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Sample records for plasmon talbot effect

  1. Dual accelerating Airy-Talbot recurrence effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Liu, Xing; Zhong, Weiping; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the dual accelerating Airy-Talbot recurrence effect, i.e., the self-imaging of accelerating optical beams, by propagating a superposition of Airy beams with successively changing transverse displacements. The dual Airy-Talbot effect is a spontaneous recurring imaging of the input and of the input with alternating component signs. It results from the constructive interference of Airy wave functions, which is also responsible for other kinds of Airy beams, for example, Airy breathers. An input composed of finite-energy Airy beams also displays the dual Airy-Talbot effect, but it demands a large transverse displacement and diminishes fast along the propagation direction.

  2. Multiscale Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, I-Lin

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry by introducing the cut-and-project construction, which allows for capturing the entire infinite Fibonacci structure into a single computational cell. Theoretical and numerical calculations demonstrate the Talbot foci of Fibonacci geometry at distances that are multiples $(\\tau+2)(F_{\\mu}+\\tau F_{\\mu+1} )^{-1}p/(2q)$ or $(\\tau+2)(L_{\\mu}+\\tau L_{\\mu+1} )^{-1}p/(2q)$ of the Talbot distance. Here, ($p$, $q$) are coprime integers, $\\mu$ is an integer, $\\tau$ is the golden mean, and $F_{\\mu}$ and $L_{\\mu}$ are Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, respectively. The image of a single Talbot focus exhibits a multiscale pattern due to the self-similarity of the scaling Fourier spectrum.

  3. Talbot Effect in Three Waveguide Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; ZHOU Hai-Feng; YANG Jian-Yi; JIANG Xiao-Qing

    2008-01-01

    By taking the coupling between the non-neighbourhood waveguides into account, the coupling characteristic of three waveguide arrays is analysed. The strong coupling equation of three waveguides is dealt with Laplace transform and LU decomposition. The general field evolution equation is obtained by inversion of the Laplace transform. The results show that the self-imaging conditions (Talbot effect) do not satisfy in general. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the BPM simulations.

  4. The Nonlinear Talbot Effect of Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Song, Jianping; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers are rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLSE). Talbot effect (TE) is an image recurrence phenomenon in the diffraction of light waves. We report the nonlinear TE of rogue waves in a cubic medium. It is different from the linear TE, in that the wave propagates in a NL medium and is an eigenmode of NLSE. Periodic rogue waves impinging on a NL medium exhibit recurrent behavior, but only at the TE length and at the half-TE length with a \\pi-phase shift; the fractional TE is absent. The NL TE is the result of the NL interference of the lobes of rogue wave breathers. This interaction is related to the transverse period and intensity of breathers, in that the bigger the period and the higher the intensity, the shorter the TE length.

  5. Generalized spatial Talbot effect based on all-dielectric metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shulabh

    2017-02-01

    The Talbot effect is among the most fundamental wave propagation effect universal across the frequency spectrum and has been used extensively in both spatial and temporal domain for wide variety of applications. In this work, a generalized spatial Talbot effect is presented based on all-dielectric Huygens' metasurface, which when combined with the conventional Fractional Talbot effect, enables the scaling of aperture periodicities by any arbitrary real number. This is achieved by allowing and engineering the phase discontinuity distributions in space on the aperture using phase engineered all-dielectric reflectionless metasurfaces, in conjunction with free-space propagation. Specific implementations using Huygens' metasurfaces are proposed and their operation to achieve such non-integer scalings of the input aperture period is demonstrated using numerical results based on Fourier propagation method.

  6. Diffraction Interference Induced Superfocusing in Nonlinear Talbot Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Jianming; Chen, Zhenhua; Wei, Dunzhao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2014-08-01

    We report a simple, novel subdiffraction method, i.e. diffraction interference induced superfocusing in second-harmonic (SH) Talbot effect, to achieve focusing size of less than λSH/4 (or λpump/8) without involving evanescent waves or subwavelength apertures. By tailoring point spread functions with Fresnel diffraction interference, we observe periodic SH subdiffracted spots over a hundred of micrometers away from the sample. Our demonstration is the first experimental realization of the Toraldo di Francia's proposal pioneered 62 years ago for superresolution imaging.

  7. On the structure of quadratic Gauss sums in the Talbot effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R

    2017-05-01

    We report on the detailed derivation of the Gauss sums leading to the weighting phase factors in the fractional Talbot effect. In contrast to previous approaches, the derivation is directly based on the two coprime integers p and q that define the fractional Talbot effect so that, using standard techniques from the number theory, the computation is reduced, up to a global phase, to the trivial completion of the exponential of the square of a sum. In addition, it is shown that the Gauss sums can be reduced to only two cases, depending on the parity of integer q. Explicit and simpler expressions for the two forms of the Talbot weighting phases are also provided. The Gauss sums are presented as a discrete Fourier transform pair between quadratic phase sequences showing perfect periodic autocorrelation and a connection with the theory of biunimodular sequences is presented. In addition, the Talbot weighting factors of orders 1/q and 2/q are reduced to a closed form, and the equivalence to existing characterizations of Talbot weighting phases is also discussed. The relationship with one-dimensional multilevel phase structures is exemplified by the study of Talbot array illuminators. These results simplify and extend the description of the role played by Gauss sums in the fractional Talbot effect, providing a compact synthesis of previous results.

  8. The transverse Talbot effect: Scaling analyses based on wavelet transforms

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C; Ludu, A

    2013-01-01

    Berry and Klein [J. Mod. Opt. 43, 2139 (1996)] studied the fractal properties of the paraxial diffracted field behind a Ronchi grating. In particular, they studied the transverse Talbot images formed at fractional distances in units of the Talbot distance chosen from the Fibonacci convergents to the complement of the inverse golden mean zeta_G=(3-square root of 5)/2. Here, we analyze these Talbot images with two well-known scaling methods, the wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) and the wavelet transform multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (WT-MFDFA). We use the widths of the singularity spectra, Delta(alpha)=alpha_H-alpha_min, as a characteristic feature of the Talbot images. The tau scaling exponents of the q moments are linear in q within the two methods, which is a strong argument in favor of the monofractality of the transverse diffractive paraxial field

  9. Observation of electromagnetically induced Talbot effect in an atomic system with nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Dan; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the Talbot effect resulting from the repeatedly self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field under the Fresnel near-field regime. By launching the probe beam into an optically induced atomic lattice (established by interfering two coupling fields) inside a thermal rubidium vapor cell, we can obtain an electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) on probe beam in a coherent three-level $\\Lambda$-type Doppler-free atomic configuration with the assistance of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) window, which can modify and greatly enhance the Kerr nonlinearity near atomic resonance. The EIG patterns out of the cell can repeat the image at the output plane of the cell at integer multiples of Talbot length, which agree well with the theoretical prediction [Appl. Phys. Lett., 98, 081108 (2011)]. Such first demonstrated EIT Talbot effect in a coherent atomic system may pave a lensless and nondestructive way for imaging ultracold atoms or molecules.

  10. Self-Focusing and the Talbot Effect in Conformal Transformation Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Huanyang; Liu, Hui; Xu, Lin; Sheng, Chong; Zhu, Shining

    2017-07-01

    Transformation optics has been used to propose various novel optical devices. With the help of metamaterials, several intriguing designs, such as invisibility cloaks, have been implemented. However, as the basic units should be much smaller than the working wavelengths to achieve the effective material parameters, and the sizes of devices should be much larger than the wavelengths of illumination to work within the light-ray approximation, it is a big challenge to implement an experimental system that works simultaneously for both geometric optics and wave optics. In this Letter, by using a gradient-index microstructured optical waveguide, we realize a device of conformal transformation optics (CTO) and demonstrate its self-focusing property for geometry optics and the Talbot effect for wave optics. In addition, the Talbot effect in such a system has a potential application to transfer digital information without diffraction. Our findings demonstrate the photon controlling ability of CTO in a feasible experiment system.

  11. Self-Focusing and the Talbot Effect in Conformal Transformation Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyang; Chen, Huanyang; Liu, Hui; Xu, Lin; Sheng, Chong; Zhu, Shining

    2017-07-21

    Transformation optics has been used to propose various novel optical devices. With the help of metamaterials, several intriguing designs, such as invisibility cloaks, have been implemented. However, as the basic units should be much smaller than the working wavelengths to achieve the effective material parameters, and the sizes of devices should be much larger than the wavelengths of illumination to work within the light-ray approximation, it is a big challenge to implement an experimental system that works simultaneously for both geometric optics and wave optics. In this Letter, by using a gradient-index microstructured optical waveguide, we realize a device of conformal transformation optics (CTO) and demonstrate its self-focusing property for geometry optics and the Talbot effect for wave optics. In addition, the Talbot effect in such a system has a potential application to transfer digital information without diffraction. Our findings demonstrate the photon controlling ability of CTO in a feasible experiment system.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet Talbot interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Marconi, Mario C

    2015-10-05

    Periodic nanopatterns can be generated using lithography based on the Talbot effect or optical interference. However, these techniques have restrictions that limit their performance. High resolution Talbot lithography is limited by the very small depth of focus and the demanding requirements in the fabrication of the master mask. Interference lithography, with large DOF and high resolution, is limited to simple periodic patterns. This paper describes a hybrid extreme ultraviolet lithography approach that combines Talbot lithography and interference lithography to render an interference pattern with a lattice determined by a Talbot image. As a result, the method enables filling the arbitrary shaped cells produced by the Talbot image with interference patterns. Detailed modeling, system design and experimental results using a tabletop EUV laser are presented.

  13. Laser Surface Microstructuring of Biocompatible Materials Using a Microlens Array and the Talbot Effect: Evaluation of the Cell Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aymerich

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A laser based technique for microstructuring titanium and tantalum substrates using the Talbot effect and an array of microlenses is presented. By using this hybrid technique; we are able to generate different patterns and geometries on the top surfaces of the biomaterials. The Talbot effect allows us to rapidly make microstructuring, solving the common problems of using microlenses for multipatterning; where the material expelled during the ablation of biomaterials damages the microlens. The Talbot effect permits us to increase the working distance and reduce the period of the patterns. We also demonstrate that the geometries and patterns act as anchor points for cells; affecting the cell adhesion to the metallic substrates and guiding how they spread over the material.

  14. Study on talbot pattern for grating interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ju; Oh, Oh Sung; Lee, Seung Wook [Dept. of School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Yul [Neutron Instrument Division, Korea Atomic Energy Reserch Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    One of properties which X-ray and Neutron can be applied nondestructive test is penetration into the object with interaction leads to decrease in intensity. X-ray interaction with the matter caused by electrons, Neutron caused by atoms. They share applications in nondestructive test area because of their similarities of interaction mechanism. Grating interferometer is the one of applications produces phase contrast image and dark field image. It is defined by Talbot interferometer and Talbot-Lau interferometer according to Talbot effect and Talbot-Lau effect respectively. Talbot interferometer works with coherence beam like X-ray, and Talbot-Lau has an effect with incoherence beam like Neutron. It is important to expect the interference in grating interferometer compared normal nondestructive system. In this paper, simulation works are conducted according to Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometer in case of X-ray and Neutron. Variation of interference intensity with X-ray and Neutron based on wave theory is constructed and calculate elements consist the system. Additionally, Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometer is simulated in different kinds of conditions.

  15. Polarization dependence of the quasi-Talbot effect of the high-density grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shuyun; Guo, Wenzhen; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2010-03-01

    Diffractions by the one-dimensional high-density grating in the near field with TM and TE polarization illuminations are studied, and the diffraction intensity distributions are calculated with the finite-difference time-domain technique. The calculation results show that the diffractions of the high-density grating with different polarization illuminations are different. The quasi-Talbot image of the grating depends on the polarization of the incident wave, and the existence condition of the quasi-Talbot image of the grating in the near field also changes with the polarization of the incident wave. We present explanations based on the vector distribution of the energy flow density. These studies on the polarization dependence of the quasi-Talbot imaging of the high-density grating are helpful for the application of the grating to near-field photolithography.

  16. Demonstration of X-ray talbot interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Momose, A; Kawamoto, S; Hamaishi, Y; Takai, K; Suzuki, Y

    2003-01-01

    First Talbot interferometry in the hard X-ray region was demonstrated using a pair of transmission gratings made by forming gold stripes on glass plates. By aligning the gratings on the optical axis of X-rays with a separation that caused the Talbot effect by the first grating, moire fringes were produced inclining one grating slightly against the other around the optical axis. A phase object placed in front of the first grating was detected by moire-fringe bending. Using the technique of phase-shifting interferometry, the differential phase corresponding to the phase object could also be measured. This result suggests that X-ray Talbot interferometry is a novel and simple method for phase-sensitive X-ray radiography. (author)

  17. Photoconductive metamaterials with giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyuknin, Andrey B.;

    2014-01-01

    and photocurrent without any external potential. This is the direct analogue of the photogalvanic effect existing in ferroelectric or piezoelectric crystals, e.g., bismuth ferrite. The reported plasmonic photogalvanic effect is valuable for characterizing photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures...

  18. Interference effects with surface plasmons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzmin, Nikolay Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon is a purely two-dimensional electromagnetic excitation bound to the interface between metal and dielectric and quickly decaying away from it. A surface plasmon is able to concentrate light on sub-wavelength scales – a feature that is attractive for nano-photonics and integrated

  19. A study of optical vortices inside the Talbot interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Panthong, Pituk; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart; Chiangga, Surasak; Deachapunya, Sarayut

    2015-01-01

    The optical Talbot interferometer has been used to explore the topological charges of optical vortices. We recorded the self-imaging of a diffraction grating in the near-field regime with the optical vortex of several topological charges. Our twisted light was generated by a spatial light modulator (SLM). Previous studies showed that interferometric methods can determine the particular orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, but a large number of OAM eigenvalues are difficult to distinguish from the interference patterns. Here, we show that the Talbot patterns can distinguish the charges as well as the OAM of the vortices with high orders. Owing to high sensitivity and self-imaging of Talbot effect, several OAM eigenvalues can be distinguished by direct measurement. We assure the experimental results with our theory. The present results are useful for classical and quantum metrology as well as future implementations of quantum communications.

  20. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Digish K., E-mail: jdiggish@gmail.com; Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002, Gujarat (India); Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ambavale, S. K. [Vishwakarma Government Engineering College Chandkheda, Ahmedabad-382424, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  1. Analytic phase-factor equations for Talbot array illuminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Stankovic, S; Tschudi, T

    1999-01-10

    Under specific circumstances the fractional Talbot effect can be described by simplified equations. We have obtained simplified analytic phase-factor equations to describe the relation between the pure-phase factors and their fractional Talbot distances behind a binary amplitude grating with an opening ratio of (1/M). We explain how these simple equations are obtained from the regularly rearranged neighboring phase differences. We point out that any intensity distribution with an irreducible opening ratio (M(N)/M) (M(N) illumination in this case. Experimental verification of our theoretical results is given.

  2. Effective Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Etrich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanocomposites find many applications, such as nanometric coatings in emerging fields, such as optotronics, photovoltaics or integrated optics. To make use of their ability to affect light propagation in an unprecedented manner, plasmonic nanocomposites should consist of densely packed metallic nanoparticles. This causes a major challenge for their theoretical description, since the reliable assignment of effective optical properties with established effective medium theories is no longer possible. Established theories, e.g., the Maxwell-Garnett formalism, are only applicable for strongly diluted nanocomposites. This effective description, however, is a prerequisite to consider plasmonic nanocomposites in the design of optical devices. Here, we mitigate this problem and use full wave optical simulations to assign effective properties to plasmonic nanocomposites with filling fractions close to the percolation threshold. We show that these effective properties can be used to properly predict the optical action of functional devices that contain nanocomposites in their design. With this contribution we pave the way to consider plasmonic nanocomposites comparably to ordinary materials in the design of optical elements.

  3. Fluorescence Talbot microscope using incoherent source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yangyang; Pang, Shuo

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence Talbot microscope is a scalable field-of-view (FOV) imaging platform, which takes advantage of the phase sensitivity of the self-image of a periodic structure. Such a system can maintain the microscopic resolution and extend the FOV for the whole slide (15 mm×15 mm) scanning. Previously reported Talbot fluorescence systems, tabletop and on-chip device alike, rely on the coherence of the illumination source, limiting their potential applications in low-resource setting environment. A more cost-effective setup using a light-emitting diode, which has an area of 4 mm2 and a full width at half maximum of 16 nm in wavelength, is demonstrated. Compared to the illumination that is spatially filtered by a single pinhole, our system has achieved an illumination intensity that is 357 times higher. The reconstructed image quality is comparable to that of a 10× microscope objective. Various samples, such as fluorescent beads, green fluorescence protein-labeled HeLa cells, and a mouse kidney slide, were reconstructed by the system.

  4. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  5. Displacement Talbot lithography: an alternative technique to fabricate nanostructured metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Boulbar, E. D.; Chausse, P. J. P.; Lis, S.; Shields, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured materials are essential for many recent electronic, magnetic and optical devices. Lithography is the most common step used to fabricate organized and well calibrated nanostructures. However, feature sizes less than 200 nm usually require access to deep ultraviolet photolithography, e-beam lithography or soft lithography (nanoimprinting), which are either expensive, have low-throughput or are sensitive to defects. Low-cost, high-throughput and low-defect-density techniques are therefore of interest for the fabrication of nanostructures. In this study, we investigate the potential of displacement Talbot lithography for the fabrication of specific structures of interest within plasmonic and metamaterial research fields. We demonstrate that nanodash arrays and `fishnet'-like structures can be fabricated by using a double exposure of two different linear grating phase masks. Feature sizes can be tuned by varying the exposure doses. Such lithography has been used to fabricate metallic `fishnet'-like structures using a lift-off technique. This proof of principle paves the way to a low-cost, high-throughput, defect-free and large-scale technique for the fabrication of structures that could be useful for metamaterial and plasmonic metasurfaces. With the development of deep ultraviolet displacement Talbot lithography, the feature dimensions could be pushed lower and used for the fabrication of optical metamaterials in the visible range.

  6. Enhanced Nonlinear Effects in Metamaterials and Plasmonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argyropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide an overview of the anomalous and enhanced nonlinear effects available when optical nonlinear materials are combined inside plasmonic waveguide structures. Broad, bistable and all-optical switching responses are exhibited at the cut-off frequency of these waveguides, characterized by reduced Q-factor resonances. These phenomena are due to the large field enhancement obtained inside specific plasmonic gratings, which ensures a significant boosting of the nonlinear operation. Several exciting applications are proposed, which may potentially lead to new optical components and add to the optical nanocircuit paradigm.

  7. Diffraction coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers with monolithically integrated Talbot cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lei; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Chuan-Wei; Liu, Ying-Hui; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Liu, Feng-Qi; Xu, Xian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction coupled arrays of quantum cascade laser are presented. The phase-locked behavior is achieved through monolithic integration of a Talbot cavity at one side of the laser array. The principle is based on fractional Talbot effect. By controlling length of Talbot cavity to be a quarter of Talbot distance (Zt/4), in-phase mode operation is selected. Measured far-field radiation patterns reflect stable in-phase mode operation under different injection currents, from threshold current to full power current. Diffraction-limited performance is shown from the lateral far-field, where three peaks can be obtained and main peak and side peak interval is 10.5{\\deg}. The phase-locked arrays with in-phase mode operation may be a feasible solution to get higher output power and maintain well beam quality meanwhile.

