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Sample records for plasmonic cloaking technique

  1. Tuning plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Pinheiro, F A; Farina, C

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mechanism to actively tune the operation of plasmonic cloaks with an external magnetic field by investigating electromagnetic scattering by a dielectric cylinder coated with a magneto-optical shell. In the long wavelength limit we show that the presence of an external magnetic field may drastically reduce the scattering cross-section at all observation angles. We demonstrate that the application of external magnetic fields can modify the operation wavelength without the need of changing material and/or geometrical parameters. We also show that applied magnetic fields can reversibly switch on and off the cloak operation. These results, which could be achieved for existing magneto-optical materials, are shown to be robust to material losses, so that they may pave the way for developing actively tunable, versatile plasmonic cloaks.

  2. A 3D tunable and multi-frequency graphene plasmonic cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of cloaking three-dimensional objects at multi-frequencies in the far-infrared part of the spectrum. The proposed cloaking mechanism exploits graphene layers wrapped around the object to be concealed. Graphene layers are doped via a variable external voltage difference permitting continuous tuning of the cloaking frequencies. Particularly, two configurations are investigated: (i) Only one graphene layer is used to suppress the scattering from a dielectric sphere. (ii) Several of these layers biased at different gate voltages are used to achieve a multi-frequency cloak. These frequencies can be set independently. The proposed cloak\\'s functionality is verified by near- and far-field computations. By considering geometry and material parameters that are realizable by practical experiments, we contribute to the development of graphene based plasmonic applications that may find use in disruptive photonic technologies. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  3. Molding the flow of light with a magnetic field: plasmonic cloaking and directional scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Pinheiro, F A; Farina, C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate electromagnetic scattering and plasmonic cloaking in a system composed by a dielectric cylinder coated with a magneto-optical shell. In the long-wavelength limit we demonstrate that the application of an external magnetic field can not only switch on and off the cloaking mechanism but also mitigate losses, as the absorption cross-section is shown to be minimal precisely at the cloaking operation frequency band. We also show that the angular distribution of the scattered radiation can be effectively controlled by applying an external magnetic field, allowing for a swift change in the scattering pattern. By demonstrating that these results are feasible with realistic, existing magneto-optical materials, such as graphene epitaxially grown on SiC, we suggest that magnetic fields could be used as an effective, versatile external agent to tune plasmonic cloaks and to dynamically control electromagnetic scattering in an unprecedented way, we hope that these results may find use in disruptive photonic ...

  4. Cloaking a metal object from an electromagnetic pulse: A comparison between various cloaking techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic cloaks are devices that can be used to reduce the total scattering cross section of various objects. An ideal cloak removes all scattering from an object and thus makes this object "invisible" to the electromagnetic fields that impinge on the object. However, ideal cloaking appears to be possible only at a single frequency. To study cloaking from an electromagnetic pulse we consider propagation of a pulse inside a waveguide with a cloaked metal object inside. There are several ways to achieve cloaking and in this paper we study three such methods, namely, the coordinate-transformation cloak, the transmission-line cloak, and the metal-plate cloak. In the case of the two last cloaks, pulse propagation is studied using experimental data whereas the coordinate-transformation cloak is studied with numerical simulations. The results show that, at least in the studied cases where the cloaked object's diameter is smaller than the wavelength, the cloaks based on transmission-line meshes and metal plate...

  5. Tunable scattering cancellation cloak with plasmonic ellipsoids in the visible

    CERN Document Server

    Fruhnert, Martin; Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The scattering cancellation technique is a powerful tool to reduce the scattered field from electrically small objects in a specific frequency window. The technique relies on covering the object of interest with a shell that scatters light into the far field of equal strength as the object, but $\\pi$ out-of-phase. The resulting destructive interference prohibits its detection in measurements that probe the scattered light. Whereas at radio or microwave frequencies feasible designs have been proposed that allow to tune the operational frequency upon request, similar capabilities have not yet been explored in the visible. However, such ability is decisive to capitalize on the technique in many envisioned applications. Here, we solve the problem and study the use of small metallic nanoparticles with an ellipsoidal shape as the material from which the shell is made to build an isotropic geometry. Changing the aspect ratio of the ellipsoids allows to change the operational frequency. The basic functionality is exp...

  6. Invisibility with a tunable cloaking device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Rosa, F.S.S.; Pinheiro, F.A.; Farina, C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: In the last decades, electromagnetic cloaking devices have been extensively investigated by physicists and engineers for several reasons. A variety of approaches have been proposed for achieving invisibility based on the unusual properties of meta materials, such as the coordinate-transformation method or scattering cancellation techniques, and both of them have already been experimentally implemented successfully. However, despite all the recent improvements in cloaking techniques, it is still a challenge to make practical tunable cloaking devices. Nowadays, the designed cloaks used in the experiments are generally manufactured to work at or around a certain frequency that cannot be freely controlled after fabrication. >From the experimental point of view this is a considerable limitation to test the cloaking efficiency in different frequency ranges of operation. Hence, it would be very interesting to conceive a cloaking device whose electromagnetic properties could be controlled by an external tunable agent. Our purpose in this work is to show that a magneto-optical cloaking device under the influence of a tunable external magnetic field can be used to control the invisibility condition for a frequency range of operation. Besides, our results, which can be achieved for moderate magnetic fields and typical plasmonic materials, are shown to be robust to material losses, so that they may pave the way for developing actively tunable, versatile plasmonic cloaks. (author)

  7. Watching outside while under a carpet cloak of invisibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Zhu; Wang, De-Lin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Hu, Qing; Wang, Mu

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate in this work a unique approach for watching outside while hiding in a carpet cloaking based on transformation optics. Unlike conventional carpet cloaking, which screens all the incident electromagnetic waves, we break the cloak and allow incident light get into the carpet. Hence outside information is detected inside the cloak. To recover the invisible cloaking, complementary techniques are applied in the broken space. Consequently, a hiding-inside and watching-outside (HIWO) carpet cloak is sewed, which works as an invisible cloaking and allows surveillance of the outside at the same time. Our work provides a strategy for an ideal cloak with "hiding" and "watching" functions simultaneously.

  8. Optical Neutrality: Invisibility without Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Reed; Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys.Rev.E 74, 026607 (2006)] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alu and Engheta [Phys.Rev.E 72, 016623 (2005)], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  9. Enhancement of non-resonant dielectric cloaks using anisotropic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Takezawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of homogenized anisotropic materials in non-resonant dielectric multilayer cloaking is studied. Because existing multilayer cloaking by isotropic materials can be regarded as homogenous anisotropic cloaking from a macroscopic view, they can be efficiently designed by handling the physical properties of anisotropic materials directly. Anisotropic properties can be realized in two-phase composites if the physical properties of the material are within appropriate bounds. The optimized anisotropic physical properties are identified by a numerical optimization technique based on a full-wave simulation using the finite element method. The cloaking performance measured by the total scattering width is improved by about 10% compared with existing multilayer cloaking by isotropic materials in eight-layer cylindrical cloaking materials. The same performance with eight-layer cloaking by isotropic materials is achieved by three-layer cloaking using anisotropic materials. Cloaking with a about 50% reduct...

  10. Dielectric optical invisibility cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J.; Tamma, V. A.; Park, W.; Summers, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, metamaterial cloaks for the microwave frequency range have been designed using transformative optics design techniques and experimentally demonstrated. The design of these structures requires extreme values of permittivity and permeability within the device, which has been accomplished by the use of resonating metal elements. However, these elements severely limit the operating frequency range of the cloak due to their non-ideal dispersion properties at optical frequencies. In this paper we present designs to implement a simpler demonstration of cloaking, the carpet cloak, in which a curved reflective surface is compressed into a flat reflective surface, effectively shielding objects behind the curve from view with respect to the incoming radiation source. This approach eliminates the need for metallic resonant elements. These structures can now be fabricated using only high index dielectric materials by the use of electron beam lithography and standard cleanroom technologies. The design method, simulation analysis, device fabrication, and near field optical microscopy (NSOM) characterization results are presented for devices designed to operate in the 1400-1600nm wavelength range. Improvements to device performance by the deposition/infiltration of linear, and potentially non-linear optical materials, were investigated.

  11. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference. PMID:27605153

  12. Detecting Thermal Cloaks via Transient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Sophia R.; Bai, Xue; Li, Baowen; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Recent research on the development of a thermal cloak has concentrated on engineering an inhomogeneous thermal conductivity and an approximate, homogeneous volumetric heat capacity. While the perfect cloak of inhomogeneous κ and inhomogeneous ρcp is known to be exact (no signals scattering and only mean values penetrating to the cloak’s interior), the sensitivity of diffusive cloaks to defects and approximations has not been analyzed. We analytically demonstrate that these approximate cloaks are detectable. Although they work as perfect cloaks in the steady-state, their transient (time-dependent) response is imperfect and a small amount of heat is scattered. This is sufficient to determine the presence of a cloak and any heat source it contains, but the material composition hidden within the cloak is not detectable in practice. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, we constructed a cloak with similar approximation and directly detected its presence using these transient temperature deviations outside the cloak. Due to limitations in the range of experimentally accessible volumetric specific heats, our detection scheme should allow us to find any realizable cloak, assuming a sufficiently large temperature difference.

  13. Practical Invisibility Cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joseph Sung-hwoon

    This thesis presents mainly two methodologies for achieving practical invisibility cloaking. Thus, using commercial technologies, devices that are good approximations to an 'ideal' cloak can be achieved - a cloak that is omnidirectional, broadband, operational for the visible spectrum, three-dimensional (3D), and phase-matching for the light field, among other attributes. We first describe 'paraxial cloaking,' where cloaking is considered as an imaging system. The small-angle ('paraxial') formalism provides a first-order design requirement for any 'perfect' cloaking device. A ray optics four-lens cloak (called the "Rochester Cloak'") is experimentally demonstrated, followed by theoretical work to match the phase for the entire visible spectrum. To extend our broadband, paraxial cloak to larger viewing angles, we then discretize space, angle, spectrum, and phase to approximate an ideal, omnidirectional cloak. Such 'discretized cloaking' is experimentally demonstrated as a 'digital cloak,' where commercially available digital image capture and display technologies are used. In particular, we demonstrate an active cloak that uses lenticular lenslet arrays, similar to 'integral imaging' for 3D displays. The 'digital integral cloak' we demonstrate is dynamic, but requires a time delay for image capture and processing, and is two-dimensional (2D) without phase-matching. Continuing improvements in commercial digital technology and computational power will minimize the resolution limitations of a digital cloak and enhance its processing speed. Thus, a wearable cloak can then be practically realized in the future.

  14. Paraxial Ray Optics Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle (`paraxial') limit, and must be satisfied by any good cloaks.

  15. Do Cloaked Objects Really Scatter Less?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Monticone

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the global scattering response of invisibility cloaks over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from static to very high frequencies. Based on linearity, causality, and energy conservation, we show that the total extinction and scattering, integrated over all wavelengths, of any linear, passive, causal, and nondiamagnetic cloak, necessarily increase compared to the uncloaked case. In light of this general principle, we provide a quantitative measure to compare the global performance of different cloaking techniques and we discuss solutions to minimize the global scattering signature of an object using thin, superconducting shells. Our results provide important physical insights on how invisibility cloaks operate and affect the global scattering of an object, suggesting ways to defeat countermeasures aimed at detecting cloaked objects using short impinging pulses.

  16. Broadband surface-wave transformation cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Su; Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Hanhong; Jiang, Yuyu; Yu, Faxin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    Guiding surface electromagnetic waves around disorder without disturbing the wave amplitude or phase is in great demand for modern photonic and plasmonic devices, but is fundamentally difficult to realize because light momentum must be conserved in a scattering event. A partial realization has been achieved by exploiting topological electromagnetic surface states, but this approach is limited to narrow-band light transmission and subject to phase disturbances in the presence of disorder. Recent advances in transformation optics apply principles of general relativity to curve the space for light, allowing one to match the momentum and phase of light around any disorder as if that disorder were not there. This feature has been exploited in the development of invisibility cloaks. An ideal invisibility cloak, however, would require the phase velocity of light being guided around the cloaked object to exceed the vacuum speed of light—a feat potentially achievable only over an extremely narrow band. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally show that the bottlenecks encountered in previous studies can be overcome. We introduce a class of cloaks capable of remarkable broadband surface electromagnetic waves guidance around ultrasharp corners and bumps with no perceptible changes in amplitude and phase. These cloaks consist of specifically designed nonmagnetic metamaterials and achieve nearly ideal transmission efficiency over a broadband frequency range from 0+ to 6 GHz. This work provides strong support for the application of transformation optics to plasmonic circuits and could pave the way toward high-performance, large-scale integrated photonic circuits. PMID:26056299

  17. Harry Potter's Cloak

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, X. F.; Liang, B.; J; Tu; Zhang, D; Cheng, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The magic "Harry Potter's cloak" has been the dream of human beings for really long time. Recently, transformation optics inspired from the advent of metamaterials offers great versatility for manipulating wave propagation at will to create amazing illusion effects. In the present work, we proposed a novel transformation recipe, in which the cloaking shell somehow behaves like a "cloaking lens", to provide almost all desired features one can expect for a real magic cloak. The most exciting fe...

  18. Experimental and computational studies of electromagnetic cloaking at microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui

    An invisibility cloak is a device that can hide the target by enclosing it from the incident radiation. This intriguing device has attracted a lot of attention since it was first implemented at a microwave frequency in 2006. However, the problems of existing cloak designs prevent them from being widely applied in practice. In this dissertation, we try to remove or alleviate the three constraints for practical applications imposed by loosy cloaking media, high implementation complexity, and small size of hidden objects compared to the incident wavelength. To facilitate cloaking design and experimental characterization, several devices and relevant techniques for measuring the complex permittivity of dielectric materials at microwave frequencies are developed. In particular, a unique parallel plate waveguide chamber has been set up to automatically map the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution for wave propagation through the resonator arrays and cloaking structures. The total scattering cross section of the cloaking structures was derived based on the measured scattering field by using this apparatus. To overcome the adverse effects of lossy cloaking media, microwave cloaks composed of identical dielectric resonators made of low loss ceramic materials are designed and implemented. The effective permeability dispersion was provided by tailoring dielectric resonator filling fractions. The cloak performances had been verified by full-wave simulation of true multi-resonator structures and experimental measurements of the fabricated prototypes. With the aim to reduce the implementation complexity caused by metamaterials employment for cloaking, we proposed to design 2-D cylindrical cloaks and 3-D spherical cloaks by using multi-layer ordinary dielectric material (epsilon r>1) coating. Genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the dielectric profiles of the cloaking shells to provide the minimum scattering cross sections of the cloaked targets. The designed cloaks can

  19. Complementary media invisibility cloak that cloaks objects at a distance outside the cloaking shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun; Chen, Huanyang; Zhang, Zhao-Qing; Chan, C T

    2009-03-06

    Based on the concept of complementary media, we propose an invisibility cloak operating at a finite frequency that can cloak an object with a prespecified shape and size within a certain distance outside the shell. The cloak is comprised of a dielectric core and an "antiobject" embedded inside a negative index shell. The cloaked object is not blinded by the cloaking shell since it lies outside the cloak. Full-wave simulations in two dimensions have been performed to verify the cloaking effect.

  20. Harry Potter's Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X F; Tu, J; Zhang, D; Cheng, J C

    2011-01-01

    The magic "Harry Potter's cloak" has been the dream of human beings for really long time. Recently, transformation optics inspired from the advent of metamaterials offers great versatility for manipulating wave propagation at will to create amazing illusion effects. In the present work, we proposed a novel transformation recipe, in which the cloaking shell somehow behaves like a "cloaking lens", to provide almost all desired features one can expect for a real magic cloak. The most exciting feature of the current recipe is that an object with arbitrary characteristics (e.g., size, shape or material properties) can be invisibilized perfectly with positive-index materials, which significantly benefits the practical realization of a broad-band cloaking device fabricated with existing materials. Moreover, the one concealed in the hidden region is able to undistortedly communicate with the surrounding world, while the lens-like cloaking shell will protect the cloaked source/sensor from being traced back by outside ...

  1. Elliptical metasurfaces for cloaking and antenna applications at microwave and terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpourbernety, Hossein

    One of the interesting applications of metamaterials is the phenomenon of electromagnetic invisibility and cloaking, which implies the suppression of bistatic scattering width of a given object, independent of incident and observation angles. In this regard, diverse techniques have been proposed to analyze and design electromagnetic cloak structures, including transformation optics, anomalous resonance methods, transmission-line networks, and plasmonic cloaking, among others. A common drawback of all these methods is that they rely on bulk materials, which are difficult to realize in practice. To overcome this issue, the mantle cloaking method has been proposed, which utilizes an ultrathin metasurface that provides anti-phase surface currents to reduce the scattering dominant mode of a given object. Recently, an analytical model has been proposed to cloak dielectric and conducting cylindrical objects realized with printed and slotted arrays at microwave frequencies. At low-terahertz (THz) frequencies, one of the promising materials to realize the required metasurface is graphene. In this regard, a graphene monolayer, characterized by inductive reactance, has been proposed to cloak dielectric planar and cylindrical objects. Then, it has been shown that a metasurface made of graphene nanopatches owns dual capacitive/inductive inductance and can be used to cloak both dielectric and conducting cylindrical objects at low-THz frequencies. So far, planar and cylindrical dielectric and conducting structures have been studied. In our study, we have extended the concept and presented an accurate analytical approach to investigate the cloaking of two-dimensional (2-D) elliptical objects including infinite dielectric elliptical cylinders using graphene monolayer; metallic elliptical cylinders, and also, as a special case, 2-D metallic strips using a nanostructured graphene patch array at low-THz frequencies. We have also obtained the results for cloaking of ellipses at

  2. Theory of diffusive light scattering cancellation cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Mohamed; Guenneau, Sebastien; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled Nabil; Alu, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new concept of cloaking objects in diffusive light regime using the paradigm of the scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking techniques. We show numerically that an object can be made completely invisible to diffusive photon density waves, by tailoring the diffusivity constant of the spherical shell enclosing the object. This means that photons' flow outside the object and the cloak made of these spherical shells behaves as if the object were not present. Diffusive light invisibility may open new vistas in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography or tissue imaging.

  3. Development of Plasmonically Cloaked Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, Eric [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Summers, Christopher [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-05-18

    An advanced in-pile multi-parameter reactor monitoring system is being proposed in this funding opportunity. The proposed effort brings cutting edge, high-fidelity optical measurement systems into the reactor environment in an unprecedented fashion, including in-core, in-cladding and in-fuel pellet itself. Unlike instrumented leads, the proposed system provides a unique solution to a multi-parameter monitoring need in core while being minimally intrusive in the reactor core. Detector designs proposed herein can monitor fuel compression and expansion in both the radial and axial dimensions as well as monitor linear power profiles and fission rates during the operation of the reactor. In addition to pressure, stress, strain, compression, neutron flux, neutron spectra, and temperature can be observed inside the fuel bundle and fuel rod using the proposed system. The proposed research aims at developing radiation-hard, harsh-environment multi-parameter systems for insertion into the reactor environment. The proposed research holds the potential to drastically increase the fidelity and precision of in-core instrumentation with little or no impact in the neutron economy in the reactor environment while providing a measurement system capable of operation for entire operating cycles. Significant work has been done over the last few years on the use of nanoparticle-based scintillators. Through the use of metamaterials, the PIs aim to develop planar neutron detectors and large-volume neutron detectors. These detectors will have high efficiencies for neutron detection and will have a high gamma discrimination capability.

  4. A temporal cloak at telecommunication data rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Joseph M; Leaird, Daniel E; Weiner, Andrew M

    2013-06-13

    Through advances in metamaterials--artificially engineered media with exotic properties, including negative refractive index--the once fanciful invisibility cloak has now assumed a prominent place in scientific research. By extending these concepts to the temporal domain, investigators have recently described a cloak which hides events in time by creating a temporal gap in a probe beam that is subsequently closed up; any interaction which takes place during this hole in time is not detected. However, these results are limited to isolated events that fill a tiny portion of the temporal period, giving a fractional cloaking window of only about 10(-4) per cent at a repetition rate of 41 kilohertz (ref. 15)--which is much too low for applications such as optical communications. Here we demonstrate another technique for temporal cloaking, which operates at telecommunication data rates and, by exploiting temporal self-imaging through the Talbot effect, hides optical data from a receiver. We succeed in cloaking 46 per cent of the entire time axis and conceal pseudorandom digital data at a rate of 12.7 gigabits per second. This potential to cloak real-world messages introduces temporal cloaking into the sphere of practical application, with immediate ramifications in secure communications.

  5. Transformation thermodynamics and heat cloaking: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad; Liu, Yichao; Lee, El Hang; Ma, Yungui

    2016-04-01

    This article is a review of the advances and progresses in the field of heat cloaking which is being realized using metamaterials. Heat cloaking has been a particularly important subject of study due to its potential multidimensional applications. The process which manipulates the heat flux in such a way that it can neither enter into the cloaked region nor be distorted outside is called thermal cloaking. Transformation optics has made the hitherto inconceivable advancements in the field of thermodynamics possible with the remarkable assistance of metamaterials. In this article we present a review of the work done in the field of heat cloaking, its progress and outlook. We discuss the theoretical and experimental studies, models, design managements, implementations and behaviors of thermal invisibility cloaking and related devices. This review is intended to help further develop practical and applicable concepts, examine fabrication techniques for a variety of different invisibility cloaking devices and systems, and to pave a way for the new avenues leading to new future technologies.

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy: A Versatile Technique in a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a powerful, label-free technique to monitor noncovalent molecular interactions in real time and in a noninvasive fashion. As a label-free assay, SPR does not require tags, dyes, or specialized reagents (e.g., enzymes-substrate complexes) to elicit a visible or a fluorescence signal. During the last…

  7. Diffusive-light invisibility cloak for transient illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazbayev, B.; Beruete, M.; Martínez, A.; García-Meca, C.

    2016-12-01

    Invisibility in a diffusive-light-scattering medium has been recently demonstrated by employing a scattering-cancellation core-shell cloak. Unlike nondiffusive cloaks, such a device can be simultaneously macroscopic, broadband, passive, polarization independent, and omnidirectional. Unfortunately, it has been verified that this cloak, as well as more sophisticated ones based on transformation optics, fail under pulsed illumination, invalidating their use for a variety of applications. Here, we introduce a different approach based on unimodular transformations that enables the construction of unidirectional diffusive-light cloaks exhibiting a perfect invisibility effect, even under transient conditions. Moreover, we demonstrate that a polygonal cloak can extend this functionality to multiple directions with a nearly ideal behavior, while preserving all other features. We propose and numerically verify a simple cloak realization based on a layered stack of two isotropic materials. The studied devices have several applications not addressable by any of the other cloaks proposed to date, including shielding from pulse-based detection techniques, cloaking undesired scattering elements in time-of-flight imaging or high-speed communication systems for diffusive environments, and building extreme optical security features. The discussed cloaking strategy could also be applied to simplify the implementation of thermal cloaks.

  8. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone, E-mail: dhlin@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  9. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, G.R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, A.G. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadkhani, R., E-mail: rmkhani@znu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 45371-38791 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-06

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes. - Highlights: • Invisibility cloaks for matter waves with three different geometries. • Exact analytical form of the effective mass tensor and potential. • Analogy between cloaking for quantum mechanical waves with classical electromagnetic waves. • Possible experimental realization in engineered semiconducting structures.

  10. A Cloaking Device for Transiting Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M

    2016-01-01

    The transit method is presently the most successful planet discovery and characterization tool at our disposal. Other advanced civilizations would surely be aware of this technique and appreciate that their home planet's existence and habitability is essentially broadcast to all stars lying along their ecliptic plane. We suggest that advanced civilizations could cloak their presence, or deliberately broadcast it, through controlled laser emission. Such emission could distort the apparent shape of their transit light curves with relatively little energy, due to the collimated beam and relatively infrequent nature of transits. We estimate that humanity could cloak the Earth from Kepler-like broadband surveys using an optical monochromatic laser array emitting a peak power of about 30 MW for roughly 10 hours per year. A chromatic cloak, effective at all wavelengths, is more challenging requiring a large array of tunable lasers with a total power of approximately 250 MW. Alternatively, a civilization could cloak ...

  11. Macroscopic Invisible Cloak for Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Baile; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufacturing techniques. A transparent cloak made of two pieces of calcite is created. This cloak is able to conceal a macroscopic object with a maximum height of 2 mm, larger than 3500 free-space-wavelength, inside a transparent liquid environment. Its working bandwidth encompassing red, green and blue light is also demonstrated.

  12. Nonlinear plasmonic imaging techniques and their biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Fujita, Katsumasa; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear optics, when combined with microscopy, is known to provide advantages including novel contrast, deep tissue observation, and minimal invasiveness. In addition, special nonlinearities, such as switch on/off and saturation, can enhance the spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy. These nonlinear imaging techniques are extremely useful for biological studies on various scales from molecules to cells to tissues. Nevertheless, in most cases, nonlinear optical interaction requires strong illumination, typically at least gigawatts per square centimeter intensity. Such strong illumination can cause significant phototoxicity or even photodamage to fragile biological samples. Therefore, it is highly desirable to find mechanisms that allow the reduction of illumination intensity. Surface plasmon, which is the collective oscillation of electrons in metal under light excitation, is capable of significantly enhancing the local field around the metal nanostructures and thus boosting up the efficiency of nonlinear optical interactions of the surrounding materials or of the metal itself. In this mini-review, we discuss the recent progress of plasmonics in nonlinear optical microscopy with a special focus on biological applications. The advancement of nonlinear imaging modalities (including incoherent/coherent Raman scattering, two/three-photon luminescence, and second/third harmonic generations that have been amalgamated with plasmonics), as well as the novel subdiffraction limit imaging techniques based on nonlinear behaviors of plasmonic scattering, is addressed.

  13. Nonlinear plasmonic imaging techniques and their biological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deka Gitanjal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optics, when combined with microscopy, is known to provide advantages including novel contrast, deep tissue observation, and minimal invasiveness. In addition, special nonlinearities, such as switch on/off and saturation, can enhance the spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy. These nonlinear imaging techniques are extremely useful for biological studies on various scales from molecules to cells to tissues. Nevertheless, in most cases, nonlinear optical interaction requires strong illumination, typically at least gigawatts per square centimeter intensity. Such strong illumination can cause significant phototoxicity or even photodamage to fragile biological samples. Therefore, it is highly desirable to find mechanisms that allow the reduction of illumination intensity. Surface plasmon, which is the collective oscillation of electrons in metal under light excitation, is capable of significantly enhancing the local field around the metal nanostructures and thus boosting up the efficiency of nonlinear optical interactions of the surrounding materials or of the metal itself. In this mini-review, we discuss the recent progress of plasmonics in nonlinear optical microscopy with a special focus on biological applications. The advancement of nonlinear imaging modalities (including incoherent/coherent Raman scattering, two/three-photon luminescence, and second/third harmonic generations that have been amalgamated with plasmonics, as well as the novel subdiffraction limit imaging techniques based on nonlinear behaviors of plasmonic scattering, is addressed.

  14. Electret electrostatic cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhao, Zhigang; Li, Hua, E-mail: 12.66@163.com

    2015-04-01

    We report that a bi-layer electret cylinder can cloak electrostatic field. We fabricated two hollow electret cylinders, the two hollow electret cylinders nested a bi-layer hollow electret cylinder. The direction of the polarization intensity is parallel to one of the diameters. Experimental results show that the bi-layer hollow electret cylinder can cloak electrostatic field.

  15. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  16. Yttrium oxide based three dimensional metamaterials for visible light cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2014-04-01

    Metamaterial with negative refractive index is the key phenomenon behind the concept of a cloaking device to hide an object from light in visible spectrum. Metamaterials made of two and three dimensional lattices of periodically placed electromagnetic resonant cells can achieve absorption and propagation of incident electromagnetic radiation as confined electromagnetic fields confined to a waveguide as surface plasmon polaritons, which can be used for shielding an object from in-tune electromagnetic radiation. The periodicity and dimensions of resonant cavity determine the frequency, which are very small as compared to the wavelength of incident light. Till now the phenomena have been demonstrated only for lights in near infrared spectrum. Recent advancements in fabrication techniques have made it possible to fabricate array of three dimensional nanostructures with cross-sections as small as 25 nm that are required for negative refractive index for wavelengths in visible light spectrum of 400-700 nm and for wider view angle. Two types of metamaterial designs, three dimensional concentric split ring and fishnet, are considered. Three dimensional structures consisted of metal-dielectric-metal stacks. The metal is silver and dielectric is yttrium oxide, other than conventional materials such as FR4 and Duroid. High κ dielectric and high refractive index as well as large crystal symmetry of Yttrium oxide has been investigated as encapsulating medium. Dependence of refractive index on wavelength and bandwidth of negative refractive index region are analyzed for application towards cloaking from light in visible spectrum.

  17. Coordinate transformations and matter waves cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, G. R.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Mohammadkhani, R.

    2016-03-01

    Transformation method provides an efficient tool to control wave propagation inside the materials. Using the coordinate transformation approach, we study invisibility cloaks with sphere, cylinder and ellipsoid structures for electronic waves propagation. The underlying physics behind this investigation is the fact that Schrödinger equation with position dependent mass tensor and potentials has a covariant form which follows the coordinate transformation. Using this technique we obtain the exact spatial form of the mass tensor and potentials for a variety of cloaks with different shapes.

  18. Realization of Desired Plasmonic Structures via a Direct Laser Writing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Quang Cong; Luong, Mai Hoang; Tran, Thi Mo; Remmel, Jacqueline; Do, Minh Thanh; Kieu, Duy Manh; Ghasemi, Rasta; Nguyen, Duc Tho; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-11-01

    We present a recent investigation of fabrication of desired plasmonic structures. First, the polymeric templates were realized by a simple and low-cost fabrication technique based on direct laser writing with a continuous-wave laser source. The plasmonic structures have been then realized by two methods, namely, a combination of gold evaporation and lift-off techniques, and a combination of gold sputtering and thermal annealing techniques. Each method presents its own advantages. Numerous metallic submicro- and nano-structures have been realized, which should be very interesting for different applications, such as high-transmission bandpass filters, plasmonic data storage, and plasmonic photonic devices.

  19. Invisibility cloaking in weak scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setälä, Tero; Hakkarainen, Timo; Friberg, Ari T.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider invisibility cloaking of a slab object in scalar wave theory within the first-order Born approximation. We show that in the forward direction cloaking is achieved for any object slab and incident field, whereas in the backward direction cloaking is possible at least for self-imaging fiel

  20. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  1. Analytical Solution for Elliptical Cloaks Based on The Frequency Selective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ghasemi Mizuji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the elliptical dielectric cylinder which is covered with FSS cloak is considered. Frequency selective surface cloak which Alu named it mantle cloak is one of the recent techniques for cloaking. In this method an appropriate FSS can act as cloaking device for suppressing  the scattering of object  in the desired frequency. With using this method the dimension of the cloaks is extremely reduced. By this proposed structure, the RCS of elliptical cylinder  is reduced about 10-20 dB and designed cloak has an appropriate performance.  The analytical solution for the wave in each layer is presented and with using simulation, the electric field and the scattering pattern has been drawn.

  2. Broadband cloaking using composite dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Bing Hwang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel cloaking structure that is able to make a metallic block invisible in a metallic waveguide. Such a cloak is made up of a stack of commonly used dielectric slabs. We carry out the numerical simulation and observe the detour of the vector Poynting power through the cloak. Moreover, the experiment is conducted for measuring the scattering characteristics including the reflection and transmission coefficients. The great improvement in the transmission coefficient in a broad bandwidth after cloaking is demonstrated. Significantly, the theory of mode conversion is developed for explaining the cloaking phenomenon.

  3. A self-assembled three-dimensional cloak in the visible

    KAUST Repository

    Mühlig, Stefan

    2013-08-07

    An invisibility cloak has been designed, realized and characterized. The cloak hides free-standing sub-wavelength three-dimensional objects at the short wavelength edge of the visible spectrum. By a bottom-up approach the cloak was self-assembled around the object. Such fabrication approach constitutes a further important step towards real world applications of cloaking; leaving the realm of curiosity. The cloak and the way it was fabricated opens an avenue for many spectacular nanooptical applications such as non-disturbing sensors and photo-detectors, highly efficient solar cells, or optical nanoantenna arrays with strongly suppressed cross-talk to mention only a few. Our results rely on the successful combination of concepts from various disciplines, i.e. chemistry, material science, and plasmonics. Consequently, this work will stimulate these fields by unraveling new paths for future research.

  4. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  5. Broadband cloaking for flexural waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zareei, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The governing equation for elastic waves in flexural plates is not form invariant, and hence designing a cloak for such waves faces a major challenge. Here, we present the design of a perfect broadband cloak for flexural waves through the use of a nonlinear transformation, and by matching term-by-term the original and transformed equations. For a readily achievable flexural cloak in a physical setting, we further present an approximate adoption of our perfect cloak under more restrictive physical constraints. Through direct simulation of the governing equations, we show that this cloak, as well, maintains a consistently high cloaking efficiency over a broad range of frequencies. The methodology developed here may be used for steering waves and designing cloaks in other physical systems with non form-invariant governing equations.

  6. A hybrid Scatter/Transform cloaking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Licht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Scatter/Transform cloak is developed that combines the light bending of refraction characteristic of a Transform cloak with the scatter cancellation characteristic of a Scatter cloak. The hybrid cloak incorporates both Transform’s variable index of refraction with modified linear intrusions to maximize the Scatter cloak effect. Scatter/Transform improved the scattering cross-section of cloaking in a 2-dimensional space to 51.7% compared to only 39.6% or 45.1% respectively with either Scatter or Transform alone. Metamaterials developed with characteristics based on the new ST hybrid cloak will exhibit superior cloaking capabilities.

  7. Grating-Coupled Waveguide Cloaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-Fu; QU Shao-Bo; XU Zhuo; MA Hua; WANG Cong-Min; XIA Song; WANG Xin-Hua; ZHOU Hang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concept of a grating-coupled waveguide (GCW),a new strategy for realizing EM cloaking is presented.Using metallic grating,incident waves are firstly coupled into the effective waveguide and then decoupled into free space behind,enabling EM waves to pass around the obstacle.Phase compensation in the waveguide keeps the wave-front shape behind the obstacle unchanged.Circular,rectangular and triangular cloaks are presented to verify the robustness of the GCW cloaking.Electric field animations and radar cross section (RCS)comparisons convincingly demonstrate the cloaking effect.

  8. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  9. Temperature-Controlled Chameleonlike Cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiguang Peng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Invisibility cloaking based on transformation optics has brought about unlimited space for reverie. However, the design and fabrication of transformation-optics-based cloaks still remain fairly challenging because of the complicated, even extreme, material prescriptions, including its meticulously engineered anisotropy, inhomogeneity and singularity. And almost all the state-of-the-art cloaking devices work within a narrow and invariable frequency band. Here, we propose a novel mechanism for all-dielectric temperature-controllable cloaks. A prototype device was designed and fabricated with SrTiO_{3} ferroelectric cuboids as building blocks, and its cloaking effects were successfully demonstrated, including its frequency-agile invisibility by varying temperature. It revealed that the predesignated cloaking device based on our proposed strategy could be directly scaled in dimensions to operate at different frequency regions, without the necessity for further efforts of redesign. Our work opens the door towards the realization of tunable cloaking devices for various practical applications and provides a simple strategy to readily extend the cloaking band from microwave to terahertz regimes without the need for reconfiguration.

  10. Transformation optics and invisibility cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Min; Yan, Min; Yan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the theory of transformation optics and introduce its application in achieving perfect invisibility cloaking. In particular, we theoretically show how the task of realizing cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be eased by using either structural approximation...

  11. Temperature-Controlled Chameleonlike Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ruiguang; Xiao, Zongqi; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Fuli; Meng, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhang, Peng; Shen, Nian-Hai; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-01-01

    Invisibility cloaking based on transformation optics has brought about unlimited space for reverie. However, the design and fabrication of transformation-optics-based cloaks still remain fairly challenging because of the complicated, even extreme, material prescriptions, including its meticulously engineered anisotropy, inhomogeneity and singularity. And almost all the state-of-the-art cloaking devices work within a narrow and invariable frequency band. Here, we propose a novel mechanism for all-dielectric temperature-controllable cloaks. A prototype device was designed and fabricated with SrTiO3 ferroelectric cuboids as building blocks, and its cloaking effects were successfully demonstrated, including its frequency-agile invisibility by varying temperature. It revealed that the predesignated cloaking device based on our proposed strategy could be directly scaled in dimensions to operate at different frequency regions, without the necessity for further efforts of redesign. Our work opens the door towards the realization of tunable cloaking devices for various practical applications and provides a simple strategy to readily extend the cloaking band from microwave to terahertz regimes without the need for reconfiguration.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    coordinate transformations. If the coordinates they conjure up run backwards one gets negative refraction, if they exclude some region of space one makes anything inside invisible [4]. In physics, general relativity has honed the theoretical tools for understanding curved space and curved-coordinate transformations. In transformation optics, general relativity has become a theoretical tool for solving practical engineering problems [4]. What an unorthodox connection! This focus issue represents a snapshot of this rapidly developing research area. It is not restricted to optics or electromagnetism, though. Metamaterials for acoustics also exist and can be applied in ways similar to optical metamaterials. So transformation optics not only attracts an unusual mix of scientists, but also spans a range of applications in optics and beyond. Transformation optics has the potential to transform optics, for example by visualizing invisibility and making materials beyond materials—metamaterials. But before we transgress the boundaries to the hermeneutics of transformation optics [5], let the papers speak for themselves. References [1] Yao J, Liu Z, Liu Y, Wang Y, Sun C, Bartal G, Stacy A M and Zhang X 2008 Science 321 930 [2] Valentine J, Zhang S, Zentgraf T, Ulin-Avila E, Genov D A, Bartal G and Zhang X 2008 Nature 455 376 [3] Schurig D, Mock J J, Justice B J, Cummer S A, Pendry J B, Starr A F and Smith D R 2006 Science 314 977 [4] Leonhardt U and Philbin T G 2006 New J. Phys. 8 247 [5] Sokal A D 1996 Social Text 14(46/47) 217 Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics Contents Transformation optics for the full dielectric electromagnetic cloak and metal-dielectric planar hyperlens D P Gaillot, C Croënne, F Zhang and D Lippens Transmutation of singularities in optical instruments Tomáš Tyc and Ulf Leonhardt Electromagnetic cloaking with canonical spiral inclusions K Guven, E Saenz, R Gonzalo, E Ozbay and S Tretyakov Theory and potentials of multi-layered plasmonic covers for

  13. Temperature controlled infrared broadband cloaking with the bilayer coatings of semiconductor and superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaohua [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng 224051 (China); Liu, Youwen, E-mail: ywliu@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Feng, Yuncai [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We first propose that the cloak is composed of the bilayer of semiconductor and superconductor. • We realize the infrared broadband cloaking based on the scattering cancellation method. • The cloaking frequency can be tuned by external temperature. - Abstract: The infrared broadband tunable cloaking have been proposed and investigated with the bilayer coating materials of semiconductor (n-Ge) and high-temperature superconductor (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}), whose cloaking frequency can be controlled by external temperature. The analytical solution is derived based on the scattering cancellation cloaking technique from the Mie scattering theory, and the full-wave numerical simulation is performed by the finite element method. The calculated and simulated results have demonstrated that this invisibility cloak may reduce the total scattering cross section of the composite structure of 90% over a broad frequency band of nearly 20 THz, and the infrared cloaking frequency can be tuned by the external temperature. It can provide a feasible way to design a broadband tunable cloak.

  14. Hidden progress: broadband plasmonic invisibility

    CERN Document Server

    Renger, Jan; Dupont, Guillaume; Aćimović, Srdjan S; Guenneau, Sébastien; Quidant, Romain; Enoch, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The key challenge in current research into electromagnetic cloaking is to achieve invisibility over an extended bandwidth. There has been significant progress towards this using the idea of cloaking by sweeping under the carpet of Li and Pendry, with dielectric structures superposed on a mirror. Here, we show that we can harness surface plasmon polaritons at a metal surface structured with a dielectric material to obtain a unique control of their propagation. We exploit this to control plasmonic coupling and demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally cloaking over an unprecedented bandwidth (650-900 nm). Our non-resonant plasmonic metamaterial allows a curved reflector to mimic a flat mirror. Our theoretical predictions are validated by experiments mapping the surface light intensity at the wavelength 800 nm.

  15. Regularized Transformation-Optics Cloaking for the Helmholtz Equation: From Partial Cloak to Full Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Rondi, Luca; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2015-04-01

    We develop a very general theory on the regularized approximate invisibility cloaking for the wave scattering governed by the Helmholtz equation in any space dimensions via the approach of transformation optics. There are four major ingredients in our proposed theory: (1) The non-singular cloaking medium is obtained by the push-forwarding construction through a transformation that blows up a subset in the virtual space, where is an asymptotic regularization parameter. will degenerate to K 0 as , and in our theory K 0 could be any convex compact set in , or any set whose boundary consists of Lipschitz hypersurfaces, or a finite combination of those sets. (2) A general lossy layer with the material parameters satisfying certain compatibility integral conditions is employed right between the cloaked and cloaking regions. (3) The contents being cloaked could also be extremely general, possibly including, at the same time, generic mediums and, sound-soft, sound-hard and impedance-type obstacles, as well as some sources or sinks. (4) In order to achieve a cloaking device of compact size, particularly for the case when is not "uniformly small", an assembly-by-components, the (ABC) geometry is developed for both the virtual and physical spaces and the blow-up construction is based on concatenating different components. Within the proposed framework, we show that the scattered wave field corresponding to a cloaking problem will converge to u 0 as , with u 0 being the scattered wave field corresponding to a sound-hard K 0. The convergence result is used to theoretically justify the approximate full and partial invisibility cloaks, depending on the geometry of K 0. On the other hand, the convergence results are conducted in a much more general setting than what is needed for the invisibility cloaking, so they are of significant mathematical interest for their own sake. As for applications, we construct three types of full and partial cloaks. Some numerical experiments are

  16. Analysis of flexural wave cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Climente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a comprehensive study of the cloak for bending waves theoretically proposed by Farhat et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009] and later on experimentally realized by Stenger et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 014301 (2012]. This study uses a semi-analytical approach, the multilayer scattering method, which is based in the Kirchoff-Love wave equation for flexural waves in thin plates. Our approach was unable to reproduce the predicted behavior of the theoretically proposed cloak. This disagreement is here explained in terms of the simplified wave equation employed in the cloak design, which employed unusual boundary conditions for the cloaking shell. However, our approach reproduces fairly well the measured displacement maps for the fabricated cloak, indicating the validity of our approach. Also, the cloak quality has been here analyzed using the so called averaged visibility and the scattering cross section. The results obtained from both analysis let us to conclude that there is room for further improvements of this type of flexural wave cloak by using better design procedures.

