the infected trout explain the pathogencity of this microorganism in many organs other than skin and fins either directly by these bacteria or by its extracellular products, or indirectly via the hypoxia and ion imbalance that results from skin and gill damage. Although some antibiotics, such as trimethoprime, chloramin T and oxytetracycline, are effective on the causative agent, improvement in water quality, vaccination, increasing fish resistance and strict hygiene as well as quarantine measures would all help.

  5. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Vander Schaaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes.

  6. Effectiveness of the Space Shuttle anti-exposure system in a cold water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagian, James P.; Kaufman, Jonathan W.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the NASA Space Shuttle launch entry suit (LES) and raft for 24 h of protection against cold water immersion. Two configurations, the LES and the LES with raft (LES/r) were evaluated for antiexposure protection. Conditions were selected to simulate worst-case water and air temperatures along projected Space Shuttle ground tracks; i.e., water temperatures = 4.4 C, air temperature = 5.6 C, 1-foot waves (chop), and constant spray. Four males 31-44 years of age and one 32-year-old female were studied once in each configuration. Trials with and without a raft were scheduled for up to 24 and 6 h, respectively. Mean LES trial durations were 150 + or - 9 min and final rectal temperature (FRT) = 36.5 + or - 0.3 C. Mean LES/r trial durations were 398 + or - 126 min and FRT = 35.6 + or - 0.4 C. LES and LES/r trials were terminated for reaching FRT = 35.0 C or subject-requested termination due to discomfort. The longest LES and LES/r trials were terminated due to subject discomfort. Although not achieving the desired durations, the LES and LES/r did prove capable of protecting individuals, respectively, for up to 3 and 13.5 h. Since the longest runs were terminated due to subjective tolerance, actual survival times greater than 3 and 13.5 h could be expected.

  7. Preparation of water-resistant antifog hard coatings on plastic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Feng-Hsi; Chang, Hsu-Hsien; Don, Trong-Ming; Chen, Ching-Chung; Cheng, Liao-Ping

    2012-12-11

    A novel water resistant antifog (AF) coating for plastic substrates was developed, which has a special hydrophilic/hydrophobic bilayer structure. The bottom layer, acting both as a mechanical support and a hydrophobic barrier against water penetration, is an organic-inorganic composite comprising colloidal silica embedded in a cross-linked network of dipentaethritol hexaacrylate (DPHA). Atop this layer, an AF coating is applied, which incorporates a superhydrophilic species synthesized from Tween-20 (surfactant), isophorone diisocyanate (coupling agent), and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (monomer). Various methods, e.g., FTIR, SEM, AFM, contact angle, and steam test, were employed to characterize the prepared AF coatings. The results indicated that the size and the continuity of the hydrophilic domains on the top surface increased with increasing added amount of T20, however, at the expense of hardness, adhesiveness, and water resistivity. The optimal T20 content was found to be 10 wt %, at which capacity the resultant AF coating was transparent and wearable (5H, hardness) and could be soaked in water for 7 days at 25 °C without downgrading of its AF capability.

  8. Water plasticization of extruded material made from meat and bone meal and sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rafael A; Onwulata, Charles I; Ashby, Richard D

    2004-06-16

    Meat and bone meal (MBM) is a high protein agricultural commodity that currently has few applications other than as an animal feed. Unmodified MBM has poor functional properties, due to its low solubility. Our results from pilot plant trials demonstrate that MBM can be extrusion-processed along with sodium caseinate to produce a useful plastic material. We developed this material for use as a dog chew toy. For this application, elastic modulus (stiffness) is a key characteristic. Our results detail the relationship between ambient relative humidity and equilibrium moisture content (MC) in the material. The influence of MC on the glass transition temperature and elastic modulus reflects the plasticization of this material by water. On the basis of a comparison to a commercially available dog chew, the range of stiffness achievable with our material, 0.25-2.50 GPa, encompasses the values appropriate for a dog chew. Our results show that a particular desired stiffness can be maintained by applying an edible moisture barrier to the surface of the material.

  9. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part II. Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine men were subjected to four temperature exposures: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. Exposures were repeated and ended with a 30-minute recovery. Heart rates were recorded continuously and blood pressures were determined six times during each experiment. Rate pressure products and indications of cardiac stroke work were calculated from the data. The results demonstrated decreased total peripheral resistance (TPR) to the blood flow in response to the heat of the sauna (C), with concurrent increase in cardiac oxygen demand and negligible increase in the stroke work. Cold exposures (D) increased the TPR. Cold did not increase the cardiac oxygen demand but increased the stroke work. The alternation of heat and cold (A) or cool (B) presented the most intensive strain on the heart.

  10. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  11. Study on the Influence of the Cold-End Cooling Water Thickness on the Generative Performance of TEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Guo, Xuexun; Tan, Gangfeng; Ji, Kangping; Xiao, Longjie

    2016-11-01

    At present, about 40% of the fuel energy is discharged into air with the exhaust gas when an automobile is working, which is a big waste of energy. A thermoelectric generator (TEG) has the ability to harvest the waste heat energy in the exhaust gas. The traditional TEG cold-end is cooled by the engine cooling system, and although its structure is compact, the TEG weight and the space occupied are important factors restricting its application. In this paper, under the premise of ensuring the TEG maximum net output power and reducing the TEG water consumption as much as possible, the optimization of the TEG water thickness in the normal direction of the cold-end surface (WTNCS) is studied, which results in lighter weight, less space occupied and better automobile fuel economy. First, the thermal characteristics of the target diesel vehicle exhaust gas are evaluated based on the experimental data. Then, according to the thermoelectric generation model and the cold-end heat transfer model, the effect of the WTNCS on the cold-end temperature control stability and the system flow resistance are studied. The results show that the WTNCS influences the TEG cold-end temperature. When the engine works in a stable condition, the cold-end temperature decreases with the decrease of the WTNCS. The optimal value of the WTNCS is 0.02 m and the TEG water consumption is 8.8 L. Comparin it with the traditional vehicle exhaust TEG structure, the power generation increased slightly, but the water consumption decreased by about 39.5%, which can save fuel at0.18 L/h when the vehicle works at the speed of 60 km/h.

  12. Cold-water immersion and other forms of cryotherapy: physiological changes potentially affecting recovery from high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gillian E; Wells, Greg D

    2013-09-01

    High-intensity exercise is associated with mechanical and/or metabolic stresses that lead to reduced performance capacity of skeletal muscle, soreness and inflammation. Cold-water immersion and other forms of cryotherapy are commonly used following a high-intensity bout of exercise to speed recovery. Cryotherapy in its various forms has been used in this capacity for a number of years; however, the mechanisms underlying its recovery effects post-exercise remain elusive. The fundamental change induced by cold therapy is a reduction in tissue temperature, which subsequently exerts local effects on blood flow, cell swelling and metabolism and neural conductance velocity. Systemically, cold therapy causes core temperature reduction and cardiovascular and endocrine changes. A major hindrance to defining guidelines for best practice for the use of the various forms of cryotherapy is an incongruity between mechanistic studies investigating these physiological changes induced by cold and applied studies investigating the functional effects of cold for recovery from high-intensity exercise. When possible, studies investigating the functional recovery effects of cold therapy for recovery from exercise should concomitantly measure intramuscular temperature and relevant temperature-dependent physiological changes induced by this type of recovery strategy. This review will discuss the acute physiological changes induced by various cryotherapy modalities that may affect recovery in the hours to days (<5 days) that follow high-intensity exercise.

  13. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  14. End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Maier

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification caused by anthropogenic uptake of CO₂ is perceived to be a major threat to calcifying organisms. Cold-water corals were thought to be strongly affected by a decrease in ocean pH due to their abundance in deep and cold waters which, in contrast to tropical coral reef waters, will soon become corrosive to calcium carbonate. Calcification rates of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, were measured under variable partial pressure of CO₂ (pCO₂ that ranged between 380 µatm for present-day conditions and 930 µatm for the end of the century. The present study addressed both short- and long-term responses by repeatedly determining calcification rates on the same specimens over a period of 9 months. Besides studying the direct, short-term response to elevated pCO₂ levels, the study aimed to elucidate the potential for acclimation of calcification of cold-water corals to ocean acidification. Net calcification of both species was unaffected by the levels of pCO₂ investigated and revealed no short-term shock and, therefore, no long-term acclimation in calcification to changes in the carbonate chemistry. There was an effect of time during repeated experiments with increasing net calcification rates for both species, however, as this pattern was found in all treatments, there is no indication that acclimation of calcification to ocean acidification occurred. The use of controls (initial and ambient net calcification rates indicated that this increase was not caused by acclimation in calcification response to higher pCO₂. An extrapolation of these data suggests that calcification of these two cold-water corals will not be affected by the pCO₂ level projected at the end of the century.

  15. End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Cornelia; Schubert, Alexander; Berzunza Sànchez, Maria M; Weinbauer, Markus G; Watremez, Pierre; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification caused by anthropogenic uptake of CO₂ is perceived to be a major threat to calcifying organisms. Cold-water corals were thought to be strongly affected by a decrease in ocean pH due to their abundance in deep and cold waters which, in contrast to tropical coral reef waters, will soon become corrosive to calcium carbonate. Calcification rates of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, were measured under variable partial pressure of CO₂ (pCO₂) that ranged between 380 µatm for present-day conditions and 930 µatm for the end of the century. The present study addressed both short- and long-term responses by repeatedly determining calcification rates on the same specimens over a period of 9 months. Besides studying the direct, short-term response to elevated pCO₂ levels, the study aimed to elucidate the potential for acclimation of calcification of cold-water corals to ocean acidification. Net calcification of both species was unaffected by the levels of pCO₂ investigated and revealed no short-term shock and, therefore, no long-term acclimation in calcification to changes in the carbonate chemistry. There was an effect of time during repeated experiments with increasing net calcification rates for both species, however, as this pattern was found in all treatments, there is no indication that acclimation of calcification to ocean acidification occurred. The use of controls (initial and ambient net calcification rates) indicated that this increase was not caused by acclimation in calcification response to higher pCO₂. An extrapolation of these data suggests that calcification of these two cold-water corals will not be affected by the pCO₂ level projected at the end of the century.

  16. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  17. The sum is more than its parts: Key species in the functioning of cold-water coral reef communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Cold-water coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity and biogeochemistry in the deep-sea, solely fuelled by external energy sources. Hence, food input, processing and recycling play a major role in the functioning of these ecosystems. In this thesis we aimed to study energy flow and metabolism of col

  18. Experimental validation of a local dehumidification system based on cold water droplets and air-to-air heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Hammink, H.A.J.; Hendriksen, L.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive humidity is a problem in Dutch growing circumstances. A traditional solution is heating and natural ventilation. To save energy a number of energy efficient dehumidification methods are developed, like mechanical ventilation with dry outside air or a curtain of cold water droplets. In this

  19. A Comparison of Ice Cold Water Pretreatment and α-Bromonaphthalene Cytogenetic Method for Identification of Papaver Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Rezaei Osalou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plants belonging to many species in genus Papaver are very similar and have very small chromosomes that make identification very difficult. The study aimed to compare the effects of α-bromonaphtalene and ice cold water pretreatment to identify chromosomes of Papaver species collected from different areas of Iranian West Azerbaijan and Turkish Van, Agri and, Hakkari provinces. The seeds were germinated in Jacobson trays at 24°C under continuous light. Thereafter, roots from 1.5 cm long plantlets were pretreated with α bromonaphtalene for 15, 30, and 45 min or at 0°C in ice cold water for 24 h before fixing, hydrolyzation, and feulgen staining. The ice cold water pretreatment was more appropriate and easy to determine chromosomes. Seeds from seven samples did not germinate. Sixty samples out of the rest of 62 samples were identified as P. pseudo orientale, one sample was identified as P. bracteatum, and another as P. orientale. This is the first study that used ice cold water to determine the chromosomes in papaver species. It is hoped that it will also facilitate to determine chromosome number and identify other papver species.

  20. Ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure facilitate deep dives and cold water foraging in adult leatherback sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John; Fraher, John; Fitzgerald, Ed; McLaughlin, Patrick; Doyle, Tom; Harman, Luke; Cuffe, Tracy; Dockery, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Adult leatherbacks are large animals (300-500 kg), overlapping in size with marine pinniped and cetacean species. Unlike marine mammals, they start their aquatic life as 40-50 g hatchlings, so undergo a 10,000-fold increase in body mass during independent existence. Hatchlings are limited to the tropics and near-surface water. Adults, obligate predators on gelatinous plankton, encounter cold water at depth (<1280 m) or high latitude and are gigantotherms that maintain elevated core body temperatures in cold water. This study shows that there are great ontogenetic changes in tracheal structure related to diving and exposure to cold. Hatchling leatherbacks have a conventional reptilian tracheal structure with circular cartilaginous rings interspersed with extensive connective tissue. The adult trachea is an almost continuous ellipsoidal cartilaginous tube composed of interlocking plates, and will collapse easily in the upper part of the water column during dives, thus avoiding pressure-related structural and physiological problems. It is lined with an extensive, dense erectile vascular plexus that will warm and humidify cold inspired air and possibly retain heat on expiration. A sub-luminal lymphatic plexus is also present. Mammals and birds have independently evolved nasal turbinates to fulfil such a respiratory thermocontrol function; for them, turbinates are regarded as diagnostic of endothermy. This is the first demonstration of a turbinate equivalent in a living reptile.

  1. Yield Traits and Water and Nitrogen Use Efficiencies of Bell Pepper Grown in Plastic-Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Rivelli

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a two-year study assessing the effects of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation regimes on yield traits and on water and nitrogen use efficiency of greenhouse-grown bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.. The trials involved the combination of four N doses (0, 100, 200, 300 kg ha-1 with two irrigation regimes (100% restitution of ETc; repeated cycles of water stress starting from fruit set. In the second year, the crop was transplanted one month earlier than in the first year and was mulched with plastic sheeting. The highest yield in both years was obtained by associating 100% restitution of ETc and the N dose of 200 kg ha-1. The marketable yields were 37 and 72 t ha-1 in 1998 and 1999, respectively. Doubling of the yield in the second year was probably due to the earlier transplantation and mulching, confirming the numerous benefits of the latter technique. The water deficit imposed during the late flowering-early fruit set phase had negative effects on the crop, with declines of the marketable yield of up to 44% due to the reduced number and weight of the fruit and the increased waste, mainly peppers with blossom-end rot, cracking, sun-burn and malformations. The peppers grown under water stress were richer in dry matter and soluble solids. The yield declines due to water deficit varied in relation to the N dose, as confirmed by the numerous interactions recorded between irrigation regime and nitrogen level.Without nitrogen fertilization, the quantity and quality of the fruits remained unchanged, while the maximum dose (300 kg ha-1 enhanced the negative effects of the water deficit on the number (-52% and weight (-161% of marketable peppers. Moreover, the waste peppers reached 31% of the total production (by weight, with over 21% affected by blossom-end rot. Water stress led to a drastic reduction of the total above-ground dry biomass (40% and a significant decrease of nitrogen absorption by the plant (54% with preferential

  2. Effects of No-tillage Combined with Reused Plastic Film Mulching on Maize Yield and Irrigation Water Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SU Yong-zhong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of reused plastic film mulching and no-tillage on maize yield and irriga-tion water productivity(IWP in the marginal oasis in the middle of Hexi Corridor region of northwestern China. The aim is to provide an alternative tillage and cultivation pattern for reducing plastic film pollution, saving cost and increasing income, and improving resource use efficiency. The field experiment was carried out in three soils with different textures and fertility levels. Three treatments for each soil were set up:(1 conventional tillage,winter irrigation, and new plastic mulching cultivation(NM;(2 no tillage, less winter irrigation and reused plastic mulching cultivation (RM;(3 no tillage, less winter irrigation and reused plastic mulching combined with straw mulching (RMS. The results showed that the average daily soil temperature in the two reused plastic mulching treatment(RM and RMS during maize sowing and elongation stage was lower 0.6~1.0℃(5 cm depth and 0.5~0.8℃(15 cm depth than that in the NM. This result suggested that no tillage and reused plastic mulching cultivation still had the effect of increasing soil temperature. Maize grain yield in the RM was reduced by 4.4%~10.6% compared with the conventional cultivation(NM, while the net income increased due to saving in plastic film and tillage ex-penses. There was no significant difference in maize grain yield between the RMS and NM treatment, but the net income in the RMS was in-creased by 12.5%~17.1% than that in the NM. Compared with the NM, the two reused plastic film mulching treatments (RM and RMS decreased the volume of winter irrigation, but maize IWP increased. Soil texture and fertility level affected significantly maize nitrogen uptake and IWP. In the arid oases with the shortage of water resources, cultivation practices of conservation tillage with recycle of plastic film is an ideal option for saving cost and increasing income

  3. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated cycling performance and limb blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, J; O'Hagan, C; Stefanovic, B; Walker, M; Gill, N; Askew, C D

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) and active recovery (ACT) on resting limb blood flow, rectal temperature and repeated cycling performance in the heat. Ten subjects completed two testing sessions separated by 1 week; each trial consisted of an initial all-out 35-min exercise bout, one of two 15-min recovery interventions (randomised: CWI or ACT), followed by a 40-min passive recovery period before repeating the 35-min exercise bout. Performance was measured as the change in total work completed during the exercise bouts. Resting limb blood flow, heart rate, rectal temperature and blood lactate were recorded throughout the testing sessions. There was a significant decline in performance after ACT (mean (SD) -1.81% (1.05%)) compared with CWI where performance remained unchanged (0.10% (0.71%)). Rectal temperature was reduced after CWI (36.8°C (1.0°C)) compared with ACT (38.3°C (0.4°C)), as was blood flow to the arms (CWI 3.64 (1.47) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 16.85 (3.57) ml/100 ml/min) and legs (CW 4.83 (2.49) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 4.83 (2.49) ml/100 ml/min). Leg blood flow at the end of the second exercise bout was not different between the active (15.25 (4.33) ml/100 ml/min) and cold trials (14.99 (4.96) ml/100 ml/min), whereas rectal temperature (CWI 38.1°C (0.3°C); ACT 38.8°C (0.2°C)) and arm blood flow (CWI 20.55 (3.78) ml/100 ml/min; ACT 23.83 (5.32) ml/100 ml/min) remained depressed until the end of the cold trial. These findings indicate that CWI is an effective intervention for maintaining repeat cycling performance in the heat and this performance benefit is associated with alterations in core temperature and limb blood flow.

  4. The influence of near-bed hydrodynamic conditions on cold-water corals in the Viosca Knoll area, Gulf of Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Davies, A.J.; Ross, S.W.; Seim, H.; Bane, J.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Near-bed hydrodynamic conditions were recorded for almost one year in the Viosca Knoll area (lease block 826), one of the most well-developed cold-water coral habitats in the Gulf of Mexico. Here, a reef-like cold-water coral ecosystem, dominated by the coral Lophelia pertusa, resembles coral habita

  5. Mammal-like muscles power swimming in a cold-water shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Diego; Donley, Jeanine M; Shadwick, Robert E; Syme, Douglas A

    2005-10-27

    Effects of temperature on muscle contraction and powering movement are profound, outwardly obvious, and of great consequence to survival. To cope with the effects of environmental temperature fluctuations, endothermic birds and mammals maintain a relatively warm and constant body temperature, whereas most fishes and other vertebrates are ectothermic and conform to their thermal niche, compromising performance at colder temperatures. However, within the fishes the tunas and lamnid sharks deviate from the ectothermic strategy, maintaining elevated core body temperatures that presumably confer physiological advantages for their roles as fast and continuously swimming pelagic predators. Here we show that the salmon shark, a lamnid inhabiting cold, north Pacific waters, has become so specialized for endothermy that its red, aerobic, locomotor muscles, which power continuous swimming, seem mammal-like, functioning only within a markedly elevated temperature range (20-30 degrees C). These muscles are ineffectual if exposed to the cool water temperatures, and when warmed even 10 degrees C above ambient they still produce only 25-50% of the power produced at 26 degrees C. In contrast, the white muscles, powering burst swimming, do not show such a marked thermal dependence and work well across a wide range of temperatures.

  6. The cold-water connection: Bergmann's rule in North American freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rypel, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding general rules governing macroecological body size variations is one of the oldest pursuits in ecology. However, this science has been dominated by studies of terrestrial vertebrates, spurring debate over the validity of such rules in other taxonomic groups. Here, relationships between maximum body size and latitude, temperature, and elevation were evaluated for 29 North American freshwater fish species. Bergmann's rule (i.e., that body size correlates positively with latitude and negatively with temperature) was observed in 38% of species, converse Bergmann's rule (that body size correlates negatively with latitude and positively with temperature) was observed in 34% of species, and 28% of species showed no macroecological body size relationships. Most notably, every species that expressed Bergmann's rule was a cool- or cold-water species while every species that expressed converse Bergmann's rule was a warm-water species, highlighting how these patterns are likely connected to species thermal niches. This study contradicts previous research suggesting Bergmann's rule does not apply to freshwater fishes, and is congruent with an emerging paradigm of variable macroecological body size patterns in poikilotherms.

  7. Resistance of Two Mediterranean Cold-Water Coral Species to Low-pH Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juancho Movilla

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep-water ecosystems are characterized by relatively low carbonate concentration values and, due to ocean acidification (OA, these habitats might be among the first to be exposed to undersaturated conditions in the forthcoming years. However, until now, very few studies have been conducted to test how cold-water coral (CWC species react to such changes in the seawater chemistry. The present work aims to investigate the mid-term effect of decreased pH on calcification of the two branching CWC species most widely distributed in the Mediterranean, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. No significant effects were observed in the skeletal growth rate, microdensity and porosity of both species after 6 months of exposure. However, while the calcification rate of M. oculata was similar for all colony fragments, a heterogeneous skeletal growth pattern was observed in L. pertusa, the younger nubbins showing higher growth rates than the older ones. A higher energy demand is expected in these young, fast-growing fragments and, therefore, a reduction in calcification might be noticed earlier during long-term exposure to acidified conditions.

  8. Effect of injecting cold water on oil-output of the beds of the Uzen' field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, Yu.P.; Kil' dibekova, L.I.; Rozenberg, M.D.; Safronov, S.V.; Teslyuk, Ye.V.

    1979-01-01

    At the Uzen' field, 254 million m/sup 3/ of cold water were injected into the oil area with average temperature 15-16/sup 0/C. This resulted in cooling of the rock-collectors on the order of 538.4 million m/sup 3/ and decrease in oil output by 9.4% as compared to injection of only hot water.

  9. The effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, S. E.; Magni, C. R.; Martinez, V. A.; Ivkovic, M.

    2013-05-01

    Aim of study: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of water availability on plastic responses and biomass allocation in early growth traits of Pinus radiata D. Don. Area of study: Seedlings of 69 families of P. radiata belonging to five different sites in Central Chile, ranging from coastal range to fothills of the Andes, were grown in controlled conditions to evaluate differences in response to watering. Material and methods: The seedlings were subjected to two watering regimes: well-watered treatment, in which seedlings were watered daily, and water stress treatment in which seedlings were subjected to three cyclic water deficits by watering to container capacity on 12 days cycles each. After twenty-eight weeks root collar diameter, height, shoot dry weight (stem + needles), root dry weight, total dry weight, height/diameter ratio and root/shoot ratio were recorded. Patterns and amounts of phenotypic changes, including changes in biomass allocation, were analyzed. Main results: Families from coastal sites presented high divergence for phenotypic changes, allocating more biomass to shoots, and those families from interior sites presented low phenotypic plasticity, allocating more biomass to roots at the expense of shoots. These changes are interpreted as a plastic response and leads to the conclusion that the local land race of P. radiata in Chile originating from contrasting environments possess distinct morphological responses to water deficit which in turn leads to phenotypic plasticity. Research highlights: Families belonging to sandy soil sites must be considered for tree breeding in dry areas, selecting those with high root: shoot ratio. (Author) 46 refs.

  10. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and water from the reaction of cold hydrogen atoms with solid oxygen at 10K

    CERN Document Server

    Miyauchi, N; Chigai, T; Nagaoka, A; Watanabe, N; Kouchi, A

    2008-01-01

    The reactions of cold H atoms with solid O2 molecules were investigated at 10 K. The formation of H2O2 and H2O has been confirmed by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. We found that the reaction proceeds very efficiently and obtained the effective reaction rates. This is the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of water molecules under conditions mimicking those found in cold interstellar molecular clouds. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the reaction mechanism and astrophysical implications.

  11. Capability of 19-L polycarbonate plastic water cooler containers for efficient solar water disinfection (SODIS): Field case studies in India, Bahrain and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Chandana

    2015-01-01

    The small treated volume (typically ~2 L) associated with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles that are most frequently used in solar water disinfection (SODIS), is a major obstacle to uptake of this water treatment technology in resource-poor environments. In order to address this problem we have conducted a series of experiments in Spain, Bahrain and India, to assess the efficacy of large volume (19 L) transparent plastic (polycarbonate) water cooler/dispenser containers (WDCs)...

  12. Capability of 19-litre polycarbonate plastic water cooler containers for efficient solar water disinfection (SODIS): field case studies in India, Bahrain and Spain.

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Michael B; Castro-Alférez, M; Polo-López, M I; Calderero, I Fernández; Al-Eryani, Y A; Joseph-Titus, C; Sawant, B; R Dhodapkar; Mathur, C; McGuigan, Kevin G; Fernández-Ibáñez, P.

    2015-01-01

    The small treated volume (typically ~2 litres) associated with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles that are most frequently used in solar water disinfection (SODIS), is a major obstacle to uptake of this water treatment technology in the developing world. In order to address this problem we have conducted a series of experiments in Spain, Bahrain and India, to assess the efficacy of large volume (19 litres) transparent plastic (polycarbonate) water cooler/dispenser containers (WDCs) as S...

  13. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part III. Body temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine active winter swimmer men were subjected to four exposures each imitating a form of hot or cold exposures or their combination practiced among the Finns: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. All exposures were repeated and ended with recovery at room temperature. Body core and surface temperatures were recorded. One surface probe was placed between the scapulae to detect any signs of thermogenic activity by brown adipose tissue upon cold exposures. In the sauna control of core temperature was lost at esophageal temperature Tes 38 degrees C where the mean skin temperature exceeded the Tes. The brief ice water immersions did not disturb the thermal balance of the body core. The interscapular surface temperature recording provided circumstantial evidence of functioning thermogenic tissue in the area.

  14. Effect of pullulan on the water distribution, microstructure and textural properties of rice starch gels during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Tian, Yaoqi; Tong, Qunyi; Zhang, Zipei; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-01-01

    The effects of pullulan on the water distribution, microstructure and textural properties of rice starch gels during cold storage were investigated by low field-nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and texture profile analysis (TPA). The addition of pullulan reduced the transversal relaxation time of rice starch gels during cold storage. The microstructure of rice starch gel with 0.5% pullulan was denser and more uniform compared with that of rice starch without pullulan in each period of storage time. With regard to textural properties, 0.01% pullulan addition did not significantly change the texture of rice starch gels, while 0.5% pullulan addition appeared to reduce the hardness and retain the springiness of rice starch gels (P⩽0.05). The restriction effects of pullulan on water mobility and starch retrogradation were hypothesized to be mainly responsible for the water retention, gel structure maintenance, and modification of the textural attributes of rice starch gels.

  15. Intensity of Cold Water and its effects on marine culturing farms along the southeast coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hwa; Shim, JeongHee; Choi, Yang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Woo; Shim, Jeong-Min

    2017-04-01

    To understand the characteristics and strength of the cold water that has caused damage to marine-culturing farms around Guryongpo, in the southeast coast of Korea, surface and water column temperatures were collected from temperature loggers deployed at a sea squirt farm during August-November 2007 and from a Real-time Information System for aquaculture environments operated by NIFS during July-August 2015 and 2016. During the study period, surface temperature at Guryongpo decreased sharply when south/southwestern winds prevailed (the 18-26th of August and 20-22nd of September 2007 and the 13-15th of July 2015) as a result of upwelling. However, the deep-water (20-30m) temperature increased during periods of strong north/northeasterly winds (the 5-7th and 16-18th of September 2007) as a result of downwelling. Among the cold water events that occurred at Guryongpo, the mass death of cultured fish followed strong cold water events (surface temperatures below 10℃) that were caused by more than two days of successive south/southeastern winds with maximum speeds higher than 5 m/s. A Cold Water Index (CWI) was defined and calculated using maximum wind speed and direction as measured daily at Pohang Meteorological Observatory. When the average CWI over two days (CWI2d) was higher than 100, mass fish mortality occurred. The four-day average CWI (CWI4d) showed a high negative correlation with surface temperature from July-August in the Guryongpo area (R2 = 0.5), suggesting that CWI is a good index for predicting strong cold water events and massive mortality. In October 2007, the sea temperature at a depth of 30 m showed a high fluctuation that ranged from 7-23℃, with frequency and spectrum coinciding with tidal levels at Ulsan, affected by the North Korean Cold Current. If temperature variations at the depth of fish cages also regularly fluctuate within this range, damage may be caused to the fish industry along the southeast coast of Korea.