  8. Spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Wenxiang, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Xi, Yan, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu; Wang, Ge, E-mail: congw@rpi.edu, E-mail: xiy2@rpi.edu, E-mail: wangg6@rpi.edu [Biomedical Imaging Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Grating interferometry is a state-of-the-art x-ray imaging approach, which can acquire information on x-ray attenuation, phase shift, and small-angle scattering simultaneously. Phase-contrast imaging and dark-field imaging are very sensitive to microstructural variation and offers superior contrast resolution for biological soft tissues. However, a common x-ray tube is a point-like source. As a result, the popular planar grating imaging configuration seriously restricts the flux of photons and decreases the visibility of signals, yielding a limited field of view. The purpose of this study is to extend the planar x-ray grating imaging theory and methods to a spherical grating scheme for a wider range of preclinical and clinical applications. Methods: A spherical grating matches the wave front of a point x-ray source very well, allowing the perpendicular incidence of x-rays on the grating to achieve a higher visibility over a larger field of view than the planer grating counterpart. A theoretical analysis of the Talbot effect for spherical grating imaging is proposed to establish a basic foundation for x-ray spherical gratings interferometry. An efficient method of spherical grating imaging is also presented to extract attenuation, differential phase, and dark-field images in the x-ray spherical grating interferometer. Results: Talbot self-imaging with spherical gratings is analyzed based on the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula, featuring a periodic angular distribution in a polar coordinate system. The Talbot distance is derived to reveal the Talbot self-imaging pattern. Numerical simulation results show the self-imaging phenomenon of a spherical grating interferometer, which is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. Conclusions: X-ray Talbot interferometry with spherical gratings has a significant practical promise. Relative to planar grating imaging, spherical grating based x-ray Talbot interferometry has a larger field of view and

  9. Giant Photogalvanic Effect in Noncentrosymmetric Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.;

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of noncentrosymmetric, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Because of the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting...... in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is a direct analogy of the photogalvanic (or bulk photovoltaic) effect known to exist in media with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure, such as doped lithium niobate or bismuth ferrite......, but is several orders of magnitude stronger. Termed the giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications....

  10. Plasmon Field Effect Transistor for Plasmon to Electric Conversion and Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Paik, Younghun; Kim, Joondong; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Sung Jin

    2016-01-13

    Direct coupling of electronic excitations of optical energy via plasmon resonances opens the door to improving gain and selectivity in various optoelectronic applications. We report a new device structure and working mechanisms for plasmon resonance energy detection and electric conversion based on a thin film transistor device with a metal nanostructure incorporated in it. This plasmon field effect transistor collects the plasmonically induced hot electrons from the physically isolated metal nanostructures. These hot electrons contribute to the amplification of the drain current. The internal electric field and quantum tunneling effect at the metal-semiconductor junction enable highly efficient hot electron collection and amplification. Combined with the versatility of plasmonic nanostructures in wavelength tunability, this device architecture offers an ultrawide spectral range that can be used in various applications.

  11. Dynamical Casimir effect for surface plasmon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hizhnyakov, V.; Loot, A., E-mail: ardi.loot@ut.ee; Azizabadi, S.Ch.

    2015-02-20

    The emission of photon pairs by a metal–dielectric interface placed between the mirrors of the resonator and excited by a plane wave is considered. The excitation causes oscillations in time of the optical length of surface plasmon polaritons in the interface. This leads to the dynamical Casimir effect – the generation of pairs of surface plasmon polariton quanta, which transfer to photons outside the interface. In the case of a properly chosen interface, the yield of two-photon emission may exceed that of the usual spontaneous parametric down-conversion. - Highlights: • The theory of dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) in the metal–dielectric interface excited by a monochromatic wave is proposed. • It is shown that the field enhancement associated with surface plasmon polaritons strongly enhances the yield of the DCE. • The numerical calculations of the enhancement factor are made. • The scheme of experimental setup to observe the DCE in the metal–dielectric interface is proposed. • Additional methods to enhance the DCE in the metal–dielectric interface are discussed.

  12. On Nature of Plasmonic Drag Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Light-matter momentum transfer in plasmonic materials is theoretically discussed in context of the modified plasmonic pressure mechanism, taking into account electron thermalization process. We show that our approach explains the observed in experiments relationship between the photoinduced electromotive force and absorption, emphasizes the quantum nature of plasmon-electron interaction, and allows one to correctly calculate the magnitude of the plasmon drag emf in flat metal films for the first time. We extend our theory on the films with modulated profiles and show that simple relationship between plasmonic energy and momentum transfer holds for the case of laminar electron drift and relatively small amplitudes of height modulation.

  13. Using the Talbot_Lau_interferometer_parameters Spreadsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Talbot-Lau interferometers allow incoherent X-ray sources to be used for phase contrast imaging. A spreadsheet for exploring the parameter space of Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers has been assembled. This spreadsheet allows the user to examine the consequences of choosing phase grating pitch, source energy, and source location on the overall geometry of a Talbot or Talbot-Lau X-ray interferometer. For the X-ray energies required to penetrate scanned luggage the spacing between gratings is large enough that the mechanical tolerances for amplitude grating positioning are unlikely to be met.

  14. Plasmonic antenna effects on photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuyan; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2011-04-19

    Efficient solar energy conversion has been vigorously pursued since the 1970s, but its large-scale implementation hinges on the availability of high-efficiency modules. For maximum efficiency, it is important to absorb most of the incoming radiation, which necessitates both efficient photoexcitation and minimal electron-hole recombination. To date, researchers have primarily focused on the latter difficulty: finding a strategy to effectively separate photoinduced electrons and holes. Very few reports have been devoted to broadband sunlight absorption and photoexcitation. However, the currently available photovoltaic cells, such as amorphous silicon, and even single-crystal silicon and sensitized solar cells, cannot respond to the wide range of the solar spectrum. The photoelectric conversion characteristics of solar cells generally decrease in the infrared wavelength range. Thus, the fraction of the solar spectrum absorbed is relatively poor. In addition, the large mismatch between the diffraction limit of light and the absorption cross-section makes the probability of interactions between photons and cell materials quite low, which greatly limits photoexcitation efficiency. Therefore, there is a pressing need for research aimed at finding conditions that lead to highly efficient photoexcitation over a wide spectrum of sunlight, particularly in the visible to near-infrared wavelengths. As characterized in the emerging field of plasmonics, metallic nanostructures are endowed with optical antenna effects. These plasmonic antenna effects provide a promising platform for artificially sidestepping the diffraction limit of light and strongly enhancing absorption cross-sections. Moreover, they can efficiently excite photochemical reactions between photons and molecules close to an optical antenna through the local field enhancement. This technology has the potential to induce highly efficient photoexcitation between photons and molecules over a wide spectrum of sunlight

  15. Plasmon switching effect based on graphene nanoribbon pair arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Wu, Lingxi; Liu, Qiong; Zhou, Renlong; Xie, Suxia; Chen, Jiangjiamin; Wu, Mengxiong; Zeng, Lisan

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the existence of plasmon switching effect in graphene nanostructure. By using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the plasmon resonance modes are studied in graphene nanoribbon pair arrays with the change of Fermi level, graphene width, and carrier mobility. It is found that the Fermi level and graphene width play an important role in changing the distribution of electric energy on different graphene nanoribbons, resulting in a significant plasmon switching effect. Moreover, we study the characteristic of resonance mode of one graphene ribbon by using glass rod with different shape. The effect of kerr material sandwiched between graphene nanoribbon pair is also considered.

  16. Plasmonic effects in metal-semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Toropov, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Metal-semiconductor nanostructures represent an important new class of materials employed in designing advanced optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic nanolasers, plasmon-enhanced light-emitting diodes and solar cells, plasmonic emitters of single photons, and quantum devices operating in infrared and terahertz domains. The combination of surface plasmon resonances in conducting structures, providing strong concentration of an electromagnetic optical field nearby, with sharp optical resonances in semiconductors, which are highly sensitive to external electromagnetic fields, creates a platform to control light on the nanoscale. The design of the composite metal-semiconductor system imposes the consideration of both the plasmonic resonances in metal and the optical transitions in semiconductors - a key issue being their resonant interaction providing a coupling regime. In this book the reader will find descriptions of electrodynamics of conducting structures, quantum physics of semiconducto...

  17. Spin-controlled plasmonics via optical Rashba effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitrit, Nir; Yulevich, Igor; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez, E-mail: mehasman@technion.ac.il [Micro and Nanooptics Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, and Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-11-18

    Observation of the optical Rashba effect in plasmonics is reported. Polarization helicity degeneracy removal, associated with the inversion symmetry violation, is attributed to the surface symmetry design via anisotropic nanoantennas with space-variant orientations. By utilizing the Rashba-induced momentum in a nanoscale kagome metastructure, we demonstrated a spin-based surface plasmon multidirectional excitation under a normal-incidence illumination. The spin-controlled plasmonics via spinoptical metasurfaces provides a route for spin-based surface-integrated photonic nanodevices and light-matter interaction control, extending the light manipulation capabilities.

  18. Coherent control of plasmonic Spin Hall effect (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shiyi; Zhong, Fan; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Li, Jensen

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate spin-induced manipulation of surface-plasmon polariton (SPP) by exploiting the plasmonic spin Hall effect. By constructing metasurfaces with plasmonic atoms and varying spin-dependent geometric phase, we establish a holographic interface between an incident plane wave and the SPP on an optical chip. It allows us to gain spin-splitting and flexible control of the shapes and phases of the local SPP orbitals. Furthermore, a linearly polarized incident light with rotating polarization angle can be used to play a motion picture of the orbitals. These investigations provide a feasible route to many applications, including spin-enabled imaging, data storage and integrated optics.

  19. Quantum information processing by weaving quantum Talbot carpets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; de Melo, Fernando; Milman, Pérola; Walborn, Stephen P.

    2015-06-01

    Single-photon interference due to passage through a periodic grating is considered in a novel proposal for processing D -dimensional quantum systems (quDits) encoded in the spatial degrees of freedom of light. We show that free-space propagation naturally implements basic single-quDit gates by means of the Talbot effect: an intricate time-space carpet of light in the near-field diffraction regime. By adding a diagonal phase gate, we show that a complete set of single-quDit gates can be implemented. We then introduce a spatially dependent beam splitter that allows for projective measurements in the computational basis and can be used for the implementation of controlled operations between two quDits. Universal quantum information processing can then be implemented with linear optics and ancilla photons via postselection and feed-forward following the original proposal of Knill-Laflamme and Milburn. Although we consider photons, our scheme should be directly applicable to a number of other physical systems. Interpretation of the Talbot effect as a quantum logic operation provides a beautiful and interesting way to visualize quantum computation through wave propagation and interference.

  20. Plasmon properties and hybridization effects in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacacela Gomez, C.; Pisarra, M.; Gravina, M.; Riccardi, P.; Sindona, A.

    2017-02-01

    The plasmonic character of monolayer silicene is investigated by time-dependent density functional theory in the random phase approximation. Both the intrinsic (undoped) and several extrinsic (carrier doped or gated) conditions are explored by simulating injection of a probe particle (i.e., an electron or a photon) of energy below 20 eV and in-plane momentum smaller than 1.1 Å -1 . The energy-loss function of the system is analyzed, with particular reference to its induced charge-density fluctuations, i.e., plasmon resonances and corresponding dispersions, occurring in the investigated energy-momentum region. At energies larger than 1.5 eV, two intrinsic interband modes are detected and characterized. The first one is a hybridized π -like plasmon, which is assisted by competing one-electron processes involving s p2 and s p3 states, and depends on the slightest changes in specific geometric parameters, such as nearest-neighbor atomic distance and buckling constant. The second one is a more conventional π -σ plasmon, which is more intense than the π -like plasmon and more affected by one-electron processes involving the σ bands with respect to the analogous collective oscillation in monolayer graphene. At energies below 1 eV, two extrinsic intraband modes are predicted to occur, which are generated by distinct types of Dirac electrons (associated with different Fermi velocities at the so-called Dirac points). The most intense of them is a two-dimensional plasmon, having an energy-momentum dispersion that resembles that of a two-dimensional electron gas. The other is an acoustic plasmon that occurs for specific momentum directions and competes with the two-dimensional plasmon at mid-infrared energies. The strong anisotropic character of this mode cannot be explained in terms of the widely used Dirac-cone approximation. As in mono-, bi-, and few-layer graphene, the extrinsic oscillations of silicene are highly sensitive to the concentration of injected or ejected

  1. Surface plasmon enhanced effects in photonic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wu

    We have developed a novel design of multi-pass surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with differential phase interrogation based on multi-pass interferometry. This new configuration provides an intrinsic phase amplification effect of over two-fold by placing the SPR sensor head in a signal arm of the interferometer so that the interrogating optical beam will traverse the sensor surface infinite number of times. Experimental interferometers based on the Michelson and Fabry-Perot configurations have been employed to experimentally verify this amplification effect through the comparison with the Mach-Zehnder configuration. Results obtained from the salt-water mixtures, antibody-antigen, and protein-DNA binding reaction have confirmed the expected phase measurement enhancement. We have demonstrated that the sensitivity limit of intensity-based SPR biosensors can be enhanced when we combine the contributions from phase with that of amplitude instead of just detecting the amplitude or phase variation only. Experimental results indicate that an enhancement factor of as much as 20 times is achievable, yet with no compromise in measurement dynamic range. While existing SPR biosensor systems are predominantly based on the angular scheme, which relies on detecting intensity variations associated with amplitude changes only, the proposed scheme may serve as a direct system upgrade approach for these systems. In addition, a surface plasmon enhanced ellipsometry (SPEE) biosensor scheme based on the use of a photoelastic modulator (PEM) has been explored. We showed that the polarization parameters of a laser beam, tan psi, cos Delta and ellipse orientation angle φ, can be directly measured by detecting the modulation signals at the 1st and 2nd harmonics of the modulation frequency under a certain birefringence geometry. This leads to an accurate measurement of refractive index variations within the evanescent field region close to the gold sensor surface, thereby enabling

  2. Enhanced magneto-plasmonic effect in Au/Co/Au multilayers caused by exciton–plasmon strong coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidi, S.M., E-mail: m_hamidi@sbu.ac.ir; Ghaebi, O.

    2016-09-15

    In this paper, we have investigated magneto optical Kerr rotation using the strong coupling of exciton–plasmon. For this purpose, we have demonstrated strong coupling phenomenon using reflectometry measurements. These measurements revealed the formation of two split polaritonic extrema in reflectometry as a function of wavelength. Then we have shown exciton–plasmon coupling in dispersion diagram which presented an anti-crossing between the polaritonic branches. To assure the readers of strong coupling, we have shown an enhanced magneto-optical Kerr rotation by comparing the reflectometry results of strong coupling of surface Plasmon polariton of Au/Co/Au multilayer and R6G excitons with surface Plasmon polariton magneto-optical kerr effect experimental setup. - Highlights: • The magneto optical Kerr rotation has been investigated by using the strong coupling of exciton–plasmon. • We have shown exciton–plasmon coupling in dispersion diagram which presented an anti-crossing between the polaritonic branches. • Strong coupling of surface plasmon polariton and exciton have been yielded to the enhanced magneto-optical Kerr effect. • Plasmons in Au/Co/Au multilayer and exciton in R6G have been coupled to enhance magneto-optical activity.

  3. Surface roughness effects on aluminium-based ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Bo-Tsun; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Shih, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of ultraviolet zinc oxide plasmonic nanolasers fabricated on aluminium films with two different degrees of surface roughness. We demonstrate that the effective dielectric functions of aluminium interfaces with distinct roughness can be analysed from reflectivity measurements. By considering the scattering losses, including Rayleigh scattering, electron scattering, and grain boundary scattering, we adopt the modified Drude-Lorentz model to describe the scattering effect caused by surface roughness and obtain the effective dielectric functions of different Al samples. The sample with higher surface roughness induces more electron scattering and light scattering for SPP modes, leading to a higher threshold gain for the plasmonic nanolaser. By considering the pumping efficiency, our theoretical analysis shows that diminishing the detrimental optical losses caused by the roughness of the metallic interface could effectively lower (~33.1%) the pumping threshold of the plasmonic nanolasers, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  4. Photogalvanic Effect in Plasmonic Non-Centrosymmetric Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; Uskov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of metamaterials containing asymmetrically shaped, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Due to the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is the direct analogy of the photogalvanic effect known to exist in media with certain asymmetries in their crystal structure, such as lithium niobate or quartz. Termed the plasmonic bulk photovoltaic (or photogalvanic) effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures, and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications.

  5. Optical enhancement effects of plasmonic nanostructures on organic photovoltaic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hui Joon

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Hui Joon Park and L. Jay Guo. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society and Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved. In this article, the optical enhancement effects of plasmonic nanostructures on OPV cells were reviewed as an effective way to resolve the mismatch problems between the short exciton diffusion length in organic semiconductors (around 10 nm) and the large thickness required to fully absorb sunlight (e.g. hundreds of nanometers). Especially, the performances of OPVs with plasmonic nanoparticles in photoactive and buffer layers and with periodic nanostructures were investigated. Furthermore, nanoimprint lithography-based nanofabrication processes that can easily control the dimension and uniformity of structures for large-area and uniform plasmonic nanostructures were demonstrated.

  6. Terahertz Optoelectronic Property of Graphene: Substrate-Induced Effects on Plasmonic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Tan Lin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The terahertz plasmon dispersion of a multilayer system consisting of graphene on dielectric and/or plasma thin layers is systematically investigated. We show that graphene plasmons can couple with other quasiparticles such as phonons and plasmons of the substrate; the characteristics of the plasmon dispersion of graphene are dramatically modified by the presence of the coupling effect. The resultant plasmon dispersion of the multilayer system is a strong function of the physical parameters of the spacer and the substrate, signifying the importance of the substrate selection in constructing graphene-based plasmonic devices.

  7. 基于泰伯莫尔法的长焦距测量系统的装调技术%Alignment method for measurement of long focal length based on Talbot-Moiréeffect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆衡; 陈好; 何勇; 李建欣; 胡绍云; 张浩; 孟庆安

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve high-accuracy measurement of the long focal length, a method of measuring long focal length based on Talbot-Moiré effect was studied in this paper, a long focal length test device was established, it included a collimated wavefront generator, a Talbot interferometer and a imaging system. The effect of wavefront aberration on accuracy of focal length was analyzed. Then the distance s from the sample to the grating G1, the space d between grating G1 and grating G2,and angle of two grating lines as influencing factors on accuracy of focal length were analysed. The alignment method to improve the accuracy was proposed. Pentaprism method for the detection of wavefront was introduced, to ensure that the collimated wavefront quality better than a wavelength. The linear grating encoder was used to measure s and calibrate d, to make the accuracy of the distance better than 0.1 mm. A reference reflective concave sphere was used for angle calibration, to make the accuracy of angle better than 0.001o. The experimental results show that the relative error is less than 0.35% when measured focal length is 5 436 mm.%为了实现长焦距的精确测量,基于泰伯莫尔法测量长焦距的原理,构建出了由准直波前发生器、泰伯干涉仪和成像采集系统组成的长焦距测量装置。分析了准直波前畸变对焦距测量精度的影响,用数值分析的方法分析了待测样品到光栅G1的距离s,光栅G1、G2的间距d以及栅线夹角对焦距测量精度的影响。提出了具体的装调方法:用五棱镜法检测波前,保证准直波前质量PV值优于一个波长;用光栅尺位移传感器测量s,标定d,使其精度达到0.1 mm;采用标准反射凹球面法标定光栅夹角,使光栅夹角的装调精度达到0.001º。对焦距为5436 mm的透镜进行实验测量,误差小于0.35%。

  8. Plasmon field effect transistor: A novel sensing platform for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein

    The interest in plasmons, associated with nanostructured metals, has remarkably increased in the past decade. A Recent improvement in fabrication techniques to create well-controlled nanostructures also contributed to the rapid development of plasmonic applications, such as meta-materials, nonlinear optics, photovoltaic devices, biomedical sensors, medical therapies and spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the successful applications, which is widely used in biomedical research. On the other hand, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also widely studied in a broad range of applications. The distinct property of LSPR is a tailored and sharp absorption/scattering peaks depending on the shape and sizes of the metal nanostructures. In addition, plasmonics can enable integration of high speed optical circuit by taking the advantages from the current electronics and optics technologies. Thus, plasmonics is considered as a solution for the next generation systems that offers ultra-high speed data processing. In this dissertation, we will introduce a novel plasmon field effect transistor (FET) that enables direct detection and efficient amplification of plasmon energy. This FET has several advantages such as electrical isolation of plasmon absorber nanostructures from a sensing and drug screening. Currently, we have proof of concept for the antigen-antibody bonding using the plasmon field effect transistor. We will develop a multiplexing capable plasmon FET sensing platform by integrating an array of plasmon FETs with microfluidic channels to detect cancer biomarkers.

