WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasmonic nanoparticle optical

  1. Switching between optical bistability and multistability in plasmonic multilayer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshfar, Nader; Naseri, Tayebeh

    2017-01-01

    We study the nonlinear optical response of multilayer metallic nanoparticles driven by an electromagnetic wave, which can show large field enhancement, hence significantly enhancing optical processes. In addition to optical bistability (OB), we find that optical multistability (OM), which plays a more important role in some applications than OB, is achievable and can be obtained in a multilayer plasmonic nanoparticle. Our results demonstrate that owing to strong localized fields created in the core and each layer of multilayer nanoshells, which occurs in the particles at frequencies close to the surface plasmon resonance, multilayer nanoparticles are promising systems with unique optical characteristics to control the light by light at the nanometer scale. It is demonstrated that OB can be converted to OM via adjusting the wavelength of the applied field and the size of the nanoshell, and the system can manifest optical hysteresis. It is found that the optical bistable or multistable threshold and the shape of hysteresis loops are strongly dependent on the thickness of shells, the incident wavelength, the permittivity of the surrounding medium, and the composition of the core and the inner/outer layers. We also give a discussion on the impact of the exciton-plasmon interaction and the intrinsic size effect on the nonlinear optical response of multilayer spherical nanoparticles.

  2. Optical Nanoparticle Sorting Elucidates Synthesis of Plasmonic Nanotriangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, María Ana; Maier, Christoph Matthias; Castez, Marcos Federico; Vericat, Carolina; Nedev, Spas; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Urban, Alexander S; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-03-22

    We investigate the optical and morphological properties of gold nanoparticles grown by reducing a gold salt with Na2S. Lasers are tuned to the observed plasmon resonances, and the optical forces exerted on the nanoparticles are used to selectively print individual nanoparticles onto a substrate. This enables us to combine dark-field spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to compare the optical properties of single nanoparticles with their morphology. By arresting the synthesis at different times, we are able to investigate which type of nanoparticle is responsible for the respective resonances. We find that thin Au nanotriangles are the source of the observed near infrared (NIR) resonance. The initial lateral growth of these triangles causes the plasmon resonance to redshift into the NIR, whereas a subsequent thickening of the triangles and a concomitant truncation lead to a blueshift of the resonance. Furthermore, we find that the nanotriangles produced have extremely narrow line widths (187 ± 23 meV), show nearly isotropic scattering, and are stable for long periods of time. This shows their vast potential for applications such as in vivo imaging and bio(chemical) sensing. The method used here is generally applicable to other syntheses, and shows how complex nanostructures can be built up on substrates by selectively printing NPs of varying plasmonic resonances.

  3. Oscillatory optical response of amorphous plasmonic nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zach, Michael; Zoric, Igor; Langhammer, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The optical response of metallic nanoparticle arrays is dominated by localized surface plasmon excitations and is the sum of individual particle contributions modified by inter-particle coupling depending on specific array geometry. Here we scrutinize how experimentally measured properties of large scale (30 mm$^{2}$) amorphous Au nanodisk arrays stem from single particle properties and their interaction. They give rise to a distinct oscillatory behavior of the plasmon peak position, full-width at half-maximum, and extinction efficiency which depends on the minimum particle center-to-center (CC) distance.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance optical sensor and antibacterial activities of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2014-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles were prepared using aqueous fruit extract of Ananas comosus as reducing agent. These silver nanoparticles showed surface plasmon peak at 439 nm. They were monodispersed and spherical in shape with an average particle size of 10 nm. The crystallinity of these nanoparticles was evident from clear lattice fringes in the HRTEM images and bright circular spots in the SAED pattern. The antibacterial activities of prepared nanoparticles were found to be size-dependent, the smaller nanoparticles showing more bactericidal effect. Aqueous Zn2+ and Cu4+ selectivity and sensitivity study of this green synthesized nanoparticle was performed by optical sensor based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at room temperature.

  5. Direct optical measurement of light coupling into planar waveguide by plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Pennanen, Antti M; 10.1364/OE.21.000A23

    2012-01-01

    Coupling of light into a thin layer of high refractive index material by plasmonic nanoparticles has been widely studied for application in photovoltaic devices, such as thin-film solar cells. In numerous studies this coupling has been investigated through measurement of e.g. quantum efficiency or photocurrent enhancement. Here we present a direct optical measurement of light coupling into a waveguide by plasmonic nanoparticles. We investigate the coupling efficiency into the guided modes within the waveguide by illuminating the surface of a sample, consisting of a glass slide coated with a high refractive index planar waveguide and plasmonic nanoparticles, while directly measuring the intensity of the light emitted out of the waveguide edge. These experiments were complemented by transmittance and reflectance measurements. We show that the light coupling is strongly affected by thin-film interference, localized surface plasmon resonances of the nanoparticles and the illumination direction (front or rear).

  6. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  7. Orientational and quantum plasmonic effects in the optics of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raman Anand

    The classical theory of plasmonics envisions spherical nanoparticles obeying classical electrodynamics. Modern colloidal synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles, in tandem with emerging methods of nanoparticle assembly, transcends the assumptions of this theory. First, strongly nonspherical particles give rise to optical spectra with complicated orientation dependence. An interpolation method is introduced to connect electrodynamic simulation results, generally carried out at fixed orientations, with experimental optical spectra, such as those of randomly oriented ensembles. Second, the ability to manipulate and arrange multiple spherical particles in solution with optical binding demands efficient calculation of the optical forces giving rise to their preferred geometries. A coupled-dipole model is developed to allow for rapid optical force calculations that predict many of the phenomena seen in the laboratory. Third, the prospect of attaching semiconductor quantum dots to metal nanoparticles in the electromagnetic near-field raises new questions about how the quantum behavior of localized surface plasmons affects the nonlinear optical response of the coupled system. Investigating such questions yields several new predictions about the optical response of plasmon-exciton systems. Under ultrafast pulsed illumination, a reversal of a Fano resonance is predicted, turning a dip into a spike in the pulsed optical spectrum. When two quantum dots are coupled to the same metal nanoparticle, it is found that their individual couplings to a quantized plasmon can give rise to coherence between the quantum dots, in particular a state enriched in an antisymmetric dark excitation that can be prepared with pulsed laser illumination. These theoretical tools and predictions, in addition to providing basic insight into plasmonic systems, will serve to guide further developments in colloidal synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and optical applications.

  8. Surface plasmon-assisted optical bistability in the quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengjun; Qi, Yihong; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigated optical bistability (OB) of a coupled excition-plasmon hybrid system in a unidirectional ring cavity. It is found that the threshold and the region of OB can be tuned by adjusting the center-center distance between the quantum dot and metal nanoparticle (MNP), the Rabi frequency of the control field and the radius of the MNP. Due to the significantly enhanced optical nonlinearity by the surface plasmon effect, the threshold of OB can be decreased greatly when the probe field is parallel to the major axis of the hybrid system. The enhanced OB may have promising applications in optical switching and optical storage.

  9. Nanometric control of the distance between plasmonic nanoparticles using optical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, B; Alegret, J; Käll, M

    2007-10-29

    We theoretically analyze the optical forces between two nearby silver nanoparticles for the case when the wavelength of the incoming light is close to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). It is shown that the optical force between the nanoparticles is enhanced by the LSPR and that it changes from attractive to repulsive for wavelengths slightly shorter than the resonance when the polarization of the incident light is parallel to the axis of the dimer. This behavior can be utilized to generate a stable separation distance between the nanoparticles. In the Rayleigh limit, the equilibrium distance is uniquely determined by the real part of the particle polarizability and the wavelength of the incident light. The results suggest that near-field optical forces can be used to manipulate and organize plasmonic nanoparticles with a tunable spatial resolution in the nanometer regime.

  10. Plasmon nanoparticle superlattices as optical-frequency magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeian, Hadiseh; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2012-07-02

    Nanocrystal superlattices have emerged as a new platform for bottom-up metamaterial design, but their optical properties are largely unknown. Here, we investigate their emergent optical properties using a generalized semi-analytic, full-field solver based on rigorous coupled wave analysis. Attention is given to superlattices composed of noble metal and dielectric nanoparticles in unary and binary arrays. By varying the nanoparticle size, shape, separation, and lattice geometry, we demonstrate the broad tunability of superlattice optical properties. Superlattices composed of spherical or octahedral nanoparticles in cubic and AB(2) arrays exhibit magnetic permeabilities tunable between 0.2 and 1.7, despite having non-magnetic constituents. The retrieved optical parameters are nearly polarization and angle-independent over a broad range of incident angles. Accordingly, nanocrystal superlattices behave as isotropic bulk metamaterials. Their tunable permittivities, permeabilities, and emergent magnetism may enable new, bottom-up metamaterials and negative index materials at visible frequencies.

  11. Multispectral optical enhanced transmission of a continuous metal film coated with a plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-qiang; Hu, Ying; Liu, Zheng-qi; Cai, Zheng-jie; Zhang, Xiang-nan; Chen, Yuan-hao; Huang, Kuan

    2014-04-01

    We propose and show multispectral optical enhanced transmission in the visible and near-infrared region in a continuous metal film coated with a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal non-close-packed plasmonic array. The plasmonic array consists of metal/dielectric multilayer core-shell nanoparticles. The excitation of near-field plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent core-shell nanoparticles, plasmon resonance coupling between adjacent metal layers in the nanoparticle, and surface plasmon (SP) waves on the metal film are mainly responsible for the multispectral optical enhanced transmission behavior. The multispectral optical enhanced transmission response could be highly modified in the wavelength range, transparent bandwidth and transmission intensity by varying the geometry parameters including the gap distance between adjacent plasmonic nanoparticles, the size of metal core and the thickness of dielectric layer between the metal layers. In addition, the number of optical enhanced transmission bands increases with the number of metal layers in the plasmonic nanoparticle. The proposed structure shows many merits such as the deep sub-wavelength size, multispectral optical enhanced transmission bands as well as fully retained electric and mechanical properties of the natural metal. These merits may provide promising applications for highly integrated optoelectronic devices including plasmonic filters, nanoscale multiplexers, and nonlinear optics.

  12. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  13. Enhanced optical second harmonic generation in hybrid polymer nanoassemblies based on coupled surface plasmon resonance of a gold nanoparticle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishifuji, Miki; Mitsuishi, Masaya; Miyashita, Tokuji

    2006-07-01

    Effective utilization of coupled surface plasmon resonance from gold nanoparticles was demonstrated experimentally for optoelectronic applications based on second-order nonlinear optics. Hybrid polymer nanoassemblies were constructed by manipulating gold nanoparticle arrays with nonlinear optical active polymer nanosheets to investigate the second harmonic generation. The gold nanoparticle arrays were assembled on heterodeposited polymer nanosheets. The second harmonic light intensity was enhanced by a factor of 8. The observed enhancement was attributed to coupling of surface plasmons between two adjacent gold nanoparticles, thereby enhancing the surface electromagnetic field around the nanoparticles at the fundamental light wavelength (1064nm).

  14. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag, its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η, i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  15. Enhanced optical characteristics of terahertz bandpass filters based on plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahzadeh, Sajjad; Baghban, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures enable considerable control and manipulation of light at the subwavelength scale and are promising for demonstration of optical metamaterials with enhanced spectral response. In this paper, we introduce a generation of terahertz bandpass filters that exploit the characteristics of subwavelength plasmonic nanoparticles. The design procedure is discussed based on a well-known complementary split ring resonator with a resonant feature at the THz region (˜1.5 THz), and it has been shown that device design based on plasmonic nanoparticles can conquer the poor off-resonance selectivity limit of common THz filters and exhibit higher transmission response, faster roll-off, and almost ripple-free operation. A much larger coupling capacitance for nanoparticles in the touching condition can modify the resonance wavelength, and localized hot spots enhance the device sensitivity for special applications. The effect of plasmonic nanoparticle size on the filtering characteristics is also discussed. A simple fabrication procedure based on discontinuous islandized surface morphology of thin metallic films on a dielectric has been proposed for demonstration of the THz filters introduced here.

  16. Enhanced and tunable optical quantum efficiencies from plasmon bandwidth engineering in bimetallic CoAg nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Ehrsam, M.; Goodwin, J.; Garcia, H.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2016-10-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are amongst the most effective ways to resonantly couple optical energy into and out of nanometer sized volumes. However, controlling and/or tuning the transfer of this incident energy to the surrounding near and far field is one of the most interesting challenges in this area. Due to the dielectric properties of metallic silver (Ag), its nanoparticles have amongst the highest radiative quantum efficiencies (η), i.e., the ability to radiatively transfer the incident energy to the surrounding. Here we report the discovery that bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag made with immiscible and plasmonically weak Co metal can show comparable and/or even higher η values. The enhancement is a result of the narrowing of the plasmon bandwidth from these bimetal systems. The phenomenological explanation of this effect based on the dipolar approximation points to the reduction in radiative losses within the Ag nanoparticles when in contact with cobalt. This is also supported by a model of coupling between poor and good conductors based on the surface to volume ratio. This study presents a new type of bandwidth engineering, one based on using bimetal nanostructures, to tune and/or enhance the quality factor and quantum efficiency for near and far-field plasmonic applications.

  17. Optical sorting of gold nanoparticles based on the red-shift of plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploschner, Martin; Čižmar, Tomáš; Mazilu, Michael; Di Falco, Andrea; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental technique allowing size-based all-optical sorting of gold nanoparticles. The technique is based on the red-shift of plasmon resonance, due to retardation effects, with increasing particle size. As a result, smaller gold nanoparticles are influenced strongly by shorter wavelengths whereas larger gold nanoparticles are influenced more strongly by longer wavelengths. We utilise this retardation effect and realize sorting in a system of two counter-propagating evanescent waves, each at different wavelengths that selectively guide nanoparticles of different sizes in opposite directions. We validate this concept by demonstrating bidirectional sorting of gold nanoparticles of either 150 or 130 nm in diameter from those of 100 nm in diameter within a mixture.

  18. Plasmon resonance gold nanoparticles for improving optical diagnostics and photothermal therapy of tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagainova, E. V.; Sirotkina, M. A.; Shirmanova, M. V.; Elagin, V. V.; Kirillin, M.; Agrba, P.; Kamensky, V. A.; Nadtochenko, V. A.

    2010-02-01

    The study was performed on 16 CBA-line female mice with transplanted cervical cancer. 0.2 ml of gold nanoparticle solution with a concentration of 109 particles/ml were injected into the animals intravenously. The particles were 200-250 nm in size; the plasmon-resonance related extinction maximum was at the wavelength of 850-950 nm. Accumulation of the nanoparticles into tumor node was visualized by the method of optical coherence tomography (OCT). When the accumulation of nanoparticles in the tumor was maximal, hyperthermia was accomplished using the LSP-AZOR laser setup generating cw radiation at 810 nm. The duration of exposition was 20 min. The therapeutical effect was assessed by the rate of tumor growth inhibition (TGI, %). Determining the instant when nanoparticle concentration in tumor tissue reaches its maximum enables more efficient laser impact. The use of nanoparticles decreases laser irradiation power and ensures local action.

  19. Theory of tailorable optical response of two-dimensional arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles at dielectric interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Debabrata; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles at interfaces are promising candidates for novel optical metamaterials. Such systems materialise from ‘top–down’ patterning or ‘bottom–up’ self-assembly of nanoparticles at liquid/liquid or liquid/solid interfaces. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of an extended effective quasi-static four-layer-stack model for the description of plasmon-resonance-enhanced optical responses of such systems. We investigate in detail the effects of the size of nanoparticles, average interparticle separation, dielectric constants of the media constituting the interface, and the nanoparticle position relative to the interface. Interesting interplays of these different factors are explored first for normally incident light. For off-normal incidence, the strong effects of the polarisation of light are found at large incident angles, which allows to dynamically tune the reflectance spectra. All the predictions of the theory are tested against full-wave simulations, proving this simplistic model to be adequate within the quasi-static limit. The model takes seconds to calculate the system’s optical response and makes it easy to unravel the effect of each system parameter. This helps rapid rationalization of experimental data and understanding of the optical signals from these novel ‘metamaterials’, optimised for light reflection or harvesting. PMID:27652788

  20. Optical impedance matching using coupled plasmonic nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, P; Hebbink, M; de Waele, R; Black, L; Lenzmann, F; Polman, A

    2011-04-13

    Silver nanoparticle arrays placed on top of a high-refractive index substrate enhance the coupling of light into the substrate over a broad spectral range. We perform a systematic numerical and experimental study of the light incoupling by arrays of Ag nanoparticle arrays in order to achieve the best impedance matching between light propagating in air and in the substrate. We identify the parameters that determine the incoupling efficiency, including the effect of Fano resonances in the scattering, interparticle coupling, as well as resonance shifts due to variations in the near-field coupling to the substrate and spacer layer. The optimal configuration studied is a square array of 200 nm wide, 125 nm high spheroidal Ag particles, at a pitch of 450 nm on a 50 nm thick Si(3)N(4) spacer layer on a Si substrate. When integrated over the AM1.5 solar spectral range from 300 to 1100 nm, this particle array shows 50% enhanced incoupling compared to a bare Si wafer, 8% higher than a standard interference antireflection coating. Experimental data show that the enhancement occurs mostly in the spectral range near the Si band gap. This study opens new perspectives for antireflection coating applications in optical devices and for light management in Si solar cells.

  1. Nonlinear chiro-optical amplification by plasmonic nanolens arrays formed via directed assembly of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sushmita; Liu, Xiaoying; Jarrett, Jeremy W; Brown, Dean; Pustovit, Vitaliy; Urbas, Augustine; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Nealey, Paul F; Vaia, Richard A

    2015-03-11

    Metal nanoparticle assemblies are promising materials for nanophotonic applications due to novel linear and nonlinear optical properties arising from their plasmon modes. However, scalable fabrication approaches that provide both precision nano- and macroarchitectures, and performance commensurate with design and model predictions, have been limiting. Herein, we demonstrate controlled and efficient nanofocusing of the fundamental and second harmonic frequencies of incident linearly and circularly polarized light using reduced symmetry gold nanoparticle dimers formed by surface-directed assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. Large ordered arrays (>100) of these C∞v heterodimers (ratio of radii R1/R2 = 150 nm/50 nm = 3; gap distance l = 1 ± 0.5 nm) exhibit second harmonic generation and structure-dependent chiro-optic activity with the circular dichroism ratio of individual heterodimers varying less than 20% across the array, demonstrating precision and uniformity at a large scale. These nonlinear optical properties were mediated by interparticle plasmon coupling. Additionally, the versatility of the fabrication is demonstrated on a variety of substrates including flexible polymers. Numerical simulations guide architecture design as well as validating the experimental results, thus confirming the ability to optimize second harmonic yield and induce chiro-optical responses for compact sensors, optical modulators, and tunable light sources by rational design and fabrication of the nanostructures.

  2. Optical Fiber Sensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Silver Nanoparticles Photodeposited on the Optical Fiber End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Mendoza, J. Gabriel; Padilla-Vivanco, Alfonso; Toxqui-Quitl, Carina; Zaca-Morán, Placido; Villegas-Hernández, David; Chávez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the implementation of an optical fiber sensor to measure the refractive index in aqueous media based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). We have used a novel technique known as photodeposition to immobilize silver nanoparticles on the optical fiber end. This technique has a simple instrumentation, involves laser light via an optical fiber and silver nanoparticles suspended in an aqueous medium. The optical sensor was assembled using a tungsten lamp as white light, a spectrometer, and an optical fiber with silver nanoparticles. The response of this sensor is such that the LSPR peak wavelength is linearly shifted to longer wavelengths as the refractive index is increased, showing a sensitivity of 67.6 nm/RIU. Experimental results are presented. PMID:25302813

  3. Optical fiber sensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance using silver nanoparticles photodeposited on the optical fiber end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Mendoza, J Gabriel; Padilla-Vivanco, Alfonso; Toxqui-Quitl, Carina; Zaca-Morán, Placido; Villegas-Hernández, David; Chávez, Fernando

    2014-10-09

    This paper reports the implementation of an optical fiber sensor to measure the refractive index in aqueous media based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). We have used a novel technique known as photodeposition to immobilize silver nanoparticles on the optical fiber end. This technique has a simple instrumentation, involves laser light via an optical fiber and silver nanoparticles suspended in an aqueous medium. The optical sensor was assembled using a tungsten lamp as white light, a spectrometer, and an optical fiber with silver nanoparticles. The response of this sensor is such that the LSPR peak wavelength is linearly shifted to longer wavelengths as the refractive index is increased, showing a sensitivity of 67.6 nm/RIU. Experimental results are presented.

  4. Optical Fiber Sensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Silver Nanoparticles Photodeposited on the Optical Fiber End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabriel Ortega-Mendoza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the implementation of an optical fiber sensor to measure the refractive index in aqueous media based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. We have used a novel technique known as photodeposition to immobilize silver nanoparticles on the optical fiber end. This technique has a simple instrumentation, involves laser light via an optical fiber and silver nanoparticles suspended in an aqueous medium. The optical sensor was assembled using a tungsten lamp as white light, a spectrometer, and an optical fiber with silver nanoparticles. The response of this sensor is such that the LSPR peak wavelength is linearly shifted to longer wavelengths as the refractive index is increased, showing a sensitivity of 67.6 nm/RIU. Experimental results are presented.

  5. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  6. Plasmonic optical nanotweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Rehab; El Maklizi, Mahmoud; Ismail, Yehea; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic grating structures can be used in many applications such as nanolithography and optical trapping. In this paper, we used plasmonic grating as optical tweezers to trap and manipulate dielectric nano-particles. Different plasmonic grating structures with single, double, and triple slits have been investigated and analyzed. The three configurations are optimized and compared to find the best candidate to trap and manipulate nanoparticles. The three optimized structures results in capability to super focusing and beaming the light effectively beyond the diffraction limit. A high transverse gradient optical force is obtained using the triple slit configuration that managed to significantly enhance the field and its gradient. Therefore, it has been chosen as an efficient optical tweezers. This structure managed to trap sub10nm particles efficiently. The resultant 50KT potential well traps the nano particles stably. The proposed structure is used also to manipulate the nano-particles by simply changing the angle of the incident light. We managed to control the movement of nano particle over an area of (5μm x 5μm) precisely. The proposed structure has the advantage of trapping and manipulating the particles outside the structure (not inside the structure such as the most proposed optical tweezers). As a result, it can be used in many applications such as drug delivery and biomedical analysis.

  7. Surface plasmon polariton assisted optical switching in noble bimetallic nanoparticle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, Sandip, E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in, E-mail: chenkh@pub.iams.sinica.edu.tw [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lu, C.-Y.; Tu, W.-S. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Magudapathy, P. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Huang, Y.-F.; Chen, K.-H., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in, E-mail: chenkh@pub.iams.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-12

    Photoresponse of bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticle embedded soda glass (Au-Ag@SG) substrate is reported for surface plasmon assisted optical switching using 808 nm excitation. Au-Ag@SG system is made by an ion beam technique where Ag{sup +} is introduced first in the soda glass matrix by ion exchange technique. Subsequently, 400 keV Au{sup +} is implanted in the sample for different fluences, which is followed by an ion beam annealing process using 1 MeV Si{sup +} at a fixed fluence of 2 × 10{sup 16} ions·cm{sup −2}. Characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks around 400 and 550 nm provided evidence for the presence of Au and Ag nanoparticles. An optical switching in the Au-Ag@SG system with 808 nm, which is away from the characteristic SPR peaks of Ag and Au nanoparticles, suggests the possible role of two photon absorption (TPA) owing to the presence of interacting electric dipole in these systems. The role of surface plasmon polariton is emphasized for the propagation of electronic carrier belonging to the conduction electron of Au-Ag system in understanding the observed photoresponse. Unique excitation dependent photoresponse measurements confirm the possible role of TPA process. A competitive interband and intraband transitions in the bimetallic system of Au and Ag, which may be primarily responsible for the observation, are validated qualitatively using finite difference time domain calculations where inter-particle separation of Au and Ag plays an important role. Thus, a smart way of optical switching can be envisaged in noble bimetallic nanocluster system where long wavelength with higher skin depth can be used for communication purpose.

  8. Optical properties of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays based on H-shaped nanoparticles with extended arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Mustafa; Aslan, Erdem

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we present the optical properties of a plasmonic nanoantenna array based on H-shaped gold nanoparticles with extended arms, which can be used for infrared detection applications. Plasmonic nanoantennas operating at the infrared and visible region provide a unique way to capture, control and manipulate light at the nanoscale through the excitation of collective electron oscillations known as surface plasmons. The unit cell of proposed antenna consists of one H-shaped nanostructure and two extended arms located on the lateral sides of this nanostructure. We will demonstrate the proposed antenna has a dual band spectral response and the locations of the resonance frequencies can be adjusted by changing the geometrical dimensions of both the H-shaped nanoparticles and the extended arms. Theoretical calculations of the reflectance spectra of the nanoantenna array are performed by using simulation software, which utilizes Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. In order to show the sensing capacity of the structure, the effect of the dielectric medium on the resonance frequency is also determined. The results show that the proposed antenna can be utilized for infrared sensing applications.

  9. Changes in Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in Cellular Environments are Modulated by Nanoparticle PEGylation and Serum Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen L.; Jackson, Meredith A.; Lin, Adam Y.; Figueroa, Elizabeth R.; Hu, Ying S.; Evans, Emily R.; Asthana, Vishwaratn; Young, Joseph K.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2016-06-01

    When plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are internalized by cells and agglomerate within intracellular vesicles, their optical spectra can shift and broaden as a result of plasmonic coupling of NPs in close proximity to one another. For such optical changes to be accounted for in the design of plasmonic NPs for light-based biomedical applications, quantitative design relationships between designable factors and spectral shifts need to be established. Here we begin building such a framework by investigating how functionalization of gold NPs (AuNPs) with biocompatible poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG), and the serum conditions in which the NPs are introduced to cells impact the optical changes exhibited by NPs in a cellular context. Utilizing darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we find that PEGylation decreases the spectral shifting and spectral broadening experienced by 100 nm AuNPs following uptake by Sk-Br-3 cells, but up to a 33 ± 12 nm shift in the spectral peak wavelength can still occur. The serum protein-containing biological medium also modulates the spectral changes experienced by cell-exposed NPs through the formation of a protein corona on the surface of NPs that mediates NP interactions with cells: PEGylated AuNPs exposed to cells in serum-free conditions experience greater spectral shifts than in serum-containing environments. Moreover, increased concentrations of serum (10, 25, or 50 %) result in the formation of smaller intracellular NP clusters and correspondingly reduced spectral shifts after 5 and 10 h NP-cell exposure. However, after 24 h, NP cluster size and spectral shifts are comparable and become independent of serum concentration. By elucidating the impact of PEGylation and serum concentration on the spectral changes experienced by plasmonic NPs in cells, this study provides a foundation for the optical engineering of plasmonic NPs for use in biomedical environments.

  10. Rod-like plasmonic nanoparticles as optical building blocks: how differences in particle shape and structural geometry influence optical signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stender, Anthony [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles, particularly those with an anisotropic shape, have become a popular optical probe for experiments involving work on the nanoscale. However, to carry out such delicate and intricate experiments, it is first necessary to understand the detailed behavior of individual nanoparticles. In this series of experiments, optical and electron microscopy were utilized for the characterization of individual nanoparticles and small assemblies of nanoparticles. In the first experiment, gold nanorods were investigated. Single, isolated nanorods exhibit two maxima of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), which are associated with the two nanorod axes. Upon the physical rotation of a nanorod at one of its LSPR wavelengths under polarized illumination, the optical behavior varies in a sinusoidal fashion. A dimer of nanorods exhibits optical behavior quite similar to a nanorod, except the LSPR maxima are shifted and broader. Under differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, a pair of nanorods separated by a distance below the diffraction limit can be distinguished from a single nanorod due to its optical behavior upon rotation. Dark field microscopy is unable to distinguish the two geometries. For the second set of experiments, the optical behavior of single gold nanorods at non-plasmonic wavelengths was investigated. The same nanorod was rotated with respect to a polarized light source under DIC, dark field, and polarized light microscopy. DIC microscopy was found to produce diffraction pattern peaks at non-plasmonic wavelengths, which could be altered by adjusting the setting of the polarizer. In the third set of experiments, the optical behavior of a single gold dumbbell and several simple dumbbell geometries were investigated with microscopy and simulations. The single dumbbell displayed behavior quite similar to that of a nanorod, but dumbbells exhibit a shift in both LSPR wavebands. Moreover, the shape of dumbbell particles allows them to

  11. Optical Observation of Plasmonic Nonlocal Effects in a 2D Superlattice of Ultrasmall Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Chen, Li; Ferrari, Lorenzo; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Mortensen, N Asger; Gwo, Shangjr; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-03-02

    The advances in recent nanofabrication techniques have facilitated explorations of metal structures into nanometer scales, where the traditional local-response Drude model with hard-wall boundary conditions fails to accurately describe their optical responses. The emerging nonlocal effects in single ultrasmall silver nanoparticles have been experimentally observed in single-particle spectroscopy enabled by the unprecedented high spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). However, the unambiguous optical observation of such new effects in gold nanoparticles has yet not been reported, due to the extremely weak scattering and the obscuring fingerprint of strong interband transitions. Here we present a nanosystem, a superlattice monolayer formed by sub-10 nm gold nanoparticles. Plasmon resonances are spectrally well-separated from interband transitions, while exhibiting clearly distinguishable blueshifts compared to predictions by the classical local-response model. Our far-field spectroscopy was performed by a standard optical transmission and reflection setup, and the results agreed excellently with the hydrodynamic nonlocal model, opening a simple and widely accessible way for addressing quantum effects in nanoplasmonic systems.

  12. Hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles as molecular specific agents for MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Timothy A [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bankson, James [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Aaron, Jesse [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sokolov, Konstantin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Nanoparticles which consist of a plasmonic layer and an iron oxide moiety could provide a promising platform for development of multimodal imaging and therapy approaches in future medicine. However, the feasibility of this platform has yet to be fully explored. In this study we demonstrated the use of gold-coated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles for combined molecular specific MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. The gold layer exhibits a surface plasmon resonance that provides optical contrast due to light scattering in the visible region and also presents a convenient surface for conjugating targeting moieties, while the iron oxide cores give strong T{sub 2} (spin-spin relaxation time) contrast. The strong optical absorption of the plasmonic gold layer also makes these nanoparticles a promising agent for photothermal therapy. We synthesized hybrid nanoparticles which specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a common biomarker for many epithelial cancers. We demonstrated molecular specific MRI and optical imaging in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that receptor-mediated aggregation of anti-EGFR hybrid nanoparticles allows selective destruction of highly proliferative cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 700 nm wavelength, a significant shift from the peak absorbance of isolated hybrid nanoparticles at 532 nm.

  13. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. Baryshnikova; M. I. Petrov; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation result...

  14. Optical extinction and scattering cross sections of plasmonic nanoparticle dimers in aqueous suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loumaigne, Matthieu; Midelet, Clyde; Doussineau, Tristan; Dugourd, Philippe; Antoine, Rodolphe; Stamboul, Meriem; Débarre, Anne; Werts, Martinus H. V.

    2016-03-01

    Absolute extinction and scattering cross sections for gold nanoparticle dimers were determined experimentally using a chemometric approach involving singular-value decomposition of the extinction and scattering spectra of slowly aggregating gold nanospheres in aqueous suspension. Quantitative spectroscopic data on plasmonic nanoparticle assemblies in liquid suspension are rare, in particular for particles larger than 40 nm, and in this work we demonstrate how such data can be obtained directly from the aggregating suspension. Our method can analyse, non invasively, the evolution of several sub-populations of nanoparticle assemblies. It may be applied to other self-assembling nanoparticle systems with an evolving optical response. The colloidal systems studied here are based on 20, 50 and 80 nm gold nanospheres in aqueous solutions containing sodium lipoate. In these systems, the reversible dimerisation process can be controlled using pH and ionic strength, and this control is rationalised in terms of DLVO theory. The dimers were identified in suspension by their translational and rotational diffusion through scattering correlation spectroscopy. Moreover, their gigadalton molecular weight was measured using electrospray charge-detection mass spectrometry, demonstrating that mass spectrometry can be used to study nanoparticles assemblies of very high molecular mass. The extinction and scattering cross sections calculated in the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) agree very well with those obtained experimentally using our approach.Absolute extinction and scattering cross sections for gold nanoparticle dimers were determined experimentally using a chemometric approach involving singular-value decomposition of the extinction and scattering spectra of slowly aggregating gold nanospheres in aqueous suspension. Quantitative spectroscopic data on plasmonic nanoparticle assemblies in liquid suspension are rare, in particular for particles larger than 40 nm, and in this

  15. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Characteristics of Optical Fiber Incorporated with Au Nano-Particles in Cladding Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Seongmin; Jeong, Seongmook; Kim, Youngwoong; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Han, Won-Taek

    2016-06-01

    A novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on specialty optical fiber having its cladding doped with Au nano-particles (NPs) was developed by modified chemical vapor deposition process. To optimize the SPR absorption and sensitivity of the fiber SPR sensor, effect of the fiber length (20 cm-90 cm) on sensing capability of refractive index (n = 1.418-1.448) was investigated. Absorption peaks appearing at 392 and 790 nm were due to SPR from Au NPs in the cladding region of the optical fiber. The SPR was found to occur at particular wavelengths around 390 nm for the corresponding refractive indices regardless of the length of the fiber, increased with the increase of the index. The measured SPR sensitivities (wavelength/RIU) of the fiber were estimated to be 407 nm/RIU, 217 nm/RIU, and 54 nm/RIU with the fiber lengths of 20 cm, 45 cm, and 90 cm, respectively. The SPR absorption intensity and FWHM decreased with the increase of the fiber length because the propagation loss of the signal through the fiber cladding region increased.

  17. Plasmon-induced optical anisotropy in hybrid graphene-metal nanoparticle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Adam M; Francescato, Yan; Roschuk, Tyler; Shautsova, Viktoryia; Chen, Yiguo; Sidiropoulos, Themistoklis P H; Hong, Minghui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Maier, Stefan A; Cohen, Lesley F; Oulton, Rupert F

    2015-05-13

    Hybrid plasmonic metal-graphene systems are emerging as a class of optical metamaterials that facilitate strong light-matter interactions and are of potential importance for hot carrier graphene-based light harvesting and active plasmonic applications. Here we use femtosecond pump-probe measurements to study the near-field interaction between graphene and plasmonic gold nanodisk resonators. By selectively probing the plasmon-induced hot carrier dynamics in samples with tailored graphene-gold interfaces, we show that plasmon-induced hot carrier generation in the graphene is dominated by direct photoexcitation with minimal contribution from charge transfer from the gold. The strong near-field interaction manifests as an unexpected and long-lived extrinsic optical anisotropy. The observations are explained by the action of highly localized plasmon-induced hot carriers in the graphene on the subresonant polarizability of the disk resonator. Because localized hot carrier generation in graphene can be exploited to drive electrical currents, plasmonic metal-graphene nanostructures present opportunities for novel hot carrier device concepts.

  18. Optical antennas and plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Q-Han

    2009-01-01

    Optical antenna is a nanoscale miniaturization of radio or microwave antennas that is also governed by the rule of plasmonics. We introduce various types of optical antenna and make an overview of recent developments in optical antenna research. The role of local and surface plasmons in optical antenna is explained through antenna resonance and resonance conditions for specific metal structures are explicitly obtained. Strong electric field is shown to exist within a highly localized region o...

  19. On the performance of surface plasmon resonance based fibre optic sensor with different bimetallic nanoparticle alloy combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Anuj K; Mohr, Gerhard J [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller University, Lessingstrasse 10, 07743 Jena (Germany)], E-mail: anuj.sharma@uni-jena.de

    2008-03-07

    In this work, we have investigated the capability of different bimetallic nanoparticle alloy combinations to be used in fibre optic sensors based on the technique of surface plasmon resonance. The metals considered for this analysis are silver, gold, copper and aluminium. The performance of the sensor with different bimetallic nanoparticle alloy combinations is evaluated and compared numerically. The performance is analysed in terms of three parameters: sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and operating range for the sensing layer refractive index values. On the basis of the comparison and some logistic criteria, the best possible bimetallic alloy combinations along with a requisite alloy composition ratio are predicted. The bimetallic nanoparticle alloy combination is capable of simultaneously providing larger values of sensitivity, SNR and operating range, which is not possible with any single metallic nanoparticle layer.

  20. Improvement of optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide layer of GaN-based light-emitting diode by surface plasmon in silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chu-Young [Applied Device and Material Department, Korea Advanced Nano fab Center, Suwon 443–270 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang-Hyun [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500–712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Ju, E-mail: esjpark@gist.ac.kr [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500–712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the effect of silver (Ag) nanoparticles on the optical transmittance and electrical conductivity of indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conducting layer deposited on p-GaN layer of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The sheet resistance of ITO and the series resistance of LEDs were decreased due to the increased electrical conductivity of ITO by Ag nanoparticles, compared with those of the LEDs with a bare ITO only. The ITO transmittance was also improved by localized surface plasmon resonance between the incident light and the randomly distributed Ag nanoparticles on ITO. The optical output power of LEDs with Ag nanoparticles on ITO was increased by 16% at 20 mA of injection current. - Highlights: • We studied the effect of Ag nanoparticles deposited on ITO on the properties of LED. • The optical power of LED and transmittance of ITO were improved by Ag surface plasmon. • The electrical conductivity of ITO was increased by Ag nanoparticles.

  1. Plasmonic nanoparticle dimers for optical sensing of DNA in complex media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer I L; Chen, Yeechi; Ginger, David S

    2010-07-21

    We introduce a new sensing modality based on the actuation of discrete gold nanoparticle dimers. Binding of the target DNA leads to a geometrical extension of the dimer, thereby yielding a spectral blue shift in the hybridized plasmon mode as detected by single nanostructure scattering spectroscopy. The magnitude and opposite direction of this shift enabled us to spectroscopically distinguish the target from nonspecific binding and to detect the target in complex media like serum.

  2. Plasmonic Nanoparticle-based Protein Detection by Optical Shift of a Resonant Microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago-Cordoba, Miguel A; Vollmer, Frank; Demirel, Melik C

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated a biosensing approach which, for the first time, combines the high-sensitivity of whispering gallery modes (WGM) with a metallic nanoparticle based assay. We provided a computational model based on generalized Mie theory to explain the higher sensitivity of protein detection through Plasmonic enhancement. We quantitatively analyzed the binding of a model protein (i.e., BSA) to gold nanoparticles from high-Q WGM resonance frequency shifts, and fit the results to an adsorption isotherm, which agrees with the theoretical predictions of a two-component adsorption model.

  3. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2014-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window. With dimensions optimized for efficient cellular uptake, the nanoparticles demonstrate a high photothermal conversion efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization.

  4. Optical and mechanical manipulation of plasmonic hot spots on gold nanoparticle tips; Optische und mechanische Manipulation plasmonischer Heisspunkte an Goldnanopartikelspitzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrelescu, Calin-Alexander

    2011-06-15

    in the present thesis hybride systems based on alternative nanoparticle morphologies were studied in view of their optical properties in order to remove extensively the known limitations and insufficiencies of the established nanoparticle systems and shapes like rod-shaped or spherical nanoparticles. Star-shaped gold nanoparticles and their special plasmonic properties are presented. By methods of the dark-field spectroscopy, the photoelectron emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy the near- and far-field properties of single nanostars and their morphologies are correlated. So the first experimental proof of the localization of optically excited hot spots on the tips of the single nanostars could be given. By suited choice of the polarization and wavelength hot spots on several or exclusively single tips of a nanostar are selectively excited and the detected plasmon resonances assigned to single nanostar tips only due to experimental data. Furthermore field amplification factors in the range of 58-79 are for the first time quantitatively determined. The high and for molecules easily accessible hot spots on the tips of the nanostars are applied in order to demonstrate the excellent amplification of the Raman scattering on the level of single nanostars. The Raman amplification factors of 10{sup 7} for the studied nanostars without use of plasmonic coupling effects mark the nanostars as important candidates for the application in complex dynamical environments. A further possibility of the use of the hot spots localized on tips offer nanopyramides. By manipulation with a scanning force microscope a positioning of the hot spots until 1 nm above the surface and on arbitrary places on a sample substrate can be reached. Nanoresonators of two nanopyramides can be mechanically fabricated in three adsorption configurations concerning the tips of the two nanoparticles directed to each other. By the mechanical change of the configuration of the nanoresonator

  5. Subwavelength plasmonic kinks in arrays of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Noskov, Roman E; Kivshar, Yuri S; 10.1364/OE.20.002733

    2012-01-01

    We analyze nonlinear effects in optically driven arrays of nonlinear metallic nanoparticles. We demonstrate that such plasmonic systems are characterized by a bistable response, and they can support the propagation of dissipative switching waves (or plasmonic kinks) connecting the states with different polarization. We study numerically the properties of such plasmonic kinks which are characterized by a subwavelength extent and a tunable velocity.

  6. Optical properties of nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At the NBI I am involved in projects relating to optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in particular with respect to plasmonic heating with direct applications to photothermal cancer therapy. For this purpose we have developed heating assays that can be used to measure the heating of any...... nanoscopic heat source like an irradiated nanoparticle...

  7. Plasmonic Effect on the Population Dynamics and the Optical Response in a Hybrid V-Type Three-Level Quantum Dot-Metallic Nanoparticle Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; So, Gwang-Hyok; Kim, Pong-Ryol Jang Yong-Jin; Kim, Il-Gwang; Li, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated theoretically the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of a hybrid nanosystem composed of a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and a V-type three level semiconductor quantum dot (SQD), which are created by the interaction with the induced dipole moments in the SQD and the MNP, respectively. Excitons of the SQD and the plasmons of the MNP in such a hybrid nanosystem could be coupled strongly or weakly to demonstrate novel properties of the hybrid system. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings.

  8. Effects of particle size and surrounding media on optical radiation efficiencies of spherical plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinayak A Dhumale; Preeti V Shah; Rishi B Sharma; Katsuaki Tanabe

    2012-04-01

    The optical radiation efficiency (), the ratio of scattering cross-section to extinction cross-section, of spherical metal nanoparticles (M= Al, Ag, Au and Cu) surrounded by glass and water was calculated using classical electrostatics. The effect of varying particle diameter (∼100 nm) on was also studied for free space wavelengths in the range of 400–1200 nm. The variations in the value of with the diameter () of the metal nanoparticles were calculated on the basis of quasi-static approximation. The increases with the size of metal nanoparticles. Corresponding to a metal nanoparticle, was found to exhibit a sharp dip (dip) at a characteristic wavelength ()M in a particular medium ( = air, glass and water). ()M was independent of particle size. The (medium)M was found to be slightly blue shifted for all metal nanoparticles surrounded by glass or water with respect to those in the air.

  9. Light-Directed Reversible Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Enhanced Thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wang, Mingsong; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Mao, Zhangming; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Becker, Michael F; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-09-21

    Reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to modulate their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Common and versatile tools in nanoparticle manipulation and assembly are optical tweezers, but these require tightly focused and high-power (10-100 mW/μm(2)) laser beams with precise optical alignment, which significantly hinders their applications. Here we present light-directed reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles with a power intensity below 0.1 mW/μm(2). Our experiments and simulations reveal that such a low-power assembly is enabled by thermophoretic migration of nanoparticles due to the plasmon-enhanced photothermal effect and the associated enhanced local electric field over a plasmonic substrate. With software-controlled laser beams, we demonstrate parallel and dynamic manipulation of multiple nanoparticle assemblies. Interestingly, the assemblies formed over plasmonic substrates can be subsequently transported to nonplasmonic substrates. As an example application, we selected surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy, with tunable sensitivity. The advantages provided by plasmonic assembly of nanoparticles are the following: (1) low-power, reversible nanoparticle assembly, (2) applicability to nanoparticles with arbitrary morphology, and (3) use of simple optics. Our plasmon-enhanced thermophoretic technique will facilitate further development and application of dynamic nanoparticle assemblies, including biomolecular analyses in their native environment and smart drug delivery.

  10. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  11. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Urcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications.

  12. Theoretical Comparison of Optical Properties of Near-Infrared Colloidal Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-09-01

    We study optical properties of near-infrared absorbing colloidal plasmonic nanostructures that are of interest for biomedical theranostic applications: SiO2@Au core-shell particles, Au nanocages and Au nanorods. Full-wave field analysis is used to compare the absorption spectra and field enhancement of these structures as a function of their dimensions and orientation with respect to the incident field polarization. Absorption cross-sections of structures with the same volume and LSPR wavelength are compared to quantify differential performance for imaging, sensing and photothermal applications. The analysis shows that while the LSPR of each structure can be tuned to the NIR, particles with a high degree of rotational symmetry, i.e. the SiO2@Au and nanocage particles, provide superior performance for photothermal applications because their absorption is less sensitive to their orientation, which is random in colloidal applications. The analysis also demonstrates that Au nanocages are advantaged with respect to other structures for imaging, sensing and drug delivery applications as they support abundant E field hot spots along their surface and within their open interior. The modeling approach presented here broadly applies to dilute colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials of arbitrary shapes, sizes and material constituents and is well suited for the rational design of novel plasmon-assisted theranostic applications.

  13. Theoretical Comparison of Optical Properties of Near-Infrared Colloidal Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Xue, Xiaozheng; Furlani, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    We study optical properties of near-infrared absorbing colloidal plasmonic nanostructures that are of interest for biomedical theranostic applications: SiO2@Au core-shell particles, Au nanocages and Au nanorods. Full-wave field analysis is used to compare the absorption spectra and field enhancement of these structures as a function of their dimensions and orientation with respect to the incident field polarization. Absorption cross-sections of structures with the same volume and LSPR wavelength are compared to quantify differential performance for imaging, sensing and photothermal applications. The analysis shows that while the LSPR of each structure can be tuned to the NIR, particles with a high degree of rotational symmetry, i.e. the SiO2@Au and nanocage particles, provide superior performance for photothermal applications because their absorption is less sensitive to their orientation, which is random in colloidal applications. The analysis also demonstrates that Au nanocages are advantaged with respect to other structures for imaging, sensing and drug delivery applications as they support abundant E field hot spots along their surface and within their open interior. The modeling approach presented here broadly applies to dilute colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials of arbitrary shapes, sizes and material constituents and is well suited for the rational design of novel plasmon-assisted theranostic applications. PMID:27665922

  14. The plasmonic coupling of metal nanoparticles and its implication for scanning near-field optical microscope characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; GONG QiHuang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Researchers at State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University (PKU), have recently shown that an otherwise forbid-den longitudinal surface plasmon mode of a gold nanorod can be excited by nor-mally incident linearly-polarized light if it is coupled with a nanoparticle with proper plasmonic resonant frequency, volume, and composition~([1]).

  15. Optical and electrical effects of plasmonic nanoparticles in high-efficiency hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Fei; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Xi; Wang, Ling; Shi, Ye; Shi, Minmin; Li, Han-Ying; Jen, Alex K-Y; Chen, Jun-Wu; Cao, Yong; Chen, Hong-Zheng

    2013-10-28

    Plasmonics have been proven to be an effective way to harness more incident light to achieve high efficiency in photovoltaic devices. Herein, we explore the possibility that plasmonics can be utilized to enhance light trapping and power conversion efficiency (PCE) for polymer-quantum dot (QD) hybrid solar cells (HSCs). Based on a low band-gap polymer poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']-dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) and a CdSe QD bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) system, gold nanoparticles were doped at different locations of the devices. Successfully, an improved PCE of 3.20 ± 0.22% and 3.16 ± 0.15% was achieved by doping the hole transporting layer and the active layer, respectively, which are among the highest values reported for CdSe QD based HSCs. A detailed study of processing, characterization, microscopy, and device fabrication is conducted to understand the underlying mechanism for the enhanced device performance. The success of this work provides a simple and generally applicable approach to enhance light harnessing of polymer-QD hybrid solar cells.

  16. Polydopamine-Assisted Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Gold Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏荣欣; 裴哲远; 黄仁亮; 齐崴; 王梦凡; 王利兵; 何志敏

    2015-01-01

    A fast and facile method of fabricating fiber-optic localized surface plasmon resonance sensors based on spherical gold nanoparticles was introduced in this study. The gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 55 nm were synthesized via the Turkevich method and were then immobilized onto the surface of an uncladded sensor probe using a polydopamine layer. To obtain a sensor probe with high sensitivity to changes in the refractive index, a set of key optimization parameters, including the sensing length, coating time of the polydopamine layer, and coating time of the gold nanoparticles, were investigated. The sensitivity of the optimized sensor probe was 522.80 nm per refractive index unit, and the probe showed distinctive wavelength shifts when the refractive index was changed from 1.328 6 to 1.398,7. When stored in deionized water at 4℃, the sensor probe proved to be stable over a period of two weeks. The sensor also exhibited advantages, such as low cost, fast fabrication, and simple optical setup, which indicated its potential application in remote sensing and real-time detection.

  17. Plasmonics Meets Biology through Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano De Sio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (NPs represent a relevant class of nanomaterials, which is able to achieve light localization down to nanoscale by exploiting a phenomenon called Localized Plasmon Resonance. In the last few years, NPs have been proposed to trigger DNA release or enhance ablation of diseased tissues, while minimizing damage to healthy tissues. In view of the therapeutic relevance of such plasmonic NPs; a detailed characterization of the electrostatic interaction between positively charged gold nanorods (GNRs and a negatively charged whole-genome DNA solution is reported. The preparation of the hybrid biosystem has been investigated as a function of DNA concentration by means of ζ-potential; hydrodynamic diameter and gel electrophoresis analysis. The results have pointed out the specific conditions to achieve the most promising GNRs/DNA complex and its photo-thermal properties have been investigated. The overall study allows to envisage the possibility to ingeniously combine plasmonic and biological materials and, thus, enable design and development of an original non invasive all-optical methodology for monitoring photo-induced temperature variation with high sensitivity.

  18. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle anti-reflective coatings

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. Baryshnikova; M. I. Petrov; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflection properties of all-dielectric and plasmonic nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon. Our results of numerical simulatio...

  19. A Self-Consistent Scheme for Optical Response of large Hybrid Networks of Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiellini, Bernardo; Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the Heisenberg equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP and hybrid SDQ/MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  20. Self-consistent scheme for optical response of large hybrid networks of semiconductor quantum dots and plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, L.; Lane, C.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A.; Mosallaei, H.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a self-consistent scheme for treating the optical response of large, hybrid networks of semiconducting quantum dots (SQDs) and plasmonic metallic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our method is efficient and scalable and becomes exact in the limiting case of weakly interacting SQDs. The self-consistent equations obtained for the steady state are analogous to the von Neumann equations of motion for the density matrix of a SQD placed in an effective electric field computed within the discrete dipole approximation. Illustrative applications of the theory to square and honeycomb SQD, MNP, and hybrid SDQ-MNP lattices as well as SQD-MNP dimers are presented. Our results demonstrate that hybrid SQD-MNP lattices can provide flexible platforms for light manipulation with tunable resonant characteristics.