  16. Structural and thermal transitions during the conversion from native to granular cold-water swelling maize starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dries, D M; Gomand, S V; Goderis, B; Delcour, J A

    2014-12-19

    Native maize starch was gradually converted into granular cold-water swelling starch (GCWSS) by aqueous ethanol treatments at elevated temperatures. At a treatment temperature of 95°C, decreasing ethanol concentrations from 68 to 48% (v/v) led to decreased post-treatment gelatinization enthalpies in excess water, reflecting remaining original A-type crystals. Concomitantly to native A-type crystal melting, VH-type crystals appeared. At an ethanol concentration of 48%, a granular cold-water swelling maize starch was successfully produced. All crystals in its intact granules were of the VH-type and appeared birefringent when studied in ethanol under polarized light. Removal of all residual solvent by high temperature drying did not influence swelling power, proving that a high temperature drying step is not necessary to induce cold-water swelling capacity. Based on in situ calorimetric measurements, the thermal requirements to produce GCWSS from different ethanol:water mixtures were elucidated. This work is the first to demonstrate that the amylose fraction contributes almost exclusively to VH-type crystal formation in GCWSS.

  17. Relationships between host phylogeny, host type and bacterial community diversity in cold-water coral reef sponges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schöttner

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral reefs are known to locally enhance the diversity of deep-sea fauna as well as of microbes. Sponges are among the most diverse faunal groups in these ecosystems, and many of them host large abundances of microbes in their tissues. In this study, twelve sponge species from three cold-water coral reefs off Norway were investigated for the relationship between sponge phylogenetic classification (species and family level, as well as sponge type (high versus low microbial abundance, and the diversity of sponge-associated bacterial communities, taking also geographic location and water depth into account. Community analysis by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA showed that as many as 345 (79% of the 437 different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs detected in the dataset were shared between sponges and sediments, while only 70 (16% appeared purely sponge-associated. Furthermore, changes in bacterial community structure were significantly related to sponge species (63% of explained community variation, sponge family (52% or sponge type (30%, whereas mesoscale geographic distances and water depth showed comparatively small effects (<5% each. In addition, a highly significant, positive relationship between bacterial community dissimilarity and sponge phylogenetic distance was observed within the ancient family of the Geodiidae. Overall, the high diversity of sponges in cold-water coral reefs, combined with the observed sponge-related variation in bacterial community structure, support the idea that sponges represent heterogeneous, yet structured microbial habitats that contribute significantly to enhancing bacterial diversity in deep-sea ecosystems.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF MULTIPLE COLD WATER IMMERSIONS ON INDICES OF MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Howatson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersions (CWI in the recovery of exercise induced muscle damage. A randomised group consisting of eighteen males, mean ± s age, height and body mass were 24 ± 5 years, 1.82 ± 0.06 m and 85.7 ± 16.6 kg respectively, completed a bout of 100 drop jumps. Following the bout of damaging exercise, participants were randomly but equally assigned to either a 12 min CWI (15 ± 1 °C; n = 9 group who experienced immersions immediately post-exercise and every 24 h thereafter for the following 3 days, or a control group (no treatment; n = 9. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC of the knee extensors, creatine kinase activity (CK, muscle soreness (DOMS, range of motion (ROM and limb girth were measured pre-exercise and then for the following 96 h at 24 h increments. In addition MVC was also recorded immediately post-exercise. Significant time effects were seen for MVC, CK, DOMS and limb girth (p 0.05. These results suggest that repeated CWI do not enhance recovery from a bout of damaging eccentric contractions

  19. Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-20

    As part of a DOE goal to develop one or more OTEC Modular Experiment Plants, TRW performed designs, analyses, and evaluations of cold water pipe (CWP) concepts for NOAA. After reviewing the results of the CWP concept selection phase NOAA/DOE selected three concepts for a baseline design: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physics Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme (this is TRW's preferred approach); (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. Detailed designs and analyses for the FRP, polyethylene, and elastomer concepts, respectively, are described. A discussion of fabrication plans and processes, schedules for mobilization of facilities and equipment, installation plans, and cost breakdown are given for each concept. (WHK)

  20. OTEC modular experiment cold water pipe concept evaluation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The Cold Water Pipe System Design Study was undertaken to evaluate the diverse CWP concepts, recommend the most viable alternatives for a 1984 deployment of the 10 to 40 MWe MEP, and carry out preliminary designs of three concepts. The concept evaluation phase reported involved a systems analysis of design alternatives in the broad categories of rigid walled (with hinges), compliant walled, stockade and bottom mounted buoyant. Quantitative evaluations were made of concept performance, availability, deployment schedule, technical feasibility and cost. CWP concepts were analyzed to determine if they met or could be made to meet established system requirements and could be deployed by 1984. Fabrication, construction and installation plans were developed for successful concepts, and costs were determined in a WBS format. Evaluations were performed on the basis of technical and cost risk. This volume includes the following appendices: (A) materials and associated design criteria; (B) summary of results of dynamic flow and transportation analysis; (C) CWP sizing analysis; (D) CWP thermal performance; and (E) investigation of the APL/ABAM CWP design. (WHK)

  1. Postexercise cold-water immersion does not attenuate muscle glycogen resynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Warren; Allan, Robert; Holden, Susan; Phibbs, Padraic; Doran, Dominic; Campbell, Iain; Waldron, Sarah; Joo, Chang Hwa; Morton, James P

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postexercise cold-water immersion (CWI, via its associated reductions in skeletal muscle blood flow) attenuates muscle glycogen resynthesis during short-term recovery from exhaustive exercise. In a repeated-measures design, nine recreationally active men performed an exhaustive glycogen depleting cycling protocol (consisting of intermittent exercise the night before and steady-state exercise on the subsequent morning of the main trial) followed by 10 min of lower-limb CWI (8°C) or remained seated in normal ambient conditions (CONT). Subjects were fed carbohydrate (CHO) at an ingestion rate of 0.6 g·kg body mass at 30 min postexercise and at 1, 2, and 3 h postexercise. Reductions in thigh skin temperature and muscle temperature during postexercise recovery were greater in CWI compared with CONT (P muscle glycogen (CONT and CWI postexercise = 76 ± 43 and 77 ± 26 mmol·kg dry weight [dw], respectively; mean ± SD) progressively increased (P muscle glycogen resynthesis rates during short-term recovery even when CHO availability is considered suboptimal. Athletes who regularly incorporate CWI as a recovery strategy to alleviate symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage should therefore not be concerned with potential negative effects of the associated reductions in muscle blood flow on the restoration of muscle glycogen stores.

  2. The influence of cold water immersions on adaptation following a single bout of damaging exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Goodall, S; van Someren, K A

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of cold water immersions (CWIs) following damaging exercise on the repeated bout effect (RBE). Sixteen males performed two bouts of drop jump exercise separated by 14-21 days. Participants were equally, but randomly assigned to either a CWI (12-min CWI at 15 degrees C) or control group (12-min seated rest). Treatments were given immediately after the first exercise bout, 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. No interventions were given following the second bout. Maximum voluntary contraction (MIVC), soreness (DOMS), creatine kinase (CK), thigh girth and range of motion (ROM) were recorded before and for 96 h following the initial and repeated bouts of damaging exercise. All variables, except ROM, showed a significant time effect (P muscle damage following the initial bout; there were no differences between the CWI and control groups after the initial bout. Following the repeated bout of exercise there was a significant attenuation in the reduction of MIVC (P = 0.002) and a reduction in DOMS (P < 0.001), which is indicative of the RBE. There were no significant differences between groups following the repeated bout of damaging exercise. These data show that CWI had no effect following damaging exercise and did not inhibit the RBE. Despite CWI being used routinely, its efficacy remains unclear and there is a need to elucidate the benefits of this intervention on recovery and adaptation to provide practitioners with evidence based practice.

  3. Characterization of culturable bacteria isolated from the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkiewicz, Julia P.; Pratte, Zoe A.; Gray, Michael A.; Kellogg, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with corals are hypothesized to contribute to the function of the host animal by cycling nutrients, breaking down carbon sources, fixing nitrogen, and producing antibiotics. This is the first study to culture and characterize bacteria from Lophelia pertusa, a cold-water coral found in the deep sea, in an effort to understand the roles that the microorganisms play in the coral microbial community. Two sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico were sampled over 2 years. Bacteria were cultured from coral tissue, skeleton, and mucus, identified by 16S rRNA genes, and subjected to biochemical testing. Most isolates were members of the Gammaproteobacteria, although there was one isolate each from the Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic results showed that both sampling sites shared closely related isolates (e.g. Pseudoalteromonas spp.), indicating possible temporally and geographically stable bacterial-coral associations. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility test was used to separate bacteria to the strain level, with the results showing that isolates that were phylogenetically tightly grouped had varying responses to antibiotics. These results support the conclusion that phylogenetic placement cannot predict strain-level differences and further highlight the need for culture-based experiments to supplement culture-independent studies.

  4. Islands erased by snow and ice: approaching the spatial philosophy of cold water island imaginaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Riquet

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Representations of islands in Western fiction typically revolve around tropical islands. Critical discourse tends to reproduce this tendency and rarely addresses the specific spatial poetics of cold-water island fictions. This paper discusses three texts that poetically deploy the geographical inventory of northern snow- and icescapes to challenge essentialist assumptions about islands: D. H. Lawrence’s short story “The man who loved islands”, Georgina Harding’s novel The solitude of Thomas Cave, and Michel Serres’s treatise Le passage du Nord-Ouest. It is argued that these texts reflect on the importance of the horizontal and vertical components of material and textual topographies for the conception and experience of islands. In all three, the physical transformation of the islandscapes by snow and ice serves to put the island concept itself into question. Serres’s philosophical text geopoetically portrays the Arctic archipelago of the Northwest Passage to explore the reciprocal relations between language and the material world. In Lawrence and Harding, the snow-covered islands cease to function as economically productive spaces and turn into complex spatial figures offering a philosophical meditation on islandness as a contradictory and multifaceted condition.

  5. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Mueller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. All tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids, bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia were deliberately enriched in 13C and 15N. The incorporation of 13C and 15N was traced into bulk tissue, fatty acids, hydrolysable amino acids, and the skeleton (13C only of L. pertusa. Incorporation rates of carbon (ranging from 0.8–2.4 µg C g–1 DW d–1 and nitrogen (0.2–0.8 µg N g–1 DW d–1 into coral tissue did not differ significantly among food sources indicating an opportunistic feeding strategy. Although total food assimilation was comparable among sources, subsequent food processing was dependent on the type of food source ingested and recovery of assimilated C in tissue compounds ranged from 17% (algae to 35% (Artemia. De novo synthesis of individual fatty acids by L. pertusa occurred in all treatments as indicated by the 13C enrichment of individual phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs in the coral that were absent in the added food sources. This indicates that the coral might be less dependent on its diet as a source of specific fatty acids than expected, with direct consequences for the interpretation of in situ observations on coral nutrition based on lipid profiles.

  6. The West Melilla cold water coral mounds, Eastern Alboran Sea: Morphological characterization and environmental context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iacono, Claudio; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Ranero, Cesar R.; Emelianov, Mikhail; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Bartolomé, Rafael; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Prades, Javier; Ambroso, Stefano; Dominguez, Carlos; Grinyó, Jordi; Rubio, Eduardo; Torrent, Josep

    2014-01-01

    A new mound field, the West Melilla mounds, interpreted as being cold-water coral mounds, has been recently unveiled along the upper slope of the Mediterranean Moroccan continental margin, a few kilometers west of the Cape Tres Forcas. This study is based on the integration of high-resolution geophysical data (swath bathymetry, parametric sub-bottom profiler), CTD casts, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), ROV video and seafloor sampling, acquired during the TOPOMED GASSIS (2011) and MELCOR (2012) cruises. Up to 103 mounds organized in two main clusters have been recognized in a depth range of 299-590 m, displaying a high density of 5 mounds/km2. Mounds, 1-48 m high above the surrounding seafloor and on average 260 m wide, are actually buried by a 1-12 m thick fine-grained sediment blanket. Seismic data suggest that the West Melilla mounds grew throughout the Early Pleistocene-Holocene, settling on erosive unconformities and mass movement deposits. During the last glacial-interglacial transition, the West Melilla mounds may have suffered a drastic change of the local sedimentary regime during the late Holocene and, unable to stand increasing depositional rates, were progressively buried. At the present day, temperature and salinity values on the West Melilla mounds suggest a plausible oceanographic setting, suitable for live CWCs. Nonetheless, more data is required to groundtruth the West Melilla mounds and better constrain the interplay of sedimentary and oceanographic factors during the evolution of the West Melilla mounds.

  7. Precursor evolution and SCC initiation of cold-worked alloy 690 in simulated PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Kruska, Karen; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-03-27

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for the 21% and 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 h, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400h exposure at constant stress intensity, which resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Interestingly, post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and will discuss their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  8. The Efficacy of Repeated Cold Water Immersion on Recovery Following a Simulated Rugby Union Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sean; John, Pattison; Brown, Freddy; Hill, Jessica

    2017-09-06

    Training and athletic competition frequently results in exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of repeated cold water immersion (CWI) on recovery following a simulated rugby union match. Sixteen male, club level rugby players were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to either a CWI group or control (CON) group. Following the simulated rugby match the CWI group underwent 2 x 5 min immersions at a temperature of 10°C separated by 2.5 min seated at room temperature, whilst the CON group remained seated for 15 min. Creatine kinase (CK), perceived muscle soreness, counter movement jump (CMJ) and maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, post-exercise, 24 h and 48 h following exercise. Large effect sizes were observed for muscle soreness at 24 and 48 h post exercise with lower soreness values observed in the CWI group. Large effect sizes were observed for CMJ at all time points and at 24 and 48 h post for MVIC with improved recovery of muscle function observed in the CWI group compared to the CON group. Lastly a moderate effect size was observed for CK immediately post exercise followed by large effect sizes at 24 and 48h post exercise, with CK concentration blunted in the CWI group. Overall these findings provide some support for the use of CWI to enhance recovery from EIMD following a simulated rugby union match.

  9. Influence of Pretreatment on Cold Water Solubility and Esterification Activity of Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Xin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to improve the Cold Water Solubility (CWS and esterification activity of Native corn Starch (NS by pretreatment NS using NaOH/urea aqueous solution. The influence of pretreatment on granule shape and crystal structure of corn starch was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. It has been found that the average particle size of Pretreatment corn Starch (PS decreased to nanometer level, smaller than those of NS (4-15 μm. XRD revealed that crystalline pattern of PS was VH-type, which was different from that of NS (A-type. The maximum CWS of PS was 96.77%, while the NS was only 0.3%. NS and PS were esterified with oleic acid catalyzed by lipase under the same conditions respectively. The effects of the pretreatment on esterification activity of the corn starches were investigated by analyzing the Degrees of Substitutions (DS of the esterification products. The maximum DS of pretreatment starch oleate was 0.229, while the DS of native starch oleate was very low and even could not be detected.

  10. Opportunistic feeding on various organic food sources by the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C. E.; Larsson, A. I.; Veuger, B.; Middelburg, J. J.; van Oevelen, D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to exploit different food sources was investigated under standardized conditions in a flume. The tested food sources, dissolved organic matter (DOM, added as dissolved free amino acids), bacteria, algae, and zooplankton (Artemia) were deliberately enriched in 13C and 15N. The incorporation of 13C and 15N was traced into bulk tissue, fatty acids, hydrolysable amino acids, and the skeleton (13C only) of L. pertusa. Incorporation rates of carbon (ranging from 0.8-2.4 μg C g-1 DW d-1) and nitrogen (0.2-0.8 μg N g-1 DW d-1) into coral tissue did not differ significantly among food sources indicating an opportunistic feeding strategy. Although total food assimilation was comparable among sources, subsequent food processing was dependent on the type of food source ingested and recovery of assimilated C in tissue compounds ranged from 17% (algae) to 35% (Artemia). De novo synthesis of individual fatty acids by L. pertusa occurred in all treatments as indicated by the 13C enrichment of individual phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) in the coral that were absent in the added food sources. This indicates that the coral might be less dependent on its diet as a source of specific fatty acids than expected, with direct consequences for the interpretation of in situ observations on coral nutrition based on lipid profiles.

  11. High thermal tolerance of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species maintained in aquaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, M. S.; Orejas, C.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2013-09-01

    In the Mediterranean deep-sea, scleractinian cold-water corals (CWC) are observed to survive at the uppermost end of their presumed thermal distribution range (4-13 °C). Here, we show that 2 common CWC species (i.e. Dendrophyllia cornigera and Desmophyllum dianthus) maintained in aquaria can indeed tolerate considerably elevated seawater temperatures (17.5 ± 0.1 °C), while growing at similar ( D. dianthus) or significantly higher ( D. cornigera) rates than conspecifics cultured in parallel for 87 days at ambient Mediterranean deep-sea temperature (12.5 ± 0.1 °C). Neither differences in coral appearance nor mortality were evident for both species at either temperature. D. dianthus grew significantly faster (0.23 ± 0.08 % day-1) than D. cornigera (0.05 ± 0.01 % day-1) under ambient thermal conditions. Growth of D. cornigera increased significantly (0.14 ± 0.07 % day-1) at elevated temperature, while Desmophyllum dianthus growth showed no significant difference under both conditions. These findings suggest that D. dianthus and D. cornigera may be capable of surviving in warmer environments than previously reported, and thus challenge temperature as the paramount limiting environmental factor for the occurrence of some CWC species.

  12. Electroencephalographic frontal synchrony and caudal asynchrony during painful hand immersion in cold water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Joshua; Choo, Hyunwoo J; Smith, Kelsey A; LeBlanc, Brian W; Saab, Carl Y

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory showed that cortical theta oscillations correlate with pain in rodent models. In this study, we sought to validate our pre-clinical data using EEG recordings in humans during immersion of the hand in ice cold water, a moderately noxious stimulus. Power spectral analysis shows that an increase in pain score is associated with an increase in power amplitude within a frequency range of 6-7Hz at the frontal (Fz) electrode. These results are consistent with our previous pre-clinical animal studies and the clinical literature. We also report a novel reduction in power at the caudal (O1) electrode within a broader 3-30Hz rand and decreased coherence between Fz and C3, C4 electrodes within the theta (4-8Hz) and low beta (13-21Hz) bands, while coherence (an indirect measure of functional connectivity) between Fz and O1 increased within the theta and alpha (8-12Hz) bands. We argue that pain is associated with EEG frontal synchrony and caudal asynchrony, leading to the disruption of cortico-cortical connectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. OTEC modular experiment: cold water pipe concept evaluation. Volume II. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The Cold Water Pipe System Design Study was undertaken to evaluate the diverse CWP concepts, recommend the most viable alternatives for a 1984 deployment of the 10 to 40 MWe MEP, and carry out preliminary designs of three concepts. The Concept Evaluation Phase reported here involved a systems analysis of design alternatives in the broad categories of rigid walled (with hinges), compliant walled, stockade and bottom mounted buoyant. Quantitative evaluations were made of concept performance, availability, deployment schedule, technical feasibility and cost. CWP concepts were analyzed to determine if they met or could be made to meet established system requirements and could be deployed by 1984. Those which faced overwhelming technical and/or scheduling problems were rejected. Those which were unviable due to isolated, crucial technical and/or scheduling problems for which a technical development may reverse the decisions were deferred. Fabrication, construction and installation plans were developed for successful concepts, and costs were determined in a WBS format. Evaluations were performed on the basis of technical and cost risk. (WHK)

  14. Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Task 2. Analysis for concept selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-04-01

    The successful performance of the CWP is of crucial importance to the overall OTEC system; the pipe itself is considered the most critical part of the entire operation. Because of the importance the CWP, a project for the analysis and design of CWP's was begun in the fall of 1978. The goals of this project were to study a variety of concepts for delivering cold water to an OTEC plant, to analyze and rank these concepts based on their relative cost and risk, and to develop preliminary design for those concepts which seemed most promising. Two representative platforms and sites were chosen: a spar buoy of a Gibbs and Cox design to be moored at a site off Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, and a barge designed by APL/Johns Hopkins University, grazing about a site approximately 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil. The approach was to concentrate on the most promising concepts and on those which were either of general interest or espoused by others (e.g., steel and concrete concepts). Much of the overall attention, therefore, focused on analyzing rigid and compliant wall design, while stockade (except for the special case of the FRP stockade) and bottom-mounted concepts received less attention. A total of 67 CWP concepts were initially generated and subjected to a screening process. Of these, 16 were carried through design analysis, costing, and ranking. Study results are presented in detail. (WHK)

  15. Phenotypic plasticity and its genetic regulation for yield, nitrogen fixation and δ13C in chickpea crops under varying water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadras, Victor O; Lake, Lachlan; Li, Yongle; Farquharson, Elizabeth A; Sutton, Tim

    2016-07-01

    We measured yield components, nitrogen fixation, soil nitrogen uptake and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in a collection of chickpea genotypes grown in environments where water availability was the main source of yield variation. We aimed to quantify the phenotypic plasticity of these traits using variance ratios, and to explore their genetic basis using FST genome scan. Fifty-five genes in three genomic regions were found to be under selection for plasticity of yield; 54 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of seeds per m(2); 48 genes in four genomic regions for the plasticity of δ(13)C; 54 genes in two genomic regions for plasticity of flowering time; 48 genes in five genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen fixation and 49 genes in three genomic regions for plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil. Plasticity of yield was related to plasticity of nitrogen uptake from soil, and unrelated to plasticity of nitrogen fixation, highlighting the need for closer attention to nitrogen uptake in legumes. Whereas the theoretical link between δ(13)C and transpiration efficiency is strong, the actual link with yield is erratic due to trade-offs and scaling issues. Genes associated with plasticity of δ(13)C were identified that may help to untangle the δ(13)C-yield relationship. Combining a plasticity perspective to deal with complex G×E interactions with FST genome scan may help understand and improve both crop adaptation to stress and yield potential.

  16. Seasonal evolution of the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass and its interactions with ambient hydrodynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchao; Li, Guangxue; Xu, Jishang; Dong, Ping; Qiao, Lulu; Liu, Shidong; Sun, Pingkuo; Fan, Zhisong

    2016-09-01

    The Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) is an important component of the hydrodynamic system in the South Yellow Sea (SYS). However, its intricate interactions with the ambient flows over long time scales are not fully understood. This paper presents the analysis of the data set obtained from a seabed-mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) deployed for nearly 1 year in the western SYS. It allowed us to study the evolution of YSCWM, including the seasonal changes of tidal currents, near-inertial oscillations (NIOs), and the wind-driven currents due to typhoons and winter storms. Strong NIOs were found near the bottom of mixed layer and in the pycnocline with nearly opposite current directions, with maximum velocity of nearly 20 cm·s-1 in summer. The YSCWM can also inhibit the direct downward energy transport in the water column due to typhoons. Conversely, the hydrodynamic system also feeds back to influence the change of YSCWM. A large current shear (S) of 20 cm·s-1·m-1 is generated near the top of pycnocline. Generally, the intensity and depth of the pycnocline determine S's magnitude and vertical location, respectively. Based on the monthly averaged density profile data, the Richardson number and wavelet analysis, the NIOs are considered to be capable of inducing predominant shear instability around the pycnocline. However, the NIOs are not strong enough to influence the lower YSCWM. In addition, in autumn, each fortnightly spring tide corresponds with a bottom temperature increase of nearly 2°C, indicating that tidal currents are the leading hydrodynamic driving force to decline the YSCWM.

  17. Effect of cold water immersion on 100-m sprint performance in well-trained swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parouty, Jonathan; Al Haddad, Hani; Quod, Marc; Leprêtre, Pierre Marie; Ahmaidi, Said; Buchheit, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on sprint swimming performance in simulated competition conditions. Ten well-trained swimmers (5 males, 5 females; 19.0 +/- 3.9 years) performed two 100-m swimming sprints (S1 and S2) interspersed with a 30-min passive recovery period, during which athletes were randomly assigned to 5 min of CWI (14 degrees C) or an out-of-water control condition (CON 28 degrees C). During tests, sprint times, heart rate (HR), pre- and post-race parasympathetic activity via HR variability (natural logarithm of the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals; Ln rMSSD) and blood lactate accumulation ([La](ac)) and clearance ([La](cle)) were recorded. Rates of perceived recovery (RPR) and exertion (RPE) were evaluated before and after each sprint. CWI was associated with a 'likely' decrease in swimming performance [1.8% (90% CI 0.2, 3.5)], as well as 'likely' lower peak HR [-1.9% (-3.6, -0.2)]. CWI was also associated with a 'likely' smaller decrease in Ln rMSSD after the first sprint [-16.7% (-30.9, -4.1)]. RPR was 'likely' better [+27.2% (-3.7, 68.0)] following CWI. 'unclear' effects were observed for [La](ac) [+24.7% (-13.4, 79.5)], [La](cle) [-7.6% (-24.2, 12.7)] or RPE [+2.0% (-12.3, 18.5)]. Following CWI, changes in sprint times were 'largely' correlated with changes in peak HR (r = 0.80). Despite a subjective perception of improved recovery following CWI, this recovery intervention resulted in slower swimming times in well-trained athletes swimming in simulated competition conditions.

  18. IODP Expedition 307 Drills Cold-Water Coral Mound Along the Irish Continental Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Williams

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Over the past decade, oceanographic and geophysical surveys along the slope of the Porcupine Seabight off the southwestern continental margin of Ireland have identified upwards of a thousand enigmatic mound-like structures (Figs. 1 and 2. The mounds of the Porcupine Seabight rise from the seafl oor in water depths of 600–900 m and formimpressive conical bodies several kilometers wide and up to 200 m high. Although a few mounds such as Thérèse Mound and Galway Mound are covered by a thriving thicket of coldwater corals, most mound tops and fl anks are covered by dead coral rubble or are entirely buried by sediment (De Mol et al., 2002; Fig. 2, Beyer et al., 2003. Lophelia pertusa (Fig.3 and Madrepora oculata are the most prominent cold-water corals growing without photosynthetic symbionts. The widespread discovery of large and numerous coral-bearing banks and the association of these corals with the mounds have generated signifi cant interest as to the composition, origin and development of these mound structures.Challenger Mound, in the Belgica mound province, has an elongated shape oriented along a north-northeast to south-southwest axis and ispartially buried under Pleistocene drift sediments. In high-resolution seismic profiles the mounds appear to root on an erosion surface (van Rooij et al., 2003. During IODP Expedition307 the Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight was drilled with the goal of unveiling the origin and depositional processes withinthese intriguing sedimentary structures. Challenger Mound, unlike its near neighbors the Thérèse and Galway mounds, has little to no livecoral coverage and, therefore, was chosen as the main target for drilling activities, so that no living ecosystem would be disturbed.

  19. A cold-water coral carbonate mound on the decline: Propeller Mound, northern Porcupine Seabight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorschel, B.; Hebbeln, D.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, C.

    2003-04-01

    Radiocarbon and U/Th datings reveal that the top sediment sequence of the Propeller Mound in the Hovland Mound Province is incomplete and characterised by numerous hiatuses. Stable oxygen isotope data obtained on benthic foraminifera indicate that almost only interstadial sediments are preserved, while interglacial and full glacial sediments are missing. The Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW), assumed to be crucial for the development of the cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora occulata found on Propeller Mound and in its sediments, reaches the Porcupine Seabight in its full strength only during interglacials, while it is absent during glacials. ROV observations show that under present-day conditions the MOW supports coral growth at the top of Propeller Mound, while at the same time it causes substantial erosion on its flanks, where scouring might lead to subsequent slumping. Thus, the hiatuses found in the sediment sequence of Propeller Mound are most likely caused by the strong bottom currents associated with the MOW. Especially during the terminations when the MOW circulation was re-established most of the glacial sediments, deposited under rather smooth conditions, might have been eroded and/or wasted downslope. Such erosion-favourable conditions lasted through the interglacials resulting in the ongoing removal of the interglacial sediments. During the interstadials the interplay between bottom current strength, coral growth and sedimentation resulted in sediment sequences which had a bigger chance to get preserved. Through the last 300 000 years the netto sedimentation on Propeller Mound is by far less compared to the surrounding off-mound sediments. Thus, at least over this time span the mound is shrinking relative to the seafloor around it and if this development continues into the future the Propeller Mound will get buried and follow the fate of the already buried near-by Magellan Mounds.