  9. An improved Talbot method for numerical Laplace transform inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Dingfelder, Benedict; J. A. C. Weideman

    2013-01-01

    The classical Talbot method for the computation of the inverse Laplace transform is improved for the case where the transform is analytic in the complex plane except for the negative real axis. First, by using a truncated Talbot contour rather than the classical contour that goes to infinity in the left half-plane, faster convergence is achieved. Second, a control mechanism for improving numerical stability is introduced. These two features are incorporated into a software code, whose perform...

  10. Large-field-of-view Chip-scale Talbot-grid-based Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Shuo; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    The fluorescence microscope is one of the most important tools in modern clinical diagnosis and biological science. However, its expense, size and limited field-of-view (FOV) are becoming bottlenecks in key applications such as large-scale phenotyping and low-resource-setting diagnostics. Here we report a low-cost, compact chip-scale fluorescence-imaging platform, termed the Fluorescence Talbot Microscopy (FTM), which utilizes the Talbot self-imaging effect to enable efficient fluorescence imaging over a large and directly-scalable FOV. The FTM prototype has a resolution of 1.2 microns and an FOV of 3.9 mm x 3.5 mm. We demonstrate the imaging capability of FTM on fluorescently labeled breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and HEK cells expressing green fluorescent protein.

  11. Screening effects on plasmon damping in an electron liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Böhm, Helga M.; Schinner, Andreas

    1993-03-01

    Plasmon damping in the three-dimensional homogeneous electron gas is investigated within the formalism of second-order perturbation theory, concentrating on the effects of static and dynamic screening. We have found several different theoretical approaches leading to comparable results, especially in the metallic-density regime. Using a spin-dependent interaction, however, significantly improves the results of our theory towards a better agreement with the experiments.

  12. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Alla Bucharskaya; Galina Maslyakova; Georgy Terentyuk; Alexander Yakunin; Yuri Avetisyan; Olga Bibikova; Elena Tuchina; Boris Khlebtsov; Nikolai Khlebtsov; Valery Tuchin

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. ...

  13. Nonlocal effects in a hybrid plasmonic waveguide for nanoscale confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiangsheng; Bao, Fanglin; He, Sailing

    2013-01-28

    The effect of nonlocal optical response is studied for a novel silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPW). Finite element method is used to implement the hydrodynamic model and the propagation mode is analyzed for a hybrid plasmonic waveguide of arbitrary cross section. The waveguide has an inverted metal nano-rib over a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure. An extremely small mode area of~10⁻⁶λ² is achieved together with several microns long propagation distance at the telecom wavelength of 1.55 μm. The figure of merit (FoM) is also improved in the same time, compared to the pervious hybrid plasmonic waveguide. We demonstrate the validity of our method by comparing our simulating results with some analytical results for a metal cylindrical waveguide and a metal slab waveguide in a wide wavelength range. For the HPW, we find that the nonlocal effects can give less loss and better confinement. In particular, we explore the influence of the radius of the rib's tip on the loss and the confinement. We show that the nonlocal effects give some new fundamental limitation on the confinement, leaving the mode area finite even for geometries with infinitely sharp tips.

  14. Plasmonic response of partially gated field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, S.; Rupper, G.; Reed, M. L.; Shur, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electron density oscillations in the transistor channels - plasma waves in the two-dimensional electron gas - determine the high frequency device response. Plasmonic field effect transistors have emerged as very sensitive, tunable, and extremely fast detectors of THz radiation. They have been implemented using silicon (CMOS), AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, and AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, with the HEMTs shown to operate more efficiently at higher THz frequencies. These HEMTs have both gated and ungated sections of the device channel between the source and drain, and the photovoltaic regime of operation requires an asymmetric gate placement in the device channel. The interactions of the plasma waves in the gated and ungated channel regions strongly affect the overall response and have been investigated in numerous publications. This work addresses a new aspect of such interaction - the effect of the relative position of the gated and ungated section. We show this previously unexplored effect plays a dominant role in determining the response. The results of the numerical simulation based on the solution of the complete system of the hydrodynamic equations describing the electron fluid in the device channel show that the inverse response frequency could be approximated by the sum of the gated plasmon transit time in the gated section of the device, the ungated plasmon transit time in the ungated section of the device between the gate and the drain, and the RC gate-to-source constant. Here R and C are the resistance and capacitance of the gate to source section. Hence, the highest speed is achieved when the gate is as close to the source as possible. This suggests a novel plasmonic detector design, where the gate and source electrode overlap, which is shown to have a superior frequency response for the same distance between the source and the drain.

  15. Modeling molecular effects on plasmon transport: Silver nanoparticles with tartrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Lopata, Kenneth; Wall, Michael R.; Bartell, Lizette; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of plasmon transport between silver nanoparticles by a yellow fluorophore, tartrazine, is studied theoretically. The system is studied by combining a finite-difference time-domain Maxwell treatment of the electric field and the plasmons with a time-dependent parameterized method number 3 simulation of the tartrazine, resulting in an effective Maxwell/Schrödinger (i.e., classical/quantum) method. The modeled system has three linearly arranged small silver nanoparticles with a radius of 2 nm and a center-to-center separation of 4 nm; the molecule is centered between the second and third nanoparticles. We initiate an x-polarized current on the first nanoparticle and monitor the transmission through the system. The molecule rotates much of the x-polarized current into the y-direction and greatly reduces the overall transmission of x-polarized current.

  16. A study of plasmonic enhanced transmission effects in nano-optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gbur, Greg

    2012-01-24

    This project was a numerical study of the behavior of surface plasmons in nano-systems, focusing on the interaction between plasmons, light, and nano-scale structures such as nano-scale metallic wires and quantum wires/dots. The primary results of the project included: a) the demonstration of the use of surface plasmons to modify the spatial coherence of a light wave, b) the demonstration of a feasible plasmonic superresolved readout system, and c) the demonstration of a Plasmonic Zeno effect, in which the attenuation of a light wave in metal is suppressed by breaking up the metal into a collection of structured layers. The integration of quantum wire/dot effects with the plasmonic simulations proved to be harder than expected, in large part due to the lack of accurate and simple quantum dot models.

  17. Giant Surface-Plasmon-Induced Drag Effect in Metal Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-10-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface-plasmon-induced drag-effect rectification (SPIDER), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. In nanowires, this giant SPIDER generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ˜105-106V/cm. The giant SPIDER is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ˜20THz. It opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  18. Giant surface plasmon induced drag effect (SPIDEr) in metal nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durach, Maxim; Rusina, Anastasia; Stockman, Mark I.

    2009-08-01

    Here, for the first time we predict a giant surface plasmon-induced drag effect (SPIDEr), which exists under conditions of the extreme nanoplasmonic confinement. Under realistic conditions, in nanowires, this giant SPIDEr generates rectified THz potential differences up to 10 V and extremely strong electric fields up to ~ 105 ~ 106 V/cm. The SPIDEr is an ultrafast effect whose bandwidth for nanometric wires is ~ 20 THz. The giant SPIDEr opens up a new field of ultraintense THz nanooptics with wide potential applications in nanotechnology and nanoscience, including microelectronics, nanoplasmonics, and biomedicine.

  19. Experimental studies of surface plasmon polariton band gap effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Leosson, K.

    2003-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagation at a gold film surface covered by periodic arrays of ~40-nm-high scatterers arranged in a triangular lattice of different periods containing straight line defects is studied using collection scanning near-field optical microscopy. The results reveal...... the dependence of the SPP band gap (SPPBG) effect manifested via the SPP reflection and guiding (along line defects) on the parameters of the surface structures (period, filling factor and lattice orientation). We find that the SPPBG effect is stronger along &ggr;K direction for all investigated periodic...

  20. Large photon drag effect of intrinsic graphene induced by plasmonic evanescent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ma; Li, Zhibing

    2016-12-01

    A large photon drag effect of the massless Dirac fermions in intrinsic graphene is predicted for a graphene-on-plasmonic-layer system. The surface plasmons in the plasmonic layer enlarge the wave number of the photon hundreds times more than in vacuum. The evanescent field of the surface plasmons generates a directional motion of carriers in the intrinsic graphene because of the large momentum transfer from the surface plasmon to the excited carriers. A model Hamiltonian is developed on the assumption that the in-plane wavelength of the surface plasmons is much smaller than the mean free path of the carriers. The time evolution of the density matrix is solved by perturbation method as well as numerical integration. The nondiagonal density matrix elements with momentum transfer lead to a gauge current, which is an optically driven macroscopic direct current. The dependence of the macroscopic direct current on the incident direction and intensity of the laser field is studied.

  1. Computational electromagnetic analysis of plasmonic effects in interdigital photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Avery M.; Nusir, Ahmad I.; Nguyen, Paul V.; Manasreh, Omar M.; Herzog, Joseph B.

    2014-09-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have been shown to act as optical antennas that enhance optical devices. This study focuses on computational electromagnetic (CEM) analysis of GaAs photodetectors with gold interdigital electrodes. Experiments have shown that the photoresponse of the devices depend greatly on the electrode spacing and the polarization of the incident light. Smaller electrode spacing and transverse polarization give rise to a larger photoresponse. This computational study will simulate the optical properties of these devices to determine what plasmonic properties and optical enhancement these devices may have. The models will be solving Maxwell's equations with a finite element method (FEM) algorithm provided by the software COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The preliminary results gathered from the simulations follow the same trends that were seen in the experimental data collected, that the spectral response increases when the electrode spacing decreases. Also the simulations show that incident light with the electric field polarized transversely across the electrodes produced a larger photocurrent as compared with longitudinal polarization. This dependency is similar to other plasmonic devices. The simulation results compare well with the experimental data. This work also will model enhancement effects in nanostructure devices with dimensions that are smaller than the current samples to lead the way for future nanoscale devices. By seeing the potential effects that the decreased spacing could have, it opens the door to a new set of devices on a smaller scale, potentially ones with a higher level of enhancement for these devices. In addition, the precise modeling and understanding of the effects of the parameters provides avenues to optimize the enhancement of these structures making more efficient photodetectors. Similar structures could also potentially be used for enhanced photovoltaics as well.

  2. Effective dielectric constants and spectral density analysis of plasmonic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin You; Raza, Aikifa; Fang, Nicholas X.; Chen, Gang; Zhang, TieJun

    2016-10-01

    Cermet or ceramic-metal composite coatings promise great potentials in light harvesting, but the complicated composite structure at the nanoscale induces a design challenge to predict their optical properties. We find that the effective dielectric constants of nanocomposites predicted by finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulation results match those of different classical effective medium theories in their respective validity range. However, a precise prediction of the fabricated nanocomposite properties for different filling factors is very challenging. In this work, we extract the spectral density functions in the Bergman representation from the analytical models, numerical simulations, and experimental data of plasmonic nanocomposites. The spectral density functions, which only depend on geometry of the nanocomposite material, provide a unique measure on the contribution of individual and percolated particles inside the nanocomposite. According to the spectral density analysis of measured dielectric constants, the material properties of nanocomposites fabricated by the co-sputtering approach are dominated by electromagnetic interaction among individual metallic particles. While in the case of the nanocomposites fabricated by the multilayer thin film approach, the material properties are dominated by percolated metallic particles inside the dielectric host, as indicated by our FDTD simulation results. This understanding provides new physical insight into the interaction between light and plasmonic nanocomposites.

  3. The Goos-Hänchen effect for surface plasmon polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerkamp, Felix; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A; Baumeier, Björn

    2011-08-01

    By means of an impedance boundary condition and numerical solution of integral equations for the scattering amplitudes to which its use gives rise, we study as a function of its angle of incidence the reflection of a surface plasmon polariton beam propagating on a metal surface whose dielectric function is ɛ1(ω) when it is incident on a planar interface with a coplanar metal surface whose dielectric function is ɛ2(ω). When the surface of incidence is optically more dense than the surface of scattering, i.e. when |ɛ2(ω)|≫|ɛ1(ω)|, the reflected beam undergoes a lateral displacement whose magnitude is several times the wavelength of the incident beam. This displacement is the surface plasmon polariton analogue of the Goos-Hänchen effect. Since this displacement is sensitive to the dielectric properties of the surface, this effect can be exploited to sense modifications of the dielectric environment of a metal surface, e.g. due to adsorption of atomic or molecular layers on it.

  4. Multi-Periodic Photonic Hyper-Crystals: Volume Plasmon Polaritons and the Purcell Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Iorsh, I. V.; Orlov, A. A.;

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate superior degree of control over volume plasmon polariton propagation and the Purcell effect in multi-period (4-layer unit cell) plasmonic multilayers, which can be viewed as multiscale hyperbolic metamaterials or multi-periodic photonic hyper-crystals. © 2014 OSA....

  5. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Uskov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    effects in the formation of plasmonic resonance is diminished. We also show that 5-20 times increase of photoemission can be achieved on embedding of nanoparticles without taking into account dynamics of ballistic electrons. The results obtained can be used to increase efficiency of plasmon...

  6. Plasmonics based VLSI processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In continuum to my previous paper titled‘Implementation of plasmonics in VLSI’, this paperattempts to explore further, the actual physicalrealization of an all-plasmonic chip. In this paper,various methods of plasmon-basedphotolithography have been discussed and anobservation is made w.r.t the cost effectiveness andease of adaptability. Also, plasmonics based activeelement has been discussed which would helpunravel further arenas ofapproaches and methodstowards the realization of an all-plasmonic chip.

  7. Classical and quantum effects in noble metal and graphene plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics — the interaction of light with free electrons in metals — is commonly understood within classical electrodynamics using local-response constitutive laws (such as Ohm's law). However, the tight localization of plasmons to small volumes is revealing intriguing new physics such as noncla...

  8. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-08-09

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  9. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Bucharskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT/photodynamic (PDT therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  10. Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, B; García-Martín, A; Cuevas, J C

    2015-08-24

    We present a theoretical study of the Faraday effect in hybrid magneto-plasmonic crystals that consist of Au-Co-Au perforated membranes with a periodic array of sub-wavelength holes. We show that in these hybrid systems the interplay between the extraordinary optical transmission and the magneto-optical activity leads to a resonant enhancement of the Faraday rotation, as compared to purely ferromagnetic membranes. In particular, we determine the geometrical parameters for which this enhancement is optimized and show that the inclusion of a noble metal like Au dramatically increases the Faraday rotation over a broad bandwidth. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the Faraday rotation in these periodically perforated membranes provides a further insight into the origin of the extraordinary optical transmission.

  11. Asymmetric Talbot-Lau interferometry for inertial sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Simone; Giammarchi, Marco; Olivares, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    We study in detail a peculiar configuration of the Talbot-Lau matter wave interferometer, characterized by unequal distances between the two diffraction gratings and the observation plane. We refer to this apparatus as the "asymmetric Talbot-Lau setup." Particular attention is given to its capabilities as an inertial sensor for particle and atomic beams, also in comparison with the classical moiré deflectometer. The present paper is motivated by possible experimental applications in the context of antimatter wave interferometry, including the measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter particles. Therefore we focus our analysis on the current state of the art. To support our findings, we have also performed numerical simulations of realistic particle beams with varying speed distributions.

  12. A Body that Matters: Tom Kilroy's Talbot's Box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Poulain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at Tom Kilroy’s play Talbot Box, and argues that it resorts to the tropes of the Passion narrative, revisited by ex-centric mystic Matt Talbot, to expose the homogenising, normalising and exploitative efforts of the Catholic Church, a powerful institution which is shown to work in collusion with the forces of capitalism. Using a grotesque, often farcical dramaturgy, the play displays the joint attempts of ecclesiastical and temporal powers to appropriate Matt Talbot’s private performance of the Christian Passion for their own purposes, as well as the ways in which he resists instrumentalization by submitting himself to a radical form of bodily exposure. The play thus invents its own version of a theatre of cruelty in order to accommodate a mystical experience which lies beyond the reach of realistic representation. 

  13. Gabor fusion technique in a Talbot bands optical coherence tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Petr; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2012-02-27

    In this paper we show how to advantageously combine two effects to enhance the sensitivity with depth in Fourier domain (FD) optical coherence tomography (OCT): Talbot bands (TB) and Gabor-based fusion (GF) technique. TB operation is achieved by routing the two beams, from the object arm and from the reference arm in the OCT interferometer, along parallel separate paths towards the spectrometer. By adjusting the lateral gap between the two beams in their way towards the spectrometer, the position for the maximum of contrast variation of spectral modulation versus the optical path difference in the interferometer is adjusted. For five values of the focus position, the gap between the two beams is readjusted to reach maximum sensitivity. Then, similar to the procedure employed in the GF technique, a compound image is formed by stitching together the parts of the five images that exhibited maximum brightness. The smaller the diameters of the two beams, the narrower the visibility profile versus depth in Talbot bands, which brings advantages in terms of mirror terms attenuation. However, this leads to a larger spot on the linear camera, which introduces losses, therefore the combined procedure, TB/GF is investigated for four different values of the beam diameters of the two beams. Future cameras with larger pixel size may take full advantage of the TB/GF procedure proposed here.

  14. Plasmonic photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Yu Lim; Liu, Ru-Shi; Tsai, Din Ping

    2013-04-01

    Plasmonic photocatalysis has recently facilitated the rapid progress in enhancing photocatalytic efficiency under visible light irradiation, increasing the prospect of using sunlight for environmental and energy applications such as wastewater treatment, water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction. Plasmonic photocatalysis makes use of noble metal nanoparticles dispersed into semiconductor photocatalysts and possesses two prominent features-a Schottky junction and localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR). The former is of benefit to charge separation and transfer whereas the latter contributes to the strong absorption of visible light and the excitation of active charge carriers. This article aims to provide a systematic study of the fundamental physical mechanisms of plasmonic photocatalysis and to rationalize many experimental observations. In particular, we show that LSPR could boost the generation of electrons and holes in semiconductor photocatalysts through two different effects-the LSPR sensitization effect and the LSPR-powered bandgap breaking effect. By classifying the plasmonic photocatalytic systems in terms of their contact form and irradiation state, we show that the enhancement effects on different properties of photocatalysis can be well-explained and systematized. Moreover, we identify popular material systems of plasmonic photocatalysis that have shown excellent performance and elucidate their key features in the context of our proposed mechanisms and classifications.