  1. Formation and characterization of silver nanoparticles embedded in optical transparent materials for plasmonic sensor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidl, G., E-mail: gabriele.schmidl@ipht-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745, Jena (Germany); Dellith, J.; Schneidewind, H.; Zopf, D.; Stranik, O.; Gawlik, A.; Anders, S. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745, Jena (Germany); Tympel, V.; Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, 07743, Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, W. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT), Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745, Jena (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed particle forming behavior of thin Ag seed films before/after annealing. • We examined passivation layers produced via different deposition methods. • Ag particles embedded in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were tested as LSPR-sensor-surface. • LSPR shifted 6.15 nm for a refractive index change of 0.07 using glucose solutions. - Abstract: Plasmonic nanostructures promise sensing capabilities with the potential for ultrasensitive and robust assays in life sciences and biomedicine. Silver island films represent an interesting and straightforward alternative for the implementation of substrate-attached plasmonic nanostructures. The temperature-induced particle-forming behavior of thin silver seed films deposited on glass substrates and on polycrystalline silicon films is represented. The measured extinction spectra reflect the different size distributions and shapes. The covering of the particles with different optical transparent film materials like ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiN{sub x}, and SiO{sub x} leads to a further shift in the resonance maximum due to their refractive index. The SiO{sub x} system shows an additional long term change in the extinction spectrum in contrast to ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SiN{sub x}. Thin silver films covered with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used in order to proof the system as a sensor element for analyte detection (glucose solution)

  2. Plasmonic Optical Tweezers toward Molecular Manipulation: Tailoring Plasmonic Nanostructure, Light Source, and Resonant Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-04

    This Perspective describes recent progress in optical trappings of nanoparticles based on localized surface plasmon. This plasmonic optical trapping has great advantages over the conventional optical tweezers, being potentially applicable for a molecular manipulation technique. We review this novel trapping technique from the viewpoints of (i) plasmonic nanostructure, (ii) the light source for plasmon excitation, and (iii) the polarizability of the trapping target. These findings give us future outlook for plasmonic optical trapping. In addition to a brief review, recent developments on plasmonic optical trapping of soft nanomaterials such as proteins, polymer chains, and DNA will be discussed to point out the important issue for further development on this trapping method. Finally, we explore new directions of plasmonic optical trapping.

  3. Molecular imaging and sensing using plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew James

    Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties that are beneficial to a variety of applications, including molecular imaging. The large scattering cross sections of nanoparticles provide high contrast necessary for biomarkers. Unlike alternative contrast agents, nanoparticles provide refractive index sensitivity revealing information regarding the local cellular environment. Altering the shape and composition of the nanoparticle shifts the peak resonant wavelength of scattered light, allowing for implementation of multiple spectrally distinct tags. In this project, nanoparticles that scatter in different spectral windows are functionalized with various antibodies recognizing extra-cellular receptors integral to cancer progression. A hyperspectral imaging system is developed, allowing for visualization and spectral characterization of cells labeled with these conjugates. Various molecular imaging and microspectroscopy applications of plasmonic nanoparticles are then investigated. First, anti-EGFR gold nanospheres are shown to quantitatively measure receptor expression with similar performance to fluorescence assays. Second, anti-EGFR gold nanorods and novel anti-IGF-1R silver nanospheres are implemented to indicate local cellular refractive indices. Third, because biosensing capabilities of nanoparticle tags may be limited by plasmonic coupling, polarization mapping is investigated as a method to discern these effects. Fourth, plasmonic coupling is tested to monitor HER-2 dimerization. Experiments reveal the interparticle conformation of proximal HER-2 bound labels, required for plasmonic coupling-enhanced dielectric sensing. Fifth, all three functionalized plasmonic tags are implemented simultaneously to indicate clinically relevant cell immunophenotype information and changes in the cellular dielectric environment. Finally, flow cytometry experiments are conducted utilizing the anti-EGFR nanorod tag to demonstrate profiling of receptor expression

  4. Optical Isolator Utilizing Surface Plasmons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yuasa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of usage of surface plasmons in a new design of an integrated optical isolator has been studied. In the case of surface plasmons propagating at a boundary between a transition metal and a double-layer dielectric, there is a significant difference of optical loss for surface plasmons propagating in opposite directions. Utilizing this structure, it is feasible to fabricate a competitive plasmonic isolator, which benefits from a broad wavelength operational bandwidth and a good technological compatibility for integration into the Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC. The linear dispersion relation was derived for plasmons propagating in a multilayer magneto-optical slab.

  5. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes.

  6. Analyzing the movement of the Nauplius 'Artemia salina' by optical tracking of plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Silke R; Fedoruk, Michael; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate how optical tweezers may provide a sensitive tool to analyze the fluidic vibrations generated by the movement of small aquatic organisms. A single gold nanoparticle held by an optical tweezer is used as a sensor to quantify the rhythmic motion of a Nauplius larva (Artemia salina) in a water sample. This is achieved by monitoring the time dependent displacement of the trapped nanoparticle as a consequence of the Nauplius activity. A Fourier analysis of the nanoparticle's position then yields a frequency spectrum that is characteristic to the motion of the observed species. This experiment demonstrates the capability of this method to measure and characterize the activity of small aquatic larvae without the requirement to observe them directly and to gain information about the position of the larvae with respect to the trapped particle. Overall, this approach could give an insight on the vitality of certain species found in an aquatic ecosystem and could expand the range of conventional methods for analyzing water samples.

  7. Optimization of immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles for cell surface receptor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekell, Kevin; Price, Hillel; Marinakos, Stella; Wax, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles hold great potential as optical contrast agents due to a unique feature, known as the plasmon resonance, which produces enhanced scattering and absorption at specific frequencies. The plasmon resonance also provides a spectral tunability that is not often found in organic fluorophores or other labeling methods. The ability to functionalize these nanoparticles with antibodies has led to their development as contrast agents for molecular optical imaging. In this review article, we present methods for optimizing the spectral agility of these labels. We discuss synthesis of gold nanorods, a plasmonic nanoparticle in which the plasmonic resonance can be tuned during synthesis to provide imaging within the spectral window commonly utilized in biomedical applications. We describe recent advances in our group to functionalize gold and silver nanoparticles using distinct antibodies, including EGFR, HER-2 and IGF-1, selected for their relevance to tumor imaging. Finally, we present characterization of these nanoparticle labels to verify their spectral properties and molecular specificity.

  8. Fusion of Selected Cells and Vesicles Mediated by Optically Trapped Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahadori, Azra

    . In this work, we introduce a novel and extremely flexible physical method which can trigger membrane fusion in a highly selective manner not only between synthetic GUVs of different compositions, but also between live cells which remain viable after fusion. Optical tweezers’ laser (1064 nm) is used to position......Selective fusion of two membrane surrounded volumes is of great interest in nanochemistry and nanomedicine as it can pave the way for performing controlled nanoscale chemical reactions and for delivering a cargo (e.g., chemicals, genetic regulatory factors, etc.) to a desired living cell...... the two desired cells and/or GUVs next to each other and in immediate contact. Then, the same laser is placed in the contact zone between the two adjacent membranes until one or more gold nanoparticles diffuse into the focus. Gold nanoparticles absorb part of near infrared light and dissipate the absorbed...

  9. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic trichloroacetic acid sensor utilizing layer of silver nanoparticles and chitosan doped hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Vivek; Shrivastav, Anand M.; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report a silver nanoparticles/chitosan doped hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for the detection of trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The sensor is based on the combined phenomenon of localized and propagating surface plasmons. The sensing relies on the interaction of TCA with silver nanoparticles (AgNP) which results in the electron transfer between the negative group of TCA and positive amino group of AgNP stabilizer (chitosan). This alters the mechanical properties/refractive index of the AgNP embedded hydrogel matrix as well as the refractive index of the AgNP. The change in refractive index of both in turn changes the effective refractive index of the nanocomposite hydrogel layer which can be determined using the Maxwell-Garnet Theory. Four stage optimization of the probe fabrication parameters is performed to obtain the best performance of the sensing probe. The sensor operates in the TCA concentration range 0-120 μm which is harmful for the humans and environment. The shift in peak extinction wavelength observed for the same TCA concentration range is 42 nm. The sensor has the linearity range for the TCA concentration range of 40-100 μm. The sensor possesses high sensitivity, selectivity and numerous other advantages such as ease of handling, quick response, modest cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing.

  10. The effect of surface plasmon resonance on optical response in dielectric (core)–metal (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Farjami Shayesteh; Matin Saie

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present the effect of refractive index of an embedding medium, core and shell having various sizes of metallic nanoshells on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties in the spherical dielectric–metal core–shell nanoparticles based on the quasistatic approaches and Mie theory. For the metallic nanoshell with dimensions comparable to the wavelength of light, the quasistatic approximation shows good agreement with the Mie theory results. However, for large nanoparticles the quasistatic approximation is not appropriate and Mie theory illustrates SPR due to dipole and quadrupole in extinction cross-section. The typical cross-section calculations show two peaks that related to inner and outer surfaces. The dimensional dependence of optical constant in the Drude model leads to a decrease in plasma absorption in metal core–shell. By increasing the shell radius and therefore increasing the metal content the SPR at the outer surface shifts to higher energy and the weaker peak (at inner surface) shifts to lower energy. Also, depending on the metal shell materials SPR occurs in different energy regions and therefore can be tuned the SP frequency at higher energy by changing the shell materials. In addition, SPR frequency is sensitive to variation in refractive index of the environment of core-shell.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of the optical absorption and catalytic efficiency of BiVO₄ photoanodes decorated with Ag@SiO₂ core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Fatwa F; Dabirian, Ali; Dam, Bernard; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-08-07

    Recent progress in the development of bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) photoanodes has firmly established it as a promising material for solar water splitting applications. Performance limitations due to intrinsically poor catalytic activity and slow electron transport have been successfully addressed through the application of water oxidation co-catalysts and novel doping strategies. The next bottleneck to tackle is the modest optical absorption in BiVO4, particularly close to its absorption edge of 2.4 eV. Here, we explore the modification of the BiVO4 surface with Ag@SiO2 core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles. A photocurrent enhancement by a factor of ~2.5 is found under 1 sun illumination (AM1.5). We show that this enhancement consists of two contributions: optical absorption and catalysis. The optical absorption enhancement is induced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances in the Ag nanoparticles, and agrees well with our full-field electromagnetic simulations. Far-field effects (scattering) are found to be dominant, with a smaller contribution from near-field plasmonic enhancement. In addition, a significant catalytic enhancement is observed, which is tentatively attributed to the electrocatalytic activity of the Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles.

  13. Influence of stabilizing agent and synthesis temperature on the optical properties of silver nanoparticles as active materials in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudin, Lufsyi; Suharyadi, Edi; Utomo, Agung Bambang Setio; Abraha, Kamsul

    2016-04-01

    It has been successfully carried out the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction method. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as metal precursors and trisodium citrate as the reducing agent. In the synthesis process, were varied the stabilizing agent of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and heating temperature. The formation of silver nanoparticles was observed visually with discoloration (yellowish). The formation and the structure of silver nanoparticles in colloidal solution were further examined through their optical properties by using a UV-Vis spectrometer. The wavelength absorption spectrum of colloidal silver nanoparticles shows that maximum surface plasmon absorption for the trisodium citrate-synthesized nanoparticles was at 429.43 nm for temperature of 90°C. The addition of the stabilizer sharpened spectrum curves and caused red shift in the maximum absorption peak of 429.01 nm and 427.09 nm for PVA and PVP respectively. Meanwhile, the addition of the synthesis temperature also sharpened the maximum surface plasmon absorption band and the red shift the maximum absorption peak of 428.79 nm and 428.58 nm for temperature of 110°C and 120°C respectively. Red shift of the maximum absorption peak indicates a smaller particle size. The maximum surface plasmon absorption band in the range of 427.09 nm to 429.43 nm indicates the presence of spherical or roughly spherical silver nanoparticles and TEM imaging confirmed this shape. TEM imaging results show that the diameter size of the silver nanoparticles range of 10 nm to 60 nm as well as the morphology (crystallites) of silver nanoparticles have spherical geometry with particle distribution which quite dispersive. The dispersibility of nanoparticles such as this could potentially be used as an active material of SPR biosensor.

  14. Plasmon-enhanced optical absorption and photocurrent in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices using self-assembled layer of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Woo-Jun; Jung, Kyung-Young; Teixeira, Fernando L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Liu, Jiwen; Duraisamy, Thirumalai; Revur, Rao; Sengupta, Suvankar [MetaMateria Partners, 1275 Kinnear Road, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States); Berger, Paul R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Improved optical absorption and photocurrent for polythiophene-fullerene bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices is demonstrated using a unique self-assembled monolayer of Ag nanoparticles formed from a colloidal solution. With the presence of suitable nanoparticle organic capping groups that inhibit its propensity to agglomerate, the particle-to-particle spacing can be tailored. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the self-assembled Ag nanospheres are highly uniform with an average diameter of {proportional_to}4 nm and controllable particle-to-particle spacing. The localized surface plasmon resonance peak is {proportional_to}465 nm with a narrow full width at half maximum (95 nm). In the spectral range of 350-650 nm, where the organic bulk heterojunction photoactive film absorbs, an enhanced optical absorption is observed due to the increased electric field in the photoactive layer by excited localized surface plasmons within the Ag nanospheres. Under the short-circuit condition, the induced photo-current efficiency (IPCE) measurement demonstrates that the maximum IPCE increased to {proportional_to}51.6% at 500 nm for the experimental devices with the self-assembled layer of Ag nanoparticles, while the IPCE of the reference devices without the plasmon-active Ag nanoparticles is {proportional_to}45.7% at 480 nm. For the experimental devices under air mass 1.5 global filtered illuminations with incident intensity of 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, the increased short-circuit current density is observed due to the enhancement of the photogeneration of excitons near the plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. (author)

  15. Effective Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Etrich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanocomposites find many applications, such as nanometric coatings in emerging fields, such as optotronics, photovoltaics or integrated optics. To make use of their ability to affect light propagation in an unprecedented manner, plasmonic nanocomposites should consist of densely packed metallic nanoparticles. This causes a major challenge for their theoretical description, since the reliable assignment of effective optical properties with established effective medium theories is no longer possible. Established theories, e.g., the Maxwell-Garnett formalism, are only applicable for strongly diluted nanocomposites. This effective description, however, is a prerequisite to consider plasmonic nanocomposites in the design of optical devices. Here, we mitigate this problem and use full wave optical simulations to assign effective properties to plasmonic nanocomposites with filling fractions close to the percolation threshold. We show that these effective properties can be used to properly predict the optical action of functional devices that contain nanocomposites in their design. With this contribution we pave the way to consider plasmonic nanocomposites comparably to ordinary materials in the design of optical elements.

  16. Resonant plasmonic nanoparticles for multicolor second harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accanto, Nicolò; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hancu, Ion M.; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles capable of efficiently generating nonlinear optical signals, like second harmonic generation, are attracting a lot of attention as potential background-free and stable nano-probes for biological imaging. However, second harmonic nanoparticles of different species do not produce readily distinguishable optical signals, as the excitation laser mainly defines their second harmonic spectrum. This is in marked contrast to other fluorescent nano-probes like quantum dots that emit light at different colors depending on their sizes and materials. Here, we present the use of resonant plasmonic nanoparticles, combined with broadband phase-controlled laser pulses, as tunable sources of multicolor second harmonic generation. The resonant plasmonic nanoparticles strongly interact with the electromagnetic field of the incident light, enhancing the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. Because the plasmon resonance in these structures is spectrally narrower than the laser bandwidth, the plasmonic nanoparticles imprint their fingerprints on the second harmonic spectrum. We show how nanoparticles of different sizes produce different colors in the second harmonic spectra even when excited with the same laser pulse. Using these resonant plasmonic nanoparticles as nano-probes is promising for multicolor second harmonic imaging while keeping all the advantages of nonlinear optical microscopy.

  17. Thiolated DNA-based chemistry and control in the structure and optical properties of plasmonic nanoparticles with ultrasmall interior nanogap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong-Wook; Lim, Dong-Kwon; Kim, Gyeong-Hwan; Suh, Yung Doug; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2014-10-08

    The design, synthesis and control of plasmonic nanostructures, especially with ultrasmall plasmonically coupled nanogap (∼1 nm or smaller), are of significant interest and importance in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, optics and nanobiotechnology. Here, we studied and established the thiolated DNA-based synthetic principles and methods in forming and controlling Au core-nanogap-Au shell structures [Au-nanobridged nanogap particles (Au-NNPs)] with various interior nanogap and Au shell structures. We found that differences in the binding affinities and modes among four different bases to Au core, DNA sequence, DNA grafting density and chemical reagents alter Au shell growth mechanism and interior nanogap-forming process on thiolated DNA-modified Au core. Importantly, poly A or poly C sequence creates a wider interior nanogap with a smoother Au shell, while poly T sequence results in a narrower interstitial interior gap with rougher Au shell, and on the basis of the electromagnetic field calculation and experimental results, we unraveled the relationships between the width of the interior plasmonic nanogap, Au shell structure, electromagnetic field and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. These principles and findings shown in this paper offer the fundamental basis for the thiolated DNA-based chemistry in forming and controlling metal nanostructures with ∼1 nm plasmonic gap and insight in the optical properties of the plasmonic NNPs, and these plasmonic nanogap structures are useful as strong and controllable optical signal-generating nanoprobes.

  18. Shape tunable plasmonic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan Homer

    2017-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles and methods of their use are provided. Certain aspects provided solid noble metal nanoparticles tuned to the near infrared. The disclosed nanoparticles can be used in molecular imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods for imaging cells are also provided.

  19. Shape tunable plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan Homer

    2017-03-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles and methods of their use are provided. Certain aspects provided solid noble metal nanoparticles tuned to the near infrared. The disclosed nanoparticles can be used in molecular imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods for imaging cells are also provided.

  20. Quantum analysis of plasmonic coupling between quantum dots and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, SalmanOgli

    2016-10-01

    In this study, interaction between core-shells nanoparticles and quantum dots is discussed via the full-quantum-theory method. The electromagnetic field of the nanoparticles is derived by the quasistatic approximation method and the results for different regions of the nanoparticles are quantized from the time-harmonic to the wave equation. Utilizing the optical field quantization, the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' deriving amplitudes contributing to the excitation waves are determined. In the current model, two counterpropagating waves with two different frequencies are applied. We derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations from the Heisenberg-Langevin equations; thus the nanoparticles-quantum dots interaction is perused. Moreover, by full quantum analyzing of the analytical expression, the quantum-plasmonic coupling relation and the Purcell factor are achieved. We show that the spontaneous emission of quantum dots can be dramatically manipulated by engineering the plasmon-plasmon interaction in the core-shells nanoparticles. This issue is a very attractive point for designing a wide variety of quantum-plasmonic sensors. Through the investigation of the nanoparticle plasmonic interaction effects on absorbed power, the results show that the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' absorption saturation state can be switched to each other just by manipulation of their deriving amplitudes. In fact, we manage the interference between the two waves' deriving amplitudes just by the plasmonic interactions effect.

  1. Quantum optical properties in plasmonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic metallic particle (MP) can affect the optical properties of a quantum system (QS) in a remarkable way. We develop a general quantum nonlinear formalism with exact vectorial description for the scattered photons by the QS. The formalism enables us to study the variations of the dielectric function and photon spectrum of the QS with the particle distance between QS and MP, exciting laser direction, polarization and phase in the presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the MP. The quantum formalism also serves as a powerful tool for studying the effects of these parameters on the nonclassical properties of the scattered photons. The plasmonic effect of nanoparticles has promising possibilities as it provides a new way for manipulating quantum optical properties of light in nanophotonic systems.

  2. Using highly accurate 3D nanometrology to model the optical properties of highly irregular nanoparticles: a powerful tool for rational design of plasmonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perassi, Eduardo M; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan C; Moreno, M Sergio; Encina, Ezequiel R; Coronado, Eduardo A; Midgley, Paul A

    2010-06-09

    The realization of materials at the nanometer scale creates new challenges for quantitative characterization and modeling as many physical and chemical properties at the nanoscale are highly size and shape-dependent. In particular, the accurate nanometrological characterization of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial for understanding their optical response that is determined by the collective excitation of conduction electrons, known as localized surface plasmons. Its manipulation gives place to a variety of applications in ultrasensitive spectroscopies, photonics, improved photovoltaics, imaging, and cancer therapy. Here we show that by combining electron tomography with electrodynamic simulations an accurate optical model of a highly irregular gold NP synthesized by chemical methods could be achieved. This constitutes a novel and rigorous tool for understanding the plasmonic properties of real three-dimensional nano-objects.

  3. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle anti-reflective coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshnikova, K V; Babicheva, V E; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflection properties of all-dielectric and plasmonic nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon. Our results of numerical simulations for periodic arrays of spherical nanoparticles on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver nanoparticle coatings demonstrate strong anti-reflective properties in the visible spectral range. In this work, we show for the first time that blooming effect, that is zero reflection from the structure, with silicon coatings originates from the interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticles with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to it as substrate-mediated Kerker ef...

  4. Influence of nanoparticle-graphene separation on the localized surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Saadabad, Reza Masoudian; Shirdel-Havar, Amir Hushang; Havar, Majid Shirdel

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theory to model the interaction of graphene substrate with localized plasmon resonances in metallic nanoparticles. The influence of a graphene substrate on the surface plasmon resonances is described using an effective background permittivity that is derived from a pseudoparticle concept using the electrostatic method. For this purpose, the interaction of metal nanoparticle with graphene sheet is studied to obtain the optical spectrum of gold nanoparticles deposited on a graphene substrate. Then, we introduce a factor based on dipole approximation to predict the influence of the separation of nanoparticles and graphene on the spectral position of the localized plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles. We applied the theory for a 4 nm radius gold nanosphere placed near 1.5 nm graphene layer. It is shown that a blue shift is emerged in the position of plasmon resonance when the nanoparticle moves away from graphene.

  5. Modeling plasmonic scattering combined with thin-film optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Klenk, R; Lux-Steiner, M Ch; Topic, M; Krc, J

    2011-01-14

    Plasmonic scattering from metal nanostructures presents a promising concept for improving the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The determination of optimal nanostructures and their position within the solar cell is crucial to boost the efficiency. Therefore we established a one-dimensional optical model combining plasmonic scattering and thin-film optics to simulate optical properties of thin-film solar cells including metal nanoparticles. Scattering models based on dipole oscillations and Mie theory are presented and their integration in thin-film semi-coherent optical descriptions is explained. A plasmonic layer is introduced in the thin-film structure to simulate scattering properties as well as parasitic absorption in the metal nanoparticles. A proof of modeling concept is given for the case of metal-island grown silver nanoparticles on glass and ZnO:Al/glass substrates. Using simulations a promising application of the nanoparticle integration is shown for the case of CuGaSe(2) solar cells.

  6. Enhanced optical output of InGaN/GaN near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes by localized surface plasmon of colloidal silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Joon; Kang, Jang-Won; Jung, Yen-Sook; Kim, Dong-Yu; Yim, Sang-Youp; Park, Seong-Ju

    2015-09-25

    We report on the characteristics of localized surface plasmon (LSP)-enhanced near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV-LEDs) fabricated by using colloidal silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs). Colloidal Ag NPs were deposited on the 20 nm thick p-GaN spacer layer using a spray process. The optical output power of NUV-LEDs with colloidal Ag NPs was increased by 48.7% at 20 mA compared with NUV-LEDs without colloidal Ag NPs. The enhancement was attributed to increased internal quantum efficiency caused by the resonance coupling between excitons in the multiple quantum wells and the LSPs in the Ag NPs.

  7. Compact plasmonic variable optical attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic nanowire-based thermo-optic variable optical attenuators operating in the 1525-1625 nm wavelength range. The devices have a footprint as low as 1 mm, extinction ratio exceeding 40 dB, driving voltage below 3 V, and full modulation bandwidth of 1 kHz. The polarization...

  8. Quasistatic limit for plasmon-enhanced optical chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finazzi, Marco; Biagioni, Paolo; Celebrano, Michele; Duò, Lamberto

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the possibility of enhancing the chiroptical response from molecules uniformly distributed around nanostructures that sustain localized plasmon resonances. We demonstrate that the average optical chirality in the near field of any plasmonic nanostructure cannot be significantly higher than that in a plane wave. This conclusion stems from the quasistatic nature of the nanoparticle-enhanced electromagnetic fields and from the fact that, at optical frequencies, the magnetic response of matter is much weaker than the electric one.

  9. Metal nanoparticles with sharp corners: Universal properties of plasmon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Sturman, B; Gorkunov, M

    2012-01-01

    We predict the simultaneous occurrence of two fundamental phenomena for metal nanoparticles possessing sharp corners: First, the main plasmonic dipolar mode experiences strong red shift with decreasing corner curvature radius; its resonant frequency is controlled by the apex angle of the corner and the normalized (to the particle size) corner curvature. Second, the split-off plasmonic mode experiences strong localization at the corners. Altogether, this paves the way for tailoring of metal nano-structures providing wavelength-selective excitation of localized plasmons and a strong near-field enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical phenomena.

  10. Metal nanoparticles with sharp corners: Universal properties of plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, B.; Podivilov, E.; Gorkunov, M.

    2013-03-01

    We predict the simultaneous occurrence of two fundamental phenomena for metal nanoparticles possessing sharp corners with variable curvature: First, the main dipolar plasmonic mode experiences a strong red shift with increasing corner curvature; for large values of the curvature, the resonant frequency is controlled by the apex angle of the corner. Second, the split-off plasmonic mode experiences a strong localization at the corners. Altogether, this paves the way for the tailoring of metal nanostructures providing a wavelength-selective excitation of localized plasmons and a strong near-field enhancement of linear and nonlinear optical phenomena.

  11. Plasmonic Nanoparticle Networks for Light and Heat Concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchot, Audrey; Marty, Renaud; Arbouet, Arnaud; Quidant, Romain; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle Networks (PNN) composed of chains of 12-nm diameter crystalline gold nanoparticles exhibit a longitudinally coupled plasmon mode cen- tered at 700 nm. We have exploited this longitudinal absorption band to efficiently confine light fields and concentrate heat sources in the close vicinity of these plasmonic chain net- works. The mapping of the two phenomena on the same superstructures was performed by combining two-photon luminescence (TPL) and fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) imaging techniques. Besides the light and heat concentration, we show experimentally that the planar spatial distribution of optical field intensity can be simply modulated by controlling the linear polarization of the incident optical excitation. On the contrary, the heat production, which is obtained here by exciting the structures within the optically transparent window of biological tissues, is evenly spread over the entire PNN. This contrasts with the usual case of localized heating i...

  12. Fusion of Selected Cells and Vesicles Mediated by Optically Trapped Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahadori, Azra

    . In this work, we introduce a novel and extremely flexible physical method which can trigger membrane fusion in a highly selective manner not only between synthetic GUVs of different compositions, but also between live cells which remain viable after fusion. Optical tweezers’ laser (1064 nm) is used to position...

  13. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  14. Raman fingerprinting of single dielectric nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Sarp; Chen, Chang; Li, Yi; van Roy, Wim; Lagae, Liesbet; van Dorpe, Pol

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies.Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: The

  15. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dep...

  16. Multipole plasmons and their disappearance in few-nanometre silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Christensen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy can be used for detailed spatial and spectral characterization of optical excitations in metal nanoparticles. In previous electron energy-loss experiments on silver nanoparticles with radii smaller than 20 nm, only the dipolar surface plasmon resonance was assumed...... theoretical predictions. Unlike in optical spectra, multipole surface plasmons are important in electron energy-loss spectra even of ultrasmall metallic nanoparticles....

  17. Dark spots along slowly scaling chains of plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Zito, Gianluigi; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the optical response of slowly scaling linear chains of mismatched silver nanoparticles. Hybridized plasmon chain resonances manifest unusual local field distributions around the nanoparticles that result from symmetry breaking of the geometry. Importantly, we find localization patterns characterized by bright hot-spots alternated by what we term \\textit{dark} spots. A dark spot is associated to dark plasmons that have collinear and antiparallel dipole moments along the chain. As a result, the field amplification in the dark interjunction gap is extinguished for incident polarization parallel to the chain axis. Despite the strong plasmonic coupling, the nanoparticles on the sides of this dark gap experience a dramatic asymmetric field amplification with amplitude gain contrast $> 2 \\times 10^2$. Remarkably, also for polarization orthogonal to the axis, gap hot-spots form on resonance.

  18. Experimental and numerical optical characterization of plasmonic copper nanoparticles embedded in ZnO fabricated by ion implantation and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Khai Q. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hoa Sen University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia); Nguyen, Hieu P.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ 07102 (United States); Ngo, Quang Minh [Institute of Material Sciences, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Canimoglu, Adil [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Nigde (Turkey); Can, Nurdogan, E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-05

    Here we describe the successfully fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting copper (Cu) ions into single zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals with ion energy of 400 keV at ion doses of 1 × 10{sup 16} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation and post-annealing treatment, the Cu implanted ZnO produces a broad range of luminescence emissions, ranging from green to yellow. A green luminescence peak at 550 nm could be ascribed to the isolated Cu ions. The changes in luminescence emission bands between the initial implant and annealed suggest that the implants give rise to clustering Cu nanoparticles in the host matrix but that the annealing process dissociates these. Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed to simulate their optical properties including the extinction cross section, electron energy loss spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances corresponding to the generation of multiple resonances, while the isolation of nanoparticles results in intensity amplification. - Highlights: • We present the fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting Cu into ZnO. • The luminescence properties were studied at different annealing temperature. • Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed. • We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances.

  19. Tridirectional Polarization Routing of Light by a Single Triangular Plasmonic Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshito Y; Shimura, Tsutomu

    2017-05-10

    Achieving high directionality of scattered light in combination with high flexibility of the direction using plasmonic nanoparticles is desirable for future optical nanocircuits and on-chip optical links. The plasmonic characteristics of nanoparticles strongly depend on their geometry. Here, we studied directional light scattering by a single-element triangular plasmonic nanoparticle. Our experimental and simulation results demonstrated that the triangular nanoparticle spatially sorted the incoming photons into three different scattering directions according to their polarization direction, including circular polarization, despite its compact overall volume of ∼λ(3)/300. The broken mirror symmetry and rotational symmetry of the triangular nanoparticle enabled such passive tridirectional polarization routing through the constructive and destructive interference of different plasmon modes. Our findings should markedly broaden the versatility of triangular plasmonic nanodevices, extending their possible practical applications in photon couplers and sorters and chemo-/biosensors.

  20. Localized surface plasmons modulated nonlinear optical processes in metal film-coupled and upconversion nanocrystals-coated nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dangyuan

    2016-09-01

    In the first part of this talk, I will show our experimental investigation on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metal film-coupled nanosphere monomers and dimers both with nanometric gaps. We have developed a new methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and color decoding to "visualizing" unambiguously the spectral and radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in these hybrid nanostructures. Single-particle spectroscopic measurements indicate that these hybrid nanostructures can simultaneously enhance several nonlinear optical processes, such as second harmonic generation, two-photon absorption induced luminescence, and hyper-Raman scattering. In the second part, I will show how the polarization state of the emissions from sub-10 nm upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) can be modulated when they form a hybrid complex with a gold nanorod (GNR). Our single-particle scattering experiments expose how an interplay between excitation polarization and GNR orientation gives rise to an extraordinary polarized nature of the upconversion emissions from an individual hybrid nanostructure. We support our results by numerical simulations and, using Förster resonance energy transfer theory, we uncover how an overlap between the UCNC emission and GNR extinction bands as well as the mutual orientation between emission and plasmonic dipoles jointly determine the polarization state of the UC emissions.

  1. Quasi-periodic distribution of plasmon modes in two-dimensional Fibonacci arrays of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallapiccola, Ramona; Gopinath, Ashwin; Stellacci, Francesco; Dal Negro, Luca

    2008-04-14

    In this paper we investigate for the first time the near-field optical behavior of two-dimensional Fibonacci plasmonic lattices fabricated by electron-beam lithography on transparent quartz substrates. In particular, by performing near-field optical microscopy measurements and three dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain simulations we demonstrate that near-field coupling of nanoparticle dimers in Fibonacci arrays results in a quasi-periodic lattice of localized nanoparticle plasmons. The possibility to accurately predict the spatial distribution of enhanced localized plasmon modes in quasi-periodic Fibonacci arrays can have a significant impact for the design and fabrication of novel nano-plasmonics devices.

  2. The role of the plasmon resonance for enhanced optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploschner, Martin

    Optical manipulation of nanoscale objects is studied with particular emphasis on the role of plasmon resonance for enhancement of optical forces. The thesis provides an introduction to plasmon resonance and its role in confinement of light to a sub-diffraction volume. The strong light confinement and related enhancement of optical forces is then theoretically studied for a special case of nanoantenna supporting plasmon resonances. The calculation of optical forces, based on the Maxwell stress tensor approach, reveals relatively weak optical forces for incident powers that are used in typical realisations of trapping with nanoantenna. The optical forces are so weak that other non-optical effects should be considered to explain the observed trapping. These effects include heating induced convection, thermoporesis and chemical binding. The thesis also studies the optical effects of plasmon resonances for a fundamentally different application - size-based optical sorting of gold nanoparticles. Here, the plasmon resonances are not utilised for sub-diffraction light confinement but rather for their ability to increase the apparent cross-section of the particles for their respective resonant sizes. Exploiting these resonances, we realise sorting in a system of two counter-propagating evanescent waves, each at different wavelength that selectively guide gold nanoparticles of different sizes in opposite directions. The method is experimentally demonstrated for bidirectional sorting of gold nanoparticles of either 150 or 130 nm in diameter from those of 100 nm in diameter within a mixture. We conclude the thesis with a numerical study of the optimal beam-shape for optical sorting applications. The developed theoretical framework, based on the force optical eigenmode method, is able to find an illumination of the back-focal plane of the objective such that the force difference between nanoparticles of various sizes in the sample plane is maximised.

  3. Enhancement of radiative processes in nanofibers with embedded plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Jurga, Radoslaw; Pisignano, Dario; Ciracì, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Efficient manipulation and long distance transport of single-photons is a key component in nanoscale quantum optics. In this letter, we study the emission properties of an individual light emitter placed into a nanofiber and coupled to a metallic nanoparticle. We find that plasmonic field enhancement together with the nanofiber optical confinement uniquely and synergistically contribute to an overall increase of emission rates as well as quantum yields.

  4. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes for antibacterial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Qian, Shi; Liu, Ziwei; Feng, Jingwei; Jin, Ping; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-06-01

    Close-packed TiO2 nanotube arrays are prepared on metallic Ti surface by electrochemical anodization. Subsequently, by magnetron sputtering, Au nanoparticles are coated onto the top sidewall and tube inwall. The Au@TiO2 systems can effectively kill Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in darkness due to the existence of Au nanoparticles. On the basis of classical optical theories, the antibacterial mechanism is proposed from the perspective of localized surface plasmon resonance. Respiratory electrons of bacterial membrane transfer to Au nanoparticles and then to TiO2, which makes bacteria steadily lose electrons until death. This work provides insights for the better understanding and designing of noble metal nanoparticles-based plasmonic heterostructures for antibacterial application.

  5. Plasmonic gold nanoparticles modified titania nanotubes for antibacterial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Huaijuan; Qian, Shi; Liu, Ziwei; Feng, Jingwei; Jin, Ping, E-mail: p-jin@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn; Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: p-jin@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-06-30

    Close-packed TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are prepared on metallic Ti surface by electrochemical anodization. Subsequently, by magnetron sputtering, Au nanoparticles are coated onto the top sidewall and tube inwall. The Au@TiO{sub 2} systems can effectively kill Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in darkness due to the existence of Au nanoparticles. On the basis of classical optical theories, the antibacterial mechanism is proposed from the perspective of localized surface plasmon resonance. Respiratory electrons of bacterial membrane transfer to Au nanoparticles and then to TiO{sub 2}, which makes bacteria steadily lose electrons until death. This work provides insights for the better understanding and designing of noble metal nanoparticles-based plasmonic heterostructures for antibacterial application.

  6. Plasmonic behaviour of phenylenediamine functionalised silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmal Che Lah, Nurul; Samykano, Mahendran; Rafie Johan, Mohd; Syahierah Othman, Nuurul; Mawardi Saari, Mohd; Bey Fen, Leo; Zalikha Khalil, Nur

    2017-09-01

    The surface functionalisation of AgNPs has demonstrated improved capability for various applications by modifying their surface chemical conditions. In this study, AgNPs functionalised with p-phenylenediamine (PPD) ligand were prepared, and the plasmonic effects of the nanocomposites were then investigated. The synthesis and functionalisation of Ag nanocomposites were achieved through chemical modification reaction of naphthalene group through hydrothermal synthesis. The influence of the chemical modification reaction on the plasmonic behaviour and size variation were obtained via optical measurement techniques such as UV–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis) for absorbance characteristic, photoluminescence for emission response and micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) for SERS study on the presence of regions containing AgNPs and PPD ligand. It was observed that the one-step process of deprotonation of the amino group on the aromatic rings gives the re-arrangement of the electron cloud towards the π-conjugated system. High-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed the formation of the nanocomposites and the AgNPs (for ~4 and ~5 nm of diameter sizes) are well-dispersed over the PPD matrix. The nanocomposites are assembled into higher dimensional structures through coordination with functional PPD ligand and also increasing the PPD amount led to the increase in the surface area of the nanoparticles.

  7. Optically tunable plasmonic color filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. J.; Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Wang, B.; Danner, A. J.; Yuan, X. C.; Teng, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    We fabricated sub-wavelength patterned gold plasmonic nanostructures on a quartz substrate through the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The perforated gold film demonstrated optical transmission peaks in the visible range, which therefore can be used as a plasmonic color filter. Furthermore, by integrating a layer of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with the gold nanostructure to form a hybrid system, we observed a red-shift of transmission peak wavelength. More importantly, the peak intensity can be further enhanced more than 10% in transmittance due to the refractive index match of the media on both sides of it. By optically pumping the hybrid system using a UV light, nematic-isotropic phase transition of the LCs was achieved, thus changing the effective refractive index experienced by the impinging light. Due to the refractive index change, the transmission peak intensity was modulated accordingly. As a result, an optically tunable plasmonic color filter was achieved. This kind of color filters could be potentially applied to many applications, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, liquid crystal display devices, light emitting diodes, etc.

  8. Observation of quantum tunneling between two plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Jonathan A; García-Etxarri, Aitzol; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-02-13

    The plasmon resonances of two closely spaced metallic particles have enabled applications including single-molecule sensing and spectroscopy, novel nanoantennas, molecular rulers, and nonlinear optical devices. In a classical electrodynamic context, the strength of such dimer plasmon resonances increases monotonically as the particle gap size decreases. In contrast, a quantum mechanical framework predicts that electron tunneling will strongly diminish the dimer plasmon strength for subnanometer-scale separations. Here, we directly observe the plasmon resonances of coupled metallic nanoparticles as their gap size is reduced to atomic dimensions. Using the electron beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we manipulate pairs of ~10-nm-diameter spherical silver nanoparticles on a substrate, controlling their convergence and eventual coalescence into a single nanosphere. We simultaneously employ electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to observe the dynamic plasmonic properties of these dimers before and after particle contact. As separations are reduced from 7 nm, the dominant dipolar peak exhibits a redshift consistent with classical calculations. However, gaps smaller than ~0.5 nm cause this mode to exhibit a reduced intensity consistent with quantum theories that incorporate electron tunneling. As the particles overlap, the bonding dipolar mode disappears and is replaced by a dipolar charge transfer mode. Our dynamic imaging, manipulation, and spectroscopy of nanostructures enables the first full spectral mapping of dimer plasmon evolution and may provide new avenues for in situ nanoassembly and analysis in the quantum regime.

  9. Photochromic organic nanoparticles as innovative platforms for plasmonic nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Kristen E; Mevellec, Jean-Yves; Humbert, Bernard; Lagugné-Labarthet, François; Ishow, Eléna

    2015-01-28

    The fabrication of hybrid core-shell nanoassemblies involving a nondoped azo photochromic core coated with a dense shell of gold nanoparticles is reported to investigate the influence of localized plasmons onto the azo core photoisomerization. Photochromic organic nanoparticles, regarded as a novel class of high-density photoswitchable nanomaterials, are first elaborated upon precipitation in water of push-pull azo molecules, containing sulfur-terminated units to chelate gold nanoparticles. Photoisomerization studies of the azo nanoparticles reveal significantly higher E → Z photoconversion yields and Z → E thermal back relaxation rate constants compared to those of dyes processed as thin films and in solution, respectively. These unexpected results are ascribed to the large surface-to-volume ratio and cooperative effects encountered in nanoparticles that deform without disassembling under polarized illumination as a result of the weak change in the azo dipole moment. UV-vis spectroscopy and Raman microscopy of the hybrid nanoassemblies show strong optical coupling between both photoactive constituents, confirming that gold nanoparticles are tightly positioned on the azo core surface. Such coupling causes partial quenching of the azo photoisomerization but does not impact the thermal back relaxation. Longer sulfur-terminated chains provide reduced quenching of the photoreaction by the localized plasmons, thereby opening perspectives toward plasmon-mediated deformation of nano-objects for light-controlled nanomechanics.

  10. Optically Thin Metallic Films for High-radiative-efficiency Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yi; Hsu, Chia Wei; Miller, Owen D; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics enables deep-subwavelength concentration of light and has become important for fundamental studies as well as real-life applications. Two major existing platforms of plasmonics are metallic nanoparticles and metallic films. Metallic nanoparticles allow efficient coupling to far field radiation, yet their synthesis typically leads to poor material quality. Metallic films offer substantially higher quality materials, but their coupling to radiation is typically jeopardized due to the large momentum mismatch with free space. Here, we propose and theoretically investigate optically thin metallic films as an ideal platform for high-radiative-efficiency plasmonics. For far-field scattering, adding a thin high-quality metallic substrate enables a higher quality factor while maintaining the localization and tunability that the nanoparticle provides. For near-field spontaneous emission, a thin metallic substrate, of high quality or not, greatly improves the field overlap between the emitter environment and ...

  11. Silicon Nitride Waveguides for Plasmon Optical Trapping and Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon nitride trench waveguide deposited with bowtie antennas for plasmonic enhanced optical trapping. The sub-micron silicon nitride trench waveguides were fabricated with conventional optical lithography in a low cost manner. The waveguides embrace not only low propagation loss and high nonlinearity, but also the inborn merits of combining micro-fluidic channel and waveguide together. Analyte contained in the trapezoidal trench channel can interact with the evanescent field from the waveguide beneath. The evanescent field can be further enhanced by plasmonic nanostructures. With the help of gold nano bowtie antennas, the studied waveguide shows outstanding trapping capability on 10 nm polystyrene nanoparticles. We show that the bowtie antennas can lead to 60-fold enhancement of electric field in the antenna gap. The optical trapping force on a nanoparticle is boosted by three orders of magnitude. A strong tendency shows the nanoparticle is likely to move to the high field strength region,...

  12. Photolabile plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles for remote-controlled traceable drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Fang, Zheng; Wang, Chenxu; Zhou, Jiajing; Duan, Bo; Pu, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) upon photo exposure. Benefiting from the interparticle plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles in close proximity, the plasmonic vesicles assembled from amphiphilic gold nanoparticles exhibit distinctively different optical properties from single nanoparticle units, which offer the opportunity to track the photo-triggered disassembly of the vesicles and the associated cargo release by plasmonic imaging. We have shown the dense layer of PEG grafts on the vesicles not only endow plasmonic vesicles with excellent colloidal stability, but also serve as flexible spacers for bioconjugation of targeting ligands to facilitate the specific recognition of cancer cells. The targeted delivery of model anticancer drug doxorubicin, investigated by dual-modality plasmonic and fluorescence imaging and toxicity studies, clearly demonstrated the potential of photolabile plasmonic vesicles as multi-functional drug carriers.We have developed a new type of photo-responsive plasmonic vesicles that allow for active delivery of anticancer payloads to specific cancer cells and personalized drug release regulated by external photo-irradiation. Our results show that amphiphilic gold nanoparticles carrying hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and photo-responsive hydrophobic poly(2-nitrobenzyl acrylate) (PNBA) can assemble into plasmonic vesicles with gold nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic shell of PNBA, which can be converted into

  13. Theoretical analysis of optical conveyor belt with plasmonic nanodisk array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhun; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic optical trapping allows trapping and manipulation of micro- and even nanometer-sized particles using localized and enhanced electric fields by plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructure. We consider an optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of nanodisks acting as optical tweezers with different sizes to implement a system to trap and manipulate particles through a laser-induced gradient force. An electric field induced and localized at each optical resonator is sensitive to the wavelength and polarization. The maximum electric field is enhanced at resonant wavelength depending on the shape and size of the plasmonic nanostructure used for light localization. By changing the light wavelength and polarization, the position of localized light induced in the disk can be determined and nanoparticles can be moved to a desired location through the variation of resonance conditions without any mechanical forces.

  14. Plasmonic silicon solar cell comprised of aluminum nanoparticles: Effect of nanoparticles' self-limiting native oxide shell on optical and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Piyush K.; Sharma, R. P.; Komarala, Vamsi K.

    2016-10-01

    The aluminum nanoparticles' (Al NPs) morphology is optimized initially, for maximum light confinement into a silicon substrate. With self-limiting native oxide shell on the Al NPs after ageing, the maximum photocurrent enhancement (from 26.89 to 29.21 mA/cm2) from a silicon solar cell is observed as compared to the bare cell, in surface plasmon resonance and off-resonance regions due to improved light forward scattering, with no occurrence of Fano resonances. Related to the electrical properties of the plasmonic device, an increase in fill factor (from 56.11 to 62.58) and a decrease in series resistance (from 1.80 Ω to 1.24 Ω) are also observed after the oxide layer formation on Al NPs. The passive partial dielectric oxide layer at the interface helped in electrical passivation by reducing lateral resistance to current flow along the plane of the interface. A finite-element method is also adapted to calculate spatial and angular radiative dipole field distributions for the experimentally optimized Al NPs' size on a silicon substrate, without and with oxide inclusion in NPs for explaining the plasmonic device performance enhancement. With oxide inclusion, Al NPs' dipole field exhibited a large shift towards a silicon due to the modified dielectric environment as compared to without oxide. Bruggeman effective medium theory (for dielectric response) is also used to explain the results with the modification in peak radiative power, spectral field distribution, and spatial and angular radiative dipole field distributions of Al NPs with oxide inclusion in Al.

  15. Rational synthesis and self-assembly of anisotropic plasmonic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Scarabelli, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work has been carried out in the framework of the ERC Advanced Grant Plasmaquo (nº 267867), which focused on the development of novel nanostructured plasmonic materials based on crystalline assemblies of anisotropic nanoparticles, to be used as optical enhancers for the surface enhanced Raman scattering detection of bacterial Quorum Sensing signaling molecules. More specifically, the thesis was oriented toward the design of such nanostructures, and on the characterization of their...

  16. Plasmonic twinned silver nanoparticles with molecular precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huayan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Xiaojing; Gu, Lin; Huang, Huaqi; Yan, Juanzhu; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Wu, Junchao; Edwards, Alison J.; Dittrich, Birger; Tang, Zichao; Wang, Dongdong; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-09-01

    Determining the structures of nanoparticles at atomic resolution is vital to understand their structure-property correlations. Large metal nanoparticles with core diameter beyond 2 nm have, to date, eluded characterization by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Here we report the chemical syntheses and structures of two giant thiolated Ag nanoparticles containing 136 and 374 Ag atoms (that is, up to 3 nm core diameter). As the largest thiolated metal nanoparticles crystallographically determined so far, these Ag nanoparticles enter the truly metallic regime with the emergence of surface plasmon resonance. As miniatures of fivefold twinned nanostructures, these structures demonstrate a subtle distortion within fivefold twinned nanostructures of face-centred cubic metals. The Ag nanoparticles reported in this work serve as excellent models to understand the detailed structure distortion within twinned metal nanostructures and also how silver nanoparticles can span from the molecular to the metallic regime.

  17. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  18. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-05-19

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  19. Surface plasmons in metallic nanoparticles: fundamentals and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M A, E-mail: magarcia@icv.csic.es [Department of Electroceramics, Institute for Ceramic and Glass, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain) and IMDEA Nanociencia, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2011-07-20

    The excitation of surface plasmons (SPs) in metallic nanoparticles (NPs) induces optical properties hardly achievable in other optical materials, yielding a wide range of applications in many fields. This review presents an overview of SPs in metallic NPs. The concept of SPs in NPs is qualitatively described using a comparison with simple linear oscillators. The mathematical models to carry on calculations on SPs are presented as well as the most common approximations. The different parameters governing the features of SPs and their effect on the optical properties of the materials are reviewed. Finally, applications of SPs in different fields such as biomedicine, energy, environment protection and information technology are revised. (topical review)

  20. Plasmonic biocompatible silver-gold alloyed nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Etterlin, Gion Diego; Spyrogianni, Anastasia; Krumeich, Frank; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2014-11-14

    The addition of Au during scalable synthesis of nanosilver drastically minimizes its surface oxidation and leaching of toxic Ag(+) ions. These biocompatible and inexpensive silver-gold nanoalloyed particles exhibit superior plasmonic performance than commonly used pure Au nanoparticles, and as such these nanoalloys have great potential in theranostic applications.

  1. Optical and Electrical Performance of MOS-Structure Silicon Solar Cells with Antireflective Transparent ITO and Plasmonic Indium Nanoparticles under Applied Bias Voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jeng Ho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports impressive improvements in the optical and electrical performance of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS-structure silicon solar cells through the incorporation of plasmonic indium nanoparticles (In-NPs and an indium-tin-oxide (ITO electrode with periodic holes (perforations under applied bias voltage. Samples were prepared using a plain ITO electrode or perforated ITO electrode with and without In-NPs. The samples were characterized according to optical reflectance, dark current voltage, induced capacitance voltage, external quantum efficiency, and photovoltaic current voltage. Our results indicate that induced capacitance voltage and photovoltaic current voltage both depend on bias voltage, regardless of the type of ITO electrode. Under a bias voltage of 4.0 V, MOS cells with perforated ITO and plain ITO, respectively, presented conversion efficiencies of 17.53% and 15.80%. Under a bias voltage of 4.0 V, the inclusion of In-NPs increased the efficiency of cells with perforated ITO and plain ITO to 17.80% and 16.87%, respectively.

  2. Optical and Electrical Performance of MOS-Structure Silicon Solar Cells with Antireflective Transparent ITO and Plasmonic Indium Nanoparticles under Applied Bias Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Sue, Ruei-Siang; Lin, Jian-Cheng; Syu, Hong-Jang; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2016-08-10

    This paper reports impressive improvements in the optical and electrical performance of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-structure silicon solar cells through the incorporation of plasmonic indium nanoparticles (In-NPs) and an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode with periodic holes (perforations) under applied bias voltage. Samples were prepared using a plain ITO electrode or perforated ITO electrode with and without In-NPs. The samples were characterized according to optical reflectance, dark current voltage, induced capacitance voltage, external quantum efficiency, and photovoltaic current voltage. Our results indicate that induced capacitance voltage and photovoltaic current voltage both depend on bias voltage, regardless of the type of ITO electrode. Under a bias voltage of 4.0 V, MOS cells with perforated ITO and plain ITO, respectively, presented conversion efficiencies of 17.53% and 15.80%. Under a bias voltage of 4.0 V, the inclusion of In-NPs increased the efficiency of cells with perforated ITO and plain ITO to 17.80% and 16.87%, respectively.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies on localized surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using graphene oxide coated silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Jeeban Kumar; Parhi, Purnendu; Jha, Rajan

    2016-07-01

    An optical fiber based refractive index sensor using graphene oxide (GO) encapsulated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is reported. The AgNPs are encapsulated with a very thin layer of GO as it controls the inter-particle distance thereby preventing aggregation. The encapsulation also enhances the colloidal stability and prevents the oxidation of the AgNPs by separating them from direct contact with the aqueous medium. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy results support the formation of 1 nm thick GO around AgNPs of an average size of 35 nm. A Raman spectrometer and a UV-VIS spectrometer have been used to characterize and study the synthesized nanoparticles along with GO. Further, Raman spectra support a 64.72% increase in D-peak intensity and a 52.91% increase in G-peak intensity of the GO-encapsulated AgNPs (GOE-AgNPs) with respect to GO. Further, the GOE-AgNPs are immobilized on the core of functionalized plastic-cladded silica fiber. FESEM confirms the immobilization of the GOE-AgNPs on the fiber core. We observed that the peak absorbance changes by 87.55% with a 0.05 change in the refractive index. The sensitivity of the proposed fiber sensor is found to be 0.9406 ΔA/RIU along with a resolution of 12.8  ×  {{10}-4} RIU. MATLAB is used to calculate the absorbance of the AgNPs by considering the bound and free electron contribution along with the size-dependent dispersion of the nanoparticles. We found that the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Formation of metal nanoparticles in silicon nanopores: Plasmon resonance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisski, S.; Goller, B.; Heck, S. C.; Maier, S. A.; Fujii, M.; Kovalev, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for the formation of noble metal nanoparticle ensembles in nanostructured silicon. The key idea is based on the unique property of the large reduction potential of extended internal hydrogen-terminated porous silicon surfaces. The process of metal nanoparticle formation in porous silicon was experimentally traced using their optical plasmon resonance response. We also demonstrate that bimetallic compounds can be formed in porous silicon and that their composition can be controlled using this technique. Experimental results were found to contradict partially with considerations based on Mie theory.