  20. Differential response of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movilla, Juancho; Orejas, Covadonga; Calvo, Eva; Gori, Andrea; López-Sanz, Àngel; Grinyó, Jordi; Domínguez-Carrió, Carlos; Pelejero, Carles

    2014-09-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) reefs constitute one of the most complex deep-sea habitats harboring a vast diversity of associated species. Like other tropical or temperate framework builders, these systems are facing an uncertain future due to several threats, such as global warming and ocean acidification. In the case of Mediterranean CWC communities, the effect may be exacerbated due to the greater capacity of these waters to absorb atmospheric CO2 compared to the global ocean. Calcification in these organisms is an energy-demanding process, and it is expected that energy requirements will be greater as seawater pH and the availability of carbonate ions decrease. Therefore, studies assessing the effect of a pH decrease in skeletal growth, and metabolic balance are critical to fully understand the potential responses of these organisms under a changing scenario. In this context, the present work aims to investigate the medium- to long-term effect of a low pH scenario on calcification and the biochemical composition of two CWCs from the Mediterranean, Dendrophyllia cornigera and Desmophyllum dianthus. After 314 d of exposure to acidified conditions, a significant decrease of 70 % was observed in Desmophyllum dianthus skeletal growth rate, while Dendrophyllia cornigera showed no differences between treatments. Instead, only subtle differences between treatments were observed in the organic matter amount, lipid content, skeletal microdensity, or porosity in both species, although due to the high variability of the results, these differences were not statistically significant. Our results also confirmed a heterogeneous effect of low pH on the skeletal growth rate of the organisms depending on their initial weight, suggesting that those specimens with high calcification rates may be the most susceptible to the negative effects of acidification.

  1. The effect of time of day on cold water ingestion by high-level swimmers in a tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Olivier; Monjo, Roland; Lazzaro, Marc; Baillot, Michelle; Hellard, Philippe; Marlin, Laurent; Jean-Etienne, A

    2013-07-01

    The authors tested the effect of cold water ingestion during high-intensity training in the morning vs the evening on both core temperature (TC) and thermal perceptions of internationally ranked long-distance swimmers during a training period in a tropical climate. Nine internationally ranked long-distance swimmers (5 men and 4 women) performed 4 randomized training sessions (2 in the evening and 2 in the morning) with 2 randomized beverages with different temperatures for 3 consecutive days. After a standardized warm-up of 1000 m, the subjects performed a standardized training session that consisted of 10 x 100 m (start every 1'20″) at a fixed velocity. The swimmers were then followed for the next 3000 m of the training schedule. Heart rate (HR) was continuously monitored during the 10 x 100 m, whereas TC, thermal comfort, and thermal sensation (TS) were measured before and after each 1000-m session. Before and after each 1000 m, the swimmers were asked to drink 190 mL of neutral (26.5 ± 2.5°C) or cold (1.3 ± 0.3°C) water packaged in standardized bottles. Results demonstrated that cold water ingestion induced a significant effect on TC, with a pronounced decrease in the evening, resulting in significantly lower mean TC and lower mean delta TC in evening cold (EC) than in evening neutral (EN), concomitant with significantly lower TS in EC than in EN and a significant effect on exercise HR. Moreover, although TC increased significantly with time in MN, MC, and EN, TC was stabilized during exercise in EC. To conclude, we demonstrate that a cold beverage had a significant effect on TC, TS, and HR during training in high-level swimmers in a tropical climate, especially during evening training.

  2. Assessing the thermal dissipation sap flux density method for monitoring cold season water transport in seasonally snow-covered forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Allison M; Bowling, David R; Phillips, Nathan

    2017-07-01

    Productivity of conifers in seasonally snow-covered forests is high before and during snowmelt when environmental conditions are optimal for photosynthesis. Climate change is altering the timing of spring in many locations, and changes in the date of transition from winter dormancy can have large impacts on annual productivity. Sap flow methods provide a promising approach to monitor tree activity during the cold season and the winter-spring and fall-winter transitions. Although sap flow techniques have been widely used, cold season results are generally not reported. Here we examine the feasibility of using the Granier thermal dissipation (TD) sap flux density method to monitor transpiration and dormancy of evergreen conifers during the cold season. We conducted a laboratory experiment which demonstrated that the TD method reliably detects xylem water transport (when it occurs) both at near freezing temperature and at low flow rate, and that the sensors can withstand repeated freeze-thaw events. However, the dependence between sensor output and water transport rate in these experiments differed from the established TD relation. In field experiments, sensors installed in two Abies forests lasted through two winters and a summer with low failure. The baseline (no-flow) sensor output varied considerably with temperature during the cold season, and a new baseline algorithm was developed to accommodate this variation. The Abies forests differed in elevation (2070 and 2620 m), and there was a clear difference in timing of initiation and cessation of transpiration between them. We conclude that the TD method can be reliably used to examine water transport during cold periods with associated low flow conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Plastic litter accumulation on high-water strandline of urban beaches in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A

    2013-09-01

    Today, almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. The inadequate recycling and poor management of waste in developing countries has resulted in considerable quantities of plastic contaminating beaches. Though India has long coastline of 5,420 km along the mainland with 43 % of sandy beaches, data on litter accumulation, particularly the plastics, which are one of the most common and persistent pollutants in marine environment, are scanty. The abundance and distribution of plastic litter was quantitatively assessed in four sandy beaches in Mumbai, India, bimonthly from May 2011 to March 2012. Triplicates of 2 × 2 m (4 m(2)) quadrats were sampled in each beach with a total of 72 quadrats. Overall, average abundance of 11.6 items m(-2) (0.25-282.5 items m(-2)) and 3.24 g m(-2) (0.27-15.53 g m(-2)) plastic litter was recorded in Mumbai beaches. Plastic litter accumulation significantly varied temporally and spatially at p = 0.05. Significantly higher plastic litter accumulation was recorded in Juhu beach. Furthermore, the highest abundance by weight was recorded in November and May numerically. More than 80 % of plastic particles were within the size range of 5-100 mm both by number and weight. Moreover, coloured plastics were predominant with 67 % by number of items and 51 % by weight. Probably, the intense use of beaches for recreation, tourism, and religious activities has increased the potential for plastic contamination in urban beaches in Mumbai.

  4. Cold-water coral ecosystems in Cassidaigne Canyon: An assessment of their environmental living conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, M.-C.; Bargain, A.; Pairaud, I.; Pedel, L.; Taupier-Letage, I.

    2017-03-01

    The Cassidaigne canyon is one of the two canyons (together with Lacaze-Duthiers) of the French Mediterranean coast in which cold-water corals have settled and formed large colonies, providing a structural habitat for other species. Nevertheless, the communities settled in the Cassidaigne canyon are physically impacted by discharges of bauxite residues. New information on the distribution of the species Madrepora oculata and the associated species diversity in Cassidaigne canyon was provided by videos and photos acquired in 2013. An area investigated at 515 m depth harbored a high density of small colonies of M. oculata. The water column structure of the area was described by using a CTD transect deployed along the axis of the canyon. High resolution (10 m and 2 m) bathymetric data were collected in the Cassidaigne canyon in 2010 and 2014. Seafloor characteristics were derived from the 10 m resolution bathymetric data. Data on local hydrodynamic conditions in the first 10 m above the seafloor were produced by applying the MARS3D hydrodynamic model in the Cassidaigne canyon at a horizontal resolution of 80 m (CASCANS model configuration). These environmental datasets combined with the geographic coordinates of the known occurrences of dense M. oculata colonies in the canyon allowed establishing a model using the MaxEnt software package to predict the habitat distribution in terms of probability of occurrence. According to the water mass analysis, M. oculata habitats are mainly located in the layer of the Intermediate waters originating from the Eastern Mediterranean Basin. A high concentration of suspended sediment due to the bauxite residues expelled into the canyon was observed in the axis of the canyon where we measured 1 NTU (2.5 mg/l) at 100 m above the bottom while concentrations were even higher (2 NTU; 5 mg/l) closer to the bottom. The habitat suitability model indicates that the living conditions of M. oculata can be found in areas of the Cassidaigne canyon

  5. Precursor Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 in Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Kruska, Karen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Bruemmer, Stephen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.

    2017-05-22

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 (UNS N06690) materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for either the 21% or 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 hours, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400 hours of exposure at constant stress intensity, which was resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and discusses their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  6. Morphological change and phenotypic plasticity in native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish in response to sustained water velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavno, S; Fox, M G

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can contribute to the proliferation and invasion success of nonindigenous species by promoting phenotypic changes that increase fitness, facilitate range expansion and improve survival. In this study, differences in phenotypic plasticity were investigated using young-of-year pumpkinseed sunfish from colonies established with lentic and lotic populations originating in Canada (native) and Spain (non-native). Individuals were subjected to static and flowing water treatments for 80 days. Inter- and intra-population differences were tested using ancova and discriminant function analysis, and differences in phenotypic plasticity were tested through a manova of discriminant function scores. Differences between Iberian and North American populations were observed in dorsal fin length, pectoral fin position and caudal peduncle length. Phenotypic plasticity had less influence on morphology than genetic factors, regardless of population origin. Contrary to predictions, Iberian pumpkinseed exhibited lower levels of phenotypic plasticity than native populations, suggesting that canalization may have occurred in the non-native populations during the processes of introduction and range expansion.

  7. Effect of cold water and inverse lighting on growth performance of broiler chickens under extreme heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-oh; Park, Byung-sung; Hwangbo, Jong

    2015-07-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of provision of extreme heat stress diet (EHD), inverse lighting, cold water on growth performance of broiler chickens exposed to extreme heat stress. The chickens were divided into four treatment groups, (T1, T2, T3, T4) as given below: Ti (EHD 1, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T2 (EHD 2, 10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light, cool water 9 degrees C); T3 (EHD 1, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 141C); T4 (EHD 2, 09:00-18:00 dark, 18:00-09:00 light, cool water 14 degrees C. EHD 1 contained soybean oil, molasses, methionine and lysine; EHD 2 contained the same ingredients as EHD 1 with addition of vitamin C. Groups T1 and T2 were given cooler water than the othertwo groups, and displayed higher body weight increase and diet intake as compared to T3 and T4 (pstress diet, inverse lighting (10:00-19:00 dark, 19:00-10:00 light) with cold water at 9 degrees C under extreme heat stress could enhance growth performance of broiler chickens.

  8. Influence of prior intense exercise and cold water immersion in recovery for performance and physiological response during subsequent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    ) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from...... the qualifying and final races in 4000-m individual pursuit. In part B, twelve trained cyclists with an average (±SD) ⩒O2-peak of 67 ± 5 mL/min/kg performed a protocol mimicking a qualifying race (QUAL) followed 3 h later by a performance test (PT) with each exercise period encompassing intense exercise for ~4...... min preceded by an identical warm-up period in both a control setting (CON) and using cold water immersion in recovery (CWI; 15 min at 15°C). Performance was lowered (P cyclists during World championships in part A. In part B...

  9. Determining the location of buried plastic water pipes from measurements of ground surface vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Brennan, M. J.; Gao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    ‘Mapping the Underworld' is a UK-based project, which aims to create a multi-sensor device that combines complementary technologies for remote buried utility service detection and location. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics, and techniques for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular plastic water pipes, are being investigated. One of the proposed techniques involves excitation of the pipe at some known location with concurrent vibrational mapping of the ground surface in order to infer the location of the remainder of the pipe. In this paper, measurements made on a dedicated pipe rig are reported. Frequency response measurements relating vibrational velocity on the ground to the input excitation were acquired. Contour plots of the unwrapped phase revealed the location of the pipe to within 0.1-0.2 m. Magnitude contour plots revealed the excitation point and also the location of the pipe end. By examining the unwrapped phase gradients along a line above the pipe, it was possible to identify the wave-type within the pipe responsible for the ground surface vibration. Furthermore, changes in the ground surface phase speed computed using this method enabled the location of the end of the pipe to be confirmed.

  10. Evaluation of the Impact of the Plastic BioSand Filter on Health and Drinking Water Quality in Rural Tamale, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumuni K. Osman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A randomized controlled trial of the plastic BioSand filter (BSF was performed in rural communities in Tamale (Ghana to assess reductions in diarrheal disease and improvements in household drinking water quality. Few studies of household water filters have been performed in this region, where high drinking water turbidity can be a challenge for other household water treatment technologies. During the study, the longitudinal prevalence ratio for diarrhea comparing households that received the plastic BSF to households that did not receive it was 0.40 (95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.80, suggesting an overall diarrheal disease reduction of 60%. The plastic BSF achieved a geometric mean reduction of 97% and 67% for E. coli and turbidity, respectively. These results suggest the plastic BSF significantly improved drinking water quality and reduced diarrheal disease during the short trial in rural Tamale, Ghana. The results are similar to other trials of household drinking water treatment technologies.

  11. Evaluation of the impact of the plastic BioSand filter on health and drinking water quality in rural Tamale, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Christine E; Kominek, Byron; Liang, Kaida R; Osman, Mumuni K; Sobsey, Mark D

    2012-10-24

    A randomized controlled trial of the plastic BioSand filter (BSF) was performed in rural communities in Tamale (Ghana) to assess reductions in diarrheal disease and improvements in household drinking water quality. Few studies of household water filters have been performed in this region, where high drinking water turbidity can be a challenge for other household water treatment technologies. During the study, the longitudinal prevalence ratio for diarrhea comparing households that received the plastic BSF to households that did not receive it was 0.41 (95% confidence interval: 0.18, 0.92), suggesting an overall diarrheal disease reduction of 59% [corrected]. The plastic BSF achieved a geometric mean reduction of 97% and 67% for E. coli and turbidity, respectively. These results suggest the plastic BSF significantly improved drinking water quality and reduced diarrheal disease during the short trial in rural Tamale, Ghana. The results are similar to other trials of household drinking water treatment technologies.

  12. Application of Water Treatment Process for Cold-rolling Waste Water to Be Drained into Natural Water%排至自然水体的冷轧废水处理工艺应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹军喜

    2014-01-01

    The water treatment process for cold rolling waste water to be drained into natural water is introduced. Treatment methods for cold rolling waste water containing chrome, acid, oil, temper mill fluid and thin alkali are summarized. The main problems and functions of the process are also analyzed. This water treatment process has reached the advanced level in the field of domestic cold rolling waste water treatment.%介绍了排至自然水体的冷轧废水处理工艺,综述了冷轧废水中含铬废水、含酸废水、含油废水、平整液废水、稀碱废水的处理方法,对主要问题和功能进行了分析,其处理工艺达到了国内冷轧废水的先进水平。

  13. Sulfur Distribution during Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Lignite, Wheat Straw and Plastic Waste in Sub-Critical Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Baofeng; Huang Yaru; Zhang Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and transformation of sulfur in products during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water were investigated in an autoclave. The inlfuence of blending ratio, temperature, initial nitrogen pressure, residence time and additives on sulfur distribution was studied systematically. The results showed that most of sulfur existed as organic sulfur and transferred into the residue, and only a small part of sulfur transferred into oil and gas during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water. The results also showed that lower temperature (less than 300℃) was favorable for obtaining oil with low sulfur content. It can be also seen from the results that the best condition to obtain the oil with low sulfur content should be implemented at a lignite/wheat straw/plastic waste blending ratio of 5:4:1, an initial nitrogen pressure of 3 MPa and a residence time of 30 minutes. Fur-thermore, the results indicated that adding tourmaline during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste was beneifcial to production of oil with low sulfur content.

  14. A Comparison of Ice Cold Water Pretreatment and α-Bromonaphthalene Cytogenetic Method for Identification of Papaver Species

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Rezaei Osalou; Sheida Daneshvar Rouyandezagh; Behrouz Alizadeh; Celal Er; Cafer Sirri Sevimay

    2013-01-01

    The plants belonging to many species in genus Papaver are very similar and have very small chromosomes that make identification very difficult. The study aimed to compare the effects of α-bromonaphtalene and ice cold water pretreatment to identify chromosomes of Papaver species collected from different areas of Iranian West Azerbaijan and Turkish Van, Agri and, Hakkari provinces. The seeds were germinated in Jacobson trays at 24°C under continuous light. Thereafter, roots from 1.5 ...

  15. Feng Shui in cold water production. Energy-efficient cold water unit for domestic comfort, trade and industry; Feng Shui in der Bereitstellung von Kaltwasser. Energieeffizienter Kaltwassersatz fuer Komfort, Gewerbe und Indsutrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeben, J. [Menerga Apparatebau GmbH, Muelheim (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    Feng Shui means 'wind and water'. According to Chinese philosophy, all processes in nature are influenced by five different elements. This principle has always been applied in air conditioning engineering, e.g. in the development of a novel, ecological cold water production process presented by Menerga. (orig.) [German] Feng steht fuer Wind, Shui fuer Wasser. Das Zusammenspiel aller Prozesse in der Natur wird nach der chinesischen Philosophie von weiteren Grundelementen beeinflusst. In der Klimatechnik hat man sich dieses Prinzip immer wieder zunutze gemacht. So auch bei der Entwicklung eines neuen oekologischen Verfahrens zur Kaltwasserbereitstellung der Firma Menerga. (orig.)

  16. Modeling water flow and nitrate dynamics in a plastic mulch vegetable cultivation system using HYDRUS-2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Romić, Davor; Romić, Marija; Matijević, Lana; Mallmann, Fábio J. K.; Robinson, David A.

    2016-04-01

    Growing vegetables commercially requires intensive management and involves high irrigation demands and input of agrochemicals. Plastic mulch application in combination with drip irrigation is a common agricultural management technique practiced due to variety of benefits to the crop, mostly vegetable biomass production. However, the use of these techniques can result in various impacts on water and nutrient distribution in underlying soil and consequently affect nutrient leaching towards groundwater resources. The aim of this work is to estimate the effect of plastic mulch cover in combination with drip irrigation on water and nitrate dynamics in soil using HYDRUS-2D model. The field site was located in Croatian costal karst area on a Gleysol (WRB). The experiment was designed according to the split-plot design in three repetitions and was divided into plots with plastic mulch cover (MULCH) and control plots with bare soil (CONT). Each of these plots received applications of three levels of nitrogen fertilizer: 70, 140, and 210 kg per ha. All plots were equipped with drip irrigation and cropped with bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bianca F1). Lysimeters were installed at 90 cm depth in all plots and were used for monitoring the water and nitrate outflow. HYDRUS-2D was used for modeling the water and nitrogen outflow in the MULCH and CONT plots, implementing the proper boundary conditions. HYDRUS-2D simulated results showed good fitting to the field site observed data in both cumulative water and nitrate outflow, with high level of agreement. Water flow simulations produced model efficiency of 0.84 for CONT and 0.56 for MULCH plots, while nitrate simulations showed model efficiency ranging from 0.67 to 0.83 and from 0.70 to 0.93, respectively. Additional simulations were performed with the absence of the lysimeter, revealing faster transport of nitrates below drip line in the CONT plots, mostly because of the increased surface area subjected to precipitation

  17. Numerical simulation of the dual-core structure of the Bohai Sea cold bottom water in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feng; HUANG DaJi; SU JiLan

    2009-01-01

    Regional Ocean Modeling Systems (ROMS 3.0) and the K-ε turbulence closure scheme has been ap-plied to investigating the seasonal evolution of the thermsocline in the Bohsi Sea. The simulation re-produces the stratifications lasting from early April to early September and reveals the existence of marked Asymmetric Dual-Core Cold Bottom Water (ADCCBW) in the south and north depression basin respectively under the thermocline. The bottom temperature in the north depression is about 1-4℃ lower than that in the south depression basin which is in good agreement with observations. Model results suggest that the local bathymetry characteristics and inhomogeneous net heat flux due to the latitude difference are the major cause for the early formation of the ADCCBW. Numerical Lagrangian drifter experiments support the finding that the ADCCBW is maintained throughout the stratification periods by the inflow of cold bottom water from the northern Yellow Sea and deep channel in the western side of Liaodong Peninsula. The inflow cold water contributes to the north depression basin distinctively larger than to the south one. Tidal mixing enhances the bottom temperature asymmetry between the two basins.

  18. Carbon, water, and energy fluxes in a semiarid cold desert grassland during and following multiyear drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, David R.; Bethers-Marchetti, S.; Lunch, C.K.; Grote, E.E.; Belnap, J.

    2010-01-01

    The net exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy were examined in a perennial Colorado Plateau grassland for 5 years. The study began within a multiyear drought and continued as the drought ended. The grassland is located near the northern boundary of the influence of the North American monsoon, a major climatic feature bringing summer rain. Following rain, evapotranspiration peaked above 8 mm d-1 but was usually much smaller (2-4 mm d-1). Net productivity of the grassland was low compared to other ecosystems, with peak hourly net CO2 uptake in the spring of 4 (mu or u)mol m-2 s-1 and springtime carbon gain in the range of 42 + or - 11 g C m-2 (based on fluxes) to 72 + or - 55 g C m-2 (based on carbon stocks; annual carbon gain was not quantified). Drought decreased gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and total ecosystem respiration, with a much larger GEP decrease. Monsoon rains led to respiratory pulses, lasting a few days at most, and only rarely resulted in net CO2 gain, despite the fact that C4 grasses dominated plant cover. Minor CO2 uptake was observed in fall following rain. Spring CO2 uptake was regulated by deep soil moisture, which depended on precipitation in the prior fall and winter. The lack of CO2 uptake during the monsoon and the dependence of GEP on deep soil moisture are in contrast with arid grasslands of the warm deserts. Cold desert grasslands are most likely to be impacted by future changes in winter and not summer precipitation.

  19. Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Nosaka, Kazunori; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2014-10-15

    We investigated the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on the recovery of muscle function and physiological responses after high-intensity resistance exercise. Using a randomized, cross-over design, 10 physically active men performed high-intensity resistance exercise followed by one of two recovery interventions: 1) 10 min of CWI at 10°C or 2) 10 min of active recovery (low-intensity cycling). After the recovery interventions, maximal muscle function was assessed after 2 and 4 h by measuring jump height and isometric squat strength. Submaximal muscle function was assessed after 6 h by measuring the average load lifted during 6 sets of 10 squats at 80% of 1 repetition maximum. Intramuscular temperature (1 cm) was also recorded, and venous blood samples were analyzed for markers of metabolism, vasoconstriction, and muscle damage. CWI did not enhance recovery of maximal muscle function. However, during the final three sets of the submaximal muscle function test, participants lifted a greater load (P muscle temperature decreased ∼7°C below postexercise values and remained below preexercise values for another 35 min. Venous blood O2 saturation decreased below preexercise values for 1.5 h after CWI. Serum endothelin-1 concentration did not change after CWI, whereas it decreased after active recovery. Plasma myoglobin concentration was lower, whereas plasma IL-6 concentration was higher after CWI compared with active recovery. These results suggest that CWI after resistance exercise allows athletes to complete more work during subsequent training sessions, which could enhance long-term training adaptations. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Carbon, water, and energy fluxes in a semiarid cold desert grassland during and following multiyear drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, D. R.; Bethers-Marchetti, S.; Lunch, C. K.; Grote, E. E.; Belnap, J.

    2010-12-01

    The net exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy were examined in a perennial Colorado Plateau grassland for 5 years. The study began within a multiyear drought and continued as the drought ended. The grassland is located near the northern boundary of the influence of the North American monsoon, a major climatic feature bringing summer rain. Following rain, evapotranspiration peaked above 8 mm d-1 but was usually much smaller (2-4 mm d-1). Net productivity of the grassland was low compared to other ecosystems, with peak hourly net CO2 uptake in the spring of 4 μmol m-2 s-1 and springtime carbon gain in the range of 42 ± 11 g C m-2 (based on fluxes) to 72 ± 55 g C m-2 (based on carbon stocks; annual carbon gain was not quantified). Drought decreased gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and total ecosystem respiration, with a much larger GEP decrease. Monsoon rains led to respiratory pulses, lasting a few days at most, and only rarely resulted in net CO2 gain, despite the fact that C4 grasses dominated plant cover. Minor CO2 uptake was observed in fall following rain. Spring CO2 uptake was regulated by deep soil moisture, which depended on precipitation in the prior fall and winter. The lack of CO2 uptake during the monsoon and the dependence of GEP on deep soil moisture are in contrast with arid grasslands of the warm deserts. Cold desert grasslands are most likely to be impacted by future changes in winter and not summer precipitation.

  1. Effectiveness of cold water immersion for treating exertional heat stress when immediate response is not possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, A D; Friesen, B J; Carlson, M J; Casa, D J; Kenny, G P

    2015-06-01

    Immediate treatment with cold water immersion (CWI) is the gold standard for exertional heatstroke. In the field, however, treatment is often delayed due to delayed paramedic response and/or inaccurate diagnosis. We examined the effect of treatment (reduction of rectal temperature to 37.5 °C) delays of 5, 20, and 40 min on core cooling rates in eight exertionally heat-stressed (40.0 °C rectal temperature) individuals. We found that rectal temperature was elevated above baseline (P  0.05). Rectal core cooling rates were similar among conditions (5 min: 0.20 ± 0.01; 20 min: 0.17 ± 0.02; 40 min: 0.17 ± 0.01 °C/min; P > 0.05). The rectal temperature afterdrop following CWI was similar across conditions (5 min: 35.95; 20 min: 35.61; 40 min: 35.87 °C; P > 0.05). We conclude that the effectiveness of 2 °C CWI as a treatment for exertional heat stress remains high even when applied with a delay of 40 min. Therefore, our results support that CWI is the most appropriate treatment for exertional heatstroke as it is capable of quickly reversing hyperthermia even when treatment is commenced with a significant delay.

  2. The Effects of Cold Water Immersion after Rugby Training on Muscle Power and Biochemical Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Takeda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During rugby game, or intensive rugby training there are many high intensity explosive exercises and eccentric muscle contractions, therefore adequate recovery is very important to rugby players. In the present study we have tested the effects of cold water immersion (CWI after game-simulated (80 min. rugby training on muscle power recovery and blood markers of muscle damage. Twenty well-trained collegiate male rugby players (age: 20.3 ± 0.6 years old, body height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m, body weight: 85.4 ± 2.0 kg, body fat: 18.2 ± 1.4 % volunteered for this study. This study was conducted as a cross-over design; i.e., the subjects were randomly assigned either to CWI (n = 10 or passive rest condition (n = 10 for the 1st trial and 1 week later the subjects were switched conditions for the 2nd trial. After the simulated rugby training, including tackles and body contacts, muscle functional ability and blood markers of muscle damage were tested immediately, after CWI or passive rest, and again 24 hours later. Statistical analysis of all muscle functional tests (10 m dash, counter movement jump, reaction time, side steps except for 10 seconds maximal pedaling power and blood makers of muscle damage (aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and creatinine revealed significant main effects for time (p < 0.05. However, no statistically significant interactions were found in any of the muscle functional tests and blood markers between groups and time courses. Our results suggest that a rugby game induces muscle damage and reduces muscle function. However, CWI has no significant restorative effect after an 80-minute rugby game in terms of muscle damage.

  3. Can Cold Water Immersion Enhance Recovery in Elite Olympic Weightlifters? An Individualized Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpchen, Jan; Wagner, Maximilian; Ferrauti, Alexander; Kellmann, Michael; Pfeiffer, Mark; Meyer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    We investigated whether cold water immersion (CWI) after intensive training sessions can enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters, taking into account each athlete's individual response pattern. The entire German male Olympic weightlifting national team participated in the study (n = 7), ensuring collection of data from elite athletes only. Using a randomized cross-over design, the athletes went through 2 high-intensity training microcycles consisting of 5 training sessions that were either followed by a CWI or passive recovery. Barbell speed in a snatch pull movement, blood parameters, and subjective ratings of general fatigue and recovery were assessed throughout the study. Physical performance at 2 snatch pull intensities (85% one repetition maximum [1RM]: -0.15% vs. -0.22%, p = 0.94; 90% 1RM: -0.7% vs. +1.23%, p = 0.25) did not differ significantly (condition × time). Although questionnaires revealed a significant decline in the ratings of overall recovery (p < 0.001) and a significantly higher rating of overall stress (p = 0.03) over time, no significant differences between conditions (p = 0.14; p = 0.98) could be revealed. Similarly, neither of the analyzed blood parameters changed significantly between conditions over time (creatine kinase: p = 0.53; urea: p = 0.43; cortisol: p = 0.59; testosterone: p = 0.53; testosterone:cortisol ratio: p = 0.69). In general, CWI did not prove to be an effective tool to enhance recovery in elite Olympic weightlifters over a 3-day intensive training period. However, even though the group was rather homogeneous with regard to performance, there were considerable intersubject differences in their response to CWI. It seems that athletes are best advised on a case-by-case basis.