  17. Analysis of flexural wave cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climente, Alfonso; Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the cloak for bending waves theoretically proposed by Farhat et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)] and later on experimentally realized by Stenger et al. [see Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 014301 (2012)]. This study uses a semi-analytical approach, the multilayer scattering method, which is based in the Kirchoff-Love wave equation for flexural waves in thin plates. Our approach was unable to reproduce the predicted behavior of the theoretically proposed cloak. This disagreement is here explained in terms of the simplified wave equation employed in the cloak design, which employed unusual boundary conditions for the cloaking shell. However, our approach reproduces fairly well the measured displacement maps for the fabricated cloak, indicating the validity of our approach. Also, the cloak quality has been here analyzed using the so called averaged visibility and the scattering cross section. The results obtained from both analysis let us to conclude that there is room for further improvements of this type of flexural wave cloak by using better design procedures.

  18. A cloaking device for transiting planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.; Teachey, Alex

    2016-06-01

    The transit method is presently the most successful planet discovery and characterization tool at our disposal. Other advanced civilizations would surely be aware of this technique and appreciate that their home planet's existence and habitability is essentially broadcast to all stars lying along their ecliptic plane. We suggest that advanced civilizations could cloak their presence, or deliberately broadcast it, through controlled laser emission. Such emission could distort the apparent shape of their transit light curves with relatively little energy, due to the collimated beam and relatively infrequent nature of transits. We estimate that humanity could cloak the Earth from Kepler-like broad-band surveys using an optical monochromatic laser array emitting a peak power of ˜30 MW for ˜10 hours per year. A chromatic cloak, effective at all wavelengths, is more challenging requiring a large array of tunable lasers with a total power of ˜250 MW. Alternatively, a civilization could cloak only the atmospheric signatures associated with biological activity on their world, such as oxygen, which is achievable with a peak laser power of just ˜160 kW per transit. Finally, we suggest that the time of transit for optical Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is analogous to the water-hole in radio SETI, providing a clear window in which observers may expect to communicate. Accordingly, we propose that a civilization may deliberately broadcast their technological capabilities by distorting their transit to an artificial shape, which serves as both a SETI beacon and a medium for data transmission. Such signatures could be readily searched in the archival data of transit surveys.

  19. Robust large dimension terahertz cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Dachuan; Han, Jiaguang; Yang, Yuanmu; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Weili

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaking not only catches the human imagination, but also promises fascinating applications in optics and photonics. By manipulating electromagnetic waves with metamaterials, researchers have been able to realize electromagnetic cloaking in the microwave, terahertz and optical regimes. Nevertheless, the complex design and fabrication process, narrow bandwidth, and high intrinsic losses in the metamaterial-based cloaks have imposed intractable limitations on their realistic applications. Seeking new approaches to overcome these perceived disadvantages is in progress. Here by using uniform sapphire crystal, we demonstrate the first homogenous invisibility cloak functioning at terahertz frequencies. The terahertz invisibility device features a large concealed volume, low loss, and broad bandwidth. In particular, it is capable of hiding objects with a dimension nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of its lithographic counterpart, but without involving complex and time-consuming cleanroom pro...

  20. Surface Wave Cloak from Graded Refractive Index Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Spada, L.; McManus, T. M.; Dyke, A.; Haq, S.; Zhang, L.; Cheng, Q.; Hao, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been re-emerged on the possibility to manipulate surface waves, in particular, towards the THz and optical regime. Both concepts of Transformation Optics (TO) and metamaterials have been regarded as one of key enablers for such applications in applied electromagnetics. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time a dielectric surface wave cloak from engineered gradient index materials to illustrate the possibility of using nanocomposites to control surface wave propagation through advanced additive manufacturing. The device is designed analytically and validated through numerical simulations and measurements, showing good agreement and performance as an effective surface wave cloak. The underlying design approach has much wider applications, which span from microwave to optics for the control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and radiation of nanoantennas.

  1. Atomic layer deposition (ALD): A versatile technique for plasmonics and nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Lindquist, Nathan C; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-02-28

    While atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used for many years as an industrial manufacturing method for microprocessors and displays, this versatile technique is finding increased use in the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanobiotechnology. In particular, ALD coatings can modify metallic surfaces to tune their optical and plasmonic properties, to protect them against unwanted oxidation and contamination, or to create biocompatible surfaces. Furthermore, ALD is unique among thin-film deposition techniques in its ability to meet the processing demands for engineering nanoplasmonic devices, offering conformal deposition of dense and ultra-thin films on high-aspect-ratio nanostructures at temperatures below 100 °C. In this review, we present key features of ALD and describe how it could benefit future applications in plasmonics, nanosciences, and biotechnology.

  2. Doppler cloak restores invisibility to objects in relativistic motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaccia, Davide; Sounas, Dimitrios L.; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2017-02-01

    Although cloaks are effective at suppressing the observability of static objects, they can be defeated when in motion. Here we discuss a general technique to cloak the motion of objects from static observers, based on compensating the Doppler shift associated with their motion with frequency conversion sustained by a spatiotemporally modulated cover. The concept is theoretically and numerically demonstrated in a system composed of a planar reflector covered by a spatiotemporally modulated slab. It is shown that, for properly selected modulation frequency, the composite system can appear to an external observer as stationary, even though it is actually moving. This concept may pave the way to the minimization of clutter produced by moving objects as well as to new directions in the science of cloaking.

  3. Broadband unidirectional cloak designed by eikonal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Wu, Xiaojia; Zhang, Luoning; Zhou, Jing

    2015-11-02

    A method for designing optical device is derived based on the eikonal theory, which could obtain the eikonal distribution on a curved surface according to the propagation characteristics of the subsequent light wave. Then combining with the phase matching condition, we designed a broadband unidirectional cloak. Different from the reported unidirectional cloaks, the proposed one could be used for coherent wave and has continuous broadband performance. Moreover, it has three cloaked regions. Full-wave simulation results verify the properties of the cloak.

  4. Metasurface Cloaks for Large Cylindrical Cluster Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Yakovlev, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    small cylinders, we demonstrate that even electrically large clusters of such particles can be cloaked by covering its constituent cylinders with the metasurface cloaks. This holds for densely packed cylinders due to significantly reduced coupling by the presence of the cloaks. The results may...

  5. An Electromagnetic GL Double Layered Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ganquan; Xie, Feng; Xie, Lee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new electromagnetic (EM) GL double layered cloak. The GL double layered cloak is consist of two sphere annular layers, $R_1 \\le r \\le R_2$ and $R_2 \\le r \\le R_3$. Two type cloak materials are proposed and installed in the each layer, respectively. The outer layer cloak of the GL double layered cloak has the invisible function, the inner layer cloak has fully absorption function. The GL double layered metamaterials are weak degenerative and weak dispersive. When the source is located outside of the GL double layered cloak, the excited EM wave field propagation outside of the double layered cloak is as same as in free space and never be disturbed by the cloak; also, the exterior EM wave can not penetrate into the inner layer and concealment. When local sources are located inside of the GL double cloaked concealment with the normal EM materials, the excited EM wave is propagating under Maxwell equation governing, it is complete absorbed by the inner layer cloak of GL double cloak and...

  6. Electromagnetic Invisibility of Elliptic Cylinder Cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Kan; LI Chao; LI Fang

    2008-01-01

    Structures with unique electromagnetic properties are designed based on the approach of spatial coordinate transformations of Maxwell's equations.This approach is applied to scheme out invisible elliptic cylinder cloaks,which provide more feasibility for cloaking arbitrarily shaped objects.The transformation expressions for the anisotropic material parameters and the field distribution are derived.The cloaking performances of ideal and lossy elliptic cylinder cloaks are investigated by finite element simulations. It is found that the cloaking performance will degrade in the forward direction with increasing loss.

  7. Plasmonic Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and ...

  8. Macroscopic Invisibility Cloaking of Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xianzhong; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Kyle; Pendry, John B; Zhang, Shuang

    2010-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks of light, which used to be confined to the imagination, have now been turned into a scientific reality, thanks to the enabling theoretical tools of transformation optics and conformal mapping. Inspired by those theoretical works, the experimental realisation of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks has been reported at various electromagnetic frequencies. All the invisibility cloaks demonstrated thus far, however, have relied on nano- or micro-fabricated artificial composite materials with spatially varying electromagnetic properties, which limit the size of the cloaked region to a few wavelengths. Here we report realisation of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding three-dimensional objects of the scale of centimetres and millimetres. Our work opens avenues for future applications with macroscopic cloaking devices.

  9. A Near Zero Refractive Index Metamaterial for Electromagnetic Invisibility Cloaking Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Sunbeam Islam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the design of a unit cell of a metamaterial that shows more than 2 GHz wideband near zero refractive index (NZRI property in the C-band region of microwave spectra. The two arms of the unit cell were splitted in such a way that forms a near-pi-shape structure on epoxy resin fiber (FR-4 substrate material. The reflection and transmission characteristics of the unit cell were achieved by utilizing finite integration technique based simulation software. Measured results were presented, which complied well with simulated results. The unit cell was then applied to build a single layer rectangular-shaped cloak that operates in the C-band region where a metal cylinder was perfectly hidden electromagnetically by reducing the scattering width below zero. Moreover, the unit cell shows NZRI property there. The experimental result for the cloak operation was presented in terms of S-parameters as well. In addition, the same metamaterial shell was also adopted for designing an eye-shaped and triangular-shaped cloak structure to cloak the same object, and cloaking operation is achieved in the C-band, as well with slightly better cloaking performance. The novel design, NZRI property, and single layer C-band cloaking operation has made the design a promising one in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  10. An Object-Independent ENZ Metamaterial-Based Wideband Electromagnetic Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-01-01

    A new, metamaterial-based electromagnetic cloaking operation is proposed in this study. The metamaterial exhibits a sharp transmittance in the C-band of the microwave spectrum with negative effective property of permittivity at that frequency. Two metal arms were placed on an FR-4 substrate to construct a double-split-square shape structure. The size of the resonator was maintained to achieve the effective medium property of the metamaterial. Full wave numerical simulation was performed to extract the reflection and transmission coefficients for the unit cell. Later on, a single layer square-shaped cloak was designed using the proposed metamaterial unit cell. The cloak hides a metal cylinder electromagnetically, where the material exhibits epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) property. Cloaking operation was demonstrated adopting the scattering-reduction technique. The measured result was provided to validate the characteristics of the metamaterial and the cloak. Some object size- and shape-based analyses were performed with the cloak, and a common cloaking region was revealed over more than 900 MHz in the C-band for the different objects. PMID:27634456

  11. An Object-Independent ENZ Metamaterial-Based Wideband Electromagnetic Cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-09-16

    A new, metamaterial-based electromagnetic cloaking operation is proposed in this study. The metamaterial exhibits a sharp transmittance in the C-band of the microwave spectrum with negative effective property of permittivity at that frequency. Two metal arms were placed on an FR-4 substrate to construct a double-split-square shape structure. The size of the resonator was maintained to achieve the effective medium property of the metamaterial. Full wave numerical simulation was performed to extract the reflection and transmission coefficients for the unit cell. Later on, a single layer square-shaped cloak was designed using the proposed metamaterial unit cell. The cloak hides a metal cylinder electromagnetically, where the material exhibits epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) property. Cloaking operation was demonstrated adopting the scattering-reduction technique. The measured result was provided to validate the characteristics of the metamaterial and the cloak. Some object size- and shape-based analyses were performed with the cloak, and a common cloaking region was revealed over more than 900 MHz in the C-band for the different objects.

  12. The Art of Cloaking Ownership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalders, Gerard; Wiebes, Cees

    1996-01-01

    After years of intensive research in archives throughout Europe and the U.S., the authors of The Art of Cloaking Ownership discovered that firms located in 'neutral' Sweden supported the Nazis' financial and industrial leadership. The case of Enskilda, a bank owned by the still powerful Wallenberg f

  13. Full and Partial Cloaking in Electromagnetic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youjun; Liu, Hongyu; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two regularized transformation-optics cloaking schemes for electromagnetic (EM) waves. Both schemes are based on the blowup construction with the generating sets being, respectively, a generic curve and a planar subset. We derive sharp asymptotic estimates in assessing the cloaking performances of the two constructions in terms of the regularization parameters and the geometries of the cloaking devices. The first construction yields an approximate full-cloak, whereas the second construction yields an approximate partial-cloak. Moreover, by incorporating properly chosen conducting layers, both cloaking constructions are capable of nearly cloaking arbitrary EM contents. This work complements the existing results in Ammari et al. (SIAM J Appl Math 73:2055-2076, 2013), Bao and Liu (SIAM J Appl Math 74:724-742, 2014), Bao et al. (J Math Pure Appl (9) 101:716-733, 2014) on approximate EM cloaks with the generating set being a singular point, and it also extends Deng et al. (On regularized full- and partial-cloaks in acoustic scat- tering. Preprint, arXiv:1502.01174, 2015), Li et al. (Commun Math Phys, 335:671-712, 2015) on regularized full and partial cloaks for acoustic waves governed by the Helmholtz system to the more challenging EM case governed by the full Maxwell system.

  14. Photoacoustic technique for the characterization of plasmonic properties of 2D periodic arrays of gold nanoholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petronijevic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We apply photo-acoustic (PA technique to examine plasmonic properties of 2D periodic arrays of nanoholes etched in gold/chromium layer upon a glass substrate. The pitch of these arrays lies in the near IR, and this, under appropriate wave vector matching conditions in the visible region, allows for the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP guided along a dielectric – metal surface. SPP offered new approaches in light guiding and local field intensity enhancement, but their detection is often difficult due to the problematic discrimination of their contribution from the overall scattering. Here PA measures the energy absorbed due to the non-radiative decay of SPPs. We report on the absorption enhancement by presenting the spatial mapping of absorption under the incidence angles and wavelength that correspond to the efficient excitation of SPPs. Moreover, a comparison with optical transmission measurements is carried out, underlining the applicability and sensitivity of PA technique.

  15. Surface plasmon effect in nanocrystalline copper/DLC composite films by electrodeposition technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Hussain; A K Pal

    2006-11-01

    Composite films of nanocrystalline copper embedded in DLC matrix prepared by electrodeposition technique were studied for their optical properties. Particle size and metal volume fractions were tailored by varying the amount of copper containing salt in the electrolyte. Blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak in the absorbance spectra of the films was observed with the reduction in size and volume fraction of metal particles. Mie theory was found to describe the experimental spectra quite well.

  16. Detecting electromagnetic cloaks using backward-propagating waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach for detecting transformation-optics invisibility cloaks is proposed. The detection method takes advantage of the unusual backward-propagation characteristics of recently reported beams and pulses to induce electromagnetic scattering from the cloak. Even though waves with backward-propagating energy flux cannot penetrate the cloaking shell and interact with the cloaked objects (i.e., they do not make the cloaked object visible), they provide a mechanism for detecting the presence of cloaks. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Electromagnetic Detection of a Perfect Carpet Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Lin, Xiao; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a spherical invisibility cloak originally proposed by Pendry et al. can be electromagnetically detected by shooting a charged particle through it, whose underlying mechanism stems from the asymmetry of transformation optics applied to motions of photons and charges [PRL 103, 243901 (2009)]. However, the conceptual three-dimensional invisibility cloak that exactly follows specifications of transformation optics is formidably difficult to implement, while the simplified cylindrical cloak that has been experimentally realized is inherently visible. On the other hand, the recent carpet cloak model has acquired remarkable experimental development, including a recently demonstrated full-parameter carpet cloak without any approximation in the required constitutive parameters. In this paper, we numerically investigate the electromagnetic radiation from a charged particle passing through a perfect carpet cloak and propose an experimentally verifiable model to demonstrate symmetry breaking of transformation optics. PMID:25997798

  18. Broadband solid cloak for underwater acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Bi, Yafeng; Sun, Zhaoyong; Xiang, Ping; Yang, Jun; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-01-01

    Shielding an object to be undetectable is an important issue for engineering applications. Cloaking is the ultimate shielding example, routing waves around an object without mutual interaction, demonstrated as possible in principle by transformation and metamaterial techniques. Example applications have been successfully designed and validated for electromagnetic wave, thin plate flexural wave, thermal flux, and airborne sound. However, for underwater acoustics, the commonly used scheme based on meta-fluids with anisotropic density for airborne sound is unworkable since an acoustic rigid material is required with mass density three orders of magnitude higher than water. Material with such high density is impossible using even the heaviest metal, and may suffer from a narrow working frequency band even if realized with locally resonant techniques. An alternative solution was recently suggested based on solid pentamode material, which can be impedance matched with water and has anisotropic modulus. Here, we rep...

  19. Topology optimized cloak for airborne sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Directional acoustic cloaks that conceal an aluminum cylinder for airborne sound waves are presented in this paper. Subwavelength cylindrical aluminum inclusions in air constitute the cloak design to aid practical realizations. The positions and radii of the subwavelength cylinders are determined...... by minimizing scattering from the cloak-structure and cylinder using the gradient-based topology optimization method. In the final optimization step, the radii of the subwavelength cylinders are constrained to three discrete values. A near-perfect narrow-banded and angular cloaking effect is obtained...

  20. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Ayushi [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sharma, Savita [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Singh, Fouran [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110075 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the optical properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films after irradiation using SPR. • Otto configuration has been used to excite the surface plasmons using gold metal thin film. • BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique. • Examined the refractive index dispersion of pristine and irradiated BFO thin film. - Abstract: Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol–gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au{sup 9+} ions at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup −2}. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  1. Low-cost, high performance surface plasmon resonance-compatible films characterized by the surface plasmon resonance technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Song-Quan; Ye Hong-An; Liu Chun-Yu; Dou Yin-Feng; Huang Yan

    2013-01-01

    A new analytical method based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique is presented,with which SPR curves for both wavelength and angular modulations can be obtained simultaneously via only a single scan of the incident angle.Using this method,the SPR responses of TiO2-coated Cu films are characterized in the wavelength range from 600 nm to 900 nm.For the first time,we determine the effective optical constants and the thicknesses of TiO2-coated Cu films using the SPR curves of wavelength modulation.The sensitivities of prism-based SPR refractive index sensors using TiO2-coated Cu films are investigated theoretically for both wavelength and angular modulations,the results show that in the case of sensitivity with wavelength modulation,TiO2-coated Cu films are not as good as the Au film,however,they are more suitable than the Au film for SPR refractive index sensors with angular modulation because a higher sensitivity can be achieved.

  2. Coherent interaction of a metallic structure with a single quantum emitter: from super absorption to cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xue-Wen; Agio, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general theoretical platform based on quantized radiation in absorptive and inhomogeneous media for investigating the coherent interaction of light with metallic structures in the immediate vicinity of quantum emitters. In the case of a very small metallic cluster, we demonstrate extreme regimes where a single emitter can either counteract or enhance particle absorption by three orders of magnitude. For larger structures, we show that an emitter can eliminate both scattering and absorption and cloak a plasmonic antenna. We provide physical interpretations of our results and discuss their applications in active metamaterials and quantum plasmonics.

  3. Designing near-perfect invisibility cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Min; Yan, Wei; Yan, Min

    2008-01-01

    Using the theory of transformation optics, practical cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be devised to conceal objects from detection at a targeted wavelength.......Using the theory of transformation optics, practical cylindrical invisibility cloaks can be devised to conceal objects from detection at a targeted wavelength....

  4. Minimizing the scattering of a nonmagnetic cloak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Nonmagnetic cloak offers a feasible way to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies using materials with only electric responses. In this letter, we suggest an approximation of the ideal nonmagnetic cloak and quantitatively study its electromagnetic characteristics using a full-wave scattering...

  5. Macroscopic invisibility cloaking of visible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xianzhong; Luo, Y.; Zhang, Jingjing

    2011-01-01

    to a few wavelengths. Here, we report the first realization of a macroscopic volumetric invisibility cloak constructed from natural birefringent crystals. The cloak operates at visible frequencies and is capable of hiding, for a specific light polarization, three-dimensional objects of the scale...

  6. Rigorous analysis of non-magnetic cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Mortensen, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Nonmagnetic cloak offers a feasible way to achieve invisibility at optical frequencies using materials with only electric responses. In this letter, we suggest an approximation of the ideal nonmagnetic cloak and quantitatively study its electromagnetic characteristics using a full-wave scattering...

  7. Unraveling an Old Cloak: k-anonymity for Location Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shokri, Reza; Troncoso, Carmela; Diaz, Claudia; Freudiger, Julien; Hubaux, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    There is a rich collection of literature that aims at protecting the privacy of users querying location-based services. One of the most popular location privacy techniques consists in cloaking users' locations such that k users appear as potential senders of a query, thus achieving k-anonymity. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of k-anonymity approaches for protecting location privacy in the presence of various types of adversaries. The unraveling of the scheme unfolds the inconsistency b...

  8. Fourier analysis: from cloaking to imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kedi; Cheng, Qiluan; Wang, Guo Ping

    2016-04-01

    Regarding invisibility cloaks as an optical imaging system, we present a Fourier approach to analytically unify both Pendry cloaks and complementary media-based invisibility cloaks into one kind of cloak. By synthesizing different transfer functions, we can construct different devices to realize a series of interesting functions such as hiding objects (events), creating illusions, and performing perfect imaging. In this article, we give a brief review on recent works of applying Fourier approach to analysis invisibility cloaks and optical imaging through scattering layers. We show that, to construct devices to conceal an object, no constructive materials with extreme properties are required, making most, if not all, of the above functions realizable by using naturally occurring materials. As instances, we experimentally verify a method of directionally hiding distant objects and create illusions by using all-dielectric materials, and further demonstrate a non-invasive method of imaging objects completely hidden by scattering layers.

  9. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-...

  10. Invisibility cloak with image projection capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debasish; Ji, Chengang; Iizuka, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of invisibility cloaks have been led by rigorous theories and such cloak structures, in general, require extreme material parameters. Consequently, it is challenging to realize them, particularly in the full visible region. Due to the insensitivity of human eyes to the polarization and phase of light, cloaking a large object in the full visible region has been recently realized by a simplified theory. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a device concept where a large object can be concealed in a cloak structure and at the same time any images can be projected through it by utilizing a distinctively different approach; the cloaking via one polarization and the image projection via the other orthogonal polarization. Our device structure consists of commercially available optical components such as polarizers and mirrors, and therefore, provides a significant further step towards practical application scenarios such as transparent devices and see-through displays.

  11. Non-Euclidean cloaking for light waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyc, Tomas; Chan, Che Ting; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Non-Euclidean geometry combined with transformation optics has recently led to the proposal of an invisibility cloak that avoids optical singularities and therefore can work, in principle, in a broad band of the spectrum [U. Leonhardt and T. Tyc, Science 323, 110 (2009)]. Such a cloak is perfect in the limit of geometrical optics, but not in wave optics. Here we analyze, both analytically and numerically, full wave propagation in non-Euclidean cloaking. We show that the cloaking device performs remarkably well even in a regime beyond geometrical optics where the device is comparable in size with the wavelength. In particular, the cloak is nearly perfect for a spectrum of frequencies that are related to spherical harmonics. We also show that for increasing wavenumber the device works increasingly better, approaching perfect behavior in the limit of geometrical optics.

  12. Invisibility Cloak Printed on a Photonic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen; Wu, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Yu-Xi; Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Yang, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility cloak capable of hiding an object can be achieved by properly manipulating electromagnetic field. Such a remarkable ability has been shown in transformation and ray optics. Alternatively, it may be realistic to create a spatial cloak by means of confining electromagnetic field in three-dimensional arrayed waveguides and introducing appropriate collective curvature surrounding an object. We realize the artificial structure in borosilicate by femtosecond laser direct writing, where we prototype up to 5,000 waveguides to conceal millimeter-scale volume. We characterize the performance of the cloak by normalized cross correlation, tomography analysis and continuous three-dimensional viewing angle scan. Our results show invisibility cloak can be achieved in waveguide optics. Furthermore, directly printed invisibility cloak on a photonic chip may enable controllable study and novel applications in classical and quantum integrated photonics, such as invisualising a coupling or swapping operation with on-chip circuits of their own. PMID:27329510

  13. Modern plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Maradudin, Alexei A; Barnes, William L

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is entering the curriculum of many universities, either as a stand alone subject, or as part of some course or courses. Nanotechnology institutes have been, and are being, established in universities, in which plasmonics is a significant topic of research. Modern Plasmonics book offers a comprehensive presentation of the properties of surface plasmon polaritons, in systems of different structures and various natures, e.g. active, nonlinear, graded, theoretical/computational and experimental techniques for studying them, and their use in a variety of applications. Contains materia

  14. Design of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak with layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Lin, Guochang; Wang, Youshan

    2017-01-01

    Thermal cloak has potential applications in thermal protection and sensing. Based on the theories of spatial transformation and effective medium, layered structure of elliptic cylindrical thermal cloak was designed. According to theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, the layered structure has typical characteristics of perfect thermal cloak. The external temperature field remains unchanged, while the internal temperature gradient decreases obviously. Meanwhile, the cloaking effect is stable in any direction. The cloaking effect can be improved by increasing the number of discretization layers or reducing the cloak thickness. The elliptic cylindrical cloak can be considered as cylindrical cloak when the focal distance is close to zero. This study has provided an effective way for realizing thermal cloak with more complex shapes.

  15. Permittivity and permeability tensors for cloaking applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Balamati; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on derivations of analytical expressions for stealth and cloaking applications. An optimal version of electromagnetic (EM) stealth is the design of invisibility cloak of arbitrary shapes in which the EM waves can be controlled within the cloaking shell by introducing a prescribed spatial variation in the constitutive parameters. The promising challenge in design of invisibility cloaks lies in the determination of permittivity and permeability tensors for all the layers. This book provides the detailed derivation of analytical expressions of the permittivity and permeability tensors for various quadric surfaces within the eleven Eisenhart co-ordinate systems. These include the cylinders and the surfaces of revolutions. The analytical modeling and spatial metric for each of these surfaces are provided along with their tensors. This mathematical formulation will help the EM designers to analyze and design of various quadratics and their hybrids, which can eventually lead to design of cloakin...

  16. Cloaking through cancellation of diffusive wave scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-08-10

    A new cloaking mechanism, which makes enclosed objects invisible to diffusive photon density waves, is proposed. First, diffusive scattering from a basic core-shell geometry, which represents the cloaked structure, is studied. The conditions of scattering cancellation in a quasi-static scattering regime are derived. These allow for tailoring the diffusivity constant of the shell enclosing the object so that the fields scattered from the shell and the object cancel each other. This means that the photon flow outside the cloak behaves as if the cloaked object were not present. Diffusive light invisibility may have potential applications in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography or tissue imaging. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Ideal cylindrical cloak: perfect but sensitive to tiny perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhichao; Yan, Min; Neff, Curtis W; Qiu, Min

    2007-09-14

    A cylindrical wave expansion method is developed to obtain the scattering field for an ideal two-dimensional cylindrical invisibility cloak. A near-ideal model of the invisibility cloak is set up to solve the boundary problem at the inner boundary of the cloak shell. We confirm that a cloak with the ideal material parameters is a perfect invisibility cloak by systematically studying the change of the scattering coefficients from the near-ideal case to the ideal one. However, because of the slow convergence of the zeroth-order scattering coefficients, a tiny perturbation on the cloak would induce a noticeable field scattering and penetration.

  18. Design of invisibility cloaks with an open tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Thomas; Yan, Min; Qiu, Min

    2010-12-20

    In this paper we apply the methodology of transformation optics for design of a novel invisibility cloak which can possess an open tunnel. Such a cloak facilitates the insertion (retrieval) of matter into (from) the cloak's interior without significantly affecting the cloak's performance, overcoming the matter exchange bottleneck inherent to most previously proposed cloak designs.We achieve this by applying a transformation which expands a point at the origin in electromagnetic space to a finite area in physical space in a highly anisotropic manner. The invisibility performance of the proposed cloak is verified by using full-wave finite-element simulations.

  19. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Singh, Fouran; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol-gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au9+ ions at a fluence of 1 × 1012 ions cm-2. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  20. Transformation Optics, Generalized Cloaking and Superlenses

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolet, Andre; Geuzaine, Christophe; 10.1109/TMAG.2010.2043073

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, transformation optics is presented together with a generalization of invisibility cloaking: instead of an empty region of space, an inhomogeneous structure is transformed via Pendry's map in order to give, to any object hidden in the central hole of the cloak, a completely arbitrary appearance. Other illusion devices based on superlenses considered from the point of view of transformation optics are also discussed.

  1. Active Invisibility Cloaks in One Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 063812 (2015) Active invisibility cloaks in one dimension Ali Mostafazadeh* Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Koc¸ University, Sarıyer 34450, Istanbul, Turkey (Received 19 March 2015; published 12 June 2015) We outline a general method of constructing finite-range cloaking potentials which render a given finite-range real or complex potential, v(x), unidirectionally reflectionless or invisible at a wave number, k0, of our choice.We give explici...

  2. Transformation thermodynamics: cloaking and concentrating heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, Sebastien; Amra, Claude; Veynante, Denis

    2012-03-26

    We adapt tools of transformation optics, governed by a (elliptic) wave equation, to thermodynamics, governed by the (parabolic) heat equation. We apply this new concept to an invibility cloak in order to thermally protect a region (a dead core) and to a concentrator to focus heat flux in a small region. We finally propose a multilayered cloak consisting of 20 homogeneous concentric layers with a piecewise constant isotropic diffusivity working over a finite time interval (homogenization approach).

  3. ABO Blood-Typing Using an Antibody Array Technique Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngkamhang, Nongluck; Vongsakulyanon, Apirom; Peungthum, Patjaree; Sudprasert, Krisda; Kitpoka, Pimpun; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Sutapun, Boonsong; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2013-01-01

    In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB, and single clones of anti-A and anti-B, were used to construct the five-line detection arrays using a multichannel flow cell in the SPR imager. The red blood cell (RBC) samples were applied to a multichannel flow cell that was orthogonal to the detection line arrays for blood group typing. We found that the blood samples were correctly grouped in less than 12 min by the SPR imaging technique, and the results were consistent with those of the standard agglutination technique for all 60 samples. We found that mixed clones of antibodies provided 33%–68% greater change in the SPR signal than the single-clone antibodies. Applying the SPR imaging technique using readily available antibodies may reduce the costs of the antibodies, shorten the measurement time, and increase the throughput. PMID:24021965

  4. On the sensitivity of the 2D electromagnetic invisibility cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaproulias, S. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Sigalas, M.M., E-mail: sigalas@upatras.gr [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2012-10-15

    A computational study of the sensitivity of the two dimensional (2D) electromagnetic invisibility cloaks is performed with the finite element method. A circular metallic object is covered with the cloak and the effects of absorption, gain and disorder are examined. Also the effect of covering the cloak with a thin dielectric layer is studied.

  5. Towards all-dielectric, polarization-independent optical cloaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Mortensen, N. Asger; Sigmund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Fully enclosing, all-dielectric cloaks working for both E-z and H-z polarizations simultaneously are presented in this letter. The cloaks are effective for two antiparallel angles of incidence, and the layout of standard dielectric material in the cloak is determined by topology optimization...

  6. Optical phase cloaking of 700 nm light waves in the far field by a three-dimensional carpet cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Tolga; Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin

    2011-10-21

    Transformation optics is a design tool that connects the geometry of space and propagation of light. Invisibility cloaking is a corresponding benchmark example. Recent experiments at optical frequencies have demonstrated cloaking for the light amplitude only. In this Letter, we demonstrate far-field cloaking of the light phase by interferometric microscope-imaging experiments on the previously introduced three-dimensional carpet cloak at 700 nm wavelength and for arbitrary polarization of light.

  7. Fiber optic profenofos sensor based on surface plasmon resonance technique and molecular imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Anand M; Usha, Sruthi P; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-05-15

    A successful approach for the fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of profenofos based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular imprinting is introduced. Molecular imprinting technology is used for the creation of three dimensional binding sites having complementary shape and size of the specific template molecule over a polymer for the recognition of the same. Binding of template molecule with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer results in the change in the dielectric nature of the sensing surface (polymer) and is identified by SPR technique. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensing probe. The operating profenofos concentration range of the sensor is from 10(-4) to 10(-1)µg/L. A red shift of 18.7 nm in resonance wavelength is recorded for this profenofos concentration range. The maximum sensitivity of the sensor is 12.7 nm/log (µg/L) at 10(-4)µg/L profenofos concentration. Limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor is found to be 2.5×10(-6)µg/L. Selectivity measurements predict the probe highly selective for the profenofos molecule. Besides high sensitivity due to SPR technique and selectivity due to molecular imprinting, proposed sensor has numerous other advantages like immunity to electromagnetic interference, fast response, low cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing of analyte due to the fabrication of the probe on optical fiber.

  8. Mechanical cloak design by direct lattice transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bückmann, Tiemo; Kadic, Muamer; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2015-04-21

    Spatial coordinate transformations have helped simplifying mathematical issues and solving complex boundary-value problems in physics for decades already. More recently, material-parameter transformations have also become an intuitive and powerful engineering tool for designing inhomogeneous and anisotropic material distributions that perform wanted functions, e.g., invisibility cloaking. A necessary mathematical prerequisite for this approach to work is that the underlying equations are form invariant with respect to general coordinate transformations. Unfortunately, this condition is not fulfilled in elastic-solid mechanics for materials that can be described by ordinary elasticity tensors. Here, we introduce a different and simpler approach. We directly transform the lattice points of a 2D discrete lattice composed of a single constituent material, while keeping the properties of the elements connecting the lattice points the same. After showing that the approach works in various areas, we focus on elastic-solid mechanics. As a demanding example, we cloak a void in an effective elastic material with respect to static uniaxial compression. Corresponding numerical calculations and experiments on polymer structures made by 3D printing are presented. The cloaking quality is quantified by comparing the average relative SD of the strain vectors outside of the cloaked void with respect to the homogeneous reference lattice. Theory and experiment agree and exhibit very good cloaking performance.

  9. Transmission-line networks cloaking objects from electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Jylhä, Liisi; Venermo, Jukka; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    We consider a novel method of cloaking objects from the surrounding electromagnetic fields in the microwave region. The method is based on transmission-line networks that simulate the wave propagation in the medium surrounding the cloaked object. The electromagnetic fields from the surrounding medium are coupled into the transmission-line network that guides the waves through the cloak thus leaving the cloaked object undetected. The cloaked object can be an array or interconnected mesh of small inclusions that fit inside the transmission-line network.

  10. Optimized invisibility cloaks from the Logarithm conformal mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhui; Liu, Lijun; Song, Zhengyong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Invisibility cloaks designed from the coordinate transformation method have attracted increasing interest recently. Conformal transformation optics scheme leads to cloaks that possess isotopic media, thus provides a prospective way to facilitate easier realization. Reducing the maximum value of the refractive index required by the cloaks is very important in practical imple- mentation. This letter studies on how the parameters in the logarithm conformal mapping control the cloaking effect. The optimized invisibility cloaks are designed. The maximum values of the refractive index required from the first kind and the second kind of logarithm conformal mappings are reduced to 9.779 and 12.936, respectively.

  11. Illusions and Cloaks for Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, T. M.; Valiente-Kroon, J. A.; Horsley, S. A. R.; Hao, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Ever since the inception of Transformation Optics (TO), new and exciting ideas have been proposed in the field of electromagnetics and the theory has been modified to work in such fields as acoustics and thermodynamics. The most well-known application of this theory is to cloaking, but another equally intriguing application of TO is the idea of an illusion device. Here, we propose a general method to transform electromagnetic waves between two arbitrary surfaces. This allows a flat surface to reproduce the scattering behaviour of a curved surface and vice versa, thereby giving rise to perfect optical illusion and cloaking devices, respectively. The performance of the proposed devices is simulated using thin effective media with engineered material properties. The scattering of the curved surface is shown to be reproduced by its flat analogue (for illusions) and vice versa for cloaks.

  12. Cloaking and Magnifying Using Radial Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kettunen, Henrik; Sihvola, Ari

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the electrostatic responses of a polarly radially anisotropic cylinder and a spherically radially anisotropic sphere. For both geometries, the permittivity components differ from each other in the radial and tangential directions. We show that choosing the ratio between these components in a certain way, these rather simple structures can be used in cloaking dielectric inclusions with arbitrary permittivity and shape in the quasi-static limit. For an ideal cloak, the contrast between the permittivity components has to tend to infinity. However, only positive permittivity values are required and a notable cloaking effect can already be observed with relatively moderate permittivity contrasts. Furthermore, we show that the polarly anisotropic cylindrical shell has a complementary capability of magnifying the response of an inner cylinder.

  13. Flow stabilization with active hydrodynamic cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav A; 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.056313

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that fluid flow cloaking solutions based on active hydrodynamic metamaterials exist for two-dimensional flows past a cylinder in a wide range of Reynolds numbers, up to approximately 200. Within the framework of the classical Brinkman equation for homogenized porous flow, we demonstrate using two different methods that such cloaked flows can be dynamically stable for $Re$ in the range 5-119. The first, highly efficient, method is based on a linearization of the Brinkman-Navier-Stokes equation and finding the eigenfrequencies of the least stable eigen-perturbations; the second method is a direct, numerical integration in the time domain. We show that, by suppressing the Karman vortex street in the weekly turbulent wake, porous flow cloaks can raise the critical Reynolds number up to about 120, or five times greater than for a bare, uncloaked cylinder.

  14. Experiments on elastic cloaking in thin plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Manfred; Wegener, Martin

    2012-01-06

    Following a theoretical proposal [M. Farhat et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 024301 (2009)], we design, fabricate, and characterize a cloaking structure for elastic waves in 1 mm thin structured polymer plates. The cloak consists of 20 concentric rings of 16 different metamaterials, each being a tailored composite of polyvinyl chloride and polydimethylsiloxane. By using stroboscopic imaging with a camera from the direction normal to the plate, we record movies of the elastic waves for monochromatic plane-wave excitation. We observe good cloaking behavior for carrier frequencies in the range from 200 to 400 Hz (one octave), in good agreement with a complete continuum-mechanics numerical treatment. This system is thus ideally suited for demonstration experiments conveying the ideas of transformation optics.

  15. Analysing surface plasmon resonance phase sensor based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer technique using glycerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Hashim, Fazida Hanim

    2016-12-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is a very accurate tool for the detection and analysis of molecular interactions. The performance of the proposed SPR phase sensor is dependent upon multiple performance parameters that include sensitivity, repeatability, drift and the induction speed of fluid into the flow cell. The SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer is tested for different glycerin-water concentrations to check its performance based on the different parameters. This paper highlights the enhancement of the performance of SPR phase technique based on MZI that is influenced by different parameters, measured using glycerin solutions. These four performance parameters can affect the performance of SPR based on MZI and have a particular impact on the sensor output. It also provides us information about suitable working conditions for the SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer sensor. The experiment data shows that the sensor's sensitivity is high for small concentrations of glycerin-water mixtures. Also, any change in drift as well as in induction speed of fluid can affect the performance of SPR Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The sensitivity of SPR phase sensor is high as it can measure glycerin concentration as low as 0.05%.

  16. Design, implementation, and extension of thermal invisibility cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thermal invisibility cloak, as inspired by optical invisibility cloaks, is a device which can steer the conductive heat flux around an isolated object without changing the ambient temperature distribution so that the object can be “invisible” to external thermal environment. While designs of thermal invisibility cloaks inherit previous theories from optical cloaks, the uniqueness of heat diffusion leads to more achievable implementations. Thermal invisibility cloaks, as well as the variations including thermal concentrator, rotator, and illusion devices, have potentials to be applied in thermal management, sensing and imaging applications. Here, we review the current knowledge of thermal invisibility cloaks in terms of their design and implementation in cloaking studies, and their extension as other functional devices.

  17. Radiation and scattering from imperfect cylindrical electromagnetic cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isic, G; Gajic, R; Novakovic, B; Popovic, Z V; Hingerl, K

    2008-02-04

    The design of electromagnetic invisibility cloaks is based on singular mappings prescribing zero or infinite values for material parameters on the inner surface of the cloak. Since this is only approximately feasible, an asymptotic analysis is necessary for a sound description of cloaks. We adopt a simple and effective approach for analyzing electromagnetic cloaks - instead of the originally proposed singular mapping, nonsingular mappings asymptotically approaching the ideal one are considered. Scattering and radiation from this type of imperfect cylindrical cloaks is solved analytically and the results are confirmed by full-wave finite element simulations. Our analysis sheds more light on the influence of this kind of imperfection on the cloaking performance and further explores the physics of cloaking devices.