  5. Nonlinear optical model for strip plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of nonlinear optical properties for strip plasmonic waveguides. The particular waveguides geometry that we investigate contains a gold core, adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. It is shown that the third-order susceptibility of the gold core...... significantly depends on the layer thickness and has the dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the long-range plasmon polariton mode. This results in two nonlinear optical effects in plasmonic waveguides, which we experimentally observed and reported in [Opt. Lett. 41, 317 (2016......)]. The first effect is the nonlinear power saturation of the plasmonic mode, and the second effect is the spectral broadening of the plasmonic mode. Both nonlinear plasmonic effects can be used for practical applications and their appropriate model will be important for further developments in communication...

  6. Giant Photogalvanic Effect in Noncentrosymmetric Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.;

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of noncentrosymmetric, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Because of the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting...... in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is a direct analogy of the photogalvanic (or bulk photovoltaic) effect known to exist in media with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure, such as doped lithium niobate or bismuth ferrite......, but is several orders of magnitude stronger. Termed the giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications....

  7. Controlling plasmon coupling in biomolecule-linked metal nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba, David S.

    Molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in biomolecule-linked nanoparticle assemblies in two-particle, small cluster, and extended network formats. The relationship between structure and optical properties is explored through comparison of measured spectra with simulated spectra calculated using structural models based upon measured structural parameters. A variety of techniques are used to characterize nanoparticle assemblies, including ensemble extinction and elastic scattering spectroscopy, single-assembly scattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Initially, molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in ˜100 nm assemblies composed of 13 nm gold "satellite" particles tethered by duplex DNA to a 50 nm gold "core" particle. Comparison of core-satellite assemblies formed with duplex DNA tethers of varying length demonstrates that, while core-satellite separation is controlled by the number of base pairs in the DNA tether, structural properties such as core:satellite ratio and yield are independent of DNA tether length. Thus, plasmon coupling within these assemblies is determined by the number of base pairs in the duplex DNA tether; compact assemblies in which tethers are composed of fewer base pairs exhibit plasmon bands that are red-shifted relative to the bands of extended assemblies, indicating increased plasmon coupling in the compact assemblies. Subsequently, core-satellite assemblies are formed with reconfigurable DNA nanostructure tethers that modulate interparticle separation in response to a molecular stimulus. Assembly reconfiguration from a compact to an extended state results in blue-shifting of the assembly plasmon resonance, indicating reduced interparticle coupling and lengthening of the core-satellite tether. Comparison between measured and simulated spectra revealed a close correspondence and provided validation of the structural models that link assembly plasmonic properties

  8. Switching Plasmons: Gold Nanorod-Copper Chalcogenide Core-Shell Nanoparticle Clusters with Selectable Metal/Semiconductor NIR Plasmon Resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Döblinger, Markus; Rodríguez-Fernández, Jessica

    2015-09-16

    Exerting control over the near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic response of nanosized metals and semiconductors can facilitate access to unexplored phenomena and applications. Here we combine electrostatic self-assembly and Cd(2+)/Cu(+) cation exchange to obtain an anisotropic core-shell nanoparticle cluster (NPC) whose optical properties stem from two dissimilar plasmonic materials: a gold nanorod (AuNR) core and a copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se, x ≥ 0) supraparticle shell. The spectral response of the AuNR@Cu2Se NPCs is governed by the transverse and longitudinal plasmon bands (LPB) of the anisotropic metallic core, since the Cu2Se shell is nonplasmonic. Under aerobic conditions the shell undergoes vacancy doping (x > 0), leading to the plasmon-rich NIR spectrum of the AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se NPCs. For low vacancy doping levels the NIR optical properties of the dually plasmonic NPCs are determined by the LPBs of the semiconductor shell (along its major longitudinal axis) and of the metal core. Conversely, for high vacancy doping levels their NIR optical response is dominated by the two most intense plasmon modes from the shell: the transverse (along the shortest transversal axis) and longitudinal (along the major longitudinal axis) modes. The optical properties of the NPCs can be reversibly switched back to a purely metallic plasmonic character upon reversible conversion of AuNR@Cu(2-x)Se into AuNR@Cu2Se. Such well-defined nanosized colloidal assemblies feature the unique ability of holding an all-metallic, a metallic/semiconductor, or an all-semiconductor plasmonic response in the NIR. Therefore, they can serve as an ideal platform to evaluate the crosstalk between plasmonic metals and plasmonic semiconductors at the nanoscale. Furthermore, their versatility to display plasmon modes in the first, second, or both NIR windows is particularly advantageous for bioapplications, especially considering their strong absorbing and near-field enhancing properties.

  9. Oscillons, solitons, and domain walls in arrays of nonlinear plasmonic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Roman Noskov; Pavel Belov; Yuri Kivshar

    2012-01-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles bas...

  10. Optical Torque from Enhanced Scattering by Multipolar Plasmonic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Yoonkyung E; Jin, Dafei; Fang, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical angular momentum transfer from a circularly polarized plane wave to thin metal nanoparticles of different rotational symmetries. While absorption has been regarded as the predominant mechanism of torque generation on the nanoscale, we demonstrate numerically how the contribution from scattering can be enhanced by using multipolar plasmon resonance. The multipolar modes in non-circular particles can convert the angular momentum carried by the scattered field, thereby producing scattering-dominant optical torque, while a circularly symmetric particle cannot. Our results show that the optical torque induced by resonant scattering can contribute to 80% of the total optical torque in gold particles. This scattering-dominant torque generation is extremely mode-specific, and deserves to be distinguished from the absorption-dominant mechanism. Our findings might have applications in optical manipulation on the nanoscale as well as new designs in plasmonics and metamateria...

  11. Nanoparticle optical notch filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinadhuni, Pradeep Kumar

    Developing novel light blocking products involves the design of a nanoparticle optical notch filter, working on the principle of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These light blocking products can be used in many applications. One such application is to naturally reduce migraine headaches and light sensitivity. Melanopsin ganglion cells present in the retina of the human eye, connect to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the body's clock) in the brain, where they participate in the entrainment of the circadian rhythms. As the Melanopsin ganglion cells are involved in triggering the migraine headaches in photophobic patients, it is necessary to block the part of visible spectrum that activates these cells. It is observed from the action potential spectrum of the ganglion cells that they absorb light ranging from 450-500nm (blue-green part) of the visible spectrum with a λmax (peak sensitivity) of around 480nm (blue line). Currently prescribed for migraine patients is the FL-41 coating, which blocks a broad range of wavelengths, including wavelengths associated with melanopsin absorption. The nanoparticle optical notch filter is designed to block light only at 480nm, hence offering an effective prescription for the treatment of migraine headaches.

  12. Selective excitation of plasmons superlocalized at sharp perturbations of metal nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, M V; Podivilov, E V

    2015-01-01

    Sharp metal corners and tips support plasmons localized on the scale of the curvature radius -- superlocalized plasmons. We analyze plasmonic properties of nanoparticles with small and sharp corner- and tip-shaped surface perturbations in terms of hybridization of the superlocalized plasmons, which frequencies are determined by the perturbations shape, and the ordinary plasmons localized on the whole particle. When the frequency of a superlocalized plasmon gets close to that of the ordinary plasmon, their strong hybridization occurs and facilitates excitation of an optical hot-spot near the corresponding perturbation apex. The particle is then employed as a nano-antenna that selectively couples the free-space light to the nanoscale vicinity of the apex providing precise local light enhancement by several orders of magnitude.

  13. Nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticle composites for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y. E-mail: takeda.yoshihiko@nims.go.jp; Kishimoto, N

    2003-05-01

    Optical absorption and nonlinear optical response were investigated for nanoparticle composites in amorphous SiO{sub 2} fabricated by negative Ta ion implantation at 60 keV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify Ta and the oxide formation in the matrix. Optical absorption clearly indicated a surface plasmon peak at 2.2 eV and the peak resulted from formation of nanoparticles embedded in the matrix. The measured absorption was compared with calculated ones, evaluated by Maxwell-Garnett theory. Nonlinear absorption was measured with a pump-probe method using a femtosecond laser system. The pumping laser transiently bleached the surface plasmon band and lead to the nonlinearity. The transient response recovered in several picoseconds and behaved in terms of electron dynamics in metallic nanoparticles. The Ta nanoparticle composite is one of the promising candidates for nonlinear optical materials with good thermal stability.

  14. Plasmon excitation and damping in noble metal nanoparticle-MoS2 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcherio, Gregory T.; Benamara, Mourad; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-09-01

    Improved fundamental understanding of resonant optical and electric interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and 2D materials, such as semiconductive molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), could benefit characterization of optoelectronic light harvesting schemes. Energy and damping of plasmon resonances of noble metal nanoparticle-decorated MoS2 were examined via parallel synthesis of (a) approximate discrete dipole (DDA) simulations and (b) near-field electron energy loss (EELS) and far-field optical transmission spectroscopies. Energy of localized surface plasmon resonance altered by MoS2 interactions was studied for gold nanospheres and silver nanoprisms. Augmented plasmon damping by injection of plasmon-excited electrons into the MoS2 was measured in EELS and represented by DDA. These techniques support rapid improvements in nanoparticle-2D material prototypes for photocatalysis and photodetection, for example.

  15. Plasmonic angular tunability of gold nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, M.L.; Guarnaccio, A.; Ranù, F. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Trucchi, D. [CNR, ISM UOS Montelibretti, Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, (RM) 00015 (Italy); Orlando, S., E-mail: stefano.orlando@ism.cnr.it [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Mollica, D.; Parisi, G.P. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy); Medici, L.; Lettino, A. [CNR, IMAA, Area della Ricerca di Potenza -Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo, (PZ) 85050 (Italy); De Bonis, A.; Teghil, R. [Dipart. di Scienze,Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, Potenza, 85100 (Italy); Santagata, A. [CNR, ISM UOS Tito Scalo, Zona Industriale, Tito Scalo (PZ) 85050 (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • fs pulsed laser ablation as a technique to produce nanoparticles. • Nanoparticle distribution as an evidence for plasmonic tunable resonances. • Correlation between angular distribution of deposited nanoparticles and specific plasmonic resonances. - Abstract: With the aim to study the influence of deposition parameters on the plasmonic properties of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) deposited by ultra-short ablation, we have focused our attention in evaluating how their size distribution can be varied. In this work, the role played by the NPs’ angular distribution, agglomeration and growth is related to the resulting optical properties. UV–vis-NIR absorption spectra together with Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction observations are presented in order to show how the angular distribution of fs laser ablation and deposition of Au NPs provides different plasmonic properties which can be beneficial for several aims, from optoelectronic to biosensor applications.

  16. Plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) using gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohua; Jain, Prashant K; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2008-07-01

    The use of lasers, over the past few decades, has emerged to be highly promising for cancer therapy modalities, most commonly the photothermal therapy method, which employs light absorbing dyes for achieving the photothermal damage of tumors, and the photodynamic therapy, which employs chemical photosensitizers that generate singlet oxygen that is capable of tumor destruction. However, recent advances in the field of nanoscience have seen the emergence of noble metal nanostructures with unique photophysical properties, well suited for applications in cancer phototherapy. Noble metal nanoparticles, on account of the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance, possess strongly enhanced visible and near-infrared light absorption, several orders of magnitude more intense compared to conventional laser phototherapy agents. The use of plasmonic nanoparticles as highly enhanced photoabsorbing agents has thus introduced a much more selective and efficient cancer therapy strategy, viz. plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT). The synthetic tunability of the optothermal properties and the bio-targeting abilities of the plasmonic gold nanostructures make the PPTT method furthermore promising. In this review, we discuss the development of the PPTT method with special emphasis on the recent in vitro and in vivo success using gold nanospheres coupled with visible lasers and gold nanorods and silica-gold nanoshells coupled with near-infrared lasers.

  17. Development of Plasmonically Cloaked Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, Eric [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Summers, Christopher [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-05-18

    An advanced in-pile multi-parameter reactor monitoring system is being proposed in this funding opportunity. The proposed effort brings cutting edge, high-fidelity optical measurement systems into the reactor environment in an unprecedented fashion, including in-core, in-cladding and in-fuel pellet itself. Unlike instrumented leads, the proposed system provides a unique solution to a multi-parameter monitoring need in core while being minimally intrusive in the reactor core. Detector designs proposed herein can monitor fuel compression and expansion in both the radial and axial dimensions as well as monitor linear power profiles and fission rates during the operation of the reactor. In addition to pressure, stress, strain, compression, neutron flux, neutron spectra, and temperature can be observed inside the fuel bundle and fuel rod using the proposed system. The proposed research aims at developing radiation-hard, harsh-environment multi-parameter systems for insertion into the reactor environment. The proposed research holds the potential to drastically increase the fidelity and precision of in-core instrumentation with little or no impact in the neutron economy in the reactor environment while providing a measurement system capable of operation for entire operating cycles. Significant work has been done over the last few years on the use of nanoparticle-based scintillators. Through the use of metamaterials, the PIs aim to develop planar neutron detectors and large-volume neutron detectors. These detectors will have high efficiencies for neutron detection and will have a high gamma discrimination capability.

  18. Monovalent plasmonic nanoparticles for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daeha; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Jung-uk; Haas, Thomas J.; Jun, Young-wook

    2016-03-01

    The multivalent nature of commercial nanoparticle imaging agents and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent nanoparticles challenge their use in biology, where clustering of target biomolecules can perturb dynamics of biomolecular targets. Here, we report production and purification of monovalent gold and silver nanoparticles for their single molecule imaging application. We first synthesized DNA-conjugated 20 nm and 40 nm gold and silver nanoparticles via conventional metal-thiol chemistry, yielding nanoparticles with mixed valency. By employing an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) method, we purified monovalent nanoparticles from the mixtures. To allow efficient peak-separation resolution while keeping the excellent colloidal stability of nanoparticles against harsh purification condition (e.g. high NaCl), we optimized surface properties of nanoparticles by modulating surface functional groups. We characterized the monovalent character of the purified nanoparticles by hybridizing two complementary conjugates, forming dimers. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the monovalent plasmonic nanoprobes as single molecule imaging probes by tracking single TrkA receptors diffusing on the cell membrane and compare to monovalent quantum dot probes.

  19. Distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxin Cao; Lenan Wu; Dayong Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The relationships of the resonant wavelength of optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to the modulation layer refractive index, thickness and the refractive index of the bulk medium are obtained by using theoretical calculation model of optical fiber SPR sensors under certain conditions, which indicates that resonant wavelength of the sensors is approximately linear with modulation layer thickness. Based on the linear relationship, multiple SPR sensors with different resonant wavelengths can be fabricated in a single optical fiber named as distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors (DOFSPRSs).Experimental results are presented, showing that it is practical to fabricate more than one SPR sensors in a single optical fiber.

  20. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Evlyukhin, A.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive...... index increases inside the array by a factor of ~1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase...

  1. Nanoparticle movement: plasmonic forces and physical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, P E; Reyes-Coronado, A; Barrera, R G; Rivacoba, A; Echenique, P M; Aizpurua, J

    2012-12-01

    Nanoparticle structures observed in aberration-corrected electron microscopes exhibit many types of behavior, some of which are dominated by intrinsic conditions, unrelated to the microscope environment. Some behaviors are clearly driven by the electron beam, however, and the question arises as to whether these are similar to intrinsic mechanisms, useful for understanding nanoscale behavior, or whether they should be regarded as unwanted modification of as-built specimens. We have studied a particular kind of beam-specimen interaction - plasmon dielectric forces caused by the electric fields imposed by a passing swift electron - identifying four types of forced motion, including both attractive and repulsive forces on single nanoparticles, and coalescent and non-coalescent forces in groups of two or more nanoparticles. We suggest that these forces might be useful for deliberate electron beam guided movement of nanoparticles.

  2. Plasmonic Imaging of Electrochemical Reactions of Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yimin; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Liu, Xianwei; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, N J

    2016-11-15

    systems and nanoscale materials with high throughput. The plasmonic approach has two imaging modes: electrochemical current imaging and interfacial impedance imaging. The former images local electrochemical current associated with electrochemical reactions (faradic current), and the latter maps local interfacial impedance, including nonfaradic contributions (e.g., double layer charging). The plasmonic imaging technique can perform voltammetry (cyclic or square wave) in an analogous manner to the traditional electrochemical methods. It can also be integrated with bright field, dark field, and fluorescence imaging capabilities in one optical setup to provide additional capabilities. To date the plasmonic imaging technique has found various applications, including mapping of heterogeneous surface reactions, analysis of trace substances, detection of catalytic reactions, and measurement of graphene quantum capacitance. The plasmonic and other emerging optical imaging techniques (e.g., dark field and fluorescence microscopy), together with the scanning probe-based electrochemical imaging and single nanoparticle analysis techniques, provide new capabilities for one to study single nanoparticle electrochemistry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. In this Account, we focus on imaging of electrochemical reactions at single nanoparticles.

  3. Local Surface-Plasmons in Nonspherical Metal Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chun-Chong; LU Yong-Hua; WANG Pei; MING Hai

    2007-01-01

    When a small metallic nanoparticleis irradiated by incident light, the oscillating electric field can cause the conduction electrons to oscillate coherently, which excites the local surface plasmons (LSPs). As is well known,excited LSPs can gather the energy of incident light to the surface of metallic nanoparticle. Recently, some nonspherical particles, e.g. tetrahedron, are suggested to obtain stronger localized electric field. We employ the discrete dipole approximation method to calculate the optical response of the tetrahedron nanoparticle, including the extinction and distribution of the electric field around the particle. The influences of some parameters,including the nanoparticle size, incident direction and polarization, are investigated to analyse the response modes and to obtain stronger localized electric field.

  4. Nonlocal inhomogeneous broadening in plasmonic nanoparticle ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Liu, Z.

    Nonclassical effects are increasingly more relevant in plasmonics as modern nanofabrication techniques rapidly approach the extreme nanoscale limits, for which departing from classical electrodynamics becomes important. One of the largest-scale necessary corrections towards this direction...... is to abandon the local response approximation (LRA) and take the nonlocal response of the metal into account, typically through the simple hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM), which predicts a sizedependent deviation of plasmon modes from the quasistatic (QS) limit. While this behaviour has been explored for simple...... averaging through both HDM and the recent Generalized Nonlocal Optical Response (GNOR) theory, which apart from the resonance frequency shifts accounts successfully for size-dependent damping as well. We examine NPs made of either ideal Drude-like metals [of plasmon frequency (wavelength) ωp (λp...

  5. Optical enhancement effects of plasmonic nanostructures on organic photovoltaic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hui Joon

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Hui Joon Park and L. Jay Guo. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society and Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved. In this article, the optical enhancement effects of plasmonic nanostructures on OPV cells were reviewed as an effective way to resolve the mismatch problems between the short exciton diffusion length in organic semiconductors (around 10 nm) and the large thickness required to fully absorb sunlight (e.g. hundreds of nanometers). Especially, the performances of OPVs with plasmonic nanoparticles in photoactive and buffer layers and with periodic nanostructures were investigated. Furthermore, nanoimprint lithography-based nanofabrication processes that can easily control the dimension and uniformity of structures for large-area and uniform plasmonic nanostructures were demonstrated.

  6. Tunable plasmon polaritons in arrays of interacting metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Guillaume; Mariani, Eros

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simple cubic array of metallic nanoparticles supporting extended collective plasmons that arise from the near-field dipolar interaction between localized surface plasmons in each nanoparticle. We develop a fully analytical quantum theory of the strong-coupling regime between these collective plasmons and photons resulting in plasmon polaritons in the nanoparticle array. Remarkably, we show that the polaritonic band gap and the dielectric function of the metamaterial can be significantly modulated by the polarization of light. We unveil how such an anisotropic behavior in the plasmonic metamaterial is crucially mediated by the dipolar interactions between the nanoparticles despite the symmetry of the underlying lattice. Our results thus pave the way towards the realization of tunable quantum plasmonic metamaterials presenting interaction-driven birefringence.

  7. Directional out-coupling of light from a plasmonic nanowire-nanoparticle junction

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Danveer; G., Aswathy V; Tripathi, Ravi; Kumar, G V Pavan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally show how a single Ag nanoparticle (NP) coupled to an Ag nanowire (NW) can convert propagating surface plasmon polaritons to directional photons. By employing dual-excitation Fourier microscopy with spatially filtered collection-optics, we show single- and dual-directional out-coupling of light from NW-NP junction for plasmons excited through glass-substrate and air-superstrate. Furthermore, we show NW-NP junction can influence the directionality of molecular-fluorescence emission, thus functioning as an optical antenna. The results discussed herein may have implications in realizing directional single-photon sources and quantum plasmon circuitry.

  8. Directional out-coupling of light from a plasmonic nanowire-nanoparticle junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Danveer; Dasgupta, Arindam; Aswathy, V G; Tripathi, Ravi P N; Pavan Kumar, G V

    2015-03-15

    We experimentally show how a single Ag nanoparticle (NP) coupled to an Ag nanowire (NW) can convert propagating surface plasmon polaritons to directional photons. By employing dual-excitation Fourier microscopy with spatially filtered collection-optics, we show single- and dual-directional out-coupling of light from NW-NP junction for plasmons excited through glass-substrate and air-superstrate. Furthermore, we show NW-NP junction can influence the directionality of molecular-fluorescence emission, thus functioning as an optical antenna. The results discussed herein may have implications in realizing directional single-photon sources and quantum plasmon circuitry.

  9. Plasmon-photon interaction in metal nanoparticles: Second-quantization perturbative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finazzi, Marco; Ciccacci, Franco

    2012-07-01

    We present a description of photon-plasmon interactions in metal nanoparticles based on the second quantization of electromagnetic fields and collective electron excitations. The quantum optical properties of nanostructured systems sustaining resonant charge oscillations will be derived by applying perturbation theory. The linear optical properties can be completely derived from the plasmon-photon coupling coefficients that apply to the particular particle material, environment, and geometry. Nonlinear electromagnetic phenomena such as second harmonic generation need instead to be described by explicitly accounting for the nonlinear corrections of the plasmon-photon interaction Hamiltonian.

  10. Controlled cellular fusion using optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Azra; Lund, Andreas R.; Semsey, Szabolcs; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-09-01

    Optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters are used to mediate efficient and controlled fusion of biological membranes. The fusion method is demonstrated by optically trapping plasmonic nanoparticles located in between vesicle membranes leading to rapid lipid and content mixing. As an interesting application we show how direct control over fusion can be used for studying diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins and their interactions with membranes and for studying protein reactions. Membrane proteins encapsulated in an inert vesicle can be transferred to a vesicle composed of negative lipids by optically induced fusion. Mixing of the two membranes results in a fused vesicle with a high affinity for the protein and we observe immediate membrane tubulation due to the activity of the protein. Fusion of distinct membrane compartments also has applications in small scale chemistry for realizing pico-liter reactions and offers many exciting applications within biology which are discussed here.

  11. Plasmonics with a Twist: Taming Optical Tornadoes on the Nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Boriskina, Svetlana V

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses a hydrodynamics-inspired approach to trap and manipulate light in plasmonic nanostructures, which is based on steering optical powerflow around nano-obstacles. New insights into plasmonic nanofocusing mechanisms are obtained by invoking an analogy of the 'photon fluid' (PF). By proper nanostructure design, PF kinetic energy can be locally increased via convective acceleration and then converted into 'pressure' energy to generate localized areas of high field intensity. In particular, trapped light can be molded into optical vortices -tornado-like areas of circular motion of power flux - connected into transmission-like sequences. In the electromagnetic theory terms, this approach is based on radiationless electromagnetic interference of evanescent fields rather than on interference of propagating waves radiated by the dipoles induced in nanoparticles. The resulting ability to manipulate optical powerflow well beyond the diffraction limit helps to reduce dissipative losses, to increase t...

  12. Experimental and Ab Initio Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ana M.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schwartzberg, Adam M.; Goddard, William A.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanostructures probe the nonequilibrium behavior of excited carriers, which involves several competing effects obscured in typical empirical analyses. Here we present pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanoparticles along with a complete theoretical description based on first-principles calculations of carrier dynamics and optical response, free of any fitting parameters. We account for detailed electronic-structure effects in the density of states, excited carrier distributions, electron-phonon coupling, and dielectric functions that allow us to avoid effective electron temperature approximations. Using this calculation method, we obtain excellent quantitative agreement with spectral and temporal features in transient-absorption measurements. In both our experiments and calculations, we identify the two major contributions of the initial response with distinct signatures: short-lived highly nonthermal excited carriers and longer-lived thermalizing carriers.

  13. Experimental and ab initio ultrafast carrier dynamics in plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Ana M; Narang, Prineha; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Goddard, William A; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanostructures probe the non-equilibrium behavior of excited carriers, which involves several competing effects obscured in typical empirical analyses. Here we present pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanoparticles along with a complete theoretical description based on first-principles calculations of carrier dynamics and optical response, free of any fitting parameters. We account for detailed electronic-structure effects in the density of states, excited carrier distributions, electron-phonon coupling, and dielectric functions which allow us to avoid effective electron temperature approximations. Using this calculation method, we obtain excellent quantitative agreement with spectral and temporal features in transient-absorption measurements. In both our experiments and calculations, we identify the two major contributions of the initial response with distinct signatures: short-lived highly non-thermal excited carriers and longer-lived thermalizing carriers.

  14. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  15. Reversible Gating of Plasmonic Coupling for Optical Signal Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Christopher G; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-07-20

    Amplification of optical signals is useful for a wide variety of applications, ranging from data signal transmission to chemical sensing and biomedical diagnostics. One such application in chemical sensing is surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), an important technique for increasing the Raman signal using the plasmonic effect of enhanced electromagnetic fields associated with metallic nanostructures. One of the most important limitations of SERS-based amplification is the difficulty to reproducibly control the SERS signal. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a unique hybrid system capable of producing reversible gating of plasmonic coupling for Raman signal amplification. The hybrid system is composed of two subsystems: (1) colloidal magneto-plasmonic nanoparticles for SERS enhancement and (2) a micromagnet substrate with an externally applied magnetic field to modulate the colloidal nanoparticles. For this proof of concept demonstration, the nanoparticles were labeled with a Raman-active dye, and it was shown that the detected SERS signal could be reproducibly modulated by controlling the externally applied magnetic field. The developed system provides a simple, robust, inexpensive, and reusable device for SERS signal modulation. These properties will open up new possibilities for optical signal amplification and gating as well for high-throughput, reproducible SERS detection.

  16. Engineering optical properties using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth

    Plasmonic nanostructures can be engineered to take on unusual optical properties not found in natural materials. The optical responses of plasmonic materials are functions of the structural parameters and symmetry of the nanostructures, material parameters of the nanostructure and its surroundings and the incidence angle, frequency and polarization state of light. The scattering and hence the visibility of an object could be reduced by coating it with a plasmonic material. In this thesis, presented is an optical frequency scattering cancelation device composed of a silicon nanorod coated by a plasmonic gold nanostructure. The principle of operation was theoretically analyzed using Mie theory and the device design was verified by extensive numerical simulations. The device was fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam milling. The optical responses of the scattering cancelation device and a control sample of bare silicon rod were directly visualized using near-field microscopy coupled with heterodyne interferometric detection. The experimental results were analyzed and found to match very well with theoretical prediction from numerical simulations thereby validating the design principles and our implementation. Plasmonic nanostructures could be engineered to exhibit unique optical properties such as Fano resonance characterized by narrow asymmetrical lineshape. We present dynamic tuning and symmetry lowering of Fano resonances in plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on flexible substrates. The tuning of Fano resonance was achieved by application of uniaxial mechanical stress. The design of the nanostructures was facilitated by extensive numerical simulations and the symmetry lowering was analyzed using group theoretical methods. The nanostructures were fabricated using electron beam lithography and optically characterized for various mechanical stress. The experimental results were in good

  17. Coherent Fano resonances in a plasmonic nanocluster enhance optical four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wen, Fangfang; Zhen, Yu-Rong; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoclusters, an ordered assembly of coupled metallic nanoparticles, support unique spectral features known as Fano resonances due to the coupling between their subradiant and superradiant plasmon modes. Within the Fano resonance, absorption is significantly enhanced, giving rise to highly localized, intense near fields with the potential to enhance nonlinear optical processes. Here, we report a structure supporting the coherent oscillation of two distinct Fano resonances within an individual plasmonic nanocluster. We show how this coherence enhances the optical four-wave mixing process in comparison with other double-resonant plasmonic clusters that lack this property. A model that explains the observed four-wave mixing features is proposed, which is generally applicable to any third-order process in plasmonic nanostructures. With a larger effective susceptibility χ(3) relative to existing nonlinear optical materials, this coherent double-resonant nanocluster offers a strategy for designing high-performance third-order nonlinear optical media. PMID:23690571

  18. Plasmonic optical trapping in biologically relevant media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Roxworthy

    Full Text Available We present plasmonic optical trapping of micron-sized particles in biologically relevant buffer media with varying ionic strength. The media consist of 3 cell-growth solutions and 2 buffers and are specifically chosen due to their widespread use and applicability to breast-cancer and angiogenesis studies. High-precision rheological measurements on the buffer media reveal that, in all cases excluding the 8.0 pH Stain medium, the fluids exhibit Newtonian behavior, thereby enabling straightforward measurements of optical trap stiffness from power-spectral particle displacement data. Using stiffness as a trapping performance metric, we find that for all media under consideration the plasmonic nanotweezers generate optical forces 3-4x a conventional optical trap. Further, plasmonic trap stiffness values are comparable to those of an identical water-only system, indicating that the performance of a plasmonic nanotweezer is not degraded by the biological media. These results pave the way for future biological applications utilizing plasmonic optical traps.

  19. Introduction to metal-nanoparticle plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Based on a popular article in Laser and Photonics Reviews, this book provides an explanation and overview of the techniques used to model, make, and measure metal nanoparticles, detailing results obtained and what they mean. It covers the properties of coupled metal nanoparticles, the nonlinear optical response of metal nanoparticles, and the phenomena that arise when light-emitting materials are coupled to metal nanoparticles. It also provides an overview of key potential applications and offers explanations of computational and experimental techniques giving readers a solid grounding

  20. Plasmonic properties of nanoparticle-film systems and periodic nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Fei

    In this thesis we perform theoretical investigations on the optical properties of geometrically infinite metallic nano-structures such as nanoparticle/film systems and periodic nanoparticle arrays. We apply both Plasmon Hybridization (PH) and Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) methods and we obtain quantitative agreement with experimental measurements as well as other theoretical methods such as Mie Theory and Finite Element simulation. For the nanoparticle over film structure, our research shows that the plasmonic interaction between the nanoparticle and the film is an electromagnetic analogue of the spinless Anderson-Fano model, which was used to describe the interaction of a localized electronic state with a continuous band of electronic states. Three characteristic regimes of the model are realized as the energy of the nanoparticle plasmon resonance lies above, within, or below the energy band of the surface plasmon state. These three interaction regimes are controlled by the film thickness. In the thin film limit, the plasmonic coupling between the nanoshell and the film induces a low-energy virtual state (VS) mainly composed of delocalized film, which can be further tuned as the aspect ratio of the nanoshell changes. The calculations are found to agree well with experimental measurements. Using FDTD method, we show that the electromagnetic field enhancement induced by the VS in the thin film limit can be very large and the nanoparticle/film system could serve as an ideal substrate for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) and Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS). The plasmonic properties of nanoparticle arrays are investigated using FDTD with Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBC). Our research shows that 2D hexagonal (hcp) nanoshell arrays possess ideal properties as a substrate that combines SERS and Surface Enhanced Infrared Absorption (SEIRA), with large electric field enhancements at the same spatial locations in the structure. With small

  1. Enhancing carrier generation in TiO2 by a synergistic effect between plasmon resonance in Ag nanoparticles and optical interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciato, Giuseppe; Bayle, Maxime; Pugliara, Alessandro; Bonafos, Caroline; Zimbone, Massimo; Privitera, Vittorio; Grimaldi, Maria Grazia; Carles, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been embedded at a few nanometer distance from the free surface of titania/silica multilayers using low energy ion beam synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of 3 nm-sized crystalline particles. Reflectance spectroscopy on these composite substrates shows an increase of the light capture efficiency in the visible range. This behaviour is interpreted as a synergistic effect between plasmon polariton resonance and Fabry-Perot interferences. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy is deeply used to analyze, on one hand confinement of vibrations and electronic excitations in Ag NPs, and on the other hand coupling of polar TiO2 phonons with injected photo-generated carriers. It is shown how these new Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films appear as very promising to enhance the efficiency and enlarge the spectral sensitivity of plasmo-electronics devices.Silver nanoparticles have been embedded at a few nanometer distance from the free surface of titania/silica multilayers using low energy ion beam synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of 3 nm-sized crystalline particles. Reflectance spectroscopy on these composite substrates shows an increase of the light capture efficiency in the visible range. This behaviour is interpreted as a synergistic effect between plasmon polariton resonance and Fabry-Perot interferences. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy is deeply used to analyze, on one hand confinement of vibrations and electronic excitations in Ag NPs, and on the other hand coupling of polar TiO2 phonons with injected photo-generated carriers. It is shown how these new Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films appear as very promising to enhance the efficiency and enlarge the spectral sensitivity of plasmo-electronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02406d

  2. Plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of spherical metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lamowski, Simon; Mariani, Eros; Weick, Guillaume; Pauly, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of interacting spherical metallic nanoparticles. Dipolar localized surface plasmons on each nanoparticle couple through the near field dipole-dipole interaction and form collective plasmons which extend over the whole metamaterial. Coupling these collective plasmons in turn to photons leads to plasmon polaritons. We derive within a quantum model general semi-analytical expressions to evaluate both plasmon and plasmon-polariton dispersions that fully account for nonlocal effects in the dielectric function of the metamaterial. Within this model, we discuss the influence of different lattice symmetries and predict related polaritonic gaps within the near-infrared to the visible range of the spectrum that depend on wavevector direction and polarization.

  3. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Downing, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudo-relativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunnelling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontriv...

  4. Surface plasmon polariton assisted optical pulling force

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, M I; Bogdanov, A A; Shalin, A S; Dogariu, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate both analytically and numerically the existence of optical pulling forces acting on particles located near plasmonic interfaces. Two main factors contribute to the appearance of this negative reaction force. The interference between the incident and reflected waves induces a rotating dipole with an asymmetric scattering pattern while the directional excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) enhances the linear momentum of scattered light. The strongly asymmetric SPP excitation is determined by spin-orbit coupling of the rotating dipole and surface plasmon polariton. As a result of the total momentum conservation, the force acting on the particle points in a direction opposite to the incident wave propagation. We derive analytical expressions for the force acting on a dipolar particles placed in the proximity of plasmonic surfaces. Analytical expressions for this pulling force are derived within the dipole approximation and are in excellent agreement with results of electromagnetic numerica...

  5. Gold Nanoparticles for Plasmonic Biosensing: The Role of Metal Crystallinity and Nanoscale Roughness

    CERN Document Server

    Tinguely, Jean-Claude; Leiner, Claude; Grand, Johan; Hohenau, Andreas; Felidj, Nordin; Aubard, Jean; Krenn, Joachim R

    2011-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles show specific optical properties due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons that make them attractive candidates for highly sensitive bionanosensors. The underlying physical principle is either an analyte-induced modification of the dielectric properties of the medium surrounding the nanoparticle or an increase of the excitation and emission rates of an optically active analyte by the resonantly enhanced plasmon field. Either way, besides the nanoparticle geometry the dielectric properties of the metal and nanoscale surface roughness play an important role for the sensing performance. As the underlying principles are however not yet well understood, we aim here at an improved understanding by analyzing the optical characteristics of lithographically fabricated nanoparticles with different crystallinity and roughness parameters. We vary these parameters by thermal annealing and apply a thin gold film as a model system to retrieve modifications in the dielectric function. We i...

  6. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-08

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.

  7. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle. PMID:24201454

  8. Plasmon-assisted optical vias for photonic ASICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skogen, Erik J.; Vawter, Gregory A.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to optical vias to optically connect multilevel optical circuits. In one example, the optical via includes a surface plasmon polariton waveguide, and a first optical waveguide formed on a first substrate is coupled to a second optical waveguide formed on a second substrate by the surface plasmon polariton waveguide. In some embodiments, the first optical waveguide includes a transition region configured to convert light from an optical mode to a surface plasmon polariton mode or from a surface plasmon polariton mode to an optical mode.

  9. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Navas M., P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  10. Nanomanipulation and controlled self-assembly of metal nanoparticles and nanocrystals for plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Hung-Ying; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Sun, Liuyang; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-21

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) associated with metallic nanostructures offer unique possibilities for light concentration beyond the diffraction limit, which can lead to strong field confinement and enhancement in deep subwavelength regions. In recent years, many transformative plasmonic applications have emerged, taking advantage of the spectral and spatial tunability of LSPRs enabled by near-field coupling between constituent metallic nanostructures in a variety of plasmonic metastructures (dimers, metamolecules, metasurfaces, metamaterials, etc.). For example, the "hot spot" formed at the interstitial site (gap) between two coupled metallic nanostructures in a plasmonic dimer can be spectrally tuned via the gap size. Capitalizing on these capabilities, there have been significant advances in plasmon enhanced or enabled applications in light-based science and technology, including ultrahigh-sensitivity spectroscopies, light energy harvesting, photocatalysis, biomedical imaging and theranostics, optical sensing, nonlinear optics, ultrahigh-density data storage, as well as plasmonic metamaterials and metasurfaces exhibiting unusual linear and nonlinear optical properties. In this review, we present two complementary approaches for fabricating plasmonic metastructures. We discuss how meta-atoms can be assembled into unique plasmonic metastructures using a variety of nanomanipulation methods based on single- or multiple-probes in an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical tweezers, and focused electron-beam nanomanipulation. We also provide a few examples of nanoparticle metamolecules with designed properties realized in such well-controlled plasmonic metastructures. For the spatial controllability on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales, we show that controlled self-assembly is the method of choice to realize scalable two-dimensional, and three-dimensional plasmonic metastructures. In the section of applications

  11. Plasmonic nanoparticles tuned thermal sensitive photonic polymer for biomimetic chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang; Liu, Lin; Cai, Zihe; Xu, Jiwen; Xu, Zhou; Zhang, Di; Hu, Xiaobin

    2016-08-01

    Among many thermo-photochromic materials, the color-changing behavior caused by temperature and light is usually lack of a full color response. And the study on visible light-stimuli chromic response is rarely reported. Here, we proposed a strategy to design a thermo-photochromic chameleon biomimetic material consisting of photonic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) copolymer and plasmonic nanoparticles which has a vivid color change triggered by temperature and light like chameleons. We make use of the plasmonic nanoparticles like gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of the responsive behavior and control the lower critical solution temperature of the thermosensitive films by tuning the polymer chain conformation transition. Finally, it is possible that this film would have colorimetric responses to the entire VIS spectrum by the addition of different plasmonic nanoparticles to tune the plasmonic excitation wavelength. As a result, this method provides a potential use in new biosensors, military and many other aspects.

  12. From nano-plasmonic optics toward molecules bio-sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai-Hung

    A systematic study on optical properties of nano-metallic particles was investigated. Nano metallic particle plasmon resonant peak wavelengths are significantly red-shifted from that of a single particle because of near-field coupling when two nano-particles are placed closer to each other. The shift decays approximately exponentially with increasing particle spacing and become negligible when the gap between the two particles exceeds about 2.5 times the particle short-axis length. While resonant peak of a finite 1D nano-particles chain is also significantly red-shifted, the peak wavelength is found to be non-monotonic and oscillating with the variation of the chain length. The results shown to occurs only for larger particles where phase retardation effects are important in plasmon coupling. Based on the coupling results from nano-particle interaction studies, we develop a new type of tunable plasmon resonance nano-particles, named tunable nano-plasmonic resonator (TNPR) which consists multi-layered Au/SiO2 nanodisks. Compared to single layered Au nanodisks, multilayered nanodisks TNPR exhibit several distinctive properties including significantly enhanced plasmon resonances and tunable resonance wavelengths which can be tailored to desired values by simply varying dielectric layer thickness while the particle diameter is kept constant. This tunable and augmented plasmon resonance holds a great potential in the applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Characterized TNPR enhancement factor reaches as high as 4.7 x 10 10 for individual TNPRs, among the highest enhancement factor reported in single nanoparticle, indicating that our designed TNPR can serve as a great SERS active-substrate by matching the laser pumping frequency to maximize SERS enhancement. TNPR design was implemented for real bio-application. The sensitivity of non-optimized TNPR for in vitro proteolytic PSA assays reaches to 6pM. Compared to other cancer biomarker detection assays

  13. Ultrasensitive Detection of a Protein by Optical Trapping in a Photonic-Plasmonic Microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago-Cordoba, Miguel A; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Vollmer, Frank; Demirel, Melik C

    2012-01-01

    Microcavity and whispering gallery mode (WGM) biosensors derive their sensitivity from monitoring frequency shifts induced by protein binding at sites of highly confined field intensities, where field strengths can be further amplified by excitation of plasmon resonances in nanoparticle layers. Here, we propose a mechanism based on optical trapping of a protein at the site of plasmonic field enhancements for achieving ultra sensitive detection in only microliter-scale sample volumes, and in real-time. We demonstrate femto-Molar sensitivity corresponding to a few 1000s of macromolecules. Simulations based on Mie theory agree well with the optical trapping concept at plasmonic 'hotspots' locations.

  14. Porous silicon photoluminescence modification by colloidal gold nanoparticles: Plasmonic, surface and porosity roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, M.B. de la; Bornacelli, J. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Nava, R. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Zanella, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Reyes-Esqueda, J.A., E-mail: betarina@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Metal nanoparticles on semiconductors are of interest because of the tunable effect of the surface plasmon resonance on the physical properties of the semiconductor. In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles obtained by two different methods, with an average size of 6.1±2.0 nm and 5.0±2.0 nm, were added to luminescent porous silicon by drop casting. The gold nanoparticles interact with porous silicon by modifying its optical properties such as photoluminescence. That being said, plasmon effects are not the only to be taken into account; as shown in this work, surface chemical modification and porosity also play a key role in the final performance of photoluminescence of a porous silicon–gold nanoparticle hybrid system. -- Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of porous silicon and gold nanoparticles was fabricated. • Porous silicon/gold nanoparticle hybrid material was made by drop casting. • Influence of plasmonics, surface chemical modification and porosity on the optical behavior of our material was analyzed. • Porosity is proposed as a parameter control to obtain the best effects on luminescence of the hybrid plasmonic material.

  15. On the optical properties of plasmonic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Langhammer, Christoph; Apell, S. Peter

    2014-12-01

    We report on the optical properties of plasmonic glasses which are metal-dielectric composites composed of metallic inclusions in a host dielectric medium. The investigated structures are of quasi-random nature, described by the pair correlation function, featuring a minimum center-to-center distance between metallic inclusions and long range randomness. Plasmonic glasses exhibiting short-range order only may be fabricated using bottom-up, self-assembly methods and have been utilized in a number of applications such as plasmonic sensing or plasmon-enhanced solar harvesting, and may be also employed for certain non-linear applications. It is therefore important to quantify their properties. Using theoretical methods we investigate optical of 1D, 2D, and 3D structures composed of amorphous distributions of metallic spheres. It is shown, that the response of the constituent element, i.e. the single sphere localized surface plasmon resonance, is modified by the scattered fields of the other spheres in such a way that its peak position, peak amplitude, and full-width at half-maximum exhibit damped oscillations. The oscillation amplitude is set by the particle density and for the peak position may vary by up to 0.3 eV in the optical regime. Using a modified coupled dipole approach we calculate the effective (average) polarizability of plasmonic glasses and discuss their spectra as a function of the dimensionality, angle of incidence and polarization, and the minimum center-to-center distance. The analytical model is complemented and validated by T-Matrix calculations of the optical cross-sections of amorphous arrays of metallic spheres obtained using a modification of the Random Sequential Adsorption algorithm for lines, surfaces, and volumes.

  16. Gold nanoparticles: Optical properties and implementations in cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohua Huang; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2010-01-01

    Currently a popular area in nanomedicine is the implementation of plasmonic gold nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy, attributed to the intriguing optical properties of the nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance, a unique phenomenon to plasmonic (noble metal) nanoparticles leads to strong electromagnetic fields on the particle surface and consequently enhances all the radiative properties such as absorption and scattering. Additionally, the strongly absorbed ligh...

  17. Transverse optical plasmons in layered superconductors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMarel, D; Tsvetkov, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the possible existance of transverse optical plasma modes in superlattices consisting of Josephson coupled superconducting layers. These modes appear as resonances in the current-current correlation function, as opposed to the usual plasmons which are poles in the density-density channel.

  18. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  19. Light-driven transport of plasmonic nanoparticles on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Laser traps provide contactless manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) boosting the development of numerous applications in science and technology. The known trapping configurations allow immobilizing and moving single NPs or assembling them, but they are not suitable for massive optical transport of NPs along arbitrary trajectories. Here, we address this challenging problem and demonstrate that it can be handled by exploiting phase gradients forces to both confine and propel the NPs. The developed optical manipulation tool allows for programmable transport routing of NPs to around, surround or impact on objects in the host environment. An additional advantage is that the proposed confinement mechanism works for off-resonant but also resonant NPs paving the way for transport with simultaneous heating, which is of interest for targeted drug delivery and nanolithography. These findings are highly relevant to many technological applications including micro/nano-fabrication, micro-robotics and biomedicine. PMID:27645257

  20. Light-driven transport of plasmonic nanoparticles on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2016-09-01

    Laser traps provide contactless manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) boosting the development of numerous applications in science and technology. The known trapping configurations allow immobilizing and moving single NPs or assembling them, but they are not suitable for massive optical transport of NPs along arbitrary trajectories. Here, we address this challenging problem and demonstrate that it can be handled by exploiting phase gradients forces to both confine and propel the NPs. The developed optical manipulation tool allows for programmable transport routing of NPs to around, surround or impact on objects in the host environment. An additional advantage is that the proposed confinement mechanism works for off-resonant but also resonant NPs paving the way for transport with simultaneous heating, which is of interest for targeted drug delivery and nanolithography. These findings are highly relevant to many technological applications including micro/nano-fabrication, micro-robotics and biomedicine.

  1. Suppression of surface plasmon resonance in Au nanoparticles upon transition to the liquid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, V S; Ershov, A E; Gavrilyuk, A P; Karpov, S V; Ågren, H; Polyutov, S P

    2016-11-14

    Significant suppression of resonant properties of single gold nanoparticles at the surface plasmon frequency during heating and subsequent transition to the liquid state has been demonstrated experimentally and explained for the first time. The results for plasmonic absorption of the nanoparticles have been analyzed by means of Mie theory using experimental values of the optical constants for the liquid and solid metal. The good qualitative agreement between calculated and experimental spectra support the idea that the process of melting is accompanied by an abrupt increase of the relaxation constants, which depends, beside electron-phonon coupling, on electron scattering at a rising number of lattice defects in a particle upon growth of its temperature, and subsequent melting as a major cause for the observed plasmonic suppression. It is emphasized that observed effect is fully reversible and may underlie nonlinear optical responses of nanocolloids and composite materials containing plasmonic nanoparticles and their aggregates in conditions of local heating and in general, manifest itself in a wide range of plasmonics phenomena associated with strong heating of nanoparticles.

  2. Fully understanding the positive roles of plasmonic nanoparticles in ameliorating the efficiency of organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Dan; Lu, Shudi; Xu, Rui; Liu, Kong; Cao, Dawei; Wen, Liaoyong; Mi, Yan; Wang, Zhijie; Lei, Yong; Qu, Shengchun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2015-09-01

    Herein, we constructed inverted PBDTTT-CF:PC70BM bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles to a ZnO buffer layer and a great improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been realized. To discover the positive roles of such plasmonic nanoparticles in the process of solar energy conversion, photovoltaic devices with the same architecture but different sized Au nanoparticles were purposely fabricated and it has been observed that the overall efficiency can be remarkably improved from 6.67% to 7.86% by embedding 41 nm Au nanoparticles in the buffer layer. The devices with other sizes of Au nanoparticles show a relatively low performance. Subsequent investigations including finite difference time domain simulation and transient photoluminescence studies reveal that the existence of the plasmonic particles could not only improve the optical absorption and facilitate the exciton separation, but can also benefit the collection of charge carriers. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive perspective on the roles of plasmonic particles in organic solar cells and insights into the photo energy conversion process in the plasmonic surroundings.Herein, we constructed inverted PBDTTT-CF:PC70BM bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles to a ZnO buffer layer and a great improvement in energy conversion efficiency has been realized. To discover the positive roles of such plasmonic nanoparticles in the process of solar energy conversion, photovoltaic devices with the same architecture but different sized Au nanoparticles were purposely fabricated and it has been observed that the overall efficiency can be remarkably improved from 6.67% to 7.86% by embedding 41 nm Au nanoparticles in the buffer layer. The devices with other sizes of Au nanoparticles show a relatively low performance. Subsequent investigations including finite difference time domain simulation and transient photoluminescence studies reveal that the

  3. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Yajie Jiang; Supriya Pillai; GREEN Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik’s 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative prope...

  4. Optical field enhancement by strong plasmon interaction in graphene nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2013-05-01

    The ability of plasmons to enhance the electromagnetic field intensity in the gap between metallic nanoparticles derives from their strong optical confinement relative to the light wavelength. The spatial extension of plasmons in doped graphene has recently been shown to be boldly reduced with respect to conventional plasmonic metals. Here, we show that graphene nanostructures are capable of capitalizing such strong confinement to yield unprecedented levels of field enhancement, well beyond what is found in noble metals of similar dimensions (~ tens of nanometers). We perform realistic, quantum-mechanical calculations of the optical response of graphene dimers formed by nanodisks and nanotriangles, showing a strong sensitivity of the level of enhancement to the type of carbon edges near the gap region, with armchair edges favoring stronger interactions than zigzag edges. Our quantum-mechanical description automatically incorporates nonlocal effects that are absent in classical electromagnetic theory, leading to over an order of magnitude higher enhancement in armchair structures. The classical limit is recovered for large structures. We predict giant levels of light concentration for dimers ~200 nm, leading to infrared-absorption enhancement factors ~10(8). This extreme light enhancement and confinement in nanostructured graphene has great potential for optical sensing and nonlinear devices.