  4. Fish communities associated with cold-water corals vary with depth and substratum type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Rosanna J.; Spence, Gemma; Roberts, J. Murray; Bailey, David M.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the processes that drive the distribution patterns of organisms and the scales over which these processes operate are vital when considering the effective management of species with high commercial or conservation value. In the deep sea, the importance of scleractinian cold-water corals (CWCs) to fish has been the focus of several studies but their role remains unclear. We propose this may be due to the confounding effects of multiple drivers operating over multiple spatial scales. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of CWCs in shaping fish community structure and individual species-habitat associations across four spatial scales in the NE Atlantic ranging from "regions" (separated by >500 km) to "substratum types" (contiguous). Demersal fish and substratum types were quantified from three regions: Logachev Mounds, Rockall Bank and Hebrides Terrace Seamount (HTS). PERMANOVA analyses showed significant differences in community composition between all regions which were most likely caused by differences in depths. Within regions, significant variation in community composition was recorded at scales of c. 20-3500 m. CWCs supported significantly different fish communities to non-CWC substrata at Rockall Bank, Logachev and the HTS. Single-species analyses using generalised linear mixed models showed that Sebastes sp. was strongly associated with CWCs at Rockall Bank and that Neocyttus helgae was more likely to occur in CWCs at the HTS. Depth had a significant effect on several other fish species. The results of this study suggest that the importance of CWCs to fish is species-specific and depends on the broader spatial context in which the substratum is found. The precautionary approach would be to assume that CWCs are important for associated fish, but must acknowledge that CWCs in different depths will not provide redundancy or replication within spatially-managed conservation networks.

  5. Cold-Water Corals and Anthropogenic Impacts in La Fonera Submarine Canyon Head, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galderic Lastras

    Full Text Available We assess the occurrence and extent of cold-water coral (CWC species Madrepora oculata and Dendrophyllia cornigera, as well as gorgonian red coral Corallium rubrum, in La Fonera canyon head (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, as well as human impacts taking place in their habitats. Occurrence is assessed based on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV video imaging. Terrain classification techniques are applied to high-resolution swath bathymetric data to obtain semi-automatic interpretative maps to identify the relationship between coral distribution patterns and canyon environments. A total of 21 ROV immersions were carried out in different canyon environments at depths ranging between 79 and 401 m. Large, healthy colonies of M. oculata occur on abrupt, protected, often overhanging, rocky sections of the canyon walls, especially in Illa Negra branch. D. cornigera is sparser and evenly distributed at depth, on relatively low sloping areas, in rocky but also partially sedimented areas. C. rubrum is most frequent between 100 and 160 m on highly sloping rocky areas. The probable extent of CWC habitats is quantified by applying a maximum entropy model to predict habitat suitability: 0.36 km2 yield M. oculata occurrence probabilities over 70%. Similar predictive models have been produced for D. cornigera and C. rubrum. All ROV transects document either the presence of litter on the seafloor or pervasive trawling marks. Nets and longlines are imaged entangled on coral colonies. Coral rubble is observed at the foot of impacted colonies. Some colonies are partially covered by sediment that could be the result of the resuspension generated by bottom trawling on neighbouring fishing grounds, which has been demonstrated to be responsible of daily increases in sediment fluxes within the canyon. The characteristics of the CWC community in La Fonera canyon are indicative that it withstands high environmental stress of both natural and human origin.

  6. Cold-Water Coral Habitats in Submarine Canyons of the Bay of Biscay

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    Inge M. J. van den Beld

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The topographical and hydrological complexity of submarine canyons, coupled with high substratum heterogeneity, make them ideal environments for cold-water coral (CWC habitats. These habitats, including reefs, are thought to provide important functions for many organisms. The canyons incising the continental slope of the Bay of Biscay have distinct morphological differences from the north to the south. CWCs have been reported from this basin in the late nineteenth century; however, little is known about their present-day distribution, diversity and environmental drivers in the canyons. In this study, the characteristics and distribution of CWC habitats in the submarine canyons of the Bay of Biscay are investigated. Twenty-four canyons and three locations between adjacent canyons were sampled using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV or a towed camera system. Acquired images were annotated for habitat type (using the CoralFISH classification system, substrate cover and coral identification. Furthermore, the influence of hydrological factors and geomorphology on the CWC distribution was investigated. Eleven coral habitats, formed by 62 morphotypes of scleractinians, gorgonians, antipatharians and seapens, inhabiting hard and/or soft substrate, were observed. The distribution patterns were heterogenous at regional and local scales; the south Bay of Biscay and the southeastern flank favored soft substrate habitats. Biogenic and hard substrate habitats supported higher coral diversities than soft substrate habitats and had similar species compositions. A higher coral species turnover characterized soft substrate habitats. Substrate type was the most important driver of the patterns in both distribution and composition. Observations of coral reefs on steeper areas in the canyons and coral rubble on flatter areas on the interfluve/upper slope support the hypothesis that canyons serve as refuges, being less accessible to trawling, although natural causes

  7. Seasonal variations of phytoplankton phosphorus stress in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dan; HUANG Bangqin; LIU Xin; LIU Guimei; WANG Hui

    2014-01-01

    The Yellow Sea is located between the China Mainland and the Korean Peninsula, representing a typical shallow epicontinental sea. The Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM) is one of the most important physical features in the Yellow Sea. The characteristics of vertical profiles and seasonal variations of biogenic ele-ments in the YSCWM may lead the variations of nutrient availability (e.g., phosphorus) and phosphorus stress of phytoplankton. In this study, the authors surveyed the seasonal variations of phytoplankton phos-phorus stress with emphasis on the effect of the YSCWM during the four cruises in April and October 2006, March and August 2007. Using both bulk and single-cell alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) assays, this study evaluated phosphorus status of phytoplankton community, succession of phytoplankton community and ecophysiological responses of phytoplankton to phosphorus in the typical region of the YSCWM. With the occurrence of the YSCWM, especially the variations of concentration of dissolved inorganic phospho-rus (DIP), the results of bulk APA appeared corresponding seasonal variations. Along Transects A and B, the mean APA in August was the highest, and that in March was the lowest. According to the ELF-labeled assay’s results, seasonal variations of the ELF-labeled percentages within dominant species indicated that diatoms were dominant in March, April and October, while dinoflagellates were dominant in August. During the four cruises, the ELF-labeled percentages of diatoms except Paralia sulcata showed that diatoms were not phosphorus deficient in April 2006 at all, but suffered from severe phosphorus stress in August 2007. In comparison, the ELF-labeled percentages of dinoflagellates were all above 50%during the four time series, which meant dinoflagellates such as Alexandrium and Scrippsiella, sustained perennial phosphorus stress.

  8. Early life stages of plaice Pleuronectes platessa in cold-water nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Martinho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plaice Pleuronectes platessa (Linnaeus, 1758 is one of the most important commercial flatfish in the European continent, whose captures have reduced considerably in recent decades due to the high pressure of fisheries. Despite the wide distribution of this species, most studies have focused on the North Sea, its central area of occurrence, and very little information is available concerning the populations living at the northern limit of its distribution. Age determination is essential to study population dynamics of commercially important species such as plaice, and can be inferred through otolith microstructure analysis. The aim of this work was to investigate the timing of early life events (spawning, larval, metamorphosis and settlement stage duration and growth of juvenile plaice in two cold-water nursery areas in northern Norway (Valosen estuary and Storfjord. A latitudinal cline was observed in the main life-history events, such as spawning, and the onset of larval and metamorphosis stages. Settlement to benthic habitats (which coincides with metamorphosis was estimated to have occurred between mid-May and early-September (peak from the end May and mid July in the Valosen, and between the end of May and early July (peak in June in the Storfjord. In the Storfjord area, larval and metamorphosis stage duration seemed to be shorter, probably due to a reduced window of opportunity for growth and survival at the northernmost extremes. Size at settlement was negatively related with hatch day, implying that the older larvae were larger at settlement, a consequence of higher fecundity of females earlier in the spawning season. A significant relationship between size at settlement and total length reinforced this evidence. The results demonstrate the influence of latitude in the early life stages of plaice, mainly by the regulatory effect of temperature in the growth and survival of larvae and juveniles.

  9. The climate influence on the mid-depth Northeast Atlantic gyres viewed by cold-water corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; Frank, Norbert; Colin, Christophe; Wienberg, Claudia; Eisele, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The neodymium (Nd) isotopic composition (expressed in epsilon units, $\\varepsilon$Nd) of reef framework-forming cold-water corals provides unique measures of water mass provenance and mixing within the Northeast Atlantic today and in the past. A reconstruction of near thermocline water $\\varepsilon$Nd from cold-water corals of the Gulf of Cádiz and Porcupine Seabight spanning over the past 300,000 years, now revealed that climate cooling during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 7.2 and MIS 8/9 led to a retraction of the mid-depth Subpolar Gyre (mSPG) to the west. Conversely, Northern Hemisphere warming and increasing fresh water fluxes to the northwest (Labrador Sea) favor a stronger eastward extension of the mSPG blocking the northward flow of temperate Atlantic water as observed during the early MIS 1 and the early stage MIS 5.5. These changes are likely the result of large-scale south-north displacement of the westerlies similar to present-day observations that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is linked with mid-depth ocean circulation. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that further climate warming will also strengthen the mSPG leading to a salt and temperature decrease in the Northeast Atlantic whereas salinity and temperature will increase in the temperate Atlantic. However, the amplitude of such changes on North Atlantic overturning remains to be tested.

  10. A phylogenetic perspective on diversity of Galatheoidea (Munida, Munidopsis) from cold-water coral and cold seep communities in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Nizinski, Martha S.; Morrison, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Squat lobsters (Galatheoidea and Chirostyloidea), a diverse group of decapod crustaceans, are ubiquitous members of the deep-sea fauna. Within Galatheoidea, the genera Munida and Munidopsis are the most diverse, but accurate estimates of biodiversity are difficult due to morphological complexity and cryptic diversity. Four species of Munida and nine species of Munidopsis from cold-water coral (CWC) and cold seep communities in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) were collected over eleven years and fifteen research cruises in order to assess faunal associations and estimate squat lobster biodiversity. Identification of the majority of specimens was determined morphologically. Mitochondrial COI sequence data, obtained from material collected during these research cruises, was supplemented with published sequences of congeners from other regions. The phylogenetic analysis of Munida supports three of the four NWA and GOM species (M. microphthalma, M. sanctipauli, and M. valida) as closely related taxa. The fourth species, Munida iris, is basal to most other species of Munida, and is closely related to M. rutllanti, a species found in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean (NEA). The majority of the nine species of Munidopsis included in our analyses were collected from chemosynthetic cold seep sites from the GOM. While seep taxa were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree, four of these species (Munidopsis livida, M. similis, M. bermudezi, and M. species A) from the NWA and the GOM were part of a large eighteen-species clade that included species collected from Pacific Ocean chemosynthetic habitats, such as hydrothermal vents and whale falls. Shinkaia crosnieri was the sister taxon to the chemosynthetic clade, and M. livida was the most basal member of this clade. Munidopsis sp. B, an undescribed species with representative individuals collected from two GOM chemosynthetic sites, exhibited the largest genetic distance from other northern

  11. A phylogenetic perspective on diversity of Galatheoidea (Munida, Munidopsis) from cold-water coral and cold seep communities in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharine Coykendall, D.; Nizinski, Martha S.; Morrison, Cheryl L.

    2017-03-01

    Squat lobsters (Galatheoidea and Chirostyloidea), a diverse group of decapod crustaceans, are ubiquitous members of the deep-sea fauna. Within Galatheoidea, the genera Munida and Munidopsis are the most diverse, but accurate estimates of biodiversity are difficult due to morphological complexity and cryptic diversity. Four species of Munida and nine species of Munidopsis from cold-water coral (CWC) and cold seep communities in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean (NWA) and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) were collected over eleven years and fifteen research cruises in order to assess faunal associations and estimate squat lobster biodiversity. Identification of the majority of specimens was determined morphologically. Mitochondrial COI sequence data, obtained from material collected during these research cruises, was supplemented with published sequences of congeners from other regions. The phylogenetic analysis of Munida supports three of the four NWA and GOM species (M. microphthalma, M. sanctipauli, and M. valida) as closely related taxa. The fourth species, Munida iris, is basal to most other species of Munida, and is closely related to M. rutllanti, a species found in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean (NEA). The majority of the nine species of Munidopsis included in our analyses were collected from chemosynthetic cold seep sites from the GOM. While seep taxa were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree, four of these species (Munidopsis livida, M. similis, M. bermudezi, and M. species A) from the NWA and the GOM were part of a large eighteen-species clade that included species collected from Pacific Ocean chemosynthetic habitats, such as hydrothermal vents and whale falls. Shinkaia crosnieri was the sister taxon to the chemosynthetic clade, and M. livida was the most basal member of this clade. Munidopsis sp. B, an undescribed species with representative individuals collected from two GOM chemosynthetic sites, exhibited the largest genetic distance from other northern

  12. [Simultaneous determination of 11 bisphenols in plastic bottled drinking water by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Xinlei; Gao, Xia; Hu, Guanghui; Chi, Haitao; Le, Shengfeng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Weili

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 11 bisphenols in plastic bottled drinking water by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The samples were freeze-dried under vacuum and then dissolved with methanol. The separation was performed on a UPLC BEH C18 column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm) by using 0.1% (v/v) NH3 · H2O and methanol as mobile phases with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The electrospray ionization (ESI) source in negative ion mode was used for the analysis of the 11 bisphenols in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The results verified that the standard curves for the 11 bisphenols were obtained with good correlation coefficients (R2) > 0.997 in their concentration ranges. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) for the 11 bisphenols were in the range of 0.01-1.00 μg/L. The mean recoveries for the 11 bisphenols at three spiked levels (low, middle, high) were 75.3%-102.1% with the relative standard deviations of 1.5%-8.9%. Seven plastic bottled drinking water samples were tested, and no bisphenol was found. The method is accurate, simple, rapid and feasible for the simultaneous determination of bisphenols in plastic bottled drinking water.

  13. Diving of great shearwaters (Puffinus gravis in cold and warm water regions of the South Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Ronconi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis, the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Time-depth recorders (TDRs were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50% dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving.

  14. Effects of diet composition on the metabolic and heart rate responses to cold water exposure in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkar, E; Marsiglia, J C; Berreta, J A; Garcia, S A; Rodríguez, R R; Estol, C J

    1985-01-01

    The reaction to immersion in cold water (22 degrees C) was studied in ten healthy male volunteers successively receiving balanced (C), hypercarbohydrate (HC), hyperprotein (HP), and hyperlipid (HL) normocaloric diets with a three week equilibration period on each diet. Oxygen consumption (ml min-1 m-2) increased from 149 to 224 during C, from 160 to 196 during HL, from 154 to 178 during HP, and from 166 to 187 during HL. Only the first two differences were significant. Pulmonary ventilation (ml min-1 m-2) increased from 4.08 to 6.24 during C, from 4.01 to 5.48 during HC, from 3.41 to 3.83 during HP, and from 3.77 to 5.48 during HL. The difference was statistically significant only for C. Heart rate (beats/min) decreased from 73 to 64 during C, from 74 to 61 during HC, from 73 to 60 during HP and from 72 to 64 during HL. The differences were statistically significant for all diets except HL. Oral temperature decreased in all groups (range 0.4 to 1.6 degrees C). Respiratory rate changes were not statistically significant. The calorigenic reaction to cold water immersion was demonstrable for all groups but more efficient in subjects receiving either balanced or HC diets, suggesting that HP and HL diets reduce cold adaptation.

  15. The Effectiveness of Whole Body Cryotherapy Compared to Cold Water Immersion: Implications for Sport and Exercise Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Holmes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryotherapy is the process of cooling the body, is typically used therapeutically, and is often used as a method of recovery relative to sport and exercise performance.  The purpose of this review is to compare the current literature on WBC to that of CWI and determine whether WBC provides any additional enhancements for sport and exercise recovery. These include tissue temperature reduction, markers of muscle damage, markers of inflammation, and parasympathetic reactivation. Method: Common methods of cryotherapy include cold water immersion (CWI, ice packs, ice massages, and gel or cooling creams. CWI is the most common method among athletes; however, a new form of cryotherapy, known as whole-body cryotherapy (WBC, has recently emerged.  Since its introduction, WBC has grown in popularity among practitioners and athletes. WBC involves short exposures (generally between 2-4 minutes to very cold air (-100o C to -140o C in a controlled room and setting. Furthermore, many of the studies on WBC were observational and did not contain a control group. Conclusion: Despite its growing popularity, the alleged benefits of WBC are largely based on anecdotal evidence as randomized, clinically-controlled studies regarding its efficacy are limited.  Keywords: cryotherapy, cold water immersion, exercise, recovery, muscle damage, inflammation

  16. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., impact in coastal areas are concerns and interest in developing deep water (> 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  17. Do estrogenic compounds in drinking water migrating from plastic pipe distribution system pose adverse effects to human? An analysis of scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Hua; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    With the widespread application of plastic pipes in drinking water distribution system, the effects of various leachable organic chemicals have been investigated and their occurrence in drinking water supplies is monitored. Most studies focus on the odor problems these substances may cause. This study investigates the potential endocrine disrupting effects of the migrating compound 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol (2,4-d-t-BP). The summarized results show that the migration of 2,4-d-t-BP from plastic pipes could result in chronic exposure and the migration levels varied greatly among different plastic pipe materials and manufacturing brands. Based on estrogen equivalent (EEQ), the migrating levels of the leachable compound 2,4-d-t-BP in most plastic pipes were relative low. However, the EEQ levels in drinking water migrating from four out of 15 pipes may pose significant adverse effects. With the increasingly strict requirements on regulation of drinking water quality, these results indicate that some drinking water transported with plastic pipes may not be safe for human consumption due to the occurrence of 2,4-d-t-BP. Moreover, 2,4-d-t-BP is not the only plastic pipe-migrating estrogenic compound, other compounds such as 2-tert-butylphenol (2-t-BP), 4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), and others may also be leachable from plastic pipes.

  18. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gula Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of CODCr and NH3N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well.

  19. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gula; Zhu, Yunqiang; Wu, Guozheng; Li, Jing; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Jiulin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of CODCr and NH3N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well. PMID:27070631

  20. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stalder

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral (CWC ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago. However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents.

  1. Estimation of the consumption of cold tap water for microbiological risk assessment: An overview of studies and statistical analysis of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mons, M.N.; Wielen, J.M.L. van der; Blokker, E.J.M.; Sinclair, M.I.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Dangendorf, F.; Hunter, P.R.; Medema, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    The volume of cold tap water consumed is an essential element in quantitative microbial risk assessment. This paper presents a review of tap water consumption studies. Study designs were evaluated and statistical distributions were fitted to water consumption data from The Netherlands, Great Britain

  2. Continuous cold therapy in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, D W; Harris, H

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a retrospective study that assessed 52 consecutive patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between January 1, 1992 and September 15, 1992. Thirty-three patients underwent TKA and received cold therapy pads placed over a thin dressing in the operating room. Nineteen patients underwent TKA using an identical operative and postoperative procedure, but did not receive continuous cold therapy. Continuous cold therapy consisted of two sterile plastic pads connnected by rubber hoses containing cool water from an electric main unit that maintained a constant temperature of 42 degrees F for the immediate postoperative period. Cold therapy pads were used an average of 3 days and removed with the first dressing change. Patients who had continuous cold therapy averaged a 200 cc decrease in postoperative blood loss. There was no significant difference in the amount of narcotic use, transfusion requirements, or hospital stay between the two groups. Postoperative swelling and range of motion were not consistently recorded. Twenty-eight other variables also examined not significant. Based on these results, we cannot recommend continuous cold therapy or justify the extra expense for all patients who undergo TKA.

  3. Effect of the Heat-treatment Temperature on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution of Cold-rolled Twinning-induced Plasticity Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dazhao; WEI Yinghui; SONG Jinlu; HOU Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    TWIP steels with 70%cold-rolled reduction were heated at 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, and 1100℃. Then, the properties before and after heating were examined through tensile and hardness experiments. The microstructures were also analyzed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The relationship between the properties and microstructure was examined as well. Finally, the evolution process of cold-rolled microstructures during heating was discussed in detail. Moreover, some conclusions can be drawn, and the heating evolution characteristics are described.

  4. Tracking trails by cracking codes : Molecular biogeography and evolution of benthic cold-water seaweeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oppen, Madeleine Josephine Henriette

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to examine the evolutionary diversification and biogeography of some polar and cold-temperatsee aweeds. Distribution patterns and dispersal routes were investigated in three species exhibiting a bipolar disjunction and one with an amphi-Atlantic distribution, by

  5. Analysis of water sorption isotherms of amorphous food materials by solution thermodynamics with relevance to glass transition: evaluation of plasticizing effect of water by the thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Eriko; Tashiro, Akiko; Kumagai, Hitomi; Kumagai, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Relation between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from water sorption isotherms and the degree of reduction in the glass transition temperature (Tg), accompanied by water sorption, was quantitatively studied. Two well-known glassy food materials namely, wheat gluten and maltodextrin were used as samples. The difference between the chemical potential of water in a solution and that of pure water ([Formula: see text]), the difference between the chemical potential of solid in a solution and that of a pure solid ([Formula: see text]), and the change in the integral Gibbs free energy ([Formula: see text]) were obtained by analyzing the water sorption isotherms using solution thermodynamics. The parameter [Formula: see text] correlated well with ΔTg (≡Tg - Tg0; where Tg0 is the glass transition temperature of dry material), which had been taken to be an index of plasticizing effect. This indicates that plasticizing effect of water on foods can be evaluated through the parameter [Formula: see text].

  6. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  7. Effect of cold water extracts of Acacia modesta Wall. and Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn. on Tribolium castaneum and Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeefullah, Sayed; Dastagir, Ghulam; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to introduce an alternative way for insects control through biodegradable plants materials. The different cold water extracts dilutions of Acacia modesta and Glycyrrhiza glabra were tested against Tribolium castaneum. The extracts dilutions of both plants caused mortality of the Tribolium castaneum. ANOVA revealed that dilutions and plants were highly significant. The interaction between plants and dilutions was also significant at P Glycyrrhiza glabra extracts significantly inhibited the growth of Lemna minor. ANOVA showed that dilutions of both plants extracts were significant at P < 0.05.

  8. Benthic O-2 uptake of two cold-water coral communities estimated with the non-invasive eddy correlation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovelli, Lorenzo; Attard, Karl M.; Bryant, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    The community respiration of 2 tidally dominated cold-water coral (CWC) sites was estimated using the non-invasive eddy correlation (EC) technique. The first site, Mingulay Reef Complex, was a rock ridge located in the Sea of Hebrides off Scotland at a depth of 128 m and the second site, Stjernsund......, was a channel-like sound in Northern Norway at a depth of 220 m. Both sites were characterized by the presence of live mounds of the reef framework-forming scleractinian Lophelia pertusa and reef-associated fauna such as sponges, crustaceans and other corals. The measured O-2 uptake at the 2 sites varied...

  9. Effect of immediate and delayed cold water immersion after a high intensity exercise session on subsequent run performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Landers, Grant; Wallman, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) performed immediately or 3 h after a high intensity interval exercise session (HIIS) on next-day exercise performance. Eight male athletes performed three HIIS at 90%VO2max velocity followed by either a passive recovery (CON), CWI performed immediately post-exercise (CWI(0)) or CWI performed 3 h post-exercise (CWI(3)). Recovery trials were performed in a counter balanced manner. Participants then returned 24 h later and completed a muscle soreness and a totally quality recovery perception (TQRP) questionnaire, which was then followed by the Yoyo Intermittent Recovery Test [level 1] (YRT). Venous blood samples were collected pre-HIIS and pre-YRT to determine C-Reactive Protein (CRP) levels. Significantly more shuttles were performed during the YRT following CWI(0) compared to the CON trial (p=0.017, ES = 0. 8), while differences between the CWI(3) and the CON trials approached significance (p = 0.058, ES = 0.5). Performance on the YRT between the CWI(0) and CWI(3) trials were similar (p = 0.147, ES = 0. 3). Qualitative analyses demonstrated a 98% and 92% likely beneficial effect of CWI(0) and CWI(3) on next day performance, compared to CON, respectively, while CWI(0) resulted in a 79% likely benefit when compared to CWI(3). CRP values were significantly lower pre-YRT, compared to baseline, following CWI(0) (p = 0.0.36) and CWI(3) (p = 0.045), but were similar for CON (p = 0.157). Muscle soreness scores were similar between trials (p = 1.10), while TQRP scores were significantly lower for CON compared to CWI(0) (p = 0.002 ) and CWI(3) (p = 0.024). Immediate CWI resulted in superior next-day YRT performance compared to CON, while delayed (3 h) CWI was also likely to be beneficial. Qualitative analyses suggested that CWI(0) resulted in better performance than CWI(3). These results are important for athletes who do not have immediate access to CWI following exercise. Key points

  10. Water-fat MRI in a hibernator reveals seasonal growth of white and brown adipose tissue without cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCannell, Amanda; Sinclair, Kevin; Friesen-Waldner, Lannette; McKenzie, Charles A; Staples, James F

    2017-03-21

    Obligate hibernators, such as ground squirrels, display circannual patterns which persist even under constant laboratory conditions, suggesting that they are regulated by endogenous rhythms. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for thermogenesis during periodic arousals from hibernation when core body temperature rises spontaneously from 5 to 37 °C. In most small eutherians BAT growth requires several weeks of cold exposure. We hypothesized that in the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), a hibernator, BAT growth is regulated, in part, by an endogenous rhythm and we predicted that this growth would precede the hibernation season without cold exposure. We tested this prediction using repeated water-fat magnetic resonance imaging over a year, including the hibernation season. Thoracic BAT depots increased in volume from spring through autumn even though animals were housed at ~22 °C. Subsequent cold exposure (5 °C) enlarged the thoracic BAT further. The fat fraction of this tissue fell significantly during the period of peak growth, indicating relative increases in non-triglyceride components, perhaps mitochondria or vasculature. We also found that the proportion of the body consisting of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased steadily from spring through autumn, and fell throughout hibernation, mirroring changes in body mass. Unlike BAT, WAT fat fractions remained constant (near 90%) throughout the year. Future studies will evaluate the significance of photoperiod and cold exposure on the growth of these tissues. We also found tissue with a fat fraction characteristic of BAT in the head near the eyes, a potentially novel discovery that requires further confirmation.