  18. Cylindrical invisibility cloak with simplified material parameters is inherently visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Ruan, Zhichao; Qiu, Min

    2007-12-07

    It was proposed that perfect invisibility cloaks can be constructed for hiding objects from electromagnetic illumination [J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006)10.1126/science.1125907]. The cylindrical cloaks experimentally demonstrated [D. Schurig, Science 314, 977 (2006)10.1126/science.1133628] and theoretically proposed [W. Cai, Nat. Photon. 1, 224 (2007)10.1038/nphoton.2007.28] have however simplified material parameters in order to facilitate easier realization as well as to avoid infinities in optical constants. Here we show that the cylindrical cloaks with simplified material parameters inherently allow the zeroth-order cylindrical wave to pass through the cloak as if the cloak is made of a homogeneous isotropic medium, and thus visible. To all high-order cylindrical waves, our numerical simulation suggests that the simplified cloak inherits some properties of the ideal cloak, but finite scatterings exist.

  19. Elastodynamic cloaking and field enhancement for soft spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-11-01

    We propose a spherical cloak described by a non-singular asymmetric elasticity tensor {C} depending upon a small parameter η, that defines the softness of a region one would like to conceal from elastodynamic waves. By varying η, we generate a class of soft spheres dressed by elastodynamic cloaks, which are shown to considerably reduce the scattering of the soft spheres. Importantly, such cloaks also provide some wave protection except for a countable set of frequencies, for which some large elastic field enhancement can be observed within the soft spheres. Through an investigation of trapped modes in elasticity, we supply a good approximation of such Mie-type resonances by some transcendental equation. Our results, unlike previous studies that focused merely on the invisibility aspects, shed light on potential pitfalls of elastodynamic cloaks for earthquake protection designed via geometric transforms: a seismic cloak needs to be designed in such a way that its inner resonances differ from eigenfrequencies of the building one wishes to protect. In order to circumvent this downfall of field enhancement inside the cloaked area, we introduce a novel generation of cloaks, named here, mixed cloaks. Such mixed cloaks consist of a shell that detours incoming waves, hence creating an invisibility region, and of a perfectly matched layer (PML, located at the inner boundary of the cloaks) that absorbs residual wave energy in such a way that aforementioned resonances in the soft sphere are strongly attenuated. The designs of mixed cloaks with a non-singular elasticity tensor combined with an inner PML and non-vanishing density bring seismic cloaks one step closer to a practical implementation. Note in passing that the concept of mixed cloaks also applies in the case of singular cloaks and can be translated in other wave areas for a similar purpose (i.e. to smear down inner resonances within the invisibility region).

  20. Fluorescence enhancement from nano-gap embedded plasmonic gratings by a novel fabrication technique with HD-DVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, K.; Pathak, A.; Menke, D.; Cornish, P. V.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Korampally, V.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate strong electromagnetic field enhancement from nano-gaps embedded in silver gratings for visible wavelengths. These structures fabricated using a store-bought HD-DVD worth 10 and conventional micro-contact printing techniques have shown maximum fluorescence enhancement factors of up to 118 times when compared to a glass substrate under epi-fluorescent conditions. The novel fabrication procedure provides for the development of a cost-effective and facile plasmonic substrate for low-level chemical and biological detection. Electromagnetic field simulations were also performed that reveal the strong field confinement in the nano-gap region embedded in the silver grating, which is attributed to the combined effect of localized as well as propagating surface plasmons.

  1. An investigation of localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag nanoparticles produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezgin, Serap Yiǧit; Kepceoǧlu, Abdullah; Kılıç, Hamdi Şükür

    2017-02-01

    Noble metal nano-structures such as Ag, Cu, Au are used commonly to increase power conversion efficiency of the solar cell by using their surface plasmons. The plasmonic metal nanoparticles of Ag among others that have strong LSPR in near UV range. They increase photon absorbance via embedding in the active semiconductor of the solar cell. Thin films of Ag are grown in the desired particle size and interparticle distance easily and at low cost by PLD technique. Ag nanoparticle thin films were grown on micro slide glass at 25-36 mJ laser pulse energies under by PLD using ns-Nd:YAG laser. The result of this work have been presented by carrying out UV-VIS and AFM analysis. It was concluded that a laser energy increases, the density and size of Ag-NPs arriving on the substrate increases, and the interparticle distance was decreases. Therefore, LSPR wavelength shifts towards to longer wavelength region.

  2. Cloaking and imaging at the same time

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Qiannan; Chen, Huanyang

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a conceptual device to perform subwavelength imaging with positive refraction. The key to this proposal is that a drain is no longer a must for some cases. What's more, this device is an isotropic omnidirectional cloak with a perfect electric conductor hiding region and shows versatile illusion optical effects. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the functionalities.

  3. Cloaking and imaging at the same time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiannan; Xu, Yadong; Li, Hui; Chen, Huanyang

    2013-02-01

    In this letter, we propose a conceptual device to perform good imaging with positive refraction. At the same time, this device is an isotropic omnidirectional cloak with a perfect electric conductor hiding region and shows versatile illusion optical effects. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the functionalities.

  4. A rigorous analysis of high-order electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weder, Ricardo [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 68 (Gustaf Hallstromin katu 2b) FI-00014 (Finland)], E-mail: weder@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-02-15

    There is currently a great deal of interest in the invisibility cloaks recently proposed by Pendry et al that are based on the transformation approach. They obtained their results using first-order transformations. In recent papers, Hendi et al and Cai et al considered invisibility cloaks with high-order transformations. In this paper, we study high-order electromagnetic invisibility cloaks in transformation media obtained by high-order transformations from general anisotropic media. We consider the case where there is a finite number of spherical cloaks located in different points in space. We prove that for any incident plane wave, at any frequency, the scattered wave is identically zero. We also consider the scattering of finite-energy wave packets. We prove that the scattering matrix is the identity, i.e., that for any incoming wave packet the outgoing wave packet is the same as the incoming one. This proves that the invisibility cloaks cannot be detected in any scattering experiment with electromagnetic waves in high-order transformation media, and in particular in the first-order transformation media of Pendry et al. We also prove that the high-order invisibility cloaks, as well as the first-order ones, cloak passive and active devices. The cloaked objects completely decouple from the exterior. Actually, the cloaking outside is independent of what is inside the cloaked objects. The electromagnetic waves inside the cloaked objects cannot leave the concealed regions and vice versa, the electromagnetic waves outside the cloaked objects cannot go inside the concealed regions. As we prove our results for media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic materials, we prove that it is possible to cloak objects inside general crystals.

  5. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  6. Polarization-sensitive surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry biosensor using the photoelastic modulation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Ho, Ho Pui; Wu, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals at the f......A surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) is reported. We show that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan , cos and ellipse orientation angle , can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals...

  7. Natural Light Cloaking for Aquatic and Terrestrial Creatures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hongsheng; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the phase of wave, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry \\emph{et al.} required transforming electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around it have to travel much faster than those passing it by. The difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization insensitive cloak for large objects. Here, we suggest a simplifying version of Pendry's cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation as irrelevant for observation in incoherent natural light with human eyes that are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows the cloak design to be made in large scale using commonly available materials and we successfully report cloaking living creatures, a cat and a fish, in front of human eyes.

  8. Two-Dimensional (2D) Polygonal Electromagnetic Cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; YAO Kan; LI Fang

    2009-01-01

    Transformation optics offers remarkable control over electromagnetic fields and opens an exciting gateway to design 'invisible cloak devices' recently.We present an important class of two-dimensional (2D) cloaks with polygon geometries.Explicit expressions of transformed medium parameters are derived with their unique properties investigated.It is found that the elements of diagonalized permittivity tensors are always positive within an irregular polygon cloak besides one element diverges to plus infinity and the other two become zero at the inner boundary.At most positions,the principle axes of permittivity tensors do not align with position vectors.An irregular polygon cloak is designed and its invisibility to external electromagnetic waves is numerically verified.Since polygon cloaks can be tailored to resemble any objects,the transformation is finally generalized to the realization of 2D cloaks with arbitrary geometries.

  9. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Chen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xue-Feng [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Xin-Ye, E-mail: xyzou@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  10. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-dimensional invisibility cloaks functioning at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Zhou, Fan; Liang, Dachuan; Gu, Jianqiang; Han, Jiaguang; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Weili

    2014-05-01

    Quasi-three-dimensional invisibility cloaks, comprised of either homogeneous or inhomogeneous media, are experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz regime. The inhomogeneous cloak was lithographically fabricated using a scalable Projection Microstereolithography process. The triangular cloaking structure has a total thickness of 4.4 mm, comprised of 220 layers of 20 μm thickness. The cloak operates at a broad frequency range between 0.3 and 0.6 THz, and is placed over an α-lactose monohydrate absorber with rectangular shape. Characterized using angular-resolved reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the results indicate that the terahertz invisibility cloak has successfully concealed both the geometrical and spectroscopic signatures of the absorber, making it undetectable to the observer. The homogeneous cloaking device made from birefringent crystalline sapphire features a large concealed volume, low loss, and broad bandwidth. It is capable of hiding objects with a dimension nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of its lithographic counterpart, but without involving complex and time-consuming cleanroom processing. The cloak device was made from two 20-mm-thick high-purity sapphire prisms. The cloaking region has a maximum height 1.75 mm with a volume of approximately 5% of the whole sample. The reflected TM beam from the cloak shows nearly the same profile as that reflected by a flat mirror.

  12. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves.

  13. Coordinate transformations make perfect invisibility cloaks with arbitrary shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Wei; Yan Min; Ruan Zhichao; Qiu Min [Laboratory of Optics, Photonics and Quantum Electronics, Department of Microelectronics and Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)], E-mail: min@kth.se

    2008-04-15

    By investigating wave properties at cloak boundaries, invisibility cloaks with arbitrary shape constructed by general coordinate transformations are confirmed to be perfectly invisible to the external incident wave. The differences between line transformed cloaks and point transformed cloaks are discussed. The fields in the cloak medium are found analytically to be related to the fields in the original space via coordinate transformation functions. At the exterior boundary of the cloak, it is shown that no reflection is excited even though the permittivity and permeability do not always have a perfectly matched layer form, whereas at the inner boundary, no reflection is excited either, and in particular no field can penetrate into the cloaked region. However, for the inner boundary of any line transformed cloak, the permittivity and permeability in a specific tangential direction are always required to be infinitely large. Furthermore, the field discontinuity at the inner boundary always exists; the surface current is induced to make this discontinuity self-consistent. A point transformed cloak does not experience such problems. The tangential fields at the inner boundary are all zero, implying that no field discontinuity exists.

  14. Electromagnetic Reciprocal Cloak with Only Axial Material Parameter Spatially Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal cloak is an intriguing metamaterial device, in which a hidden antenna or a sensor can receive electromagnetic irradiation from the outside but its presence will not be detected. Based on transformation optics, a cylindrical electromagnetic reciprocal cloak with only axial parameter varying with radius is designed and validated by full wave simulation. When two dispersive reciprocal cloaks are put together, they do not interfere with each other. Our work demonstrates the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC ability of the reciprocal cloak which is very important in multi antenna and sensor design.

  15. Topology optimized low-contrast all-dielectric optical cloak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Jacob Anders; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    A systematic methodology for designing low-contrast all-dielectric cloaks operating in the optical range is presented. Topology optimization is used to find the layout of standard dielectric material that minimizes the norm of the scattered field in the surroundings of the cloak. Rotational...... symmetries are exploited to optimize for multiple angles based on the solution for a single angle of incidence. For a few discrete angles of incidences (1-4) the cloaking is shown to be nearly perfect in a limited frequency range, and even for a rotational symmetric design, cloak and object appear smaller...

  16. Optical Möbius strips and twisted ribbon cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Isaac

    2014-02-15

    Optical Möbius strips that surround points of circular polarization, C points, in a generic three-dimensional optical field are cloaked by lines of twisted ribbons attached to the C points. When cloaking occurs, the observable signed twist index that counts the number of half-twists (one or three), and also measures the handedness (right or left), of a generic Möbius strip is determined by the twisted ribbon cloaks. Although some cloaks can be detached, they can never all be removed.

  17. The design of metamaterial cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Zhang Jie-Qiu; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By using coordinate transformation method, this paper obtains an useful equation of designing meta-material cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium. This equation is the generalization of what was introduced early by Pendry et al (2006 Science 312 1780) and can be more widely used. As an example of its applications, this paper deduces the material parameter equation for cylinder cloaks embedded in anisotropic medium, and then offers the numerical simulation. The results show that such a cylinder cloak has perfect cloaking performance and therefore verifies the method proposed in this paper.

  18. Subwavelength Plasmonic Waveguides and Plasmonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of microfabrication technology and advanced computational tools, nanophotonics has been widely studied for high-speed data transmission, sensitive optical detection, manipulation of ultrasmall objects, and visualization of nanoscale patterns. As an important branch of nanophotonics, plasmonics has enabled light-matter interactions at a deep subwavelength length scale. Plasmonics, or surface plasmon based photonics, focus on how to exploit the optical property of metals with abundant free electrons and hence negative permittivity. The oscillation of free electrons, when properly driven by electromagnetic waves, would form plasmon-polaritons in the vicinity of metal surfaces and potentially result in extreme light confinement. The objective of this article is to review the progress of subwavelength or deep subwavelength plasmonic waveguides, and fabrication techniques of plasmonic materials.

  19. Experimental demonstration of a bilayer thermal cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiancheng; Bai, Xue; Gao, Dongliang; Thong, John T L; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-02-07

    Invisibility has attracted intensive research in various communities, e.g., optics, electromagnetics, acoustics, thermodynamics, dc, etc. However, many experimental demonstrations have only been achieved by virtue of simplified approaches due to the inhomogeneous and extreme parameters imposed by the transformation-optic method, and usually require a challenging realization with metamaterials. In this Letter, we demonstrate a bilayer thermal cloak made of bulk isotropic materials, and it has been validated as an exact cloak. We experimentally verified its ability to maintain the heat front and its heat protection capabilities in a 2D proof-of-concept experiment. The robustness of this scheme is validated in both 2D (including oblique heat front incidence) and 3D configurations. The proposed scheme may open a new avenue to control the diffusive heat flow in ways inconceivable with phonons, and also inspire new alternatives to the functionalities promised by transformation optics.

  20. On three-dimensional spherical acoustic cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munteanu, Ligia; Chiroiu, Veturia, E-mail: ligia_munteanu@hotmail.com, E-mail: veturiachiroiu@yahoo.com [Institute of Solid Mechanics, Romanian Academy, 15 Constantin Mille, PO Box 1-863, 010141 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-08-15

    Transformation acoustics opens a new avenue towards the design of acoustic metamaterials, which are materials engineered at the subwavelength scale in order to mimic the parameters in wave equations. The design of the acoustic cloaking is based on the property of equations being invariant under a coordinate transformation, i.e. a specific spatial compression is equivalent to a variation of the material parameters in the original space. In this paper, the sound invisibility performance is discussed for spherical cloaks. The original domain consists of alternating concentric layers made from piezoelectric ceramics and epoxy resin, following a triadic Cantor sequence. The spatial compression, obtained by applying the concave-down transformation, leads to an equivalent domain with an inhomogeneous and anisotropic distribution of the material parameters.

  1. Extremely Thin Dielectric Metasurface for Carpet Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, LiYi; Kanté, Boubacar

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel and simple approach to cloaking a scatterer on a ground plane. We use an extremely thin dielectric metasurface ({\\lambda}/12) to reshape the wavefronts distorted by a scatterer in order to mimic the reflection pattern of a flat ground plane. To achieve such carpet cloaking, the reflection angle has to be equal to the incident angle everywhere on the scatterer. We use a graded metasurface and calculate the required phase gradient to achieve cloaking. Our metasurface locally provides additional phase to the wavefronts to compensate for the phase difference amongst light paths induced by the geometrical distortion. We design our metasurface in the microwave range using highly sub-wavelength dielectric resonators. We verify our design by full-wave time-domain simulations using micro-structured resonators and show that results match theory very well. This approach can be applied to hide any scatterer on a ground plane not only at microwave frequencies, but also at higher frequencies up to th...

  2. The boundary conditions for point transformed electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weder, Ricardo [Departamento de Metodos Matematicos y Numericos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-726, Mexico DF 01000 (Mexico)], E-mail: weder@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-10-17

    In this paper we study point transformed electromagnetic invisibility cloaks in transformation media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic media. We assume that there are several point transformed electromagnetic cloaks located in different points in space. Our results apply in particular to the first-order invisibility cloaks introduced by Pendry et al and to the high-order invisibility cloaks introduced by Hendi et al and by Cai et al. We identify the appropriate cloaking boundary conditions that the solutions of Maxwell equations have to satisfy at the outside, {partial_derivative}K{sub +}, and at the inside, {partial_derivative}K{sub -}, of the boundary of the cloaked object K in the case where the permittivity and the permeability are bounded below and above in K. Namely, that the tangential components of the electric and the magnetic fields have to vanish at {partial_derivative}K{sub +}-which is always true-and that the normal components of the curl of the electric and the magnetic fields have to vanish at {partial_derivative}K{sub -}. These results are proven requiring that energy be conserved. In the case of one spherical cloak with a spherically stratified K and a radial current at {partial_derivative}K we verify by an explicit calculation that our cloaking boundary conditions are satisfied and that cloaking of active devices holds, even if the current is at the boundary of the cloaked object. As we prove our results for media that are obtained by transformation from general anisotropic media, our results apply to the cloaking of objects with passive and active devices contained in general anisotropic media, in particular to objects with passive and active devices contained inside general crystals. Our results suggest a method to enhance cloaking in the approximate transformation media that are used in practice. Namely, to coat the boundary of the cloaked object (the inner boundary of the cloak) with a material that imposes the

  3. 隐身材料%Cloaking materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖耘; 杭志宏; 黄学勤; 陈子亭

    2012-01-01

    由于超构材料(metamaterials)的发现,隐身(cloaking)科学近年来取得了长足的发展.与军事上的隐形(stealth)所不同的是,隐身指的是将电磁波的散射在各个方向上都完全消除,从而实现神话故事或科幻小说中那种真正的全方位、全角度的“消失”.隐身也因其重要的科学价值以及将对人类生活产生跨越式的改变而成为国际上的科研热点.除了隐身之外,科学家还证明了可以将物体变成任意的幻像,从而在光学上实现了孙悟空的“七十二变”,这被称为幻像光学(illusion optics).未来,隐身和幻像光学的发展有望将人类的极限想象变为现实.文章介绍了作者在隐身和幻像领域里的一些工作.%There has been extensive development in the study of cloaking technology since the discovery of metamaterials. Different from "stealth" technology used for military purposes, cloaking refers to a total annihilation of the scattering of electromagnetic waves in all directions, and thus achieving invisibility as depicted in mythology and sci-fiction. Because of its scientific importance and the possible dramatic impact on technology, cloaking has become a hot research topic. Moreover, illusion optics has also been demon- strated by means of which scientists can make an object "look like" anything else. The development of cloaking and illusion optics could turn human imagination to reality in the future. Some of our works in cloaking and illusion optics are reviewed here.

  4. Dispersion characteristics of silicon nanorod based carpet cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata A; Blair, John; Summers, Christopher J; Park, Wounjhang

    2010-12-06

    A wide range of transformation media designed with conformal mapping are currently being studied extensively due to their favorable properties: isotropy, moderate index requirements, low loss and broad bandwidth. For optical frequency operation, the transformation media are commonly fabricated on high index semiconductor thin films. These 2D implementations, however, inevitably introduces waveguide dispersion, which affects the bandwidth and loss behavior. In this paper, for carpet cloaks implemented by a silicon nanorod array, we have confirmed that waveguide dispersion limits the bandwidth of the transformation medium by direct visualizing the cut-off conditions with near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). Furthermore, we have experimentally demonstrated the extension of cut-off wavelength by depositing a conformal dielectric layer. This study illustrates the constraints on the 2D transformation media imposed by the waveguide dispersion and suggests a general technique to tune and modify their optical properties.

  5. Fabricating plasmonic components for nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Jeppesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed.......We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed....

  6. Spontaneous emission and the operation of invisibility cloaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed Behbahani, Mina; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Mahdifar, Ali

    2016-07-01

    As a probe to explore the ability of invisibility cloaks to conceal objects in the quantum mechanics domain, we study the spontaneous emission rate of an excited two-level atom in the vicinity of an ideal invisibility cloaking. On this base, first, a canonical quantization scheme is presented for the electromagnetic field interacting with atomic systems in an anisotropic, inhomogeneous, and absorbing magnetodielectric medium which can suitably be used for studying the influence of arbitrary invisibility cloak on the atomic radiative properties. The time dependence of the atomic subsystem is obtained in the Schrodinger picture. By introducing a modified set of the spherical wave-vector functions, the Green tensor of the system is calculated via exact and discrete methods. In this formalism, the decay rate and as well the emission pattern of the aforementioned atom are computed analytically for both weak and strong coupling interaction, and then numerically calculations are done to demonstrate the performances of cloaking in the quantum mechanics domain. Special attention is paid to different possible orientations and locations of the atomic system near the spherical invisibility cloaking. Results in the presence and the absence of the invisibility cloak are compared. We find that the cloak works very well far from its resonance frequency to conceal a macroscopic object, whereas at near the resonance frequency the object is more visible than the situation where the object is not covered by the cloak.

  7. Impedance-Matched Reduced Acoustic Cloaking with Realizable Mass and Its Layered Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huan-Yang; YANG Tao; LUO Xu-Dong; MA Hong-Ru

    2008-01-01

    We present an impedance-matched reduced version of acoustic cloaking whose mass is in a reasonable range. A layered cloak design with isotropic material is also proposed for the reduced cloak. Numerical calculations from the transfer matrix methods show that the present layered cloak can reduce the scattering of an air cylinder substantially.

  8. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  9. Hiding a Realistic Object Using a Broadband Terahertz Invisibility Cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Fan; Cao, Wei; Stuart, Colin T; Gu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been a long-standing dream for many researchers over the decades. The introduction of transformational optics has revitalized this field by providing a general method to design material distributions to hide the subject from detection. By transforming space and light propagation, a three-dimensional (3D) object is perceived as having a reduced number of dimensions, in the form of points, lines, and thin sheets, making it "undetectable" judging from the scattered field. Although a variety of cloaking devices have been reported at microwave and optical frequencies, the spectroscopically important Terahertz (THz) domain remains unexplored. Moreover, due to the difficulties in fabricating cloaking devices that are optically large in all three dimensions, hiding realistic 3D objects has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of a 3D THz cloaking device fabricated using a scalable Projection Microstereolithography process. The cloak operates at a broa...

  10. A two-component NZRI metamaterial based rectangular cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sikder Sunbeam; Faruque, Mohammd Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2015-10-01

    A new two-component, near zero refractive index (NZRI) metamaterial is presented for electromagnetic rectangular cloaking operation in the microwave range. In the basic design a pi-shaped, metamaterial was developed and its characteristics were investigated for the two major axes (x and z-axis) wave propagation through the material. For the z-axis wave propagation, it shows more than 2 GHz bandwidth and for the x-axis wave propagation; it exhibits more than 1 GHz bandwidth of NZRI property. The metamaterial was then utilized in designing a rectangular cloak where a metal cylinder was cloaked perfectly in the C-band area of microwave regime. The experimental result was provided for the metamaterial and the cloak and these results were compared with the simulated results. This is a novel and promising design for its two-component NZRI characteristics and rectangular cloaking operation in the electromagnetic paradigm.

  11. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation.

  12. Optimized cylindrical invisibility cloak with minimum layers of non-magnetic isotropic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhenzhong; Feng Yijun; Xu Xiaofei; Zhao Junming; Jiang Tian, E-mail: yjfeng@nju.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Engineering, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

    2011-05-11

    We present optimized design of cylindrical invisibility cloak with minimum layers of non-magnetic isotropic materials. Through an optimization procedure based on genetic algorithm, simpler cloak structure and more realizable material parameters can be achieved with better cloak performance than that of an ideal non-magnetic cloak with a reduced set of parameters. We demonstrate that a cloak shell with only five layers of two normal materials can result in an average 20 dB reduction in the scattering width for all directions when covering the inner conducting cylinder with the cloak. The optimized design can substantially simplify the realization of the invisibility cloak, especially in the optical range.

  13. Invisibility cloaking via non-smooth transformation optics and ray tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosskey, Miles M., E-mail: mmc31@duke.ed [Mathematics Department, Duke University, Box 90320, Durham, NC 27708-0320 (United States); Nixon, Andrew T., E-mail: andrew_nixon@brown.ed [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, 182 George Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Schick, Leland M., E-mail: lschick@math.arizona.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, 617 N. Santa Rita Ave., P.O. Box 210089, Tucson, AZ 85721-0089 (United States); Kovacic, Gregor, E-mail: kovacg@rpi.ed [Mathematical Sciences Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2011-05-02

    We present examples of theoretically-predicted invisibility cloaks with shapes other than spheres and cylinders, including cones and ellipsoids, as well as shapes spliced from parts of these simpler shapes. In addition, we present an example explicitly displaying the non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. We depict rays propagating through these example cloaks using ray tracing for geometric optics. - Highlights: Theoretically-predicted conical and ellipsoidal invisibility cloaks. Non-smooth cloaks spliced from parts of simpler shapes. Example displaying non-uniqueness of invisibility cloaks of the same shape. Rays propagating through example cloaks depicted using geometric optics.

  14. Experimental demonstration of an ultra-thin three-dimensional thermal cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Hongyi; Gao, Fei; Sun, Handong; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    We report the first experimental realization of a three-dimensional thermal cloak shielding an air bubble in a bulk metal without disturbing external thermal flux. The cloak is made of a thin layer of homogeneous and isotropic material with simple mechanical manufacturing. The thickness of cloak is 200 um while the cloaked air bubble has a diameter of 1 cm, achieving the ratio between dimensions of the cloak and the cloaked object 2 orders smaller than previous thermal cloaks which were mainly realized at a two-dimensional plane. This work can find applications in novel thermal devices in the three-dimensional physical space.

  15. Asymmetric Cloaking Theory Based on Finsler Geometry ~ How to design Harry Potter's invisibility cloak with a scientific method ~

    CERN Document Server

    Amemiya, Tomohiro; Taki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to actually make Harry's invisibility cloaks? The most promising approach for realizing such magical cloaking in our real world would be to use transformation optics, where an empty space with a distorted geometry is imitated with a non-distorted space but filled with transformation medium having appropriate permittivity and permeability. An important requirement for practical invisibility cloaks is nonreciprocity; that is, a person in the cloak should not be seen from the outside but should be able to see the outside. This invisibility cloak, or a nonreciprocal shield, cannot be created as far as we stay in conventional transformation optics. Conventional transformation optics is based on Riemann geometry with a metric tensor independent of direction, and therefore cannot be used to design the nonreciprocal shield. To overcome this problem, we propose an improved theory of transformation optics that is based on Finsler geometry, an extended version of Riemann geometry. Our theory shows that no...

  16. Optical characterization of polyethylene and cobalt phthalocyanine ultrathin films by means of the ATR technique at surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Juárez, M.; Muñoz Aguirre, N.; Martínez Pérez, L.; Garibay-Febles, V.; Lozada-Cassou, M.; Becerril, M.; Zelaya Angel, O.

    2006-08-01

    It is well known that the development and determination of optical properties of ultrathin films is an important issue in many technological areas. In this work organic polyethylene (PE) and cobalt phthalocyanines (CoPc) ultrathin films were deposited over metal films using the r.f. sputtering and thermal evaporation techniques, respectively. Attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements for the system organic film/metal at the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used for determining the thicknesses and optical properties of the PE and CoPc thin films. Thicknesses of the order of some nanometers were found, fitting the theoretical multilayer ATR model, for p polarization monochromatic light, to the experimental reflection data. The dielectric function of CoPc ultrathin films was determined at a wavelength of 632.8 nm.

  17. Polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel-ferrite nanoparticle composite layer for detecting heavy metal ions using surface plasmon resonance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Naseri, Mahmoud; Rashid, Suraya Abdul

    2017-08-01

    A polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel ferrite nanoparticle composite layer was prepared using the electrochemical method to detect nickel, iron, cobalt, aluminium, manganese, mercury, and lead ions. The polypyrrole-chitosan/nickel ferrite nanoparticle composite layers were characterized using field emission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. The polymer composite was used to improve the surface of the gold layer to apply the surface plasmon resonance technique. The sensor detected the ferromagnetic ions down to a level of 0.001 ppm, and the detection of diamagnetic ions was conducted with a limitation of roughly 0.5 ppm. The polymer composite improved the response time of the sensor better than the other polymer composite sensing layers did.

  18. Study on Technique of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Sensing for Biomolecular Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Xiang; Rong Xiaofeng; Deng Yan; Yu Xinglong

    2006-01-01

    High resolution of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection is of vital importance. SPR biosensing system resolution is determined by intrinsic sensitivity of biochip and light signal acquisition system. In this article, different signal acquisition system resolutions on photodetector were analyzed based on light intensity and phase detection. Result shows that charge coupled device (CCD) with larger numbers of pixels is potential to achieve higher detection resolution. A 64 pixel line array CCD and a 12 bit ADC can achieve resolution of 10-7 refractive index unit (RIU). In array detection mode, increasing of detection throughput is at the cost of decreasing system resolution. Simulation analysis indicates that, if noise is taken into account, phase modulation methods are capable of providing better noise reduction performance than intensity methods.

  19. The effect of electrostatic shielding using invisibility cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruo-Yang Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrostatic shielding for a spherical invisibility cloak with arbitrary charges inside is investigated. Our result reveals that the charge inside the cloak is a crucial factor to determine the detection. When charged bodies are placed inside the cloak with an arbitrary distribution, the electric fields outside are purely determined by the total charges just as the fields of a point charge at the center of the cloak. As the total charges reduce to zero, the bodies can not be detected. On the other hand, if the total charges are nonzero, the electrostatic potential inside an ideal cloak tends to infinity. For unideal cloaks, this embarrassment is overcome, while they still have good behaviors of shielding. In addition, the potential across the inner surface of an ideal cloak is discontinuous due to the infinite polarization of the dielectric, however it can be alternatively interpreted as the dual Meissner effect of a dual superconductive layer with a surface magnetic current.

  20. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-10

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called "stress bandage", the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  1. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on golden nanoparticles and cold vapour generation technique for the detection of mercury in aqueous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Chirinos, José; Gutiérrez, Héctor; La Cruz, Marie

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a surface plasmon resonance sensor for determination of Hg based on golden nanoparticles was developed. The sensor follows the change of the signal from solutions in contact with atomic mercury previously generated by the reaction with sodium borohydride. Mie theory predicts that Hg film, as low as 5 nm, induced a significant reduction of the surface plasmon resonance signal of 40 nm golden nanoparticles. This property was used for quantification purposes in the sensor. The device provide limits of detection of 172 ng/L that can compared with the 91 ng/L obtained with atomic fluorescence, a common technique used for Hg quantification in drinking water. This result was relevant, considering that it was not necessary to functionalize the nanoparticles or use nanoparticles deposited in a substrate. Also, thanks that Hg is released from the matrix, the surface plasmon resonance signal was not affected by concomitant elements in the sample.

  2. Cloaking of solar cell contacts at the onset of Rayleigh scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Román, Etor; Vitrey, Alan; Buencuerpo, Jerónimo; Prieto, Iván; Llorens, José M.; García-Martín, Antonio; Alén, Benito; Chaudhuri, Anabil; Neumann, Alexander; Brueck, S. R. J.; Ripalda, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical contacts on the top surface of solar cells and light emitting diodes cause shadow losses. The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission through arrays of subwavelength holes suggests the possibility of engineering such contacts to reduce the shadow using plasmonics, but resonance effects occur only at specific wavelengths. Here we describe instead a broadband effect of enhanced light transmission through arrays of subwavelength metallic wires, due to the fact that, in the absence of resonances, metal wires asymptotically tend to invisibility in the small size limit regardless of the fraction of the device area taken up by the contacts. The effect occurs for wires more than an order of magnitude thicker than the transparency limit for metal thin films. Finite difference in time domain calculations predict that it is possible to have high cloaking efficiencies in a broadband wavelength range, and we experimentally demonstrate contact shadow losses less than half of the geometric shadow. PMID:27339390

  3. Open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Yang, Fan; Jin, Tian Yu; Lei Mei, Zhong; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    We propose open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation. Compared with the closed configurations of active cloaking and illusion devices, we focus on improving the distribution schemes for the controlled sources, which do not have to surround the protected object strictly. Instead, the controlled sources can be placed in several small discrete clusters, and produce the desired voltages along the controlled boundary, to actively hide or disguise the protected object. Numerical simulations are performed with satisfactory results, which are further validated by experimental measurements. The open cloaking and illusion devices have many advantages over the closed configurations in various potential applications.

  4. Broadening the Cloaking Bandwidth with Non-Foster Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Argyropoulos, Christos; Alù, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We introduce the concept and practical design of broadband, ultrathin cloaks based on non-Foster, negatively capacitive metasurfaces. By using properly tailored, active frequency-selective screens conformal to an object, within the realm of a practical realization, we show that it is possible to drastically reduce the scattering over a wide frequency range in the microwave regime, orders of magnitude broader than any available passive cloaking technology. The proposed active cloak may impact not only invisibility and camouflaging, but also practical antenna and sensing applications.

  5. Plasma metamaterials as cloaking and nonlinear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, O.; Yamaguchi, S.; Bambina, A.; Iwai, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Tamayama, Y.; Miyagi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Plasma metamaterials, composites of low-temperature plasmas and periodic functional microstructures, work as cloaking and nonlinear media. Due to functions of the microstructures like negative permeability, electromagnetic waves in and around plasma metamaterials propagate in a quite different manner from the case with the conventional space in which relative permeability is positive and unity. Using plasmas and plasma metamaterials, we achieve various controls of microwave propagating paths such as unidirectionality and cloaking in the two- or 3D spaces. For instance, a concentric plasma layer makes wave propagation unidirectional, and waves propagate in different routes when they start inside or outside the concentric layer. Furthermore, due to spatial permittivity gradient and anisotropic refractive index, electromagnetic waves detour in plasma metamaterial layers. Another significant point that plasma metamaterials can realize is nonlinearity. When we study high-power electromagnetic waves propagating in them, we observe several properties describable in terms of nonlinear dynamics and nonlinear photonics. Microwaves beyond threshold energy trigger bifurcations in plasma permittivity, and the second harmonic wave detected simultaneously is generated with strong emission levels. Such electromagnetic wave propagation is achieved with advantages over other materials, since plasmas and metallic microstructures work in harmony and in synergy.

  6. Acoustic cloaking and mirages with flying carpets

    CERN Document Server

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Carpets under consideration here, in the context of pressure acoustic waves propagating in a compressible fluid, do not touch the ground: they levitate in mid-air (or float in mid-water), which leads to approximate cloaking for an object hidden underneath, or touching either sides of a square cylinder on, or over, the ground. The tentlike carpets attached to the sides of a square cylinder illustrate how the notion of a carpet on a wall naturally generalizes to sides of other small compact objects. We then extend the concept of flying carpets to circular cylinders. However, instead of reducing its scattering cross-section like in acoustic cloaks, we rather mimic that of another obstacle, say a square rigid cylinder. For instance, show that one can hide any type of defects under such circular carpets, and yet they still scatter waves just like a smaller cylinder on its own. Interestingly, all these carpets are described by non-singular acoustic parameters. To exemplify this important aspect, we propose a multi-...

  7. Making Waves Round a Structured Cloak: Lattices, Negative Refraction and Fringes

    CERN Document Server

    Colquitt, DJ; Movchan, NV; Brun, AB Movchan M; McPhedran, RC

    2013-01-01

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic, and electromagnetic waves. The generating map is examined in detail and linked to the material properties of the cloak. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularised cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularised cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In t...

  8. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and guides the sound waves bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section.

  9. Active cloaking for clusters of pins in thin plates

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, Jane; Haslinger, Stewart; Movchan, Natasha; Craster, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers active cloaking of a square array of evenly spaced pins in a Kirchhoff plate in the presence of flexural waves. Active sources are distributed exterior to the cluster and are represented by the non-singular Green's function for the biharmonic operator. The complex amplitudes of the active sources, which cancel out selected multipole orders of the scattered field, are found by solving an algebraic system of equations. For frequencies in the zero-frequency stop band, we find that a small number of active sources located on a grid is sufficient for cloaking. For higher frequencies, we achieve efficient cloaking with the active sources positioned on a circle surrounding the cluster. We demonstrate the cloaking efficiency with several numerical illustrations, considering key frequencies from band diagrams and dispersion surfaces for a Kirchhoff plate pinned in a doubly periodic fashion.

  10. Broad band invisibility cloak made of normal dielectric multilayer

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiaofei; Xiong, Shuai; Fan, Jinlong; Zhao, Jun-Ming; Jiang, Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and performance test of a quasi three-dimensional carpet cloak made of normal dielectric in the microwave regime. Taking advantage of a simple linear coordinate transformation we design a carpet cloak with homogeneous anisotropic medium and then practically realize the device with multilayer of alternating normal dielectric slabs based on the effective medium theory. As a proof-of-concept example, we fabricate the carpet cloak with multilayer of FR4 dielectric slabs with air spacing. The performance of the fabricated design is verified through full-wave numerical simulation and measurement of the far-field scattering electromagnetic waves in a microwave anechoic chamber. Experimental results have demonstrated pronounced cloaking effect in a very broad band from 8 GHz to 18 GHz (whole X and Ku band) due to the low loss, non-dispersive feature of the multilayer dielectric structure.

  11. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  12. Experimental demonstration of illusion optics with ``external cloaking'' effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Guochang; Li, Fang; Fang, Guangyou

    2011-08-01

    A metamaterial "illusion optics" with "complementary medium" and "restoring medium" is designed by using inductor-capacitor (L-C) network medium. The unprecedented effects of "external cloaking" and "transforming one object to appear as another" are demonstrated experimentally. We also demonstrate that the non-resonant nature of the L-C network decreases the sensitivity of the "external cloaking" effect to the variation of the frequency and results in an acceptable bandwidth of the whole device.

  13. Transmutation of planar media singularities in a conformal cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichao; Mukhtar, Musawwadah; Ma, Yungui; Ong, C K

    2013-11-01

    Invisibility cloaking based on optical transformation involves materials singularity at the branch cut points. Many interesting optical devices, such as the Eaton lens, also require planar media index singularities in their implementation. We show a method to transmute two singularities simultaneously into harmless topological defects formed by anisotropic permittivity and permeability tensors. Numerical simulation is performed to verify the functionality of the transmuted conformal cloak consisting of two kissing Maxwell fish eyes.

  14. Time-of-flight imaging of invisibility cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2011-01-01

    As invisibility cloaking has recently become experimental reality, it is interesting to explore ways to reveal remaining imperfections. In essence, the idea of most invisibility cloaks is to recover the optical path lengths without an object (to be made invisible) by a suitable arrangement around that object. Optical path length is proportional to the time of flight of a light ray or to the optical phase accumulated by a light wave. Thus, time-of-flight images provide a direct and intuitive tool for probing imperfections. Indeed, recent phase-sensitive experiments on the carpet cloak have already made early steps in this direction. In the macroscopic world, time-of-flight images could be measured directly by light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Here, we show calculated time-of-flight images of the conformal Gaussian carpet cloak, the conformal grating cloak, the cylindrical free-space cloak, and of the invisible sphere. All results are obtained by using a ray-velocity equation of motion derived from Fermat's ...

  15. Graphene based metamaterials for terahertz cloaking and subwavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzmand, Seyedali

    Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon crystal that became one of the most controversial topics of research in the last few years. The intense interest in graphene stems from recent demonstrations of their potentially revolutionary electromagnetic applications -- including negative refraction, subdiffraction imaging, and even invisibility -- which have suggested a wide range of new devices for communications, sensing, and biomedicine. In addition, it has been shown that graphene is amenable to unique patterning schemes such as cutting, bending, folding, and fusion that are predicted to lead to interesting properties. A recent proposed application of graphene is in engineering the scattering properties of objects, which may be leveraged in applications such as radar-cross-section management and stealth, where it may be required to make one object look like another object or render an object completely invisible. We present the analytical formulation for the analysis of electromagnetic interaction with a finite conducting wedge covered with a cylindrically shaped nanostructured graphene metasurface, resulting in the scattering cancellation of the dominant scattering mode for all the incident and all the observation angles. Following this idea, the cylindrical graphene metasurface is utilized for cloaking of several concentric finite conducting wedges. In addition, a wedge shaped metasurface is proposed as an alternative approach for cloaking of finite wedges. The resolution of the conventional imaging lenses is restricted by the natural diffraction limit. Artificially engineered metamaterials now offer the possibility of creating a superlens that overcomes this restriction. We demonstrate that a wire medium (WM) slab loaded with graphene sheets enables the enhancement of the near field for subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for WM with the additional boundary condition in the connection of

  16. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  17. a Simplified Parameter Design Method for Transformation Optics-Based Metamaterial Innovative Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Hua; Huang, Ming; Yang, Jing-Jing; Lu, Jin; Cao, Hui-Lu

    2013-10-01

    Transformation optics-based innovative cloak which combines the virtues of both internal and external cloaks to enable arbitrary multi-objects hidden with visions and movements was first proposed by Huang et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett.101, 151901 (2012)]. But it is rather difficult to implement in practice, for the required material parameters vary with radius and even have singular values. To accelerate its practical realization but still keep good performance of invisibility, a simplified innovative cloak with only spatially varying axial parameter is developed via choosing appropriate transformation function. The advantage of such a cloak is that both radial and azimuthal parameters are constants, and all three components are nonsingular and finite. Full-wave simulation confirms the perfect cloaking effect of the cloak. Besides, the influences of metamaterials loss and parameter deviation on the performance of cloak are also investigated. This work provides a simple and feasible solution to push metamaterial-assisted innovative cloak more closely to the practice.