  5. Plasmon enhanced broadband optical absorption in ultrathin silicon nanobowl array for photoactive devices applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Nan; Peng, Kui-Qing; Hu, Bo; Hu, Ya; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2015-07-01

    Both photonic and plasmonic nanostructures are key optical components of photoactive devices for light harvesting, enabling solar cells with significant thickness reduction, and light detectors capable of detecting photons with sub-band gap energies. In this work, we study the plasmon enhanced broadband light absorption and electrical properties of silicon nanobowl (SiNB) arrays. The SiNB-metal photonic-plasmonic nanostructure-based devices exhibited superior light-harvesting ability across a wide range of wavelengths up to the infrared regime well below the band edge of Si due to effective optical coupling between the SiNB array and incident sunlight, as well as electric field intensity enhancement around metal nanoparticles due to localized surface plasmon resonance. The photonic-plasmonic nanostructure is expected to result in infrared-light detectors and high-efficiency solar cells by extending light-harvesting to infrared frequencies.

  6. Omnidirectional excitation of sidewall gap-plasmons in a hybrid gold-nanoparticle/aluminum-nanopore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumdee, Chatdanai; Kik, Pieter G.

    2016-06-01

    The gap-plasmon resonance of a gold nanoparticle inside a nanopore in an aluminum film is investigated in polarization dependent single particle microscopy and spectroscopy. Scattering and transmission measurements reveal that gap-plasmons of this structure can be excited and observed under normal incidence excitation and collection, in contrast to the more common particle-on-a-mirror structure. Correlation of numerical simulations with optical spectroscopy suggests that a local electric field enhancement factor in excess of 50 is achieved under normal incidence excitation, with a hot-spot located near the top surface of the structure. It is shown that the strong field enhancement from this sidewall gap-plasmon mode can be efficiently excited over a broad angular range. The presented plasmonic structure lends itself to implementation in low-cost, chemically stable, easily addressable biochemical sensor arrays providing large optical field enhancement factors.

  7. Influence of localized surface plasmons on Pauli blocking and optical limiting in graphene under femtosecond pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem B.; Namboodiri, Raman C. K.; Nayak, Pranati; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Kelly, Thomas J.; Fallon, Colm; Costello, John T.

    2014-08-01

    The Pauli blocking limit and optical limiting threshold have been found to be modified following silver-nanoparticle decoration of functionalized hydrogen induced exfoliated graphene. Femtosecond Z-scan experiments have been used to measure the Pauli blocking range, optical limiting threshold, and the third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3)) values. The observed results have been explained by modified band structure of graphene in the presence of silver nanoparticles and their localized surface plasmon resonances.

  8. Silver nanoparticles from silver halide photography to plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Tani, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    This book provides systematic knowledge and ideas on nanoparticles of Ag and related materials. While Ag and metal nanoparticles are essential for plasmonics, silver halide (AgX) photography relies to a great extent on nanoparticles of Ag and AgX which have the same crystal structure and have been studied extensively for many years. This book has been written to combine the knowledge of nanoparticles of Ag and related materials in plasmonics and AgX photography in order to provide new ideas for metal nanoparticles in plasmonics. Chapters 1–3 of this book describe the structure and formation of nanoparticles of Ag and related materials. Systematic descriptions of the structure and preparation of Ag, Au, and noble-metal nanoparticles for plasmonics are followed by and related to those of nanoparticles of Ag and AgX in AgX photography. Knowledge of the structure and preparation of Ag and AgX nanoparticles in photography covers nanoparticles with widely varying sizes, shapes, and structures, and formation proce...

  9. Optical properties of metallic nanoparticles basic principles and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Trügler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fascinating world of plasmonics and physics at the nanoscale, with a focus on simulations and the theoretical aspects of optics and nanotechnology. A research field with numerous applications, plasmonics bridges the gap between the micrometer length scale of light and the secrets of the nanoworld. This is achieved by binding light to charge density oscillations of metallic nanostructures, so-called surface plasmons, which allow electromagnetic radiation to be focussed down to spots as small as a few nanometers. The book is a snapshot of recent and ongoing research and at the same time outlines our present understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles, ranging from the tunability of plasmonic resonances to the ultrafast dynamics of light-matter interaction. Beginning with a gentle introduction that highlights the basics of plasmonic interactions and plasmon imaging, the author then presents a suitable theoretical framework for the description of metallic nanostructu...

  10. Quantifying lipid contents in enveloped virus particles with plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizpour, Amin; Yu, Xinwei; Akiyama, Hisashi; Miller, Caitlin M; Edmans, Ethan; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Reinhard, Björn M

    2015-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1 ) are examples of two host-derived lipids in the membrane of enveloped virus particles that are known to contribute to virus attachment, uptake, and ultimately dissemination. A quantitative characterization of their contribution to the functionality of the virus requires information about their relative concentrations in the viral membrane. Here, a gold nanoparticle (NP) binding assay for probing relative PS and GM1 lipid concentrations in the outer leaflet of different HIV-1 and Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) using sample sizes of less than 3 × 10(6) particles is introduced. The assay evaluates both scattering intensity and resonance wavelength, and determines relative NP densities through plasmon coupling as a measure for the target lipid concentrations in the NP-labeled VLP membrane. A correlation of the optical observables with absolute lipid contents is achieved by calibration of the plasmon coupling-based methodology with unilamellar liposomes of known PS or GM1 concentration. The performed studies reveal significant differences in the membrane of VLPs that assemble at different intracellular sites and pave the way to an optical quantification of lipid concentration in virus particles at physiological titers.

  11. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are compa......Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold...... are compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...... for complex particle geometries....

  12. Collective plasmon modes in a compositionally asymmetric nanoparticle dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyi Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon coupling phenomenon of heterodimers composed of silver, gold and copper nanoparticles of 60 nm in size and spherical in shape were studied theoretically within the scattered field formulation framework. In-phase dipole coupled σ-modes were observed for the Ag-Au and Ag-Cu heterodimers, and an antiphase dipole coupled π-mode was observed for the Ag-Au heterodimer. These observations agree well with the plasmon hybridization theory. However, quadrupole coupled modes dominate the high energy wavelength range from 357-443 nm in the scattering cross section of the D=60 nm Ag-Au and Ag-Cu heterodimer. We demonstrate for the first time that collective plasmon modes in a compositionally asymmetric nanoparticle dimer have to be predicted from the dipole-dipole approximation of plasmon hybridization theory together with the interband transition effect of the constitutive metals and the retardation effect of the nanoparticle size.

  13. Plasmonic Route to Reconfigurable Polarization Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Tang, X M; Wang, S M; Wang, Q J; Zhu, S N

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) as a bounded mode on a metal/dielectric interface intrinsically has a definite transverse magnetic (TM) polarization that usually lacks further manipulations. However, the in-plane longitudinal components of SPP field can produce versatile polarization states when two orthogonal propagating SPP interfere with each other. Here, we demonstrated a plasmonic polarization router by designing appropriate nanohole arrays that can selectively scatter the interfered SPP fields to desired light beams. It is well proved that our device is able to reconfigure a certain input polarization to all kinds of states with respect to a scattered light. Accompanied with a composite phase modulation by diffractions, multiple focusing beams with different polarization states are simultaneously achieved, promising the possibility in polarization multiplexing and related signal processing. Our design offers a new route for achieving full control of the optical polarizations as well as the optical spin-...

  14. Optical Properties and Biological Applications of Electromagnetically Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan Nathan

    The optical properties of metallic particles change dramatically as the size shrinks to the nanoscale. The familiar mirror-like sheen of bulk metals is replaced by the bright, sharp, colorful plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles. The resonances of plasmonic metal nanoparticles are highly tunable throughout the visible spectrum, depending on the size, shape, local dielectric environment, and proximity to other optical resonances. Fundamental and applied research in the nanoscience community in the past few decades has sought to understand and exploit these phenomena for biological applications. In this work, discrete nanoparticle assemblies were produced through biomolecular interactions and studied at the single particle level with darkfield spectroscopy. Pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered by DNA were utilized as molecular rulers to study the dynamics of DNA bending by the restriction enzyme EcoRV. These results substantiated that nanoparticle rulers, deemed "plasmon rulers", could measure the dynamics of single biomolecules with high throughput, long lifetime, and high temporal resolution. To extend these concepts for live cell studies, a plasmon ruler comprised of peptide-linked gold nanoparticle satellites around a core particle was synthesized and utilized to optically follow cell signaling pathways in vivo at the single molecule level. The signal provided by these plasmon rulers allowed continuous observation of caspase-3 activation at the single molecule level in living cells for over 2 hours, unambiguously identifying early stage activation of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells. In the last section of this dissertation, an experimental and theoretical study of electomagnetic coupling in asymmetric metal nanoparticle dimers is presented. A "heterodimer" composed of a silver particle and a gold particle is observed to have a novel coupling between a plasmon mode (free electron oscillations) and an inter-band absorption process (bound electron transitions). The

  15. Restructuring of plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates with arbitrary particle size distribution in pulsed laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied processes of interaction of pulsed laser radiation with resonant groups of plasmonic nanoparticles (resonant domains) in large colloidal nanoparticle aggregates having different interparticle gaps and particle size distributions. These processes are responsible for the origin of nonlinear optical effects and photochromic reactions in multiparticle aggregates. To describe photo-induced transformations in resonant domains and alterations in their absorption spectra remaining after the pulse action, we introduce the factor of spectral photomodification. Based on calculation of changes in thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical characteristics of the domains, the histograms of the spectrum photomodification factor have been obtained for various interparticle gaps, an average particle size, and the degree of polydispersity. Variations in spectra have been analyzed depending on the intensity of laser radiation and various combinations of size characteristics of domains. The obtained results can be used to predict manifestation of photochromic effects in composite materials containing different plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates in pulsed laser fields.

  16. Subwavelength modulational instability and plasmon oscillons in nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Noskov, Roman E; Kivshar, Yuri S; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.093901

    2012-01-01

    We study modulational instability in nonlinear arrays of subwavelength metallic nanoparticles, and analyze numerically nonlinear scenarios of the instability development. We demonstrate that modulational instability can lead to the formation of regular periodic or quasi-periodic modulations of the polarization. We reveal that such nonlinear nanoparticle arrays can support long-lived standing and moving oscillating nonlinear localized modes - plasmon oscillons.

  17. Photogalvanic Effect in Plasmonic Non-Centrosymmetric Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; Uskov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of metamaterials containing asymmetrically shaped, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Due to the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is the direct analogy of the photogalvanic effect known to exist in media with certain asymmetries in their crystal structure, such as lithium niobate or quartz. Termed the plasmonic bulk photovoltaic (or photogalvanic) effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures, and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications.

  18. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Charles A.; Weick, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudorelativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunneling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontrivial Zak phase, which predicts the manifestation of edge states in the chain. When two dimerized chains with different topological phases are connected, we find the appearance of the bosonic version of a Jackiw-Rebbi midgap state. We further investigate the radiative and nonradiative lifetimes of the collective plasmonic excitations and comment on the challenges for experimental realization of the topological effects found theoretically.

  19. Evolution of nonlinear optical properties: from gold atomic clusters to plasmonic nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Reji; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Thomas, Jayan

    2012-09-12

    Atomic clusters of metals are an emerging class of extremely interesting materials occupying the intermediate size regime between atoms and nanoparticles. Here we report the nonlinear optical (NLO) characteristics of ultrasmall, atomically precise clusters of gold, which are smaller than the critical size for electronic energy quantization (∼2 nm). Our studies reveal remarkable features of the distinct evolution of the optical nonlinearity as the clusters progress in size from the nonplasmonic regime to the plasmonic regime. We ascertain that the smallest atomic clusters do not show saturable absorption at the surface plasmon wavelength of larger gold nanocrystals (>2 nm). Consequently, the third-order optical nonlinearity in these ultrasmall gold clusters exhibits a significantly lower threshold for optical power limiting. This limiting efficiency, which is superior to that of plasmonic nanocrystals, is highly beneficial for optical limiting applications.

  20. Synthesis of self-assembly plasmonic silver nanoparticles with tunable luminescence color

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghamdi, Haifa S.; Mahmoud, Waleed E., E-mail: w_e_mahmoud@yahoo.com

    2014-01-15

    Assembly is an elegant and effective bottom-up approach to prepare arrays of nanoparticles from nobel metals. Noble metal nanoparticles are perfect building blocks because they can be prepared with an adequate functionalization to allow their assembly and with controlled sizes. Herein, we report a novel recipe for the synthesis of self-assembled silver nanoparticles with tunable optical properties and sizes. The synthetic route followed here based on the covalent binding among silver nanoparticles by means of poly vinyl alcohol for the first time. The size of silver nanoparticle is governed by varying the amount of sodium borohydride. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction and UV–vis spectroscopy. Results depicted that self-assembly of mono-dispersed silver nanoparticles with different sizes have been achieved. The silver nanostructure has a single crystalline faced centered cubic structure with growth orientation along (1 1 1) facet. These nanoparticles exhibited localized surface plasmon resonance at 403 nm. The luminescence peaks were red-sifted from violet to green due to the increase of the particle sizes. -- Highlights: • Self-assembled silver nanoparticles based PVA were synthesized. • NaBH{sub 4} amount was found particle size dependent. • Silver nanoparticles strongly affected the surface plasmon resonance. • Highly symmetric luminescence emission band narrow width is obtained. • Dark field image showed a tunable color change from violet to green.

  1. Optical Twist Induced by Plasmonic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Neng; Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Harvesting light for optical torque is of significant importance, owing to its ability to rotate nano- or micro-objects. Nevertheless, applying a strong optical torque remains a challenging task: angular momentum must conserve but light is limited. A simple argument shows the tendency for two objects with strong mutual scattering or light exchange to exhibit a conspicuously enhanced optical torque without large extinction or absorption cross section. The torque on each object is almost equal but opposite, which we called optical twist. The effect is quite significant for plasmonic particle cluster, but can also be observed in structures with other morphologies. Such approach exhibits an unprecedentedly large torque to light extinction or absorption ratio, enabling limited light to exert a relatively large torque without severe heating. Our work contributes to the understanding of optical torque and introduces a novel way to manipulate the internal degrees of freedom of a structured particle cluster.

  2. Gold nanoparticles: Optical properties and implementations in cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Huang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently a popular area in nanomedicine is the implementation of plasmonic gold nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy, attributed to the intriguing optical properties of the nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance, a unique phenomenon to plasmonic (noble metal nanoparticles leads to strong electromagnetic fields on the particle surface and consequently enhances all the radiative properties such as absorption and scattering. Additionally, the strongly absorbed light is converted to heat quickly via a series of nonradiative processes. In this review, we discuss these important optical and photothermal properties of gold nanoparticles in different shapes and structures and address their recent applications for cancer imaging, spectroscopic detection and photothermal therapy.

  3. All-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits: integrating nanowire plasmonics with fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyuan; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin; Lou, Jingyi; Tong, Limin

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate all-fiber hybrid photon-plasmon circuits by integrating Ag nanowires with optical fibers. Relying on near-field coupling, we realize a photon-to-plasmon conversion efficiency up to 92% in a fiber-based nanowire plasmonic probe. Around optical communication band, we assemble an all-fiber resonator and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with Q-factor of 6 × 10(6) and extinction ratio up to 30 dB, respectively. Using the MZI, we demonstrate fiber-compatible plasmonic sensing with high sensitivity and low optical power.

  4. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jer-Shing; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2015-06-12

    Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  5. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Shing Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  6. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  7. Promoting optofluidic actuation of microparticles with plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Julien; Si, Satyabrata; Delville, Marie-Hélène; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The amplitude of optical forces on flowing dielectric microparticles can be actuated by coating them partially with metallic nanospheres and exposing them to laser light within the surface plasmon resonance. Here, optical forces on both pure silica particles and silica-gold raspberries are characterized within an optical chromatography setup by measuring the Stokes drag versus laser beam power. Results are compared to Mie theory predictions for both core dielectric particles and core-shell ones where the shell is described by a continuous dielectricmetal composite of dielectric constant determined from the Maxwell Garnett approach. The nice observed quantitative agreement demonstrates that radiation pressure forces are directly related to the metal concentration present at the microparticle surface and that nano-metallic objects increase the magnitude of optical forces compared to pure dielectric particles of the same overall size, even at very low metal concentration. Behaving as "micro-sized nanoparticles", the benefit of microparticles coated with metallic nanospheres is thus twofold: (i) to enhance optofluidic manipulation and transport at the microscale and (ii) to increase sensing capabilities at the nanoscale, compared to separated pure dielectric particles and single metallic nanosystems.

  8. Narrow optical filtering with plasmonic nanoshells

    CERN Document Server

    Martynov, Y B; Tanachev, I A; Gladyshev, P P

    2011-01-01

    Narrow optical band pass filters are widely used in systems with optical processing of information, color displays development and optical computers. We show that such ultra filters can be created by means of nanoparticles which consist of a dielectric sphere and a metallic shell. The components can be adjusted such that there is a remarkable transparency at the desired wavelength range, while a strong absorption takes place outside of this region.

  9. Nonradiative limitations to plasmon propagation in chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Brandstetter-Kunc, Adam; Downing, Charles A; Weinmann, Dietmar; Jalabert, Rodolfo A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the collective plasmonic modes in a chain of metallic nanoparticles that are coupled by near-field interactions. The size- and momentum-dependent nonradiative Landau damping and radiative decay rates are calculated analytically within an open quantum system approach. These decay rates determine the excitation propagation along the chain. In particular, the behavior of the radiative decay rate as a function of the plasmon wavelength leads to a transition from an exponential decay of the collective excitation for short distances to an algebraic decay for large distances. Importantly, we show that the exponential decay is of a purely nonradiative origin. Our transparent model enables us to provide analytical expressions for the polarization-dependent plasmon excitation profile along the chain and for the associated propagation length. Our theoretical analysis constitutes an important step in the quest for the optimal conditions for plasmonic propagation in nanoparticle chains.

  10. Plasmonic Non-linear Conversion of Continuous Wave Light by Gold Nanoparticle Clusters withFluorescent Protein Loaded Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method which is feasible for deterministic activation of few molecules. Our method relies on non-linear optical excitation of few enhanced yellow fluorescent protein molecules that are sandwiched between gaps of asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that as infrared photons, which cannot get absorbed by fluorescent molecules, are converted through efficient second harmonic generation activity of gold nanoparticles to visible photons, the molecules absorb them and fluoresce. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that observation of SHG with cw laser becomes possible owing to the cooperative action of conversion enhancement through Fano resonance, hybridization in the plasmon absorption spectrum and the size asymmetry of nanoparticle dimers.

  11. All-optical generation of surface plasmons in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, T. J.; Hornett, S. M.; Chang, D. E.; Hendry, E.

    2016-02-01

    Surface plasmons in graphene offer a compelling route to many useful photonic technologies. As a plasmonic material, graphene offers several intriguing properties, such as excellent electro-optic tunability, crystalline stability, large optical nonlinearities and extremely high electromagnetic field concentration. As such, recent demonstrations of surface plasmon excitation in graphene using near-field scattering of infrared light have received intense interest. Here we present an all-optical plasmon coupling scheme which takes advantage of the intrinsic nonlinear optical response of graphene. Free-space, visible light pulses are used to generate surface plasmons in a planar graphene sheet using difference frequency wave mixing to match both the wavevector and energy of the surface wave. By carefully controlling the phase matching conditions, we show that one can excite surface plasmons with a defined wavevector and direction across a large frequency range, with an estimated photon efficiency in our experiments approaching 10-5.

  12. Highly efficient plasmonic tip design for plasmon nanofocusing in near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakoshi, Takayuki; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) combined with plasmon nanofocusing is a powerful nano-analytical tool due to its attractive feature of efficient background suppression as well as light energy compression to the nanoscale. In plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM, the metallic tip plays an important role in inducing plasmon nanofocusing. It is, however, very challenging to control plasmonic properties of tips for plasmon nanofocusing with existing tip fabrication methods, even though the plasmonic properties need to be adjusted to experimental environments such as the sample or excitation wavelength. In this study, we propose an efficient tip design and fabrication which enable one to actively control plasmonic properties for efficient plasmon nanofocusing. Because our method offers flexibility in the material and structure of tips, one can easily modify the plasmonic properties depending on the requirements. Importantly, through optimization of the plasmonic properties, we achieve almost 100% reproducibility in plasmon nanofocusing in our experiments. This new approach of tip fabrication makes plasmon nanofocusing-based NSOM practical and reliable, and opens doors for many scientists working in related fields.

  13. Quantifying spectral changes experienced by plasmonic nanoparticles in a cellular environment to inform biomedical nanoparticle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen L.; Hu, Ying S.; Jackson, Meredith A.; Lin, Adam Y.; Young, Joseph K.; Langsner, Robert J.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2014-08-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) scatter and absorb light in precise, designable ways, making them agile candidates for a variety of biomedical applications. When NPs are introduced to a physiological environment and interact with cells, their physicochemical properties can change as proteins adsorb on their surface and they agglomerate within intracellular endosomal vesicles. Since the plasmonic properties of metal NPs are dependent on their geometry and local environment, these physicochemical changes may alter the NPs' plasmonic properties, on which applications such as plasmonic photothermal therapy and photonic gene circuits are based. Here we systematically study and quantify how metal NPs' optical spectra change upon introduction to a cellular environment in which NPs agglomerate within endosomal vesicles. Using darkfield hyperspectral imaging, we measure changes in the peak wavelength, broadening, and distribution of 100-nm spherical gold NPs' optical spectra following introduction to human breast adenocarcinoma Sk-Br-3 cells as a function of NP exposure dose and time. On a cellular level, spectra shift up to 78.6 ± 23.5 nm after 24 h of NP exposure. Importantly, spectra broaden with time, achieving a spectral width of 105.9 ± 11.7 nm at 95% of the spectrum's maximum intensity after 24 h. On an individual intracellular NP cluster (NPC) level, spectra also show significant shifting, broadening, and heterogeneity after 24 h. Cellular transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electromagnetic simulations of NPCs support the trends in spectral changes we measured. These quantitative data can help guide the design of metal NPs introduced to cellular environments in plasmonic NP-mediated biomedical technologies.

  14. Physics Based Investigations of DNA Supercoiling and of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kamilla

    Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced strong......, localized thermal transducers was investigated for cancer therapy. Gold nanoparticles exhibit surface plasmon resonance that greatly enhances their photoabsorption properties. When irradiated with resonant light, they eciently absorb the light and convert it into extremely local and well-controlled heating...... with temperature increases that easily exceed 100. Due to these unique optical properties and their biocompatibility, gold nanoparticles are promising candidates for selective photothermal cancer therapy. Light with wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR) region has low absorption and high penetration through...

  15. Nanoparticle-on-mirror cavity modes for huge and/or tunable plasmonic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Ma, Lingwei; Li, Jianghao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2017-03-01

    We present a careful numerical study of nanoparticle (NP) faceting, highlighting the great influence of small morphological changes of NP-mirror cavities on near-field enhancement in the nanoparticle-on-mirror (NPOM) system. Using a 3D finite element method (FEM) plasmon mapping method, the active transverse cavity modes can be confirmed. For the dominant mode, we have found that, by increasing the facet width, the resonance can be tuned linearly to the red with little decrease of the peak near-field intensity. It is further demonstrated that by increasing the NP size, the near-field intensity can be strongly enhanced. Understanding of such extreme optics benefits significantly both the optimized design of potential plasmonic devices and the fundamental understanding of nano-optics. Collaborative experimental considerations are expected with the rapid development of nanotechnology.

  16. A plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojaverian, Neda; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report a full-wavelength plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). The plasmonic dipole optical antenna can effectively modify the EM wave distribution and convert free-space propagation infrared light to localized surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) within the nanometer (nm) gap region of the full-wavelength dipole antenna. The plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled QDIP shows incident-angle-dependent photocurrent enhancement. The angular dependence follows the far-field pattern of a full-wavelength dipole antenna. The directivity of the plasmonic dipole optical antenna is measured to be 1.8 dB, which agrees well with the antenna simulation. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the antenna far-field and directivity measurement. The agreement of the detection pattern and the directivity with antenna theory confirms functions of an optical antenna are similar to that of a RF antenna.

  17. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  18. Absorption enhancement in amorphous silicon thin films via plasmonic resonances in nickel silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates; Sachan, Ritesh; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dyck, Ondrej; Fu, Shaofang; Kalnayaraman, Ramki; Rack, Phillip; Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is a near ideal material for photovoltaics due to its low cost, abundance, and well documented optical properties. The sole detriment of Si in photovoltaics is poor absorption in the infrared. Nanoparticle surface plasmon resonances are predicted to increase absorption by scattering to angles greater than the critical angle for total internal reflection (16° for a Si/air interface), trapping the light in the film. Experiments confirm that nickel silicide nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silicon increases absorption significantly in the infrared. However, it remains to be seen if electron-hole pair generation is increased in the solar cell, or whether the light is absorbed by the nanoparticles themselves. The nature of the absorption is explored by a study of the surface plasmon resonances through electron energy loss spectrometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments, as well as first principles density functional theory calculations. Initial experimental results do not show strong plasmon resonances on the nanoparticle surfaces. Calculations of the optical properties of the nickel silicide particles in amorphous silicon are performed to understand why this resonance is suppressed. Work supported by NSF EPS 1004083 (TN-SCORE).

  19. A generalized non-local optical response theory for plasmonic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, N A; Raza, S; Wubs, M; Søndergaard, T; Bozhevolnyi, S I

    2014-05-02

    Metallic nanostructures exhibit a multitude of optical resonances associated with localized surface plasmon excitations. Recent observations of plasmonic phenomena at the sub-nanometre to atomic scale have stimulated the development of various sophisticated theoretical approaches for their description. Here instead we present a comparatively simple semiclassical generalized non-local optical response theory that unifies quantum pressure convection effects and induced charge diffusion kinetics, with a concomitant complex-valued generalized non-local optical response parameter. Our theory explains surprisingly well both the frequency shifts and size-dependent damping in individual metallic nanoparticles as well as the observed broadening of the crossover regime from bonding-dipole plasmons to charge-transfer plasmons in metal nanoparticle dimers, thus unravelling a classical broadening mechanism that even dominates the widely anticipated short circuiting by quantum tunnelling. We anticipate that our theory can be successfully applied in plasmonics to a wide class of conducting media, including doped semiconductors and low-dimensional materials such as graphene.

  20. Modeling molecular effects on plasmon transport: Silver nanoparticles with tartrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Lopata, Kenneth; Wall, Michael R.; Bartell, Lizette; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of plasmon transport between silver nanoparticles by a yellow fluorophore, tartrazine, is studied theoretically. The system is studied by combining a finite-difference time-domain Maxwell treatment of the electric field and the plasmons with a time-dependent parameterized method number 3 simulation of the tartrazine, resulting in an effective Maxwell/Schrödinger (i.e., classical/quantum) method. The modeled system has three linearly arranged small silver nanoparticles with a radius of 2 nm and a center-to-center separation of 4 nm; the molecule is centered between the second and third nanoparticles. We initiate an x-polarized current on the first nanoparticle and monitor the transmission through the system. The molecule rotates much of the x-polarized current into the y-direction and greatly reduces the overall transmission of x-polarized current.

  1. Ferroplasmons: Intense Localized Surface Plasmons in Metal-Ferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachan, Ritesh [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Malasi, Abhinav [ORNL; Ge, Jingxuan [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Yadavali, Sagar P [ORNL; Gangopadhyay, Anup [Washington University, St. Louis; Krishna, Dr. Hare [Washington University, St. Louis; Garcia, Hernando [Southern Illinois University; Duscher, Gerd J M [ORNL; Kalyanaraman, Ramki [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of photons with matter at length scales far below their wavelengths has given rise to many novel phenomena, including localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). However, LSPR with narrow bandwidth (BW) is observed only in a select few noble metals, and ferromagnets are not among them. Here, we report the discovery of LSPR in ferromagnetic Co and CoFe alloy (8% Fe) in contact with Ag in the form of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser dewetting. These plasmons in metal-erromagnetic nanostructures, or ferroplasmons (FP) for short, are in the visible spectrum with comparable intensity and BW to those of the LSPRs from the Ag regions. This finding was enabled by electron energy-loss mapping across individual nanoparticles in a monochromated scanning transmission electron microscope. The appearance of the FP is likely due to plasmonic interaction between the contacting Ag and Co nanoparticles. Since there is no previous evidence for materials that simultaneously show ferromagnetism and such intense LSPRs, this discovery may lead to the design of improved plasmonic materials and applications. It also demonstrates that materials with interesting plasmonic properties can be synthesized using bimetallic nanostructures in contact with each other.

  2. Thermo-optical properties of embedded silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Huyeh, M.; Shirdel Havar, M.; Palpant, B.

    2012-11-01

    Thermo-optical properties of nanocomposite materials consisting of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed in a dielectric medium are appropriate for many applications as imaging, nonlinear optics, or optical monitoring of local thermal exchanges. Here, we analyze the thermo-optical response of silver nanoparticles. The contribution of inter- and intraband transitions to the thermo-optical index of bulk silver is first extracted using experimental results reported earlier in the literature. The influence of these two contributions on the thermo-optical properties of silver nanoparticles embedded in glass is then investigated. The results show that these properties are essentially due to the intraband thermo-optical contribution in the vicinity of the surface plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles, while they are dominated by the interband contribution close to the interband transition threshold.

  3. Towards nano-optical tweezers with graphene plasmons: Numerical investigation of trapping 10-nm particles with mid-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Liu, Wenbin; Zhu, Zhihong; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2016-12-01

    Graphene plasmons are rapidly emerging as a versatile platform for manipulating light at the deep subwavelength scale. Here we show numerically that strong optical near-field forces can be generated under the illumination of mid-IR light when dielectric nanoparticles are located in the vicinity of a nanostructured graphene film. These near-field forces are attributed to the excitation of the graphene’s plasmonic mode. The optical forces can generate an efficient optical trapping potential for a 10-nm-diameter dielectric particle when the light intensity is only about about 4.4 mW/μm2 and provide possibilities for a new type of plasmonic nano-tweezers. Graphene plasmonic tweezers can be potentially exploited for optical manipulation of nanometric biomolecules and particles. Moreover, the optical trapping/tweezing can be combined with biosensing and provide a versatile platform for studing biology and chemistry with mid-IR light.

  4. Nonlocal Optics of Plasmonic Nanowire Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, Brian M; Podolskiy, Viktor A

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical description of the nonlocal optical response of plasmonic nanowire metamaterials that enable negative refraction, subwavelength light manipulation, and emission lifetime engineering. We show that dispersion of optical waves propagating in nanowire media results from coupling of transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic modes supported by the composite and derive the nonlocal effective medium approximation for this dispersion. We derive the profiles of electric field across the unit cell, and use these expressions to solve the long-standing problem of additional boundary conditions in calculations of transmission and reflection of waves by nonlocal nanowire media. We verify our analytical results with numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations and discuss generalization of the developed formalism to other uniaxial metamaterials.

  5. On-chip plasmonic waveguide optical waveplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Linfei; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Paik, Seonghyun; Chen, Yusi; Harris, James S.; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-10-01

    Polarization manipulation is essential in almost every photonic system ranging from telecommunications to bio-sensing to quantum information. This is traditionally achieved using bulk waveplates. With the developing trend of photonic systems towards integration and miniaturization, the need for an on-chip waveguide type waveplate becomes extremely urgent. However, this is very challenging using conventional dielectric waveguides, which usually require complex 3D geometries to alter the waveguide symmetry and are also difficult to create an arbitrary optical axis. Recently, a waveguide waveplate was realized using femtosecond laser writing, but the device length is in millimeter range. Here, for the first time we propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact, on-chip waveplate using an asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide to create an arbitrary optical axis. The device is only in several microns length and produced in a flexible integratable IC compatible format, thus opening up the potential for integration into a broad range of systems.

  6. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2016-07-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik’s 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative properties of pristine silver, due to tarnishing on air exposure. We demonstrate techniques, including use of silicon-nitride membranes, to access the full capabilities of multiple-angle, spectrometric-ellipsometry to generate an improved data set, representative of overlayer-protected, freshly-deposited silver films on silicon-nitride and glass.

  7. Nano-fabricated plasmonic optical transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyuck; Cabrini, Stefano; Schuck, P. James; Liang, Xiaogan; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides a plasmonic optical transformer to produce a highly focuses optical beam spot, where the transformer includes a first metal layer, a dielectric layer formed on the first metal layer, and a second metal layer formed on the dielectric layer, where the first metal layer, the dielectric layer, and the second layer are patterned to a shape including a first section having a first cross section, a second section following the first section having a cross-section tapering from the first section to a smaller cross-section, and a third section following the second section having a cross-section matching the tapered smaller cross-section of the second section.

  8. RIR-MAPLE deposition of plasmonic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wangyao; Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in many different applications due to the unique properties offered by quantum effects. To broaden the scope of these applications, the deposition of nanoparticles onto substrates in a simple and controlled way is highly desired. In this study, we use resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) for the deposition of metallic, silver nanoparticles for plasmonic applications. We find that RIR-MAPLE, a simple and versatile approach, is able to deposit silver nanoparticles as large as 80 nm onto different substrates with good adhesion, regardless of substrate properties. In addition, the nanoparticle surface coverage of the substrates, which result from the random distribution of nanoparticles across the substrate per laser pulse, can be simply and precisely controlled by RIR-MAPLE. Polymer films of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) are also deposited by RIR-MAPLE on top of the deposited silver nanoparticles in order to demonstrate enhanced absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect. The reported features of RIR-MAPLE nanoparticle deposition indicate that this tool can enable efficient processing of nanoparticle thin films for applications that require specific substrates or configurations that are not easily achieved using solution-based approaches.

  9. Optical detection of single non-absorbing molecules using the surface plasmon of a gold nanorod

    CERN Document Server

    Zijlstra, Peter; Orrit, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Current optical detection schemes for single molecules require light absorption, either to produce fluorescence or direct absorption signals. This severely limits the range of molecules that can be detected, because most molecules are purely refractive. Metal nanoparticles or dielectric resonators detect non-absorbing molecules by a resonance shift in response to a local perturbation of the refractive index, but neither has reached single-protein sensitivity. The most sensitive plasmon sensors to date detect single molecules only when the plasmon shift is amplified by a highly polarizable label or by a localized precipitation reaction on the particle's surface. Without amplification, the sensitivity only allows for the statistical detection of single molecules. Here we demonstrate plasmonic detection of single molecules in realtime, without the need for labeling or amplification. We monitor the plasmon resonance of a single gold nanorod with a sensitive photothermal assay and achieve a ~ 700-fold increase in ...

  10. Geometry dependence of surface lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, R; Törmä, P

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoarrays which support collective surface lattice resonances (SLRs) have become an exciting frontier in plasmonics. Compared with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in individual particles, these collective modes have appealing advantages such as angle-dependent dispersions and much narrower linewidths. Here, we investigate systematically how the geometry of the lattice affects the SLRs supported by metallic nanoparticles. We present a general theoretical framework from which the various SLR modes of a given geometry can be straightforwardly obtained by a simple comparison of the diffractive order (DO) vectors and orientation of the nanoparticle dipole given by the polarization of the incident field. Our experimental measurements show that while square, hexagonal, rectangular, honeycomb and Lieb lattice arrays have similar spectra near the $\\Gamma$-point ($k=0$), they have remarkably different SLR dispersions. Furthermore, their dispersions are highly dependent on the polarization. Num...

  11. Plasmon transmutation: inducing new modes in nanoclusters by adding dielectric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Ye, Jian; Liu, Na; Van Dorpe, Pol; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-12

    Planar clusters of coupled plasmonic nanoparticles support nanoscale electromagnetic "hot spots" and coherent effects, such as Fano resonances, with unique near and far field signatures, currently of prime interest for sensing applications. Here we show that plasmonic cluster properties can be substantially modified by the addition of individual, discrete dielectric nanoparticles at specific locations on the cluster, introducing new plasmon modes, or transmuting existing plasmon modes to new ones, in the resulting metallodielectric nanocomplex. Depositing a single carbon nanoparticle in the junction between a pair of adjacent nanodisks induces a metal-dielectric-metal quadrupolar plasmon mode. In a ten-membered cluster, placement of several carbon nanoparticles in junctions between multiple adjacent nanoparticles introduces a collective magnetic plasmon mode into the Fano dip, giving rise to an additional subradiant mode in the metallodielectric nanocluster response. These examples illustrate that adding dielectric nanoparticles to metallic nanoclusters expands the number and types of plasmon modes supported by these new mixed-media nanoscale assemblies.

  12. Surface plasmon polariton beam focusing with parabolic nanoparticle chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya P.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the focusing of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) beams with parabolic chains of gold nanoparticles fabricated on thin gold films. SPP focusing with different parabolic chains is investigated in the wavelength range of 700–860 nm, both experimentally and theoretically. Mapping of SPP...

  13. Optical Sensing and Trapping Based on Localized Surface Plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhiwen

    This project involves the study of novel plasmonic nanodevices that provide unique functionality in optical sensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and optical trapping. The first design is based on a coupling system involving double-layered metal nano-strips arrays. This system has the advantages of simple geometry and direct integration with microfluidic chips. The intense optical localization due to field coupling within the system can enhance detection sensitivity of target molecules, especially by virtue of the optical trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles. The optical resonant condition is obtained theoretically through analyzing the SPs modes. Numerical modeling based on two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is consistent with the theoretical analysis and demonstrates the feasibility of using this system for optical sensing and trapping. In the second design, a gold nano-ring structure is demonstrated to be an effective approach for plasmonic nano-optical tweezers (PNOTs) for trapping metallic nanoparticles. In our demonstration example, we have optimized a device for SERS operation at the wavelength of 785 nm. Three-dimensional (3D) FDTD techniques have been employed to calculate the optical response, and the optical force distribution have been derived using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method. Simulation results indicate that the nano-ring produces a maximum trapping potential well of ~32 kBT on a 20 nm gold nanoparticle. The existence of multiple potential well results in a very large active trapping volume of ~106 nm3 for the target particles. Furthermore, the trapped gold nanoparticles further lead to the formation of nano-gaps that offer a near-field enhancement of ~160 times, resulting in an achievable EF of 108 for SERS. In the third design, we propose a concept of all-optical nano-manipulation. We show that target molecules, after being trapped, can be transferred between the trapping sites within a linear array of

  14. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  15. Plasmonic extinction in gold nanoparticle-polymer films as film thickness and nanoparticle separation decrease below resonant wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Bodinger, Carter; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Keith Roper, D.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles embedded in polymer films enhance optoelectronic properties of photovoltaics, sensors, and interconnects. This work examined optical extinction of polymer films containing randomly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with negligible Rayleigh scattering cross-sections at particle separations and film thicknesses less than (sub-) to greater than (super-) the localized surface plasmon resonant (LSPR) wavelength, λLSPR. Optical extinction followed opposite trends in sub- and superwavelength films on a per nanoparticle basis. In ˜70-nm-thick polyvinylpyrrolidone films containing 16 nm AuNP, measured resonant extinction per particle decreased as particle separation decreased from ˜130 to 76 nm, consistent with trends from Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory and coupled dipole approximation. In ˜1-mm-thick polydimethylsiloxane films containing 16-nm AuNP, resonant extinction per particle plateaued at particle separations ≥λLSPR, then increased as particle separation radius decreased from ˜514 to 408 nm. Contributions from isolated particles, interparticle interactions and heterogeneities in sub- and super-λLSPR films containing AuNP at sub-λLSPR separations were examined. Characterizing optoplasmonics of thin polymer films embedded with plasmonic NP supports rational development of optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity using these nanocomposites.

  16. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  17. Surface Plasmon Wave Adapter Designed with Transformation Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiao, Sanshui; Wubs, Martijn;

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of transformation optics, we propose the design of a surface plasmon wave adapter which confines surface plasmon waves on non-uniform metal surfaces and enables adiabatic mode transformation of surface plasmon polaritons with very short tapers. This adapter can be simply achieved...... with homogeneous anisotropic naturally occurring materials or subwavelength grating-structured dielectric materials. Full wave simulations based on a finite-element method have been performed to validate our proposal....

  18. Monitoring of receptor dimerization using plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew J; Seekell, Kevin; Ostrander, Julie H; Wax, Adam

    2011-11-22

    The dimerization of receptors on the cell membrane is an important step in the activation of cell signaling pathways. Several methods exist for observing receptor dimerization, including coimmunoprecipitation, chemical cross-linking, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These techniques are limited in that only FRET is appropriate for live cells, but even that method suffers from photobleaching and bleed-through effects. In this study, we implement an alternative method for the targeting of HER-2 homodimer formation based on the plasmonic coupling of gold nanoparticles functionalized with HER-2 Ab. In the presented studies, SK-BR-3 cells, known to overexpress HER-2, are labeled with these nanoparticles and receptor colocalization is observed using plasmonic coupling. HER-2 targeted nanoparticles bound to these cells exhibit a peak resonance that is significantly red-shifted relative to those bound to similar receptors on A549 cells, which have significantly lower levels of HER-2 expression. This significant red shift indicates plasmonic coupling is occurring and points to a new avenue for assessing dimerization by monitoring their colocalization. To determine that dimerization is occurring, the refractive index of the nanoenvironment of the labels is assessed using a theoretical analysis based on the Mie coated sphere model. The results indicate scattering by single, isolated nanoparticles for the low HER-2 expressing A549 cell line, but the scattering observed for the HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 cell line may only be explained by plasmonic-coupling of proximal nanoparticle pairs. To validate the conformation of nanoparticles bound to HER-2 receptors undergoing dimerization, discrete dipole approximation (DDA) models are used to assess spectra of scattering by coupled nanoparticles. Comparison of the experimental results with theoretical models indicates that NP dimers are formed for the labeling of SK-BR-3 cells, suggesting that receptor

  19. The optical nonlinearity of gold nanoparticles prepared by bioreduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbuena Ortega, A.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Gayou, V. L.; Orduña Díaz, A.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, Marlon

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear optical and electronic properties of nanosized metal particles have drawn considerable attention because of their strong and size-dependent plasmon resonance absorption. In a metal nanoparticle system such as gold dispersed in a transparent matrix, an absorption peak due to surface plasmon resonance is usually observed in the visible spectral region. Metal nanoparticles are of special interest as nonlinear materials for optical switching and computing because of their relatively large third-order nonlinearity (χ3) and ultrafast response time. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nonlinear optical properties of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by biosynthesis method using yeast extract as reducing agent and the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with a beam power of 20 mW and operated at wavelength of 514 nm. The reaction between metal ions and yeast extracts were monitored by UV-visible spectra of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solution with different pH (3-6). The surface plasmon peak position was shifted from 528 nm to 573 nm, according to of pH variation 4 to 6. The average particle size was calculated by the absorption peak position using the Fernig method, from 42 to 103 nm. The z-scan curves showed a negative nonlocal nonlinear refractive index with a magnitude dependent on the nanoparticle size.

  20. Fluorescence Ratiometric Properties Induced by Nanoparticle Plasmonics and Nanoscale Dye Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Hakonen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale transport of merocyanine 540 within/near the plasmon field of gold nanoparticles was recognized as an effective inducer of single-excitation dual-emission ratiometric properties. With a high concentration of the signal transducer (ammonium, a 700% increase in fluorescence was observed at the new red-shifted emission maximum, compared to a nanoparticle free sensor membrane. A previously nonrecognized isosbestic point is demonstrated at  nm. The mechanism can be utilized for enhanced and simplified ratiometric optical chemical sensors and potentially for thin film engineering to make solar cells more effective and stable by a broader and more regulated absorption.

  1. Optical Manipulation with Plasmonic Beam Shaping Antenna Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Young Chul Jun; Igal Brener

    2012-01-01

    Near-field optical trapping of objects using plasmonic antenna structures has recently attracted great attention. However, metal nanostructures also provide a compact platform for general wavefront engineering of intermediate and far-field beams. Here, we analyze optical forces generated by plasmonic beam shaping antenna structures and show that they can be used for general optical manipulation such as guiding of a dielectric particle along a linear or curved trajectory. This removes the need...

  2. Optical nano-imaging of gate-tunable graphene plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianing; Badioli, Michela; Alonso-González, Pablo; Thongrattanasiri, Sukosin; Huth, Florian; Osmond, Johann; Spasenović, Marko; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Godignon, Philippe; Elorza, Amaia Zurutuza; Camara, Nicolas; García de Abajo, F Javier; Hillenbrand, Rainer; Koppens, Frank H L

    2012-07-05

    The ability to manipulate optical fields and the energy flow of light is central to modern information and communication technologies, as well as quantum information processing schemes. However, because photons do not possess charge, a way of controlling them efficiently by electrical means has so far proved elusive. A promising way to achieve electric control of light could be through plasmon polaritons—coupled excitations of photons and charge carriers—in graphene. In this two-dimensional sheet of carbon atoms, it is expected that plasmon polaritons and their associated optical fields can readily be tuned electrically by varying the graphene carrier density. Although evidence of optical graphene plasmon resonances has recently been obtained spectroscopically, no experiments so far have directly resolved propagating plasmons in real space. Here we launch and detect propagating optical plasmons in tapered graphene nanostructures using near-field scattering microscopy with infrared excitation light. We provide real-space images of plasmon fields, and find that the extracted plasmon wavelength is very short—more than 40 times smaller than the wavelength of illumination. We exploit this strong optical field confinement to turn a graphene nanostructure into a tunable resonant plasmonic cavity with extremely small mode volume. The cavity resonance is controlled in situ by gating the graphene, and in particular, complete switching on and off of the plasmon modes is demonstrated, thus paving the way towards graphene-based optical transistors. This successful alliance between nanoelectronics and nano-optics enables the development of active subwavelength-scale optics and a plethora of nano-optoelectronic devices and functionalities, such as tunable metamaterials, nanoscale optical processing, and strongly enhanced light–matter interactions for quantum devices and biosensing applications.

  3. Plasmonic coupling in single flower-like gold nanoparticle assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Luo; Lacie Dube; Yadong Zhou; Shengli Zou; Jing Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) arises when light interacts with metallic nanoparticles (NPs). When nanoparticles (NPs) assemble together, the plasmon coupling effect between the NPs often leads to new features in the LSPR of the assembled structure. Understanding the plasmon coupling in the complex assemblies will greatly benefit the development of new plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a 3D structure using two different sized Au NPs as building blocks. This 3D structure was achieved by manipulating the binding efficiency of ligands linking the NPs, and proper choice of the NP size. The assembled structure is flower-like structure, with one 130 nm Au NP in the center, and several 40 nm Au NPs attaching as“petals”. Single particle dark-field scattering measurements of the individual assemblies were performed, together with electrodynamics simulations. The experimental and theoretical studies show that, the plasmonic coupling lead to broadening of the LSPR and additional peaks, depending on the number and 3D arrangement of the 40 nm NPs around the center 130 nm NP.

  4. Plasmonic coupling in single flower-like gold nanoparticle assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR arises when light interacts with metallic nanoparticles (NPs. When nanoparticles (NPs assemble together, the plasmon coupling effect between the NPs often leads to new features in the LSPR of the assembled structure. Understanding the plasmon coupling in the complex assemblies will greatly benefit the development of new plasmonic devices. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a 3D structure using two different sized Au NPs as building blocks. This 3D structure was achieved by manipulating the binding efficiency of ligands linking the NPs, and proper choice of the NP size. The assembled structure is flower-like structure, with one 130 nm Au NP in the center, and several 40 nm Au NPs attaching as “petals”. Single particle dark-field scattering measurements of the individual assemblies were performed, together with electrodynamics simulations. The experimental and theoretical studies show that, the plasmonic coupling lead to broadening of the LSPR and additional peaks, depending on the number and 3D arrangement of the 40 nm NPs around the center 130 nm NP.

  5. Plasmonic Vesicles of Amphiphilic Nanocrystals: Optically Active Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Huang, Peng; Duan, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-15

    Vesicular structures with compartmentalized, water-filled cavities, such as liposomes of natural and synthetic amphiphiles, have tremendous potential applications in nanomedicine. When block copolymers self-assemble, the result is polymersomes with tailored structural properties and built-in releasing mechanisms, controlled by stimuli-responsive polymer building blocks. More recently, chemists are becoming interested in multifunctional hybrid vesicles containing inorganic nanocrystals with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. In this Account, we review our recent progress in assembling amphiphilic plasmonic nanostructures to create a new class of multifunctional hybrid vesicles and applying them towards cancer diagnosis and therapy. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gives plasmonic nanomaterials a unique set of optical properties that are potentially useful for both biosensing and nanomedicine. For instance, the strong light scattering at their LSPR wavelength opens up the applications of plasmonic nanostructures in single particle plasmonic imaging. Their superior photothermal conversion properties, on the other hand, make them excellent transducers for photothermal ablation and contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Of particular note for ultrasensitive detection is that the confined electromagnetic field resulting from excitation of LSPR can give rise to highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for molecules in close proximity. We have explored several ways to combine well-defined plasmonic nanocrystals with amphiphilic polymer brushes of diverse chemical functionalities. In multiple systems, we have shown that the polymer grafts impart amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly to the hybrid nanoparticles. This has allowed us to synthesize well-defined vesicles in which we have embedded plasmonic nanocrystals in the shell of collapsed hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophilic brushes extend into external and interior aqueous

  6. Multi-Periodicity Induces Prominent Optical Phenomena in Plasmonic Multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Krylova, A. K.; Zhukovsky, Sergei;

    2014-01-01

    We introduce multi-periodicity in plasmonic multilayers and develop a general theory for the description of their eigenwaves. We define the order of multi-periodicity as the number of different kinds of plasmonic interfaces present in the multilayer, and investigate the optical effects that arise...

  7. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in plasmon-enhanced light harvesting,14 photocatalysis ,511 surface- enhanced spectroscopies,1216 optics-based sensing,1722 nonlinear optics,2326...optical response of Al nanoparticles has appeared inconsistent relative to calculated spectra, even forwell-characterized geometries. Some studies have...model- ing their optical response. These results pro- vide a method for estimating the metallic purity of aluminum nanoparticles directly from their

  8. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA–nanoparticle superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin , Chad A. (NWU)

    2016-06-15

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure–function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  9. Metal Nanoparticle-Decorated Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Sulfide for Plasmonic-Enhanced Polymer Photovoltaic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Kai Chuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D transition metal dichalcogenides have also attracted immense interest because they exhibit appealing electronic, optical and mechanical properties. In this work, we prepared gold nanoparticle-decorated molybdenum sulfide (AuNP@MoS2 through a simple spontaneous redox reaction. Transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the properties of the AuNP@MoS2 nanomaterials. Then we employed such nanocomposites as the cathode buffer layers of organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs to trigger surface plasmonic resonance, leading to noticeable enhancements in overall device efficiencies. We attribute the primary origin of the improvement in device performance to local field enhancement induced by the effects of localized surface plasmonic resonance. Our results suggest that the metal nanoparticle-decorated two-dimensional materials appear to have great potential for use in high-performance OPVs.

  10. Transformation Optics Approach to Plasmon-Exciton Strong Coupling in Nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Qi; Hernángomez-Pérez, D.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Fernández-Domínguez, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the conditions yielding plasmon-exciton strong coupling at the single emitter level in the gap between two metal nanoparticles. Inspired by transformation optics ideas, a quasianalytical approach is developed that makes possible a thorough exploration of this hybrid system incorporating the full richness of its plasmonic spectrum. This allows us to reveal that by placing the emitter away from the cavity center, its coupling to multipolar dark modes of both even and odd parity increases remarkably. This way, reversible dynamics in the population of the quantum emitter takes place in feasible implementations of this archetypal nanocavity.