  11. The early diagenetic and PETROphysical behaviour of recent cold-water CARbonate mounds in Deep Environments (PETROCARDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, Anneleen; Pirlet, Hans; Thierens, Mieke; de Mol, Ben; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Swennen, Rudy

    2010-05-01

    Sub-recent cold-water carbonate mounds localized in deeper slope settings on the Atlantic continental margins cannot be any longer neglected in the study of carbonate systems. They clearly play a major role in the dynamics of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate and/or carbonate-dominated continental slopes. Carbonate accumulation rates of cold-water carbonate mounds are about 4 to 12 % of the carbonate accumulation rates of tropical shallow-water reefs but exceed the carbonate accumulation rates of their slope settings by a factor of 4 to 12 (Titschack et al., 2009). These findings emphasize the importance of these carbonate factories as carbonate niches on the continental margins. The primary environmental architecture of such carbonate bodies is well-characterized. However, despite proven evidences of early diagenesis overprinting the primary environmental record (e.g. aragonite dissolution) (Foubert & Henriet, 2009), the extent of early diagenetic and biogeochemical processes shaping the petrophysical nature of mounds is until now not yet fully understood. Understanding (1) the functioning of a carbonate mound as biogeochemical reactor triggering early diagenetic processes and (2) the impact of early diagenesis on the petrophysical behaviour of a carbonate mound in space and through time are necessary (vital) for the reliable prediction of potential late diagenetic processes. Approaching the fossil carbonate mound record, through a profound study of recent carbonate bodies is innovative and will help to better understand processes observed in the fossil mound world (such as cementation, brecciation, fracturing, etc…). In this study, the 155-m high Challenger mound (Porcupine Seabight, SW of Ireland), drilled during IODP Expedition 307 aboard the R/V Joides Resolution (Foubert & Henriet, 2009), and mounds from the Gulf of Cadiz (Moroccan margin) will be discussed in terms of early diagenetic processes and petrophysical behaviour. Early differential diagenesis

  12. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  13. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Wehrmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.25 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmol S cm−3 d−1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in CH2O groups and 43% carbon in -CH2- groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Reductive iron oxide dissolution linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid-driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23–18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was

  14. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Wehrmann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.2 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmolS cm−3 d−1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in –CH2O– groups and 43% carbon in –CH2– groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Iron reduction linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23-18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was consistent

  15. Yield Potential of Soil Water and Its Sustainability for Dryland Spring Maize with Plastic Film Mulch on the Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Liu, Wenzhao

    2016-04-01

    Plastic film mulch(PM) is an agronomic measure widely used in the dryland spring maize production system on the Loess Plateau of China. The measure can greatly increase yield of dryland maize due to its significant effects on soil water conservation. Few researches have been done to investigate how the yield potential is impacted by PM. The yield-water use (ET) boundary equation raised by French and Schultz provides a simple approach to calculate crop water limited yield potential and gives a benchmark for farmers in managing their crops. However, method used in building the equation is somewhat arbitrary and has no strict principle, which leads to the uncertainty of equation when it is applied. Though using PM can increase crop yield, it increases soil temperature, promotes crop growth and increases the water transpired by crop, which further leads to high water consumption as compared with crops without PM. This means that PM may lead to the overuse of soil water and hence is unsustainable in a long run. This research is mainly focused on the yield potential and sustainability of PMing for spring maize on the Loess Plateau. A principle that may be utilized by any other researchers was proposed based on French & Schultz's boundary equation and on part of quantile regression theory. We used a data set built by collecting the experimental data from published papers and analyzed the water-limited yield potential of spring maize on the Loess Plateau. Moreover, maize yield and soil water dynamics under PM were investigated by a long-term site field experiment. Results show that on the Loess Plateau, the water limited yield potential can be calculated using the boundary equation y = 60.5×(x - 50), with a platform yield of 15954 kghm-2 after the water use exceeds 314 mm. Without PMing, the water limited yield potential can be estimated by the boundary equation y = 47.5×(x - 62.3) , with a platform yield of 12840 kghm-2 when the water use exceeds 325 mm, which

  16. Tracking cold bottom water in the Gargano Peninsula and Bari Canyon regions of the Adriatic using seismic oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Warren; Book, Jeffrey; Carniel, Sandro; Lindwall, Dennis; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Hobbs, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Tracking cold, dense bottom water from conventional ship sampling is difficult - equipment safety concerns result in incomplete sampling near the seafloor, and lateral variability can be significant. Mooring time series are poor at mapping dense water vein spatial extents and can even completely miss sampling narrow veins. The relatively new technique of seismic oceanography (SO) could potentially provide a new way of identifying and characterizing these bottom waters that is not as subject to the constraints and difficulties of present methods. Furthermore, combining SO with conventional sampling is particularly appealing for better characterization of the quick and small scales of dense water cascades and bottom trapped phenomenon.. There is a relationship between oceanic temperatures and the seismic data such that seismic images can be made to represent a quantitative measure of vertical temperature gradient through much of the water column and even very near the seafloor. The SO technique involves towing a low frequency, broadband (20-250 Hz) sound source (such as an air gun array) and a long, 600-1200 m, array of hydrophones. SO uses much lower frequencies than conventional Acoustical Oceanography (AO) techniques, and is affected by the acoustic impedance (product of sound speed and density) directly, not via proxy such as impurities or biota in the water. The sound pulses reflect off the (mostly temperature) contrasts in the water, and are recorded on the hydrophone array, creating an image of temperature gradient. Because the reflection coefficients are small, signal-enhancing techniques such as synthetic aperture (common midpoint binning) processing is required. The images generated using SO allow for the tracking of very thin (less than 10 m thick) bottom currents provided that the temperature contrast between the bottom, and overlying water is strong enough (0.3 to 1.2 degrees C, depending on acoustic noise levels) and abrupt enough (10-15 meters). The

  17. Ecohydrodynamics of cold-water coral reefs: a case study of the Mingulay Reef Complex (western Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Moreno Navas

    Full Text Available Ecohydrodynamics investigates the hydrodynamic constraints on ecosystems across different temporal and spatial scales. Ecohydrodynamics play a pivotal role in the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems, however the lack of integrated complex flow models for deep-water ecosystems beyond the coastal zone prevents further synthesis in these settings. We present a hydrodynamic model for one of Earth's most biologically diverse deep-water ecosystems, cold-water coral reefs. The Mingulay Reef Complex (western Scotland is an inshore seascape of cold-water coral reefs formed by the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa. We applied single-image edge detection and composite front maps using satellite remote sensing, to detect oceanographic fronts and peaks of chlorophyll a values that likely affect food supply to corals and other suspension-feeding fauna. We also present a high resolution 3D ocean model to incorporate salient aspects of the regional and local oceanography. Model validation using in situ current speed, direction and sea elevation data confirmed the model's realistic representation of spatial and temporal aspects of circulation at the reef complex including a tidally driven current regime, eddies, and downwelling phenomena. This novel combination of 3D hydrodynamic modelling and remote sensing in deep-water ecosystems improves our understanding of the temporal and spatial scales of ecological processes occurring in marine systems. The modelled information has been integrated into a 3D GIS, providing a user interface for visualization and interrogation of results that allows wider ecological application of the model and that can provide valuable input for marine biodiversity and conservation applications.

  18. Ecohydrodynamics of cold-water coral reefs: a case study of the Mingulay Reef Complex (western Scotland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Miller, Peter I; Miller, Peter L; Henry, Lea-Anne; Hennige, Sebastian J; Roberts, J Murray

    2014-01-01

    Ecohydrodynamics investigates the hydrodynamic constraints on ecosystems across different temporal and spatial scales. Ecohydrodynamics play a pivotal role in the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems, however the lack of integrated complex flow models for deep-water ecosystems beyond the coastal zone prevents further synthesis in these settings. We present a hydrodynamic model for one of Earth's most biologically diverse deep-water ecosystems, cold-water coral reefs. The Mingulay Reef Complex (western Scotland) is an inshore seascape of cold-water coral reefs formed by the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa. We applied single-image edge detection and composite front maps using satellite remote sensing, to detect oceanographic fronts and peaks of chlorophyll a values that likely affect food supply to corals and other suspension-feeding fauna. We also present a high resolution 3D ocean model to incorporate salient aspects of the regional and local oceanography. Model validation using in situ current speed, direction and sea elevation data confirmed the model's realistic representation of spatial and temporal aspects of circulation at the reef complex including a tidally driven current regime, eddies, and downwelling phenomena. This novel combination of 3D hydrodynamic modelling and remote sensing in deep-water ecosystems improves our understanding of the temporal and spatial scales of ecological processes occurring in marine systems. The modelled information has been integrated into a 3D GIS, providing a user interface for visualization and interrogation of results that allows wider ecological application of the model and that can provide valuable input for marine biodiversity and conservation applications.

  19. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, M.F., E-mail: mfchiang@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Young, M.C.; Huang, J.Y. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Fuels and Materials, Lungtan, Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  20. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, M. F.; Young, M. C.; Huang, J. Y.

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  1. Mechanical properties of Fe -10Ni -7Mn martensitic steel subjected to severe plastic deformation via cold rolling and wire drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, H.; Nili-Ahmadabadi, M.; Shirazi, H.

    2010-07-01

    Fe-Ni-Mn martensitic steels are one of the major groups of ultra-high strength steels that have good mechanical properties and ductility in as annealed condition but they suffer from severe inter-granular embitterment after aging. In this paper, the effect of heavy shaped cold rolling and wire drawing on the mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn steel was investigated. This process could provide a large strain deformation in this alloy. The total strain was epsilon ~7. Aging behavior and tensile properties of Fe-10Ni-7Mn were studied after aging at 753 K. The results showed that the ultimate tensile strength and ductility after cold rolling, wire drawing and aging increased up to 2540 MPa and 7.1 %, respectively, while the conventional steels show a premature fracture stress of 830 MPa with about zero ductility after aging.

  2. Mechanical properties of Fe -10Ni -7Mn martensitic steel subjected to severe plastic deformation via cold rolling and wire drawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, H; Shirazi, H [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nili-Ahmadabadi, M, E-mail: sut.caster.81710018@gmail.co, E-mail: nili@ut.ac.i [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-731, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    Fe-Ni-Mn martensitic steels are one of the major groups of ultra-high strength steels that have good mechanical properties and ductility in as annealed condition but they suffer from severe inter-granular embitterment after aging. In this paper, the effect of heavy shaped cold rolling and wire drawing on the mechanical properties of Fe-Ni-Mn steel was investigated. This process could provide a large strain deformation in this alloy. The total strain was {epsilon} {approx}7. Aging behavior and tensile properties of Fe-10Ni-7Mn were studied after aging at 753 K. The results showed that the ultimate tensile strength and ductility after cold rolling, wire drawing and aging increased up to 2540 MPa and 7.1 %, respectively, while the conventional steels show a premature fracture stress of 830 MPa with about zero ductility after aging.

  3. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeber, E. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, M.E. [Comision Nacional Energia Atomica, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gavioli, N. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salmoral, E.M. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: esalmor@fi.uba.ar

    2007-01-15

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  4. Response of the Adriatic Sea to an intense cold air outbreak: Dense water dynamics and wave-induced transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetazzo, A.; Bergamasco, A.; Bonaldo, D.; Falcieri, F. M.; Sclavo, M.; Langone, L.; Carniel, S.

    2014-11-01

    The paper describes formation and spreading of dense shelf waters in the Adriatic Sea (North Adriatic Dense Water, NAdDW) during the winter of 2012 as a consequence of an intense and long cold air outbreak of northeasterly Bora winds. As a result, during February 2012 northern Adriatic Sea water temperature dropped to about 6 °C and density exceeded 1030 kg/m3, most likely the maximum value since 1929. NAdDW dynamics has been investigated by means of a 3-D ocean-wave coupled model running on a high resolution and eddy-permitting grid. The numerical experiments have relied on the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment-Transport (COAWST) system forced one-way with atmospheric forcings provided by the model COSMO-I7. A suite of observational data has been used to characterize the Bora event and evaluate numerical model performance. At sub-basin scales, the newly formed waters flowing southerly have produced a water renewal of the northern Adriatic, as more than 50% of water volumes have left the basin. Dense waters volume transports, evaluated through different Adriatic cross-sections, have been modulated by tides (damped for the densest water masses) and reached about 1 Sv. The contribution of wave-induced forcings has been quantified and examined, indicating that these represent a major driving mechanism during NAdDW production and spreading phases. This work provides evidence that NAdDW is spread accordingly with two different mechanisms: at early stages of its formation, the wind-driven ocean circulation pushes newly formed waters to leave the northern basin with relatively high speeds (about 0.30 m/s). Later on, remaining NAdDW leaks slowly out (0.09 m/s as average) from the production site. Residence times of dense waters in the north, middle, and south Adriatic Sea are also documented.

  5. Impact of plastics on fate and transport of organic contaminants in landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquing, Jovita M; Saquing, Carl D; Knappe, Detlef R U; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-08-15

    Factors controlling organic contaminant sorption to common plastics in municipal solid waste were identified. Consumer plastics [drinking water container, prescription drug bottle, soda bottle, disposable cold cup, computer casing, furniture foam, carpet, vinyl flooring, formica sheet] and model polymers [high-density polyethylene (HDPE), medium-density polyethylene, low-density polyethylene, poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)] were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis. The material characterization was used to interpret batch isotherm and kinetic data. K(p) values describing toluene sorption to rubbery or "soft" polymers could be normalized by the amorphous polymer fraction (f(amorphous)) but not by the organic carbon fraction (f(oc)). Diffusion coefficients (D) describing the uptake rate of toluene by rubbery plastics (HDPE, drinking water container, prescription drug bottle) were similar (D approximately 10(-10) cm(2)/s), indicating that pure HDPE can be used as a model for rubbery plastics. Toluene diffusivity was similar among glassy or "hard" plastics (PVC, soda bottle, computer casing, disposable cold cup; D approximately 10(-12) cm(2)/s) but lower than for rubbery plastics. Plastics in landfills are potential sinks of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) because of their higher affinity for HOCs compared to lignocellulosic materials and the slow desorption of HOCs from glassy plastics.

  6. Effects of light emitting diode (LED) therapy and cold water immersion therapy on exercise-induced muscle damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Mariana Zingari; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins; Preti, Maria Carla Perozim; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Ramos, Solange de Paula

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effects of LED therapy at 940 nm or cold water immersion therapy (CWI) after an acute bout of exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: animals kept at rest (control), exercised animals (E), exercised + CWI (CWI), and exercised + LED therapy (LED). The animals swam for 100 min, after which blood samples were collected for lactate analysis. Animals in the E group were returned to their cages without treatment, the CWI group was placed in cold water (10°C) for 10 min and the LED group received LED irradiation on both gastrocnemius muscles (4 J/cm(2) each). After 24 h, the animals were killed and the soleus muscles were submitted to histological analysis. Blood samples were used for hematological and CK analyses. The results demonstrated that the LED group presented fewer areas of muscle damage and inflammatory cell infiltration and lower levels of CK activity than the E group. Fewer areas of damaged muscle fiber were observed in the LED group than in CWI. CWI and LED did not reduce edema areas. Hematological analysis showed no significant effect of either treatment on leukocyte counts. The results suggest that LED therapy is more efficient than CWI in preventing muscle damage and local inflammation after exercise.

  7. Passive and post-exercise cold-water immersion augments PGC-1α and VEGF expression in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, C H; Allan, R; Drust, B; Close, G L; Jeong, T S; Bartlett, J D; Mawhinney, C; Louhelainen, J; Morton, J P; Gregson, Warren

    2016-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that both post-exercise and passive cold water immersion (CWI) increases PGC-1α and VEGF mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle. Study 1 Nine males completed an intermittent running protocol (8 × 3-min bouts at 90 % [Formula: see text], interspersed with 3-min active recovery (1.5-min at 25 % and 1.5-min at 50 % [Formula: see text]) before undergoing CWI (10 min at 8 °C) or seated rest (CONT) in a counterbalanced, randomised manner. Study 2 Ten males underwent an identical CWI protocol under passive conditions. Study 1 PGC-1α mRNA increased in CONT (~3.4-fold; P muscle compared to exercise per se. Additionally CWI per se mediates the activation of PGC-1α and VEGF mRNA expression in human skeletal muscle. Cold water may therefore enhance the adaptive response to acute exercise.

  8. Protection against Flavobacterium psychrophilum infection (cold water disease) in Ayu fish (Plecoglossus altivelis) by oral administration of humus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAGAWA, Jun; IWASAKI, Tadashi; KODAMA, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus, and are found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms have been present. In the present study, oral administration of humus extract to ayu fish (Plecoglossus altivelis) induced effective protection against experimental Flavobacterium psychrophilum infection (cold water disease). Mortality of fish and development of skin lesions, such as erosion and hemorrhages on the skin, gill cover or mouth, were significantly suppressed in fish treated with 10%, 5% or 1% humus extract adsorbed on dry pellets. Although F. psychrophilum was not re-isolated from gills and erosion lesions of the skin of dead fish, bacterial gyrB DNA could be amplified in these specimens from dead fish and surviving control fish using the polymerase chain reaction. The protective effect of the extract was not the results of direct killing of bacteria or antibiotic activity of the extract since no obvious reduction in the bacterial number was observed at 5 times to 5,000 times dilution of the humus extract having pH 5.45 to 7.40. These results clearly show that treating fish with humus extract is effective in preventing cold water disease.

  9. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  10. The effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammation and cell stress responses in human skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Jonathan M; Roberts, Llion A; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid; Krog, Simone; Aas, Sigve N; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Markworth, James F; Coombes, Jeff S; Cameron-Smith, David; Raastad, Truls

    2017-02-01

    Cold water immersion and active recovery are common post-exercise recovery treatments. A key assumption about the benefits of cold water immersion is that it reduces inflammation in skeletal muscle. However, no data are available from humans to support this notion. We compared the effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on inflammatory and cellular stress responses in skeletal muscle from exercise-trained men 2, 24 and 48 h during recovery after acute resistance exercise. Exercise led to the infiltration of inflammatory cells, with increased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins, and the subcellular translocation of heat shock proteins in muscle. These responses did not differ significantly between cold water immersion and active recovery. Our results suggest that cold water immersion is no more effective than active recovery for minimizing the inflammatory and stress responses in muscle after resistance exercise. Cold water immersion and active recovery are common post-exercise recovery treatments. However, little is known about whether these treatments influence inflammation and cellular stress in human skeletal muscle after exercise. We compared the effects of cold water immersion versus active recovery on inflammatory cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neurotrophins and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in skeletal muscle after intense resistance exercise. Nine active men performed unilateral lower-body resistance exercise on separate days, at least 1 week apart. On one day, they immersed their lower body in cold water (10°C) for 10 min after exercise. On the other day, they cycled at a low intensity for 10 min after exercise. Muscle biopsies were collected from the exercised leg before, 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise in both trials. Exercise increased intramuscular neutrophil and macrophage counts, MAC1 and CD163 mRNA expression (P cold water immersion is no more effective than active recovery for reducing inflammation or

  11. Cold-water coral carbonate mounds as unique palaeo-archives: the Plio-Pleistocene Challenger Mound record (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierens, M.; Browning, E.; Pirlet, H.; Loutre, M.-F.; Dorschel, B.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Titschack, J.; Colin, C.; Foubert, A.; Wheeler, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    Through the interplay of a stabilising cold-water coral framework and a dynamic sedimentary environment, cold-water coral carbonate mounds create distinctive centres of bio-geological accumulation in often complex (continental margin) settings. The IODP Expedition 307 drilling of the Challenger Mound (eastern Porcupine Seabight; NE Atlantic) not only retrieved the first complete developmental history of a coral carbonate mound, it also exposed a unique, Early-Pleistocene sedimentary sequence of exceptional resolution along the mid-latitudinal NE Atlantic margin. In this study, a comprehensive assessment of the Challenger Mound as an archive of Quaternary palaeo-environmental change and long-term coral carbonate mound development is presented. New and existing environmental proxy records, including clay mineralogy, planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and assemblage counts, planktonic foraminifer oxygen isotopes and siliciclastic particle-size, are thereby discussed within a refined chronostratigraphic and climatic context. Overall, the development of the Challenger Mound shows a strong affinity to the Plio-Pleistocene evolution of the Northern Hemisphere climate system, albeit not being completely in phase with it. The two major oceanographic and climatic transitions of the Plio-Pleistocene - the Late Pliocene/Early Pleistocene intensification of continental ice-sheet development and the mid-Pleistocene transition to the more extremely variable and more extensively glaciated late Quaternary - mark two major thresholds in Challenger Mound development: its Late Pliocene (>2.74 Ma) origin and its Middle-Late Pleistocene to recent decline. Distinct surface-water perturbations (i.e. water-mass/polar front migrations, productivity changes, melt-water pulses) are identified throughout the sequence, which can be linked to the intensity and extent of ice development on the nearby British-Irish Isles since the earliest Pleistocene. Glaciation

  12. Ecosystem engineering creates a direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water coral mounds and surface productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-10-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) form large mounds on the seafloor that are hotspots of biodiversity in the deep sea, but it remains enigmatic how CWCs can thrive in this food-limited environment. Here, we infer from model simulations that the interaction between tidal currents and CWC-formed mounds induces downwelling events of surface water that brings organic matter to 600-m deep CWCs. This positive feedback between CWC growth on carbonate mounds and enhanced food supply is essential for their sustenance in the deep sea and represents an example of ecosystem engineering of unparalleled magnitude. This ’topographically-enhanced carbon pump’ leaks organic matter that settles at greater depths. The ubiquitous presence of biogenic and geological topographies along ocean margins suggests that carbon sequestration through this pump is of global importance. These results indicate that enhanced stratification and lower surface productivity, both expected consequences of climate change, may negatively impact the energy balance of CWCs.

  13. Does morphological and anatomical plasticity during the vegetative stage make wheat more tolerant of water deficit stress than rice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Niteen N; Yin, Xinyou; Bindraban, Prem S; Struik, Paul C; Jagadish, Krishna S V

    2015-04-01

    Water scarcity and the increasing severity of water deficit stress are major challenges to sustaining irrigated rice (Oryza sativa) production. Despite the technologies developed to reduce the water requirement, rice growth is seriously constrained under water deficit stress compared with other dryland cereals such as wheat (Triticum aestivum). We exposed rice cultivars with contrasting responses to water deficit stress and wheat cultivars well adapted to water-limited conditions to the same moisture stress during vegetative growth to unravel the whole-plant (shoot and root morphology) and organ/tissue (root anatomy) responses. Wheat cultivars followed a water-conserving strategy by reducing specific leaf area and developing thicker roots and moderate tillering. In contrast, rice 'IR64' and 'Apo' adopted a rapid water acquisition strategy through thinner roots under water deficit stress. Root diameter, stele and xylem diameter, and xylem number were more responsive and varied with different positions along the nodal root under water deficit stress in wheat, whereas they were relatively conserved in rice cultivars. Increased metaxylem diameter and lower metaxylem number near the root tips and exactly the opposite phenomena at the root-shoot junction facilitated the efficient use of available soil moisture in wheat. Tolerant rice 'Nagina 22' had an advantage in root morphological and anatomical attributes over cultivars IR64 and Apo but lacked plasticity, unlike wheat cultivars exposed to water deficit stress. The key traits determining the adaptation of wheat to dryland conditions have been summarized and discussed. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Microbial assemblages on a cold-water coral mound at the SE Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic): interactions with hydrography and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Whalen, C.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Witte, H.J.; Mienis, F

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the microbial community composition over Haas Mound, one of the most prominent cold-water coral mounds of the Logachev Mound province (Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic). We outline patterns of distribution vertically – from the seafloor to the water column – and laterally – across

  15. Microbial assemblages on a cold-water coral mound at the SE Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic): interactions with hydrography and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Whalen, C.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Witte, H.J.; Mienis, F

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the microbial community composition over Haas Mound, one of the most prominent cold-water coral mounds of the Logachev Mound province (Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic). We outline patterns of distribution vertically – from the seafloor to the water column – and laterally – across

  16. Evaluation of the Impact of the Plastic BioSand Filter on Health and Drinking Water Quality in Rural Tamale, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Mumuni K. Osman; Stauber, Christine E.; Byron Kominek; Liang, Kaida R.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial of the plastic BioSand filter (BSF) was performed in rural communities in Tamale (Ghana) to assess reductions in diarrheal disease and improvements in household drinking water quality. Few studies of household water filters have been performed in this region, where high drinking water turbidity can be a challenge for other household water treatment technologies. During the study, the longitudinal prevalence ratio for diarrhea comparing households that received th...

  17. The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Scleractinia) and enigmatic seabed mounds along the north-east Atlantic margin: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J M; Long, D; Wilson, J B; Mortensen, P B; Gage, J D

    2003-01-01

    In this study, an updated distribution of Lophelia pertusa between the Porcupine Seabight and Norwegian shelf is presented. It seems unlikely that enigmatic mound structures observed at water depths of more than 570 m during acoustic seabed surveys, particularly to the west of the Shetland Islands, are related to the occurrence of L. pertusa. At these depths in the Faroe-Shetland Channel, the predominant influence of cold Arctic water precludes its growth. Iceberg dumpsites are also considered unlikely explanations for the origin of these mounds, and they are interpreted as most likely to be related to the release of fluids at the seabed. When mound structures were investigated, no scleractinian corals were recovered at water depths >500 m. This study shows the importance of seabed temperature as an environmental control on cold-water coral distribution. The significance of cold-water coral habitats in sustaining high levels of local-scale biodiversity is now becoming apparent in parallel with increased hydrocarbon extraction and fishing activity beyond the shelf edge. There is growing evidence that these areas have been marked by the passage of deep-water trawls. It seems likely that trawling activity has already reduced the extent of cold-water coral distribution in this region of the north-east Atlantic.

  18. Environmental constraints on Holocene cold-water coral reef growth off Norway: Insights from a multiproxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Jacek; Liebetrau, Volker; Trotter, Julie; Rüggeberg, Andres; Flögel, Sascha; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Eisenhauer, Anton; Voigt, Silke; McCulloch, Malcolm

    2016-10-01

    High-latitude cold-water coral (CWC) reefs are particularly susceptible due to enhanced CO2 uptake in these regions. Using precisely dated (U/Th) CWCs (Lophelia pertusa) retrieved during research cruise POS 391 (Lopphavet 70.6°N, Oslofjord 59°N) we applied boron isotopes (δ11B), Ba/Ca, Li/Mg, and U/Ca ratios to reconstruct the environmental boundary conditions of CWC reef growth. The sedimentary record from these CWC reefs reveals a lack of corals between 6.4 and 4.8 ka. The question remains if this phenomenon is related to changes in the carbonate system or other causes. The initial postglacial setting had elevated Ba/Ca ratios, indicative of meltwater fluxes showing a decreasing trend toward cessation at 6.4 ka with an oscillation pattern similar to continental glacier fluctuations. Downcore U/Ca ratios reveal an increasing trend, which is outside the range of modern U/Ca variability in L. pertusa, suggesting changes of seawater pH near 6.4 ka. The reconstructed bottom water temperature at Lopphavet reveals a striking similarity to Barent sea surface and subsea surface temperature records. We infer that meltwater pulses weakened the North Atlantic Current system, resulting in southward advances of cold and CO2-rich Arctic waters. A corresponding shift in the δ11B record from 25.0‰ to 27.0‰ probably implies enhanced pH up-regulation of the CWCs due to the higher pCO2 concentrations of ambient seawater, which hastened mid-Holocene CWC reef decline on the Norwegian margin.

  19. Cold Urticaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Cold urticaria By Mayo Clinic Staff Cold urticaria (ur-tih-KAR-e-uh) is a skin reaction to cold. Skin that has ... in contact with cold develops reddish, itchy welts (hives). The severity of cold urticaria symptoms varies widely. ...

  20. Critical material attributes (CMAs) of strip films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles: I. Impact of plasticizer on film properties and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Scott M; Patel, Hardik V; Li, Meng; Bilgili, Ecevit; Davé, Rajesh N

    2016-09-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated polymer films to be a promising platform for delivery of poorly water-soluble drug particles. However, the impact of critical material attributes, for example plasticizer, on the properties of and drug release from such films has yet to be investigated. In response, this study focuses on the impact of plasticizer and plasticizer concentration on properties and dissolution rate of polymer films loaded with poorly water-soluble drug nanoparticles. Glycerin, triacetin, and polyethylene glycol were selected as film plasticizers. Griseofulvin was used as a model Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II drug and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose was used as a film-forming polymer. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were prepared via wet stirred media milling in aqueous suspension. A depression in film glass transition temperature was observed with increasing plasticizer concentration, along with a decrease in film tensile strength and an increase in film elongation, as is typical of plasticizers. However, the type and amount of plasticizer necessary to produce strong yet flexible films had no significant impact on the dissolution rate of the films, suggesting that film mechanical properties can be effectively manipulated with minimal impact on drug release. Griseofulvin nanoparticles were successfully recovered upon redispersion in water regardless of plasticizer or content, even after up to 6months' storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity, which contributed to similar consistency in dissolution rate after 6months' storage for all films. Good content uniformity (<4% R.S.D. for very small film sample size) was also maintained across all film formulations.

  1. Stress-Strain of Hotmix Cold Laid Containing Buton Granular Asphat (BGA with Modifier Oil Base and Modifier Water Base as Wearing Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiamin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Buton granular asphalt (BGA is produced from natural rock asphalt. The employment of hotmix cold laid containing BGA with modifier oil base and modifier oil base can substitute hot rolled asphalt (HRA construction in the remote and distance areas. Natural rock asphalt that deposited in Buton Island, Southeast Sulawesi in Indonesia is crushed to produce Buton granular asphalt (BGA. BGA and cold modifier were utilized to produce hot mixture that can be laid at cold temperature of 50OC to 27OC.The present study provides the information concerning the stress-strain pattern and compressive strength of hotmix cold laid containing BGA and Modifier Oil Base and Modifier Water Base at the storing and compaction time of 4 hours, 3 days and 7 days.