  18. Dispersive finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis of the elliptic cylindrical cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Ahn, D. [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    A dispersive full-wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is used to calculate the performance of elliptic cylindrical cloaking devices. The permittivity and the permeability tensors for the cloaking structure are derived by using an effective medium approach in general relativity. The elliptic cylindrical invisibility devices are found to show imperfect cloaking, and the cloaking performance is found to depend on the polarization of the incident waves, the direction of the propagation of those waves, the semi-focal distances and the loss tangents of the meta-material. When the semifocal distance of the elliptic cylinder decreases, the performance of the cloaking becomes very good, with neither noticeable scatterings nor field penetrations. For a larger semi-focal distance, only the TM wave with a specific propagation direction shows good cloaking performance. Realistic cloaking materials with loss still show a cloak that is working, but attenuated back-scattering waves exist.

  19. Designing the coordinate transformation function for non-magnetic invisibility cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaofei; Feng Yijun; Zhao Lin; Jiang Tian [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Lu Chunhua; Xu Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, 210009 (China)], E-mail: yjfeng@nju.edu.cn

    2008-11-07

    An optical invisibility cloak based on a transformation approach has recently been proposed by a reduced set of material properties due to their easier implementation in reality and little need for an inhomogeneous permeability distribution, but the drawback of undesired scattering caused by the impedance mismatching at the outer boundary is unavoidable in such a cloak. By properly designing the coordinate transformation function to ensure impedance matching at the outer surface, we show that the performance of a nonmagnetic cylindrical cloak could be improved with minimized scattering fields. Using either a single high order power function or an optimized piecewise continuous power function, a cylindrical non-magnetic cloak has been designed with nearly perfect cloaking performance, which is better than those generated with a linear or a quadratic function. Due to the monotonicity of the designed power functions, the resulting cloak has no restriction on the size of the cloaking shell, therefore is suitable for both thick and thin cloaking structures.

  20. Molecular Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  1. Bistatic scattering characterization of a three-dimensional broadband cloaking structure

    CERN Document Server

    Alitalo, Pekka; Osipov, Andrey V; Thurner, Stefan; Kemptner, Erich; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the results of full experimental characterization of broadband cloaking of a finite-sized metallic cylinder at X-band. The cloaking effect is characterized by measuring the bistatic scattering patterns of uncloaked and cloaked objects in free space and then comparing these with each other. The results of the measurements demonstrate a broadband cloaking effect and are in good agreement with numerical predictions.

  2. 2010 PLASMONICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE/GORDON-KENAN GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR, JUNE 13-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naomi Halas

    2010-06-18

    The field of plasmonics lies at the forefront of current revolutionary developments in optics at nanoscale dimensions, with broad applications in the fields of biology, chemistry, and engineering. Advancing these applications will require an enhanced focus on the fundamental science of plasmonics in new and exotic regimes. This 2010 Gordon Conference on Plasmonics will focus on recent advances in fundamental and applied plasmonics. As with past conferences, this meeting will bring together top researchers and future leaders for substantial interactions between students, young speakers, and senior figures in the field. Participants should expect lively discussion during the sessions, intermingled with unstructured time where ideas move, collaborations form, and connections are made. Invited talks will cover a diverse range of topics, including active devices, coherence effects, metamaterials and cloaking, quantum optical phenomena, and plasmons in exotic media and in new wavelength regimes. At the conclusion of the conference, our final session will look forward and begin defining upcoming challenges and opportunities for plasmonics.

  3. Object-dependent cloaking in the first-order Born approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setälä, Tero; Hakkarainen, Timo; Friberg, Ari T.; Hoenders, Bernhard J.; Setälä, Tero

    2010-01-01

    We consider the cloaking of a slab object in scalar wave theory within the first-order Born approximation. We show that in the forward direction cloaking is achieved for any transversally invariant, positively refracting, and absorbing object by using a lossy, negative-index metamaterial cloak. Cloa

  4. Theoretical model of lossy acoustic bipolar cylindrical cloak with negative index metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Y.; Ahn, Doyeol

    2017-09-01

    While, it was shown that for the lossless acoustic cloak the illumination direction independent cloaking can be achieved by employing the structure with compressed geometry and complementary media, the effect of the material loss have not been fully explored yet. Here, we show that realistic cloaking materials with moderate loss still works when complementary media is introduced but with the attenuated back scattering waves.

  5. Infrared Cloaking, Stealth, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Sheehan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Infrared signature management (IRSM has been a primary aeronautical concern for over 50 years. Most strategies and technologies are limited by the second law of thermodynamics. In this article, IRSM is considered in light of theoretical developments over the last 15 years that have put the absolute status of the second law into doubt and that might open the door to a new class of broadband IR stealth and cloaking techniques. Following a brief overview of IRSM and its current thermodynamic limitations, theoretical and experimental challenges to the second law are reviewed. One proposal is treated in detail: a high power density, solid-state power source to convert thermal energy into electrical or chemical energy. Next, second-law based infrared signature management (SL-IRSM strategies are considered for two representative military scenarios: an underground installation and a SL-based jet engine. It is found that SL-IRSM could be technologically disruptive across the full spectrum of IRSM modalities, including camouflage, surveillance, night vision, target acquisition, tracking, and homing.

  6. Terahertz Nonlinearity in Graphene Plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, sub-wavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a THz pump-THz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results.

  7. Plasmonics in Topological Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Lai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With strong spin-orbit coupling, topological insulators have an insulating bulk state, characterized by a band gap, and a conducting surface state, characterized by a Dirac cone. Plasmons in topological insulators show high frequency-tunability in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectral regions with transverse spin oscillations, also called “spin-plasmons”. This paper presents a discussion and review of the developments in this field from the fundamental theory of plasmons in bulk, thin-film, and surface-magnetized topological insulators to the techniques of plasmon excitation and future applications.

  8. Design of cloaking metamaterials using spectral representation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Leung, Lai; Fung, Tai Hang; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-03-01

    Controlling the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves, for instance in cloaking problem, has become an important topic in nanophotonics. So far, following the cloaking model proposed by Pendry et al. [1], the experimental realization was only limited to the microwave region [2]. Since practical application lies in the visible range, we have extended the investigation to that region by utilizing nanocomposites with reference to the material parameters proposed by Pendry et al. and Shalaev et al. [3]. The calculations can be made much simpler by invoking the spectral representation theory [4]. The loss and dispersion effects, as well as the propagation of EM waves are assessed for the designed cloaking models in order to investigate the cloaking performance. Further analyses show that our models can accomplish the desired cloaking effect in the visible range. Moreover, the loss and dispersion effects are found to be small and acceptable.[1] J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006). [2] D. Schurig, J. J. Mock, B. J. Justice, S. A. Cummer, J. B. Pendry, A. F. Starr, D. R. Smith Science 314, 5801 (2006). [3] Wenshan Cai, Uday K. Chettiar, Alexander V. Kildishev and Vladimir M. Shalaev, Nature photonics 1 (2007). [4] L. Dong, Mikko Karttunen, K. W. Yu, Phys. Rev. E 72, 016613 (2005).

  9. Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Polycation and DNA Multilayer Films by Real-time Surface Plasmon ResonanceTechnique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI, Ren-Jun; CUI, Xiao-Qiang; YANG, Xiu-Rong; WANG, Er-Kang

    2001-01-01

    The assembly of alternating DNA and positively charged poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) (PDDA) multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer adsorption has been studied.Real time surface plasmon resonance (BIAcore) technique was used to characterize and monitor the formation of multilayer films in solution in real time continuously. The results indicate that the uniform multilayer can be obtained on the poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) coated substrate surface. The kinetics of the adsorption of DNA on PDDA surface was also studied by real-time BIAcore technique, and the observed rate constant was calculated using a Langmuir model (kobs= (1.28±0.08) ×10-2 s-1).

  10. Invisible anti-cloak with elliptic cross section using phase complement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yu-Qi; Zhang Min; Yue Jian-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of phase complement, an anti-cloak with circular cross section can be made invisible to an object outside its domain. As the cloak with elliptic cross section is more effective to make objects invisible than that with circular cross section, a scaled coordinate system is proposed to design equivalent materials of invisible anti-cloak with elliptic cross section using phase complement. The cloaks with conventional dielectric and double negative parameters are both simulated with the geometrical transformations. The results show that the cloak with elliptic cross section through phase complement can effectively hide the outside objects.

  11. Evaluation of agglutination strength by a flow-induced cell movement assay based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudprasert, Krisda; Peungthum, Patjaree; Vongsakulyanon, Apirom; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Sutapun, Boonsong; Kitpoka, Pimpun; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2015-02-07

    A flow-induced cell movement assay combined with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was developed to quantify the agglutination strength, derived from the standard tube-agglutination test. Red blood cells (RBCs), based on the ABO blood group system, were specifically captured by anti-A and/or anti-B antibodies immobilized on a sensor surface. The agglutination strength corresponds to the amount of antigen-antibody interactions or the strength of RBC adhesion. Under a shear flow, the adherent RBCs were forced to move out of the region of interest with different average cell velocities (vc) depending upon the adhesion strength and wall shear stress (WSS). That is, a higher adhesion strength (higher agglutination strength) or lower WSS represents a lower vc or vice versa. In this work, the agglutination strength was derived from the vc that was calculated from the time derivative of the relative SPR signal by using a simple model of cell movement response, whose validity was verified. The vc values of different samples were correlated with their agglutination strengths at a given WSS and antibody surface density. The vc decreased as the agglutination strength increased, which can be considered as a linear regression. The coefficient of variation of the calculated vc decreased to 0.1 as vc increased to 30 μm min(-1). The sensitivity of this assay can be controlled by optimizing the antibody surface density or the WSS. This assay has the capability to resolve the antigen density of A1 and B RBCs from that of A1B RBCs.

  12. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-29

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the reflection waves as if the incident waves impinge onto a flat mirror. The finite element simulation results demonstrate that an object can be hidden under these three kinds of waves with a single metasurface cloak.

  13. Metamaterials. Invisibility cloaking in a diffusive light scattering medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Wegener, Martin

    2014-07-25

    In vacuum, air, and other surroundings that support ballistic light propagation according to Maxwell's equations, invisibility cloaks that are macroscopic, three-dimensional, broadband, passive, and that work for all directions and polarizations of light are not consistent with the laws of physics. We show that the situation is different for surroundings leading to multiple light scattering, according to Fick's diffusion equation. We have fabricated cylindrical and spherical invisibility cloaks made of thin shells of polydimethylsiloxane doped with melamine-resin microparticles. The shells surround a diffusively reflecting hollow core, in which arbitrary objects can be hidden. We find good cloaking performance in a water-based diffusive surrounding throughout the entire visible spectrum and for all illumination conditions and incident polarizations of light. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Decoupling antennas in printed technology using elliptical metasurface cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernety, Hossein M., E-mail: hmehrpou@go.olemiss.edu, E-mail: yakovlev@olemiss.edu; Yakovlev, Alexander B., E-mail: hmehrpou@go.olemiss.edu, E-mail: yakovlev@olemiss.edu [Center for Applied Electromagnetic Systems Research (CAESR), Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677-1848 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    In this paper, we extend the idea of reducing the electromagnetic interactions between transmitting radiators to the case of widely used planar antennas in printed technology based on the concept of mantle cloaking. Here, we show that how lightweight elliptical metasurface cloaks can be engineered to restore the intrinsic properties of printed antennas with strip inclusions. In order to present the novel approach, we consider two microstrip-fed monopole antennas resonating at slightly different frequencies cloaked by confocal elliptical metasurfaces formed by arrays of sub-wavelength periodic elements, partially embedded in the substrate. The presence of the metasurfaces leads to the drastic suppression of mutual near-field and far-field couplings between the antennas, and thus, their radiation patterns are restored as if they were isolated. Moreover, it is worth noting that this approach is not limited to printed radiators and can be applied to other planar structures as well.

  15. Mantle cloaking for co-site radio-frequency antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Alessio, E-mail: alessio.monti@uniroma3.it; Barbuto, Mirko [“Niccolò Cusano” University, Via Don Carlo Gnocchi 3, Rome 00166 (Italy); Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Ramaccia, Davide; Vellucci, Stefano; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto [Department of Engineering, “Roma Tre” University, Via Vito Volterra 62, Rome 00146 (Italy); Trotta, Fabrizio [Antenna Department, ELETTRONICA S.p.A., Via Tiburtina Valeria Km 13700, Rome 00131 (Italy)

    2016-03-14

    We show that properly designed mantle cloaks, consisting of patterned metallic sheets placed around cylindrical monopoles, allow tightly packing the same antennas together in a highly dense telecommunication platform. Our experimental demonstration is applied to the relevant example of two cylindrical monopole radiators operating for 3G and 4G mobile communications. The two antennas are placed in close proximity, separated by 1/10 of the shorter operational wavelength, and, after cloaking, are shown to remarkably operate as if isolated in free-space. This result paves the way to unprecedented co-siting strategies for multiple antennas handling different services and installed in overcrowded platforms, such as communication towers, satellite payloads, aircrafts, or ship trees. More broadly, this work presents a significant application of cloaking technology to improve the efficiency of modern communication systems.

  16. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  17. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  18. Making waves round a structured cloak: lattices, negative refraction and fringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, D J; Jones, I S; Movchan, N V; Movchan, A B; Brun, M; McPhedran, R C

    2013-09-01

    Using the framework of transformation optics, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a non-singular square cloak for acoustic, out-of-plane shear elastic and electromagnetic waves. Analysis of wave propagation through the cloak is presented and accompanied by numerical illustrations. The efficacy of the regularized cloak is demonstrated and an objective numerical measure of the quality of the cloaking effect is provided. It is demonstrated that the cloaking effect persists over a wide range of frequencies. As a demonstration of the effectiveness of the regularized cloak, a Young's double slit experiment is presented. The stability of the interference pattern is examined when a cloaked and uncloaked obstacle are successively placed in front of one of the apertures. This novel link with a well-known quantum mechanical experiment provides an additional method through which the quality of cloaks may be examined. In the second half of the paper, it is shown that an approximate cloak may be constructed using a discrete lattice structure. The efficiency of the approximate lattice cloak is analysed and a series of illustrative simulations presented. It is demonstrated that effective cloaking may be obtained by using a relatively simple lattice structure, particularly, in the low-frequency regime.

  19. Acoustic carpet invisibility cloak with two open windows using multilayered homogeneous isotropic material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Chun-Yu; Xiang Zhi-Hai; Cen Zhang-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for designing an open acoustic cloak that can conceal a perturbation on flat ground and simultaneously meet the requirement of communication and matter interchange between the inside and the outside of the cloak.This cloak can be constructed with a multilayered structure and each layer is an isotropic and homogeneous medium.The design scheme consists of two steps:firstly,we apply a conformal coordinate transformation to obtain a quasi-perfect cloak with heterogeneous isotropic material; then,according to the profile of the material distribution,we degenerate this cloak into a multilayered-homogeneous isotropic cloak,which has two open windows with negligible disturbance on its invisibility performance.This may greatly facilitate the fabrication and enhance the applicability of such a carpet-type cloak.

  20. Optical force on a discrete invisibility cloak in time-dependent fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Zolla, Frederic; Nicolet, Andre; Belkebir, Kamal [Institut Fresnel, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Campus de St-Jerome 13013 Marseille (France); Rahmani, Adel [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    We study, in time domain, the exchange of momentum between an electromagnetic pulse and a three-dimensional, discrete, spherical invisibility cloak. We find that a discrete cloak, initially at rest, would experience an electromagnetic force due to the pulse but would acquire zero net momentum and net displacement. On the other hand, we find that while the cloak may manage to conceal an object and shroud it from the electromagnetic forces associated with the pulse, the cloak itself can experience optomechanical stress on a scale much larger than the object would in the absence of the cloak. We also consider the effects of material dispersion and losses on the electromagnetic forces experienced by the cloak and show that they lead to a transfer of momentum from the pulse to the cloak.

  1. Ray-optics cloaking devices for large objects in incoherent natural light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Zheng, Bin; Shen, Lian; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Zhang, Baile

    2013-01-01

    A cloak that can hide living creatures from sight is a common feature of mythology but still remains unrealized as a practical device. To preserve the wave phase, the previous cloaking solution proposed by Pendry and colleagues required transformation of the electromagnetic space around the hidden object in such a way that the rays bending around the object inside the cloak region have to travel faster than those passing it by. This difficult phase preservation requirement is the main obstacle for building a broadband polarization-insensitive cloak for large objects. Here we propose a simplified version of Pendry’s cloak by abolishing the requirement for phase preservation, as it is irrelevant for observation using incoherent natural light with human eyes, which are phase and polarization insensitive. This allows for a cloak design on large scales using commonly available materials. We successfully demonstrate the cloaking of living creatures, a cat and a fish, from the eye. PMID:24153410

  2. Experimental demonstration of an invisible cloak with irregular shape by using tensor transmission line metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Chang; Li, Chao; Fang, Guang-You

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and the experimental demonstration of an invisible cloak with irregular shape by using tensor transmission line (TL) metamaterials. The fabricated cloak consists of tensor TL unit cells exhibiting anisotropic effective material parameters, while the background medium consists of isotropic TL unit cells. The simulated and the measured field patterns around the cloak show a fairly good agreement, both demonstrate that the fabricated cloak can shield the cloaked interior area from electromagnetic fields without perturbing the external fields. The scattering of the cloaked perfect electric conductor (PEC) is minimized. Furthermore, the nonresonant property of the TL structure results in a relatively broad bandwidth of the realized cloak, which is clearly observed in our experiment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos.11174280, 60990323, and 60990320) and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No.YYYJ-1123).

  3. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance.

  4. Detection of a diffusive cloak via second-order statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Koirala, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to detect the diffusive cloak proposed by Schittny et al [Science 345, 427 (2014)]. We exploit the fact that diffusion of light is an approximation that disregards wave interference. The long-range contribution to intensity correlation is sensitive to locations of paths crossings and the interference inside the medium, allowing one to detect the size and position, including the depth, of the diffusive cloak. Our results also suggest that it is possible to separately manipulate the first- and the second-order statistics of wave propagation in turbid media.

  5. Metamaterial Structure Design Optimization: A Study of the Cylindrical Cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    energy. iv First, I wish to thank God and my savior, Jesus Christ , for the opportunity to study His creation. Next, a big thank-you goes to my loving wife...requirements to create a more physically realizable set of material parameters. 6 2.1 TO Cylindrical Cloak Originally , TO was conceived in an effort to avoid...TO method to designing a cloak consists of deforming the coordinate system such that the origin point is expanded into a boundary around an area to be

  6. Optical delay of a signal through a dispersive invisibility cloak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baile; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng

    2009-04-13

    We present a full-wave analysis method on the transmission of a Gaussian light pulse through a spherical invisibility cloak with causal dispersions. The spatial energy distribution of the Gaussian light pulse is distorted after the transmission. A volcano-shaped spatial time-delay distribution of the transmitted light pulse is demonstrated as a concrete example in our physical model. Both the time-delay and the energy transport depend on the polarization of light waves. This study helps to provide a complete picture of energy propagation through an invisibility cloak.

  7. A dc carpet cloak based on resistor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Zhong Lei; Liu, Yu Sha; Yang, Fan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2012-11-05

    We propose, design, and implement a two-dimensional dc carpet cloak for steady electric field using the transformation optics (TO) method. Based on the circuit theory, we introduce a resistor network to mimic the resulting anisotropic conducting medium. The experimental prototype is fabricated using metal film resistors, and the measured results agree perfectly well with theoretical predictions. This study gives the first experimental verification of a dc carpet cloak, which expands the application of TO theory, and has potential applications in related areas.

  8. Thermal invisibility based on scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-04-30

    We theoretically and numerically analyze thermal invisibility based on the concept of scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking. We show that a small object can be made completely invisible to heat diffusion waves, by tailoring the heat conductivity of the spherical shell enclosing the object. This means that the thermal scattering from the object is suppressed, and the heat flow outside the object and the cloak made of these spherical shells behaves as if the object is not present. Thermal invisibility may open new vistas in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography, military furtivity, and electronics heating reduction.

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  10. Spontaneous emission and the operation of invisibility cloaks: Can the invisibility cloaks render objects invisible in quantum mechanic domain?

    CERN Document Server

    Behbahani, Mina Morshed; Mahdifar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    As a probe to explore the ability of invisibility cloaks to conceal objects in the quantum mechanics domain, we study the spontaneous emission rate of an excited two-level atom in the vicinity of an ideal invisibility cloaking. On this base, first, a canonical quantization scheme is presented for the electromagnetic field interacting with atomic systems in an anisotropic, inhomogeneous and absorbing magnetodielectric medium which can suitably be used for studying the influence of arbitrary invisibility cloak on the atomic radiative properties. The time dependence of the atomic subsystem is obtained in the Schrodinger picture. By introducing a modified set of the spherical wave vector functions, the Green tensor of the system is calculated via the continuous and discrete methods. In this formalism, the decay rate and as well the emission pattern of the aforementioned atom are computed analytically for both weak and strong coupling interaction, and then numerically calculations are done to demonstrate the perfo...

  11. Metamaterial-Based Cylinders Used for Invisible Cloak Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Branimir Ivsic Tin Komljenovic University of Zagreb Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing Unska 3 Zagreb, Croatia HR-10000...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Zvonimir Sipus Dario Bojanjac Branimir Ivsic Tim Komljenovic 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK...Used for Invisible Cloak Realization by Zvonimir Sipus Dario Bojanjac Branimir Ivsic Tin Komljenovic

  12. Two-dimensional cylindrical thermal cloak designed by implicit transformation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Lin, Guochang; Wang, Youshan

    2016-07-01

    As a new-type technology of heat management, thermal metamaterials have attracted more and more attentions recently and thermal cloak is a typical case. Thermal conductivity of thermal cloak designed by coordinate transformation method is usually featured by inhomogeneity, anisotropy and local singularity. Explicit transformation method, which is commonly used to design thermal cloak with the coordinate transformation known in advance, has insufficient flexibility, making it hard to proactively reduce the difficulty of device fabrication. In this work, we designed the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical thermal cloak using the implicit transformation method without knowledge of the coordinate transformation in advance. With two classes of generation functions taken into consideration, this study adopted full-wave simulations to analyze the thermal cloaking performances of designed thermal cloaks. Material distributions and simulation results showed that the implicit transformation method has high flexibility. The form of coordinate transformation not only influences the homogeneity and anisotropy but also directly influences the thermal cloaking performance. An improved layered structure for 2D cylindrical thermal cloak was put forward based on the generation function g(r) = r15, which reduces the number of the kinds of constituent materials while guaranteeing good thermal cloaking performance. This work provides a beneficial guidance for reducing the fabrication difficulty of thermal cloak.

  13. Photorealistic ray tracing of free-space invisibility cloaks made of uniaxial dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2012-01-01

    The design rules of transformation optics generally lead to spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic impedance-matched magneto-dielectric material distributions for, e.g., free-space invisibility cloaks. Recently, simplified anisotropic non-magnetic free-space cloaks made of a locally uniaxial dielectric material (calcite) have been realized experimentally. In a two-dimensional setting and for in-plane polarized light propagating in this plane, the cloaking performance can still be perfect for light rays. However, for general views in three dimensions, various imperfections are expected. In this paper, we study two different purely dielectric uniaxial cylindrical free-space cloaks. For one, the optic axis is along the radial direction, for the other one it is along the azimuthal direction. The azimuthal uniaxial cloak has not been suggested previously to the best of our knowledge. We visualize the cloaking performance of both by calculating photorealistic images rendered by ray tracing. Following and complemen...

  14. Ancient DNA recovers the origins of Māori feather cloaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnup, K; Huynen, L; Te Kanawa, R; Shepherd, L D; Millar, C D; Lambert, D M

    2011-10-01

    Feather cloaks ("kakahu"), particularly those adorned with kiwi feathers, are treasured items or "taonga" to the Māori people of "Aotearoa"/New Zealand. They are considered iconic expression of Māori culture. Despite their status, much of our knowledge of the materials used to construct cloaks, the provenance of cloaks, and the origins of cloak making itself, has been lost. We used ancient DNA methods to recover mitochondrial DNA sequences from 849 feather samples taken from 109 cloaks. We show that almost all (>99%) of the cloaks were constructed using feathers from North Island brown kiwi. Molecular sexing of nuclear DNA recovered from 92 feather cloak samples also revealed that the sex ratio of birds deviated from a ratio of 1:1 observed in reference populations. Additionally, we constructed a database of 185 mitochondrial control region DNA sequences of kiwi feathers comprising samples collected from 26 North Island locations together with data available from the literature. Genetic subdivision (G(ST)), nucleotide subdivision (N(ST)) and Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variants (SAMOVA) analyses revealed high levels of genetic structuring in North Island brown kiwi. Together with sequence data from previously studied ancient and modern kiwi samples, we were able to determine the geographic provenance of 847 cloak feathers from 108 cloaks. A surprising proportion (15%) of cloaks were found to contain feathers from different geographic locations, providing evidence of kiwi trading among Māori tribes or organized hunting trips into other tribal areas. Our data also suggest that the east of the North Island of New Zealand was the most prolific of all kiwi cloak making areas, with over 50% of all cloaks analyzed originating from this region. Similar molecular approaches have the potential to discover a wealth of lost information from artifacts of endemic cultures worldwide.

  15. Exploring the proper experimental conditions in 2D thermal cloaking demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Run; Zhou, Shuling; Yu, Xingjian; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    Although thermal cloak has been studied extensively, the specific discussions on the proper experimental conditions to successfully observe the thermal cloaking effect are lacking. In this study, we focus on exploring the proper experimental conditions for 2D thermal cloaking demonstration. A mathematical model is established and detailed discussions are presented based on the model. The proper experimental conditions are suggested and verified with finite element simulations.

  16. Broadening the Bandwidth of Metamaterial Cloaks with Non-Foster Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pai-Yen; Alu, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept and practical design of broadband, ultrathin cloaks based on non-Foster, negatively capacitive metasurfaces. By using properly tailored, active frequency-selective screens conformal to an object, within the realm of practical realization, is shown to enable drastically reduced scattering over a wide frequency range in the microwave regime, orders of magnitude broader than any available passive cloaking technology. The proposed active cloak may impact not only invisibility and camouflaging, but also practical antenna and sensing applications.

  17. Digital Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick M; Mosk, Allard P; Kuipers, Kobus; Lagendijk, Ad

    2010-01-01

    The field of plasmonics offers a route to control light fields with metallic nanostructures through the excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs). These surface waves, bound to a metal dielectric interface, tightly confine electromagnetic energy. Active control over SPPs has potential for applications in sensing, photovoltaics, quantum communication, nano circuitry, metamaterials and super-resolution microscopy. We achieve here a new level of control of plasmonic fields using a digital spatial light modulator. Optimizing the plasmonic phases via feedback we focus SPPs at a freely pre-chosen point on the surface of a nanohole array with high resolution. Digital addressing and scanning of SPPs without mechanical motion will enable novel interdisciplinary applications of advanced plasmonic devices in cell microscopy, optical data storage and sensing.

  18. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  19. Non-magnetic simplified cylindrical cloak with suppressed zero-th order scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wei; Qiu, Min

    2008-01-01

    A new type of simplified cloaks with matched exterior boundaries is proposed. The cloak uses non-magnetic material for the TM polarization and can function with a relatively thin thickness. It is shown that the $zero^{th}$ order scattering of such cloak is dominant among all cylindrical scattering terms. A gap is added at the cloak's inner surface to eliminate the zero-th order scattering, through the mechanism of scattering resonance. The reduction in scattering is relatively smooth, indicating that the proposed scattering reduction method has good tolerance to perturbations. Numerical simulations also confirm that the proposed structure has very low scattering.

  20. Invisibility cloaks with arbitrary geometries for layered and gradually changing backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C; Yao, K; Li, F, E-mail: cli@mail.ie.ac.c [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2009-09-21

    Cloaks with arbitrary geometries are proposed which can make objects invisible in inhomogeneous backgrounds. The general and explicit expressions of the complex permittivity and permeability tensors are derived for cloaks embedded in layered and gradually changing media. The inner and the outer boundaries of the cloaks can be non-conformal with arbitrary shapes, which considerably improve the flexibility of the cloak applications. The interactions of electromagnetic waves with irregular cloaks are studied based on numerical simulations. The influences of the cloaked and uncloaked perfect electric conductor (PEC) cylinders upon the scattering fields of the multilayered backgrounds are quantitatively evaluated. The effect of loss on the cloaking performance has also been investigated. It is verified that cloaks with ideal parameters can smoothly deflect and guide the incoming beams to propagate around the shielded regions without disturbing the beams when they return to the inhomogeneous backgrounds. Therefore, the objects in the shielded region can be effectively invisible to the corresponding backgrounds. The performance of lossy cloaks will degrade with comparatively large power reduction of the transmitted beams.

  1. The scattering of a cylindrical invisibility cloak: reduced parameters and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Liang; Ran, L.; Mortensen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the scattering of 2D cylindrical invisibility cloaks with simplified constitutive parameters with the assistance of scattering coefficients. We show that the scattering of the cloaks originates not only from the boundary conditions but also from the spatial variation of the component...... of permittivity/permeability. According to our formulation, we propose some restrictions to the invisibility cloak in order to minimize its scattering after the simplification has taken place. With our theoretical analysis, it is possible to design a simplified cloak using some peculiar composites...

  2. Acoustic carpet cloak based on an ultrathin metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustic metasurface carpet cloak based on membrane-capped cavities is proposed and investigated numerically. This design has been chosen for allowing ultrathin geometries, although adapted to airborne sound frequencies in the range of 1 kHz (λ ≈30 cm), surpassing the designs reported in the literature in terms of thinness. A formulation of generalized Snell's laws is first proposed, mapping the directions of the incident and reflected waves to the metasurface phase function. This relation is then applied to achieve a prescribed wavefront reflection direction, for a given incident direction, by controlling the acoustic impedance grading along the metasurface. The carpet cloak performance of the proposed acoustic metasurface is then assessed on a triangular bump obstacle, generally considered as a baseline configuration in the literature.

  3. A simple construction for a cylindrical cloak via inverse homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Tom H; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2011-01-01

    An effective cylindrical cloak may be conceptualized as an assembly of adjacent local neighbourhoods, each of which is made from a homogenized composite material (HCM). The HCM is required to be a certain uniaxial dielectric-magnetic material, characterized by positive-definite constitutive dyadics. It can arise from the homogenization of remarkably simple component materials, such as two isotropic dielectric-magnetic materials, randomly distributed as oriented spheroidal particles. By carefully controlling the spheroidal shape of the component particles, a high degree of HCM anisotropy may be achieved, which is necessary for the cloaking effect to be realized. The inverse Bruggeman formalism can provide estimates of the shape and constitutive parameters for the component materials, as well as their volume fractions.

  4. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  5. Plasmonic Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics and metamaterials have attracted considerable attention over the past decade, owing to the revolutionary impacts that they bring to both the fundamental physics and practical applications in multiple disciplines. Although the two fields initially advanced along their individual trajectories in parallel, they started to interfere with each other when metamaterials reached the optical regime. The dynamic interplay between plasmonics and metamaterials has generated a number of innovative concepts and approaches, which are impossible with either area alone. This review presents the fundamentals, recent advances and future perspectives in the emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials, aiming to open up new exciting opportunities for nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  6. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  7. Invisibility Dips of Near-Field Energy Transport in a Spoof Plasmonic Metadimer

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    Invisibility dips, minima in scattering spectrum associated with asymmetric Fano-like line-shapes, have been predicted with transformation optics in studying strong coupling between two plasmonic nanoparticles. This feature of strongly coupled plasmonic nanoparticles holds promise for sensor cloaking. It requires an extremely narrow gap between the two nanoparticles, though, preventing its experimental observation at optical frequencies. Here, the concept of spoof surface plasmons is utilized to facilitate the strong coupling between two spoof-localized-surface-plasmon (SLSP) resonators. Instead of observing in far field, the near-field energy transport is probed through the two SLSP resonators. By virtue of enhanced coupling between the two resonators stacked vertically, a spectral transmission dip with asymmetric Fano-like line-shape, similar to the far-field invisibility dips predicted by transformation optics, is observed. The underlying mode interference mechanism is further demonstrated by directly imag...

  8. A fundamental Lagrangian approach to transformation acoustics and spherical spacetime cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Michael M.

    2012-05-01

    Transformation acoustics centers on the construction of advanced acoustic devices by combining mathematical transformation techniques with the engineering of acoustic metamaterials. We show how differential-geometric methods together with a variational principle form the basis of a powerful framework to control acoustic waves as desired. This formalism is required to leave the acoustic wave equation invariant under coordinate transformations and is shown to consist of a proposed acoustic Lagrangian function on a smooth spacetime manifold. As an immediate consequence, we can derive the general constitutive relations between the acoustic parameters (bulk modulus and mass-density tensor) of the physical and virtual spaces under consideration. We conclude with a practical application of this theory by presenting acoustic spherical cloaking with time dilation.

  9. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°.

  10. Quantum Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Martin-Cano, Paloma A. Huidobro, Esteban Moreno; Diego Martin-Cano; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Esteban Moreno; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a rapidly growing field of research that involves the study of the quantum properties of light and its interaction with matter at the nanoscale. Here, surface plasmons - electromagnetic excitations coupled to electron charge density waves on metal-dielectric interfaces or localized on metallic nanostructures - enable the confinement of light to scales far below that of conventional optics. In this article we review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical inve...

  11. Plasmonic photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Yu Lim; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features-a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects-the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  12. Prospects for poor-man's cloaking with low-contrast all-dielectric optical elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Sigmund, Ole; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for low-contrast all-dielectric cloaking and offer a simple picture illustrating the basic obstacle for perfect cloaking without materials with an effective double-negative response. However, the same simple picture also gives directions for less perfect designs allowing...

  13. Metasurface Cloak Performance Near-by Multiple Line Sources and PEC Cylindrical Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Yatman, William H.; Pehrson, Signe

    2014-01-01

    The performance/robustness of metasurface cloaks to a complex field environment which may represent a realistic scenario of radiating sources is presently reported. Attention is devoted to the cloak operation near-by multiple line sources and multiple perfectly electrically conducting cylinders...

  14. Invisibility Cloaks Modeled by Anisotropic Metamaterials Based on Inductor-capacitor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiao; Yao, Kan; Meng, Xiankun; Li, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Base on the transformation optics, a novel transmission-line (TL) approach to realize invisibility cloaking using planar anisotropic metamaterials (MTMs) is proposed. The two-dimensional cylindrical cloaks are modeled based on inductor-capacitor (L-C) MTMs networks. The three elements of the constitutive parameters are all allowed to be spatially inhomogeneous which lead to the full parameter realization of a cylindrical cloak. As an example, a cloak working at VHF band is modeled and its invisibility behavior is demonstrated based on the solution of the node voltages distributions. Due to the non-resonant properties of the L-C elements, the broadband characteristic of the proposed cloaks is also evident.

  15. Towards omnidirectional, large scale, full polarization, and broadband practical invisibility cloaks: challenges and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yihao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Invisibility cloaks have experienced a tremendous development in the past few years, but the current technologies to convert the cloaks into practical applications are still facing numerous bottlenecks. In this paper, we provide the review of the challenges and recent progress in the invisibility cloaks from a practical perspective. In particular, the following key challenges such as non-extreme parameters, homogeneity, omnidirectivity, full polarization, large scale and broad band are addressed. We analyze the physical mechanisms behind the challenges and consequently evaluate the merits and defects of the recent solutions. We anticipate some compromises on the ideal cloaks are required in order to achieve practical invisibility cloaks in the future.

  16. Three-dimensional magnetic cloak working from DC to 250 kHz

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jianfei; Liu, Yichao; Yin, Ge; Yuan, Jun; He, Sailing; Ma, Yungui

    2015-01-01

    Invisible cloaking is one of major outcomes of the metamaterial research, but the practical potential, in particular for high frequencies (e.g., microwave to visible light), is fatally challenged by the complex material properties they usually demand. On the other hand, it will be advantageous and also technologically instrumental to design cloaking devices for applications at low frequencies where electromagnetic components are favorably uncoupled. In this work, we vastly develop the bilayer approach to create a three-dimensional magnetic cloak able to work in both static and dynamic fields. Under the quasi-static approximation, we demonstrate a perfect magnetic cloaking device with a large frequency band from zero to 250 kHz. The practical potential of our device is experimentally verified by using a commercial metal detector, which may lead us to having a real cloaking application where the dynamic magnetic field can be manipulated in desired ways.

  17. Three-dimensional broadband acoustic illusion cloak for sound-hard boundaries of curved geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Weiwei; Liang, Bin; Li, Ruiqi; Jiang, Xue; Zou, Xin-Ye; Yin, Lei-Lei; Cheng, Jianchun

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic illusion cloaks that create illusion effects by changing the scattered wave have many potential applications in a variety of scenarios. However, the experimental realization of generating three-dimensional (3D) acoustic illusions under detection of broadband signals still remains challenging despite the paramount importance for practical applications. Here we report the design and experimental demonstration of a 3D broadband cloak that can effectively manipulate the scattered field to generate the desired illusion effect near curved boundaries. The designed cloak simply comprises positive-index anisotropic materials, with parameters completely independent of either the cloaked object or the boundary. With the ability of manipulating the scattered field in 3D space and flexibility of applying to arbitrary geometries, our method may take a major step toward the real world application of acoustic cloaks and offer the possibilities of building advanced acoustic devices with versatile functionalities.

  18. Directional cloaking of flexural waves in a plate with a locally resonant metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Rupin, Matthieu

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the numerical design of a directional invisibility cloak for backward scattered elastic waves propagating in a thin plate (A0 Lamb waves). The directional cloak is based on a set of resonating beams that are attached perpendicular to the plate and are arranged at a sub-wavelength scale in ten concentric rings. The exotic effective properties of this locally resonant metamaterial ensure coexistence of bandgaps and directional cloaking for certain beam configurations over a large frequency band. The best directional cloaking was obtained when the resonators' length decreases from the central to the outermost ring. In this case, flexural waves experience a vanishing index of refraction when they cross the outer layers, leading to a frequency bandgap that protects the central part of the cloak. Numerical simulation shows that there is no back-scattering in these configurations. These results might have applications in the design of seismic-wave protection devices.

  19. Scattering cross-section of a transformation optics-based metamaterial cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundtz, Nathan; Gaultney, Daniel; Smith, David R, E-mail: nbk@duke.ed [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We present experimental quantitative scattering cross-section (SCS) measurements for a metamaterial cloak. The cloak is nearly identical to that reported in 2006; however, quantitative experimental measurements have not yet been reported for such a structure. This cylindrically symmetric cloak is designed to operate at a frequency of 10 GHz and to reduce the SCS of a cylinder 50 mm in diameter. Despite being only a crude approximation of the ideal transformation optical design, the fabricated metamaterial cloak is shown to reduce the SCS of the cylinder over the frequency range from 9.91 to 10.14 GHz, a span of 230 MHz or a 2.3% bandwidth. The maximum reduction in the SCS is 24%. This result provides a useful experimental, quantitative benchmark that can form the basis for comparison of the performances of future improved cloaking structures.

  20. Plasmonic Optical Tweezers toward Molecular Manipulation: Tailoring Plasmonic Nanostructure, Light Source, and Resonant Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-04

    This Perspective describes recent progress in optical trappings of nanoparticles based on localized surface plasmon. This plasmonic optical trapping has great advantages over the conventional optical tweezers, being potentially applicable for a molecular manipulation technique. We review this novel trapping technique from the viewpoints of (i) plasmonic nanostructure, (ii) the light source for plasmon excitation, and (iii) the polarizability of the trapping target. These findings give us future outlook for plasmonic optical trapping. In addition to a brief review, recent developments on plasmonic optical trapping of soft nanomaterials such as proteins, polymer chains, and DNA will be discussed to point out the important issue for further development on this trapping method. Finally, we explore new directions of plasmonic optical trapping.