  11. Optical magnetism and plasmonic Fano resonances in metal-insulator-metal oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, R; Yang, Z J; Shegai, T; Käll, M

    2015-03-11

    The possibility of achieving optical magnetism at visible frequencies using plasmonic nanostructures has recently been a subject of great interest. The concept is based on designing structures that support plasmon modes with electron oscillation patterns that imitate current loops, that is, magnetic dipoles. However, the magnetic resonances are typically spectrally narrow, thereby limiting their applicability in, for example, metamaterial designs. We show that a significantly broader magnetic response can be realized in plasmonic pentamers constructed from metal-insulator-metal (MIM) sandwich particles. Each MIM unit acts as a magnetic meta-atom and the optical magnetism is rendered quasi-broadband through hybridization of the in-plane modes. We demonstrate that scattering spectra of individual MIM pentamers exhibit multiple Fano resonances and a broad subradiant spectral window that signals the magnetic interaction and a hierarchy of coupling effects in these intricate three-dimensional nanoparticle oligomers.

  12. Optical control of plasmonic heating effects using reversible photo-alignment of nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Giovanna; Cataldi, Ugo; De Sio, Luciano; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Umeton, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate and characterize an optical control of the plasmonic heat delivered by a monolayer substrate of gold nanoparticles, obtained by modulating the effective refractive index of the neighboring dielectric medium. The effect, which exploits the dependence of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) refractive index on the molecular director orientation, is realized by using a polarization dependent, light-induced molecular reorientation of a thin film of photo-alignment layer that the NLC is in contact with. For a suitable alignment, plasmonic pumping intensity values ranging from 0.25 W/cm2 to 6.30 W/cm2 can induce up to 17.4 °C temperature variations in time intervals of the order of seconds. The reversibility of the optically induced NLC molecular director orientation enables an active control of the plasmonic photo-induced heat.

  13. Investigating the optical XNOR gate using plasmonic nano-rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Kaboli, Milad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a coherent perfect absorption (CPA)-type XNOR gate based on plasmonic nano particle is proposed. It consists of two plasmonic nano rod arrays on top of two parallel arms with quartz substrate. The operation principle is based on the absorbable formation of a conductive path in the dielectric layer of a plasmonic nano-particles waveguide. Since the CPA efficiency depends strongly on the number of plasmonic nano-rod and the nano rod location, an efficient binary optimization method based the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is used to design an optimized array of the plasmonic nano-rod in order to achieve the maximum absorption coefficient in the 'off' state and the minimum absorption coefficient in the 'on' state. In Binary PSO (BPSO), a group of birds consists a matrix with binary entries, control the presence ('1‧) or the absence ('0‧) of nano rod in the array.

  14. Engineering optical gradient force from coupled surface plasmon polariton modes in nanoscale plasmonic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    We explore the dispersion properties and optical gradient forces from mutual coupling of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at two interfaces of nanoscale plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic metamaterial cladding. With Maxwell’s equations and Maxwell stress tensor, we calculate and compare the dispersion relation and optical gradient force for symmetric and antisymmetric SPP modes in two kinds of nanoscale plasmonic waveguides. The numerical results show that the optical gradient force between two coupled hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides can be engineered flexibly by adjusting the waveguide structure parameters. Importantly, an alternative way to boost the optical gradient force is provided through engineering the hyperbolic metamaterial cladding of suitable orientation. These special optical properties will open the door for potential optomechanical applications, such as optical tweezers and actuators. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474106) and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2016A030313439).

  15. Plasmonic and Thermooptical Properties of Spherical Metallic Nanoparticles for Their Thermoplasmonic and Photonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor K. Pustovalov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations and use of nanoparticles (NPs as photothermal (PT agents in laser and optical nanotechnology are fast growing areas of research and applications. The potential benefits of NPs applications include possibility for thermal imaging and treatment of materials containing of NPs, applications of NPs for light-to-thermal energy conversion, in catalysis, laser nanomedicine, and chemistry. Efficiency of applications of metallic NPs for laser and optical nanotechnology depends on plasmonic and thermophysical properties of NPs, characteristics of radiation, and surrounding medium. Here we present the results of comparative analysis of NP properties (plasmonic, thermooptical, and others allowing selecting their parameters for thermoplasmonic and photonic applications. Plasmonic and thermooptical properties of several metallic (aurum, silver, platinum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, titanium, cuprum, aluminum, molybdenum, vanadium, and palladium NPs are theoretically investigated and analysis of them is carried out. Investigation of the influence of NPs parameters (type of metal, radii, optical indexes, density, and heat capacity of NP material, characteristics of radiation (wavelength and pulse duration, and ambient parameters on plasmonic and thermophysical properties of NPs has been carried out. It was established that maximum value of thermooptical parameter (maximum NP temperature can be achieved with the use of absorption efficiency factor of NP smaller than its maximum value.

  16. Oscillons, solitons, and domain walls in arrays of nonlinear plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  17. Tuning light concentration inside plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles during laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafyeva, L. G.; Pustovalov, V. K.; Fritzsche, W.

    2017-09-01

    Computer modeling was carried out of the intensity distributions of optical (laser) radiation with wavelengths in the range of 180-540 nm concentrated inside spherical two-layered core-shell nanoparticles with the core radii in the range 10-30 nm and shell thicknesses range 5-40 nm during irradiation. Different metals and oxides are used for core and shell materials of nanoparticles. Novel effect of light localizing at the nanoscale inside spherical two-layered core-shell NPs has been established on the base of computer calculations in the frame of the theory of diffraction of electromagnetic radiation on multilayer sphere. Light intensity concentrates in shadow hemisphere of core-shell NPs for the selected values of nanoparticle sizes and radiation wavelengths. These results can be applied in nanophotonics for construction of novel plasmonic devices and photonic components, and for different applications of the core-shell nanoparticles.

  18. Plasmonic Nanogap-Enhanced Raman Scattering with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Haemi; Suh, Yung Doug

    2016-12-20

    Plasmonic coupling-based electromagnetic field localization and enhancement are becoming increasingly important in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, physics, and engineering over the past decade, generating a number of new concepts and applications. Among the plasmonically coupled nanostructures, metal nanostructures with nanogaps have been of special interest due to their ultrastrong electromagnetic fields and controllable optical properties that can be useful for a variety of signal enhancements such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The Raman scattering process is highly inefficient, with a very small cross-section, and Raman signals are often poorly reproducible, meaning that very strong, controllable SERS is needed to obtain reliable Raman signals with metallic nanostructures and thus open up new avenues for a variety of Raman-based applications. More specifically, plasmonically coupled metallic nanostructures with ultrasmall (∼1 nm or smaller) nanogaps can generate very strong and tunable electromagnetic fields that can generate strong SERS signals from Raman dyes in the gap, and plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering can be defined as Raman signal enhancement from plasmonic nanogap particles with ∼1 nm gaps. However, these promising nanostructures with extraordinarily strong optical signals have shown limited use for practical applications, largely due to the lack of design principles, high-yield synthetic strategies with nanometer-level structural control and reproducibility, and systematic, reliable single-molecule/single-particle-level studies on their optical properties. All these are extremely important challenges because even small changes (particles with respect to the design and synthesis of plasmonic nanogap structures, as well as ultrasensitive and quantitative Raman signal detection using these structures. The applications and prospects of plasmonic nanogap particle-based SERS are also discussed. In particular

  19. Surface plasmon assisted optical nonlinearities of uniformly oriented metal nano-ellipsoids in glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Sabitha; Lange, Jens; Graener, Heinrich; Seifert, Gerhard

    2012-12-17

    The nonlinear optical properties of nanocomposites consisting of non-spherical silver nanoparticles in glass matrix have been studied using the femtosecond Z-scan technique. The spheroidal nanoparticles were uniformly oriented along a common direction. By polarization sensitive studies, longitudinal and transverse plasmon resonances can be addressed separately. A sign reversal in optical nonlinearity from negative to positive is observed while switching the light interaction from near to non-resonant regime, which can be done by simply rotating the light polarization by 90°. Studying samples with different aspect ratio, we obtained the dispersion of third-order nonlinearity in the near-resonant regime, showing an enhancement of the nonlinear processes by more than two orders of magnitude due to the electric field enhancement at the surface plasmon resonance.

  20. Control of the plasmonic resonance of a graphene coated plasmonic nanoparticle array combined with a nematic liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sio, Luciano; Cataldi, Ugo; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a switchable plasmonic device based on a conductive graphene oxide (cGO) coated plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) array, layered with nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as an active medium. A monolayer of NPs has been immobilized on a glass substrate through electrostatic interaction, and then grown in place using nanochemistry. This monolayer is then coated with a thin (less then 100nm) cGO film which acts simultaneously as both an electro-conductive and active medium. The combination of the conductive NP array with a separate top cover substrate having both cGO and a standard LC alignment layer is used for aligning a NLC film in a hybrid configuration. The system is analysed in terms of morphological and electro-optical properties. The spectral response of the sample characterized after each element is added (air, cGO, NLC) reveals a red-shift of the localized plasmonic resonance (LPR) frequency of approximately 62nm with respect to the NP array surrounded by air. The application of an external voltage (8Vpp) is suitable to modulate (blue shift) the LPR frequency by approximately 22nm.

  1. Observation of Mode Splitting in Photoluminescence of Individual Plasmonic Nanoparticles Strongly Coupled to Molecular Excitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersäll, Martin; Cuadra, Jorge; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Balci, Sinan; Shegai, Timur

    2017-01-11

    Plasmon-exciton interactions are important for many prominent spectroscopic applications such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, plasmon-mediated fluorescence, nanoscale lasing, and strong coupling. The case of strong coupling is analogous to quantum optical effects studied in solid state and atomic systems previously. In plasmonics, similar observations have been almost exclusively made in elastic scattering experiments; however, the interpretation of these experiments is often cumbersome. Here, we demonstrate mode splitting not only in scattering, but also in photoluminescence of individual hybrid nanosystems, which manifests a direct proof of strong coupling in plasmon-exciton nanoparticles. We achieved these results due to saturation of the mode volume with molecular J-aggregates, which resulted in splitting up to 400 meV, that is, ∼20% of the resonance energy. We analyzed the correlation between scattering and photoluminescence and found that splitting in photoluminescence is considerably less than that in scattering. Moreover, we found that splitting in both photoluminescence and scattering signals increased upon cooling to cryogenic temperatures. These findings improve our understanding of strong coupling phenomena in plasmonics.

  2. Tunable plasmonic resonance of gallium nanoparticles by thermal oxidation at low temperaturas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán-Gómez, S.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Palomares, F. J.; Nucciarelli, F.; Pau, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the oxidation of gallium nanoparticles (Ga NPs) on their plasmonic properties is investigated. Discrete dipole approximation has been used to study the wavelength of the out-of-plane localized surface plasmon resonance in hemispherical Ga NPs, deposited on silicon substrates, with oxide shell (Ga2O3) of different thickness. Thermal oxidation treatments, varying temperature and time, were carried out in order to increase experimentally the Ga2O3 shell thickness in the NPs. The optical, structural and chemical properties of the oxidized NPs have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A clear redshift of the peak wavelength is observed, barely affecting the intensity of the plasmon resonance. A controllable increase of the Ga2O3 thickness as a consequence of the thermal annealing is achieved. In addition, simulations together with ellipsometry results have been used to determine the oxidation rate, whose kinetics is governed by a logarithmic dependence. These results support the tunable properties of the plasmon resonance wavelength in Ga NPs by thermal oxidation at low temperatures without significant reduction of the plasmon resonance intensity.

  3. Phase transfer of large anisotropic plasmon resonant silver nanoparticles from aqueous to organic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhishek P; Munechika, Keiko; Noone, Kevin M; Smith, Jessica M; Ginger, David S

    2009-07-21

    We describe the phase transfer of large, anisotropic, silver nanoparticles (approximately 50-100 nm edge length) from water to polar organics such as alcohols, acetone, dimethylformamide and to nonpolar hexanes. We transferred the silver nanoparticles to the polar organic solvents via their precipitation in water by centrifugation and redispersion in organics. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging and UV-vis extinction spectra, we confirmed that there was little to no shape change in the nanoparticles upon transfer to the polar solvents. The nanoparticles were stable for months in the polar organics. We also transferred the nanoparticles to hexanes with up to 75% phase transfer efficiency by using sodium oleate as a surfactant. We found the extinction spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the nanoparticles were similar in water and hexanes, indicating that exchange into hexanes resulted in an only slight change in shape. The nanoparticles were stable for at least 10 days in hexanes under appropriate conditions. The phase transfer efficiency decreased with an increase in the size of the nanoparticles. These results open the possibility for the conjugation of large, anisotropic plasmon resonant silver nanoparticles with organic dyes or their blends with conjugated polyelectrolytes for fundamental optical studies and applications.

  4. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 15......, 30 and 45 nm. The fabrication process of such plasmonic waveguides with width in the range of 1-100 μm and their quality inspection are described. The results of optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides using a high power laser with the peak power wavelength 1064 nm show significant deviation...

  5. All-Optical Generation of Surface Plasmons in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Constant, Thomas J; Chang, Darrick E; Hendry, Euan

    2015-01-01

    Here we present an all-optical plasmon coupling scheme, utilising the intrinsic nonlinear optical response of graphene. We demonstrate coupling of free-space, visible light pulses to the surface plasmons in a planar, un-patterned graphene sheet by using nonlinear wave mixing to match both the wavevector and energy of the surface wave. By carefully controlling the phase-matching conditions, we show that one can excite surface plasmons with a defined wavevector and direction across a large frequency range, with an estimated photon efficiency in our experiments approaching $10^{-5}$.

  6. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Nicholas Walker

    In this dissertation, the capacity of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to probe plasmons is examined in detail. EELS is shown to be able to detect both electric hot spots and Fano resonances in contrast to the prevailing knowledge prior to this work. The most detailed examination of magnetoplasmonic resonances in multi-ring structures to date and the utility of electron tomography to computational plasmonics is explored, and a new tomographic method for the reconstruction of a target is introduced. Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. A computational analysis of the electron- and photon-driven surface-plasmon resonances of monomer and dimer metal nanorods is presented to elucidate the differences and similarities between the two excitation mechanisms in a system with well understood optical properties. By correlating the nanostructure's simulated electron energy loss spectrum and loss-probability maps with its induced polarization and scattered electric field we discern how certain plasmon modes are selectively excited and how they funnel energy from the excitation source into the near- and far-field. Using a fully retarded electron-scattering theory capable of describing arbitrary three-dimensional nanoparticle geometries, aggregation schemes, and material compositions, we find that electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is able to indirectly probe the same electromagnetic hot spots that are generated by an optical excitation source. EELS is then employed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. The origins of this observation are explored

  7. Third-harmonic-upconversion enhancement from a single semiconductor nanoparticle coupled to a plasmonic antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouani, Heykel; Rahmani, Mohsen; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Maier, Stefan A

    2014-04-01

    The ability to convert low-energy quanta into a quantum of higher energy is of great interest for a variety of applications, including bioimaging, drug delivery and photovoltaics. Although high conversion efficiencies can be achieved using macroscopic nonlinear crystals, upconverting light at the nanometre scale remains challenging because the subwavelength scale of materials prevents the exploitation of phase-matching processes. Light-plasmon interactions that occur in nanostructured noble metals have offered alternative opportunities for nonlinear upconversion of infrared light, but conversion efficiency rates remain extremely low due to the weak penetration of the exciting fields into the metal. Here, we show that third-harmonic generation from an individual semiconductor indium tin oxide nanoparticle is significantly enhanced when coupled within a plasmonic gold dimer. The plasmonic dimer acts as a receiving optical antenna, confining the incident far-field radiation into a near field localized at its gap; the indium tin oxide nanoparticle located at the plasmonic dimer gap acts as a localized nonlinear transmitter upconverting three incident photons at frequency ω into a photon at frequency 3ω. This hybrid nanodevice provides third-harmonic-generation enhancements of up to 10(6)-fold compared with an isolated indium tin oxide nanoparticle, with an effective third-order susceptibility up to 3.5 × 10(3) nm V(-2) and conversion efficiency of 0.0007%. We also show that the upconverted third-harmonic emission can be exploited to probe the near-field intensity at the plasmonic dimer gap.

  8. Multimodal plasmonic biosensing nanostructures prepared by DNA-directed immobilization of multifunctional DNA-gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Nuria; Salvador, J-Pablo; Marco, M-Pilar

    2017-04-15

    Biofunctional multimodal plasmonic nanostructures suitable for multiplexed localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensing have been created by DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of two distinct multifunctional biohybrid gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) of distinct sizes, and therefore showing distinct plasmon resonant peaks (RP), have been biofunctionalized and codified with two different single stranded-DNA (ssDNA) chains. One of these oligonucleotide chains has been specifically designed to direct each AuNP to a distinct location of the surface of a DNA microarray chip through specific hybridization with complementary oligonucleotide strands. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has been used to demonstrate selective immobilization of each AuNP on distinct spots. The second ssDNA chain of the AuNPs provides the possibility to introduce by hybridization distinct types of bioactive molecules or bioreceptors, on a reversible manner. In this work, hapten-oligonucleotide bioconjugate probes, with sequences complementary to the second ssDNA linked to the AuNP, have been synthesized and used to create multiplexed hapten-biofuncionalized plasmonic nanostructures. The oligonucleotide probes consist on anabolic androgenic steroid haptens (AAS) covalently linked to specifically designed oligonucleotide sequences. The biofunctionality of these plasmonic nanostructures has been demonstrated by fluorescent microarray immunoassay and LSPR measurements, recording the shift of the RP produced after the antibody binding to the corresponding hapten-oligonucleotide probes immobilized on the nanostructured surface. Preliminary data show that this approach could allow manufacturing multifunctional multimodal LSPR chips for multiplexed analysis of different substances reaching very good detectability. Thus, small molecular weigh, analytes such as stanozolol (ST,) could be detected at concentrations in the low nM range. The results here presented open the door for an

  9. Synthesis of Silver Nanoprisms with Variable Size and Investigation of Their Optical Properties: A First-Year Undergraduate Experiment Exploring Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andrew J.; Cathcart, Nicole; Maly, Kenneth E.; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    A robust and reasonably simple experiment is described that introduces students to the visualization of nanoscale properties and is intended for a first-year laboratory. Silver nanoprisms (NPs) that display different colors due to variation of their plasmonic absorption with respect to size are prepared. Control over the size of the silver…

  10. Synthesis of Silver Nanoprisms with Variable Size and Investigation of Their Optical Properties: A First-Year Undergraduate Experiment Exploring Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andrew J.; Cathcart, Nicole; Maly, Kenneth E.; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    A robust and reasonably simple experiment is described that introduces students to the visualization of nanoscale properties and is intended for a first-year laboratory. Silver nanoprisms (NPs) that display different colors due to variation of their plasmonic absorption with respect to size are prepared. Control over the size of the silver…

  11. Parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton add-drop filters for hybrid silicon/plasmonic optical circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereux, A.; Hassan, K.; Weeber, J.-C.; Djellali, N.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Tsilipakos, O.; Pitilakis, A.; Kriezis, E.; Papaioannou, S.; Vyrsokinos, K.; Pleros, N.; Tekin, T.; Baus, M.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Avramopoulos, H.

    2011-01-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons are electromagnetic waves propagating along the surface of a conductor. Surface plasmons photonics is a promising candidate to satisfy the constraints of miniaturization of optical interconnects. This contribution reviews an experimental parametric study of dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides ring resonators and add-drop filters within the perspective of the recently suggested hybrid technology merging plasmonic and silicon photonics on a single board (European FP7 project PLATON "Merging Plasmonic and Silicon Photonics Technology towards Tb/s routing in optical interconnects"). Conclusions relevant for dielectric loaded surface plasmon switches to be integrated in silicon photonic circuitry will be drawn. They rely on the opportunity offered by plasmonic circuitry to carry optical signals and electric currents through the same thin metal circuitry. The heating of the dielectric loading by the electric current enables to design low foot-print thermo-optical switches driving the optical signal flow.

  12. Expanding the plasmonic response of bimetallic nanoparticles by laser seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R J; Rodríguez, C E; Afonso, C N

    2016-03-11

    This work explores a cost-effective route to enhance the tuning range of the optical response of metal nanostructures on substrates beyond the ranges that are achievable through the nanostructure dimensions, composition or dewetting processes. The new route (laser seeding) uses single nanosecond laser pulses to induce dewetting in regions of a metal layer deposited on a glass substrate followed by the deposition of a second metal layer, both layers being deposited by pulsed laser deposition. In order to show the possibilities of this new route, we have chosen that the two metals were different, namely Ag and Au. The comparison of the optical response of these regions to those that were laser irradiated after deposition of the second metal layer shows that while nanoalloyed nanoparticles (NPs) are formed in the latter case, the NPs produced in the former case have a heterogeneous structure. The interface between the two metals is either sharp or a narrow region where they have mixed depending on the laser fluence used. While the nanoalloyed NPs exhibit a single, narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the heterogeneous NPs show broader SPRs that peak in the near infrared and depending on conditions exhibit even two clear SPRs. The laser seeding approach in the conditions used in this work allows for the expansion of the tuning range of the color to the blue-green region, i.e. beyond the region that can be achieved through nanoalloyed NPs (yellow-red region). In addition, the results presented foresee the laser seeding route as a means to produce round and almost isolated NPs in an enhanced range of diameters.

  13. Metal-Semiconductor Nanoparticle Hybrids Formed by Self-Organization: A Platform to Address Exciton-Plasmon Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelow, Christian; Theuerholz, T Sverre; Schmidtke, Christian; Richter, Marten; Merkl, Jan-Philip; Kloust, Hauke; Ye, Ziliang; Weller, Horst; Heinz, Tony F; Knorr, Andreas; Lange, Holger

    2016-08-10

    Hybrid nanosystems composed of excitonic and plasmonic constituents can have different properties than the sum of of the two constituents, due to the exciton-plasmon interaction. Here, we report on a flexible model system based on colloidal nanoparticles that can form hybrid combinations by self-organization. The system allows us to tune the interparticle distance and to combine nanoparticles of different sizes and thus enables a systematic investigation of the exciton-plasmon coupling by a combination of optical spectroscopy and quantum-optical theory. We experimentally observe a strong influence of the energy difference between exciton and plasmon, as well as an interplay of nanoparticle size and distance on the coupling. We develop a full quantum theory for the luminescence dynamics and discuss the experimental results in terms of the Purcell effect. As the theory describes excitation as well as coherent and incoherent emission, we also consider possible quantum optical effects. We find a good agreement of the observed and the calculated luminescence dynamics induced by the Purcell effect. This also suggests that the self-organized hybrid system can be used as platform to address quantum optical effects.

  14. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min, E-mail: sjhanmin@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination. - Highlights: • We study photo-enhanced electron conductance of a hybrid Pd–Ag nanoparticle array. • The light-induced conductance enhancement is as high as 20 folds at 10 K. • The enhancement is correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles. • Coulomb blockades is overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field.

  15. Multifunctional Hybrid Fe2O3-Au Nanoparticles for Efficient Plasmonic Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murph, Simona E Hunyadi; Larsen, George K; Lascola, Robert J

    2016-02-20

    One of the most widely used methods for manufacturing colloidal gold nanospherical particles involves the reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) to neutral gold Au(0) by reducing agents, such as sodium citrate or sodium borohydride. The extension of this method to decorate iron oxide or similar nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles to create multifunctional hybrid Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles is straightforward. This approach yields fairly good control over Au nanoparticle dimensions and loading onto Fe2O3. Additionally, the Au metal size, shape, and loading can easily be tuned by changing experimental parameters (e.g., reactant concentrations, reducing agents, surfactants, etc.). An advantage of this procedure is that the reaction can be done in air or water, and, in principle, is amenable to scaling up. The use of such optically tunable Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles for hyperthermia studies is an attractive option as it capitalizes on plasmonic heating of gold nanoparticles tuned to absorb light strongly in the VIS-NIR region. In addition to its plasmonic effects, nanoscale Au provides a unique surface for interesting chemistries and catalysis. The Fe2O3 material provides additional functionality due to its magnetic property. For example, an external magnetic field could be used to collect and recycle the hybrid Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles after a catalytic experiment, or alternatively, the magnetic Fe2O3 can be used for hyperthermia studies through magnetic heat induction. The photothermal experiment described in this report measures bulk temperature change and nanoparticle solution mass loss as functions of time using infrared thermocouples and a balance, respectively. The ease of sample preparation and the use of readily available equipment are distinct advantages of this technique. A caveat is that these photothermal measurements assess the bulk solution temperature and not the surface of the nanoparticle where the heat is transduced and the temperature is likely to be higher.

  16. Chemical and Biological Sensing using Diatom Photonic Crystal Biosilica with In-Situ Growth Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xianming; Squire, Kenny; Li, Erwen; LeDuff, Paul; Rorrer, Gregory; Tang, Suning; Chen, Bin; McKay, Christopher; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Wang, Alan

    2016-12-07

    In this paper, we described a new type of bioenabled nano-plasmonic sensors based on diatom photonic crystal biosilica with in-situ growth silver nanoparticles and demonstrated label-free chemical and biological sensing based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERs) from complex samples. Diatoms are photosynthetic marine micro-organisms that create their own skeletal shells of hydrated amorphous silica, called frustules, which possess photonic crystal-like hierarchical micro- & nano-scale periodic pores. Our research shows that such hybrid plasmonic-biosilica nanostructures formed by cost-effective and eco-friendly bottom-up processes can achieve ultra-high limit of detection for medical applications, food sensing, water/air quality monitoring and geological/space research. The enhanced sensitivity comes from the optical coupling of the guided-mode resonance of the diatom frustules and the localized surface plasmons of the silver nanoparticles. Additionally, the nanoporous, ultra-hydrophilic diatom biosilica with large surface-to-volume ratio can concentrate more analyte molecules to the surface of the SERS substrates, which can help to detect biomolecules that cannot be easily adsorbed by metallic nanoparticles.

  17. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Alla Bucharskaya; Galina Maslyakova; Georgy Terentyuk; Alexander Yakunin; Yuri Avetisyan; Olga Bibikova; Elena Tuchina; Boris Khlebtsov; Nikolai Khlebtsov; Valery Tuchin

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. ...

  18. Chiral nanophotonics chiral optical properties of plasmonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schäferling, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the physics behind the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures focusing on chiral aspects. It explains in detail how the geometry determines chiral near-fields and how to tailor their shape and strength. Electromagnetic fields with strong optical chirality interact strongly with chiral molecules and, therefore, can be used for enhancing the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopy techniques. Besides a short review of the latest results in the field of plasmonically enhanced enantiomer discrimination, this book introduces the concept of chiral plasmonic near-field sources for enhanced chiroptical spectroscopy. The discussion of the fundamental properties of these light sources provides the theoretical basis for further optimizations and is of interest for researchers at the intersection of nano-optics, plasmonics and stereochemistry. .

  19. Q-factor and absorption enhancement for plasmonic anisotropic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scattering and absorption properties of anisotropic metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles. It is revealed that the radially anisotropic dielectric layer can accelerate the evanescent decay of the localized resonant surface modes, leading to Q-factor and absorption rate enhancement. Moreover, the absorption cross section can be maximized to reach the single resonance absorption limit. We further show that such artificial anisotropic cladding materials can be realized by isotropic layered structures, which may inspire many applications based on scattering and absorption of plasmonic nanoparticles.

  20. Compositional arrangement of rod/shell nanoparticles: an approach to provide efficient plasmon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, A.; Golmohammadi, S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we investigated the optical properties of a novel compositional configuration of gold nanorod and silver nanoshell which is embedded in a SiO2 substance. The proper geometrical sizes for compositional rod/shell arrangement have been obtained based on the position and peak of plasmon resonance at λ ˜1550 nm. Adjusting the plasmon resonance position at declared spectrum helps us to provide an arrangement which shows high efficiency and minimum losses. The influence of destructive components such as internal damping and scattering on the rod/shell combination is demonstrated by corresponding diagrams. Moreover, we proposed a nano-array based on examined configuration and the quality of light transmission along the array is studied. We figured out and depicted optical properties of the array such as transmission loss factors, group velocities, transmitted power, transmission quality, and two-dimensional snapshots of surface plasmons (SPs) coupling between nanoparticles arrangements under transverse and longitudinal modes excitations. Ultimately, it is shown that the suggested nanostructure based on studied nanoparticles configuration has a potential to utilize in designing nanophotonic devices such as splitters, couplers, and routers. Finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) as a major simulation model has been employed to study the features of the waveguide.

  1. Optical Sensitivity Gain in Silica-Coated Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Francesco; Figus, Cristiana; Fornasari, Lucia; Patrini, Maddalena; Pellacani, Paola; Marchesini, Gerardo; Valsesia, Andrea; Artizzu, Flavia; Marongiu, Daniela; Saba, Michele; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Marabelli, Franco; Quochi, Francesco

    2014-09-04

    Ultrathin films of silica realized by sol-gel synthesis and dip-coating techniques were successfully applied to predefined metal/polymer plasmonic nanostructures to spectrally tune their resonance modes and to increase their sensitivity to local refractive index changes. Plasmon resonance spectral shifts up to 100 nm with slope efficiencies of ∼8 nm/nm for increasing layer thickness were attained. In the ultrathin layer regime (<10 nm), which could be reached by suitable dilution of the silica precursors and optimization of the deposition speed, the sensitivity of the main plasmonic resonance to refractive index changes in aqueous solution could be increased by over 50% with respect to the bare plasmonic chip. Numerical simulations supported experimental data and unveiled the mechanism responsible for the optical sensitivity gain, proving an effective tool in the design of high-performance plasmonic sensors.

  2. Tunable plasmonic nanostructures: From fundamental nanoscale optics to surface-enhanced spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    In this thesis, I demonstrate the rational design and controllable fabrication of a series of novel plasmonic nanostructures with judiciously tailored optical properties including perfect nanoshells, roughened subwavelength particles, prolate nanoshells known as nanorice, and non-concentric nanoshells known as nanoeggs. All of these nanostructures are very important subwavelength nanoscale optical components that can be utilized to manipulate light in unique ways. The most striking feature of these nanoparticles is their geometrically tunable plasmon resonances, which can be harnessed for widespread applications. I have also utilized these nanostructures as the building blocks to construct self-assembled multinanoparticle systems, such as nanoshell heterodimers, nanosphere arrays and nanoshell arrays. I have further developed multifunctional molecular sensing platforms using these nanoengineered plasmonic structures as substrates for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, realizing integrated analytical chemistry lab-on-a-chip. Applying the Plasmon Hybridization model as design principles to experimentally realizable nanostructures results in a thorough understanding of the origin of the geometry-dependent optical properties observed in these nanosystems. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method also provides a powerful platform for the numerical simulation of local- and far-field optical properties of these nanostructures.

  3. Optical Properties and Plasmonic Performance of Titanium Nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Patsalas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride (TiN is one of the most well-established engineering materials nowadays. TiN can overcome most of the drawbacks of palsmonic metals due to its high electron conductivity and mobility, high melting point and due to the compatibility of its growth with Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS technology. In this work, we review the dielectric function spectra of TiN and we evaluate the plasmonic performance of TiN by calculating (i the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP dispersion relations and (ii the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR band of TiN nanoparticles, and we demonstrate a significant plasmonic performance of TiN.

  4. Design of an optical sensor based on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Marwa M.; AlSharif, Haya; Alshabani, Haifaa; Qadi, Eilaf; Sultan, Maha

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic nano-structured array sensors have been highlighted by their tremendously promising applications, such as the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical biosensors. In this paper, within the visible spectrum region, the optical transmission properties of a metallic thin film deposited over dielectric films of various refraction indices are investigated. With finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, we investigate the optical transmission spectra of such plasmonic structures based on both nano-holes and nano-disc arrays. This investigation includes monitoring the modification in both the transmission resonance wavelengths and peak transmittance. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the interaction between light and plasmonic nano-hole and nano-disc arrays. It shows that the changing the shapes of the nano-holes can affect the resonance wavelengths and the intensity of transmitted spectra and alter its resonance peak transmittance values. We found that the interaction coupling between the localized plasmons (LSP) and the propagating surface plasmons (PSP) can be tuned to boost the performance of the optical sensor.

  5. pH tunability and influence of alkali metal basicity on the plasmonic resonance of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay D.; Akhil Krishnan, R.; Borade, Lalit; Shirolikar, Seema; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2017-07-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance has been a unique and intriguing feature of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) that has attracted immense attention. This has led to an array of applications for AgNPs in optics, sensors, plasmonic imaging etc. Although numerous applications have been reported consistently, the importance of buffer and reaction parameters during the synthesis of AgNPs, is still unclear. In the present study, we have demonstrated the influence of parameters like pH, temperature and buffer conditions (0.1 M citrate buffer) on the plasmonic resonance of AgNPs. We found that neutral and basic pH (from alkali metal) provide optimum interaction conditions for nucleation of plasmon resonant AgNPs. Interestingly, this was not observed in the non-alkali metal base (ammonia). Also, when the nanoparticles synthesized from alkali metal base were incorporated in different buffers, it was observed that the nanoparticles dissolved in the acidic buffer and had reduced plasmonic resonance intensity. This, however, was resolved in the basic buffer, increasing the plasmonic resonance intensity and confirming that nucleation of nanoparticles required basic conditions. The above inference has been supported by characterization of AgNPs using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Fluorimetry analysis, Infrared spectrometer and TEM analysis. The study concluded that the plasmonic resonance of AgNPs occurs due to the interaction of alkali (Na) and transition metal (Ag) salt in basic/neutral conditions, at a specific temperature range, in presence of a capping agent (citric acid), providing a pH tune to the overall system.

  6. Broadband tunability of surface plasmon resonance in graphene-coating silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Shi; Yang, Yang; Lin, Gan; Zhi-Yuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    Graphene decorated nanomaterials and nanostructures can potentially be used in military and medical science applications. In this article, we study the optical properties of a graphene wrapping silica core-shell spherical nanoparticle under illumination of external light by using the Mie theory. We find that the nanoparticle can exhibit surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that can be broadly tuned from mid infrared to near infrared via simply changing the geometric parameters. A simplified equivalent dielectric permittivity model is developed to better understand the physics of SPR, and the calculation results agree well qualitatively with the rigorous Mie theory. Both calculations suggest that a small radius of graphene wrapping nanoparticle with high Fermi level could move the SPR wavelength of graphene into the near infrared regime. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204365 and 11434017) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632704).

  7. Spin-controlled plasmonics via optical Rashba effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitrit, Nir; Yulevich, Igor; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez, E-mail: mehasman@technion.ac.il [Micro and Nanooptics Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-11-18

    Observation of the optical Rashba effect in plasmonics is reported. Polarization helicity degeneracy removal, associated with the inversion symmetry violation, is attributed to the surface symmetry design via anisotropic nanoantennas with space-variant orientations. By utilizing the Rashba-induced momentum in a nanoscale kagome metastructure, we demonstrated a spin-based surface plasmon multidirectional excitation under a normal-incidence illumination. The spin-controlled plasmonics via spinoptical metasurfaces provides a route for spin-based surface-integrated photonic nanodevices and light-matter interaction control, extending the light manipulation capabilities.

  8. Structural and Optical Properties of Single Crystalline Bismuth Nanoparticles in Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Lutful; Mandal, Swapan K.

    We report here the structural and optical properties of Bi nanoparticles in polymer (polypyrrole) matrix. The nanoparticles are synthesized following a wet chemical route. The X-ray diffraction data clearly shows the growth of single crystalline Bi nanoparticles within the host polymer. The microstructure of the Bi nanoparticles obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals clearly the formation of spherical shaped nanoparticles of average size˜27 nm with a narrow size distribution. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits a distinct peak at 278 nm which is attributed to the surface plasmon band of Bi nanoparticles. The absorption spectrum is found to be described well following Mie theory.

  9. Plasmonic antenna array at optical frequency made by nanoapertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.J.; Huang, X.; Peng, R. W.; Wang, Z.; Gao, F.; Sun, W. H.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, Mu

    2008-10-31

    We show here that the plasmonic array based on nanoapertures in ultrathin silver film radiates at optical frequency and behaves as an optical antenna array (OAA). The far-field radiation originates from the coherent superposition of plasmonic emissions on each bank of the aperture. The radiation of OAA presents a strong directivity, which depends on the in-plane rotation of aperture array, and on the polarization and incidence angle of the excitation light as well. We suggest that these features have potential applications in photovoltaics, light-emitting devices, and optical sensors.

  10. Noble metal nanoparticles: Optical forces, electrochemical Ostwald ripening, and photovoltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Peter

    This thesis describes three distinct aspects of the chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. The first chapter introduces the surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles. The second chapter presents an electrodynamic model for the calculation of the attractive optical forces that arise when two dielectric particles are irradiated in a light field. These forces show resonances at dipolar plasmon wavelengths, similar to resonances in the near-field electromagnetic intensities. At MW/cm2 intensities, optical forces can be stronger than van der Waals forces. The third chapter investigates the size dependent electrochemical properties of silver nanoparticles. These thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water on conducting substrates. The process is understood through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. The fourth and fifth chapters consider photo-induced surface reactivity of noble metal particles. First, in the fourth chapter, the light driven deposition of copper onto gold nanoparticle electrodes is presented. The photocurrent is a nonlinear function of laser intensity and increases sharply with cathodic voltage in the underpotential deposition region. The photoreduction is attributed to laser heating (caused by decay of the plasmon oscillation) of the Au nanoparticles, rather than "hot electron" processes. Secondly, in the fifth chapter, the photo-induced oxidation of citrate is studied on silver nanoparticle electrodes. Irradiation of the citrate coated particles is shown to cause the particles to charge negatively from the irreversible transfer of electrons from citrate to the particles. It is hypothesized that the particle plasmon oscillation decays into electron hole pair(s) that causes the photo-oxidation of the surface bound citrate. Both the gold and silver particle systems are simulated using

  11. Rational Design of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Cavitation and Cell Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaine, Rémi; Boutopoulos, Christos; Lajoie, Pierre-Yves; Boulais, Étienne; Meunier, Michel

    2016-05-11

    Metallic nanoparticles are routinely used as nanoscale antenna capable of absorbing and converting photon energy with subwavelength resolution. Many applications, notably in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology, benefit from the enhanced optical properties of these materials, which can be exploited to image, damage, or destroy targeted cells and subcellular structures with unprecedented precision. Modern inorganic chemistry enables the synthesis of a large library of nanoparticles with an increasing variety of shapes, composition, and optical characteristic. However, identifying and tailoring nanoparticles morphology to specific applications remains challenging and limits the development of efficient nanoplasmonic technologies. In this work, we report a strategy for the rational design of gold plasmonic nanoshells (AuNS) for the efficient ultrafast laser-based nanoscale bubble generation and cell membrane perforation, which constitute one of the most crucial challenges toward the development of effective gene therapy treatments. We design an in silico rational design framework that we use to tune AuNS morphology to simultaneously optimize for the reduction of the cavitation threshold while preserving the particle structural integrity. Our optimization procedure yields optimal AuNS that are slightly detuned compared to their plasmonic resonance conditions with an optical breakdown threshold 30% lower than randomly selected AuNS and 13% lower compared to similarly optimized gold nanoparticles (AuNP). This design strategy is validated using time-resolved bubble spectroscopy, shadowgraphy imaging and electron microscopy that confirm the particle structural integrity and a reduction of 51% of the cavitation threshold relative to optimal AuNP. Rationally designed AuNS are finally used to perforate cancer cells with an efficiency of 61%, using 33% less energy compared to AuNP, which demonstrate that our rational design framework is readily transferable to a cell environment

  12. Laser synthesis of ligand-free bimetallic nanoparticles for plasmonic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intartaglia, R; Das, G; Bagga, K; Gopalakrishnan, A; Genovese, A; Povia, M; Di Fabrizio, E; Cingolani, R; Diaspro, A; Brandi, F

    2013-03-07

    A picosecond laser ablation approach has been developed for the synthesis of ligand-free AuAg bimetallic NPs where the relative amount of Ag is controlled in situ through a laser shielding effect. Various measurements, such as optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, revealed the generation of homogenous 15 nm average size bimetallic NPs with different compositions and tunable localized surface plasmon resonance. Furthermore, ligand-free metallic nanoparticles with respect to chemically synthesized nanoparticles display outstanding properties, i.e. featureless Raman background spectrum, which is a basic requirement in many plasmonic applications such as Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. Various molecules were chemisorbed on the nanoparticle and SERS investigations were carried out, by varying the laser wavelength. The SERS enhancement factor for AuAg bimetallic NPs shows an enhancement factor of about 5.7 × 10(5) with respect to the flat AuAg surface.

  13. Dirac plasmons in bipartite lattices of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebb Sturges, Thomas; Woollacott, Claire; Weick, Guillaume; Mariani, Eros

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically ‘graphene-like’ plasmonic metamaterials constituted by two-dimensional arrays of metallic nanoparticles, including perfect honeycomb structures with and without inversion symmetry, as well as generic bipartite lattices. The dipolar interactions between localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in different nanoparticles gives rise to collective plasmons (CPs) that extend over the whole lattice. We study the band structure of CPs and unveil its tunability with the orientation of the dipole moments associated with the LSPs. Depending on the dipole orientation, we identify a phase diagram of gapless or gapped phases in the CP dispersion. We show that the gapless phases in the phase diagram are characterized by CPs behaving as massless chiral Dirac particles, in analogy with electrons in graphene. When the inversion symmetry of the honeycomb structure is broken, CPs are described as gapped chiral Dirac modes with an energy-dependent Berry phase. We further relax the geometric symmetry of the honeycomb structure by analysing generic bipartite hexagonal lattices. In this case we study the evolution of the phase diagram and unveil the emergence of a sequence of topological phase transitions when one hexagonal sublattice is progressively shifted with respect to the other.

  14. A subwavelength plasmonic metamolecule exhibiting magnetic-based optical Fano resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Farbod; Monticone, Francesco; Le, Khai Q.; Liu, Xing-Xiang; Hartsfield, Thomas; Alù, Andrea; Li, Xiaoqin

    2013-02-01

    The lack of symmetry between electric and magnetic charges, a fundamental consequence of the small value of the fine-structure constant, is directly related to the weakness of magnetic effects in optical materials. Properly tailored plasmonic nanoclusters have been proposed recently to induce artificial optical magnetism based on the principle that magnetic effects are indistinguishable from specific forms of spatial dispersion of permittivity at optical frequencies. In a different context, plasmonic Fano resonances have generated a great deal of interest, particularly for use in sensing applications that benefit from sharp spectral features and extreme field localization. In the absence of natural magnetism, optical Fano resonances have so far been based on purely electric effects. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a subwavelength plasmonic metamolecule consisting of four closely spaced gold nanoparticles supports a strong magnetic response coupled to a broad electric resonance. Small structural asymmetries in the assembled nanoring enable the interaction between electric and magnetic modes, leading to the first observation of a magnetic-based Fano scattering resonance at optical frequencies. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with simulations and analytical calculations, and represent an important step towards the quest for artificial magnetism and negative refractive index metamaterials at optical frequencies.

  15. Electrically Controlled Plasmonic Lasing Resonances with Silver Nanoparticles Embedded in Amplifying Nematic Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chin

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an electrically controlled coherent random lasing with silver nano-particles dispersed in a dye-doped nematic liquid crystal (NLC), in which external electric field dependent emission intensity and frequency-splitting are recorded. A modified rate equation model is proposed to interpret the observed coherent lasing, which is a manifestation of double enhancements, caused by the plasmon-polariton near-fields of Ag particles, on the population inversion of laser dye molecules and the optical energy density of lasing modes. The noticeable quenching of lasing resonances in a weak applied field is due to the dynamic light scattering by irregular director fluctuations of the NLC host, which wash out the coherent interference among different particle palsmon-polariton fields. This provides a proof to support that the present lasing resonances are very sensitive to the dielectric perturbations in the host medium and thus are likely associated with some coupled plasmonic oscillations of metal nanopartic...

  16. Optical Control of Plasmonic Bloch Modes on Periodic Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gjonaj, B.; Aulbach, J.; Johnson, P.M.; Mosk, A.P.; Kuipers, L.; Lagendijk, A.

    2012-01-01

    We study and actively control the coherent properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) optically excited on a nanohole array. Amplitude and phase of the optical excitation are externally controlled via a digital spatial light modulator (SLM) and SPP interference fringe patterns are designed and

  17. Compact surface plasmonic waveguide component for integrated optical processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Nilima; Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2015-06-01

    A compact surface plasmonic two mode interference waveguide component having silicon core and silver and GaAsInP side cladding is proposed for optical processor elements. Coupling operation is obtained by using index modulation of GaAsInP cladding with applied optical pulse.

  18. Perfect optical vortex enhanced surface plasmon excitation for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Du, Luping; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an all-optical technique for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) with perfect optical vortex (POV). POV can improve the efficiency of the excitation of surface plasma and reduce the background noise of the excited fluorescence. The plasmonic standing wave patterns are excited by POV with fractional topological charges for accurate phase shift of {-2π/3, 0, and 2π/3}. The imaging resolution of less than 200 nm was produced. This PSIM technique is expected to be used as a wide field, super resolution imaging technique in dynamic biological imaging.

  19. Surface plasmon excitation and manipulation in disordered two-dimmensional nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coello, Victor; Cortes, Rodolfo; García Ortíz, César Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results of simultaneous surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and in-plane manipulation with random arrays of gold nanoparticles. The recorded images were obtained by using leakage radiation microscopy (LRM) for the excitation wavelength of 633 nm...... and for di®erent densities of particles. The numerical model makes use of a composed analytic Green dyadic which takes into account near- and far-¯eld regions, with the latter being approximated by the part describing the scattering via excitation of SPP. The LRM optical images obtained are related...

  20. Blueshift of the silver plasmon band using controlled nanoparticle dissolution in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kneipp, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the size-dependent blue shift of the silver nanoparticle plasmon band in aqueous solution by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy. An oxidative dissolution scheme allows a gradual decrease in the particle sizes by controlled oxidation during recording of the optical spectra. Hence......, all sizes until complete dissolution can be obtained on the same substrate, thereby avoiding substrate-to-substrate variations and greatly increasing the size resolution. Cyanide and cysteamine are strong nucleophiles (electron pair donors) that deposits negative charge onto the NP surface. A 1/R...

  1. Manipulating quantum dot fluorescence by utilizing Brownian induced near-field interactions with plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Nola

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with size-dependent optical properties; thus making them supreme fluorophores. Plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs), such as gold and silver nanoparticles, support localized surface plasmons on their surface. When the localized surface plasmons are excited, a highly concentrated electromagnetic field is formed near the particle. Therefore, if a QD is within the near-field of a PNP, the emission or excitation of the QD can be enhanced. However, due to Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the QD fluorescence could instead be quenched by the proximity of PNPs. Whether enhancement or quenching occurs, is dependent upon the distance and geometry of the nanoparticles. Enhanced QD fluorescence would be helpful in biomedical sensing and imaging and solar energy conversion applications. In addition, quenched QD fluorescence caused by FRET could be applied to FRET-based sensing and imaging in medical diagnosis. This master's thesis first theoretically models the stochastic movement of QDs and PNPs in an aqueous solution. The simulation is based upon the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method coupled with Langevin equations. Using this simulation, we were able to predict the percentage of QDs in the near-field region of PNPs. The percentage of QDs in the near-field region of GNPs for a concentration of 1 × 1013 QDs/mL and 5 × 108 GNPs/mL, is a very small percentage of 2 × 10-5%. Yet, the concentration of QDs in the near-field region of GNPs was calculated to be 1,510,000 QDs mL-1. In addition, this master's thesis experimentally explores the enhancement and quenching of QD emission for different concentrations and sizes of PNPs in aqueous solutions. The fluorescence spectra of two types of QD-PNP mixtures were measured. The first mixture was QDs and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) dispersed in distilled water, where the emission wavelength of the QDs matches the localized surface plasmon excitation wavelength of the GNPs. The second

  2. Multiple Resonances Induced by Plasmonic Coupling between Gold Nanoparticle Trimers and Hexagonal Assembly of Gold-Coated Polystyrene Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takako; Yoshikawa, Takayasu; Tamura, Mamoru; Iida, Takuya; Imura, Kohei

    2016-09-15

    Optical properties of a gold nanoparticle trimer assembly coupled with gold-coated hexagonally close-packed polystyrene microspheres were investigated by linear and nonlinear spectroscopy. The observed reflection spectrum shows multiple peaks from the visible to near-infrared spectral regions. The spectroscopic properties were also examined by a finite-difference time-domain simulation. We found that the optical response of plasmons excited in the gold nanoparticle trimers was significantly modulated by strong coupling of the plasmons and the photonic mode induced in the gold-coated polystyrene assembly. Two-photon induced photoluminescence and Raman scattering from the sample were investigated, and both signals were significantly enhanced at the gold nanoparticle assembly. The simulations reveal that the electric fields can be enhanced site-selectively, not only at the interstitial sites in the nanoparticle assembly but also at the gaps between the particle and the gold film due to plasmonic interactions, by tuning the wavelength and are responsible for the strong optical responses.

  3. Plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates: Understanding Fano-like spectra observed in reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard-Giannesini, Léo; Cruguel, Hervé; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Pluchery, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known for their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that can be measured with UV-visible spectroscopy. AuNPs are often deposited on silicon substrates for various applications, and the LSPR is measured in reflection. In this case, optical spectra are measured by surface differential reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and the absorbance exhibits a negative peak. This article studies both experimentally and theoretically on the single layers of 16 nm diameter spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) grafted on silicon. The morphology and surface density of AuNPs were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasmon response in transmission on the glass substrate and in reflection on the silicon substrate is described by an analytical model based on the Fresnel equations and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory (FMG). The FMG model shows a strong dependence to the incidence angle of the light. At low incident angles, the peak appears negatively with a shallow intensity, and at angles above 30°, the usual positive shape of the plasmon is retrieved. The relevance of the FMG model is compared to the Mie theory within the dipolar approximation. We conclude that no Fano effect is responsible for this derivative shape. An easy-to-use formula is derived that agrees with our experimental data.

  4. Synthesis and characterizations of novel magnetic and plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Naween

    This dissertation reports the colloidal synthesis of iron silicide, hafnium oxide core-gold shell and water soluble iron-gold alloy for the first time. As the first part of the experimentation, plasmonic and superparamagnetic nanoparticles of gold and iron are synthesized in the form of core-shell and alloy. The purpose of making these nanoparticles is that the core-shell and alloy nanoparticles exhibit enhanced properties and new functionality due to close proximity of two functionally different components. The synthesis of core-shell and alloy nanoparticles is of special interest for possible application towards magnetic hyperthermia, catalysis and drug delivery. The iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles prepared in the reverse micelles reflux in high boiling point solvent (diphenyl ether) in presence of oleic acid and oleyl amine results in the formation of monodisperse core-shell nanoparticles. The second part of the experimentation includes the preparation of water soluble iron-gold alloy nanoparticles. The alloy nanoparticles are prepared for the first time at relatively low temperature (110 °C). The use of hydrophilic ligand 3-mercapto-1-propane sulphonic acid ensures the aqueous solubility of the alloy nanoparticles. Next, hafnium oxide core-gold shell nanoparticles are prepared for the first time using high temperature reduction method. These nanoparticles are potentially important as a high kappa material in semiconductor industry. Fourth, a new type of material called iron silicide is prepared in solution phase. The material has been prepared before but not in a colloidal solution. The Fe3Si obtained is superparamagnetic. Another phase beta-FeSi 2 is a low band gap (0.85 eV) semiconductor and is sustainable and environmentally friendly. At last, the iron monosilicide (FeSi) and beta-FeSi2 are also prepared by heating iron-gold core-shell and alloy nanoparticles on silicon (111) substrate. The nucleation of gaseous silicon precursor on the melted

  5. Quantum plasmonics for next-generation optical and sensing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaied, Modjtaba; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-12-01

    Classical plasmonics has mostly focused on structures characterized by large dimension, for which the quantummechanical effects have nearly no impact. However, recent advances in technology, especially on miniaturized plasmonics devices at nanoscale, have made it possible to imagine experimental applications of plasmons where the quantum nature of free charge carriers play an important role. Therefore, it is necessary to use quantum mechanics to model the transport of charge carriers in solid state plasma nanostructures. Here, a non-local quantum model of permittivity is presented by applying the Wigner equation with collision term in the kinetic theory of solid state plasmas where the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the electron-lattice collisions. The surface plasmon resonance of ultra-small nanoparticles is investigated using this non-local quantum permittivity and its dispersion relation is obtained. The successful application of this theory in ultra-small plasmonics structures such as surface plasmon polariton waveguides, doped semiconductors, graphene, the metamaterials composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, and the quantum droplets is anticipated.