  15. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an...

  16. Aharonov-Casher effect for plasmons in a ring of Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsstrunk, Roman; Garate, Ion; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2013-08-01

    Phase slips in a one-dimensional closed array of Josephson junctions hybridize the persistent current states and plasmon branches of excitations. The interference between phase slips passing through different junctions of the array makes the hybridization sensitive to the charges of the superconducting islands comprising the array. This in turn results in the Aharonov-Casher effect for plasmons, which in the absence of phase slips are insensitive to island charges.

  17. Counterintuitive dispersion effect near surface plasmon resonances in Otto structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Li-Gang; Ye, Lin-Hua; Al-Amri, M.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the counterintuitive dispersion effect associated with the poles and zeros of reflection and transmission functions in an Otto configuration when a surface plasmon resonance is excited. We show that the zeros and/or poles in the reflection and transmission functions may move into the upper-half complex-frequency plane (CFP), and these locations of the zeros and poles determine the dispersion properties of the whole structures (i.e., the frequency-dependent change of both reflected and transmitted phases). Meanwhile, we demonstrate various dispersion effects (both normal and abnormal) related to the changes of the poles and zeros in both reflection and transmission functions when considering the properties of metal substrates. For a realistic metal substrate in an Otto structure, there are the optimal thickness and incident angle, which correspond to the transitions of the zeros in the reflection function from the upper-half to lower-half CFP. These properties may be helpful to manipulate light propagation in optical devices.

  18. Nonlocal effect in surface plasmon polariton of ultrathin metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Hong-jie; Yu, Yabin, E-mail: apybyu@hnu.edu.cn; Wu, Reng-lai; Yu, Yan-qin; Wang, Ya-xin

    2015-09-01

    Using the nonlocal conductivity based on quantum response theory, we study the optical properties of p-polarized wave in quartz–metal–film–air structures, especially the influence of nonlocal effect on the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) resonance. In absorption spectrum, the resonant peak of SPP is found, and the dependence of the resonant peak on film thickness shows that nonlocal effect in the SPP resonance is enhanced significantly with the decrease of film-thickness, especially in the less than 20 nm metal film. We calculate the surface charge density as a function of frequency, and find that the frequencies at the charge and absorption peaks are the same. This clearly confirms that the absorption peak stems from SPP resonance excitation, and SPPs absorb the energy of the electromagnetic wave via charge oscillations. In the case of SPP resonance, the charge and electric field on the down-surface of thin film are always greater than that on the up-surface; however, the situation is just opposite in the case of no SPP resonance. This implies that the SPP resonance occurs near the down-surface of the film. Moreover, due to the nonlocal response of electric current to the electric field, the energy flow and electric current show anomalous oscillations, and with the increase of film thickness the anomalous oscillations exhibit obvious attenuation.

  19. Nanostructure shape effects on response of plasmonic aptamer sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Subramanian; Mayer, Kathryn M; Lee, Seunghyun; Soper, Steven A; Hafner, Jason H; Spivak, David A

    2013-09-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor surface was fabricated by the deposition of gold nanorods on a glass substrate and subsequent immobilization of the DNA aptamer, which specifically bind to thrombin. This LSPR aptamer sensor showed a response of 6-nm λ(max) shift for protein binding with the detection limit of at least 10 pM, indicating one of the highest sensitivities achieved for thrombin detection by optical extinction LSPR. We also tested the LSPR sensor fabricated using gold bipyramid, which showed higher refractive index sensitivity than the gold nanorods, but the overall response of gold bipyramid sensor appears to be 25% less than that of the gold nanorod substrate, despite the approximately twofold higher refractive index sensitivity. XPS analysis showed that this is due to the low surface density of aptamers on the gold bipyramid compared with gold nanorods. The low surface density of the aptamers on the gold bipyramid surface may be due to the effect of shape of the nanostructure on the kinetics of aptamer monolayer formation. The small size of aptamers relative to other bioreceptors is the key to achieving high sensitivity by biosensors on the basis of LSPR, demonstrated here for protein binding. The generality of aptamer sensors for protein detection using gold nanorod and gold nanobipyramid substrates is anticipated to have a large impact in the important development of sensors toward biomarkers, environmental toxins, and warfare agents.

  20. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Shinpei, E-mail: Ogawa.Shimpei@eb.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Ueno, Masashi [Advanced Technology R and D Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, 8-1-1 Tsukaguchi-Honmachi, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-8661 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM) has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ∼210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  1. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinpei Ogawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ∼210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  2. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.

  3. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berthel, Martin; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an important role in the interpretation of recent experiments using leakage radiation microscopy. We compare our theory with experiments using classical or quantum near-field scanning optical microscopy probes and show that the approach leads to a full interpretation of the recorded optical images.

  4. Coherence and aberration effects in surface plasmon polariton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Chartrand, Camille; Bellessa, Joel; Huant, Serge; Genet, Cyriaque; Drezet, Aurélien

    2015-09-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally coherent imaging of surface plasmon polaritons using either leakage radiation microscopy through a thin metal film or interference microscopy through a thick metal film. Using a rigorous modal formalism based on scalar Whittaker potentials, we develop a systematic analytical and vectorial method adapted to the analysis of coherent imaging involving surface plasmon polaritons. The study includes geometrical aberrations due index mismatch which played an important role in the interpretation of recent experiments using leakage radiation microscopy. We compare our theory with experiments using classical or quantum near-field scanning optical microscopy probes and show that the approach leads to a full interpretation of the recorded optical images.

  5. Plasmonics in buried structures

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, I. T.; García de Abajo, Francisco Javier

    2009-01-01

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative los...

  6. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system.

  7. Enhanced Luminescence Performance of Quantum Wells by Coupling Piezo-Phototronic with Plasmonic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Jiang, Chunyan; Du, Chunhua; Jing, Liang; Liu, Mengmeng; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-12-27

    With a promising prospect of light-emitting diodes as an attractive alternative to conventional light sources, remaining challenges still cannot be addressed owing to their limited efficiency. Among the continued scientific efforts, significant improvement on the emission efficiency has been achieved via either piezo-phototronic effect-based strain modulation or resonant excitation of plasmons in metallic nanostructures. Here, we present the investigation on the coupling process between piezo-phototronic effect and localized surface plasmonic resonance for enhancing the photoluminescence of InGaN/GaN quantum wells coated with Ag nanoparticles. The underlying physical mechanism of experimental results originates from tuning plasmonic resonance controlled by the shift of emission wavelength via piezo-phototronic effect, and it is further confirmed with the support of theoretical calculations. As a result, our research provides an approach to the integration of plasmonics with piezo-phototronic effect and brings widespread applications to high-efficiency artificial lighting, on-chip integrated plasmonic circuits, subwavelength optical communication, and micro-optoelectronic mechanical systems.

  8. Measuring finite-range phase coherence in an optical lattice using Talbot interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Baals, Christian; Labouvie, Ralf; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Pelster, Axel; Ott, Herwig

    2017-06-01

    One of the important goals of present research is to control and manipulate coherence in a broad variety of systems, such as semiconductor spintronics, biological photosynthetic systems, superconducting qubits and complex atomic networks. Over the past decades, interferometry of atoms and molecules has proven to be a powerful tool to explore coherence. Here we demonstrate a near-field interferometer based on the Talbot effect, which allows us to measure finite-range phase coherence of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. We apply this interferometer to study the build-up of phase coherence after a quantum quench of a Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our technique of measuring finite-range phase coherence is generic, easy to adopt and can be applied in practically all lattice experiments without further modifications.

  9. A Wigner Function Approach to Coherence in a Talbot-Lau Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Imhof

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a thermal gas, we model the signal of a trapped interferometer. This interferometer uses two short laser pulses, separated by time T, which act as a phase grating for the matter waves. Near time 2 T , there is an echo in the cloud’s density due to the Talbot-Lau effect. Our model uses the Wigner function approach and includes a weak residual harmonic trap. The analysis shows that the residual potential limits the interferometer’s visibility, shifts the echo time of the interferometer, and alters its time dependence. Loss of visibility can be mitigated by optimizing the initial trap frequency just before the interferometer cycle begins.

  10. Plasmonic Demultiplexer and Guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Chenglong

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional plasmonic demultiplexers for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which consist of concentric grooves on a gold film, are proposed and experimentally demonstrated to realize light-SPP coupling, effective dispersion and multiple-channel SPP guiding. A resolution as high as 10 nm is obtained. The leakage radiation microscopy imaging shows that the SPPs of different wavelengths are focused and routed into different SPP strip waveguides. The plasmonic demultiplexer can thus serve as a wavelength division multiplexing element for integrated plasmonic circuit and also as a plasmonic spectroscopy or filter.

  11. Optical control of plasmonic heating effects using reversible photo-alignment of nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Giovanna; Cataldi, Ugo; De Sio, Luciano; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Umeton, Cesare

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate and characterize an optical control of the plasmonic heat delivered by a monolayer substrate of gold nanoparticles, obtained by modulating the effective refractive index of the neighboring dielectric medium. The effect, which exploits the dependence of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) refractive index on the molecular director orientation, is realized by using a polarization dependent, light-induced molecular reorientation of a thin film of photo-alignment layer that the NLC is in contact with. For a suitable alignment, plasmonic pumping intensity values ranging from 0.25 W/cm2 to 6.30 W/cm2 can induce up to 17.4 °C temperature variations in time intervals of the order of seconds. The reversibility of the optically induced NLC molecular director orientation enables an active control of the plasmonic photo-induced heat.

  12. Optical bistability effect in plasmonic racetrack resonator with high extinction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Jiang, Houqiang; Chen, Junxue; Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonghua; Ming, Hai

    2011-09-26

    In this paper, optical bistability effect in an ultracompact plasmonic racetrack resonator with nonlinear optical Kerr medium is investigated both analytically and numerically. The properties of optical bistability and pump threshold are studied at 1.55 µm with various detuning parameters by an analytical model. The transmission switch from the upper branch to the lower branch with a pulse is also demonstrated by a finite-difference time-domain method. An extinction ratio of 97.8% and a switching time of 0.38 ps can be achieved with proper detuning parameter. Such a plasmonic resonator design provides a promising realization for highly effective optical modulators and switch.

  13. Effects of intermediate plasmonic structures on the performance of ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashooq, Kishwar; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2017-02-01

    Although solar cells can meet the increasing demand for energy of modern world, their usage is not as widespread as expected because of their high production cost and low efficiency. Thin-film and ultra-thin-film solar cells with single and multiple active layers are being investigated to reduce cost. Additionally, multiple active layers of different energy bandgaps are used in tandem in order to absorb the solar spectra more efficiently. However, the efficiency of ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells may suffer significantly mainly because of low photon absorption and current mismatch between active layers. In this work, we study the effects of intermediate plasmonic structures on the performance of ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells. We consider three structures| each with a top amorphous silicon layer and a bottom micro-crystalline silicon layer, and an intermediate plasmonic layer between them. The intermediate layer is either a metal layer with periodic holes or periodic metal strips or periodic metal nano-clusters. Using a finite difference time domain technique for incident AM 1.5 solar spectra, we show that these intermediate layers help to excite different plasmonic and photonic modes for different light polarizations, and thereby, increase the absorption of light significantly. We find that the short-circuit current density increases by 12%, 6%, and 9% when the intermediate plasmonic structure is a metal hole-array, strips, and nano-clusters, respectively, from that of a structure that does not have the intermediate plasmonic layer.

  14. Near-unity transparency of a continuous metal film via cooperative effects of double plasmonic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-qi; Liu, Gui-qiang; Zhou, Hai-qing; Liu, Xiao-shan; Huang, Kuan; Chen, Yuan-hao; Fu, Guo-lan

    2013-04-19

    Metal structures with high optical transparency and conductivity are of great importance for practical applications in optoelectronic devices. Here we investigate the transparency response of a continuous metal film sandwiched by double plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. The upper nanoparticle array shows efficient light trapping of the incident field, acting as a light input coupler, and the lower nanoparticle array shows a light release gate opening at the other side, acting as the light output coupler. The strong near-field light-matter interactions of the nano-scale separated plasmonic nanoparticles, the excitation of surface plasmon waves of the metal film, and their cooperative coupling effects result in broadband scattering cancellation and near-unity transparency (up to 96%) in the optical regime. The transparency response in such a structure can be efficiently modified by varying the gap distance of adjacent nanoparticles, dielectric environments, and the distance between the plasmonic array and the metal film. This motif may provide a new alternative approach to obtain transparent and highly conducting metal structures with potential applications in transparent conductors, plasmonic filters, and highly integrated light input and output components.

  15. Fabrication of a cost-effective polymer nanograting as a disposable plasmonic biosensor using nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Kumari, Sudha; Moirangthem, Rakesh S.

    2017-07-01

    A simple and cost-effective flexible plasmonic sensor is developed using a gold-coated polymer nanograting structure prepared via soft UV nanoimprint lithography. The sub-wavelength nanograting patterns of digital versatile discs were used as a template to prepare the polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The plasmonic sensing substrate was achieved after coating a gold thin film on top of the imprinted nanograting sample. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) modes excited on the gold-coated nanograting structure appeared as a dip in the reflectance spectrum measured at normal incidence under white light illumination in the ambient air medium. Electromagnetic simulation based on the finite element method was carried out to analyze the excited SPR modes. The simulated result shows very close agreement with the experimental data. The performance of the sensor with respect to changing the surrounding dielectric medium yields a bulk refractive index sensitivity of 788  ±  21 nm per refractive index unit. Further, label-free detection of proteins using a plasmonic sensing substrate was demonstrated by monitoring specific interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA proteins, which gave a detection limit of 123 pg mm-2 with respect to target anti-BSA protein binding. Thus, our proposed plasmonic sensor has potential for the development of an economical and highly sensitive label-free optical biosensing device for biomedical applications.

  16. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beck, Thomas J [Quantum Medical Metrics, 1450 South Rolling Road, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Carrino, John A [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Bingham, Clifton O, E-mail: stutman@pha.jhu.edu [Divisions of Rheumatology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 {mu}m resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 {mu}m period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at {approx}25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a {approx}2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  17. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  18. Sensing (un)binding events via surface plasmons: effects of resonator geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Claudio, Virginia; Käll, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The resonance conditions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) can be perturbed in any number ways making plasmon nanoresonators viable tools in detection of e.g. phase changes, pH, gasses, and single molecules. Precise measurement via LSPR of molecular concentrations hinge on the ability to confidently count the number of molecules attached to a metal resonator and ideally to track binding and unbinding events in real-time. These two requirements make it necessary to rigorously quantify relations between the number of bound molecules and response of plasmonic sensors. This endeavor is hindered on the one hand by a spatially varying response of a given plasmonic nanosensor. On the other hand movement of molecules is determined by stochastic effects (Brownian motion) as well as deterministic flow, if present, in microfluidic channels. The combination of molecular dynamics and the electromagnetic response of the LSPR yield an uncertainty which is little understood and whose effect is often disregarded in quantitative sensing experiments. Using a combination of electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the plasmon resonance peak shift of various metal nanosensors (disk, cone, rod, dimer) and stochastic diffusion-reaction simulations of biomolecular interactions on a sensor surface we clarify the interplay between position dependent binding probability and inhomogeneous sensitivity distribution. We show, how the statistical characteristics of the total signal upon molecular binding are determined. The proposed methodology is, in general, applicable to any sensor and any transduction mechanism, although the specifics of implementation will vary depending on circumstances. In this work we focus on elucidating how the interplay between electromagnetic and stochastic effects impacts the feasibility of employing particular shapes of plasmonic sensors for real-time monitoring of individual binding reactions or sensing low concentrations

  19. Plasmonic band edge effects on the transmission properties of metal gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. de Ceglia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed analysis of the optical properties of one-dimensional arrays of slits in metal films. Although enhanced transmission windows are dominated by Fabry-Perot cavity modes localized inside the slits, the periodicity introduces surface modes that can either enhance or inhibit light transmission. We thus illustrate the interaction between cavity modes and surface modes in both finite and infinite arrays of slits. In particular we study a grating that clearly separates surface plasmon effects from Wood-Rayleigh anomalies. The periodicity of the grating induces a strong plasmonic band gap that inhibits coupling to the cavity modes for frequencies near the center of the band gap, thereby reducing the transmission of the grating. Strong field localization at the high energy plasmonic band edge enhances coupling to the cavity modes while field localization at the low energy band edge leads to weak cavity coupling and reduced transmission.

  20. Macroscopic effect of plasmon-driven high-order-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Weiwei; He, Lixin; Li, Liang; Wang, Baoning; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-09-01

    We present a numerical method to calculate the macroscopic harmonic spectrum generated from the gas-exposed nanostructure. This method includes the propagation of plasmonic and harmonic fields in the macroscopic medium as well as the response of the single atom exposed to plasmonic field. Based on the simulation, we demonstrate that the macroscopic harmonic yields drop dramatically in the high-energy region. This result well interprets the disagreement in the cutoff between the single-atom prediction and the experimental detection. Moreover, we also show that the harmonic cutoff difference induced by a π shift in carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of laser pulses depends sensitively on the spatial position. However, when the collective effect of plasmon-driven high-order-harmonic generation is considered, this cutoff difference is eliminated.

  1. Novel piezoelectric effect and surface plasmon resonance-based elements for MEMS applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponelyte, Sigita; Palevicius, Arvydas

    2014-04-17

    This paper covers research on novel thin films with periodical microstructure--optical elements, exhibiting a combination of piezoelectric and surface plasmon resonance effects. The research results showed that incorporation of Ag nanoparticles in novel piezoelectric--plasmonic elements shift a dominating peak in the visible light spectrum. This optical window is essential in the design of optical elements for sensing systems. Novel optical elements can be tunable under defined bias and change its main grating parameters (depth and width) influencing the response of diffraction efficiencies. These elements allow opening new avenues in the design of more sensitive and multifunctional microdevices.

  2. Structure of plasmonic aerogel and the breakdown of the effective medium approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Michael D W; Heck, Susannah C; Hood, Katie M; Maier, Stefan A; Birks, Tim A

    2011-02-01

    A method for making aerogel doped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) produces a composite material with a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 520 nm. The width of the extinction feature indicates the GNPs are well dispersed in the aerogel, making it suited to optical study. A simple effective medium approximation cannot explain the peak extinction wavelengths. The plasmonic field extends on a scale where aerogel cannot be considered isotropic, so a new model is required: a 5 nm glass coating on the GNPs models the extinction spectrum of the composite material, with air (aerogel), methanol (alcogel), or toluene filling the pores.