  1. Surface Plasmons in Coaxial Metamaterial Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram

    2013-07-01

    Thanks to Victor Veselago for his hypothesis of negative index of refraction, meta-materials — engineered composites — can be designed to have properties difficult or impossible to find in nature: they can have both electrical permittivity (ɛ) and magnetic permeability (μ) simultaneously negative. The metamaterials — henceforth negative-index materials (NIMs) — owe their properties to subwavelength structure rather than to their chemical composition. The tailored electromagnetic response of the NIMs has had a dramatic impact on classical optics: they are becoming known to have changed many basic notions related with electromagnetism. The present article is focused on gathering and reviewing fundamental characteristics of plasmon propagation in coaxial cables fabricated of the right-handed medium (RHM) (with ɛ > 0, μ > 0) and the left-handed medium (LHM) (with ɛ < 0, μ < 0) in alternate shells starting from the innermost cable. Such structures as conceived here may pave the way to some interesting effects in relation to, for example, optical science exploiting the cylindrical symmetry of coaxial waveguides that make it possible to perform all major functions of an optical fiber communication system in which the light is born, manipulated, and transmitted without ever leaving the fiber environment, with precise control over the polarization rotation and pulse broadening. This review also covers briefly the nomenclature, classification, potential applications, and the limitations (related, for example, to the inherent losses) of the NIMs and their impact on classical electrodynamics in general, and in designing the cloaking devices in particular. A recent surge in efforts on invisibility and the cloaking devices seems to have spoiled the researchers worldwide: proposals include not only a way to hide an object without having to wrap the cloak around it, but also to replace a given object with another, thus adding to the deception even further! All this

  2. Differential interactions of phytochrome A (Pr vs. Pfr) with monoclonal antibodies probed by a surface plasmon resonance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Chihoko; Kim, Jeong-Il; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Han, Yun-Jeong; Hanzawa, Hiroko; Furuya, Masaki; Song, Pill-Soon

    2007-01-01

    Phytochromes are red- and far-red light-reversible photoreceptors for photomorphogenesis in plants. Phytochrome A is a dimeric chromopeptide that mediates very low fluence and high irradiance responses. To analyze the surface properties of phytochrome A (phyA), the epitopes of 21 anti-phyA monoclonal antibodies were determined by variously engineered recombinant phyA proteins and the dissociation constants of seven anti-phyA monoclonal antibodies with phyA were measured using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based resonant mirror biosensor (IAsys). Purified oat phyA was immobilized on the sensor surface using a carboxymethyl dextran cuvette in advance, and the interactions of each chosen monoclonal antibody against phyA in either red light absorbing form (Pr) or far-red light absorbing form (Pfr) at different concentrations were monitored. The binding profiles were analyzed using the FAST Fit program of IAsys. The resultant values of dissociation constants clearly demonstrated the differential affinities between the phyA epitopes and the monoclonal antibodies dependent upon Pr vs. Pfr conformations. Monoclonal antibody mAP20 preferentially recognized the epitope at amino acids 653-731 in the Pr form, whereas mAA02, mAP21 and mAR07/mAR08 displayed preferential affinities for the Pfr's surfaces at epitopes 494-601 (the hinge region between the N- and C-terminal domains), 601-653 (hinge in PASI domain), and 772-1128 (C-terminal domain), respectively. The N-terminal extension (1-74) was not recognized by mAP09 and mAP15, suggesting that the N-terminal extreme is not exposed in the native conformation of phyA. On the other hand, the C-terminal domain becomes apparently exposed on Pr-to-Pfr phototransformation, suggesting an inter-domain cross-talk. The use of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy offers a new approach to study the surface properties of phytochromes associated with the photoreversible structural changes, as well as for the study of protein

  3. Design and analysis of the trapeziform and flat acoustic cloaks with controllable invisibility performance in a quasi-space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the design, implementation and detailed performance analysis for a class of trapeziform and flat acoustic cloaks. An effective large invisible area is obtained compared with the traditional carpet cloak. The cloaks are realized with homogeneous metamaterials which are made of periodic arrangements of subwavelength unit cells composed of steel embedded in air. The microstructures and its effective parameters of the cloaks are determined quickly and precisely in a broadband frequency range by using the effective medium theory and the proposed parameters optimization method. The invisibility capability of the cloaks can be controlled by the variation of the key design parameters and scale factor which are proved to have more influence on the performance in the near field than that in the far field. Different designs are suitable for different application situations. Good cloaking performance demonstrates that such a device can be physically realized with natural materials which will greatly promote the real applications of invisibility cloak.

  4. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  5. Horizontal cloaking and vertical reflection by transformation acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung Lee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation shows that if an acoustic metamaterial bounded by an external rectangle and an internal circular cavity is properly engineered by a set of transformation equations that satisfy certain requirements, it can virtually cloak an object against incoming acoustic waves in one direction and make an incoming wave along the orthogonal direction reflected by an object located inside its inner cavity. The specific transformation equations realizing the metamaterial are suggested and an analysis is carried out to investigate the wave phenomena taking place along the cavity boundary.

  6. Temporal cloak with large fractional hiding window at telecommunication data rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Dong, Jianji; Yan, Siqi; Yang, Ting

    2017-04-01

    We design and experimentally investigate a temporal cloak scheme using ultrashort pulse compression and time-domain Fraunhofer diffraction. An input continuous-wave probe beam is compressed to ultrashort pulse train based on self-phase modulation effect and chirp compensation using single mode fiber. Accordingly, wide temporal gaps appear to act as the cloaking windows. The train of ultrashort pulses can be converted to continuous wave after experiencing enough dispersion, indicating that the temporal gaps are closed. Thus, any time events will be hidden in the temporal gaps from observers. In our study, we demonstrated a temporal cloak system, which is able to hide 88% of the whole time period and cloak pseudorandom digital data at a bitrate of 10 Gbit/s. The relationships of cloaking window fraction versus pump power and the condition of cloaking off are also investigated. These results present a new feasible way towards obtaining a high-fractional cloaking window at telecommunication data rate and hiding real-world messages.

  7. Application of surface plasmon resonance for the detection of carbohydrates, glycoconjugates, and measurement of the carbohydrate-specific interactions: a comparison with conventional analytical techniques. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, Gulnara

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrates (glycans) and their conjugates with proteins and lipids contribute significantly to many biological processes. That makes these compounds important targets to be detected, monitored and identified. The identification of the carbohydrate content in their conjugates with proteins and lipids (glycoforms) is often a challenging task. Most of the conventional instrumental analytical techniques are time-consuming and require tedious sample pretreatment and utilising various labeling agents. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been intensively developed during last two decades and has received the increasing attention for different applications, from the real-time monitoring of affinity bindings to biosensors. SPR does not require any labels and is capable of direct measurement of biospecific interaction occurring on the sensing surface. This review provides a critical comparison of modern analytical instrumental techniques with SPR in terms of their analytical capabilities to detect carbohydrates, their conjugates with proteins and lipids and to study the carbohydrate-specific bindings. A few selected examples of the SPR approaches developed during 2004-2011 for the biosensing of glycoforms and for glycan-protein affinity studies are comprehensively discussed.

  8. Free-standing chiral plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Eunice Sok Ping; Deng, Jie; Wu, Siji; Khoo, Eng Huat; Liu, Yan Jun

    2014-11-01

    Chiral plasmonic nanostructures offer the ability to achieve strong optical circular dichroism (CD) activity over a broad spectral range, which has been challenging for chiral molecules. Chiral plasmonic nanostructures have been extensively studied based on top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques. Particularly, in the top-down electron-beam lithography, 3D plasmonic nanostructure fabrication involves layer-by-layer patterning and complex alignment, which is time-consuming and causes many defects in the structures. Here, we present a free-standing 3D chiral plamonic nanostructures using the electron-beam lithography technique with much simplified fabrication processes. The 3D chiral plasmonic nanostructures consist of a free-standing ultrathin silicon nitride membrane with well-aligned L-shape metal nanostructures on one side and disk-shape ones on the other side. The free-standing membrane provides an ultra-smooth metal/dielectric interface and uniformly defines the gap between the upper and lower layers in an array of chiral nanostructures. Such free-standing chiral plasmonic nanostructures exhibit strong CD at optical frequencies, which can be engineered by simply changing the disk size on one side of the membrane. Experimental results are in good agreement with the finite-difference time-domain simulations. Such free-standing chiral plasmonics holds great potential for chirality analysis of biomolecules, drugs, and chemicals.

  9. Plasmonic sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic sensors typically rely on detection of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Here, an alternative approach is reported based on electrical surface screening and controlled dissolution of ultrasmall silver nanoparticles (NPs; R < 5 nm) that can result in a great incr...

  10. Transformation-based spherical cloaks designed by an implicit transformation-independent method: theory and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitsky, Andrey [Department of Theoretical Physics, Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosti Avenue 4, 220050 Minsk (Belarus); Qiu, C-W [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zouhdi, Said [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, SUPELEC, Plateau de Moulon 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: eleqc@nus.edu.sg

    2009-11-15

    Based on the concept of the cloak generating function, we propose an implicit transformation-independent method for the required parameters of spherical cloaks without knowing the needed coordinate transformation beforehand. A non-ideal discrete model is used to calculate and optimize the total scattering cross-sections of different profiles of the generating function. A bell-shaped quadratic spherical cloak is found to be the best candidate, which is further optimized by controlling the design parameters involved. Such improved invisibility is steady even when the model is highly discretized.

  11. General scaling limitations of ground-plane and isolated-object cloaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Hila; Johnson, Steven G. [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Oskooi, A. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan); Joannopoulos, J. D. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We prove that, for arbitrary three-dimensional transformation-based invisibility cloaking of an object above a ground plane or of isolated objects, there are practical constraints that increase with the object size. In particular, we show that the cloak thickness must scale proportionally to the thickness of the object being cloaked, assuming bounded refractive indices, and that absorption discrepancies and other imperfections must scale inversely with the object thickness. For isolated objects, we also show that bounded refractive indices imply a lower bound on the effective cross section.

  12. Biomimetic antimicrobial cloak by graphene-oxide agar hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Bugli, Francesca; De Spirito, Marco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ciancico, Carlotta; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Gentilini, Silvia; Angelani, Luca; Conti, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Antibacterial surfaces have an enormous economic and social impact on the worldwide technological fight against diseases. However, bacteria develop resistance and coatings are often not uniform and not stable in time. The challenge is finding an antibacterial coating that is biocompatible, cost-effective, not toxic, and spreadable over large and irregular surfaces. Here we demonstrate an antibacterial cloak by laser printing of graphene oxide hydrogels mimicking the Cancer Pagurus carapace. We observe up to 90% reduction of bacteria cells. This cloak exploits natural surface patterns evolved to resist to microorganisms infection, and the antimicrobial efficacy of graphene oxide. Cell integrity analysis by scanning electron microscopy and nucleic acids release show bacteriostatic and bactericidal effect. Nucleic acids release demonstrates microorganism cutting, and microscopy reveals cells wrapped by the laser treated gel. A theoretical active matter model confirms our findings. The employment of biomimetic graphene oxide gels opens unique possibilities to decrease infections in biomedical applications and chirurgical equipment; our antibiotic-free approach, based on the geometric reduction of microbial adhesion and the mechanical action of Graphene Oxide sheets, is potentially not affected by bacterial resistance.

  13. Plasmonics From Basics to Advanced Topics

    CERN Document Server

    Bonod, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This book deals with all aspects of plasmonics, basics, applications and advanced developments. Plasmonics is an emerging field of research dedicated to the resonant interaction of light with metals. The light/matter interaction is strongly enhanced at a nanometer scale which sparks a keen interest of a wide scientific community and offers promising applications in pharmacology, solar energy, nanocircuitry or also light sources. The major breakthroughs of this field of research originate from the recent advances in nanotechnology, imaging and numerical modelling.  The book is divided into three main parts: extended surface plasmons polaritons propagating on metallic surfaces, surface plasmons localized on metallic particles, imaging and nanofabrication techniques. The reader will find in the book: Principles and recent advances of plasmonics, a complete description of the physics of surface plasmons, a historical survey with emphasize on the emblematic topic of Wood's anomaly, an overview of modern applicati...

  14. Plasmonic colour generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Yang, Joel K. W.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic colours are structural colours that emerge from resonant interactions between light and metallic nanostructures. The engineering of plasmonic colours is a promising, rapidly emerging research field that could have a large technological impact. We highlight basic properties of plasmonic...

  15. Surface plasmon polariton amplification in metal-semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Arsenin, Aleksey V

    2011-06-20

    We propose a novel scheme of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) amplification that is based on a minority carrier injection in a Schottky diode. This scheme uses compact electrical pumping instead of bulky optical pumping. Compact size and a planar structure of the proposed amplifier allow one to utilize it in integrated plasmonic circuits and couple it easily to passive plasmonic devices. Moreover, this technique can be used to obtain surface plasmon lasing.

  16. Protein-Flavonoid Interaction Studies by a Taylor Dispersion Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR Technique: A Novel Method to Assess Biomolecular Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preejith P. Vachali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are common polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. These pigments have important pharmacological relevance because emerging research suggests possible anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties as well other beneficial health effects. These compounds are relatively hydrophobic molecules, suggesting the role of blood transport proteins in their delivery to tissues. In this study, we assess the binding interactions of four flavonoids (kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, and resveratrol with human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in the blood, and with glutathione S-transferase pi isoform-1 (GSTP1, an enzyme with well-characterized hydrophobic binding sites that plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics with reduced glutathione, using a novel Taylor dispersion surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique. For the first time, HSA sites revealed a high-affinity binding site for flavonoid interactions. Out of the four flavonoids that we examined, quercetin and kaempferol showed the strongest equilibrium binding affinities (KD of 63 ± 0.03 nM and 37 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. GSTP1 displayed lower affinities in the micromolar range towards all of the flavonoids tested. The interactions of flavonoids with HSA and GSTP1 were studied successfully using this novel SPR assay method. The new method is compatible with both kinetic and equilibrium analyses.

  17. Exterior optical cloaking and illusions by using active sources: A boundary element perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H. H.; Xiao, J. J.; Lai, Y.; Chan, C. T.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that active sources can be used to cloak any objects that lie outside the cloaking devices [F. Guevara Vasquez, G. W. Milton, and D. Onofrei, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 073901 (2009)]. Here, we propose that active sources can create illusion effects so that an object outside the cloaking device can be made to look like another object. Invisibility is a special case in which the concealed object is transformed to a volume of air. From a boundary element perspective, we show that active sources can create a nearly “silent” domain which can conceal any objects inside and at the same time make the whole system look like an illusion of our choice outside a virtual boundary. The boundary element method gives the fields and field gradients, which can be related to monopoles and dipoles, on continuous curves which define the boundary of the active devices. Both the cloaking and illusion effects are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  18. The scattering of a cylindrical invisibility cloak: reduced parameters and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, L; Mortensen, N A [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU-building 345 west, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Ran, L, E-mail: plia@fotonik.dtu.dk [Department of Information and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-04-06

    We investigate the scattering of 2D cylindrical invisibility cloaks with simplified constitutive parameters with the assistance of scattering coefficients. We show that the scattering of the cloaks originates not only from the boundary conditions but also from the spatial variation of the component of permittivity/permeability. According to our formulation, we propose some restrictions to the invisibility cloak in order to minimize its scattering after the simplification has taken place. With our theoretical analysis, it is possible to design a simplified cloak using some peculiar composites such as photonic crystals which mimic an effective refractive index landscape rather than offering effective constitutives, meanwhile cancelling the scattering from the inner and outer boundaries.

  19. Transformation cloaking and radial approximations for flexural waves in elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, M; Jones, I S; Movchan, A B; Movchan, N V

    2014-01-01

    It is known that design of elastic cloaks is much more challenging than the design idea for acoustic cloaks, cloaks of electromagnetic waves or scalar problems of anti-plane shear. In this paper, we address fully the fourth-order problem and develop a model of a broadband invisibility cloak for channelling flexural waves in thin plates around finite inclusions. We also discuss an option to employ efficiently an elastic pre-stress and body forces to achieve such a result. An asymptotic derivation provides a rigorous link between the model in question and elastic wave propagation in thin solids. This is discussed in detail to show connection with non-symmetric formulations in vector elasticity studied in earlier work.

  20. Isotropic-medium three-dimensional cloaks for acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Smith, David R; 10.1063/1.3691242

    2012-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the two-dimensional eikonal-limit cloak derived from a conformal transformation to three dimensions. The proposed cloak is a spherical shell composed of only isotropic media; it operates in the transmission mode and requires no mirror or ground plane. Unlike the well-known omnidirectional spherical cloaks, it may reduce visibility of an arbitrary object only for a very limited range of observation angles. In the short-wavelength limit, this cloaking structure restores not only the trajectories of incident rays, but also their phase, which is a necessary ingredient to complete invisibility. Both scalar-wave (acoustic) and transverse vector-wave (electromagnetic) versions are presented.

  1. Transformation-optics macroscopic visible-light cloaking beyond two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Chia-Wei; Lee, Chih Jie; Duan, Yubo; Tsai, Din Ping; Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Transformation optics, a recent geometrical design strategy of controlling light by combining Maxwell's principles of electromagnetism with Einstein's general relativity, promises without precedent an invisibility cloaking device that can render a macroscopic object invisible in three dimensions. However, most previous proof-of-concept transformation-optics cloaking devices focused predominantly on two dimensions, whereas detection of a macroscopic object along its third dimension was always unfailing. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of transformation-optics macroscopic visible-light cloaking beyond two dimensions. This almost-three-dimensional cloak exhibits three-dimensional (3D) invisibility for illumination near its center (i.e. with a limited field of view), and its ideal wide-angle invisibility performance is preserved in multiple two-dimensional (2D) planes intersecting in the 3D space. Both light ray trajectories and optical path lengths have been verified experimentally at the ma...

  2. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.; Passian, A.

    2017-04-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  3. Omnidirectional transformation-optics cloak made from lenses and glenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Oxburgh, Stephen; Cowie, Euan N; Chaplain, Gregory J; Macauley, Gavin; White, Chris D; Courtial, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    We present a design for an omnidirectional transformation-optics (TO) cloak comprising thin lenses and glenses (generalized thin lenses) [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A33, 962 (2016)1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.33.000962]. It should be possible to realize such devices in pixelated form. Our design is a piecewise nonaffine generalization of piecewise affine pixelated-TO devices [Proc. SPIE9193, 91931E (2014)PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.2061404; J. Opt18, 044009 (2016)]. It is intended to be a step in the direction of TO devices made entirely from lenses, which should be readily realizable on large length scales and for a broad range of wavelengths.

  4. Magnetic light cloaking control in the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H.; Mizukawa, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Ohtsuka, S.

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the light cloaking behavior of the marine planktonic copepod Sapphirina under a magnetic field. Optical interferences in the multi-laminated guanine crystal layer beneath the dorsal body surface create a brilliant structural color, which can be almost entirely removed by changing the light reflection. In the investigation, we immersed segments of Sapphirina in seawater contained in an optical chamber. When the derived Sapphirina segments were attached to the container surface, they were inert to magnetic fields up to 300 mT. However, when the back plate segments were attached to the substrate at a point, with most of the plate floating in the seawater, the plate rotated oppositely to the applied magnetic field. In addition, the brilliant parts of the Sapphirina back plate rotated backward and forward by changing the magnetic field directions. Our experiment suggests a new model of an optical micro-electro-mechanical system that is controllable by magnetic fields.

  5. Improvement of the sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance sensors based on multi-layer modulation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xihong; Chu-Su, Yu; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Lin, Chii-Wann; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Wu, Mu-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a multi-layer modulation technique was used in an SPR optical fiber sensor to enhance the sensitivity of the SPR optical fiber sensor by adjusting the SPR resonant wavelength. The sputtering process deposited 20 nm of TiO2, 11 nm of SiO2 and 30 nm of gold film on the material surface to change the refractive index. Regardless of the different refractive index solutions (1.32 and 1.36), the sensitivities in wavelength interrogation of the SPR optical fiber with the single gold thin film and multi-layers modulation were 1.08×10-5 RIUs and 1.74×10-6 RIUs, respectively. The results showed the significant differences between the different refractive index solutions of 1.32 and 1.36 using the 850 nm light source to analyze the SPR optical fiber sensor in real-time. The sensitivities in intensity interrogation of the SPR optical fiber with the single gold thin film and multi-layers modulation were 1.08×10-3 RIUs and 1.73×10-4 RIUs, respectively, which indicated that the multi-layer modulation techniques could enhance the sensitivity of the SPR optical fiber sensor. The compact size of the multi-layer SPR fiber sensor had a wider detecting range of the refractive index and higher sensitivity, which had the potential for other applications in biological analysis with suitable wavelength.

  6. Experimental validation of a new bianisotropic parameter retrieval technique using plasmonic metasurfaces made of V-shape antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Shaltout, Amr M.; Ni, Xingjie; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    We report on a numerical study of a new bianisotropic parameter retrieval technique for both regular and complementary V-shape antenna metasurfaces. Each antenna element with a discrete phase shift is modeled by a homogenous bianisotropic film to represent the optical response. For the complementary design, the retrieval implies a complementary behavior of effective material properties and predicts the analogous functionalities. Further, FDFD solver is developed to integrate the bianisotropic descriptions of each antenna and describes a fully functional metasurface. The computational burden is significantly reduced, because effective material properties replace the detailed meshing of the antennas. Experimentally, large dimension arrays of nano-voids are fabricated using electron beam lithography. It is demonstrated that cross-polarized light is diffracted towards the same direction. Furthermore, the complementary design greatly increases the extinction ratio of functional fields to background fields.

  7. Plasmonic Colors: Toward Mass Production of Metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mäkela, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic metasurface coloration has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its industrial potential. So far, demonstrations have been limited to small patterned areas fabricated using expensive techniques with limited scalability. This study elevates the technology beyond...

  8. Molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a novel approach, this book provides a unique ""molecular perspective"" on plasmonics, concisely presenting the fundamentals and applications in a way suitable for beginners entering this hot field as well as for experienced researchers and practitioners. It begins by introducing readers to the optical effects that occur at the nanoscale and particularly their modification in the presence of biomolecules, followed by a concise yet thorough overview of the different methods for the actual fabrication of nanooptical materials. Further chapters address the relevant nanooptics, as well as

  9. Plasmonics based VLSI processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In continuum to my previous paper titled‘Implementation of plasmonics in VLSI’, this paperattempts to explore further, the actual physicalrealization of an all-plasmonic chip. In this paper,various methods of plasmon-basedphotolithography have been discussed and anobservation is made w.r.t the cost effectiveness andease of adaptability. Also, plasmonics based activeelement has been discussed which would helpunravel further arenas ofapproaches and methodstowards the realization of an all-plasmonic chip.

  10. All-dielectric ultrathin conformal metasurfaces: lensing and cloaking applications at 532 nm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jierong; Jafar-Zanjani, Samad; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Metasurfaces are ideal candidates for conformal wave manipulation on curved objects due to their low profiles and rich functionalities. Here we design and analyze conformal metasurfaces for practical optical applications at 532 nm visible band for the first time. The inclusions are silicon disk nanoantennas embedded in a flexible supporting layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). They behave as local phase controllers in subwavelength dimensions for successful modification of electromagnetic responses point by point, with merits of high efficiency, at visible regime, ultrathin films, good tolerance to the incidence angle and the grid stretching due to the curvy substrate. An efficient modeling technique based on field equivalence principle is systematically proposed for characterizing metasurfaces with huge arrays of nanoantennas oriented in a conformal manner. Utilizing the robust nanoantenna inclusions and benefiting from the powerful analyzing tool, we successfully demonstrate the superior performances of the conformal metasurfaces in two specific areas, with one for lensing and compensation of spherical aberration, and the other carpet cloak, both at 532 nm visible spectrum.

  11. Implementation of Plasmonics in VLSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This Paper presents the idea of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI using Plasmonic Waveguides.Current VLSI techniques are facing challenges with respect to clock frequencies which tend to scale up, making it more difficult for the designers to distribute and maintain low clock skew between these high frequency clocks across the entire chip. Surface Plasmons are light waves that occur at a metal/dielectric interface, where a group of electrons is collectively moving back and forth. These waves are trapped near the surface as they interact with the plasma of electrons near the surface of the metal. The decay length of SPs into the metal is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of the light in air. This feature of SPs provides the possibility of localization and the guiding of light in sub wavelength metallic structures, and it can be used to construct miniaturized optoelectronic circuits with sub wavelength components. In this paper, various methods of doing the same have been discussed some of which include DLSPPW’s, Plasmon waveguides by self-assembly, Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides etc. Hence by using Plasmonic chips, the speed, size and efficiency of microprocessor chips can be revolutionized thus bringing a whole new dimension to VLSI design.

  12. Implementation of Plasmonics in VLSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This Paper presents the idea of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI using Plasmonic Waveguides. Current VLSI techniques are facing challenges with respect to clock frequencies which tend to scale up, making it more difficult for the designers to distribute and maintain low clock skew between these high frequency clocks across the entire chip. Surface Plasmons are light waves that occur at a metal/dielectric interface, where a group of electrons is collectively moving back and forth. These waves are trapped near the surface as they interact with the plasma of electrons near the surface of the metal. The decay length of SPs into the metal is two orders of magnitude smaller than the wavelength of the light in air. This feature of SPs provides the possibility of localization and the guiding of light in sub wavelength metallic structures, and it can be used to construct miniaturized optoelectronic circuits with sub wavelength components. In this paper, various methods of doing the same have been discussed some of which include DLSPPW’s, Plasmon waveguides by self-assembly, Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides etc. Hence by using Plasmonic chips, the speed, size and efficiency of microprocessor chips can be revolutionized thus bringing a whole new dimension to VLSI design.

  13. Plasmon polaritons in nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its unique electronic and optical properties. When graphene is electrically/chemically doped, it can support surface plasmon where the light propagates along the surface with a very short wavelength and an extremely small mode volume. The optical...... properties of graphene can be tuned by electrical gating, thus proving a promising way to realize a tunable plasmonic material. We firstly investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides, and show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided...... that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. Then we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The silicon grating is realized by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self...

  14. Plasmon polaritons in nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention due to its unique electronic and optical properties. When graphene is electrically/chemically doped, it can support surface plasmon where the light propagates along the surface with a very short wavelength and an extremely small mode volume. The optical...... properties of graphene can be tuned by electrical gating, thus proving a promising way to realize a tunable plasmonic material. We firstly investigate the performance of bends and splitters in graphene nanoribbon waveguides, and show that bends and splitters do not induce any additional loss provided...... that the nanoribbon width is sub-wavelength. Then we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The silicon grating is realized by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self...

  15. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  16. Numerical design of FSHL-based approximate cloaks with arbitrary shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hou, Yanren; Li, Jingzhi

    2017-03-01

    This paper considers numerical design of finite sound-hard lining (FSHL)-based approximate cloaks with arbitrary shapes. Regarding the complexity of the shape, two new approaches are proposed to design the transformation map from the virtual space to the physical space via transformation optics. For star-shaped geometry, we propose an explicit global transformation map which can be easily differentiated and inverted. For more general shapes, an Initialize-Untangle-Extend (IUE) approach is initiated to build locally piecewise differentiable deformations, which can be locally inverted with the help of an approximate triangulation. With the locally piecewise-constructed transformation, the parameters of acoustic scattering models in physical space can be determined in both approaches based on the transformation invariance of the Helmholtz system. Then the cloaking effects for an arbitrary shape FSHL-based cloak can be realized following Li et al. (2012) [5]. Extensive numerical experiments are presented to illustrate both the effectiveness of cloak design and the efficiency of the proposed FSHL-based cloaks with arbitrary shapes.

  17. Reviews in plasmonics 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2010, the first volume of the new book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonic

  18. Kinetics of electrochemically controlled surface reactions on bulk and thin film metals studied with Fourier transform impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiongbon, Kankoe A.

    2005-07-01

    In the work presented in this thesis, the surface sensitive electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltametry (CV), potential step (PS) and Fourier transform impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS), as well as the optical technique of surface plasmon resonance (SPR), were used to probe a wide variety of surface processes at various metal/liquid interface. Three polycrystalline metals (Au, Ta and Cu) and a Cr-coated gold film were used for these studies in different aqueous environments. A combination of CV with FT-EIS and PS was used to investigate electronic and structural proprieties of a modified bulk electrode of Au. This experimental system involved under potential deposition (UPD) of Bi3+ on Au in a supporting aqueous electrolyte containing ClO-4 . UPD range of Bi3+ was determined, and adsorption kinetics of Bi3+ in the presence of coadsorbing anion, ClO-4 were quantified. Potentiodynamic growth of oxide films of Ta in the following electrolytes NaNO3, NaNO3 + 5wt% H2O2, NaOH and NaOH + 5wt% H2O2 had been investigated. The oxide films were grown in the range -0.1 → +0.4V (high electric field) at a scan rate of 10 mV/s. Time resolved A.C. impedance spectroscopy measurements in the frequency range (0.1--20 KHz) were performed to characterize the surface reactions of oxide formation. The results are interpreted in terms of charge conductivity O2- through the oxide film, and disintegration of H2O2 into OH-. In a high pH medium (pH 12), dissociation of H2O2 was catalytically enhanced. This led to destabilization of the electrogenerated tantalum oxide surface film in the form of a soluble hexatantalate species. In contrast with the electrolytes, NaNO3, NaNO3 + 5wt% H2O2, NaOH, where only the oxide growth was observed, the A.C. impedance spectroscopy measurements in NaOH + 5wt% H 2O2 showed competition between oxide formation and its removal. These results are relevant for chemical slurry design in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Ta. Further investigations were

  19. Pushing the high-energy limit of plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Francesco; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Moroni, Riccardo; Maidecchi, Giulia; Alabastri, Alessandro; Gonella, Grazia; Giglia, Angelo; Andolfi, Laura; Nannarone, Stefano; Mattera, Lorenzo; Canepa, Maurizio

    2014-09-23

    The localized surface plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles allows confining the eletromagnetic field in nanosized volumes, creating high-field "hot spots", most useful for enhanced nonlinear optical spectroscopies. The commonly employed metals, Au and Ag, yield plasmon resonances only spanning the visible/near-infrared range. Stretching upward, the useful energy range of plasmonics requires exploiting different materials. Deep-ultraviolet plasmon resonances happen to be achievable with one of the cheapest and most abundant materials available: aluminum indeed holds the promise of a broadly tunable plasmonic response, theoretically extending far into the deep-ultraviolet. Complex nanofabrication and the unavoidable Al oxidation have so far prevented the achievement of this ultimate high-energy response. A nanofabrication technique producing purely metallic Al nanoparticles has at last allowed to overcome these limits, pushing the plasmon resonance to 6.8 eV photon energy (≈180 nm) and thus significantly broadening the spectral range of plasmonics' numerous applications.

  20. Cloaks and antiobject-independent illusion optics based on illusion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Zang, XiaoFei; Cai, Bin; Shi, Cheng; Zhu, YiMing

    2013-11-01

    Based on the transformation optics, we propose a new strategy of illusion media consisting of homogeneous and anisotropic materials. By utilizing the illusion media, invisible cloak is theoretically realized, in which objects covered with the illusion media could not be detected. The cloak here allows neither the propagation of light around the concealed region nor compensates the scattering field of object outside the media. What the cloak does is to shift the region into another place where outside the trace of light, so that objects in that region can disappear. Another application of the illusion media is to create the antiobject-independent illusion optics which means that two objects appear to be like some other objects of our choice. Finite element simulations for two-dimensional cases have been performed to prove these ideas.

  1. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.;

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a tra......A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed...... in a transmission spectrum and it is very sensitive to the constituent materials as well as both lateral and vertical dimensions of the structures. This makes LSPR spectroscopy interesting for a number of applications including nanometrology. Like scatterometry, LSPR spectroscopy requires test structures...

  2. Basics of quantum plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a topical review of the theoretical research on the quantum theory of plasmons and plasmon-photon interaction. The plasmons are defined as the quanta of the quantized plasmonic field. The corresponding classical plasmonic field was constructed on the basis of the study of collective oscillations of the electron gas in the solid. The electron-electron Coulomb interaction is taken into account. The explicit forms of the plasmon-photon interaction Lagrangian in canonical quantum mechanics and the plasmon-photon interaction action functional in the functional integral approach are derived. They all show that the interaction processes are nonlocal ones. The physical origin of the nonlocality is the complex structure of plasmons as composite quasiparticles: they cannot be considered as point particles, as was assumed in all phenomenological theories.

  3. Plasmonics in buried structures

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, I. T.; García de Abajo, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative los...

  4. Plasmonics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Stefan Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Considered a major field of photonics, plasmonics offers the potential to confine and guide light below the diffraction limit and promises a new generation of highly miniaturized photonic devices. This book combines a comprehensive introduction with an extensive overview of the current state of the art. Coverage includes plasmon waveguides, cavities for field-enhancement, nonlinear processes and the emerging field of active plasmonics studying interactions of surface plasmons with active media.

  5. Design of optical cloaks and illusion devices along a circumferential direction in curvilinear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tungyang; Yu, Shang-Ru

    2010-11-01

    We propose a cloaking and illusion device of circumferential topology based on the concept of transformation optics. The device is capable to cloak an object and/or simultaneously generate illusion images along a circumferential direction in curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. This feature allows us to construct multiple illusions in different ways, irrespective of the profile and direction of incident wave. Particularly when the device is served as a building brick of a larger device, one can generate a circumferential array of illusions in a periodic or any preferred pattern. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed illusion devices by carrying out full wave simulations based on finite element calculations.

  6. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology.

  7. Detailed optical characterization of three-dimensional visible-frequency polarization-independent carpet invisibility cloak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ergin, Tolga, E-mail: tolga.ergin@kit.edu [Institute of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanotechnology, and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin [Institute of Applied Physics, Institute of Nanotechnology, and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The invention of the three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal by Costas M. Soukoulis and coworkers in 1994 has stimulated much further research - excellent research stimulates further research. Here, we report on using spatially inhomogeneous polymer woodpile structures in the long-wavelength limit as artificial graded-index structures. After briefly reviewing previous work on carpet invisibility cloaks designed by transformation optics, we present new experiments for various focus planes of the inspecting microscope as well as for different inspection angles in three-dimensional space. Numerical ray-tracing modeling is also provided. These data confirm our previous assessment that three-dimensional cloaking is quite robust for these structures.

  8. Time gap for temporal cloak based on spectral hole burning in atomic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabar, M. S. Abdul; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating a time gap in the slow light based on spectral hole burning in a four-level Doppler broadened sodium atomic system. A time gap is also observed between the slow and the fast light in the hole burning region and near the burnt hole region, respectively. A cloaking time gap is attained in microseconds and no distortion is observed in the transmitted pulse. The width of the time gap is observed to vary with the inverse Doppler effect in this system. Our results may provide a way to create multiple time gaps for a temporal cloak. Project supported by the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan.

  9. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-07-07

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our cloak. The proposed method will be a great addition to existing invisibility technology.

  10. Nanoroughened plasmonic films for enhanced biosensing detection

    CERN Document Server

    Moal, Eric Le; Pottier, Marie-Claude; Fort, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Although fluorescence is the prevailing labeling technique in biosensing applications, sensitivity improvement is still a striving challenge. We show that coating standard microscope slides with nanoroughened silver films provides a high fluorescence signal enhancement due to plasmonic interactions. As a proof of concept, we applied these films with tailored plasmonic properties to DNA microarrays. Using common optical scanning devices, we achieved signal amplifications by more than 40-fold.

  11. Coexistence of Scattering Enhancement and Suppression by Plasmonic Cavity Modes in Loaded Dimer Gap-Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Li, Meili; Han, Dezhuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-11-27

    Plasmonic nanoantenna is of promising applications in optical sensing and detection, enhancement of optical nonlinear effect, surface optical spectroscopy, photoemission, etc. Here we show that in a carefully-designed dimer gap-antenna made by two metallic nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon antenna mode (AM) of bonding dipoles can compete with the transverse plasmonic cavity modes (CMs), yielding dramatically enhanced or suppressed scattering efficiency, depending on the CMs symmetry characteristics. More specifically, it is demonstrated that an appropriately loaded gap layer enables substantial excitation of toroidal moment and its strong interaction with the AM dipole moment, resulting in Fano- or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like profile in the scattering spectrum. However, for CMs with nonzero azimuthal number, the spectrum features a cumulative signature of the respective AM and CM resonances. We supply both detailed near-field and far-field analysis, showing that the modal overlap and phase relationship between the fundamental moments of different order play a crucial role. Finally, we show that the resonance bands of the AM and CMs can be tuned by adjusting the geometry parameters and the permittivity of the load. Our results may be useful in plasmonic cloaking, spin-polarized directional light emission, ultra-sensitive optical sensing, and plasmon-mediated photoluminescence.

  12. Tailoring alphabetical metamaterials in optical frequency: plasmonic coupling, dispersion, and sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Cuong; Xu, Xinlong; Liow, Chihao; Li, Shuzhou; Tan, Pingheng; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-04-22

    Tailoring optical properties of artificial metamaterials, whose optical properties go beyond the limitations of conventional and naturally occurring materials, is of importance in fundamental research and has led to many important applications such as security imaging, invisible cloak, negative refraction, ultrasensitive sensing, and transformable and switchable optics. Herein, by precisely controlling the size, symmetry, and topology of alphabetical metamaterials with U, S, Y, H, U-bar, and V shapes, we have obtained highly tunable optical response covering visible-to-infrared (vis-NIR) optical frequency. In addition, we show a detailed study on the physical origin of resonance modes, plasmonic coupling, the dispersion of resonance modes, and the possibility of negative refraction. We have found that all the electronic and magnetic modes follow the dispersion of surface plasmon polaritons; thus, essentially they are electronic- and magnetic-surface-plasmon-polaritons-like (ESPP-like and MSPP-like) modes resulted from diffraction coupling between localized surface plasmon and freely propagating light. On the basis of the fill factor and formula of magnetism permeability, we predict that the alphabetical metamaterials should show the negative refraction capability in visible optical frequency. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the specific ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensing of monolayer molecules and femtomolar food contaminants by tuning their resonance to match the laser wavelength, or by tuning the laser wavelength to match the plasmon resonance of metamaterials. Our tunable alphabetical metamaterials provide a generic platform to study the electromagnetic properties of metamaterials and explore the novel applications in optical frequency.

  13. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  14. Plasmonic Demultiplexer and Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Chenglong

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional plasmonic demultiplexers for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which consist of concentric grooves on a gold film, are proposed and experimentally demonstrated to realize light-SPP coupling, effective dispersion and multiple-channel SPP guiding. A resolution as high as 10 nm is obtained. The leakage radiation microscopy imaging shows that the SPPs of different wavelengths are focused and routed into different SPP strip waveguides. The plasmonic demultiplexer can thus serve as a wavelength division multiplexing element for integrated plasmonic circuit and also as a plasmonic spectroscopy or filter.

  15. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  16. Spoof Plasmon Hybridization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Maier, Stefan A; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon hybridization between closely spaced nanoparticles yields new hybrid modes not found in individual constituents, allowing for the engineering of resonance properties and field enhancement capabilities of metallic nanostructure. Experimental verifications of plasmon hybridization have been thus far mostly limited to optical frequencies, as metals cannot support surface plasmons at longer wavelengths. Here, we introduce the concept of 'spoof plasmon hybridization' in highly conductive metal structures and investigate experimentally the interaction of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in adjacent metal disks corrugated with subwavelength spiral patterns. We show that the hybridization results in the splitting of spoof plasmon modes into bonding and antibonding resonances analogous to molecular orbital rule and plasmonic hybridization in optical spectrum. These hybrid modes can be manipulated to produce enormous field enhancements (larger than 5000) by tuning the separation between disks or alte...

  17. Reviews in plasmonics 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2016, the third volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  18. Reviews in plasmonics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2015, the second volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  19. Rainbow and blueshift effect of a dispersive spherical invisibility cloak impinged on by a nonmonochromatic plane wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baile; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2008-08-08

    We demonstrate some interesting phenomena associated with a nonmonochromatic plane wave passing through a spherical invisibility cloak whose radial permittivity and permeability are of Drude and Lorentz types. We observe that the frequency center of a quasimonochromatic incident wave will suffer a blueshift in the forward scattering direction. Different frequency components have different depths of penetration, causing a rainbowlike effect within the cloak. The concept of group velocity at the inner boundary of the cloak needs to be revisited. Extremely low scattering can still be achieved within a narrow band.

  20. Scattering suppression and wideband tunability of a flexible mantle cloak for finite-length conducting rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, R. S.; Soric, J. C.; Rainwater, D.; Kerkhoff, A.; Alù, A.

    2014-06-01

    A simple, thin, flexible mantle cloak for conducting rods based on scattering cancellation is analyzed, designed and experimentally realized. We show strong scattering suppression at all angles of incidence, for both far-field plane-wave and near-field Gaussian excitations. The required effective shunt surface impedance is realized by a subwavelength patch array, targeting the suppression of the dominant omnidirectional scattering contribution of a conductive rod. Full-wave simulations predict a total radar cross-section reduction better than 14 dB in the lossless case and nearly 8 dB when considering a lossy substrate in the cover. Measurements of the realized cloak are consistent and validate these numerical predictions. The proposed geometry is also shown to be an ideal platform for monolithic integration of varactor diodes, allowing real-time tuning of the effective surface capacitance of the cloak. We show with numerical simulations the possibility of tunable scattering suppression over 1 GHz of bandwidth by seamlessly integrating varactor diodes in our mantle cloak design.

  1. Electromagnetic cloak to restore the antenna radiation patterns affected by nearby scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperik, Tatiana V.; de Lustrac, André

    2015-12-01

    We have theoretically verified the feasibility of the concept of mantle cloak for very high frequency (VHF) antenna communications. While the applicability of the concept has been demonstrated for an infinitely long cylindrical obstacle and infinitely long electric source [Y.R. Padooru, A.B. Yakovlev, and P.-Y. Chen and Andrea Alù, J. Appl. Phys., 112, 104902, (2012)], the use of this cloak in realistic conditions is not straightforward. In this paper as an electric source we consider a typical VHF monopole antenna mounted on ground plane together with a metallic cylindrical obstacle. The both ground plane and obstacle affect the antenna radiation scattering. Nevertheless, we could show that the mantle cloak can bee successfully applied to restore the radiation patterns of antenna even when the source, the cylindrical metallic obstacle, and the ground plane have finite length. We have studied the antenna adaptation in the presence of the cloaked obstacle and found that the complete radiation system is still functional in the bandwidth that is reduced only by 11%.

  2. Novel applications of photonic signal processing: Temporal cloaking and biphoton pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukens, Joseph M.

    We experimentally demonstrate two innovative applications of photonic technologies previously solidified in the field of classical optical communications. In the first application, we exploit electro-optic modulator technology to develop a novel "time cloak,'' a device which hides events in time by manipulating the flow of a probing light beam. Our temporal cloak is capable of masking high-speed optical data from a receiver, greatly improving the feasibility of time cloaking and bringing such exotic concepts to the verge of practical application. In the second specialization, high-resolution Fourier-transform pulse shaping---perfected for multi-wavelength telecom networks---is applied to shape the correlations of entangled photon pairs, states which have received considerable attention in nonlocal tests of quantum theory and in quantum key distribution. Using nonlinear waveguides fabricated out of periodically poled lithium niobate, we are able to demonstrate ultrafast coincidence detection with record-high efficiency, which coupled with our pulse shaper allows us to realize for the first time several capabilities in biphoton control, including high-order dispersion cancellation, orthogonal spectral coding, correlation train generation, and tunable delay control. Each of these experiments represents an important advance in quantum state manipulation, with the potential to impact developments in quantum information. And more generally, our work introducing telecommunication technology into both temporal cloaking and biphoton control highlights the potential of such tools in more nascent outgrowths of classical and quantum optics.