  6. Active coated nanoparticles: impact of plasmonic material choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    The near- and far-field properties of a number of active coated spherical nanoparticles excited by an electric Hertzian dipole at optical frequencies are investigated. Their enhanced, as well as reduced, radiation effects are demonstrated and compared.......The near- and far-field properties of a number of active coated spherical nanoparticles excited by an electric Hertzian dipole at optical frequencies are investigated. Their enhanced, as well as reduced, radiation effects are demonstrated and compared....

  7. DNA origami-directed, discrete three-dimensional plasmonic tetrahedron nanoarchitectures with tailored optical chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaole; Lu, Xuxing; Chen, Zhong; Meng, Chun; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2014-04-23

    Discrete, three-dimensional (3D) gold nanoparticle (AuNP) tetrahedron nanoarchitectures are successfully self-assembled with DNA origami as template with high purity (>85%). A distinct plasmonic chiral response is experimentally observed from the AuNP tetrahedron nanoarchitectures and appears in a configuration-dependent manner. The chiral optical properties are then rationally engineered by modifying the structural parameters including the AuNP size and interparticle distance. Theoretical study of the AuNP tetrahedron nanoarchitectures shows the dependence of the chiral optical property on the AuNP size and interparticle distance, consistent with the ensemble averaged measurements.

  8. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    A grand challenge of modern science has been the ability to predict and design the properties of new materials. This approach to the a priori design of materials presents a number of challenges including: predictable properties of the material building blocks, a programmable means for arranging such building blocks into well understood architectures, and robust models that can predict the properties of these new materials. In this dissertation, we present a series of studies that describe how optical properties in DNA-programmed nanoparticle superlattices can be predicted prior to their synthesis. The first chapter provides a history and introduction to the study of metal nanoparticle arrays. Chapter 2 surveys and compares several geometric models and electrodynamics simulations with the measured optical properties of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices. Chapter 3 describes silver nanoparticle superlattices (rather than gold) and identifies their promise as plasmonic metamaterials. In chapter 4, the concept of plasmonic metallurgy is introduced, whereby it is demonstrated that concepts from materials science and metallurgy can be applied to the optical properties of mixed metallic plasmonic materials, unveiling rich and tunable optical properties such as color and asymmetric reflectivity. Chapter 5 presents a comprehensive theoretical exploration of anisotropy (non-spherical) in nanoparticle superlattice architectures. The role of anisotropy is discussed both on the nanoscale, where several desirable metamaterial properties can be tuned from the ultraviolet to near-infrared, and on the mesoscale, where the size and shape of a superlattice is demonstrated to have a pronounced effect on the observed far-field optical properties. Chapter 6 builds upon those theoretical data presented in chapter 5, including the experimental realization of size and shape dependent properties in DNA-programmed superlattices. Specifically, nanoparticle spacing is explored as a parameter that

  9. Fano-resonance boosted cascaded field enhancement in a plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity nanoantenna array and its SERS application

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhendong; You, Oubo; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-01-01

    Cascaded optical field enhancement (CFE) can be realized in some specially designed multiscale plasmonic nanostructures, where the generation of extremely strong field at nanoscale volume is crucial for many applications, for example, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Here, we propose a strategy of realizing a high-quality plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity (PIC) nanoantenna array, where strong coupling between a nanoparticle dark mode with a high order nanocavity bright mode can produce Fano resonance at a target wavelength. The Fano resonance can effectively boost the CFE in the PIC, with a field enhancement factor up to 5X10^2. A cost-effective and reliable nanofabrication method is developed with room temperature nanoimprinting lithography to manufacture high-quality PIC arrays. This technique guarantees the generation of only one gold nanoparticle at the bottom of each nanocavity, which is crucial for the generation of the expected CFE. As a demonstration of the performance and application of the...

  10. Design guideline for plasmonic 16-QAM optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-mfrji, Alhuda A.; Tawfeeq, Shelan K.; Fyath, Raad S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design and investigation of 16-QAM optical modulator based on plasmonic-polymer hybrid slot waveguides. The design is CMOS-compatible and uses dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) followed by a phase modulator (PM). Careful consideration is given to design low loss photonic-plasmonic interfaces to ensure efficient coupling between silicon and plasmonic waveguide. The effect of slot widths on device performance is investigated comprehensively using COMSOL software simulation along with analytical analysis for both gold and silver contact. The results can be used as a guideline to design compact and high speed all-plasmonic 16-QAM modulators for 1550 nm wavelength communication systems.

  11. Plasmonic enhancement of direct optical initiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Glambra, Anna M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Current Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) detonators use a laser focused onto a thin metal layer to drive a hot plasma and/or fragments into PETN powder. Previous studies showed a dramatic decrease in laser energies required to initiate the detonation using this approach over direct laser illumination of the PETN powder. Plasmonic metal nanostructures have been shown capable of strongly coupling laser energy into adjacent materials. We have incorporated gold nanospheres into PETN powder and are investigating their plasmonic enhancement of direct optical initiation via measurements of threshold laser energies and streak camera measurements for calculation of run to detonation distances compared to other DOI schemes.

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of direct optical initiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Akinci, Adrian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giambra, Anna M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Current Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) detonators use a laser focused onto a thin metal layer to drive a hot plasma and/or fragments into PETN powder. Previous studies showed a dramatic decrease in laser energies required to initiate the detonation using this approach over direct laser illumination of the PETN powder. Plasmonic metal nanostructures have been shown capable of strongly coupling laser energy into adjacent materials. We have incorporated gold nanospheres into PETN powder and are investigating their plasmonic enhancement of direct optical initiation via measurements of threshold laser energies and streak camera measurements for calculation of run to detonation distances compared to other DOI schemes.

  13. Point-by-point near-field optical energy deposition around plasmonic nanospheres in absorbing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R K; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-08-01

    Here we investigate the effects of absorbing media on plasmon-enhanced near-field optical energy deposition. We find that increasing absorption by the medium results in increased particle scattering at the expense of particle absorption, and that much of this increased particle scattering is absorbed by the medium close to the particle surface. We present an analytical method for evaluating the spatial distribution of near-field enhanced absorption surrounding plasmonic metal nanospheres in absorbing media using a new point-by-point method. We propose criteria to define relevant near-field boundaries and calculate the properties of the local absorption enhancement, which redistributes absorption to the near-field and decays asymptotically as a function of the distance from the particle to background levels. Using this method, we performed a large-scale parametric study to understand the effect of particle size and wavelength on the near-field absorption for gold nanoparticles in aqueous media and silicon, and identified conditions that are relevant to enhanced local infrared absorption in silicon. The presented approach provides insight into the local energy transfer around plasmonic nanoparticles for predicting near-field effects for advanced concepts in optical sensing, thin-film solar cells, nonlinear imaging, and photochemical applications.

  14. Mathematical analysis of plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles: The full Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Habib; Ruiz, Matias; Yu, Sanghyeon; Zhang, Hai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we use the full Maxwell equations for light propagation in order to analyze plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles. We mathematically define the notion of plasmonic resonance and analyze its shift and broadening with respect to changes in size, shape, and arrangement of the nanoparticles, using the layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations. We present an effective medium theory for resonant plasmonic systems and derive a condition on the volume fraction under which the Maxwell-Garnett theory is valid at plasmonic resonances.

  15. Numerical investigation of optical Tamm states in two-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zi-Ming; Hu, Yi-Hua; Ju, Gui-Fang; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Ding, Wei; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Optical Tamm states (OTSs) in analogy with its electronic counterpart confined at the surface of crystals are optical surface modes at the interfaces between uniform metallic films and distributed Bragg reflectors. In this paper, OTSs are numerically investigated in two-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanobeams (HPPCN), which are constructed by inserting a metallic nanoparticle into a photonic crystal nanobeam formed by periodically etching square air holes into dielectric waveguides. The evidences of OTSs can be verified by transmission spectra and the field distribution at resonant frequency. Similar to OTSs in one-dimensional multilayer structures OTSs in HPPCN can be excited by both TE and TM polarization. The physical origin of OTSs in HPPCN is due to the combined contribution of strong reflection imposed by the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal (PC) nanobeam and strong backward scattering exerted by the nanoparticle. For TE, incidence OTSs can be obtained at the frequency near the center of the photonic band gap. The transmissivity and the resonant frequency can be finely tuned by the dimension of nanoparticles. While for TM incidence OTSs are observed for relatively larger metallic nanoparticles compared with TE polarization. The differences between TE and TM polarization can be explained by two reasons. For one reason stronger backward scattering of nanoparticles for TE polarization can be achieved by the excitation of localized surface plasmon polariton of nanoparticles. This assumption has been proved by examining the scattering, absorption, and extinction cross section of the metallic nanoparticle. The other can be attributed to the deep and wide PBG available for TE polarization with less number of air holes compared with TM polarization. Our results show great promise in extending the application scope of OTSs from one-dimensional structures to practical integrated photonic devices and circuits.

  16. Numerical investigation of optical Tamm states in two-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanobeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zi-Ming, E-mail: mengzm@gdut.edu.cn, E-mail: lizy@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Hu, Yi-Hua; Ju, Gui-Fang [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Ding, Wei; Li, Zhi-Yuan, E-mail: mengzm@gdut.edu.cn, E-mail: lizy@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-28

    Optical Tamm states (OTSs) in analogy with its electronic counterpart confined at the surface of crystals are optical surface modes at the interfaces between uniform metallic films and distributed Bragg reflectors. In this paper, OTSs are numerically investigated in two-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanobeams (HPPCN), which are constructed by inserting a metallic nanoparticle into a photonic crystal nanobeam formed by periodically etching square air holes into dielectric waveguides. The evidences of OTSs can be verified by transmission spectra and the field distribution at resonant frequency. Similar to OTSs in one-dimensional multilayer structures OTSs in HPPCN can be excited by both TE and TM polarization. The physical origin of OTSs in HPPCN is due to the combined contribution of strong reflection imposed by the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal (PC) nanobeam and strong backward scattering exerted by the nanoparticle. For TE, incidence OTSs can be obtained at the frequency near the center of the photonic band gap. The transmissivity and the resonant frequency can be finely tuned by the dimension of nanoparticles. While for TM incidence OTSs are observed for relatively larger metallic nanoparticles compared with TE polarization. The differences between TE and TM polarization can be explained by two reasons. For one reason stronger backward scattering of nanoparticles for TE polarization can be achieved by the excitation of localized surface plasmon polariton of nanoparticles. This assumption has been proved by examining the scattering, absorption, and extinction cross section of the metallic nanoparticle. The other can be attributed to the deep and wide PBG available for TE polarization with less number of air holes compared with TM polarization. Our results show great promise in extending the application scope of OTSs from one-dimensional structures to practical integrated photonic devices and circuits.

  17. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-08-09

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  18. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Bucharskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT/photodynamic (PDT therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  19. Transverse Chiral Optical Forces by Locally Excited Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, M H

    2015-01-01

    Recently the new concepts of transverse spin angular momentum and Belinfante spin momentum of evanescent waves have drawn considerable attention. Here, we investigate these novel physical properties of electromagnetic fields in the context of locally excited surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that locally excited surface plasmon polaritons possess transverse spin angular momentum and Belinfante momentum with rich and non-trivial characteristics. We also show that the transverse spin angular momentum of locally excited surface plasmon polaritons leads to the emergence of transverse chiral forces in opposite directions for chiral objects of different handedness. The magnitude of such a transverse force is comparable to the optical gradient force and scattering forces. This finding may pave the way for realization of optical separation of chiral biomolecules.

  20. Optimization of extraordinary optical absorption in plasmonic and dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Extraordinary optical absorption (EOA) can be obtained by plasmonic surface structuring. However, studies that compare the performance of these plasmonic devices with similar structured dielectric devices are rarely found in the literature. In this work we show different methods to enhance the EOA...... silicon layer for certain optical wavelengths compared to metal strips. It is then demonstrated that by topology optimization it is possible to generate nonintuitive surface designs that perform even better than the simple strip designs for both silicon and metals. These results indicate that in general...... by optimizing the geometry of the surface structuring for both plasmonic and dielectric devices, and the optimized performances are compared. Two different problem types with periodic structures are considered. The first case shows that strips of silicon on a surface can increase the absorption in an underlying...

  1. Resonance fluorescence of a two-level quantum emitter near a plasmonic nanoparticle: role of the near-field polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Yu V.; Chubchev, E. D.; Zadkov, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the interaction of a two-level quantum emitter (atom, molecule, etc) with a plasmonic nanoparticle (prolate nanospheroid) in an external laser field features either an essential increase (up to a few orders of magnitude) or reduction (up to a few times) of the total decay rate of the emitter in specific areas around the nanoparticle in contrast to its decay rate in a vacuum. It is also shown that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of the emitter in close proximity to a plasmonic nanoparticle is very sensitive to both the location of the emitter around the nanoparticle and to polarization of the near-field, which depends in turn on the polarization of the incident laser field. This can be used in engineering potential quantum optics experiments with quantum emitters in the near-field, as well as for 3D nanoscopy of the near-field by registering the resonance fluorescence spectra of quantum emitters scattered in the vicinity of a plasmonic nanoparticle.

  2. Bonding and charge transfer plasmons of conductively bridged nanoparticles: The effects of junction conductance and nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Alemayehu Nana; Lin, Jingquan

    2016-09-01

    A detailed study of charge transfer plasmon properties of conductively bridged nanoparticles is essential for designing artificial molecules and developing plasmonic sensors. In this report, we demonstrate spectral tuning and control of local field responses of conductively bridged and compositionally homogeneous plasmonic nanoparticles of various shapes and sizes. The scattering spectral peaks of connected nanoparticles are tuned by controlling inter-particle feed-gap, junction conductance, and nanoparticle morphology. The far-field spectral responses are further tuned by increasing the number of nanoparticles from dimer to trimer, and a generalized expression for charge transfer plasmon peak shift with junction geometry is developed for various shapes of nanotrimers. The corresponding near-field distributions of the linked nanoparticles also exhibit remarkable features. Specifically, the local field profiles of dimer nanoparticles calculated at the charge transfer wavelengths show strong interaction between the nanoparticles. On the other hand, in the bridged symmetrical nanotrimers, the central nanoparticles act as a bridge and only the rest two of the nanoparticles show bright modes. These findings suggest that using conductively bridged nanoaggregates could play a significant role in tuning far-field spectral responses of plasmonic nanostructures for practical applications in molecular sensing.

  3. Impact of the Nanoscale Gap Morphology on the Plasmon Coupling in Asymmetric Nanoparticle Dimer Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Paul S; Herrmann, Janning F; Fritz, Eva-Corinna; Ravoo, Bart Jan; Höppener, Christiane

    2016-03-23

    Coupling of plasmon resonances in metallic gap antennas is of interest for a wide range of applications due to the highly localized strong electric fields supported by these structures, and their high sensitivity to alterations of their structure, geometry, and environment. Morphological alterations of asymmetric nanoparticle dimer antennas with (sub)-nanometer size gaps are assigned to changes of their optical response in correlative dark-field spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) investigations. This multimodal approach to investigate individual dimer structures clearly demonstrates that the coupling of the plasmon modes, in addition to well-known parameters such as the particle geometry and the gap size, is also affected by the relative alignment of both nanoparticles. The investigations corroborate that the alignment of the gap forming facets, and with that the gap area, is crucial for their scattering properties. The impact of a flat versus a rounded gap structure on the optical properties of equivalent dimers becomes stronger with decreasing gap size. These results hint at a higher confinement of the electric field in the gap and possibly a different onset of quantum transport effects for flat and rounded gap antennas in corresponding structures for very narrow gaps.

  4. Toward Plasmonics: Photoelectric Conversion and Laser Writing Utilizing Gold Nanoparticles%等离子体的光电转换以及激光刻蚀金纳米颗粒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.; Yamada

    2005-01-01

    @@ A new technology for the development of optic and photonic devices andsystems taking advantages of extraordinary enhancement and localization of surface plasmon may be called as “plasmonics". A noteworthy characteristic of goldnanoparticles is that they show strong absorption bands in the visible-near IR region due to localized surface plasmon oscillation. Here, I will describe the utilization of gold nanoparticles on photoelectric conversion from self-assembled monolayers, and of gold nanorods as laser writing materials.

  5. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Sun, Jiantang; Bickford, Lissett R.; Lin, Alex W. H.; Halas, Naomi J.; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  6. Measurement of immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles' cellular binding: a key factor in optimizing diagnostic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Kun [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sun Jiantang [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Bickford, Lissett R [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Lin, Alex W H [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Halas, Naomi J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Yu, T-K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Box 1202, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah A [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-142, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2008-01-30

    In this study, we use polarized light scattering to study immunotargeted plasmonic nanoparticles which bind to live SK-BR-3 human breast carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles can be conjugated to various biomolecules in order to target specific molecular signatures of disease. This specific targeting provides enhanced contrast in scattering-based optical imaging techniques. While there are papers which report the number of antibodies that bind per nanoparticle, there are almost no reports of the key factor which influences diagnostic or therapeutic efficacy using nanoparticles: the number of targeted nanoparticles that bind per cell. To achieve this goal, we have developed a 'negative' method of determining the binding concentration of those antibody/nanoparticle bioconjugates which are targeted specifically to breast cancer cells. Unlike previously reported methods, we collected unbound nanoparticle bioconjugates and measured the light scattering from dilute solutions of these particles so that quantitative binding information can be obtained. By following this process, the interaction effects of adjacent bound nanoparticles on the cell membrane can be avoided simply by measuring the light scattering from the unbound nanoparticles. Specifically, using nanoshells of two different sizes, we compared the binding concentrations of anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates targeted to HER2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells. The results indicate that, for anti-HER2/nanoshell bioconjugates, there are approximately 800-1600 nanoshells bound per cell; for anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates, the binding concentration is significantly lower at nearly 100 nanoshells bound per cell. These results are also supported by dark-field microscopy images of the cells labeled with anti-HER2/nanoshell and anti-IgG/nanoshell bioconjugates.

  7. Plasmon-enhanced second harmonic generation in semiconductor quantum dots close to metal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Bragas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the enhancement of the optical second harmonic signal in non-centrosymmetric semiconductor CdS quantum dots, when they are placed in close contact with isolated silver nanoparticles. The intensity enhancement is about 1000. We also show that the enhancement increases when the incoming laser frequency $omega$ is tuned toward the spectral position of the silver plasmon at $2omega$, proving that the silver nanoparticle modifies the nonlinear emission.Received: 8 March 2011, Accepted: 30 May 2011; Edited by: L. Viña; Reviewed by: R. Gordon, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.030002Cite as: P. M. Jais, C. von Bilderling, A. V. Bragas, Papers in Physics 3, 030002 (2011

  8. Size Characterisation Method and Detection Enhancement of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in a Pump–Probe System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fuentes-Domínguez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The optical resonance of metal nanoparticles can be used to enhance the generation and detection of their main vibrational mode. In this work, we show that this method allows the accurate characterisation of the particle’s size because the vibrational frequency of plasmonic nanoparticles only depends on their mechanical properties. Moreover, by a careful selection of the particle size and/or probe laser wavelength, the detected signal can be increased by a large factor (∼9 for the particles used in this work under the same illumination conditions. Finally, we show experimentally that particles of different sizes inside the point spread function can be observed due to the differences in their vibrational states, which could provide a feasible route to super-resolution.

  9. Highly tunable plasmonic nanoring arrays for nanoparticle manipulation and detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergides, M.; Truong, V. G.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of trapping and detection of nano-objects at very low laser powers in the near-infra-red region (NIR) is crucial for many applications. Singular visible-light nano-optics based on abrupt phase changes have recently demonstrated a significant improvement in molecule detection. Here, we propose and demonstrate tunable plasmonic nanodevices, which can improve both the trapping field enhancement and detection of nano-objects using singular phase drops in the NIR range. The plasmonic nanostructures, which consist of gaps with dimensions 50 nm × 50 nm connecting nanorings in arrays is discussed. These gaps act as individual detection and trapping sites. The tunability of the system is evident from extinction and reflection spectra while increasing the aperture size in the arrays. Additionally, in the region where the plasmonic nano-array exhibits topologically-protected, near-zero reflection behaviour, the phase displays a rapid change. Our experimental data predict that, using this abrupt phase changes, one can improve the detection sensitivity by 10 times compared to the extinction spectra method. We finally report experimental evidence of 100 nm polystyrene beads trapping using low incident power on these devices. The overall design demonstrates strong capability as an optical, label-free, non-destructive tool for single molecule manipulation where low trapping intensity, minimal photo bleaching and high sensitivity is required.

  10. Improved optical enhancement in binary plasmonic gratings with nanogap spacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Ahmad A.; Bauman, Stephen J.; Brawley, Zachary T.; Herzog, Joseph B.

    2016-09-01

    This work thoroughly investigates binary nanowire gratings with nanogap spacing. A binary plasmonic grating is a periodic nanostructure for which each period has two different widths. The study has determined that plasmonic gratings with two different widths in each period give rise to optical enhancement that is 2.1 times stronger than that of standard plasmonic grating structures. A map of varying width ratios has been created to illustrate the key geometric characteristic for enhancement optimization. The structure under investigation was a gold structure with a constant height of 15 nm and a nanogap of 5 nm. The period size of the structure depends on the two nanowire widths in each grating period. The optical enhancement (E/E0)2 of the geometry was investigated using a finite element method (FEM) simulation for various wavelengths. The results show a strong correlation between the plasmon wavelength and the periodicity of the gratings. Additionally, the plasmonic charge distributions have been calculated for various periods and geometries. Various resonant modes exist for the charge distribution, significantly affecting the enhancement depending on the nanowire widths.

  11. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 1...

  12. Plasmonic enhancement of ultrafast all-optical magnetization reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir; Neely, Lauren N.; Allin, Leigh J.; Kochergin, Eugene V.; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrafast all optical magnetization switching in GdFeCo layers on the basis of Inverse Faraday Effect (IFE) was demonstrated recently and suggested as a possible path toward next generation magnetic data storage medium with much faster writing time. However, to date, the demonstrations of ultrafast all-optical magnetization switching were performed with powerful femtosecond lasers, hardly useful for practical applications in data storage and data processing. Here we show that utilization of IFE enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures enables fast all-optical magnetization switching with smaller/cheaper laser sources with longer pulse durations. Our modeling results predict significant enhancement of IFE around all major types of plasmonic nanostructures for a circularly polarized incident light. Unlike the IFE in uniform bulk materials, nonzero value of IFE is predicted in plasmonic nanostructures even with a linearly polarized excitation. Experimentally, all-optical magnetization switching at 20 times lower laser fluence and roughly 100 times lower value of laser fluence/pulse duration ratio is demonstrated in plasmonic samples to verify the model predictions. The path to achieve higher levels of enhancement experimentally is discussed.

  13. Spoof Plasmon Hybridization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Maier, Stefan A; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon hybridization between closely spaced nanoparticles yields new hybrid modes not found in individual constituents, allowing for the engineering of resonance properties and field enhancement capabilities of metallic nanostructure. Experimental verifications of plasmon hybridization have been thus far mostly limited to optical frequencies, as metals cannot support surface plasmons at longer wavelengths. Here, we introduce the concept of 'spoof plasmon hybridization' in highly conductive metal structures and investigate experimentally the interaction of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in adjacent metal disks corrugated with subwavelength spiral patterns. We show that the hybridization results in the splitting of spoof plasmon modes into bonding and antibonding resonances analogous to molecular orbital rule and plasmonic hybridization in optical spectrum. These hybrid modes can be manipulated to produce enormous field enhancements (larger than 5000) by tuning the separation between disks or alte...

  14. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jes Ærøe Hyllested

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemicals typically available in plants have the capability to reduce silver and gold salts and to create silver and gold nanoparticles. We report the preparation of silver nanoparticles with sizes between 10 and 300 nm from silver nitrate using fruit extract collected from pineapples and oranges as reducing agents. The evolvement of a characteristic surface plasmon extinction spectrum in the range of 420 nm to 480 nm indicates the formation of silver nanoparticles after mixing silver nitrate solution and fruit extract. Shifts in plasmon peaks over time indicate the growth of nanoparticles. Electron microscopy shows that the shapes of the nanoparticles are different depending on the fruit used for preparation. The green preparation process can result in individual nanoparticles with a very poor tendency to form aggregates with narrow gaps even when aggregation is forced by the addition of NaCl. This explains only modest enhancement factors for near-infrared-excited surface enhanced Raman scattering. In addition to the surface plasmon band, UV–visible absorption spectra show features in the UV range which indicates also the presence of small silver clusters, such as Ag42+. The increase of the plasmon absorption correlates with the decrease of absorption band in the UV. This confirms the evolution of silver nanoparticles from silver clusters. The presence of various silver clusters on the surface of the “green” plasmonic silver nanoparticles is also supported by a strong multicolor luminesce signal emitted by the plasmonic particles during 473 nm excitation.

  15. Interplay between out-of-plane magnetic plasmon and lattice resonance for modified resonance lineshape and near-field enhancement in double nanoparticles array

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Pei; He, Jinna; Fan, Chunzhen; Cai, Genwang; Liang, Erjun

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional double nanoparticles (DNPs) arrays are demonstrated theoretically supporting the interaction of out-of-plane magnetic plasmons and in-plane lattice resonances, which can be achieved by tuning the nanoparticle height or the array period due to the height-dependent magnetic resonance and the periodicity-dependent lattice resonance. The interplay of the two plasmon modes can lead to a remarkable change in resonance lineshape and an improvement of magnetic field enhancement. Simultaneous electric field and magnetic field enhancements can be obtained in the gap regions between neighboring particles at two resonance frequencies as the interplay occurs, which present open cavities as electromagnetic field hot spots for potential applications on detection and sensing. The results not only offer an attractive way to tune the optical responses of plasmonic nanostructure, but also provide further insight into the plasmons interactions in periodic nanostructure or metamaterials comprising multiple element...

  16. Optical properties of surface plasmon resonances of coupled metallic nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Cubukcu, Ertugrul; Capasso, Federico

    2007-06-11

    We present a systematic study of optical antenna arrays, in which the effects of coupling between the antennas, as well as of the antenna length, on the reflection spectra are investigated and compared. Such arrays can be fabricated on the facet of a fiber, and we propose a photonic device, a plasmonic optical antenna fiber probe, that can potentially be used for in-situ chemical and biological detection and surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

  17. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fa

  18. Tuned longitudinal surface plasmon resonance and third-order nonlinear optical properties of gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Yushi; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamura, Go; Nogami, Masayuki

    2011-07-08

    In order to elucidate the relationship for third-order nonlinear optical properties of anisotropic metal nanoparticles between the incident laser wavelength and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength, gold nanorods (GNRs) with a tuned longitudinal SPR mode in frequency were prepared by seed-mediated methods with two different surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and benzyldimethylammonium chloride (BDAC). The real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities χ(3) were examined by near-infrared (800 nm) femtosecond Z-scan and I-scan techniques for various gold sols with SPR wavelengths of 530 nm (spheres), 800 nm (nanorods) and 1000 nm (nanorods), named as 530GNSs, 800GNRs and 1000GNRs, respectively. All the samples showed intrinsically third-order nonlinear optical refractive responses. However, as for the real part of χ(3) for one particle, 800GNRs whose plasmon peak was tuned to the incident laser wavelength exhibited a Reχ(3) value 45 times stronger than 530GNSs. More interestingly, the imaginary part of χ(3) was more greatly influenced at the tuned SPR wavelength. Here we first demonstrate that 800GNRs showed plasmon-enhanced saturable absorption (SA) due to a longitudinal SPR tuned to the incident laser wavelength.

  19. Real-Time Description of the Electronic Dynamics for a Molecule Close to a Plasmonic Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipolo, Silvio; Corni, Stefano

    2016-12-22

    The optical properties of molecules close to plasmonic nanostructures greatly differ from their isolated molecule counterparts. To theoretically investigate such systems from a quantum-chemistry perspective, one has to take into account that the plasmonic nanostructure (e.g., a metal nanoparticle-NP) is often too large to be treated atomistically. Therefore, a multiscale description, where the molecule is treated by an ab initio approach and the metal NP by a lower level description, is needed. Here we present an extension of one such multiscale model [Corni, S.; Tomasi, J. J. Chem. Phys.2001, 114, 3739], originally inspired by the polarizable continuum model, to a real-time description of the electronic dynamics of the molecule and of the NP. In particular, we adopt a time-dependent configuration interaction (TD CI) approach for the molecule, the metal NP is described as a continuous dielectric of complex shape characterized by a Drude-Lorentz dielectric function, and the molecule-NP electromagnetic coupling is treated by an equation-of-motion (EOM) extension of the quasi-static boundary element method (BEM). The model includes the effects of both the mutual molecule-NP time-dependent polarization and the modification of the probing electromagnetic field due to the plasmonic resonances of the NP. Finally, such an approach is applied to the investigation of the light absorption of a model chromophore, LiCN, in the presence of a metal-NP of complex shape.

  20. Plasmonic nanoparticle-film calipers for rapid and ultrasensitive dimensional and refractometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Tseng, Yi-Chuan; Chou, Sin-Yi; Shao, Chang-Ching; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Su, Wei-Fang

    2014-10-21

    In this study, we develop an ultrasensitive nanoparticle (NP)-film caliper that functions with high resolution (angstrom scale) in response to both the dimensions and refractive index of the spacer sandwiched between the NPs and the film. The anisotropy of the plasmonic gap mode in the NP-film caliper can be characterized readily using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) without the need for further optical modeling. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first to report the use of SE to study the plasmonic gap modes in NP-film calipers and to demonstrate that SE is a robust and convenient method for analyzing NP-film calipers. The high sensitivity of this system originates from the plasmonic gap mode in the NP-film caliper, induced by electromagnetic coupling between the NPs and the film. The refractometric sensitivity of this NP-film caliper reaches up to 314 nm per RIU, which is superior to those of other NP-based sensors. The NP-film caliper also provides high dimensional resolution, down to the angstrom scale. In this study, the shift in wavelength in response to the change in gap spacing is approximately 9 nm Å(-1). Taking advantage of the ultrasensitivity of this NP-film caliper, we develop a platform for discriminating among thiol-containing amino acids.

  1. Optical cavity coupled surface plasmon resonance sensing for enhanced sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zheng; Xin Zhao; Jinsong Zhu; Jim Diamond

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system based on the optical cavity enhanced detection tech-nique is experimentally demonstrated. A fiber-optic laser cavity is built with a SPR sensor inside. By measuring the laser output power when the cavity is biased near the threshold point, the sensitivity, defined as the dependence of the output optical intensity on the sample variations, can be increased by about one order of magnitude compared to that of the SPR sensor alone under the intensity interrogation scheme. This could facilitate ultra-high sensitivity SPR biosensing applications. Further system miniaturization is possible by using integrated optical components and waveguide SPR sensors.

  2. Metallic Nanoparticle Block Copoloymer Vesicles with Enhanced Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Leonardo Martinez-Hurtado

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of template silver nanoshell structures and the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using biocompatible poly(oxyethylene-poly(butylene diblock co-polymer vesicles is described in this work. These vesicles have a narrow diameter size distribution around 200 nm. Silver nanoparticles (Ø = 1–10 nm functionalized with decanethiol were successfully entrapped in the hydrophobic membrane and non-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Ø = 3.0–5.5 nm were encapsulated in the vesicle core. Transmission Electron Microscopy confirms the localisation of the particles; silver functionalized nanoparticles appear to thicken the vesicle membrane as shown with TEM image analysis. The enhancement of the optical properties is confirmed using transmission spectrophotometry; the 430 nm plasmon resonance peak of the silver nanoparticles was replaced by a broader extinction spectrum to beyond 700 nm (O.D. = 0.8. For a number density of 4.8 x 1012 mL-1 the scattering cross section was calculated to be 0.92 x 10-4 μm2 with a scattering coefficient of 0.44 mm-1. The measurements indicate scattering cross section of 3.8 x 10-5 μm2, attenuation coefficient of 0.18 mm-1 and extinction efficiency equal to 1.2 x 10-3. Stable and biocompatible block co-polymer vesicles can potentially be used as plasmon-resonant optical contrast agents for biomedical applications.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance based fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-05-01

    A surface plasmon based fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed using a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film with embedded gold nanoparticles as the recognition element. The MIP was formed on the layer of gold thin film which was deposited on the surface of a fibre core. The sensing was based on swelling of the MIP film induced by analyte binding that shifted the resonance spectrum toward a shorter wavelength. The sensor exhibited a response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 400 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures. Selectivity for cocaine over other drugs has also been demonstrated.

  4. Electromagnetically induced transparency of a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber based on multilayered metallic nanoparticle sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tanaka, Daisuke; Degawa, Ryo; Li, Xinheng; Wang, Pangpang; Ryuzaki, Sou; Tamada, Kaoru

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we observed the peak splitting of absorption spectra for two-dimensional sheets of silver nanoparticles due to the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect. This unique optical phenomenon was observed for the multilayered nanosheets up to 20 layers on a metal substrate, while this phenomenon was not observed on a transparent substrate. The wavelength and intensities of the split peaks depend on the number of layers, and the experimental results were well reproduced by the calculation of the Transfer-Matrix method by employing the effective medium approximation. The Ag nanosheets used in this study can act as a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber, which has a such large oscillator strength. This phenomenon is a fundamental optical property of a thin film on a metal substrate but has never been observed because native materials do not have a large oscillator strength. This new type of EIT effect using a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber presents the potential for the development of future optic and photonic technologies.

  5. Plasmonic nanoantennas for multipurpose particle manipulation and enhanced optical magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian James

    This dissertation explores the near-field enhancement and confinement properties of arrays of Au bowtie nanoantennas (BNAs) for plasmonic optical trapping. Using BNAs as a model system, the delicate interplay between optical and thermally induced forces in plasmonic nanotweezers is investigated over a broad parameter spacing including bowtie array spacing, adhesion layer materials, nanostructure orientation, composition of the fluid trapping media, optical polarization, input optical power, and trapped-particle diameter. Using theoretical modeling, it is shown that plasmon-induced convection drives experimentally observed phase-like behavior in plasmonic nanotweezers, and further, that this process can be used to engineer trapping tasks including dexterous single-particle trapping, trapping and manipulation of large self-assembled particle clusters using a single input beam, and particle sorting. The crucial role of an optically-absorptive substrate material for developing the requisite micron-per-second fluid flows for these phenomena is confirmed both theoretically and experimentally. In addition, this dissertation details the first experimental demonstration of plasmonic nanotweezers using an ultrafast, femtosecond (fs) pulsed input source. The fs pulses are shown to increase trapping performance in both the Rayleigh and Mie size regimes, where particle diameters are much smaller and greater than the incident illumination wavelength, respectively. This augmentation of forces enables plasmonic trapping of 80 nm to 1.2 mum diameter, metallic and dielectric particles with as little as 50 muW of input optical power. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response of trapped species can be probed during the trapping event, which opens doors for increased particle diagnostics in plasmonic optical trapping. An interesting particle fusing behavior is described whereby above a 60--75 muW power threshold, both metallic and dielectric particles spontaneously fuse to the BNA

  6. Nonlinear Fano Profiles in the Optical Second-Harmonic Generation from Silver Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Butet, J; Russier-Antoine, I; Bertorelle, F; Mosset, A; Lascoux, N; Jonin, C; Benichou, E; Brevet, P -F

    2012-01-01

    The resonance effects on the optical second harmonic generation from 140 nm silver nanoparticles is studied experimentally by hyper-Rayleigh scattering and numerically by finite element method calculations. We find that the interferences between the broad dipolar and narrow octupolar surface plasmon resonances leads to nonlinear Fano profiles that can be externally controlled by the incident polarization angle. These profiles are responsible for the nonlinear plasmon-induced transparency in the second harmonic generation.

  7. Enhancing the driving field for plasmonic nanoparticles in thin-film solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santbergen, R.; Hairen, T.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The scattering cross-section of a plasmonic nanoparticle is proportional to the intensity of the electric field that drives the plasmon resonance. In this work we determine the driving field pattern throughout a complete thin-film silicon solar cell. Our simulations reveal that by tuning of the thic

  8. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Uskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    effects in the formation of plasmonic resonance is diminished. We also show that 5-20 times increase of photoemission can be achieved on embedding of nanoparticles without taking into account dynamics of ballistic electrons. The results obtained can be used to increase efficiency of plasmon...

  9. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  10. Interplay Between Optical Bianisotropy and Magnetism in Plasmonic Metamolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liuyang; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Yang, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Gaehang; Shi, Jinwei; Martinez, Irving; Yi, Gi-Ra; Shvets, Gennady; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-07-13

    The smallness of natural molecules and atoms with respect to the wavelength of light imposes severe limits on the nature of their optical response. For example, the well-known argument of Landau and Lifshitz and its recent extensions that include chiral molecules show that the electric dipole response dominates over the magneto-electric (bianisotropic) and an even smaller magnetic dipole optical response for all natural materials. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that both these responses can be greatly enhanced in plasmonic nanoclusters. Using atomic force microscopy nanomanipulation technique, we assemble a plasmonic metamolecule that is designed for strong and simultaneous optical magnetic and magneto-electric excitation. Angle-dependent scattering spectroscopy is used to disentangle the two responses and to demonstrate that their constructive/destructive interplay causes strong directional scattering asymmetry. This asymmetry is used to extract both magneto-electric and magnetic dipole responses and to demonstrate their enhancement in comparison to ordinary atomistic materials.

  11. Influence of sodium hydroxide in enhancing the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay D.; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2017-08-01

    Herein, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticles, by confluence graph described previously using acetate as the stabilizer as well as a reducing agent. The process involves use of ‘green’ chemicals and benign synthesis conditions. The synthesized nanoparticles were tuned for their surface plasmon resonance by sodium hydroxide addition and scanned between 400 to 800 nm to study the hyperchromic effect. As the concentration of sodium hydroxide increased, the surface plasmon resonance of the silver nanoparticles at 420 nm increased (hyperchromic effect). The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized by TEM, for morphology analysis and laser scattering for the electromagnetic properties of nanoparticles. Our method may provide a gateway for intensive exploration of innovative approaches in synthesizing silver nanoparticles and tuning (hyperchromic effect) their localized surface plasmon resonance by using sodium hydroxide, which has tremendous utility in diverse application sectors.

  12. Bottom-up fabrication of nanohole arrays loaded with gold nanoparticles: extraordinary plasmonic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Quint, Stefan B; Klenk, Simon; Pacholski, Claudia

    2014-12-18

    A chemical route to periodic hole arrays in gold films whose holes are loaded with single gold nanoparticles is presented, paving the road to mass production of highly sensitive plasmonic sensors on large areas.

  13. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, Jes Ærøe; Espina Palanco, Marta; Hagen, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Chemicals typically available in plants have the capability to reduce silver and gold salts and to create silver and gold nanoparticles. We report the preparation of silver nanoparticles with sizes between 10 and 300 nm from silver nitrate using fruit extract collected from pineapples and oranges...... as reducing agents. The evolvement of a characteristic surface plasmon extinction spectrum in the range of 420 nm to 480 nm indicates the formation of silver nanoparticles after mixing silver nitrate solution and fruit extract. Shifts in plasmon peaks over time indicate the growth of nanoparticles. Electron......Cl. This explains only modest enhancement factors for near-infrared-excited surface enhanced Raman scattering. In addition to the surface plasmon band, UV-visible absorption spectra show features in the UV range which indicates also the presence of small silver clusters, such as Ag42+. The increase of the plasmon...

  14. Plasmon-enhanced absorption in a metal nanoparticles and photosynthetic molecules hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiyuan; Govorov, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Photosystem I from cyanobacteria is one of nature's most efficient light harvesting complexes, converting light energy into electronic energy with a quantum yield of 100% and an energy yield about 58%. It is very attractive to the nanotechnology community because of its nanoscale dimensions and excellent optoelectronic properties. This protein has the potential to be utilized in devices such as solar cells, electric switches, photo-detectors, etc. However, there is one limiting factor for potential applications of a single monolayer of these photosynthetic proteins. One monolayer absorbs less than 1% of sunlight's energy, despite their excellent optoelectronic properties. Recently, experiments [1] have been conducted to enhance light absorption with the assistance of metal nanoparticles as artificial antenna for the photosystem I. Here, we present a theoretical description of the strong plasmon-assisted interactions between the metal nanoparticles and the optical dipoles of the reaction centers observed in the experiments. The resonance and off-resonance plasmon effects enhance the electromagnetic fields around the photosystem-I molecules and, in this way, lead to enhanced absorption. [4pt] [1] I. Carmeli, I. Lieberman, L. Kraversky, Zhiyuan Fan, A. O. Govorov, G. Markovich, and S. Richter, submitted.

  15. Optics of plasmon-exciton nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2017-08-14

    This review provides a brief introduction to the physics of coupled exciton-plasmon systems, the theoretical description and experimental manifestation of such phenomena, followed by an account of the state-of-the-art methodology for the numerical simulations of such phenomena and supplemented by a number of FORTRAN codes, by which the interested reader can introduce himself/herself to the practice of such simulations. Applications to CW light scattering as well as transient response and relaxation are described. Particular attention is given to so-called strong coupling limit, where the hybrid exciton-plasmon nature of the system response is strongly expressed. While traditional descriptions of such phenomena usually rely on analysis of the electromagnetic response of inhomogeneous dielectric environments that individually support plasmon and exciton excitations, here we explore also the consequences of a more detailed description of the molecular environment in terms of its quantum density matrix (applied in a mean field approximation level). Such a description makes it possible to account for characteristics that cannot be described by the dielectric response model: the effects of dephasing on the molecular response on one hand, and nonlinear response on the other. It also highlights the still missing important ingredients in the numerical approach, in particular its limitation to a classical description of the radiation field and its reliance on a mean field description of the many-body molecular system. We end our review with an outlook to the near future, where these limitations will be addressed and new novel applications of the numerical approach will be pursued. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Harmonic nanoparticles: noncentrosymmetric metal oxides for nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, Andrii; Mugnier, Yannick; Bonacina, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    The combination of nonlinear optics and nanotechnology is an extremely rich scientific domain yet widely unexplored. We present here a review of recent optical investigations on noncentrosymmetric oxide nanoparticles with a large {{χ }(2)} response, often referred to as harmonic nanoparticles (HNPs). HNPs feature a series of properties which distinguish them from other photonics nanoprobes (quantum dots, up-conversion nanoparticles, noble metal particles). HNPs emission is inherently nonlinear and based on the efficient generation of harmonics as opposed to fluorescence or surface plasmon scattering. In addition, the fully coherent signal emitted by HNPs together with their polarization sensitive response and absence of resonant interaction make them appealing for several applications ranging from multi-photon (infrared) microscopy and holography, to cell tracking and sensing.

  17. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  18. Utilization of plasmonic and photonic crystal nanostructures for enhanced micro- and nanoparticle manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Cameron S; Knouf, Emily Christine; Tewari, Muneesh; Lin, Lih Y

    2011-09-27

    A method to manipulate the position and orientation of submicron particles nondestructively would be an incredibly useful tool for basic biological research. Perhaps the most widely used physical force to achieve noninvasive manipulation of small particles has been dielectrophoresis(DEP). However, DEP on its own lacks the versatility and precision that are desired when manipulating cells since it is traditionally done with stationary electrodes. Optical tweezers, which utilize a three dimensional electromagnetic field gradient to exert forces on small particles, achieve this desired versatility and precision. However, a major drawback of this approach is the high radiation intensity required to achieve the necessary force to trap a particle which can damage biological samples. A solution that allows trapping and sorting with lower optical intensities are optoelectronic tweezers (OET) but OET's have limitations with fine manipulation of small particles; being DEP-based technology also puts constraint on the property of the solution. This video article will describe two methods that decrease the intensity of the radiation needed for optical manipulation of living cells and also describe a method for orientation control. The first method is plasmonic tweezers which use a random gold nanoparticle (AuNP) array as a substrate for the sample as shown in Figure 1. The AuNP array converts the incident photons into localized surface plasmons (LSP) which consist of resonant dipole moments that radiate and generate a patterned radiation field with a large gradient in the cell solution. Initial work on surface plasmon enhanced trapping by Righini et al and our own modeling have shown the fields generated by the plasmonic substrate reduce the initial intensity required by enhancing the gradient field that traps the particle. The plasmonic approach allows for fine orientation control of ellipsoidal particles and cells with low optical intensities because of more efficient optical

  19. Plasmonic properties of gold nanoparticles can promote neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paviolo, Chiara; Haycock, John W.; Yong, Jiawey; Yu, Aimin; McArthur, Sally L.; Stoddart, Paul R.

    2013-02-01

    As-synthesized, poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS)-coated and SiO2 coated gold nanorods were taken up by NG108-15 neuronal cells. Exposure to laser light at the plasmon resonance wavelength of gold nanorods was found to trigger the differentiation process in the nanoparticle treated cells. Results were assessed by measuring the maximum neurite length, the number of neurites per neuron and the percentage of neurons with neurites. When the intracellular Ca2+ signaling was monitored, evidence of photo-generated transients were recorded without altering other normal cell functions. These results open new opportunities for peripheral nerve regeneration treatments and for the process of infrared nerve stimulation.

  20. Optical Control of Fluorescence through Plasmonic Eigenmode Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiaoying; Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili; Ivanov, Ilia N; Li, Yuan; Wang, Wenbin; Gu, Baohua; Zhang, Zhenyu; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Snijders, Paul C; Seal, Katyayani

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.

  1. Bottom-Up Nanofabrication of Supported Noble Metal Alloy Nanoparticle Arrays for Plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Ferry A A; Iandolo, Beniamino; Wagner, Jakob B; Langhammer, Christoph

    2016-02-23

    Mixing different elements at the nanoscale to obtain alloy nanostructures with fine-tuned physical and chemical properties offers appealing opportunities for nanotechnology and nanoscience. However, despite widespread successful application of alloy nanoparticles made by colloidal synthesis in heterogeneous catalysis, nanoalloy systems have been used very rarely in solid-state devices and nanoplasmonics-related applications. One reason is that such applications require integration in arrays on a surface with compelling demands on nanoparticle arrangement, uniformity in surface coverage, and optimization of the surface density. These cannot be fulfilled even using state-of-the-art self-assembly strategies of colloids. As a solution, we present here a generic bottom-up nanolithography-compatible fabrication approach for large-area arrays of alloy nanoparticles on surfaces. To illustrate the concept, we focus on Au-based binary and ternary alloy systems with Ag, Cu, and Pd, due to their high relevance for nanoplasmonics and complete miscibility, and characterize their optical properties. Moreover, as an example for the relevance of the obtained materials for integration in devices, we demonstrate the superior and hysteresis-free plasmonic hydrogen-sensing performance of the AuPd alloy nanoparticle system.

  2. Precisely Size-Tunable Monodisperse Hairy Plasmonic Nanoparticles via Amphiphilic Star-Like Block Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihuang; Yoon, Young Jun; Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Feng, Chaowei; Zhang, Guangzhao; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-12-01

    In situ precision synthesis of monodisperse hairy plasmonic nanoparticles with tailored dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on amphiphilic star-like diblock copolymers as nanoreactors are reported. Such hairy plasmonic nanoparticles comprise uniform noble metal nanoparticles intimately and perpetually capped by hydrophobic polymer chains (i.e., "hairs") with even length. Interestingly, amphiphilic star-like diblock copolymer nanoreactors retain the spherical shape under reaction conditions, and the diameter of the resulting plasmonic nanoparticles and the thickness of polymer chains situated on the surface of the nanoparticle can be readily and precisely tailored. These hairy nanoparticles can be regarded as hard/soft core/shell nanoparticles. Notably, the polymer "hairs" are directly and permanently tethered to the noble metal nanoparticle surface, thereby preventing the aggregation of nanoparticles and rendering their dissolution in nonpolar solvents and the homogeneous distribution in polymer matrices with long-term stability. This amphiphilic star-like block copolymer nanoreactor-based strategy is viable and robust and conceptually enables the design and synthesis of a rich variety of hairy functional nanoparticles with new horizons for fundamental research on self-assembly and technological applications in plasmonics, catalysis, energy conversion and storage, bioimaging, and biosensors.

  3. Enhancement of perovskite solar cells by plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Omelyanovich, Mikhail; Milichko, Valentin; Simovski, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic perovskites with photovoltaic properties open a new era in solar photovoltaics. Due to high optical absorption perovskite-based thin-film solar cells are usually considered as fully absorbing solar radiation on condition of ideal blooming. However, is it really so? The analysis of the literature data has shown that the absorbance of all photovoltaic pervoskites has the spectral hole at infrared frequencies where the solar radiation spectrum has a small local peak. This absorption dip results in the decrease of the optical efficiency of thin-film pervoskite solar cells by nearly 3% and close the ways of utilise them at this range for any other applications. In our work we show that to cure this shortage is possible complementing the basic structure by an inexpensive plasmonic array.

  4. Plasmonic-Field Interactions at Nanoparticle Interfaces for Infrared Thermal-Shielding Applications Based on Transparent Oxide Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroaki; Furuta, Shinya; Hasebe, Takayuki; Tabata, Hitoshi

    2016-05-11

    This paper describes infrared plasmonic responses in three-dimensional (3D) assembled films of In2O3:Sn nanoparticles (NPs). The introduction of surface modifications to NPs can facilitate the production of electric-field interactions between NPs due to the creation of narrow crevices in the NP interfaces. In particular, the electric-field interactions along the in-plane and out-of-plane directions in the 3D assembled NP films allow for resonant splitting of plasmon excitations to the quadrupole and dipole modes, thereby realizing selective high reflections in the near- and mid-infrared range, respectively. The origins of these plasmonic properties were revealed from electric-field distributions calculated by electrodynamic simulations that agreed well with experimental results. The interparticle gaps and their derived plasmon couplings play an important role in producing high reflective performances in assembled NP films. These 3D assemblies of NPs can be further extended to produce large-size flexible films with high infrared reflectance, which simultaneously exhibit microwave transmittance essential for telecommunications. This study provides important insights for harnessing infrared optical responses using plasmonic technology for the fabrication of infrared thermal-shielding applications.

  5. Far-Field Plasmonic Resonance Enhanced Nano-Particle Image Velocimetry within a Micro Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhili; Haque, Sara S; Zhang, Mingjun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel far-field plasmonic resonance enhanced nanoparticle-seeded Particle Image Velocimetry (nPIV) has been demonstrated to measure the velocity profile in a micro channel. Chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles have been used to seed the flow in the micro channel. By using Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), plasmonic resonance enhanced light scattering has been calculated for spherical silver nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 15nm to 200nm. Optimum scattering wavelength is specified for the nanoparticles in two media: water and air. The diffraction-limited plasmonic resonance enhanced images of silver nanoparticles at different diameters have been recorded and analyzed. By using standard PIV techniques, the velocity profile within the micro channel has been determined from the images.