  3. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  4. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  5. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to

  6. The influence of edge and corner evolution on plasmon properties and resonant edge effect in gold nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-Bin; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yu-Ying; Yi, Zao; Li, Xi-Bo; Yi, You-Gen; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2015-01-28

    In this paper a simulation of the properties of surface plasmons on gold nanoplatelets with various cross-sections inscribed in a circle and an investigation of their field distributions to assign multiple SPRs are described. The manipulated propagation can be obtained through the evolution of edges and corners. Furthermore, the particle morphology and the associated spectral positions alone do not uniquely reflect the important details of the local field distribution or the resonance modes. The plasmon modes were investigated and found to be mainly excited along the edges and in the side and sloped side surfaces. The strong field distributions can generally be found around the corners and how the plasmons transmit through the corners to adjacent edges was also investigated. Besides the plasmons excited along the edges as were found for the triangular nanoplatelets, plasmons were excited in the interior region of the triangular surfaces and were also investigated. Despite this in the infrared region, plasmon modes were found to be along the edges for the hexagonal nanoplatelets. Also, it can be seen that the change of nanoplatelet thickness can support different plasmon modes ranging from dipolar resonance mode to quadrupole resonance mode. The thickness far below the skin depth can display complex plasmon modes along the edges and on the side and sloping side surfaces as well as the strong coupling between the top and bottom surfaces. The observed plasmon resonance modes in this simulation reflect the interference of all these contributions including the plasmons along the edges and on the side surfaces. This is an essential step towards a thorough understanding of plasmon modes and the effect of edge and corner evolution in polygonous nanoplatelets.

  7. Electron photoemission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays: analysis of collective resonances and embedding effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refractive index mismatch between media surrounding the nanoparticles disrupts the formation of a narrow absorption peak associated with the Rayleigh anomaly, so the role of collective lattice effects in the formation of plasmonic resonance is diminished. We also show that 5-20 times increase of photoemission can be achieved on embedding of nanoparticles without taking into account dynamics of ballistic electrons. The results obtained can be used to increase efficiency of plasmon-based photodetectors and photovoltaic devices. The results may provide clues to designing an experiment where the contributions of surface and volume photoelectric effects to the overall photocurrent would be defined.

  8. Characterization of plasmonic effects in thin films and metamaterials using spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Wormeester, H.; Arwin, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of plasmon resonances at metal–dielectric interfaces of thin films are reviewed. We show how ellipsometry provides valuable non-invasive amplitude and phase information from which one can determine the effective dielectric functions, and how these

  9. Revealing the effect of plasmon transmutation on charge transfer plasmons in substrate-mediated metallodielectric aluminum clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshnab, Vida; Golmohammadi, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum nanoparticle nanocomplexes have extensively been utilized for sustaining ultrastrong plasmonic bonding and antibonding resonant modes across the ultraviolet to visible spectrum. In this study, we analyze the plasmon response for two conventional symmetric heptamer and antisymmetric octamer antennas mediated by conductive film as a substrate to induce very sharp Fano-resonant mode at the high energy states. Besides, presence of an underlying conductive film in touching regime with the plasmonic nanoantennas leads to formation of charge transfer plasmons (CTPs) across the deep-UV band. It is also shown that presence of dielectric carbon nanospheres in the gap spots between proximal nanodisks gives rise to breaking the symmetry of the assemblies, while the new magnetic multipolar modes are induced and divided the Fano dip in two parts as well as formation of a couple of charge transfer plasmon resonant shoulders. The compactness and geometries of the clusters allow for inducing substantially strong resonant modes across the deep-UV domain. Our investigations provide new pathways and features for designing multifunctional molecular probes, biochemical sensors, and cathodoluminescence antennas across the UV spectrum. The proposed analysis were done using a blend of Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) calculations and transfer of plasmonic charges in nanoscale systems.

  10. Effect of Acidic and Basic Conditions on the Plasmon Band of Colloidal Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiza S. SHABBEER

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of colloidal silver nanoparticles has been carried out by salt reduction method and confirmed by the appearance of plasmon band in the visible region. The prepared nanoparticles were subjected to acidic and basic environments. The plasmon band was studied as a function of time under the described conditions and hence used as a stability check of silver nanoparticles in different media. The mechanism of plasmon band disappearance of silver colloids was found to depend strongly on the pH of the medium.Graphical abstractResearch highlights► Plasmon band of silver nanoparticles formed by citrate reduction method is strongly affected by the acidic and basic environments demonstrating effect of pH on the structure and stability of citrate caped silver nanoparticles. ► In acidic condition, an accelerated particle growth results only limited by the buffer action of citrate in solution. ► In the case of base Ag+ ions formation take place which ultimately deposit on the walls of test tube forming a silver mirror.

  11. Effective Propagation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Graphene-Protected Single-Crystalline Silver Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun Young; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Park, Jong Hyuk

    2017-02-08

    Silver (Ag) is a promising material for manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), due to its optical and electrical properties; however, the intrinsic properties are easily degraded by surface corrosion under atmospheric conditions, restricting its applications in plasmonics. Here, we address this issue via single-crystalline Ag films protected with graphene layers and demonstrate effective propagation of SPPs on the graphene-protected Ag films. Single-crystalline Ag films with atomically flat surfaces are prepared by epitaxial growth; graphene layers are then transferred onto the Ag films. The propagation lengths of SPPs on the graphene-protected Ag films are measured, and their variations under corrosive conditions are investigated. The initial SPP propagation lengths for the bare Ag films are very long (about 50 μm in the wavelength range 550-700 nm). However, the values decrease significantly (11-13 μm) under corrosive conditions. On the contrary, the double-layer-graphene-protected Ag films exhibit SPP propagation lengths of about 23 μm and retain over 90% (21-23 μm) of the propagation lengths even after exposure to corrosive conditions, guaranteeing the reliability of Ag plasmonic devices. This approach can encourage extending the application of the graphene-metal hybrid structure and thus developing Ag plasmonic devices.

  12. Quantum size effects in the volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. H.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2006-04-01

    Quantum size effects in volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5to500nm have been studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The Bi nanoparticles were prepared by reducing Bi3+ with sodium borohydride in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone). The volume plasmon energy and its peak width increase with decreasing nanoparticle diameter, due to the quantum size effect. For the particles with diameter less than 40nm, the increase of the volume plasmon energy is proportional to the inverse square of the nanoparticle diameter, confirming the semimetal to semiconductor transition in Bi nanoparticles.

  13. Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2013-12-01

    Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

  14. Photoelectron emission from plasmonic nanoparticles: Comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects

    CERN Document Server

    Uskov, Alexander V; Ikhsanov, Renat Sh; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrey V; OReilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    We study emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of the photoelectric effect from nanoparticles - surface and volume ones, and use models of these two effects which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rates from nanoparticle. Calculations have been done for the step potential at surface of spherical nanoparticle, and the simple model for the hot electron cooling have been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to substantial (by 5 times) increase of photoelectron emission rate from nanoparticle compared to the case when such discontinuity is absent. For plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of two mechanisms of the photoeffect was done for the first time and showed that surface photoeffect, at least, does not concede the volume one, which agrees with results for the flat metal surface first formulated b...

  15. Plasmonics in buried structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, I; García de Abajo, F J

    2009-10-12

    We describe plasmon propagation in silica-filled coupled nanovoids fully buried in gold. Propagation bands and band gaps are shown to be tunable through the degree of overlap and plasmon hybridization between contiguous voids. The effect of disorder and fabrication imperfections is thoroughly investigated. Our work explores a novel paradigm for plasmon photonics relying on plasmon modes in metal-buried structures, which can benefit from long propagation distances, cancelation of radiative losses, minimum crosstalk between neighboring waveguides, and maximum optical integration in three-dimensional arrangements.

  16. Effect of phonon-plasmon and surface plasmon polaritons on photoluminescence in quantum emitter and graphene deposited on polar crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Brzozowski, Marek J.; Apter, Boris

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the light-matter interaction in a quantum emitter and metallic graphene flake (MGF) hybrid system deposited on a polar material. The coupling of surface plasmons in graphene and optical phonons in the polar material produces phonon-plasmon polaritons (PPPs). Similarly, couplings of photons with surface plasmons of graphene produce surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Using the second quantized formulation for SPPs and PPPs interactions and density matrix method, we have calculated photoluminescence of the quantum emitters. It is found that when the exciton energy of the quantum emitter is in resonant with SPP and PPP energies, the photoluminescence in the quantum emitter are enhanced in the terahertz range. The enhancement is due to the transfer of SPP and PPP energies from the graphene flake to the quantum emitter. The energy transfer from graphene to the quantum emitter can be controlled by applying external pump lasers or stress and strain fields. These are interesting findings which can be used to fabricate switches and sensors.

  17. Analysis of the Purcell effect in photonic and plasmonic crystals with losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Hideo; Englund, Dirk; Vucković, Jelena

    2010-08-02

    We study the spontaneous emission rate of emitter in a periodically patterned metal or dielectric membrane in the picture of a multimode field of damped Bloch states. For Bloch states in dielectric structures, the approach fully describes the Purcell effect in photonic crystal or spatially coupled cavities with losses. For a metal membrane, the Purcell factor depends on resistive loss at the resonant frequency of surface plasmon polariton (SPP). Analysis of an InP-Au-InP structure indicates that the SPP's Purcell effect can exceed a value of 50 in the ultraviolet. For a plasmonic crystal, we find a position-dependent Purcell enhancement with a mean value similar to the unpatterned membrane.

  18. Electron Photoemission in Plasmonic Nanoparticle Arrays: Analysis of Collective Resonances and Embedding Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically study the characteristics of photoelectron emission in plasmonic nanoparticle arrays. Nanoparticles are partially embedded in a semiconductor, forming Schottky barriers at metal/semiconductor interfaces through which photoelectrons can tunnel from the nanoparticle into the semiconductor; photodetection in the infrared range, where photon energies are below the semiconductor band gap (insufficient for band-to-band absorption in semiconductor), is therefore possible. The nanoparticles are arranged in a sparse rectangular lattice so that the wavelength of the lattice-induced Rayleigh anomalies can overlap the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the individual particles, bringing about collective effects from the nanoparticle array. Using full-wave numerical simulations, we analyze the effects of lattice constant, embedding depth, and refractive index step between the semiconductor layer and an adjacent transparent conductive oxide layer. We show that the presence of refracti...

  19. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  20. Utilization of surface plasmon resonance of Au/Pt nanoparticles for highly photosensitive ZnO nanorods network based plasmon field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dixit, Tejendra; Palani, I. A.; Nakamura, D.; Higashihata, M.; Singh, Vipul

    2017-09-01

    Hydrothermally processed highly photosensitive ZnO nanorods based plasmon field effect transistors (PFETs) have been demonstrated utilizing the surface plasmon resonance coupling of Au and Pt nanoparticles at Au/Pt and ZnO interface. A significantly enhanced photocurrent was observed due to the plasmonic effect of the metal nanoparticles (NPs). The Pt coated PFETs showed Ion/Ioff ratio more than 3 × 104 under the dark condition, with field-effect mobility of 26 cm2 V-1 s-1 and threshold voltage of -2.7 V. Moreover, under the illumination of UV light (λ = 350 nm) the PFET revealed photocurrent gain of 105 under off-state (-5 V) of operation. Additionally, the electrical performance of PFETs was investigated in detail on the basis of charge transfer at metal/ZnO interface. The ZnO nanorods growth temperature was preserved at 110 °C which allowed a low temperature, economical and simple method to develop highly photosensitive ZnO nanorods network based PFETs for large scale production.

  1. Effects of thermo-plasmonics on laser-induced backside wet etching of silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, M. Yu; Yusupov, V. I.; Minaev, N. V.; Timashev, P. S.; Golant, K. M.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-10-01

    The thermo-plasmonic effect (heat deposition via absorption of laser light by metal nanoparticles) is applied to substantially enhance the effectiveness and controllability of the microstructure formation by laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE). Experiments were carried out with silicate glass plates using a pulsed 527 nm wavelength laser and an aqueous solution of AgNO3 as a precursor of the Ag nanoparticles. Mechanisms of such thermo-plasmonic LIBWE (TP-LIBWE) versions are considered. They involve: laser-induced photo-thermal reducing of silver (Ag) and self-assembling of Ag nanoparticles in water and the water/glass interface; fast laser-induced overheating of a water and glass surface through the thermo-plasmonic effect; formation of highly reactive supercritical water that causes glass etching and crater formation; generation of steam-gas bubbles in a liquid. It is significant that the emergence of the Marangoni convection results in bubble retention in the focal point at the interface and the accumulation of nanoparticles on the surface of the laser-induced crater, as this facilitates the movement of the bubbles with captured Ag particles from the fluid volume in the crater region, and accelerates the formation of the area of strong ‘surface absorption’ of laser energy. All these mechanisms provide a highly efficient and reproducible process for laser microstructure formation on the surface of glass using a novel TP-LIBWE technique.

  2. Modeling of optimum light absorption in random plasmonic solar cell using effective medium theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralaee, M.; Asgari, A.

    2016-12-01

    Random plasmonic nanostructures are very suitable candidates for light trapping in thin film solar cells because of their ability of efficient transportation and localization of light in a broad spectrum. In this work, besides the introducing of a novel structure of plasmonic thin-film solar cell, in which metal nanoparticles are randomly distributed through the photoactive layer of solar cell, we are presenting a new simple calculation method which can predict the behavior of plasmonic solar cells. To avoid the difficulty of analytical calculation and due to small size of constituents of the structure, we have used the effective medium theory to describe its optical properties. We have used a general description of effective dielectric function that can support each effective medium theory named spectral density theory, which takes into account the percolation of metal component and also interaction among inclusions. Using this method, the optimum values of nanoparticle's filling fraction for each wavelength within the active layer can be found where the solar cell can have the maximum absorption of light, thereupon the optimum external quantum efficiency.

  3. Improving All-Inorganic Perovskite Photodetectors by Preferred Orientation and Plasmonic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuhui; Gu, Yu; Zou, Yousheng; Song, Jizhong; Xu, Leimeng; Li, Jianhai; Xue, Jie; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Haibo

    2016-10-01

    All-inorganic perovskites have high carrier mobility, long carrier diffusion length, excellent visible light absorption, and well overlapping with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanocrystals (NCs). The high-performance photodetectors can be constructed by means of the intrinsic outstanding photoelectric properties, especially plasma coupling. Here, for the first time, inorganic perovskite photodetectors are demonstrated with synergetic effect of preferred-orientation film and plasmonic with both high performance and solution process virtues, evidenced by 238% plasmonic enhancement factor and 10(6) on/off ratio. The CsPbBr3 and Au NC inks are assembled into high-quality films by centrifugal-casting and spin-coating, respectively, which lead to the low cost and solution-processed photodetectors. The remarkable near-field enhancement effect induced by the coupling between Au LSPR and CsPbBr3 photogenerated carriers is revealed by finite-difference time-domain simulations. The photodetector exhibits a light on/off ratio of more than 10(6) under 532 nm laser illumination of 4.65 mW cm(-2) . The photocurrent increases from 0.67 to 2.77 μA with centrifugal-casting. Moreover, the photocurrent rises from 245.6 to 831.1 μA with Au NCs plasma enhancement, leading to an enhancement factor of 238%, which is the most optimal report among the LSPR-enhanced photodetectors, to the best of our knowledge. The results of this study suggest that all-inorganic perovskites are promising semiconductors for high-performance solution-processed photodetectors, which can be further enhanced by Au plasmonic effect, and hence have huge potentials in optical communication, safety monitoring, and biological sensing.

  4. Plasmonic effects of au/ag bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Ayon, Arturo A

    2014-09-10

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the use of plasmons, that is, free electron oscillations in conductors, to boost the performance of both organic and inorganic thin film solar cells. This has been driven by the possibility of employing thin active layers in solar cells in order to reduce materials costs, and is enabled by significant advances in fabrication technology. The ability of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures to guide and confine light in the nanometer scale has opened up new design possibilities for solar cell devices. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of highly monodisperse, reasonably stable, multipode Au/Ag bimetallic nanostructures using an inorganic additive as a ligand for photovoltaic applications. A promising surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect has been observed for the synthesized bimetallic Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles, which compare favorably well with their Au and Ag spherical nanoparticle counterparts. The synthesized plasmonic nanostructures were incorporated on the rear surface of an ultrathin planar c-silicon/organic polymer hybrid solar cell, and the overall effect on photovoltaic performance was investigated. A promising enhancement in solar cell performance parameters, including both the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC), has been observed by employing the aforementioned bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of solar cell devices. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) value as high as 7.70% has been measured in a hybrid device with Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of an ultrathin, crystalline silicon (c-Si) membrane (∼ 12 μm). This value compares well to the measured PCE value of 6.72% for a similar device without nanoparticles. The experimental observations support the hope for a sizable PCE increase, due to plasmon effects, in thin-film, c-Si solar cells in the near future.

  5. Molecular Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  6. Unconventional Fano effect and off-resonance field enhancement in plasmonic coated spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Arruda, Tiago J; Pinheiro, Felipe A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate light scattering by coated spheres composed of a dispersive plasmonic core and a dielectric shell. By writing the absorption cross-section in terms of the internal electromagnetic fields, we demonstrate it is an observable sensitive to interferences that ultimately lead to the Fano effect. Specially, we show that unconventional Fano resonances, recently discovered for homogeneous spheres with large dielectric permittivities, can also occur for metallic spheres coated with single dielectric layers. These resonances arise from the interference between two electromagnetic modes with the same multipole moment inside the shell and not from interactions between various plasmon modes of different layers of the particle. In contrast to the case of homogeneous spheres, unconventional Fano resonances in coated spheres exist even in the Rayleigh limit. These resonances can induce an off-resonance field enhancement, which is approximately one order of magnitude larger than the one achieved with conventiona...

  7. A method for achieving larger enhancement in Four-Wave Mixing via plasmonic path interference effects

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Tasgin, Mehmet Emre

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement and suppression of nonlinear processes in coupled systems of plasmonic converters and quantum emitters are well-studied theoretically, numerically and experimentally, in the past decade. Here, in difference, we explicitly demonstrate --with a single equation-- how the presence of a Fano resonance leads to cancellation of nonresonant terms in a four-wave mixing process. Cancellation in the denominator gives rise to enhancement in the nonlinearity. The explicit demonstration, we present here, guides us to the method for achieving more and more orders of magnitude enhancement factors via path interference effects. We also study the coupled system of a plasmonic converter with two quantum emitters. We show that the potential for the enhancement increases dramatically due to better cancellation of the terms in the denominator.

  8. Molecular fluorescence enhancement in plasmonic environments: exploring the role of nonlocal effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Stefanou, Nikolaos; Wubs, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    in the nanoparticle vicinity. Here we explore the influence of hitherto disregarded nonclassical effects in the description of emitter-plasmon hybrids, focusing on the roles of metal nonlocal response and especially size-dependent plasmon damping. Through extensive modelling of metallic nanospheres and nanoshells...... coupled to dipole emitters, we show that within a purely classical description a remarkable fluorescence enhancement can be achieved. However, once departing from the local-response approximation, and particularly by implementing the recent generalised nonlocal optical response theory, which provides...... a more complete physical description combining electron convection and diffusion, we show that not only are fluorescence rates dramatically reduced as compared to the predictions of the local description and the common hydrodynamic Drude model, but the optimum emitter-nanoparticle distance is also...

  9. Transverse Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect in Active Magneto-Plasmonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Borovkova, Olga; Belotelov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method to enhance the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (TMOKE) in the magneto-plasmonic (MP) nanostructures by means of the active dielectric layer. We report the theoretical analysis of the magnetoplasmonic structure with a ferromagnetic dielectric doped with rear-earth ions (Nd3+) as the example of a gain layer. The enhancement takes place near the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonances of the nanostructures. The stimulated emission of the dopants in the field of SPP wave partially compensates its losses. It is shown that due to a decrease of SPP damping a Q-factor of the MP resonance increases and the TMOKE is increased in comparison with the passive nanostructure.

  10. Scanning tunneling microscope light emission: Effect of the strong dc field on junction plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J.