  3. Beam Steering at Higher Photonic Bands and Design of a Directional Cloak Formed by Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Subramanian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam steering due to anomalous dispersion at higher photonic bands in dielectric photonic crystal is reported in this work. Based on this concept, directional cloak is designed that conceals a larger dimensional scattering object against the normal incident, linearly polarizedelectromagnetic waves.

  4. Electromagnetic cloak to restore the antenna radiation patterns affected by nearby scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teperik, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.teperik@u-psud.fr [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Donostia International Physics Center, Aptdo. 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Lustrac, André de [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, UMR 8622, Orsay F-91405 (France); Univ. Paris-Ouest, 92410 Ville d’Avray (France)

    2015-12-15

    We have theoretically verified the feasibility of the concept of mantle cloak for very high frequency (VHF) antenna communications. While the applicability of the concept has been demonstrated for an infinitely long cylindrical obstacle and infinitely long electric source [Y.R. Padooru, A.B. Yakovlev, and P.-Y. Chen and Andrea Alù, J. Appl. Phys., 112, 104902, (2012)], the use of this cloak in realistic conditions is not straightforward. In this paper as an electric source we consider a typical VHF monopole antenna mounted on ground plane together with a metallic cylindrical obstacle. The both ground plane and obstacle affect the antenna radiation scattering. Nevertheless, we could show that the mantle cloak can bee successfully applied to restore the radiation patterns of antenna even when the source, the cylindrical metallic obstacle, and the ground plane have finite length. We have studied the antenna adaptation in the presence of the cloaked obstacle and found that the complete radiation system is still functional in the bandwidth that is reduced only by 11%.

  5. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  6. Hybrid plasmonic-photonic resonators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, A. Femius; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Ruesink, Freek; Verhagen, Ewold; Osorio, Clara I.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid nanophotonic structures are structures that integrate different nanoscale platforms to harness light-matter interaction. We propose that combinations of plasmonic antennas inside modest-Q dielectric cavities can lead to very high Purcell factors, yielding plasmonic mode volumes at essentially cavity quality factors. The underlying physics is subtle: for instance, how plasmon antennas with large cross sections spoil or improve cavities and vice versa, contains physics beyond perturbation theory, depending on interplays of back-action, and interferences. This is evident from the fact that the local density of states of hybrid systems shows the rich physics of Fano interferences. I will discuss recent scattering experiments performed on toroidal microcavities coupled to plasmon particle arrays that probe both cavity resonance shifts and particle polarizability changes illustrating these insights. Furthermore I will present our efforts to probe single plasmon antennas coupled to emitters and complex environments using scatterometry. An integral part of this approach is the recently developed measurement method of `k-space polarimetry', a microscopy technique to completely classify the intensity and polarization state of light radiated by a single nano-object into any emission direction that is based on back focal plane imaging and Stokes polarimetry. I show benchmarks of this technique for the cases of scattering, fluorescence, and cathodoluminescence applied to directional surface plasmon polariton antennas.

  7. Understanding the Plasmonics of Nanostructured Atomic Force Microscopy Tips

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Alan; Zhang, Liwu; Turek, Vladimir; Sigle, Daniel O; Lombardi, Anna; Weller, Lee; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    Structured metallic tips are increasingly important for optical spectroscopies such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), with plasmonic resonances frequently cited as a mechanism for electric field enhancement. We probe the local optical response of sharp and spherical-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips using a scanning hyperspectral imaging technique to identify plasmonic behaviour. Localised surface plasmon resonances which radiatively couple with far-field light are found only for spherical AFM tips, with little response for sharp AFM tips, in agreement with numerical simulations of the near-field response. The precise tip geometry is thus crucial for plasmon-enhanced spectroscopies, and the typical sharp cones are not preferred.

  8. Harmonics radiation of graphene surface plasmon polaritons in terahertz regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D., E-mail: dazhi_li@hotmail.com [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Wang, Y. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Nakajima, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hashida, M. [Advanced Research Center for Beam Science, ICR, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Wei, Y. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Miyamoto, S. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2016-06-03

    This letter presents an approach to extract terahertz radiation from surface plasmon polaritons excited in the surface of a uniform graphene structure by an electron beam. A sidewall configuration is proposed to lift the surface plasmon mode to be close to the light line, so that some of its harmonics have chances to go above the light line and become radiative. The harmonics are considered to be excited by a train of periodic electron bunches. The physical mechanism in this scheme is analyzed with three-dimensional theory, and the harmonics excitation and radiation are demonstrated through numerical calculations. The results show that this technique could be an alternative to transform the surface plasmon polaritons into radiation. - Highlights: • An approach to extract terahertz radiation from graphene surface plasmon polaritons is presented. • A sidewall configuration is proposed to lift the surface plasmon mode. • Harmonics of surface plasmon polaritons are possible to radiate.

  9. Plasmonics based micro/nano manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Quincy

    Since the advent of the Information Age, there has been an ever growing demand to continually shrink and reduce the cost of semiconductor products. To meet this demand, a great amount of research has been done to improve our current micro/nano manufacturing processes and develop the next generation of semiconductor fabrication techniques. High throughput, low cost, smaller features, high repeatability, and the simplification of the manufacturing processes are all targets that researchers continually strive for. To this day, there are no perfect systems capable of simultaneously achieving all of these targets. For this reason, much research time is spent improving and developing new techniques in hopes of developing a system that will incorporate all of these targets. While there are numerous techniques being investigated and developed every year, one of the most promising areas of research that may one day be capable of achieving our desired targets is plasmonics. Plasmonics, or the study of the free electron oscillations in metals, is the driving phenomena in the applications reported in this paper. In chapter 2, the formation of ordered gold nanoparticles on a silicon substrate through the use of energetic surface plasmons is reported. Utilizing a gold/alumina nano-hole antenna and 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser system, semi-periodic gold nanoparticles were deposited onto the surface of a silicon substrate. The novel technique is simpler, faster, and safer than any known gold nanoparticle deposition technique reported in literature. The implementation of this technique has potential wide-ranging applications in photovoltaic cells, medical products, and many others. In chapter 3, a low cost lithography technique utilizing surface plasmons is reported. In this technique, a plasmonic photomask is created by coating a pre-made porous alumina membrane with a thin aluminum layer. A coherent, 337 nm UV laser source is used to expose the photomask and excite surface plasmons along

  10. Plasmon cross transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzynski, Leonard; Akjouj, Abdellatif; Li, Changsheng, E-mail: Abdellatif.Akjouj@univ-lille1.fr [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille1, Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Unite de Physique, Batiment P5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-14

    Plasmon cross transmission avoids the frontal collision between two plasmons traveling in opposite directions along a guide. The guide is made out of equidistant identical metal dots. Thanks to two resonator dots, the plasmon frontal impact is avoided by transmission of the two plasmons from the input guide to an output one. The resonator and guide dots are identical in size and metal composition. The dipole-dipole interactions are restricted to first nearest neighbors. A convenient metal doping is assumed to compensate exactly all attenuations. The parameters are the nearest neighbor distances between the dots. These distances are rescaled to the chain nearest neighbor distance d. The system has two symmetry mirror planes. This simple model enables us to obtain two analytic tuning relations for the plasmon cross transmission. The intensities of the transmitted signals versus kd, where k is the plasmon propagation vector, are also given. (paper)

  11. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  12. Plasmonics in buried structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, I; García de Abajo, F J

    2009-10-12

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative losses, minimum crosstalk between neighboring waveguides, and maximum optical integration in three-dimensional arrangements.

  13. Light-Directed Reversible Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Enhanced Thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wang, Mingsong; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Mao, Zhangming; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Becker, Michael F; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-09-21

    Reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to modulate their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Common and versatile tools in nanoparticle manipulation and assembly are optical tweezers, but these require tightly focused and high-power (10-100 mW/μm(2)) laser beams with precise optical alignment, which significantly hinders their applications. Here we present light-directed reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles with a power intensity below 0.1 mW/μm(2). Our experiments and simulations reveal that such a low-power assembly is enabled by thermophoretic migration of nanoparticles due to the plasmon-enhanced photothermal effect and the associated enhanced local electric field over a plasmonic substrate. With software-controlled laser beams, we demonstrate parallel and dynamic manipulation of multiple nanoparticle assemblies. Interestingly, the assemblies formed over plasmonic substrates can be subsequently transported to nonplasmonic substrates. As an example application, we selected surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy, with tunable sensitivity. The advantages provided by plasmonic assembly of nanoparticles are the following: (1) low-power, reversible nanoparticle assembly, (2) applicability to nanoparticles with arbitrary morphology, and (3) use of simple optics. Our plasmon-enhanced thermophoretic technique will facilitate further development and application of dynamic nanoparticle assemblies, including biomolecular analyses in their native environment and smart drug delivery.

  14. Impact of Radii Ratios on a Two-Dimensional Cloaking Structure and Corresponding Analysis for Practical Design at Optical Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Anam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is an extension to the evaluation and analysis of a two-dimensional cylindrical cloak in the Terahertz or visible range spectrum using Finite Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method. It was concluded that it is possible to expand the frequency range of a cylindrical cloaking model by careful scaling of the inner and outer radius of the simulation geometry with respect to cell size and/or number of time steps in the simulation grid while maintaining appropriate stability conditions. Analysis in this study is based on a change in the radii ratio, that is, outer radius to inner radius, of the cloaking structure for an array of wavelengths in the visible spectrum. Corresponding outputs show inconsistency in the cloaking pattern with respect to frequency. The inconsistency is further increased as the radii ratio is decreased. The results also help to establish a linear relationship between the transmission coefficient and the real component of refractive index with respect to different radii ratios which may simplify the selection of the material for practical design purposes. Additional performance analysis is carried out such that the dimensions of the cloak are held constant at an average value and the frequency varied to determine how a cloaked object may be perceived by the human eye which considers different wavelengths to be superimposed on each other simultaneously.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  16. Plasmon-assisted optoelectrofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndukaife, Justus C.; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    By harnessing the photo-induced heating of a single plasmonic nanostructure and AC E-field in our research at the interface between plasmonics and optofluidics we demonstrate on-demand fluid flow control with unparalleled micron per second-scale velocities. © 2015 OSA....

  17. Perfect optical vortex enhanced surface plasmon excitation for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Du, Luping; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose an all-optical technique for plasmonic structured illumination microscopy (PSIM) with perfect optical vortex (POV). POV can improve the efficiency of the excitation of surface plasma and reduce the background noise of the excited fluorescence. The plasmonic standing wave patterns are excited by POV with fractional topological charges for accurate phase shift of {-2π/3, 0, and 2π/3}. The imaging resolution of less than 200 nm was produced. This PSIM technique is expected to be used as a wide field, super resolution imaging technique in dynamic biological imaging.

  18. Level Set-Based Topology Optimization for the Design of an Electromagnetic Cloak With Ferrite Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otomori, Masaki; Yamada, Takayuki; Andkjær, Jacob Anders;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a structural optimization method for the design of an electromagnetic cloak made of ferrite material. Ferrite materials exhibit a frequency-dependent degree of permeability, due to a magnetic resonance phenomenon that can be altered by changing the magnitude of an externally...... applied dc magnetic field. Thus, such ferrite cloaks have the potential to provide novel functions, such as on-off operation in response to on-off application of an external magnetic field. The optimization problems are formulated to minimize the norm of the scattering field from a cylindrical obstacle....... A level set-based topology optimization method incorporating a fictitious interface energy is used to find optimized configurations of the ferrite material. The numerical results demonstrate that the optimization successfully found an appropriate ferrite configuration that functions as an electromagnetic...

  19. Invisibility cloak inside a Luneburg lens: Experimental demonstration of birefrigent transformation optics devices

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninova, V N; Piazza, A; Schaefer, D; Smolyaninov, I I

    2012-01-01

    Transformation optics (TO) has recently become a useful methodology in the design of unusual optical devices, such as novel metamaterial lenses and invisibility cloaks. Very recently Danner et al. [1] have suggested theoretical extension of this approach to birefrigent TO devices, which perform useful and different functions for mutually orthogonal polarization states of light. Theoretical designs which operate as invisibility cloak for one polarization while behaving as a Luneburg lens for another orthogonal polarization have been suggested. Here we report the first experimental realization of this and other birefrigent TO designs based on lithographically defined metal/dielectric waveguides. Adiabatic variations of the waveguide shape enable control of the effective refractive indices experienced by the TE and TM modes propagating inside the waveguides. We have studied wavelength and polarization dependent performance of the resulting birefrigent TO devices. These novel optical devices considerably extend o...

  20. Fick's Second Law Transformed: One Path to Cloaking in Mass Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multilayered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multilayered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bio-engineering.

  1. Design of diamond-shaped transient thermal cloaks with homogeneous isotropic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting-Hua; Zhu, Dong-Lai; Mao, Fu-Chun; Huang, Ming; Yang, Jing-Jing; Li, Shou-Bo

    2016-10-01

    Transformation thermodynamics as a major extension of transformation optics has recently received considerable attention. In this paper, we present two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) diamond-shaped transient thermal cloaks with non-singular homogeneous material parameters. The absence of singularity in the parameters results from the fact that the linear coordinate transformation is performed by expanding a line segment rather than a point into a region, while the mechanism behind the homogeneity is the homogeneous stretching and compression along orthogonal directions during the transformation. Although the derived parameters remain anisotropic, we further show that this can be circumvented by considering a layered structure composed of only four types of isotropic materials based on the effective medium theory. Numerical simulation results confirm the good performance of the proposed cloaks.

  2. Fick's second law transformed: one path to cloaking in mass diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenneau, S; Puvirajesinghe, T M

    2013-06-06

    Here, we adapt the concept of transformational thermodynamics, whereby the flux of temperature is controlled via anisotropic heterogeneous diffusivity, for the diffusion and transport of mass concentration. The n-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous Fick's equation is considered, which is a parabolic partial differential equation also applicable to heat diffusion, when convection occurs, for example, in fluids. This theory is illustrated with finite-element computations for a liposome particle surrounded by a cylindrical multi-layered cloak in a water-based environment, and for a spherical multi-layered cloak consisting of layers of fluid with an isotropic homogeneous diffusivity, deduced from an effective medium approach. Initial potential applications could be sought in bioengineering.

  3. Lipid-insertion enables targeting functionalization of erythrocyte membrane-cloaked nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Chen, Kevin N. H.; Luk, Brian T.; Carpenter, Cody W.; Gao, Weiwei; Li, Shulin; Zhang, Dong-Er; Lu, Weiyue; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-09-01

    RBC membrane-cloaked polymeric nanoparticles represent an emerging nanocarrier platform with extended circulation in vivo. A lipid-insertion method is employed to functionalize these nanoparticles without the need for direct chemical conjugation. Insertion of both folate and the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411 shows receptor-specific targeting against model cancer cell lines.RBC membrane-cloaked polymeric nanoparticles represent an emerging nanocarrier platform with extended circulation in vivo. A lipid-insertion method is employed to functionalize these nanoparticles without the need for direct chemical conjugation. Insertion of both folate and the nucleolin-targeting aptamer AS1411 shows receptor-specific targeting against model cancer cell lines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03064d

  4. Optically tunable plasmonic color filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. J.; Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Wang, B.; Danner, A. J.; Yuan, X. C.; Teng, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    We fabricated sub-wavelength patterned gold plasmonic nanostructures on a quartz substrate through the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The perforated gold film demonstrated optical transmission peaks in the visible range, which therefore can be used as a plasmonic color filter. Furthermore, by integrating a layer of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with the gold nanostructure to form a hybrid system, we observed a red-shift of transmission peak wavelength. More importantly, the peak intensity can be further enhanced more than 10% in transmittance due to the refractive index match of the media on both sides of it. By optically pumping the hybrid system using a UV light, nematic-isotropic phase transition of the LCs was achieved, thus changing the effective refractive index experienced by the impinging light. Due to the refractive index change, the transmission peak intensity was modulated accordingly. As a result, an optically tunable plasmonic color filter was achieved. This kind of color filters could be potentially applied to many applications, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, liquid crystal display devices, light emitting diodes, etc.

  5. Total reflection and cloaking by zero index metamaterials loaded with rectangular dielectric defects

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2013-05-06

    In this work, we investigate wave transmission property through a zero index metamaterial (ZIM) waveguide embedded with rectangular dielectric defects. We show that total reflection and total transmission (cloaking) can be achieved by adjusting the geometric sizes and/or permittivities of the defects. Our work provides another possibility of manipulating wave propagation through ZIM in addition to the widely studied dielectric defects with cylindrical geometries.

  6. Optic-null space medium for cover-up cloaking without any negative refraction index materials

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Sun; Sailing He

    2016-01-01

    With the help of optic-null medium, we propose a new way to achieve invisibility by covering up the scattering without using any negative refraction index materials. Compared with previous methods to achieve invisibility, the function of our cloak is to cover up the scattering of the objects to be concealed by a background object of strong scattering. The concealed object can receive information from the outside world without being detected. Numerical simulations verify the performance of our...

  7. Increasing the density of passive photonic-integrated circuits via nanophotonic cloaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing; Polson, Randy; Menon, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    Photonic-integrated devices need to be adequately spaced apart to prevent signal cross-talk. This fundamentally limits their packing density. Here we report the use of nanophotonic cloaking to render neighbouring devices invisible to one another, which allows them to be placed closer together than is otherwise feasible. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrated waveguides that are spaced by a distance of ~λ0/2 and designed waveguides with centre-to-centre spacing as small as 600 nm (experiments show a transmission efficiency >-2 dB and an extinction ratio >15 dB over a bandwidth larger than 60 nm. This performance can be improved with better design algorithms and industry-standard lithography. The nanophotonic cloak relies on multiple guided-mode resonances, which render such devices very robust to fabrication errors. Our devices are broadly complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, have a minimum pitch of 200 nm and can be fabricated with a single lithography step. The nanophotonic cloaks can be generally applied to all passive integrated photonics.

  8. Dispersion engineering of metasurfaces for dual-frequency quasi-three-dimensional cloaking of microwave radiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the design methodology and experimental investigation of compact and lightweight dispersive coatings, comprised by multiple layers of anisotropic metasurfaces, which are capable of cloaking radiators at multiple frequencies are presented. To determine the required surface electromagnetic properties for each layer, an analytical model is developed for predicting the scattering from a cylinder surrounded by multiple layers of anisotropic metasurfaces subject to plane-wave illumination at a general oblique incidence angle. Particularly, two different metasurface coating solutions with different dispersive properties are designed to provide more than 10 dB scattering width suppression at two pre-selected frequencies within a field-of-view (FOV) of ± 20° off normal incidence. Both coating designs implemented using metasurfaces are fabricated and measured, experimentally demonstrating the simultaneous suppression of mutual coupling and quasi-three-dimensional radiation blockage at the two pre-selected frequency ranges. At the same time, the functionality of the coated monopole is still well-maintained. The performance comparison further sheds light on how the optimal performance can be obtained by properly exploiting the dispersion of each metasurface layer of the coating. In addition, the cloaking effect is retained even when the distance between the radiators is significantly reduced. The concept and general design methodology presented here can be extended for applications that would benefit from cloaking multi-spectral terahertz as well as optical antennas.

  9. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer.

  10. Engineering optical properties using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth

    Plasmonic nanostructures can be engineered to take on unusual optical properties not found in natural materials. The optical responses of plasmonic materials are functions of the structural parameters and symmetry of the nanostructures, material parameters of the nanostructure and its surroundings and the incidence angle, frequency and polarization state of light. The scattering and hence the visibility of an object could be reduced by coating it with a plasmonic material. In this thesis, presented is an optical frequency scattering cancelation device composed of a silicon nanorod coated by a plasmonic gold nanostructure. The principle of operation was theoretically analyzed using Mie theory and the device design was verified by extensive numerical simulations. The device was fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam milling. The optical responses of the scattering cancelation device and a control sample of bare silicon rod were directly visualized using near-field microscopy coupled with heterodyne interferometric detection. The experimental results were analyzed and found to match very well with theoretical prediction from numerical simulations thereby validating the design principles and our implementation. Plasmonic nanostructures could be engineered to exhibit unique optical properties such as Fano resonance characterized by narrow asymmetrical lineshape. We present dynamic tuning and symmetry lowering of Fano resonances in plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on flexible substrates. The tuning of Fano resonance was achieved by application of uniaxial mechanical stress. The design of the nanostructures was facilitated by extensive numerical simulations and the symmetry lowering was analyzed using group theoretical methods. The nanostructures were fabricated using electron beam lithography and optically characterized for various mechanical stress. The experimental results were in good

  11. Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoantennas: Basics and Applications (Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Maksymov, Ivan S

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantennas is a hot and rapidly expanding research field. Here we overview basic operating principles and applications of novel magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas, which are made of ferromagnetic metals and driven not only by light, but also by external magnetic fields. We demonstrate that magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas enhance the magneto-optical effects, which introduces additional degrees of freedom in the control of light at the nano-scale. This property is used in conceptually new devices such as magneto-plasmonic rulers, ultra-sensitive biosensors, one-way subwavelength waveguides and extraordinary optical transmission structures, as well as in novel biomedical imaging modalities. We also point out that in certain cases 'non-optical' ferromagnetic nanostructures may operate as magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas. This undesigned extra functionality capitalises on established optical characterisation techniques of magnetic nanomaterials and it may be useful for the integration of nanophotonics and nan...

  12. Optical Sensitivity Gain in Silica-Coated Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Francesco; Figus, Cristiana; Fornasari, Lucia; Patrini, Maddalena; Pellacani, Paola; Marchesini, Gerardo; Valsesia, Andrea; Artizzu, Flavia; Marongiu, Daniela; Saba, Michele; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Marabelli, Franco; Quochi, Francesco

    2014-09-04

    Ultrathin films of silica realized by sol-gel synthesis and dip-coating techniques were successfully applied to predefined metal/polymer plasmonic nanostructures to spectrally tune their resonance modes and to increase their sensitivity to local refractive index changes. Plasmon resonance spectral shifts up to 100 nm with slope efficiencies of ∼8 nm/nm for increasing layer thickness were attained. In the ultrathin layer regime (<10 nm), which could be reached by suitable dilution of the silica precursors and optimization of the deposition speed, the sensitivity of the main plasmonic resonance to refractive index changes in aqueous solution could be increased by over 50% with respect to the bare plasmonic chip. Numerical simulations supported experimental data and unveiled the mechanism responsible for the optical sensitivity gain, proving an effective tool in the design of high-performance plasmonic sensors.

  13. Plasmonic resonances in nanostructured transparent conducting oxide films

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jongbum; Emani, Naresh K; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCO) are emerging as possible alternative constituent materials to replace noble metals such as silver and gold for low-loss plasmonic and metamaterial (MMs) applications in the near infrared (NIR) regime. The optical characteristics of TCOs have been studied to evaluate the functionalities and potential of these materials as metal substitutes in plasmonic and MM devices, even apart from their usual use as electrode materials. However, patterning TCOs at the nanoscale, which is necessary for plasmonic and MM devices, is not well-studied. This paper investigates nanopatterning processes for TCOs, especially the lift-off technique with electron-beam lithography, and the realization of plasmonic nanostructures with TCOs. By employing the developed nanopatterning process, we fabricate 2D-periodic arrays of TCO nanodisks and characterize the material's plasmonic properties to evaluate the performance of TCOs as metal substitutes. Light-induced collective oscillations of the free elec...

  14. Plasmon field effect transistor: A novel sensing platform for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein

    The interest in plasmons, associated with nanostructured metals, has remarkably increased in the past decade. A Recent improvement in fabrication techniques to create well-controlled nanostructures also contributed to the rapid development of plasmonic applications, such as meta-materials, nonlinear optics, photovoltaic devices, biomedical sensors, medical therapies and spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the successful applications, which is widely used in biomedical research. On the other hand, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also widely studied in a broad range of applications. The distinct property of LSPR is a tailored and sharp absorption/scattering peaks depending on the shape and sizes of the metal nanostructures. In addition, plasmonics can enable integration of high speed optical circuit by taking the advantages from the current electronics and optics technologies. Thus, plasmonics is considered as a solution for the next generation systems that offers ultra-high speed data processing. In this dissertation, we will introduce a novel plasmon field effect transistor (FET) that enables direct detection and efficient amplification of plasmon energy. This FET has several advantages such as electrical isolation of plasmon absorber nanostructures from a sensing and drug screening. Currently, we have proof of concept for the antigen-antibody bonding using the plasmon field effect transistor. We will develop a multiplexing capable plasmon FET sensing platform by integrating an array of plasmon FETs with microfluidic channels to detect cancer biomarkers.

  15. Plasmonic-Electronic Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    resonances in two dimensional electron gases. Tunable plasmon absorption resonances were observed and studied in InP-based and GaN -based HEMTs . The...Resonant terahertz absorption by plasmons in grating-gate GaN HEMT structures,” A. V. Muravjov, D. B. Veksler, X. Hu, R. Gaska, N. Pala, H. Saxena...Nov. 2009, Singapore. 4. “Terahertz Plasmons in Grating-Gate AlGaN/ GaN HEMTs ,” A.V. Muravjov, D.B. Veksler, V.V. Popov, M.S. Shur, N. Pala, X. Hu, R

  16. Plasmon resonance in multilayer graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh Kumar; Wang, Di; Chung, Ting Fung

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon resonances in nanopatterned single-layer graphene nanoribbons (SL-GNRs), double-layer graphene nanoribbons (DL-GNRs) and triple-layer graphene nanoribbons (TL-GNRs) are studied experimentally using 'realistic' graphene samples. The existence of electrically tunable plasmons in stacked...... multilayer graphene nanoribbons was first experimentally verified by infrared microscopy. We find that the strength of the plasmonic resonance increases in DL-GNRs when compared to SL-GNRs. However, further increase was not observed in TL-GNRs when compared to DL-GNRs. We carried out systematic full......-wave simulations using a finite-element technique to validate and fit experimental results, and extract the carrier-scattering rate as a fitting parameter. The numerical simulations show remarkable agreement with experiments for an unpatterned SLG sheet, and a qualitative agreement for a patterned graphene sheet...

  17. Nonlocal inhomogeneous broadening in plasmonic nanoparticle ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Liu, Z.

    Nonclassical effects are increasingly more relevant in plasmonics as modern nanofabrication techniques rapidly approach the extreme nanoscale limits, for which departing from classical electrodynamics becomes important. One of the largest-scale necessary corrections towards this direction...... is to abandon the local response approximation (LRA) and take the nonlocal response of the metal into account, typically through the simple hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM), which predicts a sizedependent deviation of plasmon modes from the quasistatic (QS) limit. While this behaviour has been explored for simple...... averaging through both HDM and the recent Generalized Nonlocal Optical Response (GNOR) theory, which apart from the resonance frequency shifts accounts successfully for size-dependent damping as well. We examine NPs made of either ideal Drude-like metals [of plasmon frequency (wavelength) ωp (λp...

  18. Thermo-plasmonics of Irradiated Metallic Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan

    Thermo-plasmonics is an emerging field in photonics which aims at harnessing the kinetic energy of light to generate nanoscopic sources of heat. Localized surface plasmons (LSP) supported by metallic nanostructures greatly enhance the interactions of light with the structure. By engineering...... the size, morphology and composition of metallic nanostructures, the absorption of light can be maximized, resulting in a substantial temperature elevation in a nanoscopic volume. Applications of these nanoscopic sources of heat can be found in various contexts including localized cancer therapy, drug......-plasmonic simulations as well as the ImageJ program “Mosaic”, used for single particle tracking. Chapter 4 presents the experimental details of the lipid bilayer based temperature mapping technique based on a lipid bilayer containing fluorophores with a phase dependent partitioning. This assay allowed quantification...

  19. Plasmon Resonance in Multilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    CERN Document Server

    Emani, Naresh Kumar; Chung, Ting-Fung; Prokopeva, Ludmila J; Kildishev, Alexander V; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Chen, Yong P; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon resonance in nanopatterned single layer graphene nanoribbon (SL-GNR), double layer graphene nanoribbon (DL-GNR) and triple layer graphene nanoribbon (TL-GNR) structures is studied both experimentally and by numerical simulations. We use 'realistic' graphene samples in our experiments to identify the key bottle necks in both experiments and theoretical models. The existence of electrical tunable plasmons in such stacked multilayer GNRs was first experimentally verified by infrared microscopy. We find that the strength of the plasmonic resonance increases in DL-GNR when compared to SL-GNRs. However, we do not find a further such increase in TL-GNRs compared to DL-GNRs. We carried out systematic full wave simulations using finite element technique to validate and fit experimental results, and extract the carrier scattering rate as a fitting parameter. The numerical simulations show remarkable agreement with experiments for unpatterned SLG sheet, and a qualitative agreement for patterned graphene sheet. W...

  20. Plasmonic Structures for Sensing and Emitting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Francesco; Fornasari, Lucia; Patrini, Maddalena; Figus, Cristiana; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Quochi, Francesco; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea; Marabelli, Franco

    2014-12-01

    We report on the study of a plasmonic nanostructure that could be adopted as platform for emitting and sensing applications. Several devices have been prepared and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform micro-reflectance (FT- pR) techniques. In addition, a modelling via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations have been developed in order to interpret the morphological shape and the optical response of the considered structures. Until now, remarkable performances as surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical sensor have been founded. Moreover, we are performing preliminary trials in order to establish a coupling between photoluminescence (PL) features of suitable emitters with respect to the plasmonic resonances.

  1. Broadband Excitation and Active Control of Terahertz Plasmons in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Khorrami, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A novel broadband technique to effectively launch plasmons along a single graphene layer at terahertz (THz) frequencies is proposed. To this end, the coupling of the electromagnetic wave from a readily available plasmonic waveguide established by a periodically corrugated metallic surface to the graphene sheet is proposed. As will be shown, this technique can significantly surmount the need for efficient excitation of plasmons in graphene. For this purpose, an analytical technique based on transmission line theory is employed to calculate the scattering parameters of the connection of the plasmonic waveguides. In this manner, the gating effects of the graphene waveguide on the input reflection and transmission of the junction are also investigated. For comparison, a full wave numerical simulator is employed.

  2. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  3. Optical antennas and plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Q-Han

    2009-01-01

    Optical antenna is a nanoscale miniaturization of radio or microwave antennas that is also governed by the rule of plasmonics. We introduce various types of optical antenna and make an overview of recent developments in optical antenna research. The role of local and surface plasmons in optical antenna is explained through antenna resonance and resonance conditions for specific metal structures are explicitly obtained. Strong electric field is shown to exist within a highly localized region o...

  4. Plasmonic Graphene Transparent Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    www.MaterialsViews.com www.advopticalmat.de FU LL P A P ER Guowei Xu,* Jianwei Liu, Qian Wang , Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni, and Judy Wu Plasmonic...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UU...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS surface plasmon, graphene, transparent conductors Guowei Xu, Jianwei Liu, Qian

  5. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  6. Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for Control of Quantum Nanoemitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-13

    properties, metal ion implantation techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nanotechnology 16...techniques, and multi- physics modeling to produce hyperbolic quantum nanoemitters. During the course of this project we studied plasmonic...AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2017-0001 Novel Plasmonic and Hyberbolic Optical Materials for control of Quantum Nanoemitters Paras Prasad RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF

  7. Laser implantation of plasmonic nanostructures into glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Simon J.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Stolojan, Vlad; Silva, S. Ravi. P.

    2013-01-01

    A laser direct-writing method producing high-resolution patterns of gold, silver and alloy plasmonic nanoparticles implanted into the surface of glass substrates is demonstrated, by scanning a pulsed UV laser beam across selected areas of ultra-thin metal films. The nanoparticles are incorporated beneath the surface of the glass and hence the patterns are scratch-resistant. The physical mechanisms controlling the process are investigated and we demonstrate that this technique can be used to fabricate a wide range of plasmonic optical structures such as wavelength selected diffraction gratings and high-density substrates for lab-on-chip surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.A laser direct-writing method producing high-resolution patterns of gold, silver and alloy plasmonic nanoparticles implanted into the surface of glass substrates is demonstrated, by scanning a pulsed UV laser beam across selected areas of ultra-thin metal films. The nanoparticles are incorporated beneath the surface of the glass and hence the patterns are scratch-resistant. The physical mechanisms controlling the process are investigated and we demonstrate that this technique can be used to fabricate a wide range of plasmonic optical structures such as wavelength selected diffraction gratings and high-density substrates for lab-on-chip surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33629d

  8. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  9. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Simple high-performance two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique a thin noble metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a tightly focused single nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depends on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. The plasmon...

  10. Molecular cloaking of H2A.Z on mortal DNA chromosomes during nonrandom segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yang Hoon; Sherley, James L

    2011-10-01

    Although nonrandom sister chromatid segregation is a singular property of distributed stem cells (DSCs) that are responsible for renewing and repairing mature vertebrate tissues, both its cellular function and its molecular mechanism remain unknown. This situation persists in part because of the lack of facile methods for detecting and quantifying nonrandom segregating cells and for identifying chromosomes with immortal DNA strands, the cellular molecules that signify nonrandom segregation. During nonrandom segregation, at each mitosis, asymmetrically self-renewing DSCs continuously cosegregate to themselves the set of chromosomes that contain immortal DNA strands, which are the oldest DNA strands. Here, we report the discovery of a molecular asymmetry between segregating sets of immortal chromosomes and opposed mortal chromosomes (i.e., containing the younger set of DNA template strands) that constitutes a new convenient biomarker for detection of cells undergoing nonrandom segregation and direct delineation of chromosomes that bear immortal DNA strands. In both cells engineered with DSC-specific properties and ex vivo-expanded mouse hair follicle stem cells, the histone H2A variant H2A.Z shows specific immunodetection on immortal DNA chromosomes. Cell fixation analyses indicate that H2A.Z is present on mortal chromosomes as well but is cloaked from immunodetection, and the cloaking entity is acid labile. The H2A.Z chromosomal asymmetry produced by molecular cloaking provides a first direct assay for nonrandom segregation and for chromosomes with immortal DNA strands. It also seems likely to manifest an important aspect of the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation in DSCs.

  11. Gap Surface Plasmon Waveguide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic waveguides supporting gap surface plasmons (GSPs) localized in a dielectric spacer between metal films are investigated numerically and the waveguiding properties at telecommunication wavelengths are presented. Especially, we emphasize that the mode confinement can advantageously...

  12. Plasmonic components fabrication via nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A review report on nanoimprinted plasmonic components is given. The fabrication of different metal–dielectric geometries and nanostructured surfaces that support either propagating or localized surface plasmon modes is discussed. The main characteristics and advantages of the nanoimprint technolo...

  13. Pre-Cloak Comic Superheroes: Tools for the Empowerment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Fradkin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This note explores the notion of comic superheroes as tools for the empowerment of children. The author details interventions in Rwanda and Brazil, and their different usages of superheroes. With a focus on the superhero’s pre-cloak stage—the stage prior to their employing superpowers—the author offers glimpses of current work in progress to help therapists empower orphaned children. While this area of research is at an early stage, its potential among health professionals is growing. Thus the comic superhero may be more than celluloid, as health professionals learn to use his superpowers.

  14. An optimization method for the problems of thermal cloaking of material bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, G. V.; Levin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Inverse heat-transfer problems related to constructing special thermal devices such as cloaking shells, thermal-illusion or thermal-camouflage devices, and heat-flux concentrators are studied. The heatdiffusion equation with a variable heat-conductivity coefficient is used as the initial heat-transfer model. An optimization method is used to reduce the above inverse problems to the respective control problem. The solvability of the above control problem is proved, an optimality system that describes necessary extremum conditions is derived, and a numerical algorithm for solving the control problem is proposed.

  15. Hide the interior region of core-shell nanoparticles with quantum invisible cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jeng Yi

    2013-01-01

    By applying the interplay among the nodal points of partial waves, along with the concept of streamline in fluid dynamics for the probability flux, a quantum invisible cloak to the electron transport in a host semiconductor is demonstrated by simultaneously guiding the probability flux outside the core region and keeping the total scattering cross section negligible. As the probability flux vanishes in the interior region, one can embed any material inside a multiple core-shell sphere without affecting physical observables from the outside. Our results reveal the possibility to design a protection shield layer for fragile interior parts from the impact of transports of electrons.

  16. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  17. Backside configured surface plasmonic enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun, E-mail: xuejun-lu@uml.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Vaillancourt, Jarrod [Applied NanoFemto Technologies, LLC, 181 Stedman St. 2, Lowell, MA 01851 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we fabricated, measured and compared the quantum dots infrared photodetector enhancement by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures. The backside configured plasmonic structure can provide much higher device performance enhancement. Furthermore, the excitation of the surface plasmonic waves by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures was analyzed. Detailed simulation results of the electric field at different wavelength from top illumination and backside illumination were provided. The stronger electric field from the backside illumination attributed to the higher enhancement.

  18. Plasmonic SERS biosensing nanochips for DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hoan T; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Fales, Andrew M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-03-01

    The development of rapid, cost-effective DNA detection methods for molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) has been receiving increasing interest. This article reviews several DNA detection techniques based on plasmonic-active nanochip platforms developed in our laboratory over the last 5 years, including the molecular sentinel-on-chip (MSC), the multiplex MSC, and the inverse molecular sentinel-on-chip (iMS-on-Chip). DNA probes were used as the recognition elements, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used as the signal detection method. Sensing mechanisms were based on hybridization of target sequences and DNA probes, resulting in a distance change between SERS reporters and the nanochip's plasmonic-active surface. As the field intensity of the surface plasmon decays exponentially as a function of distance, the distance change in turn affects SERS signal intensity, thus indicating the presence and capture of the target sequences. Our techniques were single-step DNA detection techniques. Target sequences were detected by simple delivery of sample solutions onto DNA probe-functionalized nanochips and measuring the SERS signal after appropriate incubation times. Target sequence labeling or washing to remove unreacted components was not required, making the techniques simple, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. The usefulness of the nanochip platform-based techniques for medical diagnostics was illustrated by the detection of host genetic biomarkers for respiratory viral infection and of the dengue virus gene.

  19. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  20. Deep-UV plasmonics of indium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yasuaki; Saito, Yuika; Taguchi, Atsushi; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kawata, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Deep-UV (DUV) plasmonics can expand the possibilities of DUV-based techniques (i.e. UV lithography, UV spectroscopy, UV imaging, UV disinfection). Here we present that indium is useful for research of DUV plasmonics. According to dielectric function, indium and aluminum are low-loss, DUV plasmonic metals, of which the imaginary parts are far smaller than those of other metals (i.e. rhodium, platinum) in the DUV range. Additionally, the real parts in the whole DUV range are close to but smaller than -2, allowing efficient generation of surface plasmon polaritons on an indium or aluminum nanosphere. In comparison to aluminum, indium provides a distinctive feature for fabricating DUV-resonant substrates. It is highly apt to form a grainy deposition film on a standard, optically transparent substrate (i.e. fused silica). The surface plasmon resonance wavelength becomes promptly tailored by simply varying the deposition thickness of the films, resulting in different grain sizes. Thus, we fabricated indium-coated substrates having different plasmon resonance wavelengths by varying the deposition thicknesses from 10 to 50 nm. DUV resonance Raman scattering of adenine molecules was best enhanced using the 25 nm deposition thickness substrates by the factor of 2. Furthermore, the FDTD calculation simulated the electromagnetic field enhancement over a grainy, indium-coated fused silica substrate. Both results indicate how indium plays an indispensable role in study of DUV plasmonics.

  1. Surface Plasmon Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    The development of advanced dielectric photonic structures has enabled tremendous control over the propagation and manipulation of light. Structures such as waveguides, splitters, mixers, and resonators now play a central role in the telecommunications industry. This book will discuss an exciting new class of photonic devices, known as surface plasmon nanophotonic structures. Surface plasmons are easily accessible excitations in metals and semiconductors and involve a collective motion of the conduction electrons. These excitations can be exploited to manipulate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies ("light") in new ways that are unthinkable in conventional dielectric structures. The field of plasmon nanophotonics is rapidly developing and impacting a wide range of areas including: electronics, photonics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The book will highlight several exciting new discoveries that have been made, while providing a clear discussion of the underlying physics, the nanofabrication issues...

  2. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  3. Nonlinear organic plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fainberg, B D

    2015-01-01

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses. The bistability response of the electron-vibrational model of organic materials in the condensed phase has been demonstrated. Non-steady-state organic plasmonics enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  4. Topographical coloured plasmonic coins

    CERN Document Server

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal nanostructures for colourization has attracted a great deal of interest with the recent developments in plasmonics. However, the current top-down colourization methods based on plasmonic concepts are tedious and time consuming, and thus unviable for large-scale industrial applications. Here we show a bottom-up approach where, upon picosecond laser exposure, a full colour palette independent of viewing angle can be created on noble metals. We show that colours are related to a single laser processing parameter, the total accumulated fluence, which makes this process suitable for high throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of the laser irradiated surfaces reveal various distributions of nanoparticle sizes which control colour. Quantitative comparisons between experiments and large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations, demonstrate that colours are produced by selective absorption phenomena in heterogeneous nanoclusters. Plasmonic cluster resonances are thus fo...