  6. Coupling single quantum dots to plasmonic nanocones: optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, Alfred J; Jäger, Regina; Jäger, Sebastian; Bräuer, Annika; Scherzinger, Kerstin; Fulmes, Julia; Krockhaus, Sven zur Oven; Gollmer, Dominik A; Kern, Dieter P; Fleischer, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Coupling a single quantum emitter, such as a fluorescent molecule or a quantum dot (QD), to a plasmonic nanostructure is an important issue in nano-optics and nano-spectroscopy, relevant for a wide range of applications, including tip-enhanced near-field optical microscopy, plasmon enhanced molecular sensing and spectroscopy, and nanophotonic amplifiers or nanolasers, to mention only a few. While the field enhancement of a sharp nanoantenna increasing the excitation rate of a very closely positioned single molecule or QD has been well investigated, the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the emission of a photon from such a system are, by far, less investigated. In one of our ongoing research projects, we try to address these issues by constructing and spectroscopically analysing geometrically simple hybrid heterostructures consisting of sharp gold cones with single quantum dots attached to the very tip apex. An important goal of this work is to tune the longitudinal plasmon resonance by adjusting the cones' geometry to the emission maximum of the core-shell CdSe/ZnS QDs at nominally 650 nm. Luminescence spectra of the bare cones, pure QDs and hybrid systems were distinguished successfully. In the next steps we will further investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the optical properties of the coupled systems in more detail, such as the fluorescence spectra, blinking statistics, and the current results on the fluorescence lifetimes, and compare them with uncoupled QDs to obtain a clearer picture of the radiative and non-radiative processes.

  7. Optical Properties and Immunoassay Applications of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoli Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble metal, especially gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles exhibit unique and tunable optical properties on account of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR. In this paper, we mainly discussed the theory background of the enhanced optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Mie theory, transfer matrix method, discrete dipole approximation (DDA method, and finite-difference time domain (FDTD method applied brute-force computational methods for different nanoparticles optical properties. Some important nanostructure fabrication technologies such as nanosphere lithography (NSL and focused ion beam (FIB are also introduced in this paper. Moreover, these fabricated nanostructures are used in the plasmonic sensing fields. The binding signal between the antibody and antigen, amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs-potential Alzheimer's disease (AD biomarkers, and staphylococcal enterotixn B (SEB in nano-Moore per liter (nM concentration level are detected by our designed nanobiosensor. They have many potential applications in the biosensor, environment protection, food security, and medicine safety for health, and so forth, fields.

  8. Synthesis and optical properties of anisotropic metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Encai; Schatz, George C; Hupp, Joseph T

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we overview our recent studies of anisotropic noble metal (e.g. gold and silver) nanoparticles, in which a combination of theory and experiment has been used to elucidate the extinction spectra of the particles, as well as information related to their surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. We used wet-chemical methods to generate several structurally well-defined nanostructures other than solid spheres, including silver nanodisks and triangular nanoprisms, and gold nanoshells and multipods. When solid spheres are transformed into one of these shapes, the surface plasmon resonances in these particles are strongly affected, typically red-shifting and even splitting into distinctive dipole and quadrupole plasmon modes. In parallel, we have developed computational electrodynamics methods based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to determine the origins of these intriguing optical features. This has resulted in considerable insight concerning the variation of plasmon wavelength with nanoparticle size, shape and dielectric environment, as well as the use of these particles for optical sensing applications.

  9. Gold nanoparticles: interesting optical properties and recent applications in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohua; Jain, Prashant K; El-Sayed, Ivan H; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2007-10-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in the design and study of nanomaterials geared towards biological and biomedical applications, most notable among these being the noble metal nanoparticles. In this review, we outline the surface-plasmon resonance-enhanced optical properties of colloidal gold nanoparticles directed towards recent biomedical applications with an emphasis on cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Methods of molecular-specific diagnostics/detection of cancer, including strongly enhanced surface plasmon resonance light-scattering, surface-enhanced emission of gold nanorods and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, are described. We also discuss the plasmonic photothermal therapy of cancer achieved by using the strongly enhanced surface-plasmon resonance absorption of gold nanospheres and nanorods.

  10. Toward Self-Assembled Plasmonic Devices: High-Yield Arrangement of Gold Nanoparticles on DNA Origami Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Fatih N; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Ye, Jingjing; Diez, Stefan; Schmidt, Thorsten L

    2016-05-24

    Plasmonic structures allow the manipulation of light with materials that are smaller than the optical wavelength. Such structures can consist of plasmonically active metal nanoparticles and can be fabricated through scalable bottom-up self-assembly on DNA origami templates. To produce functional devices, the precise and high-yield arrangement of each of the nanoparticles on a structure is of vital importance as the absence of a single particle can destroy the functionality of the entire device. Nevertheless, the parameters influencing the yield of the multistep assembly process are still poorly understood. To overcome this deficiency, we employed a test system consisting of a tubular six-helix bundle DNA origami with binding sites for eight oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. We systematically studied the assembly yield as a function of a wide range of parameters such as ionic strength, stoichiometric ratio, oligonucleotide linker chemistry, and assembly kinetics by an automated high-throughput analysis of electron micrographs of the formed heterocomplexes. Our optimized protocols enable particle placement yields up to 98.7% and promise the reliable production of sophisticated DNA-based multiparticle plasmonic devices for applications in photonics, optoelectronics, and nanomedicine.

  11. Population Dynamics and the Optical Absorption in Hybrid Metal Nanoparticle - Semiconductor Quantum dot Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Nam-Chol; Ko, Myong-Chol; So, Guang Hyok; Kim, Il-Guang

    2015-01-01

    We studied theoretically the population dynamics and the absorption spectrum of hybrid nanosystem consisted of a matal nanoparticle (MNP) and a semiconductor quantum dot(SQD). We investigated the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of the nanostructure. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings. The results obtained here may have the potential applications of nanoscale optical devices such as optical switches and quantum devices such as a single photon transistor.

  12. Ultrafast optical switching of infrared plasmon polaritons in high-mobility graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, G. X.; Wang, L.; Goldflam, M. D.; Wagner, M.; Fei, Z.; McLeod, A. S.; Liu, M. K.; Keilmann, F.; Özyilmaz, B.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Hone, J.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    The success of metal-based plasmonics for manipulating light at the nanoscale has been empowered by imaginative designs and advanced nano-fabrication. However, the fundamental optical and electronic properties of elemental metals, the prevailing plasmonic media, are difficult to alter using external stimuli. This limitation is particularly restrictive in applications that require modification of the plasmonic response at sub-picosecond timescales. This handicap has prompted the search for alternative plasmonic media, with graphene emerging as one of the most capable candidates for infrared wavelengths. Here we visualize and elucidate the properties of non-equilibrium photo-induced plasmons in a high-mobility graphene monolayer. We activate plasmons with femtosecond optical pulses in a specimen of graphene that otherwise lacks infrared plasmonic response at equilibrium. In combination with static nano-imaging results on plasmon propagation, our infrared pump-probe nano-spectroscopy investigation reveals new aspects of carrier relaxation in heterostructures based on high-purity graphene.

  13. Photoelectron emission from plasmonic nanoparticles: Comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Uskov, Alexander V; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrey V; OReilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    We study emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of the photoelectric effect from nanoparticles - surface and volume ones, and use models of these two effects which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rates from nanoparticle. Calculations have been done for the step potential at surface of spherical nanoparticle, and the simple model for the hot electron cooling have been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to substantial (by 5 times) increase of photoelectron emission rate from nanoparticle compared to the case when such discontinuity is absent. For plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of two mechanisms of the photoeffect was done for the first time and showed that surface photoeffect, at least, does not concede the volume one, which agrees with results for the flat metal surface first formulated b...

  14. Ultrathin organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Plasmon enhanced performance using Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Shiva; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Norwood, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    The plasmonic effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) enhances light absorption and, thus, the efficiency of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells with poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as active layer. We report optimization of this enhancement by varying the attachment density of the self-assembled AuNPs on silanized ITO using N1-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine. Using finite difference time domain simulations, the thicknesses of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT): poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and P3HT:PCBM layers were suitably varied to ensure broadband optical absorption enhancement and minimal exciton quenching within the active layer. Our experimental results demonstrate that for solar cell structures with 20% surface coverage, absorption is increased by 65% as predicted by simulations. Further, we show that AuNPs increase the efficiency by 30% and that silanization of ITO positively impacts device performance.

  15. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Yan, Wei; Stenger, Nicolas;

    2013-01-01

    the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius–Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response......We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) [1]. As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 e...... of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects. We find that the substrate-based calculations show a similar-sized blueshift as calculations based on a sphere in a homogeneous environment, and that they both agree qualitatively...

  16. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N Asger

    2013-01-01

    We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 eV of the SP resonance energy is observed. In this paper, we base our theoretical interpretation of our experimental findings on the nonlocal hydrodynamic model, and compare the effect of the substrate on the SP resonance energy to the approach of an effective homogeneous background permittivity. We derive the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius-Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects....

  17. Frequency-dependent optical steering from subwavelength plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalalian-Assl, A; Gómez, D E; Roberts, A; Davis, T J

    2012-10-15

    We show theoretically and with numerical simulations that the direction of the in-plane scattering from a subwavelength optical antenna system can be controlled by the frequency of the incident light. This optical steering effect does not rely on propagation phase shifts or diffraction but arises from phase shifts in the localized surface plasmon modes of the antenna. An analytical model is developed to optimize the parameters for the configuration, showing good agreement with a rigorous numerical simulation. The simulation predicts a 25° angular shift in the direction of the light scattered from two gold nanorods for a wavelength change of 12 nm.

  18. Optical mode control of surface-plasmon quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, V.; Bahriz, M.; Palomo, J.; Wilson, L. R.; Krysa, A. B.; Sirtori, C.; Austin, D. A.; Cockburn, J. W.; Roberts, J. S.; Colombelli, R.

    2007-04-01

    Surface-plasmon waveguides based on metallic strips can provide a two dimensional optical confinement. This concept has been successfully applied to quantum cascade lasers, processed as ridge waveguides, to demonstrate that the lateral extension of the optical mode can be influenced solely by the width of the device top contact. For devices operating at a wavelength of λ ≈7.5 μm, the room-temperature threshold current density was reduced from 6.3 kA/cm2 to 4.4 kA/cm2 with respect to larger devices with full top metallization.

  19. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Based on Polymer Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Sheng Zheng; Yong-Hua Lu; Zhi-Guo Xie; Jun Tao; Kai-Qun Lin; Hai Ming

    2008-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for directly sensing in biological studies, chemical detection and environmental pollution monitoring. In this paper, we present polymer optical fiber application in SPR sensors, including wavelength interrogation surface enhanced Raman scattering SPR sensor and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe.Long-period fiber gratings are fabricated on single mode polymer optical fiber (POF) with 120 μm period and 50% duty cycle. The polarization characteristic of this kind of birefringent grating is studied. Theoretical analysis shows it will be advantageous in SPR sensing applications.

  20. Enhanced sensing of molecular optical activity with plasmonic nanohole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, Maxim V; Kondratov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    Prospects of using metal hole arrays for the enhanced optical detection of molecular chirality in nanosize volumes are investigated. Light transmission through the holes filled with an optically active material is modeled and the activity enhancement by more than an order of magnitude is demonstrated. The spatial resolution of the chirality detection is shown to be of a few tens of nanometers. From comparing the effect in arrays of cylindrical holes and holes of complex chiral shape, it is concluded that the detection sensitivity is determined by the plasmonic near field enhancement. The intrinsic chirality of the arrays due to their shape appears to be less important.

  1. Enhanced photothermal effect of plasmonic nanoparticles coated with reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Kwon; Barhoumi, Aoune; Wylie, Ryan G; Reznor, Gally; Langer, Robert S; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-09-11

    We report plasmonic gold nanoshells and nanorods coated with reduced graphene oxide that produce an enhanced photothermal effect when stimulated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Electrostatic interactions between nanosized graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles followed by in situ chemical reduction generated reduced graphene oxide-coated nanoparticles; the coating was demonstrated using Raman and HR-TEM. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles showed enhanced photothermal effect compared to noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles killed cells more rapidly than did noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles.

  2. Tuning Plasmon Resonance in Magnetoplasmonic Nanochains by Controlling Polarization and Interparticle Distance for Simple Preparation of Optical Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Tran, V T; Lee, J

    2017-07-26

    Magnetoplasmonic Fe3O4-coated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are assembled in large scale (18 × 18 mm(2)) in order to observe unique modulation of plasmonic coupling and optical tunable application via both external magnetic field and the combination of magnetic dipole and electrostatic interactions of particle-particle and particle-substrate. These large nanochains film exhibits outstanding tunability of plasmonic resonance from visible to near-infrared range by controlling the polarization angle and interparticle distance (IPD). The enormous spectral shift mainly originated from far-field rather than near-field coupling of Ag cores because of the sufficiently large separation between them in which Fe3O4 shell acts as spacer. This tunable magnetoplasmonic film can be applicable in the field of anisotropic optical waveguides, tunable optical filter, and nanoscale sensing platform.

  3. Ultrafast, broadband, and configurable midinfrared all-optical switching in nonlinear graphene plasmonic waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin J. A. Ooi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphene plasmonics provides a unique and excellent platform for nonlinear all-optical switching, owing to its high nonlinear conductivity and tight optical confinement. In this paper, we show that impressive switching performance on graphene plasmonic waveguides could be obtained for both phase and extinction modulations at sub-MW/cm2 optical pump intensities. Additionally, we find that the large surface-induced nonlinearity enhancement that comes from the tight confinement effect can potentially drive the propagating plasmon pump power down to the pW range. The graphene plasmonic waveguides have highly configurable Fermi-levels through electrostatic-gating, allowing for versatility in device design and a broadband optical response. The high capabilities of nonlinear graphene plasmonics would eventually pave the way for the adoption of the graphene plasmonics platform in future all-optical nanocircuitry.

  4. Thermal energy transfer by plasmon-resonant composite nanoparticles at pulse laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-04-01

    Heating of composite plasmon-resonant nanoparticles (spherical gold nanoshells) under pulse laser illumination is considered. The numerical solution of the time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for spatial inhomogeneities of absorbed laser radiation is performed. Important features of temperature kinetics and thermal flux inside nanoparticles are analyzed. Possible applications of the observed effects in nanotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  5. Gold-plated silver nanoparticles engineered for sensitive plasmonic detection amplified by morphological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Krysten; Cathcart, Nicole; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2016-07-28

    Gold-plated silver nanoparticles have been developed to undergo morphological changes that enhance the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing response. These morphological changes were realized through thin-frame gold plating that both reinforces the nanoparticle edges and enables partial silver etching upon exposure to several biological molecules, including thiols and amines.

  6. Ultrasensitive plasmonic sensing in air using optical fibre spectral combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-11-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be excited on metal-coated optical fibres, enabling the accurate monitoring of refractive index changes. Configurations reported so far mainly operate in liquids but not in air because of a mismatch between permittivities of guided light modes and the surrounding medium. Here we demonstrate a plasmonic optical fibre platform that overcomes this limitation. The underpinning of our work is a grating architecture--a gold-coated highly tilted Bragg grating--that excites a spectral comb of narrowband-cladding modes with effective indices near 1.0 and below. Using conventional spectral interrogation, we measure shifts of the SPP-matched resonances in response to static atmospheric pressure changes. A dynamic experiment conducted using a laser lined-up with an SPP-matched resonance demonstrates the ability to detect an acoustic wave with a resolution of 10-8 refractive index unit (RIU). We believe that this configuration opens research directions for highly sensitive plasmonic sensing in gas.

  7. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, Jes Ærøe; Espina Palanco, Marta; Hagen, Nicolai;

    2015-01-01

    microscopy shows that the shapes of the nanoparticles are different depending on the fruit used for preparation. The green preparation process results mainly in individual nanoparticles with a very poor tendency to form aggregates with narrow gaps even when aggregation is forced by the addition of Na......Cl. This explains only modest enhancement factors for near-infrared-excited surface enhanced Raman scattering. In addition to the surface plasmon band, UV-visible absorption spectra show features in the UV range which indicates also the presence of small silver clusters, such as Ag42+. The increase of the plasmon...... absorption correlates with the decrease of absorption band in the UV. This confirms the evolution of silver nanoparticles from silver clusters. The presence of various silver clusters on the surface of the “green” plasmonic silver nanoparticles is also supported by a strong multi-color luminesce signal...

  8. Vertically stacked plasmonic nanoparticles in a circular arrangement: a key to colorimetric refractive index sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sujin; Gartia, Manas Ranjan; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-10-21

    True colorimetric sensing produces a linear spectral response of a single peak within the visible light range with various surrounding media refractive indices. We demonstrate how the circular arrangement of hemispheric silver nanoparticles achieves colorimetric properties without modifying the associated full-width-half-maximum values in a broad range of surrounding media refractive indices. We also show that the vertical out-of-plane arrangement of each circular array in nanoholes enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. High electric field confinement at the interface of the nanoparticles and the supporting substrate reveals the effect of the dielectric constant of the substrate and the morphology of the 3D nanoparticle arrays on achieving a single resonance peak in the visible range with a change in the surrounding refractive index. This study opens up the pathway to top-down fabricated nanostructure platform based plasmonic colorimetric sensing with a single resonance peak in the visible range. The studied rich set of tunable geometrical nanostructures enables broadening of the working optical range of the device.

  9. Angular plasmon response of gold nanoparticles arrays: approaching the Rayleigh limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marae-Djouda, Joseph; Caputo, Roberto; Mahi, Nabil; Lévêque, Gaëtan; Akjouj, Abdellatif; Adam, Pierre-Michel; Maurer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The regular arrangement of metal nanoparticles influences their plasmonic behavior. It has been previously demonstrated that the coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes can give rise to extremely narrow plasmon resonances. This is the case when the single-particle localized surface plasmon resonance (λLSP) is very close in value to the Rayleigh anomaly wavelength (λRA) of the nanoparticles array. In this paper, we performed angle-resolved extinction measurements on a 2D array of gold nano-cylinders designed to fulfil the condition λRA<λLSP. Varying the angle of excitation offers a unique possibility to finely modify the value of λRA, thus gradually approaching the condition of coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes. The experimental observation of a collective dipolar resonance has been interpreted by exploiting a simplified model based on the coupling of evanescent diffracted waves with plasmon modes. Among other plasmon modes, the measurement technique has also evidenced and allowed the study of a vertical plasmon mode, only visible in TM polarization at off-normal excitation incidence. The results of numerical simulations, based on the periodic Green's tensor formalism, match well with the experimental transmission spectra and show fine details that could go unnoticed by considering only experimental data.

  10. Angular plasmon response of gold nanoparticles arrays: approaching the Rayleigh limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marae-Djouda Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The regular arrangement of metal nanoparticles influences their plasmonic behavior. It has been previously demonstrated that the coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes can give rise to extremely narrow plasmon resonances. This is the case when the single-particle localized surface plasmon resonance (λLSP is very close in value to the Rayleigh anomaly wavelength (λRA of the nanoparticles array. In this paper, we performed angle-resolved extinction measurements on a 2D array of gold nano-cylinders designed to fulfil the condition λRA<λLSP. Varying the angle of excitation offers a unique possibility to finely modify the value of λRA, thus gradually approaching the condition of coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes. The experimental observation of a collective dipolar resonance has been interpreted by exploiting a simplified model based on the coupling of evanescent diffracted waves with plasmon modes. Among other plasmon modes, the measurement technique has also evidenced and allowed the study of a vertical plasmon mode, only visible in TM polarization at off-normal excitation incidence. The results of numerical simulations, based on the periodic Green’s tensor formalism, match well with the experimental transmission spectra and show fine details that could go unnoticed by considering only experimental data.

  11. Synthesis and optical properties of silver nanoparticles in ORMOCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Andrey L.; Kiyan, Roman; Ovsianikov, Alexander; Nuzhdin, Vladimir I.; Valeev, Valery F.; Osin, Yuri N.; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental results on synthesis of metal nanoparticles in ORMOCER by ion implantation are presented. Silver ions were implanted into organic/inorganic matrix at an accelerating energy of 30 keV and doses in the range of 0.25ṡ1017 to 0.75ṡ1017 ion/cm2. The silver ions form metal nanoparticles, which demonstrate surface plasmon absorption at the wavelength of 425-580 nm. The nonlinear absorption of new composite materials is measured by Z-scan technique using 150 fs laser pulses at 780 nm wavelength. ORMOCER matrix shows two-photon nonlinear absorption, whereas ORMOCER with silver nanoparticles demonstrates saturated absorption. Some optical applications of these composite materials are discussed.

  12. Surface Plasmon Waves on noble metals at Optical Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Pratap Maity

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the variation of the propagation constant, the attenuation coefficient, penetration depth inside the metal and the dielectric has been evaluated. The propagation characteristics of Surface Plasmon Waves (SPWs which exists on noble metals like gold (Au, silver (Ag and aluminium (Al due to the formation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs, have been evaluated theoretically and simulated. It has been found that highly conducting metals Au and Ag provide a strong confinement to the SPWs than Al at optical frequencies. The comparative study reveals that metal having higher conductivity can support a more confined SPW, having a lower penetration depth than metals of lower conductivity at terahertz frequencies when its dielectric constant assumes a negative value.

  13. Optical security features and filters using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallinet, Benjamin; Lütolf, Fabian; Duempelmann, Luc; Basset, Guillaume; Luu-Dinh, Angélique; Schnieper, Marc; Bosshard, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonics involves the interaction of light with metallic structures at the nanoscale, which enables in particular the generation of strong reflection and absorption effects in the visible and near infrared range. The fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures using ultra-violet (UV) imprint and thin metallic coatings is reported. Wafer-scale fabrication and process compatibility with cost-efficient roll-to-roll production are demonstrated, which paves the road towards an industrial implementation. The color, phase, polarization and direction of the transmitted light are controlled by tuning the process parameters and the symmetry of the nanostructures. A family of devices is presented, for which the potential for sensing, filtering, anticounterfeiting and optical security is evaluated.

  14. Design of plasmonic toroidal metamaterials at optical frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Wu, Pin Chieh; Fedotov, Vassili; Savinov, Vassili; Ho, You Zhe; Chau, Yuan-Fong; Zheludev, Nikolay I; Tsai, Din Ping

    2012-01-16

    Toroidal multipoles are the subject of growing interest because of their unusual electromagnetic properties different from the electric and magnetic multipoles. In this paper, we present two new related classes of plasmonic metamaterial composed of purposely arranged of four U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) that show profound resonant toroidal responses at optical frequencies. The toroidal and magnetic responses were investigated by the finite-element simulations. A phenomenon of reversed toroidal responses at higher and lower resonant frequencies has also been reported between this two related metamaterials which results from the electric and magnetic dipoles interaction. Finally, we propose a physical model based on coupled LC circuits to quantitatively analyze the coupled system of the plasmonic toroidal metamaterials.

  15. Quantum size effects in the volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. H.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2006-04-01

    Quantum size effects in volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5to500nm have been studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The Bi nanoparticles were prepared by reducing Bi3+ with sodium borohydride in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone). The volume plasmon energy and its peak width increase with decreasing nanoparticle diameter, due to the quantum size effect. For the particles with diameter less than 40nm, the increase of the volume plasmon energy is proportional to the inverse square of the nanoparticle diameter, confirming the semimetal to semiconductor transition in Bi nanoparticles.

  16. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.

  17. Optical Effects in the Active Layer of Organic Solar Cells with Embedded Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Supachai Sompech; Sukhontip Thaomola; Thananchai Dasri

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of organic solar cells with noble metal nanoparticles such as Ag and Au embedded in the active layer were investigated. The Discrete Dipole Approximation theory was used to analyze the light scattering and absorption efficiencies. The results show that the size, refractive index of medium and amount of the metal nanoparticles are key factors that directly influence the plasmonic enhancements in the devices. These parameters were adjusted for the light scattering and abs...

  18. Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Optical-to-Electrical Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Matthew

    High-quality semiconductor solids have been the dominant photovoltaic materials platform for decades. Although several alternative approaches have been proposed, e.g. dye-sensitized cells or polymeric solids, none compete in terms of cost and conversion efficiency, the crucial benchmarks for industrial scale implementation. However, semiconductors suffer from several fundamental limitations relating to the microscopic mechanism of power conversion that preclude them, even theoretically, from achieving conversion efficiency at the Carnot limit of 95%. Indeed, the fundamentally different tasks of semiconductors in photovoltaic devices, both as optical absorbers, and separately, for electron-hole pair separation and collection, often demand opposing trade-offs in materials optimization. Alternatively, recent advances in subwavelength metal optics, e.g. nanophotonics, metamaterials, and plasmonics, provide several new examples where nanostructured metals perform the separate tasks of absorption and charge separation necessary for photovoltaic power conversion. Nanostructured metals are extremely efficient broadband absorbers of radiation, with tailorable optical properties throughout the visible and infrared spectrum. It is traditionally assumed that the lack of a band gap and consequent fast electronic relaxation (fs) and short mean free path (100 nm) hinders efficient carrier collection. However, new phenomena resulting from the remarkable energy concentration and nanoscale collection geometry afforded by plasmonic systems suggest new strategies may be possible that use all metal structures. In this talk, I will describe two ongoing studies in our laboratory that exemplify opportunities for metal-based optical energy conversion: (1) Excitation with circularly polarized illumination can induce strong, persistent electrical drift currents in resonant metal nanostructures via the inverse faraday effect. (2) Plasmonic absorption in metal nanostructures provides an

  19. Development and Application of Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Optical Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs along the interface between a metal and a dielectric has attracted significant attention due to its unique optical properties, which has inspired a plethora of fascinating applications in photonics and optoelectronics. However, SPPs suffer from large attenuation because of the ohmic losses in the metal layer. It has become the main bottom-neck problem for the development of high performance plasmonic devices. This limitation can be overcome by providing the material adjacent to the metal with optical gain. In this paper, a review of gain compensation to SPPs is presented. We focus on the spontaneous radiation amplification and simulated radiation amplification. The ohmic loss of metal was greatly improved by introducing optical gain. Then we introduce several gain mediums of dye doped, quantum dots, erbium ion, and semiconductor to compensate optical loss of SPPs. Using gain medium mentioned above can compensate losses and achieve many potential applications, for example, laser, amplifier, and LRSPP discussed.

  20. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refractive index mismatch between media surrounding the nanoparticles disrupts the formation of a narrow absorption peak associated with the Rayleigh anomaly, so the role of collective lattice effects in the formation of plasmonic resonance is diminished. We also show that 5-20 times increase of photoemission can be achieved on embedding of nanoparticles without taking into account dynamics of ballistic electrons. The results obtained can be used to increase efficiency of plasmon-based photodetectors and photovoltaic devices. The results may provide clues to designing an experiment where the contributions of surface and volume photoelectric effects to the overall photocurrent would be defined.

  1. Ultraviolet Plasmonic Aluminium Nanoparticles for Highly Efficient Light Incoupling on Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances have attracted a great deal of interest in boosting the light absorption in solar cells. Among the various plasmonic materials, the aluminium nanoparticles recently have become a rising star due to their unique ultraviolet plasmonic resonances, low cost, earth-abundance and high compatibility with the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS manufacturing process. Here, we report some key factors that determine the light incoupling of aluminium nanoparticles located on the front side of silicon solar cells. We first numerically study the scattering and absorption properties of the aluminium nanoparticles and the influence of the nanoparticle shape, size, surface coverage and the spacing layer on the light incoupling using the finite difference time domain method. Then, we experimentally integrate 100-nm aluminium nanoparticles on the front side of silicon solar cells with varying silicon nitride thicknesses. This study provides the fundamental insights for designing aluminium nanoparticle-based light trapping on solar cells.

  2. Low noise patch-clamp current amplification by nanoparticles plasmonic-photonic coupling (analysis and modelling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberal, E O; SalmanOgli, A; Nasseri, B

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a patch-clamp low noise current amplification based on nanoparticles plasmonic radiation is analyzed. It is well-known, a very small current is flowing from different membrane channels and so, for extra processing the current amplification is necessary. It is notable that there are some problems in traditional electronic amplifier due to its noise and bandwidth problem. Because of the important role of the patch-clamp current in cancer research and especially its small amplitude, it is vital to intensify it without adding any noises. In this study, the current amplification is performed firstly: from the excitement of nanoparticles by the patch-clamp pico-ampere current and then, the effect of nanoparticles plasmonic far-field radiation on conductor's carriers, which will cause the current amplification. This relates to the plasmonic-photonic coupling and their effect on conductor carriers as the current perturbation agent. In the steady state, the current amplification can reach to 1000 times of initial level. Furthermore, we investigated the nanoparticles morphology changing effect such as size, nanoparticles inter-distance, and nanoparticles distance from the conductor on the amplifier parameters. Finally, it should note that the original aim is to use nanoparticles plasmonic engineering and their coupling to photonics for output current manipulating.

  3. Nonlocal Optical Response of Plasmonic Nanowire Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    exceptional properties that are not readily found in nature. There are numerous applications in modern optics which can be realized through the study and...K., R. C. McPhedran, and Vladimir M. Shalaev. " Electrodynamics of metal-dielectric composites and electromagnetic crystals." Physical Review B 62.12...16.10 (2008): 7460-7470. [41] Pokrovsky, A. L., and A. L. Efros. "Nonlocal electrodynamics of two-dimensional wire mesh photonic crystals." Physical

  4. Synthesis of quantum dot nanocrystals and plasmonic nanoparticles using a segmented flow reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbwahnche, R. C.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Ryzhov, O. A.; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an automated method of synthesizing quantum dot nanocrystals and plasmonic nanoparticles using segmented flow rector synthesis as a new alternative to the batch method of synthesizing nanoparticles. A reactor was successfully applied to the synthesis of colloidal solutions of semiconductor (CdSe) and metal (Ag) nanoparticles. This instrument is applicable in both material science laboratories and industry.

  5. Gold nanostars as thermoplasmonic nanoparticles for optical heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Oliveros, R; Sánchez-Gil, José A

    2012-01-02

    Gold nanostars are theoretically studied as efficient thermal heaters at their corresponding localized surface-plasmon resonances (LSPRs). Numerical calculations are performed through the 3D Green's Theorem method to obtain the absorption and scattering cross sections for Au nanoparticles with star-like shape of varying symmetry and tip number. Their unique thermoplasmonic properties, with regard to their (red-shifted) LSPR wavelentgh, (∼ 30-fold increase) steady-state temperature, and scattering/absorption cross section ratios, make them specially suitable for optical heating and in turn for cancer thermal therapy.

  6. Size dependence of multipolar plasmon resonance frequencies and damping rates in simple metal spherical nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachova, A

    2008-01-01

    Multipolar plasmon oscillation frequencies and corresponding damping rates for nanospheres formed of the simplest free-electron metals are studied. The possibility of controlling plasmon features by choosing the size and dielectric properties of the sphere surroundings is discussed. Optical properties of the studied metals are described within the Drude-Sommerfeld model of the dielectric function with effective parameters acounting for the contribution of conduction electrons and of interband transitions. No approximation is made in respect of the size of a particle; plasmon size characteristics are described rigorously. The results of our experiment on sodium nanodroplets [1] are compared with the oscillation frequency size dependence of dipole and quadrupole plasmon.

  7. Measuring chromatic aberrations in imaging systems using plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Sylvain D.; Roschuk, Tyler R.; Maier, Stefan A.; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2016-04-01

    Chromatic aberration in optical systems arises from the wavelength dependence of a glass's refractive index. Polychromatic rays incident upon an optical surface are refracted at slightly different angles and in traversing an optical system follow distinct paths creating images displaced according to color. Although arising from dispersion, it manifests as a spatial distortion correctable only with compound lenses with multiple glasses and accumulates in complicated imaging systems. While chromatic aberration is measured with interferometry, simple methods are attractive for their ease of use and low cost. In this letter we retrieve the longitudinal chromatic focal shift of high numerical aperture (NA) microscope objectives from the extinction spectra of metallic nanoparticles within the focal plane. The method is accurate for high NA objectives with apochromatic correction, and enables rapid assessment of the chromatic aberration of any complete microscopy systems, since it is straightforward to implement

  8. Exciton-plasmon Coupling and Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Monolayer Semiconductors Hybridized with Ag Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Weijie, Zhao; Bo, Liu; Ivan, Verzhbitskiy; Shisheng, Li; Francesco, Giustiniano; Daichi, Kozawa; Ping, Loh Kian; Kazunari, Matsuda; Koichi, Okamoto; Rupert, Oulton F; Goki, Eda

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid systems of excitons strongly coupled to localized surface plasmons supported by metallic nanoparticles define a new approach to control light-matter interactions. Here, we report exciton-plasmon coupling in two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, such as MoS2 and WS2, hybridized with silver nanoparticles. Prominent photoluminescence enhancement in monolayer MoS2 was observed with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) tuned to the exciton resonance. By tuning the excitation energy, the contributions from near field enhancement and radiative emission rate enhancement via Purcell effect were resolved. Strong coherent dipole-dipole coupling between excitons and LSPR in resonant condition manifests as an electromagnetically induced transparency window in the extinction spectra of the localized surface plasmon. In this strong coupling regime a new quasi-particle, known as a plexciton, is expected to exhibit distinct properties, which exist in neither of the original particles. Our results demonstrate that ...

  9. High-throughput ultrasensitive characterization of chemical, structural and plasmonic properties of EBL-fabricated single silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Cao, Wei; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2012-01-21

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) has become a popular means to prepare a wide variety of nano-arrays for numerous studies and applications, including photonics and sensors. Their fabrications and characterizations are costly and time consuming, underscoring the importance of developing effective tools to rapidly study their physicochemical stabilities and properties over time. In this study, we characterized EBL-fabricated single silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) arrays over their 12-week exposure to ambient conditions using SEM/EDS, AFM and dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). We found that chemical compositions, structural morphologies and plasmonic optical properties of single NPs altered drastically over the exposure. Single cuboid and triangular-prism Ag NPs degraded at rates of (0.74 ± 0.02) and (0.66 ± 0.02) per week, and their localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra showed striking blue-shifts (171 ± 25 and 203 ± 35 nm) over the 12-week exposure, respectively. Plasmonic colors of single NPs changed distinctively from red to green over the 12-week exposure. The LSPR spectra of individual NPs in each array were acquired simultaneously and correlated specifically with their SEM and AFM images, demonstrating that DFOMS can serve as high-throughput, ultrasensitive and non-invasive means to characterize chemical, structural and optical properties of nano-arrays in situ in real time at single-NP resolution.

  10. Plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles in a SiON antireflective coating: engineering rules and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecler, S.; Bastide, S.; Tan, J.; Qu, M.; Slaoui, A.; Fix, T.

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been proposed in the architectures of several solar cells as a way to enhance light collection and thus to increase their efficiency. Here, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in a SiON antireflective layer using an electroless technique. The plasmonic effects are modeled and observed experimentally for NPs 5 to 200 nm in size. The systematic comparison of scattering and extinction efficiencies computed as a function of the NPs and surrounding medium properties allows establishing engineering rules, validated by the experimental measurements. The fact that Ag NPs larger than 30 nm mainly contribute to light scattering and therefore to optical path enlargement (green-red light), whereas those smaller than 15 nm absorb light by light trapping (blue-green), is demonstrated and physically explained. A physical barrier making it impossible to shift the dominant resonance beyond 650 nm is pointed out.

  11. Direct photocatalysis for organic synthesis by using plasmonic-metal nanoparticles irradiated with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qi; Jaatinen, Esa; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in direct-use plasmonic-metal nanoparticles (NPs) as photocatalysts to drive organic synthesis reactions under visible-light irradiation have attracted great interest. Plasmonic-metal NPs are characterized by their strong interaction with visible light through excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Herein, we review recent developments in direct photocatalysis using plasmonic-metal NPs and their applications. We focus on the role played by the LSPR of the metal NPs in catalyzing organic transformations and, more broadly, the role that light irradiation plays in catalyzing the reactions. Through this, the reaction mechanisms that these light-excited energetic electrons promote will be highlighted. This review will be of particular interest to researchers who are designing and fabricating new plasmonic-metal NP photocatalysts by identifying important reaction mechanisms that occur through light irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Plasmonic control of extraordinary optical transmission in the infrared regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiao, S.; Freire, F.; de León-Pérez, F.; Rodrigo, S. G.; De Teresa, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that the spectral location of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) resonances in metallic arrays of rectangular holes can be plasmonically tuned in the near and mid-infrared ranges. The experiments have been performed on patterned gold films. We focus on a subset of localized resonances occurring close to the cut-off wavelength of the holes, λ c. Metals are usually regarded as perfect electric conductors in the infrared regime, with an EOT cut-off resonance found around λ c = 2 L for rectangular holes (L being the long edge). For real metals, the penetration of the electromagnetic fields is simply seen as effectively enlarging L. However, by changing the hole short edge, we have found that λ c varies due to the excitation of gap surface plasmon polaritons. Finite-element calculations confirm that in these high aspect ratio rectangles with short edges two important aspects have to be taken into account in order to explain the experiments: the finite conductivity of the metal and the excitation of gap-surface plasmons inside the nanoholes.

  13. Size-Dependent Shifts of Plasmon Resonance in Silver Nanoparticle Films Using Controlled Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kneipp, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    A study of the size dependent blue- and red-shift of the plasmon band of silver nanoparticle films in aqueous solution is reported. A detection scheme, where the particle size is continuously decreased by means of controlled dissolution, while measuring the plasmon band position by UV–vis...... absorption spectroscopy is used. Both blue- and red-shifts of the peak position are observed, depending on the presence of electron donors and/or acceptors in the solution, respectively. A great increase in plasmon shifts for smaller particle sizes (R 10 nm) is demonstrated, which we ascribe...

  14. Delocalization of nonlinear optical responses in plasmonic nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Viarbitskaya, Sviatlana; Cluzel, Benoit; Francs, Gérard Colas des; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Remote excitation and emission of two-photon luminescence and second-harmonic generation are observed in micrometer long gold rod optical antennas upon local illumination with a tightly focused near-infrared femtosecond laser beam. We show that the nonlinear radiations can be emitted from the entire antenna and the measured far-field angular patterns bear the information regarding the nature and origins of the respective nonlinear processes. We demonstrate that the nonlinear responses are transported by the propagating surface plasmon at excitation frequency, enabling thereby polariton-mediated tailoring and design of nonlinear responses.

  15. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  16. Optical and structural properties of noble-metal nanoparticles; Optische und strukturelle Eigenschaften von Edelmetallnanopartikeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmen, C.

    2006-06-23

    Noble-metal nanoparticles exhibit rich optical behavior, such as resonant light scattering and absorption and non-linear signal enhancement. This makes them attractive for a multitude of physical, chemical, and biophysical applications. For instance, recent biomedical experiments demonstrate the suitability of noble-metal nanoparticles for selective photothermal apoptosis by heat transport by laser irradiation. The applications of nanoparticles largely exploit that plasmons, i. e. collective oscillations of the conduction electrons, can be optically excited in these nanoparticles. In optical spectroscopy, these are seen as pronounced resonances. In the first part of this work, model calculations are employed to elucidate how radiation damping in noble-metal nanoparticles, i. e. the transformation of plasmons into photons, depends on particle size, particle shape, and on electromagnetic coupling between individual particles. Exact electrodynamic calculations are carried out for individual spheroidal particles and for pairs of spherical particles. These calculations for spheroidal particles demonstrate for the first time that radiative plasmon decay is determined by both the particle volume and the particle shape. Model calculations for pairs of large spherical particles reveal that the electromagnetic fields radiated by the particles mediate electromagnetic coupling at interparticle distances in the micrometer range. This coupling can lead to immense modulations of the plasmonic linewidth. The question whether this coupling is sufficiently strong to mediate extended, propagating, plasmon modes in nanoparticle arrays is addressed next. Detailed analysis reveals that this is not the case; instead, for the particle spacings regarded here, a non-resonant, purely diffractive coupling is observed, which is identified by steplike signatures in reflection spectra of the particle arrays. In the second part of this work, structural and optical properties of noble

  17. Polydopamine-Enabled Approach toward Tailored Plasmonic Nanogapped Nanoparticles: From Nanogap Engineering to Multifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiajing; Xiong, Qirong; Ma, Jielin; Ren, Jinghua; Messersmith, Phillip B; Chen, Peng; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-12-27

    We present a platform strategy that offers diverse flexibility in tailoring the structure and properties of core-shell plasmonic nanoparticles with built-in nanogaps. Our results have demonstrated that polydopamine serves multiple concerted functions as a nanoscale spacer to afford controllable nanogap sizes, a redox-active coating to promote metal shell growth, and a reactive scaffold to exclusively lock molecular probes inside the nanogap for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). More interestingly, the universal adhesion of polydopamine on diverse colloidal substrates allows for customized synthesis of multishell plasmonic nanogapped nanoparticles (NNPs) and multifunctional hybrid NNPs containing different cores (i.e., magnetic nanoparticles), which are not readily accessible by conventional methods. Internally coupled plasmonic NNPs with broadly tunable spectroscopic properties, highly active SERS, and multifunctionality hold great promise for emerging fields, such as sensing, optoelectronics, and theranostics, as demonstrated by the ultrasensitive SERS detection and efficient photothermal killing of food-borne pathogens here.

  18. Nanoparticle plasmonics: going practical with transition metal nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urcan Guler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Promising designs and experimental realizations of devices with unusual properties in the field of plasmonics have attracted a great deal of attention over the past few decades. However, the high expectations for realized technology products have not been met so far. The main complication is the absence of robust, high performance, low cost plasmonic materials that can be easily integrated into already established technologies such as microelectronics. This review provides a brief discussion on alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications and focuses on transition metal nitrides, in particular, titanium nitride, which has recently been shown to be a high performance refractory plasmonic material that could replace and even outperform gold in various plasmonic devices. As a material compatible with biological environments and the semiconductor industry, titanium nitride possesses superior properties compared to noble metals such as high temperature durability, chemical stability, corrosion resistance, low cost and mechanical hardness.

  19. Electron Photoemission in Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays: Analysis of Collective Resonances and Embedding Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refracti...

  20. Direct Imaging of Single Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles in Capillary with Laser Light-Sheet Scattering Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Feng, Jingjing; Pan, Qi; Xiong, Bin; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2017-03-07

    Understanding the heterogeneous distribution of the physical and chemical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is fundamentally important to their basic and applied research. Traditionally, they are obtained either indirectly via bulk spectroscopic measurements plus electron microscopic characterizations or through single molecule/particle imaging of nanoparticles immobilized on planar substrates. In this study, by using light-sheet scattering microscopy with a supercontinuum white laser, highly sensitive imaging of individual metal nanoparticles (MNPs) flowing inside a capillary, driven by either pressure or electric field, was achieved for the first time. We demonstrate that single plasmonic nanoparticles with different size or chemical modification could be differentiated through their electrophoretic mobility in a few minutes. This technique could potentially be applied to high throughput characterization and evaluation of single metal nanoparticles as well as their dynamic interactions with various local environments.

  1. Optical manipulation of gold nanoparticles using an optical nanofiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Hu Yan-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their biological and medical applications.In this letter,we experimentally demonstrate the optical manipulation of 250-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles along an optical nanofiber (550 nm in diameter) injected by an 808-nm laser light.The nanoparticles situated in the evanescent optical field are trapped by optical gradient force and move along the direction of light propagation due to optical scattering force.The velocities reach as high as 132 μm/s at an optical power of 80 mW.

  2. Electromagnetic field enhancement and spectrum shaping through plasmonically integrated optical vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Wonmi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Hong, Yan; Reinhard, Björn M

    2012-01-11

    We introduce a new design approach for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates that is based on molding the optical powerflow through a sequence of coupled nanoscale optical vortices "pinned" to rationally designed plasmonic nanostructures, referred to as Vortex Nanogear Transmissions (VNTs). We fabricated VNTs composed of Au nanodiscs by electron beam lithography on quartz substrates and characterized their near- and far-field responses through combination of computational electromagnetism, and elastic and inelastic scattering spectroscopy. Pronounced dips in the far-field scattering spectra of VNTs provide experimental evidence for an efficient light trapping and circulation within the nanostructures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that VNT integration into periodic arrays of Au nanoparticles facilitates the generation of high E-field enhancements in the VNTs at multiple defined wavelengths. We show that spectrum shaping in nested VNT structures is achieved through an electromagnetic feed-mechanism driven by the coherent multiple scattering in the plasmonic arrays and that this process can be rationally controlled by tuning the array period. The ability to generate high E-field enhancements at predefined locations and frequencies makes nested VNTs interesting substrates for challenging SERS applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Design of a plasmonic back reflector using Ag nanoparticles with a mirror support for an a-Si:H solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungerford, Chanse D.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles have unique optical properties and these properties are affected by any surrounding structures, or lack thereof. Nanoparticles are often added to a device without fully assessing the effect that each interface will have on the nanoparticle's response. In this work, we simulate and fabricate devices utilizing hemispherical nanoparticles integrated into the back reflector of an amorphous silicon solar cell. 3D finite difference time domain simulations were used to calculate the optical absorption of a 300nm amorphous silicon layer as a function of the size of the nanoparticles, the distance between the nanoparticles and the active layer, and the distance between the nanoparticles and the mirror. Two transparent conducting oxides, aluminum doped zinc oxide and indium tin oxide, are investigated to determine the importance of the material properties between the nanoparticles and mirror. Silver hemispherical nanoparticles with a diameter of 150nm placed directly on the a-Si:H and a 60nm aluminum doped zinc oxide layer between the nanoparticles and the mirror lead to a maximum absorption increase of 7.2% in the 500nm to 800nm wavelength range. Experimental devices confirmed the trends predicted by theory but did not achieve enhancement, likely due to fabrication challenges. Fabricating a solar cell with the simulated design requires a high quality transparent conductive oxide and high control over the nanoparticle size distribution.

  4. Efficiency enhancements in Ag nanoparticles-SiO2-TiO2 sandwiched structure via plasmonic effect-enhanced light capturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    TiO2-SiO2-Ag composites are fabricated by depositing TiO2 films on silica substrates embedded with Ag nanoparticles. Enhancement of light absorption of the nanostructural composites is observed. The light absorption enhancement of the synthesized structure in comparison to TiO2 originated from the near-field enhancement caused by the plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles, which can be demonstrated by the optical absorption spectra, Raman scattering investigation, and the increase of the photocatalytic activity. The embedded Ag nanoparticles are formed by ion implantation, which effectively prevents Ag to be oxidized through direct contact with TiO2. The suggested incorporation of plasmonic nanostructures shows a great potential application in a highly efficient photocatalyst and ultra-thin solar cell. PMID:23402586

  5. Tunable Dipole Surface Plasmon Resonances of Silver Nanoparticles by Cladding Dielectric Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaotong; Li, Dabing; Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Yiren

    2015-07-28

    The tunability of surface plasmon resonance can enable the highest degree of localised surface plasmon enhancement to be achieved, based on the emitting or absorbing wavelength. In this article, tunable dipole surface plasmon resonances of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are realized by modification of the SiO2 dielectric layer thicknesses. SiO2 layers both beneath and over the Ag NPs affected the resonance wavelengths of local surface plasmons (LSPs). By adjusting the SiO2 thickness beneath the Ag NPs from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances shifted from 470 nm to 410 nm. Meanwhile, after sandwiching the Ag NPs by growing SiO2 before NPs fabrication and then overcoating the NPs with various SiO2 thicknesses from 5 nm to 20 nm, the dipole surface plasmon resonances changed from 450 nm to 490 nm. The SiO2 cladding dielectric layer can tune the Ag NP surface charge, leading to a change in the effective permittivity of the surrounding medium, and thus to a blueshift or redshift of the resonance wavelength. Also, the quadrupole plasmon resonances were suppressed by the SiO2 cladding layer because the dielectric SiO2 can suppress level splitting of surface plasmon resonances caused by the Ag NP coupling effect.

  6. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  7. Localization of Temperature Using Plasmonic Hot Spots in Metal Nanostructures: The Nano-Optical Antenna Approach and Fano Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Valentine, Jason; Govorov, Alexander O

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to strongly localize temperature in small volumes because heat transfer is a diffusive process. Here we show how to overcome this limitation using electrodynamic hot spots and interference effects in the regime of continuous-wave (CW) excitation. We introduce a set of figures of merit for the localization of temperature and for the efficiency of the plasmonic photo-thermal effect. Our calculations show that the temperature localization in a trimer nanoparticle assembly is a complex function of the geometry and sizes. Large nanoparticles in the trimer play the role of the nano-optical antenna whereas the small nanoparticle in the plasmonic hot spot acts as a nano-heater. Under the peculiar conditions, the temperature increase inside a nanoparticle trimer can be localized in a hot spot region at the small heater nanoparticle and, in this way, a thermal hot spot can be realized. However, the overall power efficiency of temperature generation in this trimer is much smaller than that of a single ...

  8. Analysis of Solar Cells Efficacy with Imbedded Layer of Spherical Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshetov S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scattered sunlight absorption efficacy by a solar cell with imbedded layer of spherical plasmonic nanoparticles is simulated versus the parameters of the imbedded particles, the material they are made of, their density and location in the polymeric buffer layer inclusive. It was shown that the embedded plasmonic nanoparticles cause an increase of the relative efficacy of an organic solar cell with the P3HT:PCBM photosensitive layer and the PEDOT buffer layer of up to 10-20%. This increase depends also on the angle at which the sunlight shines the solar cell, which was also studied in detail.

  9. Hybridizing Poly(ε-caprolactone) and Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles for Broadband Photoresponsive Shape Memory Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Uto, Koichiro; Niiyama, Eri; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Nagao, Tadaaki

    2016-03-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can confine light in nanoscale and locally heat the surrounding. Here we use titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as broadband plasmonic light absorbers and synthesized a highly photoresponsive hybrid cross-linked polymer from shape memory polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The TiN-PCL hybrid is responsive to sunlight and the threshold irradiance was among the lowest when compared with other photoresponsive shape memory polymers studied previously. Sunlight heating with TiN NPs can be applied to other heat responsive smart polymers, thereby contributing to energy-saving smart polymers research for a sustainable society.

  10. Detection of Biomolecular Binding Through Enhancement of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR by Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Gon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To amplify the difference in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR spectra of gold nano-islands due to intermolecular binding events, gold nanoparticles were used. LSPR-based optical biosensors consisting of gold nano-islands were readily made on glass substrates using evaporation and heat treatment. Streptavidin (STA and biotinylated bovine serum albumin (Bio-BSA were chosen as the model receptor and the model analyte, respectively, to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection method. Using this model system, we were able to enhance the sensitivity in monitoring the binding of Bio-BSA to gold nano-island surfaces functionalized with STA through the addition of gold nanoparticle-STA conjugates. In addition, SU-8 well chips with gold nano-island surfaces were fabricated through a conventional UV patterning method and were then utilized for image detection using the attenuated total reflection mode. These results suggest that the gold nano-island well chip may have the potential to be used for multiple and simultaneous detection of various bio-substances.