    2016-07-01

    The observed energies of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited at the tip-sample junction of a scanning tunneling microscope, as identified by spectral peaks in the light output, are very significantly redshifted with respect to calculations that use standard optical data for the tip and sample material, gold in this case. We argue that this anomaly depends on the extreme field in the sub-nm tunneling proximity of the tip and the sample, across which a dc bias (1-2 V) is applied. Finite element modeling analysis is presented of a gold nanosphere-plane (NS-P) combination in tunneling proximity and, crucially, in the presence of a high static electric field (˜109V /m ). It is argued that the strong dc field induces nonlinear corrections to the dielectric function of the gold via the effect of a large background polarizability through the nonlinear, χ(3 ) susceptibility contribution. When fed into the model system the modified optical data alters the LSP cavity modes of the NS-P system to indeed reveal a large redshift in energy compared to those of the virgin gold NS-P system. The net outcome may be regarded as equivalent to lowering the bulk plasmon energy, the physical interpretation being that the intense field of the tunneling environment leads to surface charge screening, effectively reducing the density of free electrons available to participate in the plasmon oscillations.

  11. Partial Polarization in Interfered Plasmon Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martínez Vara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the polarization features for plasmon fields generated by the interference between two elemental surface plasmon modes, obtaining a set of Stokes parameters which allows establishing a parallelism with the traditional polarization model. With the analysis presented, we find the corresponding coherence matrix for plasmon fields incorporating to the plasmon optics the study of partial polarization effects.

  12. Versatile plasmonic-effects at the interface of inverted perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalan, Ahmed Esmail; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Sawayanagi, Hiroki; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ueno, Kosei; Sun, Quan; Wu, Hui-Ping; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-19

    Plasmonics is a highly promising approach to enhancing the light-harvesting properties of hybrid organic/inorganic perovskite solar cells. In the present work, our cells have a p-i-n inverted planar structure. An ultrathin NiO film with two different thicknesses of 5 and 10 nm prepared by a pulsed laser deposition process on an ITO substrate with a faceted and furrowed surface enabled the formation of a continuous and compact layer of well-crystallized CH3NH3PbI3via an anti-solvent chlorobenzene process. The coverage mechanism of the NiO film on the ITO was clearly demonstrated through the J-V and external quantum efficiency (EQE) curves. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the gold nanoislands (Au NIs) increased the power conversion efficiency to 5.1%, almost double that of the samples without Au NIs. This result is due to the excitation of surface plasmons, which is characterized by strong scattering and enhancement of the electric field in the vicinity of the Au NIs loaded at the interface between the NiO and perovskite films. Additionally, we observed an enhancement of the EQE at wavelengths shorter than the plasmon resonance peak. In the current state, we speculate that the plasmoelectric potential effect is considered to be a good explanation of the photocurrent enhancement at the off-resonance region. Our work provides good guidance for the design and fabrication of solar-energy-related devices employing NiO electrodes and plasmonic Au NIs.

  13. Molecular fluorescence enhancement in plasmonic environments: exploring the role of nonlocal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Stefanou, Nikolaos; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N Asger

    2016-10-14

    Molecular spontaneous emission and fluorescence depend strongly on the emitter local environment. Plasmonic nanoparticles provide excellent templates for tailoring fluorophore emission, as they exhibit potential for both fluorescence enhancement and quenching, depending on emitter positioning in the nanoparticle vicinity. Here we explore the influence of hitherto disregarded nonclassical effects on the description of emitter-plasmon hybrids, focusing on the roles of the metal nonlocal response and especially size-dependent plasmon damping. Through extensive modelling of metallic nanospheres and nanoshells coupled to dipole emitters, we show that within a purely classical description a remarkable fluorescence enhancement can be achieved. However, once departing from the local-response approximation, and particularly by implementing the recent generalised nonlocal optical response theory, which provides a more complete physical description combining electron convection and diffusion, we show that not only are fluorescence rates dramatically reduced compared to the predictions of the local description and the common hydrodynamic Drude model, but the optimum emitter-nanoparticle distance is also strongly affected. In this respect, experimental measurements of fluorescence, the theoretical description of which requires a precise concurrent evaluation of far- and near-field properties of the system, constitute a novel, more sensitive probe for assessing the validity of state-of-the-art nonclassical theories.

  14. Balancing Near-Field Enhancement, Absorption, and Scattering for Effective Antenna-Reactor Plasmonic Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Kale, Matthew J; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-06-14

    Efficient photocatalysis requires multifunctional materials that absorb photons and generate energetic charge carriers at catalytic active sites to facilitate a desired chemical reaction. Antenna-reactor complexes are an emerging multifunctional photocatalytic structure where the strong, localized near field of the plasmonic metal nanoparticle (e.g., Ag) is coupled to the catalytic properties of the nonplasmonic metal nanoparticle (e.g., Pt) to enable chemical transformations. With an eye toward sustainable solar driven photocatalysis, we investigate how the structure of antenna-reactor complexes governs their photocatalytic activity in the light-limited regime, where all photons need to be effectively utilized. By synthesizing core@shell/satellite (Ag@SiO2/Pt) antenna-reactor complexes with varying Ag nanoparticle diameters and performing photocatalytic CO oxidation, we observed plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis only for antenna-reactor complexes with antenna components of intermediate sizes (25 and 50 nm). Optimal photocatalytic performance was shown to be determined by a balance between maximized local field enhancements at the catalytically active Pt surface, minimized collective scattering of photons out of the catalyst bed by the complexes, and minimal light absorption in the Ag nanoparticle antenna. These results elucidate the critical aspects of local field enhancement, light scattering, and absorption in plasmonic photocatalyst design, especially under light-limited illumination conditions.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Surface Plasmons Associated Subwavelength Optical Single-Pass Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Chang-Jun; WANG Pei; JIAO Xiao-Jin; MING Hai

    2007-01-01

    Surface plasmons (SPs) associated optical single-pass effect has been investigated in novel subwavelength metallic structures, including single slit and grating structures. With influence of SPs, these metallic structures can enhance transmission in incident direction and suppress it in the opposite direction, exhibiting a single-pass effect. The finite difference time domain method is employed to study the influences of structure parameters on far-field transmission, near-field electric field distribution and extinction ratio of the single-pass transmission effect. A maximal extinction ratio of 47.83 dB is achieved in the grating structure.

  16. Plasmonic Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and ...

  17. Nonlinear effects in propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in gold strip waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear propagation of a long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) in gold strip waveguides. The plasmonic waveguides are fabricated in house, and contain a gold layer, tantalum pentoxide adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. The optical characterization was performed using a high power picosecond laser at 1064 nm. The experiments reveal two nonlinear optical effects: nonlinear power transmission and spectral broadening of the LRSPP mode in the waveguides. Both nonlinear optical effects depend on the gold layer thickness. The theoretical model of these effects is based on the third-order susceptibility of the constituent materials. The linear and nonlinear parameters of the LRSPP mode are obtained, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is solved. The dispersion length is much larger than the waveguides length, and the chromatic dispersion does not affect the propagation of the plasmonic mode. We find that the third-order susceptibility of the gold layer has a dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the LRSPP mode. The real part of the effective third-order susceptibility leads to the observed spectral broadening through the self-phase modulation effect, and its imaginary part determines the nonlinear absorption parameter and leads to the observed nonlinear power transmission. The experimental values of the third-order susceptibility of the gold layers are obtained. They indicate an effective enhancement of the third-order susceptibility for the gold layers, comparing to the bulk gold values. This enhancement is explained in terms of the change of the electrons motion.

  18. Enhanced photothermal effect of plasmonic nanoparticles coated with reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Kwon; Barhoumi, Aoune; Wylie, Ryan G; Reznor, Gally; Langer, Robert S; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-09-11

    We report plasmonic gold nanoshells and nanorods coated with reduced graphene oxide that produce an enhanced photothermal effect when stimulated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Electrostatic interactions between nanosized graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles followed by in situ chemical reduction generated reduced graphene oxide-coated nanoparticles; the coating was demonstrated using Raman and HR-TEM. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles showed enhanced photothermal effect compared to noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles killed cells more rapidly than did noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles.

  19. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskov, Alexander V; Protsenko, Igor E; Ikhsanov, Renat S; Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Zhukovsky, Sergei V; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; O'Reilly, Eoin P; Xu, Hongxing

    2014-05-01

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles--surface and volume ones--and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary in the surface mechanism, which leads to a substantial (by ∼5 times) increase of the internal photoelectron emission rate from a nanoparticle compared to the case when such a discontinuity is absent. For a plasmonic nanoparticle, a comparison of the two photoeffect mechanisms was undertaken for the first time which showed that the surface photoeffect can in the general case be larger than the volume one, which agrees with the results obtained for a flat metal surface first formulated by Tamm and Schubin in their pioneering development of a quantum-mechanical theory of photoeffect in 1931. In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism through the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary. The latter is stronger at relatively lower photon energies and correspondingly is more substantial for internal photoemission than for an external one. We show that in the general case, it is essential to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna.

  20. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, V V

    2007-01-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for a construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  1. Plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, V. V.; Guzatov, D. V.

    2007-11-01

    The proposed paradigm of plasmonic atoms and plasmonic molecules allows one to describe and predict the strongly localized plasmonic oscillations in the clusters of nanoparticles and some other nanostructures in uniform way. Strongly localized plasmonic molecules near the contacting surfaces might become the fundamental elements (by analogy with Lego bricks) for the construction of fully integrated opto-electronic nanodevices of any complexity and scale of integration.

  2. Molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a novel approach, this book provides a unique ""molecular perspective"" on plasmonics, concisely presenting the fundamentals and applications in a way suitable for beginners entering this hot field as well as for experienced researchers and practitioners. It begins by introducing readers to the optical effects that occur at the nanoscale and particularly their modification in the presence of biomolecules, followed by a concise yet thorough overview of the different methods for the actual fabrication of nanooptical materials. Further chapters address the relevant nanooptics, as well as

  3. Analysis of the modal behavior of an antiguide diode laser array with Talbot filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van Pieter D.; Reglat, Muriel; Vassilief, Georges; Krijnen, Gijs J.M.; Driessen, Alfred; Mouthaan, Anton J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the filtering of the array modes in a resonant optical waveguide (ROW) array of antiguides by a diffractive spatial filter (a Talbot filter) is presented. A dispersion relation is derived for the array modes, allowing the calculation of the field distribution. The filtering is analyze

  4. Multiple plasmon-induced transparency effects in a multimode-cavity-coupled metal-dielectric-metal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiquan; Li, Hongjian; He, Zhihui; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei; Zhao, Mingzhuo

    2017-09-01

    We numerically and theoretically investigate multiple plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) effects in a multimode-cavity-coupled metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide system. The introduced multimode coupled-radiating oscillator theory (MC-ROT) gives a clear understanding of multiple PIT effects in the proposed system. Two and three PIT peaks appear in the transmission spectra corresponding to the symmetrical and asymmetrical structures, respectively. Evolution of the PIT peaks can be effectively tuned by adjusting the geometric dimensions and asymmetry of the structure. The ultra-compact plasmonic waveguide structure may have important applications for multichannel filters, optical switches, and other devices in integrated optical circuits.

  5. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Søren; Yan, Wei; Stenger, Nicolas; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) [1]. As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 eV of the SP resonance energy is observed. In this paper, we base our theoretical interpretation of our experimental findings on the nonlocal hydrodynamic model, and compare the effect of the substrate ...

  6. Cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas coupled to plasmonic Fabry-Pérot cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Qu-Quan; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2012-09-07

    We investigate the cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas that are coupled to a finite Au nanowire acting as plasmonic Fabry-Pérot (F-P) cavity. The coherent coupling between one single antenna and the F-P cavity can result in Fano resonance, and the coupling strength is antenna position dependent. For two antennas coupled to the F-P cavity, constructive or destructive interference between antennas could be achieved by adjusting their positions along the F-P cavity. Consequently, the Fano resonance will become stronger or weaker correspondingly.

  7. Field-effect active plasmonics for ultracompact electro-optic switching

    OpenAIRE

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.; Çetin, Arif E.; Yanık, Ahmet A.; Mertiri, Alket; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Altuğ, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Field-effect active plasmonics for ultracompact electro-optic switching Arif E. Çetin, Ahmet A. Yanik, Alket Mertiri, Shyamsunder Erramilli, Özgür E. Müstecaplolu, and Hatice Altug Citation: Applied Physics Letters 101, 121113 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.4754139 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4754139 View Table of Contents: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/101/12?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in A proposal f...

  8. Coupling effect of surface plasmon polaritons in single-negative lamellar heterostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhou; Yongyuan Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the lamellar heterostructure, which is actually a SPP waveguide array, constructed by two kinds of single negative (SNG) material layers stacked alternatively are investigated. Based on the finite element method (FEM), the negative-refraction (NR) property is demonstrated when the electromagnetic wave penetrates through free space into such SNG lamellar structure. A clear view of the underlying physics of NR is presented qualitatively that is mainly related to the coupled SPPs. The strong coupling effect leads to the novel SPP dispersion curves and then the anomalous propagation characteristics.

  9. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kekesi, R., E-mail: renata.kekesi@csic.es; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G., E-mail: gaspar@imm.cnm.csic.es [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  10. Experimental studies of surface plasmon polariton band gap effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Leosson, K.;

    2003-01-01

    the dependence of the SPP band gap (SPPBG) effect manifested via the SPP reflection and guiding (along line defects) on the parameters of the surface structures (period, filling factor and lattice orientation). We find that the SPPBG effect is stronger along &ggr;K direction for all investigated periodic...

  11. Internal photoemission from plasmonic nanoparticles: comparison between surface and volume photoelectric effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.;

    2014-01-01

    We study the emission of photoelectrons from plasmonic nanoparticles into a surrounding matrix. We consider two mechanisms of electron emission from the nanoparticles - surface and volume ones and use models for these two mechanisms which allow us to obtain analytical results for the photoelectro...... to take both mechanisms into account in the development of devices based on the photoelectric effect and when considering hot electron emission from a plasmonic nanoantenna....... emission rate from a nanoparticle. Calculations have been carried out for a step potential at the surface of a spherical nanoparticle, and a simple model for the hot electron cooling has been used. We highlight the effect of the discontinuity of the dielectric permittivity at the nanoparticle boundary....... In accordance with our calculations, this possible predominance of the surface effect is based on two factors: (i) effective cooling of hot carriers during their propagation from the volume of the nanoparticle to its surface in the scenario of the volume mechanism and (ii) strengthening of the surface mechanism...

  12. Numerical analysis of surface plasmon resonance effects on a rotational silver nanorod/nanoshell dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effects on a pair of rotational silver nanorod/nanoshell dimer with a finite height of 1000 nm by means of finite element method with three dimensional calculation. The rotational angles of the silver nanorod/nanoshell dimer are chosen θ=0°, θ=25°, θ=45° and θ=90°, respectively. The proposed structure exhibits a red-shifted localized SPR that can tuned over an extended wavelength range by varying the dielectric constant in metal nanoshell and the rotational angle of the silver nanorod/nanoshell dimer. The tunable optical properties on SPR phenomena are attributed to the rotational effect and a larger effective size of dielectric constant that is filled with a higher refractive medium of finite height of metal nanorod/nanoshell. This unique property of a pair of rotational nanorod/nanoshell dimer is highly attractive for serving as resonant center to hold and probe smaller nanostructures, such as biomolecules or quantum dots. Such structures also show significant promise for applications in nano-switch devices, sensing, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy, due to their strong and tunable plasmon resonances.

  13. Plasmonic effect of spray-deposited Au nanoparticles on the performance of inverted organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2014-09-21

    Gold nanoparticles with varying sizes were prepared by the spray process under an electric field (DC voltages of 0 V and 1 kV applied to the nozzle) for studying their role in inverted organic solar cells (ITO/Au/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/Ag). The application of electric field during the spray process resulted in a smaller size (35 nm as compared to 70 nm without the electric field) of the nanoparticles with more uniform distribution. This gave rise to a difference in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect created by the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), which then affected the solar cell performance. The photovoltaic performances of plasmonic inverted organic solar cells (ITO/Au/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/Ag) using spray-deposited Au and ZnO layers (both at 1 kV) showed improved efficiency. Fast exciton quenching in the P3HT:PCBM layer was achieved by using a spray-deposited Au layer in between ITO and ZnO layers. The absorption spectra and internal power conversion efficiency (IPCE) curve showed that the Au nanoparticles provide significant plasmonic broadband light absorption enhancement which resulted in the enhancement of the JSC value. Maximum efficiency of 3.6% was achieved for the inverted organic solar cell (IOSC) with an exceptionally high short circuit current density of ∼15 mA cm(-2) which is due to the additional photon absorption and the corresponding increase observed in the IPCE spectrum. The spray technique can be easily applied for the direct formation of Au nanoparticles in the fabrication of IOSC with improved performance over a large area.

  14. Ultracompact Field Effect Electro-Absorption Plasmonic Modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kaifeng

    2015-01-01

    One of the technical barriers impeding the wide applications of integrated photonic circuits is the lack of ultracompact, high speed, broadband electro-optical (EO) modulators, which up-convert electronic signals into high bit-rate photonic data. In addition to direct modulation of lasers, EO modulators can be classified into (i) phase modulation based on EO effect or free-carrier injection, or (ii) absorption modulation based on Franz-Keldysh effect or quantum-confined Stark effect. Due to the poor EO properties of regular materials, a conventional EO modulator has a very large footprint. Based on high-Q resonators, recent efforts have advanced EO modulators into microscale footprints, which have nearly reached their physical limits restricted by the materials. On-chip optical interconnects require ultrafast EO modulators at the nanoscale. The technical barrier may not be well overcome based on conventional approaches and well-known materials. Herein, we report an EO modulator, more specifically electro-abso...

  15. Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes for efficient plasmonic light scattering effect in low bandgap organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Se-Woong; Park, Garam; Noh, Jonghyeon; Cho, Changsoon; Lee, Chun-Ho; Seo, Min-Kyo; Song, Hyunjoon; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2014-04-22

    In this report, we propose a metal-metal core-shell nanocube (NC) as an advanced plasmonic material for highly efficient organic solar cells (OSCs). We covered an Au core with a thin Ag shell as a scattering enhancer to build Au@Ag NCs, which showed stronger scattering efficiency than Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) throughout the visible range. Highly efficient plasmonic organic solar cells were fabricated by embedding Au@Ag NCs into an anodic buffer layer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), and the power conversion efficiency was enhanced to 6.3% from 5.3% in poly[N-9-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4,7-di-2-thienyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT):[6,6]-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) based OSCs and 9.2% from 7.9% in polythieno[3,4-b]thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7):PC70BM based OSCs. The Au@Ag NC plasmonic PCDTBT:PC70BM-based organic solar cells showed 2.2-fold higher external quantum efficiency enhancement compared to AuNPs devices at a wavelength of 450-700 nm due to the amplified plasmonic scattering effect. Finally, we proved the strongly enhanced plasmonic scattering efficiency of Au@Ag NCs embedded in organic solar cells via theoretical calculations and detailed optical measurements.