  5. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  6. Embedded plasmonic nanoparticles in high refractive index TiOx matrix for photovoltaics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco

    light in ultrathin solar cells. Colloidal plasmonic oligomers are obtained following a cost-effective selfassembly strategy and incorporated in organic based cells produced using spincoating techniques in ambient air conditions. An interesting increase is observed of both external quantum efficiency...... (EQE) and short-circuit current for solar cells loaded with plasmonic oligomers compared with reference organic cells.Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the wavelength dependent EQE enhancement is a resonant process due to the increased scattering efficiency in plasmonic antennas allowed...

  7. Optical Isolator Utilizing Surface Plasmons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yuasa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of usage of surface plasmons in a new design of an integrated optical isolator has been studied. In the case of surface plasmons propagating at a boundary between a transition metal and a double-layer dielectric, there is a significant difference of optical loss for surface plasmons propagating in opposite directions. Utilizing this structure, it is feasible to fabricate a competitive plasmonic isolator, which benefits from a broad wavelength operational bandwidth and a good technological compatibility for integration into the Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC. The linear dispersion relation was derived for plasmons propagating in a multilayer magneto-optical slab.

  8. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  9. Handbook of molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Fabio Della

    2013-01-01

    While several reviews and books on surface nanophotonics and fluorescence spectroscopy are available, an updated focus on molecular plasmonics, including both theoretical methods and experimental aspects, is still lacking. This handbook is a comprehensive overview on the physics of the plasmon-emitter interaction, ranging from electromagnetism to quantum mechanics, from metal-enhanced fluorescence to surface-enhanced Raman scattering, from optical microscopy to synthesis of metal nanoparticles, filling the gap in the literature of this merging field. It allows experimentalists to have a solid

  10. Plasmonic Nanoguides and Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Modern communication systems dealing with huge amounts of data at ever increasing speed try to utilize the best aspects of electronic and optical circuits. Electronic circuits are tiny but their operation speed is limited, whereas optical circuits are extremely fast but their sizes are limited by diffraction. Waveguide components utilizing surface plasmon (SP) modes were found to combine the huge optical bandwidth and compactness of electronics, and plasmonics thereby began to be considered as the next chip-scale technology. In this book, the authors concentrate on the SP waveguide configurati

  11. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  12. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  13. In vitro colocalization of plasmonic nano-biolabels and biomolecules using plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-04-01

    An insight into the intracellular fate of theranostics is important for improving their potential in biological applications. In vivo efficacy of plasmonic theranostics depends on our ability to monitor temporal changes in their size, shape, and state of aggregation, and the identification of molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. We develop a technique which combines plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy to colocalize plasmonic scattering from metallic nanoparticles with the Raman signatures of biomolecules adsorbed on the surface of the former. Using this technique, we have colocalized biomolecules with the plasmonic scattering from silver nanoparticles in the vicinity of Escherichia coli bacteria. To prove the applicability of this setup for the measurements on mammalian cells, imaging of HEK293 cells treated with gold nanoparticles was performed. We discuss the importance of such correlated measurements over individual techniques, although the latter may lead to misinterpretation of results. Finally, with the above-mentioned examples, we have given criteria to improve the specificity of theranostics. We believe that this methodology will be considered as a prime development in the assessment of theranostics.

  14. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  15. Arbitrary Bending Plasmonic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Itai

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation, and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and non-paraxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field-scanning-optical-microscope.

  16. Neuroplasmonics: From Kretschmann configuration to plasmonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Foozieh; Hamidi, Seyedeh Mehri

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a worldwide attempt for understanding the functions of brain and nervous system has been made. Hence, various aspects of neuroscience have been investigated through different techniques. Among these techniques, neuroplasmonics as a newborn branch of this science tries to seize the realm of in vitro and in vivo neural imaging, recording and healing. Neuroplasmonics offers advantages comprising rapidity, high sensitivity, biological compatibility, label-free and real-time detection by benefiting from the sensing and thermal characteristics of surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). This paper reviews four main branches of neuroplasmonics comprising prism coupler configurations, the combination of SPR and fluorescence microscopy and methods based on nanorods and plasmonic crystals. For each division, the advantages, disadvantages and the provided facilities will be discussed in detail.

  17. Excitation of a surface plasmon with an elastomeric grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, A.; Dâna, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-07-01

    We report on a new method to excite surface plasmon polaritons on a thin metal slab surface using an elastomeric grating which is fabricated by replica molding technique. The grating is placed on the metal surface which creates a periodic perturbation on the surface matching the momentum of the incident light to that of the surface plasmon. The conformal contact between the metal surface and the elastomeric grating changes the dielectric medium periodically and allows the observation of an effective surface plasmon polariton at the metal-air and metal-polymer interfaces of the grating. To clarify the nature of the observed plasmon, comparison of the elastomeric grating with elastomeric slabs was performed with the attenuated total reflection method.

  18. Chiral nanophotonics chiral optical properties of plasmonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schäferling, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the physics behind the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures focusing on chiral aspects. It explains in detail how the geometry determines chiral near-fields and how to tailor their shape and strength. Electromagnetic fields with strong optical chirality interact strongly with chiral molecules and, therefore, can be used for enhancing the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopy techniques. Besides a short review of the latest results in the field of plasmonically enhanced enantiomer discrimination, this book introduces the concept of chiral plasmonic near-field sources for enhanced chiroptical spectroscopy. The discussion of the fundamental properties of these light sources provides the theoretical basis for further optimizations and is of interest for researchers at the intersection of nano-optics, plasmonics and stereochemistry. .

  19. Terahertz plasmonic laser radiating in an ultra-narrow beam

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chongzhao; Reno, John L; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic lasers (spasers) generate coherent surface-plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) and could be realized at subwavelength dimensions in metallic cavities for applications in nanoscale optics. Plasmonic cavities are also utilized for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which are the brightest available solid-state sources of terahertz radiation. A long standing challenge for spasers is their poor coupling to the far-field radiation. Unlike conventional lasers that could produce directional beams, spasers have highly divergent radiation patterns due to their subwavelength apertures. Here, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a new technique for implementing distributed-feedback (DFB) that is distinct from any other previously utilized DFB schemes for semiconductor lasers. The so-termed antenna-feedback scheme leads to single-mode operation in plasmonic lasers, couples the resonant SPP mode to a highly directional far-field radiation pattern, and integrates hybrid SPPs in surrounding medium into the ...

  20. The role of colloidal plasmonic nanostructures in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, C R; Honold, T; Gujar, T P; Retsch, M; Fery, A; Karg, M; Thelakkat, M

    2016-08-17

    Plasmonic particles can contribute via multiple processes to the light absorption process in solar cells. These particles are commonly introduced into organic solar cells via deposition techniques such as spin-coating or dip-coating. However, such techniques are inherently challenging to achieve homogenous surface coatings as they lack control of inter-particle spacing and particle density on larger areas. Here we introduce interface assisted colloidal self-assembly as a concept for the fabrication of well-defined macroscopic 2-dimensional monolayers of hydrogel encapsulated plasmonic gold nanoparticles. The monolayers showed a pronounced extinction in the visible wavelength range due to localized surface plasmon resonance with excellent optical homogeneity. Moreover this strategy allowed for the investigation of the potential of plasmonic monolayers at different interfaces of P3HT:PCBM based inverted organic solar cells. In general, for monolayers located anywhere underneath the active layer, the solar cell performance decreased due to parasitic absorption. However with thick active layers, where low hole mobility limited the charge transport to the top electrode, the plasmonic monolayer near that electrode spatially redistributed the light and charge generation close to the electrode led to an improved performance. This work systematically highlights the trade-offs that need to be critically considered for designing an efficient plasmonically enhanced organic solar cell.

  1. Field Enhancement in Nano Photonic Applications: Transition Metamaterials, Plasmonics and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Fatema Abdullah

    This dissertation includes four chapters. Chapter 1 contains a brief introduction to the field of nanophotonics and an overview of the topics studied and methods used in this research. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 each deal with distinct and major applications of nanophotonics. Chapter 2 focuses exclusively on metamaterials, specifically transition metamaterials were the refractive index gradually decreases from positive to negative values passing through a near zero value point along the direction of propagation. We investigate the propagation of a Gaussian beam through such materials and show for the first time that unlike the case of plain waves, Gaussian beam field enhancement near the zero refractive index is attainable for normal incident. Such materials can be used for light manipulation applications such as cloaking and field concentrators. The next chapter, Chapter 3, deals with plasmonics, the science and applications of plasmons. We study the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) of metallic Au nanotori and nanoring structures and compare their absorption as a function or orientation to that of other nanoparticles (nanospheres and nanorods), specifically for biomedical applications, especially photothermal therapy. We show that nanotori (nanorings) have higher averaged absorption for random orientations, which makes them well-suited for colloidal heating applications such as photothermal cancer therapy. Finally, in Chapter 4 we investigate methods for enhancing optical rotation in artificial chiral materials. We introduce the concept of multiscale chirality, a superposition of geometric and molecular chirality, to boost the effective chirality parameter kappa of a material and consequently its optical activity. The goal is to obtain a sufficiently high kappa to achieve an effective negative refractive index without requiring simultaneous negative values of permittivity and permeability, which are difficult to achieve at optical wavelengths. We also use

  2. Plasmonics light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are waves propagating at the interface between a metal and a dielectric and, due to their tight confinement, may be used for nanoscale control of the light propagation. Thus, photonic integrated circuits can benefit from devices using SPPs because of their highly...

  3. Photocatalysis: Plasmonic solar desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Li, Yat

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of many existing desalination technologies is questionable. Plasmon-mediated solar desalination has now been demonstrated for the first time, using an aluminium structure that absorbs photons spanning the 200 nm to 2,500 nm wavelength range, and is both cheap and 'clean'.

  4. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in plasmon-enhanced light harvesting,14 photocatalysis ,511 surface- enhanced spectroscopies,1216 optics-based sensing,1722 nonlinear optics,2326...optical response of Al nanoparticles has appeared inconsistent relative to calculated spectra, even forwell-characterized geometries. Some studies have...model- ing their optical response. These results pro- vide a method for estimating the metallic purity of aluminum nanoparticles directly from their

  5. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  6. Cathodoluminescence plasmon microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttge, M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic waves that are strongly coupled to the collective oscillation of free electrons at an interface between a dielectric and a metal. Strong confinement of the electromagnetic field and tunability of SPP dispersion allow two-dimensional optics. This

  7. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...

  8. Mathematical analysis of plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles: The full Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Habib; Ruiz, Matias; Yu, Sanghyeon; Zhang, Hai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we use the full Maxwell equations for light propagation in order to analyze plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles. We mathematically define the notion of plasmonic resonance and analyze its shift and broadening with respect to changes in size, shape, and arrangement of the nanoparticles, using the layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations. We present an effective medium theory for resonant plasmonic systems and derive a condition on the volume fraction under which the Maxwell-Garnett theory is valid at plasmonic resonances.

  9. Experimental validation of an ultra-thin metasurface cloak for hiding a metallic obstacle from an antenna radiation at low frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teperik, Tatiana V.; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; de Lustrac, André; Sabanowski, Guy; Piau, Gérard-Pascal

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate numerically and experimentally an ultra-thin (≈ λ/240) metasurface-based invisibility cloak for low frequency antenna applications. We consider a monopole antenna mounted on a ground plane and a cylindrical metallic obstacle of diameter smaller than the wavelength located in its near-field. To restore the intrinsic radiation patterns of the antenna perturbed by this obstacle, a metasurface cloak consisting simply of a metallic patch printed on a dielectric substrate is wrapped around the obstacle. Using a finite element method based commercial electromagnetic solver, we show that the radiation patterns of the monopole antenna can be restored completely owing to electromagnetic modes of the resonant cavity formed between the patch and obstacle. The metasurface cloak is fabricated, and the concept is experimentally demonstrated at 125 MHz. Performed measurements are in good agreement with numerical simulations, verifying the efficiency of the proposed cloak.

  10. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  11. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Dominic; Carrier, Dominic; Jiménez, Alvaro; Beauvais, Jacques; Dubowski, Jan J

    2011-05-17

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  12. Ultrafast Surface Plasmonic Switch in Non-Plasmonic Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Bévillon, E; Recoules, V; Zhang, H; Li, C; Stoian, R

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast carrier excitation can drastically affect electronic structures and induce brief surface plasmonic response in non-plasmonic metals, potentially creating a plasmonic switch. Using first-principles molecular dynamics and Kubo-Greenwood formalism for laser-excited tungsten we show that carrier heating mobilizes d electrons into collective inter and intraband transitions leading to a sign flip in the imaginary optical conductivity, activating plasmonic properties for the initial non-plasmonic phase. The drive for the optical evolution can be visualized as an increasingly damped quasi-resonance at visible frequencies for pumping carriers across a chemical potential located in a d-band pseudo-gap with energy-dependent degree of occupation. The subsequent evolution of optical indices for the excited material is confirmed by time-resolved ultrafast ellipsometry. The large optical tunability extends the existence spectral domain of surface plasmons in ranges typically claimed in laser se...

  13. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage Dominic; Carrier Dominic; Jiménez Alvaro; Beauvais Jacques; Dubowski Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral r...

  14. Plasmon-Exciton-Polariton Lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I; Feist, Johannes; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J; Gómez-Rivas, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of Frenkel excitons with surface plasmons leads to the formation of bosonic quasi-particles known as plasmon-exciton-polaritons (PEPs).Localized surface plasmons in nanoparticles are lossy due to radiative and nonradiative decays, which has hampered the realization of polariton lasing in a plasmonic system, i.e., PEP lasing. These losses can be reduced in collective plasmonic resonances supported by arrays of nanoparticles. Here we demonstrate PEP lasing in arrays of silver nanoparticles by showing the emergence of a threshold in the photoluminescence accompanied by both a superlinear increase of the emission and spectral narrowing. We also observe a reduction of the threshold by increasing the coupling between the molecular excitons and the resonances supported by the array despite the reduction of the quantum efficiency of the emitters. The coexistence of bright and dark collective modes in this plasmonic system allows for a 90?-change of polarization in the emission beyond the threshold.

  15. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Jin, M. L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized surface plasmon resonance effect is obtained. These plasmonic microcapsules can be engineered and modified by nanoparticle size and the metal film thickness. Repeatable Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scatte...

  16. Objects cloaking in LWIR region by using a high efficiency infrared pixel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article, introduces a new pixel which can emit infrared wavelengths from its surface and can be used for the purpose of cloaking objects from thermal cameras. This pixel can simulate the temperatures between 0 and 100ºC emited from an infrared radiation in LWIR (8-12 micrometres region. Nanocomposite material is used in the pixel structure and this has increased its capacities like ZT factor %40-50 better than the commercial material like Bi2Te3. Technical aspects of the pixel such as the emission wavelengths, rate of temperature changing, thermal contrast, ZT factor and so on are discussed in this paper and were determined by using thermography, non-contact thermometry, radiometry, four probe ac method and temperature differential

  17. The man in the scarlet cloak. The mysterious death of Peter Anthony Motteux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, W B

    1991-09-01

    Peter Anthony Motteux (1663-1718), a Huguenot refugee in London, established a literary reputation by completing Sir Thomas Urquhart's translation of Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel, then Cervantes' Don Quixote. He later became an import-export merchant. On his 55th birthday he donned his scarlet cloak and went out on the town. He picked up a prostitute and after some dalliance returned to her bordello. Shortly thereafter he was found dead, although the evidence is that he was in good health when he arrived. Literary evidence is that he died from assisted erotic asphyxia, a variant of autoerotic asphyxia, cf. the case of Frantisek Koczwara (Am J Forensic Med Pathol 5:145-149, 1984.)

  18. T-matrix method in plasmonics: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2013-07-01

    Optical properties of isolated and coupled plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are of great interest for many applications in nanophotonics, nanobiotechnology, and nanomedicine owing to rapid progress in fabrication, characterization, and surface functionalization technologies. To simulate optical responses from plasmonic nanostructures, various electromagnetic analytical and numerical methods have been adapted, tested, and used during the past two decades. Currently, the most popular numerical techniques are those that do not suffer from geometrical and composition limitations, e.g., the discrete dipole approximation (DDA), the boundary (finite) element method (BEM, FEM), the finite difference time domain method (FDTDM), and others. However, the T-matrix method still has its own niche in plasmonic science because of its great numerical efficiency, especially for systems with randomly oriented particles and clusters. In this review, I consider the application of the T-matrix method to various plasmonic problems, including dipolar, multipolar, and anisotropic properties of metal NPs; sensing applications; surface enhanced Raman scattering; optics of 1D-3D nanoparticle assemblies; plasmonic particles and clusters near and on substrates; and manipulation of plasmonic NPs with laser tweezers.

  19. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  20. Plasmonic substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbing; Zhao, Xinchu; Yi, Zhifeng; Glushenkov, Alexey M; Kong, Lingxue

    2017-09-01

    As an advanced analytical tool, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has broad applications in identification of colorants in paints and glazes, hazard detection to ensure food safety, biomedicine and diagnosis, environmental monitoring, detection of explosives and forensic science. In this review, main types of plasmonic substrates, which include solid substrate with metallic nanostructures and chemically synthesized noble metal colloids, and their fabrication methods are reviewed. The design principles for fabrication of ultrasensitive plasmonic substrates for SERS are presented on the basis of published literature. Finally, various applications of SERS substrates are described, indicating the potential of this technique in practical applications. As an ultrasensitive detection method, SERS is at the core of a rapidly expanding research field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bloch oscillations in plasmonic waveguide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, A; Etrich, C; Limboeck, T; Bleckmann, F; Soergel, E; Rockstuhl, C; Linden, S

    2014-05-12

    The combination of modern nanofabrication techniques and advanced computational tools has opened unprecedented opportunities to mold the flow of light. In particular, discrete photonic structures can be designed such that the resulting light dynamics mimics quantum mechanical condensed matter phenomena. By mapping the time-dependent probability distribution of an electronic wave packet to the spatial light intensity distribution in the corresponding photonic structure, the quantum mechanical evolution can be visualized directly in a coherent, yet classical wave environment. On the basis of this approach, several groups have recently observed discrete diffraction, Bloch oscillations and Zener tunnelling in different dielectric structures. Here we report the experimental observation of discrete diffraction and Bloch oscillations of surface plasmon polaritons in evanescently coupled plasmonic waveguide arrays. The effective external potential is tailored by introducing an appropriate transverse index gradient during nanofabrication of the arrays. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with numerical calculations.

  2. Imprinting localized plasmons for enhanced solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Ricky B; Pfadler, Thomas; Lal, Niraj N; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2012-09-28

    Imprinted silver nanovoid arrays are investigated via angle-resolved reflectometry to demonstrate their suitability for plasmonic light trapping. Both wavelength- and subwavelength-scale nanovoids are imprinted into standard solar cell architectures to achieve nanostructured metallic electrodes which provide enhanced absorption for improving solar cell performance. The technique is versatile, low-cost and scalable and can be applied to a wide range of organic semiconductors. Absorption features which are independent of incident polarization and weakly dependent on incident angle reveal localized plasmonic modes at the structured interface. Metallic nanostructure-PCPDTBT:PCBM samples demonstrate absorption enhancements of up to 40%. The structured interface provides light trapping, which boosts absorption at wavelengths where the semiconductors absorb poorly.

  3. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Biosensing with Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Janner, Davide; Etezadi, Dordaneh; de Abajo, F Javier García; Pruneri, Valerio; Altug, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric size molecules. Here, we exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically-specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene, up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals, produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.

  4. A Phase-Conjugate-Mirror Inspired Approach for Building Cloaking Structures with Left-handed Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoan; Heng, Xin; Yang, Changhuei

    2009-01-01

    A phase conjugate mirror (PCM) has a remarkable property of cancellation the back-scattering wave of the lossless scatterers. The similarity of a phase conjugate mirror to the interface of a matched RHM (right-handed material) and a LHM (left-handed material) prompts us to explore the potentials of using the RHM-LHM structure to achieve the anti-scattering property of the PCM. In this paper, we present two such structures. The first one is a RHM-LHM cloaking structure with a lossless arbitrary-shape scatterer imbedded in the RHM and its left-handed duplicate imbedded in the matched LHM. It is shown that such a structure is transparent to the incident electromagnetic (EM) field. As a special case of this structure, we proposed an EM tunnel that allows EM waves to spatially transport to another location in space without significant distortion and reflection. The second one is an RHM-PEC (perfect electric conductor)-LHM cloaking structure, which is composed of a symmetric conducting shell embedded in the interface junction of an RHM and the matched LHM layer. Such a structure presents an anomalously small scattering cross-section to an incident propagating EM field, and the interior of the shell can be used to shield small objects (size comparable to the wavelength) from interrogation. We report the results of 2D finite-element-method (FEM) simulations that were performed to verify our idea, and discuss the unique properties of the proposed structures as well as their limitations.

  5. Searching for better plasmonic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, P.; Ishii, S.; Naik, G.;

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonics is a research area merging the fields of optics and nanoelectronics by confining light with relatively large free-space wavelength to the nanometer scale - thereby enabling a family of novel devices. Current plasmonic devices at telecommunication and optical frequencies face significant...... challenges due to losses encountered in the constituent plasmonic materials. These large losses seriously limit the practicality of these metals for many novel applications. This paper provides an overview of alternative plasmonic materials along with motivation for each material choice and important aspects...

  6. An Introduction to Graphene Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, P.A.D.; Peres, N. M. R.

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving...... the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field....

  7. Ion-beam assisted laser fabrication of sensing plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Gurbatov, Stanislav; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Milichko, Valentin; Makarov, Sergey; Kudryashov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Simple high-performance, two-stage hybrid technique was developed for fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures, including nanorods, nanorings, as well as more complex structures on glass substrates. In this technique, a thin noble-metal film on a dielectric substrate is irradiated by a single tightly focused nanosecond laser pulse and then the modified region is slowly polished by an accelerated argon ion (Ar+) beam. As a result, each nanosecond laser pulse locally modifies the initial metal film through initiation of fast melting and subsequent hydrodynamic processes, while the following Ar+-ion polishing removes the rest of the film, revealing the hidden topography features and fabricating separate plasmonic structures on the glass substrate. We demonstrate that the shape and lateral size of the resulting functional plasmonic nanostructures depend on the laser pulse energy and metal film thickness, while subsequent Ar+-ion polishing enables to vary height of the resulting nanostructures. Plasmonic properties of the fabricated nanostructures were characterized by dark-field micro-spectroscopy, Raman and photoluminescence measurements performed on single nanofeatures, as well as by supporting numerical calculations of the related electromagnetic near-fields and Purcell factors. The developed simple two-stage technique represents a new step towards direct large-scale laser-induced fabrication of highly ordered arrays of complex plasmonic nanostructures.

  8. Nonlinear plasmonic antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeeb Bin Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to traditional optical elements, plasmonic antennas made from nanostructured metals permit the localization of electromagnetic fields on length scales much smaller than the wavelength of light. This results in huge amplitudes for the electromagnetic field close to the antenna being conducive for the observation of nonlinear effects already at moderate pump powers. Thus, these antennas exhibit a promising potential to achieve optical frequency conversion and all-optical control of light at the nano-scale. This opens unprecedented opportunities for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, sensing devices, on-chip optical frequency conversion, nonlinear optical metamaterials, and novel photon sources. Here, we review some of the recent advances in exploiting the potential of plasmonic antennas to realize robust nonlinear applications.

  9. Surface Plasmon Singularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Martínez-Niconoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to compare the physical features of the electromagnetic field, we describe the synthesis of optical singularities propagating in the free space and on a metal surface. In both cases the electromagnetic field has a slit-shaped curve as a boundary condition, and the singularities correspond to a shock wave that is a consequence of the curvature of the slit curve. As prototypes, we generate singularities that correspond to fold and cusped regions. We show that singularities in free space may generate bifurcation effects while plasmon fields do not generate these kinds of effects. Experimental results for free-space propagation are presented and for surface plasmon fields, computer simulations are shown.

  10. Functionalization of Gold-plasmonic Devices for Protein Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Battista, E.

    2017-07-13

    Here we propose a straightforward method to functionalize gold nanostructures by using an appropriate peptide sequence already selected toward gold surfaces and derivatized with another sequence for the capture of a molecular target. Large scale 3D-plasmonic devices with different nanostructures were fabricated by means of direct nanoimprint technique. The present work is aimed to address different innovative aspects related to the fabrication of large-area 3D plasmonic arrays, their direct and easy functionalization with capture elements, and their spectroscopic verifications through enhanced Raman and enhanced fluorescence techniques.

  11. Polarization interferometry for real-time spectroscopic plasmonic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Lauren M.; Mohr, Daniel A.; Johnson, Timothy W.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Lindquist, Nathan C.

    2015-02-01

    We present quantitative, spectroscopic polarization interferometry phase measurements on plasmonic surfaces for sensing applications. By adding a liquid crystal variable wave plate in our beam path, we are able to measure phase shifts due to small refractive index changes on the sensor surface. By scanning in a quick sequence, our technique is extended to demonstrate real-time measurements. While this optical technique is applicable to different sensor geometries--e.g., nanoparticles, nanogratings, or nanoapertures--the plasmonic sensors we use here consist of an ultrasmooth gold layer with buried linear gratings. Using these devices and our phase measurement technique, we calculate a figure of merit that shows improvement over measuring only surface plasmon resonance shifts from a reflected intensity spectrum. To demonstrate the general-purpose versatility of our phase-resolved measurements, we also show numerical simulations with another common device architecture: periodic plasmonic slits. Since our technique inherently measures both the intensity and phase of the reflected or transmitted light simultaneously, quantitative sensor device characterization is possible.We present quantitative, spectroscopic polarization interferometry phase measurements on plasmonic surfaces for sensing applications. By adding a liquid crystal variable wave plate in our beam path, we are able to measure phase shifts due to small refractive index changes on the sensor surface. By scanning in a quick sequence, our technique is extended to demonstrate real-time measurements. While this optical technique is applicable to different sensor geometries--e.g., nanoparticles, nanogratings, or nanoapertures--the plasmonic sensors we use here consist of an ultrasmooth gold layer with buried linear gratings. Using these devices and our phase measurement technique, we calculate a figure of merit that shows improvement over measuring only surface plasmon resonance shifts from a reflected intensity

  12. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  13. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  14. Linear and Nonlinear Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Capretti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the present Thesis, the electromagnetic properties of metal nanostructures are theoretically and experimentally investigated, for applications ranging from chemical sensing to integrated optical devices. Collective resonances of the conduction electrons occur on the surface of metal particles with nanoscale sizes, if visible or infrared light interacts with them. These resonances, usually referred to as Localized Surface Plasmons (LSPs), are able to confine the incident light into regions...

  15. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  16. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  17. Terahertz plasmonic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Padilla, Willie J; Basov, Dimitri N; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Bruzewicz, Derek; Whitesides, George

    2007-03-01

    The dielectric response of a polymer matrix composite can be substantially modified and tuned within a broad frequency band by integrating within the material an artificial plasmon medium composed of periodically distributed, very thin, electrically conducting wires. In the microwave regime, such plasmon/polymer composites have been studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. This work reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of similar composites for operation at terahertz frequencies. Such composites require significant reduction in the thickness and spacing of the wires. We used numerical modeling to design artificial effective plasmonic media with turn-on frequencies in the terahertz range. Prototype samples were produced by lithographically embedding very thin gold strips into a PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] matrix. These samples were characterized with a Fourier-transform infrared interferometer using the frequency-dependent transmission and Kramers-Kronig relations to determine the electromagnetic properties. We report the characterization results for a sample, demonstrating excellent agreement between theory, computer design, and experiment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the possibility of creating composites with tuned dielectric response at terahertz frequencies.

  18. Plasmonic optical nanotweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Rehab; El Maklizi, Mahmoud; Ismail, Yehea; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic grating structures can be used in many applications such as nanolithography and optical trapping. In this paper, we used plasmonic grating as optical tweezers to trap and manipulate dielectric nano-particles. Different plasmonic grating structures with single, double, and triple slits have been investigated and analyzed. The three configurations are optimized and compared to find the best candidate to trap and manipulate nanoparticles. The three optimized structures results in capability to super focusing and beaming the light effectively beyond the diffraction limit. A high transverse gradient optical force is obtained using the triple slit configuration that managed to significantly enhance the field and its gradient. Therefore, it has been chosen as an efficient optical tweezers. This structure managed to trap sub10nm particles efficiently. The resultant 50KT potential well traps the nano particles stably. The proposed structure is used also to manipulate the nano-particles by simply changing the angle of the incident light. We managed to control the movement of nano particle over an area of (5μm x 5μm) precisely. The proposed structure has the advantage of trapping and manipulating the particles outside the structure (not inside the structure such as the most proposed optical tweezers). As a result, it can be used in many applications such as drug delivery and biomedical analysis.

  19. Graphene plasmonics: physics and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shenyang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon in graphene possesses many unique properties. It originates from the collective motion of massless Dirac fermions, and the carrier density dependence is distinctively different from conventional plasmons. In addition, graphene plasmon is highly tunable and shows strong energy confinement capability. Most intriguingly, as an atom-thin layer, graphene and its plasmon are very sensitive to the immediate environment. Graphene plasmons strongly couple to polar phonons of the substrate, molecular vibrations of the adsorbates, and lattice vibrations of other atomically thin layers. In this review, we present the most important advances in graphene plasmonics field. The topics include terahertz plasmons, mid-infrared plasmons, plasmon-phonon interactions, and potential applications. Graphene plasmonics opens an avenue for reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces; it is an exciting and promising new subject in the nanophotonics and plasmonics research field.

  20. Tunable Omnidirectional Surface Plasmon Resonance in Cylindrical Plasmonic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; WANG Bing; ZHOU Zhi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ The tunable omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance in the optical range is theoretically demonstrated in a cylindrical plasmonic crystal by using rigorous coupled-wave analysis.The cylindrical plasmonic crystal consists of an infinite chain of two-dimensional cylindrical metal-dielectric-dielectric-metal structures.The dispersion relation of the cylindrical plasmonic crystal is obtained by calculating the absorptance as a function of a TM-polarized incident plane wave and its in-plane wave vector.The omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance can be tuned from UV region to visible region by adjusting the thickness of the cylindrical dielectric layers.The absorption spectrum of the infinite chain of nanocylinders is also investigated for comparison.

  1. Nonlinear plasmonic amplification via dissipative soliton-plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a strategy for the compensation of plasmonic losses based on a recently proposed nonlinear mechanism: the resonant interaction between surface plasmon polaritons and spatial solitons propagating in parallel along a metal/dielectric/Kerr structure. This mechanism naturally leads to the generation of a quasiparticle excitation, the so-called soliplasmon resonance. We analyze the role played by the effective nonlinear coupling inherent to this system and how this can be used to provide a mechanism of quasiresonant nonlinear excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We will pay particular attention to the introduction of asymmetric linear gain in the Kerr medium. The unique combination of nonlinear propagation, nonlinear coupling, and gain give rise to a scenario for the excitation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons with distinguishing characteristics. The connection between plasmonic losses and soliplasmon resonances in the presence of gain will be discussed.

  2. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  3. Interference effects with surface plasmons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmin, Nikolay Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon is a purely two-dimensional electromagnetic excitation bound to the interface between metal and dielectric and quickly decaying away from it. A surface plasmon is able to concentrate light on sub-wavelength scales – a feature that is attractive for nano-photonics and integrated

  4. Photothermal modification of plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a method for geometrically modifying plasmonic structures on a support structure, such as for printing or recording, said method comprising changing a geometry specifically of plasmonic structures, wherein said changing the geometry is carried out by photothermally melting...

  5. 应用超常介质设计柱形隐形容器%Design Column Cloak Using Metamaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马越界; 黄建平; 孙文波; 刘德全

    2012-01-01

    Melamaterial, a kind of artificial material composed by nanometer units, can be controlled permittivity and permeability at the same time. Taking advantage of this finding, we can adjust the transmission of light We used the approach of transformation optics and calculated out the permittivity and permeability of Metamaterial cloak in the condition of cylindrical and elliptical cylinder, to make sure the light along the specific trajectory and spread around the cloak, then outgoing along the direction of the incident radiatioa In this way, the information inside the cloak can not be divulged.%超常介质是一种纳米尺度的人工复合材料,可以同时设定材料的介电常数和磁导率.利用超常介质的这一特性,能够自由地调整光的传播路径.在此基础上,应用坐标转换的方法,计算出圆柱形和椭圆柱形的介电常数和磁导率分布.让光在介质内沿着特定的轨迹传播,绕过包围的空腔,沿入射的方向出射,从而实现圆柱和椭圆柱形状的隐形.

  6. Partial Polarization in Interfered Plasmon Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martínez Vara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the polarization features for plasmon fields generated by the interference between two elemental surface plasmon modes, obtaining a set of Stokes parameters which allows establishing a parallelism with the traditional polarization model. With the analysis presented, we find the corresponding coherence matrix for plasmon fields incorporating to the plasmon optics the study of partial polarization effects.

  7. Active components for integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasavin, A.V.; Bolger, P.M.; Zayats, A.V.;

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides.......We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides....

  8. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered...... with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic...... waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics....

  9. Plasmonic percolation: Plasmon-manifested dielectric-to-metal transition

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huanjun

    2012-08-28

    Percolation generally refers to the phenomenon of abrupt variations in electrical, magnetic, or optical properties caused by gradual volume fraction changes of one component across a threshold in bicomponent systems. Percolation behaviors have usually been observed in macroscopic systems, with most studies devoted to electrical percolation. We report on our observation of plasmonic percolation in Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures. When the Pd volume fraction in the shell consisting of palladium and water approaches the plasmonic percolation threshold, ∼70%, the plasmon of the nanostructure transits from red to blue shifts with respect to that of the unshelled Au nanorod. This plasmonic percolation behavior is also confirmed by the scattering measurements on the individual core-shell nanostructures. Quasistatic theory and numerical simulations show that the plasmonic percolation originates from a positive-to-negative transition in the real part of the dielectric function of the shell as the Pd volume fraction is increased. The observed plasmonic percolation is found to be independent of the metal type in the shell. Moreover, compared to the unshelled Au nanorods with similar plasmon wavelengths, the Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures exhibit larger refractive index sensitivities, which is ascribed to the expulsion of the electric field intensity from the Au nanorod core by the adsorbed Pd nanoparticles. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...... and breaking. DLC coating with thicknesses between 25 and 105 nm is found to considerably increase the mechanical strength of the substrates while at the same time ensuring conservation of sufficient field enhancements of the gold plasmonic substrates....

  11. Plasmonic-Enhanced Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    photocurrent on a chemically modified gold thin film of metal- semiconductor (TiO2) Schottky diodes. • Intrinsic correlation between the hot electron flow...Surface Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Flow Probed with Metal- semiconductor Nanodiodes,” Y. K. Lee, C. H. Jung, J. Park, H. Seo, G. A. Somorjai, J. Park. Nano... Photocatalytic Activity of Iron Oxide on Gold Nanopillars,” H. Gao, C. Liu, H. E. Jeong, P. Yang, ACS Nano. 6, 234, 2012. “Ag Nanoparticle-Alumina Hybrid

  12. Efficient design, accurate fabrication and effective characterization of plasmonic quasicrystalline arrays of nano-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Farhad A.; Yuwen, Yu A.; Liu, Liu; Panaretos, Anastasios H.; Werner, Douglas H.; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the scattering properties of two-dimensional quasicrystalline plasmonic lattices are investigated. We combine a newly developed synthesis technique, which allows for accurate fabrication of spherical nanoparticles, with a recently published variation of generalized multiparticle Mie theory to develop the first quantitative model for plasmonic nano-spherical arrays based on quasicrystalline morphologies. In particular, we study the scattering properties of Penrose and Ammann- Beenker gold spherical nanoparticle array lattices. We demonstrate that by using quasicrystalline lattices, one can obtain multi-band or broadband plasmonic resonances which are not possible in periodic structures. Unlike previously published works, our technique provides quantitative results which show excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  13. Thermo-plasmonic manipulation of living cyanobacteria on a gold nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Shota; Shoji, Tatsuya; Wakisaka, Yumi; Murakoshi, Kei; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel manipulation technique for living cyanobacteria on a plasmonic substrate. Upon plasmon excitation, a local temperature around the excitation area was elevated, leading to a microbubble formation in water. Subsequently, living cyanobacteria were transported to the microbubble by a thermal convection. The cyanobacteria were permanently fixed on the area even after switching off the plasmon excitation. We found that about a half of the fixed cyanobacteria were alive. We succeeded in a micro-ring pattern of living cyanobacteria by the technique.

  14. Grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance in conical mounting with polarization modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, G; Romanato, F

    2012-07-01

    A grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) technique based on polarization modulation in conical mounting is presented. A metallic grating is azimuthally rotated to support double-surface plasmon polariton excitation and exploit the consequent sensitivity enhancement. Corresponding to the resonance polar angle, a polarization scan of incident light is performed, and reflectivity data are collected before and after functionalization with a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. The output signal exhibits a harmonic dependence on polarization, and the phase term is used as a parameter for sensing. This technique offers the possibility of designing extremely compact, fast, and cheap high-resolution plasmonic sensors based on GCSPR.

  15. Chiral near fields generated from plasmonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic fields are usually considered non-chiral because of the transverse magnetic polarization of surface plasmon modes. We however show here that plasmonic lattices built from coherent superpositions of surface plasmons can generate optical chirality in the interfering near field. We reveal in particular the emergence of plasmonic potentials relevant to the generation of near-field chiral forces. This draws promising perspectives for performing enantiomeric separation schemes within the near field.

  16. Active Molecular Plasmonics: Controlling Plasmon Resonances with Molecular Switches

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2009-02-11

    A gold nanodisk array, coated with bistable, redox-controllable [2]rotaxane molecules, when exposed to chemical oxidants and reductants, undergoes switching of its plasmonic properties reversibly. By contrast, (i) bare gold nanodisks and (ii) disks coated with a redox-active, but mechanically inert, control compound do not display surface-plasmon-based switching. Along with calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory, these experimental observations suggest that the nanoscale movements within surface-bound “molecular machines” can be used as the active components in plasmonic devices.

  17. Surface plasmon polariton propagation in organic nanofiber based plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Lemke, Christoph; Jauernik, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic wave packet propagation is monitored in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides realized from para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited onto a 60 nm thick gold film. Using interferometric time resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy we are able to determine...... phase and group velocity of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waveguiding mode (0.967c and 0.85c at λLaser = 812nm) as well as the effective propagation length (39 μm) along the fiber-gold interface. We furthermore observe that the propagation properties of the SPP waveguiding mode are governed...

  18. Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acar, H.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. Thes

  19. Investigation of nanogap localized field enhancement in gold plasmonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Bauman, Stephen; Saylor, Cameron; Novak, Eric; French, David; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Nanogaps between plasmonic structures allow confining the localized electric field with moreenhancements. Based on previously implemented two-step lithography process, we introducea nano-masking technique to fabricate nanostructrues and nanogaps for various geometrical patterns. This new method can fabricate gold nanostructures as well as nanogaps that are less than 10nm, below the limiting scale of lithography. Simulation from finite element method (FEM) shows strong gap dependence of optical properties and peak enhancement of these devices. The fabricated plasmonic nanostructure provides wide range of potential future application including highly sensitive optical antenna, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and biosensing.

  20. Two-photon quantum interference in plasmonics: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S Dutta; Agarwal, G S

    2014-01-15

    We report perfect two-photon quantum interference with near-unity visibility in a resonant tunneling plasmonic structure in folded Kretschmann geometry. This is despite absorption-induced loss of unitarity in plasmonic systems. The effect is traced to perfect destructive interference between the squares of amplitude reflection and transmission coefficients. We further highlight yet another remarkable potential of coincidence measurements as a probe with better resolution as compared to standard spectroscopic techniques. The finer features show up in both angle resolved and frequency resolved studies.

  1. Channel plasmon-polaritons: modal shape, dispersion, and losses

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, E; García-Vidal, F J; Martín-Moreno, L; Rodrigo, S G; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Moreno, Esteban; Rodrigo, Sergio G.

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically study channel plasmon-polaritons (CPPs) with a geometry similar to that in recent experiments at telecom wavelengths (Bozhevolnyi et al., Nature 440, 508 (2006)). The CPP modal shape, dispersion relation, and losses are simulated using the multiple multipole method and the finite difference time domain technique. It is shown that, with the increase of the wavelength, the fundamental CPP mode shifts progressively towards the groove opening, ceasing to be guided at the groove bottom and becoming hybridized with wedge plasmon-polaritons running along the groove edges.

  2. Application of plasmonic silver films in histology for contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevich, I. G.; Strekal, N. D.; Shulha, A. V.; Basinski, V. A.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2012-09-01

    We have studied the absorption spectra and micrographs of sections of cells of the epithelium and andenocarcinoma of the large intestine, immobilized between standard glass slides and cover glasses and plasmonic silver films. We have shown that when we use a microtome technique and specially selected plasmonic silver films, we can achieve enhancement of the image contrast in analysis of the cell morphology as a result of the increase in the light absorption and scattering cross sections with the contrasting stains hematoxylin and eosin.

  3. Plasmonic candle: towards efficient nanofocusing with channel plasmon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, V S; Gosciniak, J; Bozhevolnyi, S I [Institute of Sensors, Signals and Electrotechnics (SENSE), University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Alle 1, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Rodrigo, S G; MartIn-Moreno, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC - Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garcia-Vidal, F J [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Devaux, E; Ebbesen, T W [ISIS, CNRS UMR 7006, Universite Louis Pasteur, 8 allee Monge, BP 70028, 67083 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: vsv@sense.sdu.dk

    2009-11-15

    Channel plasmon polaritons (CPPs) propagating along the bottom of V-grooves cut into a metal were recently shown to exhibit strong confinement combined with low propagation loss, a feature that makes this guiding configuration very promising for the realization of ultracompact photonic components. Here, we present a comprehensive study of radiation nanofocusing with CCPs propagating along subwavelength metal grooves that are terminated with various types of tapers of different lengths. Tapered V-grooves are fabricated in a gold film using a focused ion beam milling technique, with the tapering being realized by gradually decreasing the groove width and/or depth (in different way for different structures), and characterized at telecom wavelengths with a collection scanning near-field optical microscope. Efficient CPP nanofocusing is directly demonstrated featuring a field intensity enhancement of up to {approx}130 for optimal taper configurations. Experimental observations are found to be concurrent with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic simulations, predicting the possibility of reaching an intensity enhancement of {approx}1200 and opening thereby exciting perspectives for practical applications of CPP nanofocusing.