  11. Optical properties of a nanomatch-like plasmonic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xudong; Zhang, Weihua; Erni, Daniel; Dong, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    The optical properties of a match-like plasmonic nanostructure are numerically investigated using full-wave finite-difference time-domain analysis in conjunction with dispersive material models. This work is mainly motivated by the developed technique enabling reproducible fabrication of nanomatch structures as well as the growing applications that utilize the localized field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. Our research revealed that due to the pronounced field enhancement and larger resonance tunabilities, some nanomatch topologies show potentials for various applications in the field of, e.g., sensing as well as a novel scheme for highly reproducible tips in scanning near field optical microscopy, among others. Despite the additional degrees of freedom that are offered by the composite nature of the proposed nanomatch topology, the paper also reflects on a fundamental complication intrinsic to the material interfaces especially in the nanoscale: stoichiometric mixing. We conclude that the specificity in material modeling will become a significant issue in future research on functionalized composite nanostructures.

  12. Gallium Metal Nanoparticles for Plasmonics and Droplet Epitaxy: Formation and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sunyeol

    The development of new materials in nanophotonics, defined as the use of multiscale materials to control light-matter interactions, has proven to be the foundation for revolutionary advances in both science and technology. In this thesis, we utilize Ga droplets as a plasmonic metal nanoparticle (NP) as well as a seed for droplet epitaxy of ZB GaN nanostructures, and examine the formation of embedded GaAs:Ga nanocomposites and ZB GaN nanostructures, and their structural and optical properties. Metallic nanostructures generate surface plasmons an incident electromagnetic wave, leading to enhancements in absorption and emission. However, materials research and device fabrication have focused nearly exclusively on 2-dimensional dispersions of Ag and Au formed on surfaces, with plasmon resonances limited to visible wavelengths. Thus, it is necessary to explore a new plasmonic materials, which cover wide wavelength ranges. Here, we examined the formation of embedded Ga NP arrays and their influence on GaAs NBE PL efficiency using ion beams and molecular beam epitaxy. Using a combined computational-experimental approach, we revealed new insight into the influence of the embedded NPs on the PL of GaAs. This approach provides an opportunity to enhance the PL efficiency from a variety of semiconductor heterostructures, using a seamless approach to embed non-noble metals during epitaxy. GaN is of interest for optoelectronic applications. However, GaN typically crystallizes in a WZ structure, exhibiting piezoelectric properties leading to a reduced probability for recombination of electrons and holes and consequently limit the performance of devices. Thus, interest in polarization-free ZB GaN nanostructures is rapidly increasing. In this thesis, we first demonstrate the growths of ZB GaN nanostructures via DE. By varying the surface conditions of substrates and nitridation processes, GaN QDs were grown polycrystalline, WZ, and ZB. Furthermore, we examined the growth of ZB

  13. Visible-light Induced Reduction of Graphene Oxide Using Plasmonic Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Lee, Ah-Reum; Kaur, Sandeep; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-09-22

    Present work demonstrates the simple, chemical free, fast, and energy efficient method to produce reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) solution at RT using visible light irradiation with plasmonic nanoparticles. The plasmonic nanoparticle is used to improve the reduction efficiency of GO. It only takes 30 min at RT by illuminating the solutions with Xe-lamp, the r-GO solutions can be obtained by completely removing gold nanoparticles through simple centrifugation step. The spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as compared to the other nanostructures is the most suitable plasmonic nanostructure for r-GO preparation. The reduced graphene oxide prepared using visible light and AuNPs was equally qualitative as chemically reduced graphene oxide, which was supported by various analytical techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, powder XRD and XPS. The reduced graphene oxide prepared with visible light shows excellent quenching properties over the fluorescent molecules modified on ssDNA and excellent fluorescence recovery for target DNA detection. The r-GO prepared by recycled AuNPs is found to be of same quality with that of chemically reduced r-GO. The use of visible light with plasmonic nanoparticle demonstrates the good alternative method for r-GO synthesis.

  14. Two-Dimensional Bipyramid Plasmonic Nanoparticle Liquid Crystalline Superstructure with Four Distinct Orientational Packing Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qianqian; Si, Kae Jye; Sikdar, Debabrata; Yap, Lim Wei; Premaratne, Malin; Cheng, Wenlong

    2016-01-26

    Anisotropic plasmonic nanoparticles have been successfully used as constituent elements for growing ordered nanoparticle arrays. However, orientational control over their spatial ordering remains challenging. Here, we report on a self-assembled two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticle liquid crystalline superstructure (NLCS) from bipyramid gold nanoparticles (BNPs), which showed four distinct orientational packing orders, corresponding to horizontal alignment (H-NLCS), circular arrangement (C-NLCS), slanted alignment (S-NLCS), and vertical alignment (V-NLCS) of constituent particle building elements. These packing orders are characteristic of the unique shape of BNPs because all four packing modes were observed for particles with various sizes. Nevertheless, only H-NLCS and V-NLCS packing orders were observed for the free-standing ordered array nanosheets formed from a drying-mediated self-assembly at the air/water interface of a sessile droplet. This is due to strong surface tension and the absence of particle-substrate interaction. In addition, we found the collective plasmonic coupling properties mainly depend on the packing type, and characteristic coupling peak locations depend on particle sizes. Interestingly, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancements were heavily dependent on the orientational packing ordering. In particular, V-NLCS showed the highest Raman enhancement factor, which was about 77-fold greater than the H-NLCS and about 19-fold greater than C-NLCS. The results presented here reveal the nature and significance of orientational ordering in controlling plasmonic coupling and SERS enhancements of ordered plasmonic nanoparticle arrays.

  15. Self-organized plasmonic metasurfaces for all-optical modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, G.; Polli, D.; Biagioni, P.; Martella, C.; Giordano, M. C.; Finazzi, M.; Longhi, S.; Duò, L.; Cerullo, G.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a self-organized metasurface with a polarization dependent transmittance that can be dynamically controlled by optical means. The configuration consists of tightly packed plasmonic nanowires with a large dispersion of width and height produced by the defocused ion-beam sputtering of a thin gold film supported on a silica glass. Our results are quantitatively interpreted according to a theoretical model based on the thermomodulational nonlinearity of gold and a finite-element numerical analysis of the absorption and scattering cross-sections of the nanowires. We found that the polarization sensitivity of the metasurface can be strongly enhanced by pumping with ultrashort laser pulses, leading to potential applications in ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching of light.

  16. Double-Teeth-Shaped Plasmonic Waveguide Electro-Optical Switches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jia-Hu; HUANG Xu-Guang; MEI Xian

    2011-01-01

    @@ An electro-optical switch based on a plasmonic T-shaped waveguide structure with a double-teeth-shaped waveguide filled with 4-dimet4ylamino-N-methyl-4stilbazolium tosylate is proposed and numerically investigated.TheFinite-difference time domain simulation results reveal that the structure can operate as a circuit switch by controlling the external voltages V1 and/or V2.The proposed structure can also operate as a variable optical attenuator, which can continuously attenuate the power of a light beam from 6dB to 30dB by an external electrical field.The structure is of small size of a few hundred nanometers.Our results may open a possibility to construct nanoscale high-density photonic integration circuits.

  17. Influence of plasmon coupling on the photoluminescence of ZnS/Ag nanoparticles obtained by laser irradiation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Rafaela; Graff, Ismael L.; de Oliveira, Vinicius S.; Schreiner, Wido H.; Bezerra, Arandi G.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence, optical absorption and structural properties of ZnS submitted to laser irradiation in water and isopropyl alcohol. Nanoparticles were produced by irradiating micro-sized ZnS particles dispersed in both liquids, with and without the addition of Ag nanoparticles, taking advantage of the laser-assisted fragmentation effect. When ZnS microparticles are irradiated either in pure water or isopropyl alcohol a considerable size reduction is achieved (from micra to few nanometers). The photoluminescence of these nanoparticles mainly occurs in the UV, centered at 350 nm, and with smaller intensity in the visible, centered at 600 nm. Irradiation of ZnS microparticles dispersed in colloidal silver triggers a reaction between both materials, modifying its optical absorption and photoluminescent properties. After irradiation of ZnS in alcohol containing Ag nanoparticles, a giant increase of the UV photoluminescence is observed. Interestingly, when the irradiation is performed in aqueous Ag nanoparticles colloids, the photoluminescence suffers a red-shift towards the violet-blue. The data show that core-shell (Ag-ZnO) nanostructures are formed after irradiation and the visible emission likely originates from the ZnO shell grown around silver nanoparticles. The presence of Ag nanoparticles in the liquid medium promotes a stronger absorption of the laser beam during irradiation due to the coupling with the surface plasmon resonance, fostering intense reactions among ZnS, Ag nanoparticles, and the liquid medium. Our study shows that with a simple change of the liquid medium wherein the irradiation is conducted the photoluminescence can be tuned from UV to visible and core-shell nanostructures can be obtained.

  18. Effect of silver NPs plasmon on optical properties of fluorescein dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Alaa EL-din E. A.; Gadallah, A.; Mohamed, Mona B.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we studied the effect of silver nanoparticles "AgNPs" on the optical properties of fluoretain-->rescein dye. Fluorescein dye solutions have been mixed with different concentrations of colloidal AgNPs. Absorption and fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein dye molecules was detected in the presence of AgNPs. Fluorescence enhancement of the dye molecules was observed with a maximal enhancement factor of about 3-fold. Enhancement of the rate of radiative transition was also detected. The enhancement mechanisms are attributed to a modification of the local density of electromagnetic modes in the vicinity of AgNPs at energies resonant with surface Plasmon. The ability of fluorophore-metal mixture to actively enhance the dye's luminescence could leads to new opportunities for technological development of light emitting and photonic devices. It also may have applications in the fields of bio-technology and medical diagnostics as new class of fluorescence based sensing.

  19. Photo-generated THz antennas: All-optical control of plasmonic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiou, Giorgos; Mulder, Peter; Bauhuis, Gerard J; Schermer, John J; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon polaritons in conducting structures give rise to enhancements of electromagnetic local fields and extinction efficiencies. Resonant conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their plasmonic response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of plasmonic materials (THz plasmonic antennas) on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the definition of different plasmonic antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for an all-optical spatial and temporal control of resonances on plasmonic surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local field enhancements.

  20. Chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics: an optical near-field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zebo; Wang, Weiliang; Ma, Teng; Deng, Zexiang; Ke, Yanlin; Zhan, Runze; Zou, Qionghui; Ren, Wencai; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Huanjun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-10-01

    One of the most fascinating and important merits of graphene plasmonics is their tunability over a wide range. While chemical doping has proven to be a facile and effective way to create graphene plasmons, most of the previous studies focused on the macroscopic behaviors of the plasmons in chemically-doped graphene and little was known about their nanoscale responses and related mechanisms. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first experimental near-field optical study on chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics. By using a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM), we managed to show that the graphene plasmons can be tuned and improved using a facile chemical doping method. Specifically, the plasmon interference patterns near the edge of the monolayer graphene were substantially enhanced via nitric acid (HNO3) exposure. The plasmon-related characteristics can be deduced by analyzing such plasmonic fringes, which exhibited a longer plasmon wavelength and reduced plasmon damping rate. In addition, the local carrier density and therefore the Fermi energy level (EF) of graphene can be obtained from the plasmonic nano-imaging, which indicated that the enhanced plasmon oscillation originated from the injection of free holes into graphene by HNO3. These findings were further corroborated by theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT). We believe that our findings provide a clear nanoscale picture on improving graphene plasmonics by chemical doping, which will be helpful for optimizing graphene plasmonics and for elucidating the mechanisms of two-dimensional light confinement by atomically thick materials.

  1. Nanoparticle enhanced optical imaging and phototherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Allison M; DeWitt, Matthew R; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticle research has seen advances in many fields, including the imaging and treatment of cancer. Specifically, nanotechnology has been investigated for its potential to be used as a tool to deliver well-tested drugs in potentially safer concentrations through both passive and active tumor targeting, while additionally providing means for a secondary therapy or imaging contrast. In particular, the use of light in conjunction with nanoparticle-based imaging and therapies has grown in popularity in recent years due to advances in utilizing light energy. In this review, we will first discuss nanoparticle platforms that can be used for optical imaging of cancer, such as fluorescence generation with quantum dots and surface-enhanced Raman scattering with plasmonic nanoparticles. We then analyze nanoparticle therapies, including photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapies, and photoacoustic therapy and their differences in exploiting light for cancer treatment. For photothermal therapies in particular, we have aggregated data on key variables in gold nanoparticle treatment protocols, such as exposure energy and nanoparticle concentration, and hope to highlight the need for normalization of variable reporting across varying experimental conditions and energy sources. We additionally discuss the potential to co-deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to the tumor using nanoparticles and how light can be harnessed for multifunctional approaches to cancer therapy. Finally, current in vitro methods of testing these therapies is discussed as well as the potential to improve on clinical translatability through 3D tissue phantoms. This review is focused on presenting, for the first time, a comprehensive comparison on a wide variety of photo based nanoparticle interactions leading to novel treatments and imaging tools from a basic science to clinical aspects and future directions.

  2. Tunable Optical Properties of Metal Nanoparticle Sol-Gel Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Snow, Lanee A.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that the linear and non-linear optical properties of sol-gels containing metal nanoparticles are highly tunable with porosity. Moreover, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous hosts, such as aerogels, and determine rigorous bounds for the average fractional composition of each component, i.e., the porosity of the aerogel, or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Sol-gels containing noble metal nanoparticles were fabricated and a significant blue-shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was observed upon formation of an aerogel, as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping and aggregation this blue-shift does not strictly obey standard effective medium theories. Mitigation of these complications is achieved by avoiding the use of alcohol and by annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere.

  3. Dependence of fluorescence intensity on the spectral overlap between fluorophores and plasmon resonant single silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeechi; Munechika, Keiko; Ginger, David S

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the fluorescence from dyes coupled to individual DNA-functionalized metal nanoparticles. We use single-particle darkfield scattering and fluorescence microscopy to correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of the individual metal nanoparticles to which they are attached. For each of three different dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak approximately 40-120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. These results should prove useful for understanding and optimizing metal-enhanced fluorescence.

  4. Structure and Plasmonic Properties of Thin PMMA Layers with Ion-Synthesized Ag Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Hanif, Muhammad; Mackova, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are synthesized in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by 30 keV Ag+ ion implantation with high fluences. The implantation is accompanied by structural and compositional evolution of the polymer as well as sputtering. The latter causes towering of the shallow nucleated Ag nanoparti......Silver nanoparticles are synthesized in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by 30 keV Ag+ ion implantation with high fluences. The implantation is accompanied by structural and compositional evolution of the polymer as well as sputtering. The latter causes towering of the shallow nucleated Ag...... nanoparticles above the surface. The synthesized nanoparticles can be split into two groups: (i) located at the surface and (ii) fully embedded in the shallow layer. These two groups provide corresponding spectral bands related to localized surface plasmon resonance. The bands demonstrate considerable intensity...... making the synthesized composites promising for plasmonic applications....

  5. Optical modulator based on propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film: proof-of-concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Chuang; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Chen, Min; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film can be utilized as a fluorescence modulator to mimic multiple representative Boolean logic operations. Surface plasmon mediated fluorescence presents characteristic properties including directional and polarized emission, which hold the feasibility in creating a universal optical modulator. In this work, through constructing the thin layer with the specific thickness, surface plasmon mediated fluorescence can be modulated with an ON-OFF ratio by more than 5-fold, under a series of coupling configurations.

  6. 3D self-assembly of aluminium nanoparticles for plasmon-enhanced solar desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Wang, Jingyang; Xu, Weichao; Yuan, Ye; Cai, Wenshan; Zhu, Shining; Zhu, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonics has generated tremendous excitement because of its unique capability to focus light into subwavelength volumes, beneficial for various applications such as light harvesting, photodetection, sensing, catalysis and so on. Here we demonstrate a plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device, fabricated by the self-assembly of aluminium nanoparticles into a three-dimensional porous membrane. The formed porous plasmonic absorber can float naturally on water surface, efficiently absorb a broad solar spectrum (>96%) and focus the absorbed energy at the surface of the water to enable efficient (˜90%) and effective desalination (a decrease of four orders of magnitude). The durability of the devices has also been examined, indicating a stable performance over 25 cycles under various illumination conditions. The combination of the significant desalination effect, the abundance and low cost of the materials, and the scalable production processes suggest that this type of plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device could provide a portable desalination solution.

  7. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to

  8. Effect of Ag Nanoparticles on Optical Properties of R6G Doped PMMA Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yan; SUN You-Yi; WANG Pei; ZHANG Dou-Guo; JIAO Xiao-Jin; MING Hai; ZHANG Qi-Jing; JIAO Yang; SUN Xiao-Quan

    2007-01-01

    The composite PMMA films containing Ag nanoparticles and rhodamine 6G are prepared.We investigate the fluorescence Droperties and nonlinear optical properties of R6G/PMMA films influenced by Ag nanoparticles.The fluorescence enhancement factor is about 3.3.The corresponding nonlinear refractive index is measured to be-2.423×10-8 esu using the Z-scan technique,which is much enhanced compared with the R6G/PMMA film.The results indicate that these enhancements are attributed to surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles.

  9. Plasmonic properties of Ag nanoparticles embedded in GeO2-SiO2 matrix by atom beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Satyabrata

    2016-02-01

    Nanocomposite thin films containing Ag nanoparticles embedded in the GeO2-SiO2 matrix were synthesized by the atom beam co-sputtering technique. The structural, optical and plasmonic properties and the chemical composition of the nanocomposite thin films were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). UV-visible absorption studies on Ag-SiO2 nanocomposites revealed the presence of a strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak characteristic of Ag nanoparticles at 413 nm, which showed a blue shift of 26 nm (413 to 387 nm) along with a significant broadening and drastic decrease in intensity with the incorporation of 16 at% of Ge into the SiO2 matrix. TEM studies on Ag-GeO2-SiO2 nanocomposite thin films confirmed the presence of Ag nanoparticles with an average size of 3.8 nm in addition to their aggregates with an average size of 16.2 nm. Thermal annealing in air resulted in strong enhancement in the intensity of the LSPR peak, which showed a regular red shift of 51 nm (from 387 to 438 nm) with the increase in annealing temperature up to 500 °C. XPS studies showed that annealing in air resulted in oxidation of excess Ge atoms in the nanocomposite into GeO2. Our work demonstrates the possibility of controllably tuning the LSPR of Ag nanoparticles embedded in the GeO2-SiO2 matrix by single-step thermal annealing, which is interesting for optical applications.

  10. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development.

  11. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles studied with EELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima

    2013-01-01

    We study the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated spherical Ag nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride substrate in the diameter range 3.5–26 nm with monochromated electron energy-loss spectroscopy. A significant blueshift of the SP resonance energy of 0.5 eV is measured when...

  12. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  13. Site-selective nanoscale-polymerization of pyrrole on gold nanoparticles via plasmon induced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Furukawa, Y; Ishida, T; Yamada, S

    2016-04-28

    We proposed a nanoscale oxidative polymerization method which enables site-selective deposition on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) combined with TiO2 by using plasmon induced charge separation (PICS) under visible-to-near infrared (IR) light irradiation. The method also revealed that the anodic site of PICS was located at the surface of AuNPs.

  14. Impact of the Excitation Source and Plasmonic Material on Cylindrical Active Coated Nano-Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Liu, Yan; Malureanu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    , as well as to their far-field radiation characteristics, in the presence of an electric or a magnetic line source. A constant frequency canonical gain model is used to account for the gain introduced in the dielectric part of the nano-particle, whereas three different plasmonic materials (silver, gold...

  15. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  16. Understanding the plasmonic properties of dewetting formed Ag nanoparticles for large area solar cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günendi, M.C.; Tanyeli, I.; Akgüç, G.B.; Bek, A.; Turan, R.; Gülseren, O.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of substrates with technological interest for solar cell industry are examined on the plasmonic properties of Ag nanoparticles fabricated by dewetting technique. Both surface matching (boundary element) and propagator (finite difference time domain) methods are used in numerical simulati

  17. Altering Plasmonic Nanoparticle Size Through Thermal Annealing for Improved Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    electron beam causes atoms from the target to transform into the gaseous phase. These atoms then precipitate into solid form, coating everything that is...Springer Science: Plasmonics 2009, 147–148. 6. Okumu, J.; Dahmen, C.; Luysberg, M.; Wuttig, M. Photochromic Silver Nanoparticles Fabricated by

  18. Stabilization of plasmon resonance in Cu2-xS semiconductor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Zheni N; Tomat, Marshall A; Kim, Christian; Plass, Katherine E

    2016-07-12

    Controllable copper vacancy concentrations in copper chalcogenides are essential to any application that requires constant NIR absorption behavior, including cancer phototherapy and photovoltaics. Doping levels, however, can change spontaneously and with oxygen exposure. Treatment of copper sulphide nanoparticles with tetrathiomolybdate is shown here to stabilize vacancy-induced plasmon bands.

  19. HSI colour-coded analysis of scattered light of single plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Lei, Gang; Zheng, Lin Ling; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) analysis with dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) has attracted much attention in recent years. The ability for quantitative analysis of iDFM is critical, but cumbersome, for characterizing and analyzing the scattered light of single PNPs. Here, a simple automatic HSI colour coding method is established for coding dark-field microscopic (DFM) images of single PNPs with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattered light, showing that hue value in the HSI system can realize accurate quantitative analysis of iDFM and providing a novel approach for quantitative chemical and biochemical imaging at the single nanoparticle level.Single plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) analysis with dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) has attracted much attention in recent years. The ability for quantitative analysis of iDFM is critical, but cumbersome, for characterizing and analyzing the scattered light of single PNPs. Here, a simple automatic HSI colour coding method is established for coding dark-field microscopic (DFM) images of single PNPs with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattered light, showing that hue value in the HSI system can realize accurate quantitative analysis of iDFM and providing a novel approach for quantitative chemical and biochemical imaging at the single nanoparticle level. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01089j

  20. Spatial Modulation Microscopy for Real-Time Imaging of Plasmonic Nanoparticles and Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fairbairn, N; Carter, R; Fernandes, R; Kanaras, A G; Elliott, T J; Somekh, M G; Pitter, M C; Muskens, O L

    2012-01-01

    Spatial modulation microscopy is a technique originally developed for quantitative spectroscopy of individual nano-objects. Here, a parallel implementation of the spatial modulation microscopy technique is demonstrated based on a line detector capable of demodulation at kHz frequencies. The capabilities of the imaging system are shown using an array of plasmonic nanoantennas and dendritic cells incubated with gold nanoparticles.

  1. Electrical excitation of waveguided surface plasmons by a light-emitting tunneling optical gap antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazier, N; Buret, M; Uskov, A V; Markey, L; Arocas, J; Colas Des Francs, G; Bouhelier, A

    2016-02-22

    We introduce a new type of electroplasmonic interfacing component to electrically generate surface plasmons. Specifically, an electron-fed optical tunneling gap antenna is integrated on a plasmonic waveguiding platform. When electrical charges are injected in the tunneling barrier of the gap antenna, a broad-band radiation is emitted from the feed area by a process identified as a thermal emission of hot electrons. Part of the emitted photons couples to surface plasmon modes sustained by the waveguide geometry. The transducing optical antenna is thus acting as a localized electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons. The integration of electrically-activated optical antennas into a plasmonic architecture mitigates the need for complex coupling scheme and proposes a solution for realizing nanoscale units at the interface between nano-electronics and photonics.

  2. Laser ablative decoration of micro-diamonds by gold nanoparticles for fabrication of hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A. K.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Umanskaya, S. P.; Zayarny, D. A.; Nguyen, L. V.; Nguyen, T. T. H.; Pham, M. H.; Pham, D. V.; Do, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric antennae are fabricated by laser ablation of gold in water sols of micro-diamonds. Electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of their deposits on a silicon wafer surface indicate close proximity of gold nanoparticles and micro-diamonds, which is supported by photoluminescence studies demonstrating strong (eight-fold) damping of micro-diamond luminescence owing to the attachment of the gold nanoparticles. UV-near-IR spectroscopy of their sols reveals a considerable plasmonic effect, related to red spectral shifts of surface plasmon resonance for the gold nanoparticles in the laser-ablation-fabricated antennae.

  3. Optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from plasmonic vortex lens to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Yang, Haifang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Zhengping; Petrov, V; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-11-12

    We demonstrate the optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from subwavelength plasmonic vortex lens (PVLs) to light and the generating process of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Illuminating plasmonic vortex lenses with beams carrying optical orbital angular momentum, the SP vortices with orbital angular momentum were generated and inherit the optical angular momentum of light beams and PVLs. The angular momentum of twisting SP electromagnetic field is tunable by the twisted metal/dielectric interfaces of PVLs and angular momentum of illuminating singular light. This work may open the door for several possible applications of SP vortices in subwavelength region.

  4. Large Optical Nonlinearity of Surface Plasmon Modes on Thin Gold Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Witthaut, Dirk; Kumar, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the optical nonlinear effects of a long-range surface plasmon polariton mode propagating on a thin gold film. These effects may play a key role in the design of future nanophotonic circuits as they allow for the realization of active plasmonic elements. We demonstrate a significant...

  5. Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for Control of Quantum Nanoemitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    properties, metal ion implantation techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanotechnology 16...techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. During the course of this project we studied plasmonic...AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2017-0001 Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for control of Quantum Nanoemitters Paras Prasad RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF

  6. Size dependence of multipolar plasmon resonance frequencies and damping rates in simple metal spherical nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Multipolar plasmon oscillation frequencies and corresponding damping rates for nanospheres formed of the simplest free-electron metals are studied. The possibility of controlling plasmon features by choosing the size and dielectric properties of the sphere surroundings is discussed. Optical properties of the studied metals are described within the Drude-Sommerfeld model of the dielectric function with effective parameters acounting for the contribution of conduction electrons and of interband...

  7. Pushing nanoparticles with light — A femtonewton resolved measurement of optical scattering forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zensen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Optomechanical manipulation of plasmonic nanoparticles is an area of current interest, both fundamental and applied. However, no experimental method is available to determine the forward-directed scattering force that dominates for incident light of a wavelength close to the plasmon resonance. Here, we demonstrate how the scattering force acting on a single gold nanoparticle in solution can be measured. An optically trapped 80 nm particle was repetitively pushed from the side with laser light resonant to the particle plasmon frequency. A lock-in analysis of the particle movement provides a measured value for the scattering force. We obtain a resolution of less than 3 femtonewtons which is an order of magnitude smaller than any measurement of switchable forces performed on nanoparticles in solution with single beam optical tweezers to date. We compared the results of the force measurement with Mie simulations of the optical scattering force on a gold nanoparticle and found good agreement between experiment and theory within a few fN.

  8. Optical Properties of Mixed Nanofluids Containing Carbon Nanohorns and Silver Nanoparticles for Solar Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, E; Di Ninni, P; Colla, L; Barison, S; Agresti, F

    2015-05-01

    Different kinds of nanofluids show peculiar characteristics. In this work, a mixed nanofluid consisting of single-wall carbon nanohorns and silver nanoparticles aqueous suspensions is prepared and optically characterized, in the perspective to merge the favorable optical characteristics of carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids to the good thermal properties of silver-nanofluids. For the samples, both the spectral extinction and the scattering albedo at discrete wavelengths have been investigated. The silver nanoparticle plasmonic peak in the visible range further improves the overall nanofluid sunlight absorption properties, opening interesting perspectives for using such mixed nanofluids as solar absorber and heat transfer media in solar thermal collectors.

  9. Detection and aggregation of the antitumoral drug parietin in ethanol/water mixture and on plasmonic metal nanoparticles studied by surface-enhanced optical spectroscopy: Effect of pH and ethanol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Tobar, Eduardo; Verebova, Valeria; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Fabriciova, Gabriela; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2016-04-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of ethanol in aqueous media, the pH and the presence of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the aggregation processes of the antitumoral anthraquinone parietin in aqueous media and on the metal surface. UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra of parietin were used for such purpose. The present study provides information about the deprotonation and molecular aggregation processes occurring in parietin under different environments: ethanol/water mixture and when adsorbed onto Ag nanoparticles. The effect of ethanol on the optical properties of parietin in alcohol-water mixtures was also investigated at different ethanol concentrations with the time. For the case of the adsorption and organization of parietin molecules on the surface of Ag NPs, special attention was paid to the use of surface-enhanced optical techniques, SEF (surface-enhanced fluorescence) and SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), for the characterization of the parietin aggregates and the ionization of the molecule on the surface. In particular, we have studied the variation of the SEF signal with the pH, which depends on the molecular organization of the molecule on the surface. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the SERS spectra at different pH was accomplished and the main Raman bands of the protonated, mono-deprotonated and di-deprotonated parietin were identified. Finally, the second ionization pK of parietin on metal NPs was deduced from the SERS spectra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coupling of InAs/InP quantum dots to the plasmon resonance of In nanoparticles grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiayue; Jin, C. Y.; Skacel, Matthias; Urbańczyk, Adam; Xia, Tian; van Veldhoven, P. J.; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-05-01

    We report strongly modified optical emission of InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) coupled to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of In nanoparticles grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. With increasing In deposition time, the In nanoparticle size increases and the SPR redshifts significantly. When overlapping with the SPR, the excited state photoluminescence of the QDs is strongly enhanced due to QD-SPR coupling while the ground state photoluminescence is quenched due to non-radiative energy transfer. This is underpinned by the wavelength dependence of the spontaneous emission decay time which shows an opposite trend compared to that of bare QDs.

  11. Green preparation and spectroscopic characterization of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using fruits as reducing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyllested, Jes Ærøe; Espina Palanco, Marta; Hagen, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Chemicals typically available in plants have the capability to reduce silver and gold salts and to create silver and gold nanoparticles. We report the preparation of silver nanoparticles with sizes between 10 and 300 nm from silver nitrate using fruit extract collected from pineapples and oranges...... microscopy shows that the shapes of the nanoparticles are different depending on the fruit used for preparation. The green preparation process results mainly in individual nanoparticles with a very poor tendency to form aggregates with narrow gaps even when aggregation is forced by the addition of Na...... absorption correlates with the decrease of absorption band in the UV. This confirms the evolution of silver nanoparticles from silver clusters. The presence of various silver clusters on the surface of the “green” plasmonic silver nanoparticles is also supported by a strong multi-color luminesce signal...

  12. Surface Plasmons and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra of Aggregated and Alloyed Gold-Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fleger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of size, morphology, and composition of gold and silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance (SPR and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS are studied with the purpose of optimizing SERS substrates. Various gold and silver films made by evaporation and subsequent annealing give different morphologies and compositions of nanoparticles and thus different position of the SPR peak. SERS measurements of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid obtained from these films reveal that the proximity of the SPR peak to the exciting laser wavelength is not the only factor leading to the highest Raman enhancement. Silver nanoparticles evaporated on top of larger gold nanoparticles show higher SERS than gold-silver alloyed nanoparticles, in spite of the fact that the SPR peak of alloyed nanoparticles is narrower and closer to the excitation wavelength. The highest Raman enhancement was obtained for substrates with a two-peak particle size distribution for excitation wavelengths close to the SPR.

  13. Selective trapping or rotation of isotropic dielectric microparticles by optical near field in a plasmonic archimedes spiral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Yi; Huang, Jer-Shing; Huang, Chen-Bin

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate selective trapping or rotation of optically isotropic dielectric microparticles by plasmonic near field in a single gold plasmonic Archimedes spiral. Depending on the handedness of circularly polarized excitation, plasmonic near fields can be selectively engineered into either a focusing spot for particle trapping or a plasmonic vortex for particle rotation. Our design provides a simple solution for subwavelength optical manipulation and may find applications in micromechanical and microfluidic systems.

  14. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Ikhsanov, Renat S; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; O'Reilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-05-01

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles--surface and volume ones--and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to a substantial (by ∼5 times) increase of the internal photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle compared to the case when such a discontinuity is absent. For a plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of the two photoeffect mechanisms was undertaken for the first time which showed that the surface photoeffect can in the general case be larger than the volume one, which agrees with the results obtained for a flat metal surface first formulated by Tamm and Schubin in their pioneering development of a quantum-mechanical theory of photoeffect in 1931. In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism through the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary. The latter is stronger at relatively lower photon energies and correspondingly is more substantial for internal photoemission than for an external one. We show that in the general case, it is essential to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  16. An optimized surface plasmon photovoltaic structure using energy transfer between discrete nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Albert; Fu, Sze-Ming; Chung, Yen-Kai; Lai, Shih-Yun; Tseng, Chi-Wei

    2013-01-14

    Surface plasmon enhancement has been proposed as a way to achieve higher absorption for thin-film photovoltaics, where surface plasmon polariton(SPP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) are shown to provide dense near field and far field light scattering. Here it is shown that controlled far-field light scattering can be achieved using successive coupling between surface plasmonic (SP) nano-particles. Through genetic algorithm (GA) optimization, energy transfer between discrete nano-particles (ETDNP) is identified, which enhances solar cell efficiency. The optimized energy transfer structure acts like lumped-element transmission line and can properly alter the direction of photon flow. Increased in-plane component of wavevector is thus achieved and photon path length is extended. In addition, Wood-Rayleigh anomaly, at which transmission minimum occurs, is avoided through GA optimization. Optimized energy transfer structure provides 46.95% improvement over baseline planar cell. It achieves larger angular scattering capability compared to conventional surface plasmon polariton back reflector structure and index-guided structure due to SP energy transfer through mode coupling. Via SP mediated energy transfer, an alternative way to control the light flow inside thin-film is proposed, which can be more efficient than conventional index-guided mode using total internal reflection (TIR).

  17. Physics Based Investigations of DNA Supercoiling and of Plasmonic Nanoparticles for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Kamilla

    Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced stron...... an ecient and robust process. This part of the thesis project is described in three published papers that are included in this dissertation.......Hyperthermia has great potential as a cancer therapy as it weakens or causes irreversible damage to cancer cells. However, available heat sources are poor in discriminating between healthy and cancerous tissue. In this thesis work, the application of plasmonic nanoparticles as photo-induced strong...... remains an open question. Using positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging as a treatment evaluation tool it was found that NIR irradiated resonant silica-gold nanoshells had a higher therapeutic ecacy than non-resonant colloidal gold nanoparticles, when delivered directly...

  18. Enhancement of dynamic sensitivity of multiple surface-plasmonic-polaritonic sensor using silver nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Farhat; Swiontek, Stephen E; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves excited at the interface of a homogeneous isotropic metal and a chiral sculptured thin film (STF) impregnated with silver nanoparticles were theoretically assessed for the multiple-SPP-waves-based sensing of a fluid uniformly infiltrating the chiral STF. The Bruggemann homogenization formalism was used in two different modalities to determine the three principal relative permittivity scalars of the silver-nanoparticle-impregnated chiral STF infiltrated uniformly by the fluid. The dynamic sensitivity increased when silver nanoparticles were present, provided their volume fraction did not exceed about 1%.

  19. Plasmonic-based colorimetric and spectroscopic discrimination of acetic and butyric acids produced by different types of Escherichia coli through the different assembly structures formation of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ju A; Lim, Sora; Park, Hyo Jeong; Heo, Min-Ji; Sang, Byoung-In; Oh, Min-Kyu; Cho, Eun Chul

    2016-08-24

    We present a plasmonic-based strategy for the colourimetric and spectroscopic differentiation of various organic acids produced by bacteria. The strategy is based on our discovery that particular concentrations of dl-lactic, acetic, and butyric acids induce different assembly structures, colours, and optical spectra of gold nanoparticles. We selected wild-type (K-12 W3110) and genetically-engineered (JHL61) Escherichia coli (E. coli) that are known to primarily produce acetic and butyric acid, respectively. Different assembly structures and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were observed when different organic acids, obtained after the removal of acid-producing bacteria, were mixed with gold nanoparticles. Moreover, at moderate cell concentrations of K-12 W3110 E. coli, which produce sufficient amounts of acetic acid to induce the assembly of gold nanoparticles, a direct estimate of the number of bacteria was possible based on time-course colour change observations of gold nanoparticle aqueous suspensions. The plasmonic-based colourimetric and spectroscopic methods described here may enable onsite testing for the identification of organic acids produced by bacteria and the estimation of bacterial numbers, which have applications in health and environmental sciences.

  20. Efficient graphene based electro-optical modulator enabled by interfacing plasmonic slot and silicon waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhu, Xiaolong; Hu, Hao; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mortensen, N Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2016-01-01

    Graphene based electro-absorption modulators involving dielectric optical waveguides or resonators have been widely explored, suffering however from weak graphene-light interaction due to poor overlap of optical fields with graphene layers. Surface plasmon polaritons enable light concentration within subwavelength regions opening thereby new avenues for strengthening graphene-light interactions. Through careful optimization of plasmonic slot waveguides, we demonstrate efficient and compact graphene-plasmonic modulators that are interfaced with silicon waveguides and thus fully integrated in the silicon-on-insulator platform. By advantageously exploiting low-loss plasmonic slot-waveguide modes, which weakly leak into a substrate while feature strong fields within the two-layer-graphene covered slots in metal, we have successfully achieved a tunability of 0.13 dB/{\\mu}m for our fabricated graphene-plasmonic waveguide modulators with low insertion loss, which significantly exceeds the performance of previously r...

  1. Chip-integrated all-optical diode based on nonlinear plasmonic nanocavities covered with multicomponent nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Zhen; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-01-01

    Ultracompact chip-integrated all-optical diode is realized experimentally in a plasmonic microstructure, consisting of a plasmonic waveguide side-coupled two asymmetric plasmonic composite nanocavities covered with a multicomponent nanocomposite layer, formed directly in a plasmonic circuit. Extremely large optical nonlinearity enhancement is obtained for the multicomponent nanocomposite cover layer, originating from resonant excitation, slow-light effect, and field enhancement effect. Nonreciprocal transmission was achieved based on the difference in the shift magnitude of the transparency window centers of two asymmetric plasmonic nanocavities induced by the signal light, itself, for the forward and backward propagation cases. An ultralow threshold incident light power of 145 μW (corresponding to a threshold intensity of 570 kW/cm2) is realized, which is reduced by seven orders of magnitude compared with previous reports. An ultrasmall feature size of 2 μm and a transmission contrast ratio of 15 dB are obtained simultaneously.

  2. A nonlinear plasmonic resonator for three-state all-optical switching

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A nonlinear plasmonic resonator design is proposed for three-state all-optical switching at frequencies including near infrared and lower red parts of the spectrum. The tri-stable response required for three-state operation is obtained by enhancing nonlinearities of a Kerr medium through multiple (higher order) plasmons excited on resonator\\'s metallic surfaces. Indeed, simulations demonstrate that exploitation of multiple plasmons equips the proposed resonator with a multi-band tri-stable response, which cannot be obtained using existing nonlinear plasmonic devices that make use of single mode Lorentzian resonances. Multi-band three-state optical switching that can be realized using the proposed resonator has potential applications in optical communications and computing. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  3. Theory of molecule metal nano-particle interaction: Quantum description of plasmonic lasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; May, Volkhard

    2015-06-14

    The recent quantum description of a few molecules interacting with plasmon excitations of a spherical metal nano-particle (MNP) as presented in the work of Zhang and May [Phys. Rev. B 89, 245441 (2014)] is extended to systems with up to 100 molecules. We demonstrate the possibility of multiple plasmon excitation and describe their conversion into far-field photons. The calculation of the steady-state photon emission spectrum results in an emission line-narrowing with an increasing number of molecules coupled to the MNP. This is considered as an essential criterion for the action of the molecule-MNP system as a nano-laser. To have exact results for systems with up to 20 molecules, we proceed as recently described by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 91, 035306 (2015)] and study a highly symmetric system. It assumes an equatorial and regular position of identical molecules in such a way that their coupling is dominated by that to a single MNP dipole-plasmon excitation. Changing from the exact computation of the system's complete density matrix to an approximate theory based on the reduced plasmon density matrix, systems with more than 100 molecules can be described. Finally, nonlinear rate equations are proposed which reproduce the mean number of excited plasmons in their dependence of the number of molecules and of the used pump rate. The second order intensity correlation function of emitted photons is related to the respective plasmon correlation function which approaches unity when the system starts lasing.

  4. Theory of molecule metal nano-particle interaction: Quantum description of plasmonic lasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuan, E-mail: yyzhang@physik.hu-berlin.de; May, Volkhard, E-mail: may@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institute für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Netwonstraße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-14

    The recent quantum description of a few molecules interacting with plasmon excitations of a spherical metal nano-particle (MNP) as presented in the work of Zhang and May [Phys. Rev. B 89, 245441 (2014)] is extended to systems with up to 100 molecules. We demonstrate the possibility of multiple plasmon excitation and describe their conversion into far-field photons. The calculation of the steady-state photon emission spectrum results in an emission line-narrowing with an increasing number of molecules coupled to the MNP. This is considered as an essential criterion for the action of the molecule-MNP system as a nano-laser. To have exact results for systems with up to 20 molecules, we proceed as recently described by Richter et al. [Phys. Rev. B 91, 035306 (2015)] and study a highly symmetric system. It assumes an equatorial and regular position of identical molecules in such a way that their coupling is dominated by that to a single MNP dipole-plasmon excitation. Changing from the exact computation of the system’s complete density matrix to an approximate theory based on the reduced plasmon density matrix, systems with more than 100 molecules can be described. Finally, nonlinear rate equations are proposed which reproduce the mean number of excited plasmons in their dependence of the number of molecules and of the used pump rate. The second order intensity correlation function of emitted photons is related to the respective plasmon correlation function which approaches unity when the system starts lasing.

  5. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Abul Kalam [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hou - Tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of {approx}10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor holes. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stopband to a passband and up to {pi}/2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz plasmonics.

  6. Enhanced electron photoemission by collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle-array photodetectors and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use collective lattice resonances in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays to enhance photoelectron emission in Schottky-barrier photodetectors and solar cells. We show that the interaction of lattice resonances (the Rayleigh anomaly) and individual particle excitations (localized surface plasmon resonances) leads to stronger local field enhancement and significant increase of the photocurrent compared to the case when only individual particle excitations are present. The results can be used to design new photodetectors with highly selective, tunable spectral response, able to detect photons with the energy below the semiconductor bandgap, and to develop solar cells with increased efficiency.

  7. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  8. Brightening gold nanoparticles: new sensing approach based on plasmon resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Jing, Chao; Gu, Zhen; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-05-11

    Scattering recovered plasmonic resonance energy transfer (SR-PRET) was reported by blocking the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) from gold nanoparticle (GNP) to the adsorbed molecules (RdBS). Due to the selective cleavage of the Si-O bond by F- ions, the quenching is switched off causing an increase in the brightness of the GNPs,detected using dark-field microscopy (DFM) were brightened. This method was successfully applied to the determination of fluoride ions in water. The SR-PRET provides a potential approach for a vitro/vivo sensing with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  9. Time Response Dynamics of Plasmon Excitation in Cobalt Nanoparticles on Glass Substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Shrestha, R K

    2013-01-01

    We use ultrafast pump-probe transmission spectroscopy to measure the electronic relaxation time for electrons in cobalt nanoparticles embedded on glass substrate using femtosecond laser pulses. We found that the plasmon excitation is inhomogenously broadening with a fast excitation time of 23 fs. and a plasmonic relaxation time of 97fs. The femtosecond laser pulses used in this experiment were come from a Ti:Sapphire resonator that uses a self-mode-locking mechanism based on the nonlinear Kerr effect. The pulses were found to have repetition rate of 103.52MHz with a pulse width of 64.5 fs at FWHM, and 810nm center wavelength.

  10. Measuring melittin uptake into hydrogel nanoparticles with near-infrared single nanoparticle surface plasmon resonance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyunghee; Fasoli, Jennifer B; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Shea, Kenneth J; Corn, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes how changes in the refractive index of single hydrogel nanoparticles (HNPs) detected with near-infrared surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) can be used to monitor the uptake of therapeutic compounds for potential drug delivery applications. As a first example, SPRM is used to measure the specific uptake of the bioactive peptide melittin into N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm)-based HNPs. Point diffraction patterns in sequential real-time SPRM differential reflectivity images are counted to create digital adsorption binding curves of single 220 nm HNPs from picomolar nanoparticle solutions onto hydrophobic alkanethiol-modified gold surfaces. For each digital adsorption binding curve, the average single nanoparticle SPRM reflectivity response, ⟨Δ%RNP⟩, was measured. The value of ⟨Δ%RNP⟩ increased linearly from 1.04 ± 0.04 to 2.10 ± 0.10% when the melittin concentration in the HNP solution varied from zero to 2.5 μM. No change in the average HNP size in the presence of melittin is observed with dynamic light scattering measurements, and no increase in ⟨Δ%RNP⟩ is observed in the presence of either FLAG octapeptide or bovine serum albumin. Additional bulk fluorescence measurements of melittin uptake into HNPs are used to estimate that a 1% increase in ⟨Δ%RNP⟩ observed in SPRM corresponds to the incorporation of approximately 65000 molecules into each 220 nm HNP, corresponding to roughly 4% of its volume. The lowest detected amount of melittin loading into the 220 nm HNPs was an increase in ⟨Δ%RNP⟩ of 0.15%, corresponding to the absorption of 10000 molecules.

  11. Silicon as a virtual plasmonic material: Acquisition of its transient optical constants and the ultrafast surface plasmon-polariton excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, P. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I., E-mail: sikudr@sci.lebedev.ru; Makarov, S. V.; Rudenko, A. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Saltuganov, P. N. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation); Seleznev, L. V.; Yurovskikh, V. I.; Zayarny, D. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Apostolova, T. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energetics (Bulgaria)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrafast intense photoexcitation of a silicon surface is complementarily studied experimentally and theoretically, with its prompt optical dielectric function obtained by means of time-resolved optical reflection microscopy and the underlying electron-hole plasma dynamics modeled numerically, using a quantum kinetic approach. The corresponding transient surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) dispersion curves of the photo-excited material were simulated as a function of the electron-hole plasma density, using the derived optical dielectric function model, and directly mapped at several laser photon energies, measuring spatial periods of the corresponding SPP-mediated surface relief nanogratings. The unusual spectral dynamics of the surface plasmon resonance, initially increasing with the increase in the electron-hole plasma density but damped at high interband absorption losses induced by the high-density electron-hole plasma through instantaneous bandgap renormalization, was envisioned through the multi-color mapping.

  12. Optical control of graphene plasmon using liquid crystal layer 29K New One

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    the basic research and establishes possible optical ways to control the surface plasmon polariton in graphene layer. A system comprises the graphene...Project main idea The project is devoted to the basic research and establishes possible optical ways to control the surface plasmon polariton in...H H E     (5) Demanding the boundary conditions (5) to be satisfied we obtain after some algebraic transformations a dispersion equation for

  13. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Yan, Wei; Stenger, Nicolas; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N Asger

    2013-11-04

    We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) [1]. As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 eV of the SP resonance energy is observed. In this paper, we base our theoretical interpretation of our experimental findings on the nonlocal hydrodynamic model, and compare the effect of the substrate on the SP resonance energy to the approach of an effective homogeneous background permittivity. We derive the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius-Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects. We find that the substrate-based calculations show a similar-sized blueshift as calculations based on a sphere in a homogeneous environment, and that they both agree qualitatively with the EELS measurements.

  14. Tailoring the surface plasmon resonance of embedded silver nanoparticles by combining nano- and femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doster, J.; Baraldi, G.; Gonzalo, J.; Solis, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-14

    We demonstrate that the broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a single layer of near-coalescence silver nanoparticles (NPs), embedded in a dielectric matrix can be tailored by irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse into a distribution featuring a sharp resonance at 435 nm. Scanning electron microscopy studies reveal the underlying mechanism to be a transformation into a distribution of well-separated spherical particles. Additional exposure to multiple femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm or 800 nm wavelength induces polarization anisotropy of the SPR, with a peak shift that increases with laser wavelength. The spectral changes are measured in-situ, employing reflection and transmission micro-spectroscopy with a lateral resolution of 4 μm. Spectral maps as a continuous function of local fluence can be readily produced from a single spot. The results open exciting perspectives for dynamically tuning and switching the optical response of NP systems, paving the way for next-generation applications.

  15. Linear and nonlinear optics of surface plasmon toy-models of black holes and wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, I I

    2003-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of linear and nonlinear optics of surface plasmon toy wormholes and black holes have been performed. These models are based on dielectric microdroplets on the metal surfaces and on nanoholes drilled in thin metal films. Toy surface plasmon black holes and wormholes are shown to exhibit strongly enhanced nonlinear optical behavior in the frequency range near the surface plasmon resonance of a metal-liquid interface. Various possibilities to emulate such nontrivial gravitation theory effects as Hawking radiation and Cauchy horizons are discussed.

  16. Plasmonic Fiber Optic Refractometric Sensors: From Conventional Architectures to Recent Design Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Klantsataya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR fiber sensor research has grown since the first demonstration over 20 year ago into a rich and diverse field with a wide range of optical fiber architectures, plasmonic coatings, and excitation and interrogation methods. Yet, the large diversity of SPR fiber sensor designs has made it difficult to understand the advantages of each approach. Here, we review SPR fiber sensor architectures, covering the latest developments from optical fiber geometries to plasmonic coatings. By developing a systematic approach to fiber-based SPR designs, we identify and discuss future research opportunities based on a performance comparison of the different approaches for sensing applications.

  17. Plasmonic Fiber Optic Refractometric Sensors: From Conventional Architectures to Recent Design Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klantsataya, Elizaveta; Jia, Peipei; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M; François, Alexandre

    2016-12-23

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) fiber sensor research has grown since the first demonstration over 20 year ago into a rich and diverse field with a wide range of optical fiber architectures, plasmonic coatings, and excitation and interrogation methods. Yet, the large diversity of SPR fiber sensor designs has made it difficult to understand the advantages of each approach. Here, we review SPR fiber sensor architectures, covering the latest developments from optical fiber geometries to plasmonic coatings. By developing a systematic approach to fiber-based SPR designs, we identify and discuss future research opportunities based on a performance comparison of the different approaches for sensing applications.

  18. Strong and Coherent Coupling of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle to a Subwavelength Fabry-Pérot Resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Alexander; Kern, Andreas M; Brecht, Marc; Meixner, Alfred J

    2015-07-08

    A major aim in experimental nano- and quantum optics is observing and controlling the interaction between light and matter on a microscopic scale. Coupling molecules or atoms to optical microresonators is a prominent method to alter their optical properties such as luminescence spectra or lifetimes. Until today strong coupling of optical resonators to such objects has only been observed with atom-like systems in high quality resonators. We demonstrate first experiments revealing strong coupling between individual plasmonic gold nanorods (GNR) and a tunable low quality resonator by observing cavity-length-dependent nonlinear dephasing and spectral shifts indicating spectral anticrossing of the luminescent coupled system. These phenomena and experimental results can be described by a model of two coupled oscillators representing the plasmon resonance of the GNR and the optical fields of the resonator. The presented reproducible and accurately tunable resonator allows us to precisely control the optical properties of individual particles.

  19. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  20. Fibre optic surface plasmon resonance sensor system designed for smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Kort; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-06-29

    A fibre optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system for smartphones is reported, for the first time. The sensor was fabricated by using an easy-to-implement silver coating technique and by polishing both ends of a 400 µm optical fibre to obtain 45° end-faces. For excitation and interrogation of the SPR sensor system the flash-light and camera at the back side of the smartphone were employed, respectively. Consequently, no external electrical components are required for the operation of the sensor system developed. In a first application example a refractive index sensor was realised. The performance of the SPR sensor system was demonstrated by using different volume concentrations of glycerol solution. A sensitivity of 5.96·10(-4) refractive index units (RIU)/pixel was obtained for a refractive index (RI) range from 1.33 to 1.36. In future implementations the reported sensor system could be integrated in a cover of a smartphone or used as a low-cost, portable point-of-care diagnostic platform. Consequently it offers the potential of monitoring a large variety of environmental or point-of-care parameters in combination with smartphones.