  16. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  17. Abnormal thermal effects on the surface plasmon resonance of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Han; Ding, Ruiqiang [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Suzhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Yingfeng; Yang, Ganghai; Song, Dandan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya [State Key Laboratory for Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2015-06-01

    The thermal effects on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Ag nanoparticles on the silicon surface have been studied. It is found that unusual blue shifts and narrowing of the SPR troughs occur as the temperature increases from 323 K to 363 K. At low temperature range (from 273 K to 323 K), the SPR troughs have the normal red shifts and broadening as in previous studies. The change of SPR is attributed to the thermal induced electron transport between particles and substrate, and is analyzed using samples with different particle sizes. This work reveals the mechanism of thermal effects on the plasmonic properties of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of silicon and offers useful information for designing of SPR devices. - Highlights: • Unusual blue shift of the SPR troughs is observed at 343 K. • Red shift of the SPR troughs is observed at 323 K. • The mechanism relies on the thermal induced surface electron transport. • Particle sizes play an important role in the change of the SPR troughs.

  18. Magnetically induced Stark-like splitting and asymmetric refractive index effect in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanguo; Shen, Yang; Liu, Wenjie; Jin, Chongjun

    2017-05-01

    We develop an analytical method to investigate the eigenmodes of the surface plasmonic polaritons propagating along the interface of metal and magneto-optical (MO) medium by using perturbation theory. The solution shows that the MO activity can eliminate the eigenfrequency degeneracy of a pair of time-reversed waves. Analogously to the electron's magneto-Stark effect, we show this splitting can be understood as a result of "Lorentz force" acting on photons and it exhibits a Stark-like shape, which causes a difference between the forward and backward refractive index. It can be further enhanced by the surface plasmonic polaritons. Then, a hybrid structure composed with MO medium and metallic array is proposed to demonstrate this effect. In such a hybrid structure, the one-way property of surface wave presents a much higher efficiency than that of conventional magnetic photonic crystal. This Stark-like splitting at the interface of metal and magneto-optical (MO) medium can be used in the design of nanophotonic circuits, such as surface wave diode and asymmetric prism.

  19. Plasmonic effect-enhanced Ag nanodisk incorporated ZnO/Si metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manjeet; Kojori, Hossein Shokri; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we present the enhancement of ultraviolet (UV) photodetection of Ag-ZnO thin film deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The surface morphological, optical, structural, and electrical properties of the deposited thin films were investigated by various characterization techniques. With this Ag-ZnO thin film structure and proper geometry of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) interdigitated structure design, photocurrent enhancement has been accomplished. MSM-photodetectors (PDs) using structures of Ag-ZnO gave a 30 times higher magnitude photocurrent at 340 nm of the wavelength. Plasmon-induced hot electrons contributed to improved spectral response to the UV region, while absorption and scattering effect enhanced broadband improvement to a response in the VIS-IR spectrum range. The improvement of Ag-ZnO PD in comparison with ZnO is attributed to the surface plasmon effect using Ag nanodisks. These results indicate that Ag-ZnO thin films can serve as excellent ultraviolet-PD and a very promising candidate for practical applications.

  20. Impact of surface plasmon polaritons on photorefractive effect in dye doped liquid crystal cells with ZnSe interlayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tingyu; Zhao, Hua; Meng, Cuiling; Fu, Jiayin; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-08-25

    Great impact of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on photorefractive effect in ZnSe/liquid crystal interface was observed and studied in dye pyrromethane 597 doped 4,4'-n-pentylcyanobiphenyl (5CB) liquid crystal (LC) cells sandwiched with ZnSe coated ITO glass plates. Locally electrostatic modification of ZnSe in charge carrier density makes possible visible light excitation of SPPs in the LC/ZnSe interfaces. A tentative physical picture of SPP mediation was proposed in elucidating associated findings, including photoinduced scattering enhancement at low electric field and then reduction at high field, stepwise up- and down-turns in exponential gain coefficient, and 2D diffraction patterns. This work may open a new way toward tunable low-loss visible excitation of SPPs for plasmonic applications, specifically for organic plasmonics.

  1. Effects of plasmon excitation on photocatalytic activity of Ag/TiO 2 and Au/TiO2 nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellappan, Raja; González-Posada, Fernando; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-01-01

    Model nanocomposite photocatalysts consisting of undoped TiO2 films with optically active Ag or Au nanoparticles (NPs) were designed, fabricated, and examined to address the role of plasmon excitations in their performance. Different composition configurations were tested in which the NPs were...... either facing the reaction environment or not, and in direct contact or not with TiO2. We found, as measured for the reactions of methanol and ethylene oxidation in two different photoreactors, that composites always show enhanced activity (up to ×100 for some configurations) compared to bare TiO2. We...... deduced from in situ localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements that the interfacial charge transfer from TiO2 to NPs plays a major role in the activity enhancement for composite configurations where particles are in direct contact with TiO2. Plasmonic near- and far-field effects were...

  2. Modern plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Maradudin, Alexei A; Barnes, William L

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is entering the curriculum of many universities, either as a stand alone subject, or as part of some course or courses. Nanotechnology institutes have been, and are being, established in universities, in which plasmonics is a significant topic of research. Modern Plasmonics book offers a comprehensive presentation of the properties of surface plasmon polaritons, in systems of different structures and various natures, e.g. active, nonlinear, graded, theoretical/computational and experimental techniques for studying them, and their use in a variety of applications. Contains materia

  3. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques.

  4. Optical and electrical effects of plasmonic nanoparticles in high-efficiency hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Fei; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Xi; Wang, Ling; Shi, Ye; Shi, Minmin; Li, Han-Ying; Jen, Alex K-Y; Chen, Jun-Wu; Cao, Yong; Chen, Hong-Zheng

    2013-10-28

    Plasmonics have been proven to be an effective way to harness more incident light to achieve high efficiency in photovoltaic devices. Herein, we explore the possibility that plasmonics can be utilized to enhance light trapping and power conversion efficiency (PCE) for polymer-quantum dot (QD) hybrid solar cells (HSCs). Based on a low band-gap polymer poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']-dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) and a CdSe QD bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) system, gold nanoparticles were doped at different locations of the devices. Successfully, an improved PCE of 3.20 ± 0.22% and 3.16 ± 0.15% was achieved by doping the hole transporting layer and the active layer, respectively, which are among the highest values reported for CdSe QD based HSCs. A detailed study of processing, characterization, microscopy, and device fabrication is conducted to understand the underlying mechanism for the enhanced device performance. The success of this work provides a simple and generally applicable approach to enhance light harnessing of polymer-QD hybrid solar cells.

  5. Quantum Effects in Plasma Dielectric Response: Plasmons and Shielding in Normal Systems and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    A brief review of quantum plasma theory and phenomenology in solid-state plasmas is presented here, with attention to dynamic and nonlocal features of dielectric response. Focussing on the random-phase approximation, we discuss the RPA screening and dielectric functions in three, two, and one dimensions corresponding to bulk, quantum well, and quantum wire plasmas, respectively, taking care to distinguish quantum effects from classical ones mandated by the correspondence principle. In particular, we exhibit plasmon dispersion, damping, and static shielding in these various dimensionalities. We also review Landau-quantized magnetoplasma phenomenology, with emphasis on de Haas-van Alphen oscillatory features in intermediate strength magnetic fields and the quantum strong field limit in which only the lowest Landau eigenstate is populated. Graphene is an exceptionally device-friendly material, with a massless relativistic Dirac energy spectrum for electrons and holes. We exhibit its RPA dynamic, nonlocal dielectric function in detail, discussing Graphene plasmons and electromagnetic modes in the THz range, self-energy, fast particle energy loss spectroscopy, atom/van der Waals interaction, and static shielding of impurity scatterers limiting dc transport in Graphene.

  6. Quantum \\v{C}erenkov Effect from Hot Carriers in Graphene: An Efficient Plasmonic Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminer, I; Buljan, H; Shen, Y; Ilic, O; López, J J; Wong, L J; Joannopoulos, J D; Soljačić, M

    2015-01-01

    Graphene plasmons (GPs) have been found to be an exciting plasmonic platform, thanks to their high field confinement and low phase velocity, motivating contemporary research to revisit established concepts in light-matter interaction. In a conceptual breakthrough that is now more than 80 years old, \\v{C}erenkov showed how charged particles emit shockwaves of light when moving faster than the phase velocity of light in a medium. To modern eyes, the \\v{C}erenkov effect (\\v{C}E) offers a direct and ultrafast energy conversion scheme from charge particles to photons. The requirement for relativistic particles, however, makes \\v{C}E-emission inaccessible to most nanoscale electronic and photonic devices. We show that GPs provide the means to overcome this limitation through their low phase velocity and high field confinement. The interaction between the charge carriers flowing inside graphene and GPs presents a highly efficient 2D \\v{C}erenkov emission, giving a versatile, tunable, and ultrafast conversion mechani...

  7. Manipulating the effective index of the hybrid plasmonic waveguide based on subwavelength grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Bai, Bowen; Zhou, Zhiping

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose and numerically study a subwavelength grating based hybrid plasmonic waveguide. The metal layer on top of the waveguide enables unique features compared with conventional silicon based waveguide. Since the field distribution in this structure is different, traditional homogeneous medium approximation is not applicative. Therefore, we develop a new effective index calculation method. This method is suitable for metal-existing waveguide as well as structures with multiple medium. Effective index of this waveguide depends on grating period, duty ratio and width, respectively. By modifying duty ratio and period of the waveguide, the relationship between effective index and waveguide width can be concave function or convex function and the slope can be similar to TM mode of silicon based waveguide, which opens up possibilities for SPPs based applications.

  8. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N Asger

    2013-01-01

    We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 eV of the SP resonance energy is observed. In this paper, we base our theoretical interpretation of our experimental findings on the nonlocal hydrodynamic model, and compare the effect of the substrate on the SP resonance energy to the approach of an effective homogeneous background permittivity. We derive the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius-Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects....

  9. Airy plasmons in graphene based waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that both the quasi-transverse-magnetic (TM) and quasi-transverseelectric (TE) Airy plasmons can be supported in graphene-based waveguides. The solution of Airy plasmons is calculated analytically and the existence of Airy plasmons is studied under the paraxial approximation. Due to the tunability of the chemical potential of graphene, the self-accelerating behavior of quasi-TM Airy plasmons can be steered effectively, especially in multilayer graphene based waveguides. Besides the metals, graphene provides an additional platform to investigate the propagation of Airy plasmons and to design various plasmonic devices.

  10. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J.; Jin, M. L.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, A.E.; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots” with a deposited metal film, on which the localized surface plasmon resonance effect is obtained. These plasmonic microcapsules can be engineered and modified by nanoparticle size and the metal film thickness. Repeatable Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scatte...

  11. Environment effects on surface-plasmon spectra in gold-island films potential for sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meriaudeau, F. [Laboratoire Electronique Informatique et Image (LE2I), 12 rue de la fonderie, 71200 Le Creusot, France and Photometrics Group, Life Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Downey, T.R.; Passian, A.; Wig, A.; Ferrell, T.L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, 401 A. H. Nielsen Avenue, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1200 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The effects of the local dielectric environment on the surface-plasmon resonances of annealed gold-island films as a potential for sensing applications are studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. Gold-island films were annealed at 600{degree}C to produce spheroidal shape particles that exhibit well-resolved resonances in polarized, angle-resolved, absorption spectra. These resonances are shifted in different amounts by the depolarization effect of the surrounding medium (liquids with various refraction indices). Cross-section calculations based on nonretarded, single-particle, dielectric interaction for these various configurations are presented and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. The results show an interesting potential for biosensing or environmental monitoring applications. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  12. Performance enhancement of organic photovoltaic devices enabled by Au nanoarrows inducing surface plasmonic resonance effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujun; Li, Zhiqi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Zhang, Zhihui; Liu, Chunyu; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-09-21

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of metal nanoparticles is widely employed in organic solar cells to enhance device performance. However, the light-harvesting improvement is highly dependent on the shape of the metal nanoparticles. In this study, the significantly enhanced performance upon incorporation of Au nanoarrows in solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices is demonstrated. Incorporating Au nanoarrows into the ZnO cathode buffer layer results in superior broadband optical absorption improvement and a power conversion efficiency of 7.82% is realized with a 27.3% enhancement compared with the control device. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the introduction of Au nanoarrows not only increases optical trapping by the SPR effect but also facilitates exciton generation, dissociation, and charge transport inside the thin film device.

  13. Enhancement in photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells by surface plasmon effect of palladium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyaoui, Malek; Atyaoui, Atef; Khalifa, Marwen; Elyagoubi, Jalel; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the surface Plasmon effect of Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) on the photovoltaic properties of silicon solar cells. Pd NPs were deposited on the p-type silicon base of the n+/p junction using a chemical deposition method in an aqueous solution containing Palladium (II) Nitrate (PdNO3)2 and Ammonium Hydroxide (NH4OH) followed by a thermal treatment at 500 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical composition and surface morphology of the treated silicon base were examined by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The effect of the deposited Pd NPs on the electrical properties was evaluated by the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The results indicate that the formation of the Pd NPs is accompanied by an enhanced light absorption and improved photovoltaic parameters.

  14. Digital Plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick M; Mosk, Allard P; Kuipers, Kobus; Lagendijk, Ad

    2010-01-01

    The field of plasmonics offers a route to control light fields with metallic nanostructures through the excitation of Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs). These surface waves, bound to a metal dielectric interface, tightly confine electromagnetic energy. Active control over SPPs has potential for applications in sensing, photovoltaics, quantum communication, nano circuitry, metamaterials and super-resolution microscopy. We achieve here a new level of control of plasmonic fields using a digital spatial light modulator. Optimizing the plasmonic phases via feedback we focus SPPs at a freely pre-chosen point on the surface of a nanohole array with high resolution. Digital addressing and scanning of SPPs without mechanical motion will enable novel interdisciplinary applications of advanced plasmonic devices in cell microscopy, optical data storage and sensing.

  15. Experimental research on the feature of Talbot-Lau interferometer vs. tube accelerating voltage

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shenghao; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Kai; Momose, Atsushi; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Talbot-Lau interferometer has been used most widely to perform X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a conventional low-brilliance X-ray source, it yields high-sensitivity phase and dark-field images of sample producing low absorption contrast, thus bearing tremendous potential for future clinical diagnosis. In this manuscript, while changing accelerating voltage of the X-ray tube from 35KV to 45KV, X-ray phase-contrast imaging of a test sample were performed at each integer KV position to investigate the characteristic of a Talbot-Lau interferometer (located in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Japan.) vs. tube voltage. Experimental results and data analysis show that this Talbot-Lau interferometer is insensitive to the tube accelerating voltage within a certain range, fringe visibility around 44% is maintained in the aforementioned tube voltage range. This experimental research is of guiding significance for choosing optimal tube accelerating voltage with thi...

  16. Formation Regularities of Plasmonic Silver Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Effective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarenka, Hanna V; Girel, Kseniya V; Bondarenko, Vitaly P; Khodasevich, Inna A; Panarin, Andrei Yu; Terekhov, Sergei N

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures demonstrating an activity in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been fabricated by an immersion deposition of silver nanoparticles from silver salt solution on mesoporous silicon (meso-PS). The SERS signal intensity has been found to follow the periodical repacking of the silver nanoparticles, which grow according to the Volmer-Weber mechanism. The ratio of silver salt concentration and immersion time substantially manages the SERS intensity. It has been established that optimal conditions of nanostructured silver layers formation for a maximal Raman enhancement can be chosen taking into account a special parameter called effective time: a product of the silver salt concentration on the immersion deposition time. The detection limit for porphyrin molecules CuTMPyP4 adsorbed on the silvered PS has been evaluated as 10(-11) M.

  17. A synergetic application of surface plasmon and field effect to improve Si solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Wang, Liang-Xing; Shi, Wei; Sun, Shu-Lin; Lu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We report a synergetic application of surface plasmon (SP) and field effect (FE) to improve crystalline Si solar cell performance. The SPs are supported by small-sized Ag nanoparticles with an average diameter of 36.7 nm. The localized SP electromagnetic field from Ag nanoparticles excites extra electron-hole pairs at the surface region of the Si solar cell emitter, and meanwhile, the electron-hole pairs are detached by the electrostatic field that crosses the emitter surface. This synergism of SP and FE produces extra charges and enhances the Si solar cell efficiency. As compared to a Si solar cell applying SP and FE independently, a more than 10% efficiency enhancement is achieved by using them synergistically.

  18. Theory of plasmonic effects in nonlinear optics: The case of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Habib; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Polini, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We develop a microscopic large-N theory of electron-electron interaction corrections to multilegged Feynman diagrams describing second- and third-order non-linear-response functions. Our theory, which reduces to the well-known random-phase approximation in the linear-response limit, is completely general and is useful to understand all second- and third-order nonlinear effects, including harmonic generation, wave mixing, and photon drag. We apply our theoretical framework to the case of graphene, by carrying out microscopic calculations of the second- and third-order non-linear-response functions of an interacting two-dimensional (2D) gas of massless Dirac fermions. We compare our results with recent measurements, where all-optical launching of graphene plasmons has been achieved by virtue of the finiteness of the quasihomogeneous second-order nonlinear response of this inversion-symmetric 2D material.

  19. Differential microstrip lines with reduced crosstalk and common mode effect based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin Jei; Hou, Da Jun; Liu, Kexin; Shen, Linfang; Tsai, Chi An; Wu, Chien Jang; Tsai, Dichi; Yang, Tzong-Jer

    2014-11-03

    We apply the concept of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) to the design of differential microstrip lines by introducing periodic subwavelength corrugations on their edges. The dispersion relation and field distribution of those lines are analyzed numerically. And then through designing practical coupling circuits, we found that compared with conventional differential microstrip lines, the electromagnetic field can be strongly confined inside the grooves of the corrugated microstrip lines, so the crosstalk between the differential pair and the adjacent microstrip lines is greatly reduced, and the conversion from the differential signal to the common mode signal can also be effectively suppressed. The propagation length of those lines is also very long in a wide band. Moreover, the experimental results in time domain demonstrate those lines perform very well in high-speed circuit. Therefore, those novel kinds of spoof SPPs based differential microstrip lines can be widely utilized in high-density microwave circuits and guarantee signal integrity in high-speed systems.

  20. Theory of plasmonic effects in nonlinear optics: the case of graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Rostami, Habib; Polini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We develop a microscopic large-$N$ theory of electron-electron interaction corrections to multi-legged Feynman diagrams describing second- and third-order nonlinear response functions. Our theory, which reduces to the well-known random phase approximation in the linear-response limit, is completely general and is useful to understand all second- and third-order nonlinear effects, including harmonic generation, wave mixing, and photon drag. We apply our theoretical framework to the case of graphene, by carrying out microscopic calculations of the second- and third-order nonlinear response functions of an interacting two-dimensional (2D) gas of massless Dirac fermions. We compare our results with recent measurements, where all-optical launching of graphene plasmons has been achieved by virtue of the finiteness of the quasi-homogeneous second-order nonlinear response of this inversion-symmetric 2D material.

  1. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Yan, Wei; Stenger, Nicolas;

    2013-01-01

    the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius–Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response......We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) [1]. As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 e...... of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects. We find that the substrate-based calculations show a similar-sized blueshift as calculations based on a sphere in a homogeneous environment, and that they both agree qualitatively...