  2. Variation of the cold intermediate water in the Black Sea exit of the Strait of Istanbul (Bosphorus and its transfer through the strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Yuce

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The cold intermediate water (CIW, T < 8°C entering the Strait of Istanbul and its variation along the strait have been studied by using monthly conductivity-temperature-depth (CTDdata sets collected during the period from 1996 to 2000. In the northern exit of the strait, CIW is located between the seasonal thermocline and Mediterranean water originating from the lowerlayer of the Sea of Marmara. The thickness of CIW decreases fromApril to October. In the Strait of Istanbul, CIW is observedas a layer of temperature < 14$^{circ}$C. The thickness of thismodified cold intermediate water flowing southwards with the upper layer decreases, while its temperature increases along thestrait due to mixing with adjacent water. In the southern exit of the strait, the modified cold intermediate water is observed during the period from May to October. If CIW exists in the Black Sea exit region of the strait, modified cold water is found inthe Marmara exit region during the same period. The distribution of CIW in the Strait of Istanbul contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of the strait, especially in the summer months.

  3. Contribution of the Yellow Sea bottom cold water to the abnormal cooling of sea surface temperature in the summer of 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon-ho; Pang, Ig-Chan; Moon, Jae-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) measurements revealed an abnormal cooling anomaly over the Yellow Sea (YS) in the summer of 2011. Using in situ hydrographic profiles, meteorological fields, and an ocean circulation model with a passive tracer experiment, we identified the cold SST anomaly and its connection with the YS Bottom Cold Water (YSBCW), which occupies the central part of the YS below the thermocline in the summer. The summer SST anomalies in the YS showed three cold peaks in 1993, 2003, and 2011 over the past 20 years, but the reasons for the cooling events were different, as one was due to weakened surface heating and the other was attributed to mixing with the YSBCW. In 1993 and 2003, relatively weak surface heating made the surface water cooler compared with that during the other years, whereas in 2011, a strong vertical mixing of water was induced by a typhoon that passed through the central YS, causing the surface water to cool by ˜8°C and the bottom water to warm up by ˜4°C. A tracer experiment further confirmed that the vertical heat transfers between the warm surface and the cold bottom water masses when the typhoon passed through the YS interior.

  4. Effects of cold water immersion on the recovery of physical performance and muscle damage following a one-off soccer match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascensão, António; Leite, Marco; Rebelo, António N; Magalhäes, Sérgio; Magalhäes, José

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a single session of cold or thermoneutral water immersion after a one-off match on muscular dysfunction and damage in soccer players. Twenty-male soccer players completed one match and were randomly divided into cryotherapy (10 min cold water immersion, 10°C, n = 10) and thermoneutral (10 min thermoneutral water immersion, 35°C, n = 10) groups. Muscle damage (creatine kinase, myoglobin), inflammation (C-reactive protein), neuromuscular function (jump and sprint abilities and maximal isometric quadriceps strength), and delayed-onset muscle soreness were evaluated before, within 30 min of the end, and 24 and 48 h after the match. After the match, the players in both groups showed increased plasma creatine kinase activity (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min) and C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h) concentrations. Peak jump ability and maximal strength were decreased and delayed-onset muscle soreness increased in both groups. However, differential alterations were observed between thermoneutral water and cold water immersion groups in creatine kinase (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), myoglobin (30 min), C-reactive protein (30 min, 24 h, 48 h), quadriceps strength (24 h), and quadriceps (24 h), calf (24 h) and adductor (30 min) delayed-onset muscle soreness. The results suggest that cold water immersion immediately after a one-off soccer match reduces muscle damage and discomfort, possibly contributing to a faster recovery of neuromuscular function.

  5. Cold generation under 0 degrees Celsius with a water-lithiumbromide resorption refrigerating machine; Kaelteerzeugung unter 0 C mit einer Wasser/Lithiumbromid-Resorptionskaeltemaschine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, L. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik

    2008-03-15

    The target of development in the area of absorption refrigeration is using low tempered waste heat to cold generation narrow under 0 degrees Celsius through realisation of a water lithiumbromide resorption refrigeration process because higher COP can be achieved with water lithiumbromide compared with ammonia water. In a development project a test plant was built, tested and measured in the ILK. Realised refrigerating plants of this type aren't known on the market till now. (orig.)

  6. [Effects of noxious coldness and non-noxious warmth on the magnitude of cerebral cortex activation during intraoral stimulation with water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiuwen, Yang; Hongchen, Liu; Ke, Li; Zhen, Jin; Gang, Liu

    2014-12-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the effects of noxious coldness and non-noxious warmth on the magnitude of cerebral cortex activation during intraoral stimulation with water. Six male and female subjects were subjected to whole-brain fMRI during the phasic delivery of non-noxious hot (23 °C) and no- xious cold (4 °C) water intraoral stimulation. A block-design blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI scan covering the entire brain was also carried out. The activated cortical areas were as follows: left pre-/post-central gyrus, insula/operculum, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), orbital frontal cortex (OFC), midbrain red nucleus, and thalamus. The activated cortical areas under cold condition were as follows: left occipital lobe, premotor cortex/Brodmann area (BA) 6, right motor language area BA44, lingual gyrus, parietal lobule (BA7, 40), and primary somatosensory cortex S I. Comparisons of the regional cerebral blood flow response magnitude were made among stereotactically concordant brain regions that showed significant responses under the two conditions of this study. Compared with non-noxious warmth, more regions were activated in noxious coldness, and the magnitude of activation in areas produced after non-noxious warm stimulation significantly increased. However, ACC only significantly increased the magnitude of activation under noxious coldness stimulation. Results suggested that a similar network of regions was activated common to the perception of pain and no-pain produced by either non-noxious warmth or noxious coldness stimulation. Non-noxious warmth also activated more brain regions and significantly increased the response magnitude of cerebral-cortex activation compared with noxious coldness. Noxious coldness stimulation further significantly increased the magnitude of activation in ACC areas compared with noxious warmth.

  7. Digital Marine Bioprospecting: Mining New Neurotoxin Drug Candidates from the Transcriptomes of Cold-Water Sea Anemones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åse Emblem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine bioprospecting is the search for new marine bioactive compounds and large-scale screening in extracts represents the traditional approach. Here, we report an alternative complementary protocol, called digital marine bioprospecting, based on deep sequencing of transcriptomes. We sequenced the transcriptomes from the adult polyp stage of two cold-water sea anemones, Bolocera tuediae and Hormathia digitata. We generated approximately 1.1 million quality-filtered sequencing reads by 454 pyrosequencing, which were assembled into approximately 120,000 contigs and 220,000 single reads. Based on annotation and gene ontology analysis we profiled the expressed mRNA transcripts according to known biological processes. As a proof-of-concept we identified polypeptide toxins with a potential blocking activity on sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels from digital transcriptome libraries.

  8. Digital marine bioprospecting: mining new neurotoxin drug candidates from the transcriptomes of cold-water sea anemones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbarova, Ilona; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Okkenhaug, Siri; Seternes, Ole Morten; Johansen, Steinar D; Emblem, Ase

    2012-10-01

    Marine bioprospecting is the search for new marine bioactive compounds and large-scale screening in extracts represents the traditional approach. Here, we report an alternative complementary protocol, called digital marine bioprospecting, based on deep sequencing of transcriptomes. We sequenced the transcriptomes from the adult polyp stage of two cold-water sea anemones, Bolocera tuediae and Hormathia digitata. We generated approximately 1.1 million quality-filtered sequencing reads by 454 pyrosequencing, which were assembled into approximately 120,000 contigs and 220,000 single reads. Based on annotation and gene ontology analysis we profiled the expressed mRNA transcripts according to known biological processes. As a proof-of-concept we identified polypeptide toxins with a potential blocking activity on sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels from digital transcriptome libraries.

  9. Influence of prior intense exercise and cold water immersion in recovery for performance and physiological response during subsequent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A) and the......Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A......) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from...

  10. Reproduction in cold water: paradigm changes in the 20th century and a role for cidaroid sea urchins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, John S.; Lockhart, Susanne J.

    2004-07-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, powerful ideas about the biology of marine animals in cold waters (polar and deep sea) were in early stages of development. (1) General similarities between some Arctic and Antarctic species suggested a past or present continuity between the poles, possibly through tropical submergence. (2) The discovery of subantarctic species brooding their offspring suggested that supposedly harsh polar conditions select against species with pelagic, dispersive larvae. (3) The linkage between seasonal temperature changes and seasonal reproduction suggested that where temperatures were constant, as in polar and deep seas, reproduction would be aseasonal or continuous throughout the year. (4) Recognition of the phenomenon of metabolic temperature adaptation suggested that animals living in cold water should exhibit rates of physiological processes similar to rates in warmer environments. Observations and experiments throughout the first half of the 20th century generally supported and reinforced these ideas. During the second half of the 20th century, however, the generality of these paradigms broke down. Detailed analyses of fuller data indicated that Arctic, Antarctic, and deep-sea faunas are not the same and probably have different phylogenies reflecting different vicariant histories. Moreover, many species in these habitats have pelagic larvae, they generally spawn seasonally, and their physiological processes (respiration, gametogenesis, development, feeding, growth) are slow, showing little evidence of the expected temperature adaptation. Nevertheless, entering the 21st century, we are challenged by important exceptions that do support many of the earlier ideas. Bipolarity in some groups does indicate relict distributions, and other groups show equatorial submergence. Moreover, major species-rich clades in the Antarctic (unlike the Arctic) do brood their young. Most species with pelagic larvae produce non-feeding (lecithotrophic) larvae

  11. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  12. Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Study on the Coating Removal from Passenger-Vehicle Plastics for Recycling by Using Water Jet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongshen; Chen, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The recovery and utilization of automotive plastics are a global concern because of the increasing number of end-of-life vehicles. In-depth studies on technologies for the removal of coatings from automotive plastics can contribute to the high value-added levels of the recycling and utilization of automotive plastic. The liquid waste generated by removing chemical paint by using traditional methods is difficult to handle and readily produces secondary pollution. Therefore, new, clean, and highly efficient techniques of paint removal must be developed. In this article, a method of coating removal from passenger-vehicle plastics was generated based on high-pressure water jet technology to facilitate the recycling of these plastics. The established technology was theoretically analyzed, numerically simulated, and experimentally studied. The high-pressure water jet equipment for the removal of automotive-plastic coatings was constructed through research and testing, and the detailed experiments on coating removal rate were performed by using this equipment. The results showed that high-pressure water jet technology can effectively remove coatings on the surfaces of passenger-vehicle plastics. The research also revealed that the coating removal rate increased as jet pressure ( P) increased and then decreased when jet moving speed ( Vn) increased. The rate decreased as the distance from nozzle to work piece ( S nw ) and the nozzle angle ( Φ) increased. The mathematical model for the rate of removal of coatings from bumper surfaces by water jet was derived based on the experiment data and can effectively predict coating removal rate under different operating conditions.

  13. Effects of Cold Water Immersion and Contrast Water Therapy for Recovery From Team Sport: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Trevor R; Greene, David A; Baker, Michael K

    2017-05-01

    Higgins, TR, Greene, DA, Baker, MK. Effects of cold water immersion and contrast water therapy for recovery from team sport: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1443-1460, 2017-To enhance recovery from sport, cold water immersion (CWI) and contrast water therapy (CWT) have become common practice within high level team sport. Initially, athletes relied solely on anecdotal support. As there has been an increase in the volume of research into recovery including a number of general reviews, an opportunity existed to narrow the focus specifically examining the use of hydrotherapy for recovery in team sport. A Boolean logic [AND] keyword search of databases was conducted: SPORTDiscus; AMED; CINAHL; MEDLINE. Data were extracted and the standardized mean differences were calculated with 95% confidence interval (CI). The analysis of pooled data was conducted using a random-effect model, with heterogeneity assessed using I. Twenty-three peer reviewed articles (n = 606) met the criteria. Meta-analyses results indicated CWI was beneficial for recovery at 24 hours (countermovement jump: p = 0.05, CI: -0.004 to 0.578; All-out sprint: p = 0.02, -0.056 to 0.801) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for recovery at 72 hours (fatigue: p = 0.03, CI: 0.061-1.418) and CWT was beneficial for recovery at 48 hours (fatigue: p = 0.04, CI: 0.013-0.942) following team sport. The CWI was beneficial for neuromuscular recovery 24 hours following team sport, whereas CWT was not beneficial for recovery following team sport. In addition, when evaluating accumulated sprinting, CWI was not beneficial for recovery following team sports. In evaluating subjective measures, both CWI (72 hours) and CWT (24 hours) were beneficial for recovery of perceptions of fatigue, following team sport. However neither CWI nor CWT was beneficial for recovery, of perceptions of muscle soreness, following team sport.

  14. Cold-water coral distributions in the drake passage area from towed camera observations--initial interpretations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhian G Waller

    Full Text Available Seamounts are unique deep-sea features that create habitats thought to have high levels of endemic fauna, productive fisheries and benthic communities vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts. Many seamounts are isolated features, occurring in the high seas, where access is limited and thus biological data scarce. There are numerous seamounts within the Drake Passage (Southern Ocean, yet high winds, frequent storms and strong currents make seafloor sampling particularly difficult. As a result, few attempts to collect biological data have been made, leading to a paucity of information on benthic habitats or fauna in this area, particularly those on primarily hard-bottom seamounts and ridges. During a research cruise in 2008 six locations were examined (two on the Antarctic margin, one on the Shackleton Fracture Zone, and three on seamounts within the Drake Passage, using a towed camera with onboard instruments to measure conductivity, temperature, depth and turbidity. Dominant fauna and bottom type were categorized from 200 randomized photos from each location. Cold-water corals were present in high numbers in habitats both on the Antarctic margin and on the current swept seamounts of the Drake Passage, though the diversity of orders varied. Though the Scleractinia (hard corals were abundant on the sedimented margin, they were poorly represented in the primarily hard-bottom areas of the central Drake Passage. The two seamount sites and the Shackleton Fracture Zone showed high numbers of stylasterid (lace and alcyonacean (soft corals, as well as large numbers of sponges. Though data are preliminary, the geological and environmental variability (particularly in temperature between sample sites may be influencing cold-water coral biogeography in this region. Each area observed also showed little similarity in faunal diversity with other sites examined for this study within all phyla counted. This manuscript highlights how little is understood of these

  15. Porosity effects on crystallization kinetics of Amorphous Solid Water: Implications for cold icy objects in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Emily H.; Raut, Ujjwal; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline ice has been identified on the cold surfaces of most icy satellites and TNOs [1]. This is surprising since accretion of water vapor at temperatures (T isothermal transition from amorphous to fully crystalline phase was characterized by analyzing the time-dependent evolution of the OH-stretch absorption band using transmission infrared spectroscopy. Our initial results show that τc decreases with increasing porosity; for instance, a film deposited at 45° was observed to crystallize ~6 times faster than a film deposited at 0°. The preliminary estimate of the porosity of the 45° film is ~50% higher than that of the film deposited at normal incidence. Our findings can explain the reported variation in temperature-dependent τc [2] and contribute to the understanding of crystalline ice on cold bodies in the Outer Solar System.1. Mastrapa, R.M.E. et al. In: Gudipati, M.S. & Castillo-Rogez, J., Eds, The Science of Solar System Ices, Springer, New York, 2013.2. Baragiola, R.A. In: Devlin & Buch, Eds, Water in Confining Geometries, Springer-Verlag, 2003.3. Jewitt, D.C. & Luu, J., Nature 432, 731, 2004.4. Porter, S.B. et al. Icarus 208, 492, 2010.5. Stevenson, K.P., et al. Science 283, 1505, 1999.6. Francis, R.J. & O’Hare, D., J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 3133, 1998.7. Kirsch, B.L. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B., 108, 12698, 2004.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological responses of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreiro-Silva, M.; Cerqueira, T.; Godinho, A.; Caetano, M.; Santos, R. S.; Bettencourt, R.

    2014-06-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) are thought to be particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification (OA) due to increased atmospheric pCO2, because they inhabit deep and cold waters where the aragonite saturation state is naturally low. Several recent studies have evaluated the impact of OA on organism-level physiological processes such as calcification and respiration. However, no studies to date have looked at the impact at the molecular level of gene expression. Here, we report results of a long-term, 8-month experiment to compare the physiological responses of the CWC Desmophyllum dianthus to OA at both the organismal and gene expression levels under two pCO2/pH treatments: ambient pCO2 (460 μatm, pHT = 8.01) and elevated pCO2 (997 μatm, pHT = 7.70). At the organismal level, no significant differences were detected in the calcification and respiration rates of D. dianthus. Conversely, significant differences were recorded in gene expression profiles, which showed an up-regulation of genes involved in cellular stress (HSP70) and immune defence (mannose-binding c-type lectin). Expression of alpha-carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of coral skeleton, was also significantly up-regulated in corals under elevated pCO2, indicating that D. dianthus was under physiological reconditioning to calcify under these conditions. Thus, gene expression profiles revealed physiological impacts that were not evident at the organismal level. Consequently, understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the physiological processes involved in a coral's response to elevated pCO2 is critical to assess the ability of CWCs to acclimate or adapt to future OA conditions.

  17. In situ growth experiments of reef-building cold-water corals: The good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartaud, F.; Meistertzheim, A. L.; Peru, E.; Le Bris, N.

    2017-03-01

    The ecological study of corals in their habitat is essential to determine the effects of global change and to develop strategies for reef conservation. Based on mark and recovery experiments, we investigated skeletal growth patterns of two reef-building cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, in the Lacaze-Duthiers canyon in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Coral fragments were collected, stained and deployed for short-term (2.5 months) and long-term (15 months) growth experiments at two sites located 4.5 km and 6.8 km from the canyon head. The analysis of distinct growth parameters (budding, new polyp growth and linear extension of the coral fragments) revealed that growth patterns are consistent among branches of different sizes, but discrepancies arose from the different types of staining used. Calcein appeared more suitable than alizarin red, which strongly limited growth by delaying coral recovery, for short-term experiments at least. Both species grew rapidly when redeployed in their habitat. Effects of long-term experiments could not be observed because corals were exposed to harmful environmental stress, particularly the lethal effect of sedimentation on the fragments. Despite limited in situ deployment, the growth analysis from the short-term experiment highlighted species-specific responses according to the location along a longitudinal gradient in the canyon and were likely related to the local environmental conditions. Consistent with the observed species distributions, M. oculata showed optimal growth at the site closer to the canyon head compared with L. pertusa, which had optimal growth at the deeper site. In situ experiments are difficult to conduct in deep-sea ecosystems, but with the use of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), such a simple approach may be of interest to managers of cold-water coral ecosystems.

  18. Glassy metallic plastics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a class of bulk metallic glass including Ce-, LaCe-, CaLi-, Yb-, and Sr-based metallic glasses, which are regarded as glassy metallic plastics because they combine some unique properties of both plastics and metallic alloys. These glassy metallic plastics have very low glass transition temperature (Tg~25oC to 150oC) and low Young’s modulus (~20 GPa to 35 GPa). Similar to glassy plastics, these metallic plastics show excellent plastic-like deformability on macro-, micro- and even nano-scale in their supercooled liquid range and can be processed, such as elongated, compressed, bent, and imprinted at low temperatures, in hot water for instance. Under ambient conditions, they display such metallic properties as high thermal and electric conductivities and excellent mechanical properties and other unique properties. The metallic plastics have potential applications and are also a model system for studying issues in glass physics.

  19. Analysis of the clinical application of cold eye plastic surgery therapy%眼部整形美容术后冷疗法的临床应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭文胜

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨眼部整形美容术后使用冷疗法的临床应用效果。方法:选取2012年1月-2014年1月接受眼部整形美容手术的患者50例为研究对象。按照术后处理方法的不同将其分为观察组与对照组,每组各25例;观察组术后接受冷疗法处理,对照组术后接受常规处理。对比分析处理后两组患者的疼痛评分、肿胀情况以及不良反应发生率等。结果:观察组的疼痛程度明显比对照组轻;观察组不良反应发生率显著小于对照组;并且观察组术后恢复时间小于对照组;两组以上差异具有统计学意义,P<0.05。结论:眼部整形美容手术后,使用冷疗法处理,能够起到很好的止痛、消肿等作用,从而加快患者术后恢复,避免出现不良反应,提高手术成功率。因此,该方法值得临床推广应用。%Objective To explore the eye plastic surgery clinical application effect of using cold. Methods Selected in January 2012 to January 2012 in our hospital eye plastic surgery patients 50 cases as the research object.According to the postoperative treatment methods of the different divided into observation group and control group, each group of 25 cases.Observation group receied cold therapy treatment,ontrol group receied routine processing.Comparative analysis of two groups of patients after pain score, swelling, and incidence of adverse reactions, etc. Results Pain degree of observation group was obviously lighter than the control group.Observation group of adverse reactions was significantly less than the control group.And the observation group of postoperative recovery time is less than the control group.The more similar between the two groups have statistical significance,P<0.05. Conclusion Eye plastic surgery, the use of cold therapy treatment,can play a role is to pain, swelling,etc,so as to speed up the patients with postoperative recovery,avoid adverse reaction, improve the success rate

  20. Dynamic Measurements of Plastic Deformation in a Water-Filled Aluminum Tube in Response to Detonation of a Small Explosives Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Sandusky

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have been conducted to benchmark computer code calculations for the dynamic interaction of explosions in water with structures. Aluminum cylinders with a length slightly more than twice their diameter were oriented vertically, sealed on the bottom by a thin plastic sheet, and filled with distilled water. An explosive charge suspended in the center of the tube plastically deformed but did not rupture the wall. Tube wall velocity, displacement, and strain were directly measured. The agreement among the three sets of dynamic data and the agreement of the terminal displacement measurements with the residual deformation were excellent.

  1. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhofel, J. L.; Zboray, R.; Damsohn, M.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E. H.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-09-01

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  2. Diversity and endemism in cold waters of the South Atlantic: contrasting patterns in the plankton and the benthos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio Boltovskoy

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In total, ca. 7000 zooplanktonic species have been described for the World Ocean. This figure represents less than 4% of the total number of known marine organisms. Of the 7000 zooplanktonic species world-wide, some 60% are present in the South Atlantic; about one third of the latter have been recorded in its Subantarctic waters, and ca. 20% south of the Polar Front. When compared with those of benthic animals, these figures indicate that proportions of the overall inventories that are present in the cold waters are almost two times higher among the zooplankton. In agreement with this pattern, the proportions of Antarctic endemics in the benthos are very significantly higher than those in the plankton. For the water-column dwelling animals, the Polar Front boundary is more important than the Tropical-Subtropical limit, but almost equivalent to the Subtropical-Transitional limit, and weaker in biogeographic terms than the Transitional-Subantarctic boundary. Some of the implications of these dissimilarities, both for ecological theory and for resource allocation strategies, are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of treatment and disinfection of water using cold atmospheric plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmei, Zohreh; Bornasi, Hamid; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the disinfection of water is investigated using plasma spark treatment and the results are compared with conventional techniques. Inactivation of the Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli bacteria is considered in the treatment process of water by the plasma spark. For this purpose, many physical and chemical parameters of water are measured and the obtained results demonstrate a reduction of 8-log in colony forming units of E. coli and E. faecalis at 15 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively. The results of this research show that no ozone is produced during the plasma spark treatment. Moreover, inactivation of a large number of bacteria without any change of pH shows that pH is not the cause of the bacterial inactivation. It is concluded that the main causes of the inactivation of bacteria in the treated water are H2O2 molecules and the electrical fields generated by plasma.

  4. Effects of lake warming on behavioural thermoregulatory tactics in a cold-water stenothermic fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerine Goyer

    Full Text Available Despite some evidence of within-population phenotypic variation in fish thermal behaviour, the occurrence of alternative tactics of this behaviour is rarely explicitly considered when studying natural populations. Brook charr provide an example of within-population variability in behavioural thermoregulation as revealed by a recent study on a lacustrine population of this species. The objectives of the present study were (i to determine the influence of natural variability in the lake's thermal profiles on the expression of thermoregulatory tactics, and (ii to determine the vertical and horizontal movements of individuals at different periods of the day to better understand the spatio-temporal behaviour associated with each thermoregulatory tactic. During summer 2010, 30 adult brook charr were equipped with thermo-sensitive radio transmitters to monitor their selected temperatures and daily movements. These individuals exhibited the same four behavioural thermoregulatory tactics observed in 2003 and 2005, but the expression of two of these was weaker in 2010. This result was associated with lake warming, which constrained the expression of two thermoregulatory tactics: brook charr significantly decreased their selected temperatures and daily movements when the mean daily epilimnion temperature was above 22.4°C. This study shows for the first time that the expression of behavioural thermoregulatory tactics is related to the lake's thermal regime and that the tactics are plastic through time.

  5. Plasticity of Sorghum Stem Biomass Accumulation in Response to Water Deficit: A Multiscale Analysis from Internode Tissue to Plant Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Lisa; Rouan, Lauriane; Jaffuel, Sylvie; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Roques, Sandrine; Soutiras, Armelle; Baptiste, Christelle; Bastianelli, Denis; Fabre, Denis; Dubois, Cécile; Pot, David; Luquet, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Sorghum is increasingly used as a biomass crop worldwide. Its genetic diversity provides a large range of stem biochemical composition suitable for various end-uses as bioenergy or forage. Its drought tolerance enables it to reasonably sustain biomass production under water limited conditions. However, drought effect on the accumulation of sorghum stem biomass remains poorly understood which limits progress in crop improvement and management. This study aimed at identifying the morphological, biochemical and histological traits underlying biomass accumulation in the sorghum stem and its plasticity in response to water deficit. Two hybrids (G1, G4) different in stem biochemical composition (G4, more lignified, less sweet) were evaluated during 2 years in the field in Southern France, under two water treatments differentiated during stem elongation (irrigated; 1 month dry-down until an average soil water deficit of -8.85 bars). Plant phenology was observed weekly. At the end of the water treatment and at final harvest, plant height, stem and leaf dry-weight and the size, biochemical composition and tissue histology of internodes at 2-4 positions along the stem were measured. Stem biomass accumulation was significantly reduced by drought (in average 42% at the end of the dry-down). This was due to the reduction of the length, but not diameter, of the internodes expanded during water deficit. These internodes had more soluble sugar but lower lignin and cellulose contents. This was associated with a decrease of the areal proportion of lignified cell wall in internode outer zone whereas the areal proportion of this zone was not affected. All internodes for a given genotype and environment followed a common histochemical dynamics. Hemicellulose content and the areal proportion of inner vs. outer internode tissues were set up early during internode growth and were not drought responsive. G4 exhibited a higher drought sensitivity than G1 for plant height only. At final

  6. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Agnes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying potential targets for plant breeding. Drought tolerance in the field was successfully conferred to crops by transferring genes from this model species. While involved in a plant genomics programme, which aims to identify new genes responsible for plant response to abiotic stress, we identified ESKIMO1 as a key gene involved in plant water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance. Results All esk1 mutants were more tolerant to freezing, after acclimation, than their wild type counterpart. esk1 mutants also showed increased tolerance to mild water deficit for all traits measured. The mutant's improved tolerance to reduced water supply may be explained by its lower transpiration rate and better water use efficiency (WUE, which was assessed by carbon isotope discrimination and gas exchange measurements. esk1 alleles were also shown to be more tolerant to salt stress. Transcriptomic analysis of one mutant line and its wild-type background was carried out. Under control watering conditions a number of genes were differentially expressed between the mutant and the wild type whereas under mild drought stress this list of genes was reduced. Among the genes that were differentially expressed between the wild type and mutant, two functional categories related to the response to stress or biotic and abiotic stimulus were over-represented. Under salt stress conditions, all gene functional categories were represented equally in both the mutant and wild type. Based on this transcriptome analysis we hypothesise that in control conditions the esk1 mutant behaves as if it was exposed to drought stress. Conclusion Overall our findings suggest that the

  7. Influence of white plastic and water replacement rates on pomegranate orchard phenology, fruit yield and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, 98% of domestic commercial pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum L.) are produced in California on over 13,000 ha. In 2013, a pomegranate orchard, established in 2010 with a density of 558 trees/ha, was irrigated at water replacement rates of 35, 50 and 100% based on rainfall, tree water r...

  8. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures.

  9. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  10. Interaction of cold-water aquifers with exploited reservoirs of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdell, Alfred; Lippmann, Marcelo

    1990-01-01

    Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoirs tend to exhibit good hydraulic communication with adjacent cool groundwater aquifers. Under natural state conditions the hot fluids mix with the surrounding colder waters along the margins of the geothermal system, or discharge to shallow levels by flowing up fault L. In response to exploitation reservoir pressures decrease, leading to changes in the fluid flow pattern in the system and to groundwater influx. The various Cerro Prieto reservoirs have responded differently to production, showing localized near-well or generalized boiling, depending on their access to cool-water recharge. Significant cooling by dilution with groundwater has only been observed in wells located near the edges of the field. In general, entry of cool water at Cerro Prieto is beneficial because it tends to maintain reservoir pressures, restrict boiling, and lengthen the life and productivity of wells.