  4. Decoupling absorption and emission processes in super-resolution localization of emitters in a plasmonic hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, David L.; Cortés, Emiliano; Giannini, Vincenzo; Török, Peter; Roschuk, Tyler; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-02-01

    The absorption process of an emitter close to a plasmonic antenna is enhanced due to strong local electromagnetic (EM) fields. The emission, if resonant with the plasmonic system, re-radiates to the far-field by coupling with the antenna via plasmonic states, whose presence increases the local density of states. Far-field collection of the emission of single molecules close to plasmonic antennas, therefore, provides mixed information of both the local EM field strength and the local density of states. Moreover, super-resolution localizations from these emission-coupled events do not report the real position of the molecules. Here we propose using a fluorescent molecule with a large Stokes shift in order to spectrally decouple the emission from the plasmonic system, leaving the absorption strongly resonant with the antenna's enhanced EM fields. We demonstrate that this technique provides an effective way of mapping the EM field or the local density of states with nanometre spatial resolution.

  5. Challenges of fabricating plasmonic and photonic structures with Neon ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Fiutowski, Jacek; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    properties. We are currently studying the capabilities of focussed Helium and Neon ion beam milling for the fabricating of plasmonic and photonic devices. We found that Neon ion beam milling enables us to prepare plasmonic structures, such as trenches (see Fig. 1) and V-grooves without doping and alloying...... effects specific to Galium FIB. Neon FIB milling is superior to Helium FIB milling in terms of the processing speed and smaller levels of implanted ions. From our perspective it is the most promising technique for the fabrication of individual plasmonic devices with a few nanometers precision. The main...... presentation we show the current progress in Neon FIB milling of plasmonic structures. We compare different materials, in particular poly- and mono-crystalline gold as well as thin films of Titanium Nitride, which are commonly used for plasmonic applications....

  6. Plasmonic color tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  7. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  8. Wavelength selective uncooled infrared sensor by plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Okada, Kazuya; Fukushima, Naoki; Kimata, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    A wavelength selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensor using two-dimensional plasmonic crystals (2D PLCs) has been developed. The numerical investigation of 2D PLCs demonstrates that the wavelength of absorption can be mainly controlled by the period of the surface structure. A microelectromechanical systems-based uncooled IR sensor with 2D PLCs as the IR absorber was fabricated through a complementary metal oxide semiconductor and a micromachining technique. The selective enhancement of responsivity was observed at the wavelength that coincided with the period of the 2D-PLC absorber.

  9. Electrically driven surface plasmon nanosources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth; Wang, Tao; Le Moal, Eric; Dujardin, Gérald

    2015-03-01

    Electrical nanosources of surface plasmons will be an integral part of any future plasmonic circuits. Three different types of such nanosources (based on inelastic electron tunneling, high energy electron bombardment, and the electrical injection of a semiconductor device) are briefly described here. An example of a fundamental experiment using an electrical nanosource consisting of the tunnel junction formed between a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a metallic sample is given. In this experiment, the temporal coherence of the broadband STM-plasmon source is probed using a variant of Young's double slit experiment, and the coherence time of the broadband source is estimated to be about 5-10 fs.

  10. Femtosecond dynamics of Tamm plasmon-polaritons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afinogenov, Boris I.; Popkova, Anna A.; Bessonov, Vladimir O.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-09-01

    Tamm plasmon-polaritons (TPPs) have attracted many interest due to the peculiarities of their optical properties. TPPs are optical surface states, which can be excited at the boundary of distributed Bragg reflector and metal film. Like in case of surface plasmon-polaritons or surface electromagnetic waves excitation, the emergence of the TPP leads to the localization of the electromagnetic field near the DBR/metal interface. Experimentally, TPP can be detected by a narrow resonance in reflectance or transmittance spectrum of the DBR/metal structure. Tamm plasmon-polaritons were proposed to be used in several types of novel optical elements, such as sensors and lasers. It was also shown that TPPs can be effectively coupled with other localized states like surface plasmons and microcavity modes. In this contribution the direct measurements of the Tamm plasmon-polariton relaxation dynamics are presented. The lifetime of the TPP in one-dimensional photonic crystal is estimated experimentally and compared to the results of numerical calculations. The dependence of the lifetime on the angle of incidence and duration of the incident pulse is supported by numerical studies performed with the finite difference time-domain technique.

  11. Solar-Powered Plasmon-Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naldoni Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis uses semiconductors to convert sunlight into chemical energy. Recent reports have shown that plasmonic nanostructures can be used to extend semiconductor light absorption or to drive direct photocatalysis with visible light at their surface. In this review, we discuss the fundamental decay pathway of localized surface plasmons in the context of driving solar-powered chemical reactions. We also review different nanophotonic approaches demonstrated for increasing solar-to-hydrogen conversion in photoelectrochemical water splitting, including experimental observations of enhanced reaction selectivity for reactions occurring at the metalsemiconductor interface. The enhanced reaction selectivity is highly dependent on the morphology, electronic properties, and spatial arrangement of composite nanostructures and their elements. In addition, we report on the particular features of photocatalytic reactions evolving at plasmonic metal surfaces and discuss the possibility of manipulating the reaction selectivity through the activation of targeted molecular bonds. Finally, using solar-to-hydrogen conversion techniques as an example, we quantify the efficacy metrics achievable in plasmon-driven photoelectrochemical systems and highlight some of the new directions that could lead to the practical implementation of solar-powered plasmon-based catalytic devices.

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  13. Single-Molecule Detection in Nanogap-Embedded Plasmonic Gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce nanogap-embedded silver plasmonic gratings for single-molecule (SM visualization using an epifluorescence microscope. This silver plasmonic platform was fabricated by a cost-effective nano-imprint lithography technique, using an HD DVD template. DNA/ RNA duplex molecules tagged with Cy3/Cy5 fluorophores were immobilized on SiO 2 -capped silver gratings. Light was coupled to the gratings at particular wavelengths and incident angles to form surface plasmons. The SM fluorescence intensity of the fluorophores at the nanogaps showed approximately a 100-fold mean enhancement with respect to the fluorophores observed on quartz slides using an epifluorescence microscope. This high level of enhancement was due to the concentration of surface plasmons at the nanogaps. When nanogaps imaged with epifluorescence mode were compared to quartz imaged using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy, more than a 30-fold mean enhancement was obtained. Due to the SM fluorescence enhancement of plasmonic gratings and the correspondingly high emission intensity, the required laser power can be reduced, resulting in a prolonged detection time prior to photobleaching. This simple platform was able to perform SM studies with a low-cost epifluorescence apparatus, instead of the more expensive TIRF or confocal microscopes, which would enable SM analysis to take place in most scientific laboratories.

  14. Solar-Powered Plasmon-Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldoni, Alberto; Riboni, Francesca; Guler, Urcan; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2016-06-01

    Photocatalysis uses semiconductors to convert sunlight into chemical energy. Recent reports have shown that plasmonic nanostructures can be used to extend semiconductor light absorption or to drive direct photocatalysis with visible light at their surface. In this review, we discuss the fundamental decay pathway of localized surface plasmons in the context of driving solar-powered chemical reactions. We also review different nanophotonic approaches demonstrated for increasing solar-to-hydrogen conversion in photoelectrochemical water splitting, including experimental observations of enhanced reaction selectivity for reactions occurring at the metalsemiconductor interface. The enhanced reaction selectivity is highly dependent on the morphology, electronic properties, and spatial arrangement of composite nanostructures and their elements. In addition, we report on the particular features of photocatalytic reactions evolving at plasmonic metal surfaces and discuss the possibility of manipulating the reaction selectivity through the activation of targeted molecular bonds. Finally, using solar-to-hydrogen conversion techniques as an example, we quantify the efficacy metrics achievable in plasmon-driven photoelectrochemical systems and highlight some of the new directions that could lead to the practical implementation of solar-powered plasmon-based catalytic devices.

  15. Harmonics radiation of graphene surface plasmon polaritons in terahertz regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Nakajima, M.; Hashida, M.; Wei, Y.; Miyamoto, S.

    2016-06-01

    This letter presents an approach to extract terahertz radiation from surface plasmon polaritons excited in the surface of a uniform graphene structure by an electron beam. A sidewall configuration is proposed to lift the surface plasmon mode to be close to the light line, so that some of its harmonics have chances to go above the light line and become radiative. The harmonics are considered to be excited by a train of periodic electron bunches. The physical mechanism in this scheme is analyzed with three-dimensional theory, and the harmonics excitation and radiation are demonstrated through numerical calculations. The results show that this technique could be an alternative to transform the surface plasmon polaritons into radiation.

  16. Plasmonic Nanoparticle Networks for Light and Heat Concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchot, Audrey; Marty, Renaud; Arbouet, Arnaud; Quidant, Romain; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle Networks (PNN) composed of chains of 12-nm diameter crystalline gold nanoparticles exhibit a longitudinally coupled plasmon mode cen- tered at 700 nm. We have exploited this longitudinal absorption band to efficiently confine light fields and concentrate heat sources in the close vicinity of these plasmonic chain net- works. The mapping of the two phenomena on the same superstructures was performed by combining two-photon luminescence (TPL) and fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) imaging techniques. Besides the light and heat concentration, we show experimentally that the planar spatial distribution of optical field intensity can be simply modulated by controlling the linear polarization of the incident optical excitation. On the contrary, the heat production, which is obtained here by exciting the structures within the optically transparent window of biological tissues, is evenly spread over the entire PNN. This contrasts with the usual case of localized heating i...

  17. Plasmon coupling in vertical split-ring resonator metamolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pin Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chen, Wei Ting; Huang, Yao-Wei; Liao, Chun Yen; Liu, Ai Qun; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Sun, Greg; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen a number of interesting designs proposed and implemented to generate artificial magnetism at optical frequencies using plasmonic metamaterials, but owing to the planar configurations of typically fabricated metamolecules that make up the metamaterials, the magnetic response is mainly driven by the electric field of the incident electromagnetic wave. We recently fabricated vertical split-ring resonators (VSRRs) which behave as magnetic metamolecules sensitive to both incident electric and magnetic fields with stronger induced magnetic dipole moment upon excitation in comparison to planar SRRs. The fabrication technique enabled us to study the plasmon coupling between VSRRs that stand up side by side where the coupling strength can be precisely controlled by varying the gap in between. The resulting wide tuning range of these resonance modes offers the possibility of developing frequency selective functional devices such as sensors and filters based on plasmon coupling with high sensitivity. PMID:26043931

  18. Plasmon-enhanced emission from single fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donehue, Jessica E.; Haas, Beth L.; Wertz, Esther; Talicska, Courtney N.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we use evaporated gold nanoparticle films (GNPFs) as substrates for plasmon-enhanced imaging of two fluorescent proteins (FPs): mCherry and YFP. Through single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy, we show enhancement of single FP emission in the presence of GNPFs. The gold-coupled FPs demonstrate emission up to four times brighter and seven times longer lived, yielding order-of-magnitude enhancements in total photons detected. Ultimately, this results in increased localization accuracies for single-molecule imaging. Furthermore, we introduce preliminary results for enhancement of mCherry-labeled TcpP membrane proteins inside live Vibrio cholerae cells coupled to GNPFs. Our work indicates that plasmonic substrates are uniquely advantageous for super-resolution imaging and that plasmon-enhanced imaging is a promising technique for improving live cell single-molecule microscopy.

  19. Nonlinear Phase Control and Anomalous Phase Matching in Plasmonic Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Euclides; Prior, Yehiam

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces, and in particular those containing plasmonic-based metallic elements, constitute a particularly attractive set of materials. By means of modern nanolithographic fabrication techniques, flat, ultrathin optical elements may be constructed. However, in spite of their strong optical nonlinearities, plasmonic metasurfaces have so far been investigated mostly in the linear regime. Here we introduce full nonlinear phase control over plasmonic elements in metasurfaces. We show that for nonlinear interactions in a phase-gradient nonlinear metasurface a new anomalous nonlinear phase matching condition prevails, which is the nonlinear analog of the generalized Snell law demonstrated for linear metasurfaces. This phase matching condition is very different from the other known phase matching schemes. The subwavelength phase control of optical nonlinearities provides a foundation for the design of flat nonlinear optical elements based on metasurfaces. Our demonstrated flat nonlinear elements (i.e. lenses) act...

  20. Experimental observation of plasmons in a graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate graphene-plasmon polariton excitation in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The subwavelength silicon grating is fabricated by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self-assembled nanosphere array...... as a template. Measured transmission spectra illustrate the excitation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, which is further supported by numerical simulations and theoretical prediction of plasmon-band diagrams. Our grating-assisted coupling to graphene-plasmon polaritons forms an important platform for graphene...

  1. Angular plasmon response of gold nanoparticles arrays: approaching the Rayleigh limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marae-Djouda, Joseph; Caputo, Roberto; Mahi, Nabil; Lévêque, Gaëtan; Akjouj, Abdellatif; Adam, Pierre-Michel; Maurer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The regular arrangement of metal nanoparticles influences their plasmonic behavior. It has been previously demonstrated that the coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes can give rise to extremely narrow plasmon resonances. This is the case when the single-particle localized surface plasmon resonance (λLSP) is very close in value to the Rayleigh anomaly wavelength (λRA) of the nanoparticles array. In this paper, we performed angle-resolved extinction measurements on a 2D array of gold nano-cylinders designed to fulfil the condition λRA<λLSP. Varying the angle of excitation offers a unique possibility to finely modify the value of λRA, thus gradually approaching the condition of coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes. The experimental observation of a collective dipolar resonance has been interpreted by exploiting a simplified model based on the coupling of evanescent diffracted waves with plasmon modes. Among other plasmon modes, the measurement technique has also evidenced and allowed the study of a vertical plasmon mode, only visible in TM polarization at off-normal excitation incidence. The results of numerical simulations, based on the periodic Green's tensor formalism, match well with the experimental transmission spectra and show fine details that could go unnoticed by considering only experimental data.

  2. Angular plasmon response of gold nanoparticles arrays: approaching the Rayleigh limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marae-Djouda Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The regular arrangement of metal nanoparticles influences their plasmonic behavior. It has been previously demonstrated that the coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes can give rise to extremely narrow plasmon resonances. This is the case when the single-particle localized surface plasmon resonance (λLSP is very close in value to the Rayleigh anomaly wavelength (λRA of the nanoparticles array. In this paper, we performed angle-resolved extinction measurements on a 2D array of gold nano-cylinders designed to fulfil the condition λRA<λLSP. Varying the angle of excitation offers a unique possibility to finely modify the value of λRA, thus gradually approaching the condition of coupling between diffracted waves and plasmon modes. The experimental observation of a collective dipolar resonance has been interpreted by exploiting a simplified model based on the coupling of evanescent diffracted waves with plasmon modes. Among other plasmon modes, the measurement technique has also evidenced and allowed the study of a vertical plasmon mode, only visible in TM polarization at off-normal excitation incidence. The results of numerical simulations, based on the periodic Green’s tensor formalism, match well with the experimental transmission spectra and show fine details that could go unnoticed by considering only experimental data.

  3. Submentalizing or Mentalizing in a Level 1 Perspective-Taking Task: A Cloak and Goggles Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that humans possess an automatic system to represent mental states (‘implicit mentalizing’). The existence of an implicit mentalizing system has generated considerable debate however, centered on the ability of various experimental paradigms to demonstrate unambiguously such mentalizing. Evidence for implicit mentalizing has previously been provided by the ‘dot perspective task,’ where participants are slower to verify the number of dots they can see when an avatar can see a different number of dots. However, recent evidence challenged a mentalizing interpretation of this effect by showing it was unaltered when the avatar was replaced with an inanimate arrow stimulus. Here we present an extension of the dot perspective task using an invisibility cloaking device to render the dots invisible on certain trials. This paradigm is capable of providing unambiguous evidence of automatic mentalizing, but no such evidence was found. Two further well-powered experiments used opaque and transparent goggles to manipulate visibility but found no evidence of automatic mentalizing, nor of individual differences in empathy or perspective-taking predicting performance, contradicting previous studies using the same design. The results cast doubt on the existence of an implicit mentalizing system, suggesting that previous effects were due to domain-general processes. PMID:27893269

  4. Role of on-board discharge in shock wave drag reduction and plasma cloaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Xiao-Ming; Tang De-Li; Sun Ai-Ping; Liu Wan-Dong; Zeng Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, a physical model is proposed for reducing the problem of the drag reduction of an attached bow shock around the nose of a high-speed vehicle with on-board discharge, to the problem of a balance between the magnetic pressure and gas pressure of plane shock of a partially ionized gas consisting of the environmental gas around the nose of the vehicle and the on-board discharge-produced plasma. The relation between the shock strength and the discharge-induced magnetic pressure is studied by means of a set of one-fluid, hydromagnetic equations reformed for the present purpose, where the discharge-induced magnetic field consists of the electron current (produced by the discharge)-induced magnetic field and the partially ionized gas flow-induced one. A formula for the relation between the above parameters is derived. It shows that the discharge-induced magnetic pressure can minimize the shock strength,successfully explaining the two recent experimental observations on attached bow shock mitigation and elimination in a supersonic flow during on-board discharge [Phys. Plasmas 9 (2002) 721 and Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 1345]. In addition,the formula implies that the shock elimination leaves room for a layer of higher-density plasma rampart moving around the nose of the vehicle, being favourable to the plasma radar cloaking of the vehicle. The reason for it is expounded.

  5. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Ansell, D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thackray, B.; Britnell, L.; Belle, B. D.; Withers, F.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics has established itself as a branch of physics which promises to revolutionize data processing, improve photovoltaics, and increase sensitivity of bio-detection. A widespread use of plasmonic devices is notably hindered by high losses and the absence of stable and inexpensive metal films suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics. PMID:24980150

  6. An introduction to graphene plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, P A D

    2016-01-01

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving towards more advanced topics. This book is essentially self-contained and brings together a number of different topics about the field that are scattered in the vast literature. The text is composed of eleven chapters and of a set of detailed appendices. It can be read in two different ways: Reading only the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field.

  7. Dispersion engineering of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Isroel M; Bendoym, Igor; Jung, Young U; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2013-12-30

    In this work, it is shown how the shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be engineered by manipulating the distribution of the electromagnetic fields in multilayer structures, which themselves are controlled by the free electron density in metal-like materials, such as doped semiconductors in the THz spectral range. By having a nonuniform free electron density profile, reduced relative to that in typical bulk metals, the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmons are distributed in different metallic materials that have different complex dielectric permittivities. As the in-plane component of surface plasmon's wave-vector increases, they become more confined to a particular layer of the multilayer structure and have energies that are predictable by considering the permittivity of the layer in which the fields are most concentrated. Unusual and arbitrary shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be designed, including stair steps and dovetails shapes.

  8. Photoluminescence of a Plasmonic Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da; Byers, Chad P; Wang, Lin-Yung; Hoggard, Anneli; Hoener, Ben; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Chen, Sishan; Chang, Wei-Shun; Landes, Christy F; Link, Stephan

    2015-07-28

    Photoluminescent Au nanoparticles are appealing for biosensing and bioimaging applications because of their non-photobleaching and non-photoblinking emission. The mechanism of one-photon photoluminescence from plasmonic nanostructures is still heavily debated though. Here, we report on the one-photon photoluminescence of strongly coupled 50 nm Au nanosphere dimers, the simplest plasmonic molecule. We observe emission from coupled plasmonic modes as revealed by single-particle photoluminescence spectra in comparison to correlated dark-field scattering spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the dimers is found to be surprisingly similar to the constituent monomers, suggesting that the increased local electric field of the dimer plays a minor role, in contradiction to several proposed mechanisms. Aided by electromagnetic simulations of scattering and absorption spectra, we conclude that our data are instead consistent with a multistep mechanism that involves the emission due to radiative decay of surface plasmons generated from excited electron-hole pairs following interband absorption.

  9. An Introduction to Graphene Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, P A D

    2016-01-01

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving towards more advanced topics. This book is essentially self-contained and brings together a number of different topics about the field that are scattered in the vast literature. The text is composed of eleven chapters and of a set of detailed appendices. It can be read in two different ways: Reading only the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field.

  10. Group-IV midinfrared plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Calandrini, Eugenio; Millar, Ross W.; Giliberti, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The use of heavily doped semiconductors to achieve plasma frequencies in the mid-IR has been recently proposed as a promising way to obtain high-quality and tunable plasmonic materials. We introduce a plasmonic platform based on epitaxial n-type Ge grown on standard Si wafers by means of low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large carrier concentration achieved with P dopants and to the compatibility with the existing CMOS technology, SiGe plasmonics hold promises for mid-IR applications in optoelectronics, IR detection, sensing, and light harvesting. As a representative example, we show simulations of mid-IR plasmonic waveguides based on the experimentally retrieved dielectric constants of the grown materials.

  11. Semiconductors for Plasmonics and Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Gururaj V; 10.1002/pssr.201004269

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonics has conventionally been in the realm of metal-optics. However, conventional metals as plasmonic elements in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible spectral ranges suffer from problems such as large losses and incompatibility with semiconductor technology. Replacing metals with semiconductors can alleviate these problems if only semiconductors could exhibit negative real permittivity. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) is a low loss semiconductor that can show negative real permittivity in the NIR. A comparative assessment of AZO-based plasmonic devices such as superlens and hyperlens with their metal-based counterparts shows that AZO-based devices significantly outperform at a wavelength of 1.55 um. This provides a strong stimulus in turning to semiconductor plasmonics at the telecommunication wavelengths.

  12. Waveguiding with surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Zhanghua; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic modes propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces. Various SPP modes can be supported by flat and curved, single and multiple surfaces, exhibiting remarkable properties, including the possibility of concentrating electromagnetic fields beyond...

  13. Infrared Topological Plasmons in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Dafei; Christensen, Thomas; Soljačić, Marin; Fang, Nicholas X.; Lu, Ling; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-06-01

    We propose a two-dimensional plasmonic platform—periodically patterned monolayer graphene—which hosts topological one-way edge states operable up to infrared frequencies. We classify the band topology of this plasmonic system under time-reversal-symmetry breaking induced by a static magnetic field. At finite doping, the system supports topologically nontrivial band gaps with mid-gap frequencies up to tens of terahertz. By the bulk-edge correspondence, these band gaps host topologically protected one-way edge plasmons, which are immune to backscattering from structural defects and subject only to intrinsic material and radiation loss. Our findings reveal a promising approach to engineer topologically robust chiral plasmonic devices and demonstrate a realistic example of high-frequency topological edge states.

  14. Enhanced Propagating Surface Plasmon Signal Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2016-12-21

    Overcoming the dissipative nature of propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) is pre-requisite to realizing functional plasmonic circuitry, in which large bandwidth signals can be manipulated over length scales far-below the diffraction limit of light. To this end, we report on a novel PSP enhanced signal detection technique achieved in an all-metallic substrate. We take advantage of two strategically spatio-temporally separated phase-locked femtosecond laser pulses, incident onto lithographically patterned PSP coupling structures. We follow PSP propagation with joint femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution in a time-resolved non-linear photoemission electron microscopy scheme. Initially, a PSP signal wave packet is launched from a hole etched into the silver surface from where it propagates through an open trench structure and is decoded through the use of a timed probe pulse. FDTD calculations demonstrate that PSP signal waves may traverse open trenches in excess of 10 microns in diameter, thereby allowing remote detection even through vacuum regions. This arrangement results in a 10X enhancement in photoemission relative to readout from the bare metal surface. The enhancement is attributed to an all-optical homodyne detection technique that mixes signal and reference PSP waves in a non-linear scheme. Larger readout trenches achieve higher readout levels, however reduced transmission through the trench limits the trench size to 6 microns for maximum readout levels. However, the use of an array of trenches increases the maximum enhancement to near 30X. The attainable enhancement factor may be harnessed to achieve extended coherent PSP propagation in ultrafast plasmonic circuitry.

  15. Particle plasmons: Why shape matters

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, William L

    2016-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions for the polarizability of metallic nanoparticles are in wide use in the field of plasmonics, but their origins are not obvious. In this article, expressions for the polarizability of a particle are derived in the quasistatic limit in a manner that allows the physical origin of the terms to be clearly seen. The discussion is tutorial in nature, with particular attention given to the role of particle shape since this is a controlling factor in particle plasmon resonances.

  16. Controlling light with plasmonic multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Iorsh, Ivan V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen a new wave of interest in layered media - namely, plasmonic multilayers - in several emerging applications ranging from transparent metals to hyperbolic metamaterials. In this paper, we review the optical properties of such subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayered...... metamaterials and describe their use for light manipulation at the nanoscale. While demonstrating the recently emphasized hallmark effect of hyperbolic dispersion, we put special emphasis to the comparison between multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials and more broadly defined plasmonic-multilayer metamaterials...

  17. Plasmonic response of nanoscale spirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Jed I; Haglund, Richard F

    2010-08-11

    The Archimedean spiral geometry presents a platform for exploration of complex plasmonic mechanisms and applications. Here we show both through simulations and experiment that more complex plasmonic modes with unique near-field structure and larger mode volumes can be realized within a single, topologically robust structure. In the spiral, complex polarization response, resonant interactions and symmetry-breaking features are defined by the width and spacing of the spiral tracks and by the winding number of the spiral.

  18. Airy plasmons in graphene based waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that both the quasi-transverse-magnetic (TM) and quasi-transverseelectric (TE) Airy plasmons can be supported in graphene-based waveguides. The solution of Airy plasmons is calculated analytically and the existence of Airy plasmons is studied under the paraxial approximation. Due to the tunability of the chemical potential of graphene, the self-accelerating behavior of quasi-TM Airy plasmons can be steered effectively, especially in multilayer graphene based waveguides. Besides the metals, graphene provides an additional platform to investigate the propagation of Airy plasmons and to design various plasmonic devices.

  19. Semiconductors for plasmonics and metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, G.V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonics has conventionally been in the realm of metal-optics. However, conventional metals as plasmonic elements in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible spectral ranges suffer from problems such as large losses and incompatibility with semiconductor technology. Replacing metals with semiconduct......Plasmonics has conventionally been in the realm of metal-optics. However, conventional metals as plasmonic elements in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible spectral ranges suffer from problems such as large losses and incompatibility with semiconductor technology. Replacing metals...... with semiconductors can alleviate these problems if only semiconductors could exhibit negative real permittivity. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) is a low loss semiconductor that can show negative real permittivity in the NIR. A comparative assessment of AZO-based plasmonic devices such as superlens and hyperlens...... with their metal-based counterparts shows that AZO-based devices significantly outperform at a wavelength of 1.55 µm. This provides a strong stimulus in turning to semiconductor plasmonics at the telecommunication wavelengths. (© 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)....

  20. Raman fingerprinting of single dielectric nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Sarp; Chen, Chang; Li, Yi; van Roy, Wim; Lagae, Liesbet; van Dorpe, Pol

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies.Plasmonic nano-apertures are commonly used for the detection of small particles such as nanoparticles and proteins by exploiting electrical and optical techniques. Plasmonic nanopores are metallic nano-apertures sitting on a thin membrane with a tiny hole. It has been shown that plasmonic nanopores with a given geometry identify internal molecules using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). However, label-free identification of a single dielectric nanoparticle requires a highly localized field comparable to the size of the particle. Additionally, the particle's Brownian motion can jeopardize the amount of photons collected from a single particle. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of optical trapping and SERS can be used for the detection and identification of 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in plasmonic nanopores. This work is anticipated to contribute to the detection of small bioparticles, optical trapping and nanotribology studies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: The

  1. Triple negative permeability band in plasmon-hybridized cut-wire-pair metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy, V. T. T.; Viet, D. T.; Hieu, N. V.; Lee, Y. P.; Lam, V. D.; Tung, N. T.

    2010-11-01

    We expand the picture of plasmon hybridization in metamagnetic structure via numerically studying the electromagnetic coupling in the metallic cut-wire-pair super cells. It is shown that a triple negative permeability band can be achieved by systematically controlling the plasmon hybridization in such the structure. The corresponding transmission properties as well as the electromagnetic responses of the plasmon-hybridized structures were presented by using the finite integration technique simulations. Our results would reveal a promising design to obtain the multiple negative refractions based on the combination of hybridized cut-wire-pairs and continuous wires.

  2. Plasmonic-exciton coupling in synthesized metal/semiconductor hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadalla, A.; Hamad, D. A. [Physics Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Mohamed, M. B. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced science (NIELS), Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-12-31

    A new method has been developed to grow plasmonic semiconductor nanocomposites of Au/CdSe and Ag/CdSe. Their chemical composition and crystal structure are determined by X-ray diffraction. The collective optical properties of the prepared semiconductor nanohybrid have been measured using spectrophotometer techniques and compared to those of the individual components. The electron transfer processes from CdSe to the gold are faster than that of the silver. Au/CdSe has a strong plasmonic-excitonic coupling, but Ag/CdSe has a weak plasmonic-excitonic coupling.

  3. Experimental model of topological defects in Minkowski spacetime based on disordered ferrofluid: magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the spacetime cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I; Smolyaninov, Alexei I

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid in the presence of external magnetic field forms a self-assembled hyperbolic metamaterial. Wave equation describing propagation of extraordinary light inside the ferrofluid exhibits 2+1 dimensional Lorentz symmetry. The role of time in the corresponding effective 3D Minkowski spacetime is played by the spatial coordinate directed along the periodic nanoparticle chains aligned by the magnetic field. Here we present a microscopic study of point, linear and volume defects of the nanoparticle chain structure and demonstrate that they may exhibit strong similarities with such Minkowski spacetime defects as magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the recently proposed spacetime cloaks. Experimental observations of such defects are described.

  4. Optimization of plasmonic enhancement of fluorescence on plastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooney, Robert I; Stranik, Ondrej; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D

    2008-10-07

    In this work, we report on the uniform deposition of tailored plasmonic coatings on polymer substrates and on the distance dependence of the plasmonic enhancement of a fluorescent dye. Silver, gold, and silver/gold alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with a range of diameters were synthesized using chemical techniques and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Reproducible polyelectrolyte (PEL) layers, which were deposited on plastic microwell plates using a layer-by-layer technique, served as both a stable and uniform substrate for deposition of the NPs as well as providing spacer layers of known thickness between the NPs and the fluorescent dye. A maximum enhancement factor of approximately 11 was measured for 60 nm diameter pure silver NPs, for a dye-NP separation of approximately 3 nm. A shift in the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength as a function of the effective refractive index of the PEL layers was also observed, and the measured shifts show a similar trend with theoretical predictions. This work will contribute toward the rational design of optical biochip platforms based on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence.

  5. Surface plasmon polariton-induced hot carrier generation for photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Wonmi; Ratchford, Daniel C; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Simpkins, Blake S

    2017-03-02

    Non-radiative plasmon decay in noble metals generates highly energetic carriers under visible light irradiation, which opens new prospects in the fields of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and photodetection. While localized surface plasmon-induced hot carrier generation occurs in diverse metal nanostructures, inhomogeneities typical of many metal-semiconductor plasmonic nanostructures hinder predictable control of photocarrier generation and therefore reproducible carrier-mediated photochemistry. Here, we generate traveling surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the interface between a noble metal/titanium dioxide (TiO2) heterostructure film and aqueous solution, enabling simultaneous optical and electrochemical interrogation of plasmon-mediated chemistry in a system whose resonance may be continuously tuned via the incident optical excitation angle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of SPP-induced hot carrier generation for photocatalysis. We found electrochemical photovoltage and photocurrent responses as SPP-induced hot carriers drive both solution-based oxidation of methanol and the anodic half-reaction of photoelectrochemical water-splitting in sodium hydroxide solution. A strong excitation angle dependence and linear power dependence in the electrochemical photocurrent confirm that the photoelectrochemical reactions are SPP-driven. SPP-generated hot carrier chemistry was recorded on gold and silver and with two different excitation wavelengths, demonstrating potential for mapping resonant charge transfer processes with this technique. These results will provide the design criteria for a metal-semiconductor hybrid system with enhanced hot carrier generation and transport, which is important for the understanding and application of plasmon-induced photocatalysis.

  6. Hybrid Airy Plasmons with Dynamically Steerable Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    With the intriguing properties of diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing, Airy plasmons are promising to be used in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, the high dissipative loss and the lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal the hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the terahertz (THz) domain as an example. Due to the coupling between an optical mode and a plasmonic mode, the hybrid Airy plasmons can have large propagation lengths and effective transverse deflections, where the transverse waveguide confinements are governed by the hybrid modes with moderate quality factors. Meanwhile, the propagation trajectories of hybrid Airy plasmons are dynamically steerable by changing the chemical potential of graphene. These hybrid Airy plasmons may promote the further discovery of non-diffracting be...

  7. Photoconductive metamaterials with giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyuknin, Andrey B.;

    2014-01-01

    and photocurrent without any external potential. This is the direct analogue of the photogalvanic effect existing in ferroelectric or piezoelectric crystals, e.g., bismuth ferrite. The reported plasmonic photogalvanic effect is valuable for characterizing photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures...

  8. Hybrid Airy plasmons with dynamically steerable trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rujiang; Imran, Muhammad; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-26

    With their intriguing diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing properties, Airy plasmons show promise for use in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, high dissipative loss and lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the terahertz (THz) domain as an example. Due to coupling between optical modes and plasmonic modes, the hybrid Airy plasmons can have large propagation lengths and effective transverse deflections, where the transverse waveguide confinements are governed by the hybrid modes with moderate quality factors. Meanwhile, the propagation trajectories of the hybrid Airy plasmons are dynamically steerable by changing the chemical potential of graphene. These hybrid Airy plasmons may promote the further discovery of non-diffracting beams along with the emerging developments of optical tweezers and tractor beams.

  9. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  10. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  11. Ultralow-loss CMOS copper plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I.; Kirtaev, Roman V.

    2016-01-01

    with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which...

  12. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  13. Plasmonic Nanostructures: Tailoring Light-matter Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    The flow of light can be molded by plasmonic structures within the nanoscale. In this talk, plasmonic nanostructures for suppressing light transmission, improving light absorption and enhancing photoemissions are to be presented....

  14. Plasmonics: Manipulating Light at the Subwavelength Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yuan Zhu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of light to collective oscillation of electrons on the metal surface allows the creation of surface plasmon-polariton wave. This surface wave is of central interest in the field of plasmonics. In this paper, we will present a brief review of this field, focusing on the plasmonic waveguide and plasmonic transmission. In the plasmonic waveguide, the light can be guided along the metal surface with subwavelength lateral dimensions, enabling the possibility of high-density integration of the optical elements. On the other hand, in the plasmonic transmission, the propagation of light through a metal surface can be tailored with the subwavelength holes, leading to the anomalous transmission behaviors which have received extensive investigations in recent years. In addition, as a supplement to plasmonics in the visible and near-infrared region, the study of THz plasmonics has also been discussed.

  15. Controlling plasmon coupling in biomolecule-linked metal nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba, David S.

    Molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in biomolecule-linked nanoparticle assemblies in two-particle, small cluster, and extended network formats. The relationship between structure and optical properties is explored through comparison of measured spectra with simulated spectra calculated using structural models based upon measured structural parameters. A variety of techniques are used to characterize nanoparticle assemblies, including ensemble extinction and elastic scattering spectroscopy, single-assembly scattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Initially, molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in ˜100 nm assemblies composed of 13 nm gold "satellite" particles tethered by duplex DNA to a 50 nm gold "core" particle. Comparison of core-satellite assemblies formed with duplex DNA tethers of varying length demonstrates that, while core-satellite separation is controlled by the number of base pairs in the DNA tether, structural properties such as core:satellite ratio and yield are independent of DNA tether length. Thus, plasmon coupling within these assemblies is determined by the number of base pairs in the duplex DNA tether; compact assemblies in which tethers are composed of fewer base pairs exhibit plasmon bands that are red-shifted relative to the bands of extended assemblies, indicating increased plasmon coupling in the compact assemblies. Subsequently, core-satellite assemblies are formed with reconfigurable DNA nanostructure tethers that modulate interparticle separation in response to a molecular stimulus. Assembly reconfiguration from a compact to an extended state results in blue-shifting of the assembly plasmon resonance, indicating reduced interparticle coupling and lengthening of the core-satellite tether. Comparison between measured and simulated spectra revealed a close correspondence and provided validation of the structural models that link assembly plasmonic properties

  16. SPR技术检测血小板抗体及其临床应用的研究%Detection of platelet antibody by surface plasmon resonance technique and its preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍昌林; 周雪敏; 何建安; 顾大勇; 朱奕; 邵超鹏

    2015-01-01

    目的:利用表面等离子体共振(SPR)技术对血小板抗体筛选与配型的可行性进行研究,摸索一种血小板相容性输注的新方法。方法采用氨基耦联法在SPR芯片表面固定相应的通用型血小板抗原,并优化芯片分析条件,再用该芯片检测对照血清,分析该技术的特性;MAIPA法对比研究临床样本,同时运用SPR技术对10例血小板抗体阳性患者输注前进行血小板配合试验,选用配合型血小板输注,临床跟踪评价输注效果。结果 SPR技术检测血小板抗体的稳定性、敏感性与特异性均较好;SPR技术与MAIPA法对106例多次输注血小板的临床样本检测显示,2种方法比较差异无统计学意义(χ2=0.333,P>0.05),灵敏度为91%,特异性为97.9%,总一致性为97.2%;利用SPR技术配型输注的10例血小板抗体阳性患者,8例1 h血小板增加值CCI>7.5,24 h CCI>4.5,临床跟踪评价良好。结论 SPR技术筛检血小板抗体与M AIPA法性能基本相当,但SPR技术操作更简便快速、可靠直观,而且非标记,可满足临床血小板输注前抗体的快速检测和配型的初步要求。%Objective To study the platelet antibody screening and crossing match by surface plasmon resonance(SPR) ,and to find a new way for platelet compatibility testing .Methods The corresponding universal platelet antigen was fixed on the SPR chip surface by the amino coupling method .Platelet antibody positive and negative control serum were analysed by SPR micro-ar-ray ,the stability ,sensitivity and specificity of this technique were discussed ,and compared with MAIPA assay .Finally we used the SPR technology to cross match for ten cases of the platelet antibody positive patients before infusion ,and to evaluate the effect of platelet infusion .Results For the SPR technology ,the stability ,sensitivity and specificity of platelet antibody detection were all better ,106

  17. The invisibility cloak illusion: People (incorrectly) believe they observe others more than others observe them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Erica J; Clark, Margaret S; Bargh, John A

    2017-04-01

    Whether at a coffee shop, in a waiting room, or riding the bus, people frequently observe the other people around them. Yet they often fail to realize how much other people engage in the same behavior, and that they, therefore, also are being observed. Because it is logically impossible that people, on average, are the subjects of observation more than they are objects of it, the belief that one watches others more than one is watched is an illusion. Several studies show that people incorrectly believe that they observe others more than other people observe them. We call this mistaken belief the "invisibility cloak illusion." People believe that they observe others more than do other people and that they are generally observed less than are others (Studies 1-3, 5, 6). The illusion persists both among strangers in the same vicinity (Study 2) and among friends interacting with one another (Study 3), and it cannot be explained away as yet another general better-than-average bias nor is it the result of believing one has more thoughts, in general, than do other people (Studies 2-3). The illusion is supported by a failure to catch others watching oneself (Studies 1b, 4) and it is manifest in the specific contents of people's thoughts about one another (Studies 5 and 6). Finally, rendering a feature of one's appearance salient to oneself fails to interrupt the illusion despite increasing one's belief that others are paying more attention specifically to that salient feature (Study 6). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. High-Q plasmonic bottle microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, M. Narizee; Ding, Ming; Murugan, G. Senthil; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a hybrid plasmonic bottle microresonator (PBMR) which supports whispering gallery modes (WGMs) along with surface plasmon waves (SPWs) for high performance optical sensor applications. The BMR was fabricated through "soften-and-compress" technique with a thin gold layer deposited on top of the resonator. A polarization-resolved measurement was set-up in order to fully characterize the fabricated PBMR. Initially, the uncoated BMR with waist diameter of 181 μm, stem diameter of 125 μm and length of 400 μm was fabricated and then gold film was deposited on the surface. Due to surface curvature, the gold film covering half of the BMR had a characteristic meniscus shape and maximum thickness of 30 nm. The meniscus provides appropriately tapered edges which facilitate the adiabatic transformation of BMR WGMs to SPWs and vice versa. This results in low transition losses, which combined with partially-metal-coated resonator, can result in high hybrid-PBMR Q's. The transmission spectra of the hybrid PBMR are dramatically different to the original uncoated BMR. Under TE(TM) excitation, the PBMR showed composite resonances with Q of ~2100(850) and almost identical ~ 3 nm FSR. We have accurately fitted the observed transmission resonances with Lorentzian-shaped curves and showed that the TE and TM excitations are actually composite resonances comprise of two and three partially overlapping resonances with Q's in excess of 2900 and 2500, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest Qs observed in plasmonic microcavities.

  19. Hybrid Airy Plasmons with Dynamically Steerable Trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rujiang; Imran, Muhammad; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    With the intriguing properties of diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing, Airy plasmons are promising to be used in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, the high dissipative loss and the lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal the hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the ter...

  20. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.