  11. Questioning the Mpemba effect: hot water does not cool more quickly than cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Henry C.; Linden, Paul F.

    2016-11-01

    The Mpemba effect is the name given to the assertion that it is quicker to cool water to a given temperature when the initial temperature is higher. This assertion seems counter-intuitive and yet references to the effect go back at least to the writings of Aristotle. Indeed, at first thought one might consider the effect to breach fundamental thermodynamic laws, but we show that this is not the case. We go on to examine the available evidence for the Mpemba effect and carry out our own experiments by cooling water in carefully controlled conditions. We conclude, somewhat sadly, that there is no evidence to support meaningful observations of the Mpemba effect.

  12. Ultraviolet-B radiation induced cross-linking improves physical properties of cold- and warm-water fish gelatin gels and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoni, Caio G; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Bechtel, Peter J; McHugh, Tara H

    2012-09-01

    Cold- and warm-water fish gelatin granules were exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation for doses up to 29.7 J/cm(2). Solutions and films were prepared from the granules. Gel electrophoresis and refractive index were used to examine changes in molecular weight of the samples. Also, the gel strength and rheological properties of the solutions as well as the tensile and water vapor barrier properties of the films were characterized. SDS-PAGE and refractive index results indicated cross-linking of gelatin chains after exposure to radiation. Interestingly, UV-B treated samples displayed higher gel strengths, with cold- and warm-water fish gelatin having gel strength increases from 1.39 to 2.11 N and from 7.15 to 8.34 N, respectively. In addition, both gelatin samples exhibited an increase in viscosity for higher UV doses. For gelatin films, the cold-water fish gelatin samples made from irradiated granules showed greater tensile strength. In comparison, the warm-water gelatin films made from irradiated granules had lower tensile strength, but better water vapor barrier properties. This might be due to the UV induced cross-linking in warm-water gelatin that disrupted helical structures.

  13. Linking benthic dynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three carbonate mound provinces in the NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony;

    We used the 3-D ocean circulation model with grid refinement ROMS-AGRIF to describe the hydrodynamic conditions at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic (Logachev Mounds, Arc Mounds and Belgica Mounds). Modelled fields of currents, temperature and salinity were analysed for observed...

  14. Spatial and tidal variation in food supply to shallow cold-water coral reefs of the Mingulay Reef complex (Outer Hebrides, Scotland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, G.C.A.; Jeffreys, R.M.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Davies, A.J.; Bergman, M.J.N.; Watmough, T.; Witbaard, R.

    2012-01-01

    The finding of a previously undescribed cold-water coral reef (Banana Reef) in the Scottish Mingulay reef complex, with denser coverage of living Lophelia pertusa than the principal Mingulay 1 Reef, was the incentive for a comparative study of the food supply to the 2 reefs. Suspended particulate

  15. Genome-wide association studies reveal similar genetic architecture with shared and unique QTL for Bacterial Cold Water Disease resistance in two rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) breeding populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) causes significant mortality and economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. In previous studies, we identified moderate-large effect QTL for BCWD resistance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, the recent availability of a 57K SNP array and a genome phys...

  16. Hydrodynamic Conditions Influencing Cold-Water Coral Carbonate Mound Development (Challenger Mound, Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic): a Contribution to IODP Exp307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierens, M.; Odonnell, R.; Stuut, J.; Titschack, J.; Dorschel, B.; Wheeler, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    Cold-water coral carbonate mounds are complex geo-biological systems, originating from the interplay of hydrodynamic, sedimentological and biological factors. As changes in hydrodynamic and sedimentary regime are assumed to be amongst the main controls on mound evolution, reconstruction of the hydrodynamic and palaeoclimatic microenvironment on-mound, compared to the background environmental conditions (as seen off- mound), contributes to the fundamental understanding of these intriguing features and the development of a cold- water coral carbonate mound development model. Challenger Mound, one of the large cold-water coral carbonate mounds along the eastern Porcupine Seabight continental margin (NE Atlantic, SW off Ireland), was successfully drilled during IODP Expedition 307, providing the first complete recovery of a continuous sedimentary sequence through a carbonate mound. High-resolution particle size analysis of the terrigenous sediment component is used as primary proxy for reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions during mound development. First results indicate repeated shifts in hydrodynamic conditions during sediment deposition on Challenger Mound, from lower-energetic conditions to higher-energetic environments and visa versa, which might reflect environmental variation over interglacial-glacial timescales throughout the whole mound development period. In conjunction with other available data, this dataset provides insight in local current regimes and sediment dynamics, the specific role of cold-water corals in these complex geo-biological systems and the differentiation of different sediment contributors to the coral mound system and its surroundings.

  17. Spatial and tidal variation in food supply to shallow cold-water coral reefs of the Mingulay Reef complex (Outer Hebrides, Scotland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, G.C.A.; Jeffreys, R.M.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Davies, A.J.; Bergman, M.J.N.; Watmough, T.; Witbaard, R.

    2012-01-01

    The finding of a previously undescribed cold-water coral reef (Banana Reef) in the Scottish Mingulay reef complex, with denser coverage of living Lophelia pertusa than the principal Mingulay 1 Reef, was the incentive for a comparative study of the food supply to the 2 reefs. Suspended particulate ma

  18. Genomic selection models double the accuracy of predicted breeding values for bacterial cold water disease resistance compared to a traditional pedigree-based model in rainbow trout aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously we have shown that bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout can be improved using traditional family-based selection, but progress has been limited to exploiting only between-family genetic variation. Genomic selection (GS) is a new alternative enabling exploitation...

  19. Genome-enabled selection doubles the accuracy of predicted breeding values for bacterial cold water disease resistance compared to traditional family-based selection in rainbow trout aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have shown previously that bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance in rainbow trout can be improved using traditional family-based selection, but progress has been limited to exploiting only between-family genetic variation. Genomic selection (GS) is a new alternative enabling exploitation...

  20. Using novel acoustic and visual mapping tools to predict the small-scale spatial distribution of live biogenic reef framework in cold-water coral habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Clippele, L. H.; Gafeira, J.; Robert, K.; Hennige, S.; Lavaleye, M.S.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Huvenne, V.A.I.; Roberts, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cold-water corals form substantial biogenic habitats on continental shelves and in deep-sea areas with topographic highs, such as banks and seamounts. In the Atlantic, many reef and mound complexes are engineered by Lophelia pertusa, the dominant framework-forming coral. In this study, a variety of

  1. Modeling disinfection of plastic poultry transport cages inoculated with Salmonella enteritids by slightly acidic electrolyzed water using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Y T; Li, B M; Bing, Sh; Cao, W

    2015-09-01

    In order to reduce the risk of enteric pathogens transmission in animal farms, the disinfection effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW, pH 5.85 to 6.53) for inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis on the surface of plastic poultry transport cages was evaluated. The coupled effects of the tap water cleaning time (5 to 15 s), SAEW treatment time (20 to 40 s), and available chlorine concentrations (ACCs) of 30 to 70 mg/l on the reductions of S. Enteritidis on chick cages were investigated using a central composite design of the response surface methodology (RSM). The established RS model had a goodness of fit quantified by the parameter R2 (0.971), as well as a lack of fit test (P>0.05). The maximum reduction of 3.12 log10 CFU/cm2 for S. Enteritidis was obtained for the cage treated with tap water cleaning for 15 s followed by SAEW treatment for 40 s at an ACC of 50 mg/l. Results indicate that the established RS model has shown the potential of SAEW in disinfection of bacteria on cages. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  3. Effect of deboning time and cold storage on water-holding capacity of chicken breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) is a very important qualitative characteristic of meat and directly affects the yield of further processed meat and consumer acceptance of bagged pre-packaged fresh meat. Boneless skinless chicken breast meat for further processing and consumer usage is commonly deboned...

  4. Response of observables for cold anionic water clusters to cluster thermal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarász, Adám; Rossky, Peter J; Turi, László

    2010-02-18

    We have used mixed quantum classical molecular dynamics simulations to explore the role of structural relaxation when binding an excess electron to neutral water clusters. The structural and spectral properties of the water cluster anions were investigated as a function of the size (n = 45 and 104), nominal temperature (T(nom) = 50, 100, and 150 K), and preparation method of the parent neutral clusters. In particular, we consider two different protocols for preparing the initial neutral clusters, which differ markedly in their thermal history. In the first, warm equilibrium neutral clusters are gradually quenched to increasingly lower temperature. In the second, neutral clusters are formed spontaneously at approximately 0 K and then warmed to the same target temperatures, yielding inherently metastable, nonequilibrium structures. Electron attachment to these alternative sets of clusters shows that below a critical temperature (approximately 200 K), the metastable water clusters bind a surface state excess electron significantly more strongly than the quenched, equilibrium clusters. The structural analysis indicates that these cluster anions with larger vertical detachment energies (VDEs) more frequently stabilize the electron by double-acceptor-type water molecules and exhibit a weak temperature dependence of the VDE compared with the quenched clusters. These results suggest that the alternative classes of cluster anions seen experimentally may reflect differences in the thermal history of such clusters.

  5. Physical origin of hydrophobicity studied in terms of cold denaturation of proteins: comparison between water and simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    A clue to the physical origin of the hydrophobicity is in the experimental observations, which show that it is weakened at low temperatures. By considering a solvophobic model protein immersed in water and three species of simple solvents, we analyze the temperature dependence of the changes in free energy, energy, and entropy of the solvent upon protein unfolding. The angle-dependent and radial-symmetric integral equation theories and the morphometric approach are employed in the analysis. Each of the changes is decomposed into two terms, which depend on the excluded volume and on the area and curvature of the solvent-accessible surface, respectively. The excluded-volume term of the entropy change is further decomposed into two components representing the protein-solvent pair correlation and the protein-solvent-solvent triplet and higher-order correlation, respectively. We show that water crowding in the system becomes more serious upon protein unfolding but this effect becomes weaker as the temperature is lowered. If the hydrophobicity originated from the water structuring near a nonpolar solute, it would be strengthened upon lowering of the temperature. Among the three species of simple solvents, considerable weakening of the solvophobicity at low temperatures is observed only for the solvent where the particles interact through a strong attractive potential and the particle size is as small as that of water. Even in the case of this solvent, however, cold denaturation of a protein cannot be reproduced. It would be reproducible if the attractive potential was substantially enhanced, but such enhancement causes the appearance of the metastability limit for a single liquid phase.

  6. Water level-dependent morphological plasticity in Sagittaria montevidensis Cham. and Schl. (Alismataceae).

    OpenAIRE

    GR Demetrio; MEA Barbosa; FF Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic plants are able to alter their morphology in response to environmental condition variation, such as water level fluctuations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water level on Sagittaria montevidensis morphology through measures of vegetative structures formed in drought and flood periods. We hypothesised that the plant height and the biomass of S. montevidensis leaves will increase during flood periods, while the biomass and diameter of petioles, and the basal plant ...

  7. The influence of seawater pH on U / Ca ratios in the scleractinian cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Raddatz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pCO2 in seawater is a serious threat for marine calcifiers and alters the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Therefore, the reconstruction of past-seawater properties and their impact on marine ecosystems is an important way to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to better constrain the effects of possible changes in the future ocean. Cold-water coral (CWC ecosystems are biodiversity hotspots. Living close to aragonite-undersaturation, these corals serve as living laboratories as well as archives to reconstruct the boundary conditions of their calcification under the carbonate system of the ocean. We investigated the reef-building CWC Lophelia pertusa as a recorder of intermediate ocean seawater pH. This species-specific field calibration is based on a unique sample set of live in-situ collected L. pertusa and corresponding seawater samples. These data demonstrate that uranium speciation and skeletal incorporation for azooxanthellate scleractinian CWCs is pH dependent. However, this also indicates that internal pH up-regulation of the coral does not play a role in uranium incorporation into the majority of the skeleton of L. pertusa. This study suggests L. pertusa provides a new archive for the reconstruction of intermediate water mass pH and hence may help to constrain tipping points for ecosystem dynamics and evolutionary characteristics in a changing ocean.

  8. Rapid isolation, reliable characterization, and water solubility improvement of polymethoxyflavones from cold-pressed mandarin essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marina; Rigano, Francesca; Arigò, Adriana; Sciarrone, Danilo; Calabrò, Maria Luisa; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Polymethoxyflavones possess many biological properties, as lipid-lowering, hypoglycaemic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities, therefore, they may be employed as nutraceuticals or therapeutic agents. The scarcity of pure polymethoxyflavones on the market as well as their low water solubility limited in vivo studies and the use of polymethoxyflavones as food or pharmaceutical supplements. Since mandarin peels are a rich source of polymethoxyflavones, tangeretin, nobiletin, sinensetin, tetra-O-methyl scutellarein, and heptamethoxyflavone were purified from a nonvolatile residue of a cold-pressed mandarin essential oil using a multidimensional preparative liquid chromatographic system coupled with a photodiode array detector and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. A new prototype, consisting of a nano-liquid chromatography system coupled with an electron ionization mass spectrometer, was used for the characterization of the pure isolated molecules. Finally, due to the collection of highly pure nobiletin and tangeretin, the ability of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin to enhance the water solubility of both polymethoxyflavones was evaluated by phase solubility studies and Job's plot method.

  9. New cold-water coral occurrences in the Eastern Ionian Sea: Results from experimental long line fishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytilineou, Ch.; Smith, C. J.; Anastasopoulou, A.; Papadopoulou, K. N.; Christidis, G.; Bekas, P.; Kavadas, S.; Dokos, J.

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge on the cold-water corals (CWCs) occurring in the deep waters of Eastern Ionian Sea (E. Mediterranean) has improved with new species records and information related to their occurrence, abundance, distribution, morphological and other characteristics. Data were collected from accidental coral catches during experimental long-line fishing using two different hook sizes (No. 7 targeting hake and No. 9 targeting blackspot seabream). Eight coral taxa were identified, with new records for the E. Ionian Sea for Antipathes dichotoma, Desmophyllum dianthus, Swiftia pallida and Pennatula phosphorea. CWCs occurred in 72% of the long lines and most of them were entire and live (except Leiopathes glaberrima). The most frequently caught coral group was Antipatharia. Isidella elongata and A. dichotoma presented the highest abundance. The main bulk of the corals was caught between 500 and 600 m depth. Some of the identified corals (L. glaberrima and I. elongata) seemed to have more close relationships with some species of the fish assemblage (Galeus melastomus, Helicolenus dactylopterus) inhabiting the study area. Species richness and coral catch in numbers were higher for the smaller hook size (No. 9), which caught the larger entire living colonies of A. dichotoma, L. glaberrima and I. elongata. As a result, the corals collected during the present study, characterized by slow growth rates and high longevities, could be considered vulnerable to the gear used in blackspot seabream fishery; this implies the need for more research, monitoring, protection and sustainable management.

  10. Caution on the storage of waters and aqueous solutions in plastic containers for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2012-11-30

    The choice of containers for storage of aqueous samples between their collection, transport and water hydrogen ((2)H) and oxygen ((18)O) stable isotope analysis is a topic of concern for a wide range of fields in environmental, geological, biomedical, food, and forensic sciences. The transport and separation of water molecules during water vapor or liquid uptake by sorption or solution and the diffusive transport of water molecules through organic polymer material by permeation or pervaporation may entail an isotopic fractionation. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the extent of such fractionation. Sixteen bottle-like containers of eleven different organic polymers, including low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE), polypropylene (PP), polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and perfluoroalkoxy-Teflon (PFA), of different wall thickness and size were completely filled with the same mineral water and stored for 659 days under the same conditions of temperature and humidity. Particular care was exercised to keep the bottles tightly closed and prevent loss of water vapor through the seals. Changes of up to +5‰ for δ(2)H values and +2.0‰ for δ(18)O values were measured for water after more than 1 year of storage within a plastic container, with the magnitude of change depending mainly on the type of organic polymer, wall thickness, and container size. The most important variations were measured for the PET and PC bottles. Waters stored in glass bottles with Polyseal™ cone-lined PP screw caps and thick-walled HDPE or PFA containers with linerless screw caps having an integrally molded inner sealing ring preserved their original δ(2)H and δ(18)O values. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen stable isotope compositions of the organic polymeric materials were also determined. The results of this study clearly show that for precise and accurate measurements of the water stable isotope composition in aqueous solutions, rigorous sampling and

  11. Removal of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides from water by means of gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Utrilla, José; Daiem, Mahmoud M Abdel; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl; López-Peñalver, Jesús J; Velo-Gala, Inmaculada; Mota, Antonio J

    2016-11-01

    Gamma radiation has been used to induce the degradation of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides such as phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in aqueous solution, determining the dose constants, removal percentages, and radiation-chemical yields. The reaction rate constants of hydroxyl radical (HO), hydrated electron (eaq(-)) and hydrogen atom (H) with these pollutants were also obtained by means of competition kinetics, using 3-aminopyridine and atrazine as reference compounds. The results indicated that the elimination of these pollutants with gamma radiation mainly follows the oxidative pathway through reaction with HO radicals. The degradation by-products from the five pollutants were determined, detecting that the hydroxylation of the corresponding parent compounds was the main chemical process in the degradation of the pollutants. Moreover, a high decrease in the chemical oxygen demand has been observed for all pollutants. As expected, the degradation by-products generated by the irradiation of PA, BPA and DPA showed a lower toxicity than the parent compounds, however, in the case of 2,4-D and MCPA irradiation, interestingly, their by-products were more toxic than the corresponding original compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. APPLICATION OF NATURAL COLD FOR PROTECTION OF WATER RESOURCES AGAINST POLLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sosnovskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presented herein discusses theoretical and practical aspects of formation artificial firn-ice masses and prospects for their use in solutions of practical and environmental problems. The method utilizes winter sprinkler irrigation with long-jet sprinklers. The mass of artificial firm can be as high as 10 meters. This application is effective for treatment and desalination to protect water resources from contamination. Mineralization of artificial firn is 5–10 times lower than the salinity of the original water. The dynamics of the removal of salts ions, microelements, and dissolved organic compounds during firn melting is assessed through mathematical modeling and experimental research. Melting of one-third of the firn mass decreases mineralization by more than a factor of 10.

  13. Enhanced Arabian Sea intermediate water flow during glacial North Atlantic cold phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Simon J. A.; Kroon, Dick; Ganssen, Gerald; Peeters, Frank; Ganeshram, Raja

    2009-04-01

    During the last glacial period, polar ice cores indicate climate asynchrony between the poles at the millennial time-scale. Yet, surface ocean circulation in large parts of the globe varied in tune with Greenland temperature fluctuations suggesting that any anti-phase behavior to a substantial degree must lie in the deeper global ocean circulation which is poorly understood outside the Atlantic Ocean. Here we present data from the north-western Indian Ocean which indicate that the timing of maxima in northward extensions of glacial Antarctic Intermediate Water (GAAIW) coincides with dramatically reduced thermohaline overturn in the North Atlantic associated with the Heinrich-ice surge events (HE). The repeated expansion of the GAAIW during HEs, recorded far north of the equator in the Arabian Sea, suggests that southern hemisphere driven intermediate water mass variability forms an integral part of the inter-hemisphere asynchronous climate change behavior at the millennial time-scale.

  14. Investigation of primary static recrystallization in a NiTiFe shape memory alloy subjected to cold canning compression using the coupling crystal plasticity finite element method with cellular automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Hu, Li; Zhao, Yanan; Sun, Dong

    2017-10-01

    The behavior of primary static recrystallization (SRX) in a NiTiFe shape memory alloy (SMA) subjected to cold canning compression was investigated using the coupling crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) with the cellular automaton (CA) method, where the distribution of the dislocation density and the deformed grain topology quantified by CPFEM were used as the input for the subsequent SRX simulation performed using the CA method. The simulation results were confirmed by the experimental ones in terms of microstructures, average grain size and recrystallization fraction, which indicates that the proposed coupling method is well able to describe the SRX behavior of the NiTiFe SMA. The results show that the dislocation density exhibits an inhomogeneous distribution in the deformed sample and the recrystallization nuclei mainly concentrate on zones where the dislocation density is relatively higher. An increase in the compressive deformation degree leads to an increase in nucleation rate and a decrease in grain boundary spaces in the compression direction, which reduces the growth spaces for the SRX nuclei and impedes their further growth. In addition, both the mechanisms of local grain refinement in the incomplete SRX and the influence of compressive deformation degree on the grain size of SRX were vividly illustrated by the corresponding physical models.

  15. The Role of Water Consumption on Consumption of the Ration, Cold Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-22

    physiological water requirement to excrete the waste products from excessive protein intake. Nutritional Status Venous antecubital blood samples were taken... cider , and orange beverage base. The troops appeared to like the dessert type items since they consumed 90.2% of the b.-ownies and chocolate covered...while early morning urine collections show physiological status for a shorter and more recent period of time. The incidence of ketone production

  16. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  17. A new mercury-accumulating Mucor hiemalis strain EH8 from cold sulfidic spring water biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Enamul; Fritscher, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Here, we report about a unique aquatic fungus Mucor hiemalisEH8 that can remove toxic ionic mercury from water by intracellular accumulation and reduction into elemental mercury (Hg(0) ). EH8 was isolated from a microbial biofilm grown in sulfidic-reducing spring water sourced at a Marching's site located downhill from hop cultivation areas with a history of mercury use. A thorough biodiversity survey and mercury-removal function analyses were undertaken in an area of about 200 km(2) in Bavaria (Germany) to find the key biofilm and microbe for mercury removal. After a systematic search using metal removal assays we identified Marching spring's biofilm out of 18 different sulfidic springs' biofilms as the only one that was capable of removing ionic Hg from water. EH8 was selected, due to its molecular biological identification as the key microorganism of this biofilm with the capability of mercury removal, and cultivated as a pure culture on solid and in liquid media to produce germinating sporangiospores. They removed 99% of mercury from water within 10-48 h after initial exposure to Hg(II). Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated occurrence of intracellular mercury in germinating sporangiospores exposed to mercury. Not only associated with intracellular components, but mercury was also found to be released and deposited as metallic-shiny nanospheres. Electron-dispersive x-ray analysis of such a nanosphere confirmed presence of mercury by the HgMα peak at 2.195 keV. Thus, a first aquatic eukaryotic microbe has been found that is able to grow even at low temperature under sulfur-reducing conditions with promising performance in mercury removal to safeguard our environment from mercury pollution. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sensitive limits on the abundance of cold water vapor in the DM Tauri protoplanetary disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergin, E.A.; Hogerheijde, M.R.; Brinch, C.; Fogel, J.; Yıldız, U.A.; Kristensen, L.E.; van Dishoeck, E.F.; Bell, T.A.; Blake, G.A.; Cernicharo, J.; Dominik, C.; Lis, D.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Panić, O.; Pearson, J.C.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A.O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Caselli, P.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; Di Giorgio, A.M.; Doty, S.D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J.R.; de Graauw, T.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G.J.; Herpin, F.; Jacq, T.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J.K.; Larsson, B.; Liseau, R.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Nisini, B.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Tafalla, M.; van Kempen, T.A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S.F.; Wyrowski, F.; van der Tak, F.; Jellema, W.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Hartogh, P.; Stützki, J.; Szczerba, R.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a sensitive search for the ground-state emission lines of ortho-and para-water vapor in the DM Tau protoplanetary disk using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. No strong lines are detected down to 3 sigma levels in 0.5 km s(-1) channels of 4.2 mK for the 1(10)-1(01) line and 12.6 mK for the

  19. Sensitive limits on the abundance of cold water vapor in the DM Tau protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, E A; Brinch, C; Fogel, J; Yildiz, U A; Kristensen, L E; van~Dishoeck, E F; Bell, T A; Blake, G A; Cernicharo, J; Dominik, C; Lis, D; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Panic, O; Pearson, J C; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Benz, A O; Bjerkeli, P; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Bruderer, S; Caselli, P; Codella, C; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Doty, S D; Encrenaz, P; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Helmich, F; Herczeg, G J; Herpin, F; Jacq, T; Johnstone, D; Jorgensen, J K; Larsson, B; Liseau, R; Marseille, M; McCoey, C; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Plume, R; Risacher, C; Santiago-Garcia, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; Tafalla, M; van Kempen, T A; Visser, R; Wampfler, S F; Wyrowski, F; van der Tak, F; Jellema, W; Tielens, A G G M; Hartogh, P; Stutzki, J; Szczerba, R

    2010-01-01

    We performed a sensitive search for the ground-state emission lines of ortho- and para-water vapor in the DM Tau protoplanetary disk using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. No strong lines are detected down to 3sigma levels in 0.5 km/s channels of 4.2 mK for the 1_{10}--1_{01} line and 12.6 mK for the 1_{11}--0_{00} line. We report a very tentative detection, however, of the 1_{10}--1_{01} line in the Wide Band Spectrometer, with a strength of T_{mb}=2.7 mK, a width of 5.6 km/s and an integrated intensity of 16.0 mK km/s. The latter constitutes a 6sigma detection. Regardless of the reality of this tentative detection, model calculations indicate that our sensitive limits on the line strengths preclude efficient desorption of water in the UV illuminated regions of the disk. We hypothesize that more than 95-99% of the water ice is locked up in coagulated grains that have settled to the midplane.

  20. Effects of Different Water and Super Plasticizer Amount, Pre-Setting and Curing Regimes on the Behavior of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Dashti Rahmatabadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC is an ultra high performance concrete which has superior mechanical and physical properties. The RPC is composed of cement and very fine powders such as crushed quartz (100–600 μm and silica fume with very low water/binder ratio (W/B (less than 0.20 and Super Plasticizer (SP. The RPC has a very high compressive and tensile strength with better durability properties than current high performance concretes. Application of very low water/binder ratio with a high dosage of super plasticizer, different heat curing processes and pre-setting pressure improve mechanical and physical properties of RPC. In this study, the RPC is composed of available materials in Iran. Two different mixing proportions, different water/binder ratios for preparation of samples, different super plasticizer dosages, five different (0, 25, 50, 100 and 150 MPa pre-setting pressure and 7 different curing regimes were used in samples preparation and experiments. Results showed that appropriate water/binder ratio and super plasticizer dosage, higher temperature and pre-setting pressure increase the workability, density and compressive strength of compositions.

  1. Factors controlling plasticity of leaf morphology in Robinia pseudoacacia L. II: the impact of water stress on leaf morphology of seedlings grown in a controlled environment chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.T. Tyree

    2012-01-01

    Context. The cause of morphological plasticity of leaves within the crowns of tall trees still debated. Whether it is driven by irradiance or hydraulic constraints is inconclusive. In a previous study, we hypothesized that water stress caused between-site and within-tree morphological variability in mature Robinia trees.

  2. Maximal stomatal conductance to water and plasticity in stomatal traits differ between native and invasive introduced lineages of Phragmites australis in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhovnikoff, V; Taylor, S H; Hazelton, E L G; Smith, C M; O'Brien, J

    2016-01-27

    The fitness costs of reproduction by clonal growth can include a limited ability to adapt to environmental and temporal heterogeneity. Paradoxically, some facultatively clonal species are not only able to survive, but colonize, thrive and expand in heterogeneous environments. This is likely due to the capacity for acclimation (sensu stricto) that compensates for the fitness costs and complements the ecological advantages of clonality. Introduced Phragmites australis demonstrates great phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature, nutrient availability, geographic gradient, water depths, habitat fertility, atmospheric CO2, interspecific competition and intraspecific competition for light. However, no in situ comparative subspecies studies have explored the difference in plasticity between the non-invasive native lineage and the highly invasive introduced lineage. Clonality of the native and introduced lineages makes it possible to control for genetic variation, making P. australis a unique system for the comparative study of plasticity. Using previously identified clonal genotypes, we investigated differences in their phenotypic plasticity through measurements of the lengths and densities of stomata on both the abaxial (lower) and adaxial (upper) surfaces of leaves, and synthesized these measurements to estimate impacts on maximum stomatal conductance to water (gwmax). Results demonstrated that at three marsh sites, invasive lineages have consistently greater gwmax than their native congeners, as a result of greater stomatal densities and smaller stomata. Our analysis also suggests that phenotypic plasticity, determined as within-genotype variation in gwmax, of the invasive lineage is similar to, or exceeds, that shown by the native lineage.

  3. Environmental boundary conditions of cold-water coral mound growth over the last 3 million years in the Porcupine Seabight, Northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Jacek; Rüggeberg, Andres; Liebetrau, Volker; Foubert, Anneleen; Hathorne, Ed C.; Fietzke, Jan; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2014-01-01

    IODP Expedition 307 made it for the first time possible to investigate the entire body of a cold-water coral carbonate mound. Here we provide new insights into the long-term history of Challenger Mound on the European continental margin off Ireland. This study is based on age determinations (230Th/U, 87Sr/86Sr) and geochemical signals (Mg/Li and Ba/Ca) measured in the scleractinian cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa from IODP Site 1317 in the Porcupine Seabight. The paleoceanographic reconstructions reveal that coral growth in the Porcupine Seabight was restricted to specific oceanographic conditions such as enhanced export of primary production and Bottom-Water Temperatures (BWT) between ∼8 and 10 °C, related to the water mass stratification of the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) and Eastern North Atlantic Water (ENAW). The geochemical signals from the coral skeletons can be explained by the close interaction between cold-water coral growth, sea-surface productivity and the surrounding water masses - the boundary layer between MOW and ENAW. Enhanced sea-surface productivity and the build-up of a stable water mass stratification between ENAW and MOW caused enhanced nutrient supply at intermediate water depths and facilitated a steady mound growth between ∼3.0 and 2.1 Ma. With the decrease in sea-surface productivity and related reduced export productivity the food supply was insufficient for rapid coral mound growth between ∼1.7 and 1 Ma. During the late Pleistocene (over the last ∼0.5 Myr) mound growth was restricted to interglacial periods. During glacials the water mass boundary between ENAW/MOW probably was below the mound summit and hence food supply was not sufficient for corals to grow.

  4. Armazenamento refrigerado da uva de mesa 'Romana' (A1105 cultivada sob cobertura plástica Cold storage of 'Romana' (A1105 table grape cultivated under plastic cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lulu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A videira é uma das principais fruteiras cultivadas em todo o mundo e atualmente a preferência por uvas do tipo "sem sementes" ou "apirênicas" vem aumentando gradativamente no mercado interno brasileiro. A cultivar 'Romana' (A1105 tem mostrado grande potencial como nova alternativa de uva de mesa apirênica na região de Jundiaí - SP. No entanto, a qualidade dos cachos tem sido afetada pela ocorrência de chuvas na época da colheita, propiciando a incidência de rachaduras nas bagas ("cracking" e podridões. Visando a solucionar essa dificuldade, foram conduzidos experimentos de campo em vinhedo cultivado em cortina dupla e sob cobertura plástica. Após a colheita, foram coletadas oito amostras com seis cachos cada, que foram armazenadas a 3 ºC e submetidas a avaliações de qualidade por um período máximo de 36 dias. A perda de massa ultrapassou o valor de 6% após três semanas de armazenamento refrigerado, quando apresentou sinais de murchamento das bagas, concluindo-se que o período máximo de armazenamento em câmara fria para a cultivar 'Romana' (A1105 foi de 21 dias.The grapevine is one of the most cultivated fruit crop and nowadays the preference for seedless grapes is gradualy increasing in the Brazilian internal market. The table grape cultivar 'Romana' (A1105 has been showing potential as a new option for the growers from Jundiaí - SP, Brazil, as a seedless grape. However the bunch quality has been affected by rain at the harvest allowing the incidence of cracking and bunch rot. Aiming to solve this problem a field trial was carried out with grapes cultivated under plastic cover and Geneva Double Curtain training system. After harvest, eight samples of six bunches each were taken and stored at 3 ºC and evaluated for quality during a period of 36 days. After three weeks of storage, the weight loss was higher than 6%, showing bunch fade and the rot bunch increased significantly. It was concluded that maximum shelf life for

  5. Vietnam: Water Policy Dynamics under a Post-Cold War Communism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Fforde

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam is widely seen as a development success, with rather rapid economic growth and a reported reduced role of the state, yet presents many paradoxes to conventional analytical frameworks. Two of relevance are accounts that stress a combination of a strongly hegemonic regime with weak internal sovereignty in terms of both the internal coherence of the apparat and its interactions with the rest of Vietnamese society, and also associated accounts that deny much role to intentionality in explaining apparent development success. This article will contextualise accounts of political intention and policy development towards water issues in Vietnam through an examination of two main empirics: the evolution of formal policy, understood as documents of the state, as well as of political intention, understood as documents of the ruling Party; and the by now extensive series of 'active' case studies that have examined donor as well as other projects in the sector. It will examine the notion, in the contexts suggested by the Vietnamese experience, that attempts to explain Vietnamese water policy, which have shown a tendency to shift away from assumptions that an analytical framework’s categories may easily and without too much risk be extended across different contexts. Rather, comparisons of Vietnamese experience across contexts will tend, if they are to be persuasive, to shift to the use of languages that reflect ontological fluidity, in that what things mean is expected to change over time, without reference to an imagined transcendental and universal 'real'. In this sense, Vietnamese water policy may be usefully understood as an example of how 'success gives voice to the local'.

  6. Survey of Cold Water Lines in Protoplanetary Disks: Indications of Systematic Volatile Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin Anthony; Hogerheijde, Michiel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoff; Bruderer, Simon; Cleeves, Ilse; Dominik, Carsten; Fedele, Davide; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pearson, John; Yıldız, Umut

    2017-06-01

    We performed very deep searches for 2 ground-state water transitions in 13 protoplanetary disks with the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory, with integration times up to 12 hr per line. We also searched for, with shallower integrations, two other water transitions that sample warmer gas. The detection rate is low, and the upper limits provided by the observations are generally much lower than predictions of thermo-chemical models with canonical inputs. One ground-state transition is newly detected in the stacked spectrum of AA Tau, DM Tau, LkCa 15, and MWC 480. We run a grid of models to show that the abundance of gas-phase oxygen needs to be reduced by a factor of at least ∼ 100 to be consistent with the observational upper limits (and positive detections) if a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.01 were to be assumed. As a continuation of previous ideas, we propose that the underlying reason for the depletion of oxygen (hence the low detection rate) is the freeze-out of volatiles such as water and CO onto dust grains followed by grain growth and settling/migration, which permanently removes these gas-phase molecules from the emissive upper layers of the outer disk. Such depletion of volatiles is likely ubiquitous among different disks, though not necessarily to the same degree. The volatiles might be returned back to the gas phase in the inner disk (≲ 15 au), which is consistent with current constraints. Comparison with studies on disk dispersal due to photoevaporation indicates that the timescale for volatile depletion is shorter than that of photoevaporation.

  7. Do cold, low salinity waters pass through the Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, R.R.; Girishkumar, M.S.; Ravichandran, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pankajakshan, T.

    . The SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a data (O’Riley et al., 1998) are also utilized as a tracer to track the southward water flow through the ISLC. The mean monthly (July-August) climatologies of SSS from Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) analysis (Carton et al...) and the southward flow through the ISLC if any.The SODA which assimilates all available temperature and salinity observations in the world oceans, satellite altimetry, and sea surface temperature (SST) observations to constrain a numerical model of the primitive...

  8. Do cold, low salinity waters pass through the Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, R.R.; Girishkumar, M.S.; Ravichandran, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pankajakshan, T.

    the southward water flow through the ISLC. The mean monthly (July–August) Indo-Sri Lanka Channel during winter 7385 climatologies of SSS from simple ocean data assimilation (SODA) analysis (Carton et al. 2005), TMI SST and SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a are utilized... Assimilation (SODA) is an ocean general circulation model-using Parallel Ocean Program with eddy-permitting resolution, which assim- ilates all available hydrographic profile data as well as ocean station data, moored temperature and salinity time series...

  9. Influence of Prior Intense Exercise and Cold Water Immersion in Recovery for Performance and Physiological Response during Subsequent Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peter M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Athletes in intense endurance sports (e.g., 4000-m track cycling) often perform maximally (~4 min) twice a day due to qualifying and finals being placed on the same day. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate repeated performance on the same day in a competitive setting (part A) and the influence from prior intense exercise on subsequent performance and physiological response to moderate and maximal exercise with and without the use of cold water immersion (CWI) in recovery (part B). In part A, performance times during eight World championships for male track cyclists were extracted from the qualifying and final races in 4000-m individual pursuit. In part B, twelve trained cyclists with an average (±SD) ⩒O2-peak of 67 ± 5 mL/min/kg performed a protocol mimicking a qualifying race (QUAL) followed 3 h later by a performance test (PT) with each exercise period encompassing intense exercise for ~4 min preceded by an identical warm-up period in both a control setting (CON) and using cold water immersion in recovery (CWI; 15 min at 15°C). Performance was lowered (P < 0.001) from qualification to finals (259 ± 3 vs. 261 ± 3 s) for the track cyclists during World championships in part A. In part B, mean power in PT was not different in CWI relative to CON (406 ± 43 vs. 405 ± 38 W). Peak ⩒O2 (5.04 ± 0.50 vs. 5.00 ± 0.49 L/min) and blood lactate (13 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 3 mmol/L) did not differ between QUAL and PT and cycling economy and potassium handling was not impaired by prior intense exercise. In conclusion, performance is reduced with repeated maximal exercise in world-class track cyclists during 4000-m individual pursuit lasting ~4 min, however prior intense exercise do not appear to impair peak ⩒O2, peak lactate, cycling economy, or potassium handling in trained cyclists and CWI in recovery does not improve subsequent performance.

  10. Water level-dependent morphological plasticity in Sagittaria montevidensis Cham. and Schl. (Alismataceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Demetrio

    Full Text Available Aquatic plants are able to alter their morphology in response to environmental condition variation, such as water level fluctuations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water level on Sagittaria montevidensis morphology through measures of vegetative structures formed in drought and flood periods. We hypothesised that the plant height and the biomass of S. montevidensis leaves will increase during flood periods, while the biomass and diameter of petioles, and the basal plant area will increase during dry periods. We sampled a total amount of 270 individuals in nine sediment banks per visit, totalling 1080 plants. In order to compare plant morphology between dry and flood periods, we measured the water level in each bank and took the following variables for each plant: diameter, height and diameter of the biggest petiole. In order to compare biomass allocation between dry and flood periods, we sampled a total amount of 90 individuals in nine sediment banks per visit, totalling 360 plants. Plants were dried and weighed in the laboratory. All measured morphologic traits, as well as the biomass of leaf blades and petioles, were higher during flood periods, indicating that water level highly influences the morphology of S. montevidensis individuals. Our results suggest that these morphological responses allow survival and maintenance of S. montevidensis populations under environmental stress. These results can be linked to the invasive potential of S. montevidensis and sheds light on basic management practices that may be applied in the future.

  11. Water level-dependent morphological plasticity in Sagittaria montevidensis Cham. and Schl. (Alismataceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrio, G R; Barbosa, M E A; Coelho, F F

    2014-08-01

    Aquatic plants are able to alter their morphology in response to environmental condition variation, such as water level fluctuations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water level on Sagittaria montevidensis morphology through measures of vegetative structures formed in drought and flood periods. We hypothesised that the plant height and the biomass of S. montevidensis leaves will increase during flood periods, while the biomass and diameter of petioles, and the basal plant area will increase during dry periods. We sampled a total amount of 270 individuals in nine sediment banks per visit, totalling 1080 plants. In order to compare plant morphology between dry and flood periods, we measured the water level in each bank and took the following variables for each plant: diameter, height and diameter of the biggest petiole. In order to compare biomass allocation between dry and flood periods, we sampled a total amount of 90 individuals in nine sediment banks per visit, totalling 360 plants. Plants were dried and weighed in the laboratory. All measured morphologic traits, as well as the biomass of leaf blades and petioles, were higher during flood periods, indicating that water level highly influences the morphology of S. montevidensis individuals. Our results suggest that these morphological responses allow survival and maintenance of S. montevidensis populations under environmental stress. These results can be linked to the invasive potential of S. montevidensis and sheds light on basic management practices that may be applied in the future.

  12. Water vapor permeability, mechanical, optical and sensorial properties of plasticized guar gumedible films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edible films were prepared by casting method using guar gum and glycerol in different ratios. The concentration of guar gum was 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% whereas glycerol concentration was 20, 30 and 40% (w/v). The water vapor permeability (WVP), mechanical properties (tensile strength and elongation), thic...

  13. Water Vapor Permeation of Metal Oxide/Polymer Coated Plastic Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Yukihiro; Oya, Toshiyuki; Kuwahara, Mitsuru; Ito, Katsuya

    Barrier performance to water vapor permeation of ceramic coated layers deposited on flexible polymer films is of great interest to food packaging, medical device packaging and flat panel display industries. In this study, a new type film in which a ceramic layer is deposited on a polymer coated film was proposed for lower water vapor permeation. It is important how to control interfacial properties between each layer and film for good barrier performance. Several kinds of polymer coated materials were prepared for changing surface free energy of the films before and after depositing the ceramic layer. The ceramic layer, which is composed of mixed material of SiO2 and Al2O3, was adopted under the same conditions. The following results were obtained; 1) Water vapor permeation is not related to the surface energy of polymer coated films, 2) After depositing the ceramic layer, however, a strong correlation is observed between the water vapor permeation and surface free energy. 3) The phenomenon is considered that the polarity of the polymer layers plays a key role in changing the structure of ceramic coated layers.

  14. Hot water extracted wood fiber for production of wood plastic composites (WPCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel Raul Pelaez-Samaniego; Vikram Yadama; Eini Lowell; Thomas E. Amidon; Timothy L. Chaffee

    2013-01-01

    Undebarked ponderosa pine chips were treated by hot water extraction to modify the chemical composition. In the treated pine (TP) , the mass was reduced by approximately 20%, and the extract was composed mainly of degradation products of hemicelluloses. Wood flour produced from TP and unextracted chips (untreated pine, UP) was blended with high-density polyethylene (...

  15. Adaptive changes in the plasticity of body melanisation in generalist, cold and warm adapted Drosophila species%不同气候适应类型果蝇体色黑化可塑性的适应性变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravi PARKASH; Seema RAMNIWAS; Chanderkala LAMBHOD; Babita KAJLA

    2011-01-01

    变温昆虫果蝇Drosophila深受热选择(即遗传效应)或表型诱导效应(即可塑性)的影响.表型可塑性是不同生物进行适应的有效方法,但是它在不同的果蝇种中较少受到关注.我们分析了不同发育温度范围和地理分布的果蝇的黑化反应模式.嗜凤梨果蝇D.ananassae和蒲桃果蝇D.jambulina对低温敏感,这些物种可在18 ~ 32℃下饲育.相反,D.nepalensis为耐冷且对热敏感的物种,可在12 ~ 25℃下饲育.世界广为分布的黑腹果蝇D.melanogaster的温度范围宽(13~31℃),该物种前3个腹节和后3个腹节的黑化反应模式未见明显差异.D.nepalensis的全部6个腹节(第2~7节)均具有高度的可塑性.不过,黑腹果蝇D.melanogaster只有后3个腹节具有可塑性.相反,热带物种嗜凤梨果蝇D.ananassae的所有腹节均不具有可塑性.世界广为分布的黑腹果蝇,即使来自冷得多的气候环境,其体色也不加深,与D.nepalensis中观察到的体色接近.本研究的目的旨在认识引起体色的形态多样性的过程以及果蝇对不同地理区域的适应性.最后,将体色黑化与物种系统发育谱系的比较表明,在不同的演化谱系中不断发生遗传多态性或表型可塑性两种不同模式的适应.%Ectothermic drosophilids are profoundly affected by thermal selection (i.e.,genetic effects) or through induced effects on phenotype (i.e.,plasticity).Phenotypic plasticity is a powerful means of adaptation in diverse organisms but has received less attention for different drosophilids. We analyzed reaction norms of melanisation in Drosophila species which differ in developmental thermal range and geographical distribution.D.ananassae and D.jambulina are cold sensitive,and these species can be cultured between 18 to 32℃.By contrast,D.nepalensis is cold-tolerant and heat-sensitive species which can be raised between 12 and 25℃.The cosmopolitan species D. melanogaster has a broader thermal range ( 13

  16. Bacteriological safety of plastic-bagged sachet drinking water sold in Amassoma, Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakubu B Ngwai; Adebukola A Sounyo; Siyeofori M Fiabema; Geoffrey A Agadah; Tamunobelema O Ibeakuzie

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the bacteriological safety of sachet water sold in Amassoma, a rural community in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Methods:Six samples of each of the different sachet drinking water brands were bought at random from shop shelves, markets and street vendors and were studies for microbial indicators of safety and quality. Bacterial counts were analyzed by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and significance of differences was tested at 5%probability. Results:Minimum and maximum counts with regard to the sachet water samples investigated were (4.3±1.1)í106 CFU mL-1 and (8.2±1.0)í106 CFU mL-1 for heterotrophic plate counts;(0.9±0.3)í106 CFU mL-1 and (1.2±0.4)í106 CFU mL-1 for aerobic spore-former counts;(1.3±0.5)í103 CFU mL-1 and (2.5±0.8)í103 CFU mL-1 for total coliforms;(1.6±0.9)í103 CFU mL-1 and (9.5±11.2)í103 CFU mL-1 for thermotolerant coliforms. Klebsiella spp but not Escherichia coli was present in all samples of the brands;non-coliform bacteria detected in some samples were Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Bacillus species. Conclusions:The brands of sachet water sold (at the time of this study) in Amassoma did not meet the minimum acceptable standard for microbiologically safe drinking water as recommended by the World Health Organization.

  17. Plasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lubliner, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The aim of Plasticity Theory is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary state of knowledge in basic plasticity theory and to its applications. It treats several areas not commonly found between the covers of a single book: the physics of plasticity, constitutive theory, dynamic plasticity, large-deformation plasticity, and numerical methods, in addition to a representative survey of problems treated by classical methods, such as elastic-plastic problems, plane plastic flow, and limit analysis; the problem discussed come from areas of interest to mechanical, structural, and

  18. Paleo-environment of cold-water coral initiation in the NE Atlantic:Implications from a deep-water carbonate mound drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, W.-Chr.,; Margreht, S.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding of the paleo-environment during initiation and early development of deep-water carbonate mounds in the NE Atlantic is still under debate. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 sailed in 2005 to the Porcupine Seabight in order to investigate for the first time sediments from the base of a giant carbonate mound (Challenger Mound, 155 m). These results indicate that the initiation and start-up phase of this carbonate mound coincides with the beginning of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) at around 2.6 Ma (Kano et al. 2007). Further carbonate mound development seems to be strongly dependent on rapid changes in paleo-oceanographic and climatic conditions around the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary, especially characterized and caused by intermediate water masses. To characterise the paleo-environmental and paleo-ecological setting favourable for the initial coral colonization at 2.6 Ma, we use well-developed proxies such as δ18O and δ13C of planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) and of a collection of benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, Discanomalina coronata, Cibicides lobatulus, Lobatulua antarctica, Planulina ariminensis), benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as grain size analysis. These proxies indicate variability in seawater temperature, salinity and density of intermediate water masses from southern origin (Mediterranean, Bay of Biscay) supporting cold-water coral settlement and initial development in the Porcupine Seabight. References: Kano et al. (2007) Age constraints on the origin and growth history of a deep-water coral mound in the northeast Atlantic drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. Geology, 35(11):1051-1054.

  19. Relationships between water temperatures and upstream migration, cold water refuge use, and spawning of adult bull trout from the Lostine River, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, P.J.; Dunham, J.B.; Sankovich, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding thermal habitat use by migratory fish has been limited by difficulties in matching fish locations with water temperatures. To describe spatial and temporal patterns of thermal habitat use by migratory adult bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus, that spawn in the Lostine River, Oregon, we employed a combination of archival temperature tags, radio tags, and thermographs. We also compared temperatures of the tagged fish to ambient water temperatures to determine if the fish were using thermal refuges. The timing and temperatures at which fish moved upstream from overwintering areas to spawning locations varied considerably among individuals. The annual maximum 7-day average daily maximum (7DADM) temperatures of tagged fish were 16-18 ??C and potentially as high as 21 ??C. Maximum 7DADM ambient water temperatures within the range of tagged fish during summer were 18-25 ??C. However, there was no evidence of the tagged fish using localized cold water refuges. Tagged fish appeared to spawn at 7DADM temperatures of 7-14 ??C. Maximum 7DADM temperatures of tagged fish and ambient temperatures at the onset of the spawning period in late August were 11-18 ??C. Water temperatures in most of the upper Lostine River used for spawning and rearing appear to be largely natural since there has been little development, whereas downstream reaches used by migratory bull trout are heavily diverted for irrigation. Although the population effects of these temperatures are unknown, summer temperatures and the higher temperatures observed for spawning fish appear to be at or above the upper range of suitability reported for the species. Published 2009. This article is a US Governmentwork and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Field comparison of solar water disinfection (SODIS) efficacy between glass and polyethylene terephalate (PET) plastic bottles under sub-Saharan weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, J K; Quilty, B; Muyanja, C K; McGuigan, K G

    2013-12-01

    Concerns about photodegradation products leaching from plastic bottle material into water during solar water disinfection (SODIS) are a major psychological barrier to increased uptake of SODIS. In this study, a comparison of SODIS efficacy using glass and plastic polyethylene terephalate (PET) bottles was carried out under strong real sunlight and overcast weather conditions at Makerere University in central Uganda. Both clear and turbid natural water samples from shallow wells and open dug wells, respectively, were used. Efficacy was determined from the inactivation of a wild strain of Escherichia coli in solar-exposed contaminated water in both glass and PET bottles. The studies reveal no significant difference in SODIS inactivation between glass and PET bottles (95% CI, p > 0.05), for all water samples under the different weather conditions except for clear water under overcast conditions where there was a small but significant difference (95% CI, p = 0.047) with less viable bacterial counts in PET bottles at two intermediate time points but not at the end of the exposure. The results demonstrate that SODIS efficacy in glass under tropical field conditions is comparable to PET plastic. SODIS users in these regions can choose either of reactors depending on availability and preference of the user.

  1. Response of the cold water mass in the western South China Sea to the wind stress curl associated with the summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Wei; WANG Dongxiao; HU Jianyu; NI Wensheng

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of climatological observation temperature data reveals that during the southwesterly monsoon, there exists a low temperature zone east of Vietnam. It cools down from June to August and warms up in September. Meanwhile, during this period, the cold water mass spreads eastward to the deep basin. Numerical experiments validate the results of data analysis and further verify that there are two basic factors that induce the Vietnam cold water. The major one is the strong local positive wind stress curl, which leads to the divergence of sea surface water and the upward supplement of lower layer water in the deep basin. Another minor one is the alongshore component of southwesterly monsoon, which drives the offshore Ekman transport and coastal upwelling in the shallow region along the Vietnam coast. In addition, the negative wind stress curl in the southern South China Sea inputs negative vorticity to the ocean and drives a strong anticyclonic gyre, which affects the spatial distribution of the cold water evidently.

  2. [Chemicohydrographic characteristics and the seasonal variations of nutrients at 35 degrees N transect in the cold water mass of the Southern Yellow Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin-Sheng; Fu, Ming-Zhu; Ge, Ren-Feng; Zang, Jia-Ye

    2010-09-01

    Based on the four cruises during 2006-2007, the chemicohydrographic characteristics and the seasonal variations of nutrients at 35 degrees N transect in the cold water mass of the Southern Yellow Sea were analyzed. The results showed that: In Winter, hydrological conditions in the eastern part of the section was significantly influenced by the Yellow Sea Warm Current, and the vertical mixing in the deep water had not reached the bottom, which led to the different distribution of the elements in the eastern and western part of the section, the vertically uniform distribution was presented in the west and the upper water of the east, while the stratification structure was found in the bottom water of the east. In Spring, the Yellow Sea warm current residual water and the Qingdao cold water mass were the most obviously hydrological characteristics, and because of the increasing of the temperature in the upper water and the weakening of the vertical mixing, the stability of the water column increased gradually; compared with winter, the contour trend of DO, pH and nutrients in deep water transferred to the more horizontal direction, and with the arrival of spring blooming, the nutrient concentrations in the upper water decreased significantly, besides, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) phenomena also began to emerge. In Summer, the section was influenced by the thermocline and the Yellow Sea cold water mass, which was accompanied with the maximum value phenomenon of DO and pH, in addition, the nutrient concentrations were low in upper water and high in bottom water, and compared with spring, the further reduction of the nutrient concentrations existed in upper water, but the nutrient concentrations were increasing dominantly in the water below the thermocline. In Autumn, with the decreasing of the temperature in the upper water and the enhancing of the vertical mixing, the stability of the water column decreased, but the vertical mixing in the deep water was

  3. Starch-related alpha-glucan/water dikinase is involved in the cold-induced development of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Nishida, Ikuo

    2005-06-01

    Cold-induced soluble sugar accumulation enhances the degree of freezing tolerance in various cold-hardy plants including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where soluble sugars accumulate in only a few hours at 2 degrees C. Hence, along with photosynthesis, starch degradation might play a significant role in cold-induced sugar accumulation and enhanced freezing tolerance. Starch-related alpha-glucan/water dikinase (EC 2.7.9.4), encoded by Arabidopsis STARCH EXCESS 1 (SEX1), is hypothesized to regulate starch degradation in plastids by phosphorylating starch, thereby ensuring better accessibility by starch-degrading enzymes. Here, we show that Arabidopsis sex1 mutants, when incubated at 2 degrees C for 1 d, were unable to accumulate maltooligosaccharides or normal glucose and fructose levels. In addition, they displayed impaired freezing tolerance. After 7 d at 2 degrees C, sex1 mutants did not show any of the above abnormal phenotypes but displayed slightly higher leaf starch contents. The impaired freezing tolerance of sex1 mutants was restored by overexpression of wild-type SEX1 cDNA using the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The results demonstrate a genetic link between the SEX1 locus and plant freezing tolerance, and show that starch degradation is important for enhanced freezing tolerance during an early phase of cold acclimation. However, induction of starch degradation was not accompanied by significant changes in alpha-glucan/water dikinase activity in leaf extracts and preceded cold-induced augmentation of SEX1 transcripts. Therefore, we conclude that augmentation of SEX1 transcripts might be a homeostatic response to low temperature, and that starch degradation during an early phase of cold acclimation could be regulated by a component(s) of a starch degradation pathway(s) downstream of SEX1.

  4. Cold water cleaning of brain proteins, biofilm and bone - harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkin, P R; Offin, D G; Vian, C J B; Howlin, R P; Dawson, J I; Secker, T J; Hervé, R C; Stoodley, P; Oreffo, R O C; Keevil, C W; Leighton, T G

    2015-08-28

    In the absence of sufficient cleaning of medical instruments, contamination and infection can result in serious consequences for the health sector and remains a significant unmet challenge. In this paper we describe a novel cleaning system reliant on cavitation action created in a free flowing fluid stream where ultrasonic transmission to a surface, through the stream, is achieved using careful design and control of the device architecture, sound field and the materials employed. Cleaning was achieved with purified water at room temperature, moderate fluid flow rates and without the need for chemical additives or the high power consumption associated with conventional strategies. This study illustrates the potential in harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream to remove biological contamination including brain tissue from surgical stainless steel substrates, S. epidermidis biofilms from glass, and fat/soft tissue matter from bone structures with considerable basic and clinical applications.

  5. Analysis of air-to-water heat pump in cold climate: comparison between experiment and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Januševičius

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat pump systems are promising technologies for current and future buildings and this research presents the performance of air source heat pump (ASHP system. The system was monitored, analysed and simulated using TRNSYS software. The experimental data were used to calibrate the simulation model of ASHP. The specific climate conditions are evaluated in the model. It was noticed for the heating mode that the coefficient of performance (COP varied from 1.98 to 3.05 as the outdoor temperature changed from –7.0 ºC to +5.0 ºC, respectively. TRNSYS simulations were also performed to predict seasonal performance factor of the ASHP for Vilnius city. It was identified that seasonal performance prediction could be approximately 15% lower if frost formation effects are not included to air-water heat pump simulation model.

  6. Buried Cold-Water Coral Mound Provinces and Contourite Drifts Along the Eastern Atlantic Margin: Controls, Interactions and Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooij, D.; Vandorpe, T.; Delivet, S.; Hebbeln, D.; Wienberg, C.; Martins, I.

    2014-12-01

    The association between cold-water coral mounds and contourite drift deposits has been demonstrated in the Belgica mound province, off Ireland. On that location, IODP expedition 307 was able to drill through the base of a mound, dating mound initiation at 2.65 Ma. However, the Belgica mounds are just one of the many expressions of mound growth. More enigmatic is the buried Magellan mound province, located in the northern part of the Porcupine Basin, featuring over 1000 relatively closely spaced buried mounds, which are all rooted on a common reflector. This indicates a common start-up event, but the true driving forces behind their initial settling, growth and demise are still unknown. The influence of bottom currents cannot be ruled out, since clear obstacle marks are present surrounding the mounds. In 2013, some 3000 km south of the Magellan mounds, a new province of buried mounds was discovered along the Moroccan Atlantic Margin, whic