  2. Effect of silver NPs plasmon on optical properties of fluorescein dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Alaa EL-din E. A.; Gadallah, A.; Mohamed, Mona B.; Azzouz, I. M.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we studied the effect of silver nanoparticles "AgNPs" on the optical properties of fluoretain-->rescein dye. Fluorescein dye solutions have been mixed with different concentrations of colloidal AgNPs. Absorption and fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein dye molecules was detected in the presence of AgNPs. Fluorescence enhancement of the dye molecules was observed with a maximal enhancement factor of about 3-fold. Enhancement of the rate of radiative transition was also detected. The enhancement mechanisms are attributed to a modification of the local density of electromagnetic modes in the vicinity of AgNPs at energies resonant with surface Plasmon. The ability of fluorophore-metal mixture to actively enhance the dye's luminescence could leads to new opportunities for technological development of light emitting and photonic devices. It also may have applications in the fields of bio-technology and medical diagnostics as new class of fluorescence based sensing.

  3. Talbot-carpets of periodic and quasi-periodic close-packed 2D mask structures calculated by a modified chirp-z-algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Jacqueline; Sandfuchs, Oliver; Gatto, Alexandre; Thomae, Daniel; Brunner, Robert

    2012-06-01

    In this contribution we simulate theoretically the resulting 3D Talbot-carpets of different initial close-packed 2D mask structures. Especially, we investigate the transition from regular periodic to quasi-periodic tessellations. For the pure periodic mask structure a hexagonally tessellation was selected. The calculated field distribution adjacent to the mask still shows a lateral six-fold symmetry but also a rather complex characteristics in the propagation direction. In particular, the appearance and the repetition of self-imaging planes deviate significantly from the classical Talbot-effect. For the quasi-periodic tessellation a Penrose tapestry based on rhombus pairs was chosen. A pronounced lateral fivefold symmetry becomes visible in the field distribution. In the propagation direction dominant planes with increased intensity are observed clearly, but, instead of a simple periodicity, a complex behavior becomes obvious. The numerical algorithm used in our simulations is based on a modified angular spectrum method, in which Bluestein's fast Fourier (FFT) algorithm is applied. This approach allows to decouple the sampling points in the real space and in the spatial frequency domain so that both parameter can be chosen independently. The introduced fast and flexible algorithm requires a minimized number of numerical steps and a minimal computation time, but still offers high accuracy.

  4. Plasmonic Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonics and metamaterials have attracted considerable attention over the past decade, owing to the revolutionary impacts that they bring to both the fundamental physics and practical applications in multiple disciplines. Although the two fields initially advanced along their individual trajectories in parallel, they started to interfere with each other when metamaterials reached the optical regime. The dynamic interplay between plasmonics and metamaterials has generated a number of innovative concepts and approaches, which are impossible with either area alone. This review presents the fundamentals, recent advances and future perspectives in the emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials, aiming to open up new exciting opportunities for nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  5. Hybrid Airy Plasmons with Dynamically Steerable Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    With the intriguing properties of diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing, Airy plasmons are promising to be used in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, the high dissipative loss and the lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal the hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the terahertz (THz) domain as an example. Due to the coupling between an optical mode and a plasmonic mode, the hybrid Airy plasmons can have large propagation lengths and effective transverse deflections, where the transverse waveguide confinements are governed by the hybrid modes with moderate quality factors. Meanwhile, the propagation trajectories of hybrid Airy plasmons are dynamically steerable by changing the chemical potential of graphene. These hybrid Airy plasmons may promote the further discovery of non-diffracting be...

  6. Hybrid Airy plasmons with dynamically steerable trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rujiang; Imran, Muhammad; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2017-01-26

    With their intriguing diffraction-free, self-accelerating, and self-healing properties, Airy plasmons show promise for use in the trapping, transporting, and sorting of micro-objects, imaging, and chip scale signal processing. However, high dissipative loss and lack of dynamical steerability restrict the implementation of Airy plasmons in these applications. Here we reveal hybrid Airy plasmons for the first time by taking a hybrid graphene-based plasmonic waveguide in the terahertz (THz) domain as an example. Due to coupling between optical modes and plasmonic modes, the hybrid Airy plasmons can have large propagation lengths and effective transverse deflections, where the transverse waveguide confinements are governed by the hybrid modes with moderate quality factors. Meanwhile, the propagation trajectories of the hybrid Airy plasmons are dynamically steerable by changing the chemical potential of graphene. These hybrid Airy plasmons may promote the further discovery of non-diffracting beams along with the emerging developments of optical tweezers and tractor beams.

  7. Efficient design, accurate fabrication and effective characterization of plasmonic quasicrystalline arrays of nano-spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Farhad A.; Yuwen, Yu A.; Liu, Liu; Panaretos, Anastasios H.; Werner, Douglas H.; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the scattering properties of two-dimensional quasicrystalline plasmonic lattices are investigated. We combine a newly developed synthesis technique, which allows for accurate fabrication of spherical nanoparticles, with a recently published variation of generalized multiparticle Mie theory to develop the first quantitative model for plasmonic nano-spherical arrays based on quasicrystalline morphologies. In particular, we study the scattering properties of Penrose and Ammann- Beenker gold spherical nanoparticle array lattices. We demonstrate that by using quasicrystalline lattices, one can obtain multi-band or broadband plasmonic resonances which are not possible in periodic structures. Unlike previously published works, our technique provides quantitative results which show excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  8. Quantum Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Martin-Cano, Paloma A. Huidobro, Esteban Moreno; Diego Martin-Cano; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Esteban Moreno; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a rapidly growing field of research that involves the study of the quantum properties of light and its interaction with matter at the nanoscale. Here, surface plasmons - electromagnetic excitations coupled to electron charge density waves on metal-dielectric interfaces or localized on metallic nanostructures - enable the confinement of light to scales far below that of conventional optics. In this article we review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical inve...

  9. Plasmonic Effect on the Population Dynamics and the Optical Response in a Hybrid V-Type Three-Level Quantum Dot-Metallic Nanoparticle Nanosystem

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, Myong-Chol; Choe, Song-Il; So, Gwang-Hyok; Kim, Pong-Ryol Jang Yong-Jin; Kim, Il-Gwang; Li, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated theoretically the exciton-plasmon coupling effects on the population dynamics and the absorption properties of a hybrid nanosystem composed of a metal nanoparticle (MNP) and a V-type three level semiconductor quantum dot (SQD), which are created by the interaction with the induced dipole moments in the SQD and the MNP, respectively. Excitons of the SQD and the plasmons of the MNP in such a hybrid nanosystem could be coupled strongly or weakly to demonstrate novel properties of the hybrid system. Our results show that the nonlinear optical response of the hybrid nanosystem can be greatly enhanced or depressed due to the exciton-plasmon couplings.

  10. Modeling and optimizing the performance of plasmonic solar cells using effective medium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piralaee, M. [Research Institute of Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, 51665-163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Photonics Group, Aras International Campus, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asgari, A., E-mail: asgari@tabrizu.ac.ir [Research Institute of Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, 51665-163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Siahpoush, V. [Research Institute of Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, 51665-163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-05

    In this paper, the effects of random Ag nanoparticle used within the active layer of Si based thin film solar cell are investigated. To avoid the complexity of taking into account all random nanoparticles, an effective dielectric function for random Ag nanoparticles and Si nanocomposites is used that is the Maxwell–Garnet theory along with Percus–Yevick correction term. Considering the energy reservation law and using the effective dielectric function, the absorbance of the active layer, therefore, the solar cell's maximum short current density is obtained. Also, the maximum external quantum efficiency of the solar cell is obtained using the optimum values for the radius and filling fraction of Ag nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A random plasmonic thin film solar cells is studied theoretically. • Silver nanoparticles are randomly distributed through the active layer of solar cell. • The Maxwell–Garnett effective medium theory is used to describe the optical properties. • We have found an optimum situation in which maximum short circuit current density is obtained. • The maximum EQE are found for Ag particles of 7.5 nm radius and filling fraction of 0.05.

  11. Correlation Effects on the Coupled Plasmon Modes of a Double Quantum Well

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, N. P. R.; Nicholls, J. T.; Linfield, E. H.;

    1997-01-01

    At temperatures comparable to the Fermi temperature, we have measured a plasmon enhanced Coulomb drag in a GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well electron system. This measurement provides a probe of the many-body corrections to the coupled plasmon modes, and we present a detailed comparison between...... experiment and theory testing the validity of local field theories. Using a perpendicular magnetic field to raise the magnetoplasmon energy we can induce a crossover to single-particle Coulomb scattering....

  12. Nonlinear plasmonic amplification via dissipative soliton-plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Albert

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a strategy for the compensation of plasmonic losses based on a recently proposed nonlinear mechanism: the resonant interaction between surface plasmon polaritons and spatial solitons propagating in parallel along a metal/dielectric/Kerr structure. This mechanism naturally leads to the generation of a quasiparticle excitation, the so-called soliplasmon resonance. We analyze the role played by the effective nonlinear coupling inherent to this system and how this can be used to provide a mechanism of quasiresonant nonlinear excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We will pay particular attention to the introduction of asymmetric linear gain in the Kerr medium. The unique combination of nonlinear propagation, nonlinear coupling, and gain give rise to a scenario for the excitation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons with distinguishing characteristics. The connection between plasmonic losses and soliplasmon resonances in the presence of gain will be discussed.

  13. Dispersive Casimir Pressure Effect from Surface Plasmon Quanta by Quasi 1D Metal Wires in Ferrite Disks and The Josephson Frequencies and Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Obol, Mahmut

    2013-01-01

    Ferrites are distinct material for electromagnetic applications due to its unique spin precession. In this paper, Casimir pressure effect by deploying magnetically tunable surface plasmon quanta in stratified structure of using ferrite and metal wires is presented. Previously, oscillating surface plasmon quanta were successfully included to modify first reflection and first transmission characteristics. The oscillating surface plasmon quanta in the modified reflection in such a system, not only does resolve in a typical matter in metamaterial, but also provide new applications such as creating Casimir pressure effects through the metamaterial composite shown in this paper. The Casimir pressure flips from attractive state to repulsive state is referred to actual cause mechanism of radiation from surface plasmon quanta. Both Casimir force analysis and the measured data of radiations indicate us the system develops quantized states by electric flux induced by ferromagnetic resonance, so we also carried quantum a...

  14. Blueshift of the surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: substrate effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Yan, Wei; Stenger, Nicolas; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N Asger

    2013-11-04

    We study the blueshift of the surface plasmon (SP) resonance energy of isolated Ag nanoparticles with decreasing particle diameter, which we recently measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) [1]. As the particle diameter decreases from 26 down to 3.5 nm, a large blueshift of 0.5 eV of the SP resonance energy is observed. In this paper, we base our theoretical interpretation of our experimental findings on the nonlocal hydrodynamic model, and compare the effect of the substrate on the SP resonance energy to the approach of an effective homogeneous background permittivity. We derive the nonlocal polarizability of a small metal sphere embedded in a homogeneous dielectric environment, leading to the nonlocal generalization of the classical Clausius-Mossotti factor. We also present an exact formalism based on multipole expansions and scattering matrices to determine the optical response of a metal sphere on a dielectric substrate of finite thickness, taking into account retardation and nonlocal effects. We find that the substrate-based calculations show a similar-sized blueshift as calculations based on a sphere in a homogeneous environment, and that they both agree qualitatively with the EELS measurements.

  15. Optical Observation of Plasmonic Nonlocal Effects in a 2D Superlattice of Ultrasmall Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Chen, Li; Ferrari, Lorenzo; Lin, Meng-Hsien; Mortensen, N Asger; Gwo, Shangjr; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-03-02

    The advances in recent nanofabrication techniques have facilitated explorations of metal structures into nanometer scales, where the traditional local-response Drude model with hard-wall boundary conditions fails to accurately describe their optical responses. The emerging nonlocal effects in single ultrasmall silver nanoparticles have been experimentally observed in single-particle spectroscopy enabled by the unprecedented high spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). However, the unambiguous optical observation of such new effects in gold nanoparticles has yet not been reported, due to the extremely weak scattering and the obscuring fingerprint of strong interband transitions. Here we present a nanosystem, a superlattice monolayer formed by sub-10 nm gold nanoparticles. Plasmon resonances are spectrally well-separated from interband transitions, while exhibiting clearly distinguishable blueshifts compared to predictions by the classical local-response model. Our far-field spectroscopy was performed by a standard optical transmission and reflection setup, and the results agreed excellently with the hydrodynamic nonlocal model, opening a simple and widely accessible way for addressing quantum effects in nanoplasmonic systems.

  16. Cluster Plasmonics: Dielectric and Shape Effects on DNA-Stabilized Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle; Swasey, Steven M; Faris, Alexis; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2016-06-01

    This work investigates the effects of dielectric environment and cluster shape on electronic excitations of fluorescent DNA-stabilized silver clusters, AgN-DNA. We first establish that the longitudinal plasmon wavelengths predicted by classical Mie-Gans (MG) theory agree with previous quantum calculations for excitation wavelengths of linear silver atom chains, even for clusters of just a few atoms. Application of MG theory to AgN-DNA with 400-850 nm cluster excitation wavelengths indicates that these clusters are characterized by a collective excitation process and suggests effective cluster thicknesses of ∼2 silver atoms and aspect ratios of 1.5 to 5. To investigate sensitivity to the surrounding medium, we measure the wavelength shifts produced by addition of glycerol. These are smaller than reported for much larger gold nanoparticles but easily detectable due to narrower line widths, suggesting that AgN-DNA may have potential for fluorescence-reported changes in dielectric environment at length scales of ∼1 nm.

  17. Dual-band infrared perfect absorber for plasmonic sensor based on the electromagnetically induced reflection-like effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Ying Qiao; Jin, Xing Ri; Zhang, Shou; Lee, Young Pak

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for realizing a narrow-dual-band perfect absorber based on the plasmonic analogy of the electromagnetically induced reflection (EIR)-like effect. In our scheme, two short gold bars are excited strongly by incident plane wave serving as the bright mode. The middle gold bar is excited by two short gold bars. Due to the strong hybridization between the two short gold bars and the middle gold bar, two absorption peaks occur. The corresponding absorption rates are both over 99%. The quality factors of the two absorption peaks are 41.76 (198.47 THz) and 71.42 (207.79 THz), respectively, and the narrow-distance of the two absorption peaks is 9.32 THz. Therefore, they are narrow enough for the absorber to be a filter and a dual-band plasmonic sensor.

  18. Plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles in a SiON antireflective coating: engineering rules and physical barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecler, S.; Bastide, S.; Tan, J.; Qu, M.; Slaoui, A.; Fix, T.

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been proposed in the architectures of several solar cells as a way to enhance light collection and thus to increase their efficiency. Here, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in a SiON antireflective layer using an electroless technique. The plasmonic effects are modeled and observed experimentally for NPs 5 to 200 nm in size. The systematic comparison of scattering and extinction efficiencies computed as a function of the NPs and surrounding medium properties allows establishing engineering rules, validated by the experimental measurements. The fact that Ag NPs larger than 30 nm mainly contribute to light scattering and therefore to optical path enlargement (green-red light), whereas those smaller than 15 nm absorb light by light trapping (blue-green), is demonstrated and physically explained. A physical barrier making it impossible to shift the dominant resonance beyond 650 nm is pointed out.

  19. Diffuse Surface Scattering and Quantum Size Effects in the Surface Plasmon Resonances of Low Carrier Density Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Monreal, R Carmina; Apell, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the physical parameters that determine Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPRs) is essential to develop new applications for plasmonics. A relatively new area of research has been opened by the identification of LSPRs in low carrier density systems obtained by doping semiconductor quantum dots. We investigate theoretically how diffuse surface scattering of electrons in combination with the effect of quantization due to size (QSE) impact the evolution of the LSPRs with the size of these nanosystems. Two key parameters are the length $R_0$ giving the strength of the QSE and the velocity $\\beta_T$ of the electronic excitations entering in the length scale for diffuse surface scattering. While the QSE itself only produces a blueshift in energy of the LSPRs, the diffuse surface scattering mechanism gives to both energy and linewidth an oscillatory-damped behavior as a function of size, with characteristic lengths that depend on material parameters. Thus, the evolution of the LSPRs...

  20. Fabrication of highly active and cost effective SERS plasmonic substrates by electrophoretic deposition of gold nanoparticles on a DVD template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leordean, Cosmin; Marta, Bogdan; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Focsan, Monica; Botiz, Ioan; Astilean, Simion, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Simple and cost effective electrophoretic method to fabricate plasmonic substrates. • SERS performance at three different excitation laser lines. • Promising applicability in SERS based biosensing. - Abstract: In this work we present a simple, rapid and cost effective method to fabricate highly active SERS substrates. This method consists in an electrophoretic deposition of gold nanoparticles on a metallic nanostructured template of a commercial digital versatile disk (DVD). The negatively charged gold nanoparticles self-assemble on the positively charged DVD metallic film connected to a positive terminal of a battery, due to the influence of the electric field. When gold nanoparticles self-assembled on DVD metallic film, a 10-fold additional enhancement of Raman signal was observed when compared with the case of GNPs self-assembled on a polycarbonate DVD substrate only. Finite-difference time-domain simulations demonstrated that the additional electromagnetic field arising in the hot-spots created between gold nanoparticles and DVD metallic film induces an additional enhancement of the Raman signal. SERS efficiency of the fabricated plasmonic substrate was successfully demonstrated through detection of para-aminothiophenol molecule with three different excitation laser lines (532, 633 and 785 nm). The enhancement factor was calculated to be 10{sup 6} and indicates that plasmonic substrates fabricated through this method could be a promising platform for future SERS based sensors.

  1. New insight into daylight photocatalysis of AgBr@Ag: synergistic effect between semiconductor photocatalysis and plasmonic photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Hao; Zhang, Lizhi

    2012-05-14

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) are often used as electron scavengers in conventional semiconductor photocatalysis to suppress electron-hole (e(-)-h(+) ) recombination and promote interfacial charge transfer, and thus enhance photocatalytic activity of semiconductors. In this contribution, it is demonstrated that noble metal NPs such as Ag NPs function as visible-light harvesting and electron-generating centers during the daylight photocatalysis of AgBr@Ag. Novel Ag plasmonic photocatalysis could cooperate with the conventional AgBr semiconductor photocatalysis to enhance the overall daylight activity of AgBr@Ag greatly because of an interesting synergistic effect. After a systematic investigation of the daylight photocatalysis mechanism of AgBr@Ag, the synergistic effect was attributed to surface plasmon resonance induced local electric field enhancement on Ag, which can accelerate the generation of e(-)-h(+) pairs in AgBr, so that more electrons are produced in the conduction band of AgBr under daylight irradiation. This study provides new insight into the photocatalytic mechanism of noble metal/semiconductor systems as well as the design and fabrication of novel plasmonic photocatalysts.

  2. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Della Gaspera

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors.

  3. Plasmonic Effect in Au-Added TiO2-Based Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hong, Le; Cat, Do Tran; Chi, Le Ha; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Van Hung, Tran; Tai, Ly Ngoc; Long, Pham Duy

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 nano thin films have been fabricated on fluoride tin oxide (FTO) film electrodes by hydrothermal synthesis at temperatures of 80°C, 120°C, 150°C, and 200°C for different synthesis times of 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h in 2.5 mol, 5 mol, and 7.5 mol NaOH solution. X-ray diffraction patterns and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images were recorded for all the film samples, and the results confirmed that TiO2 anatase phase was generally formed in nanowire form. The influence of synthesis temperature, processing time, and NaOH content on the structure and morphology of the TiO2 material was studied. Au nanoparticles with size of around 2 × 10-8 m were added into the TiO2 thin films by thermal evaporation in vacuum combined with thermal annealing. Based on photocurrent-voltage ( I- V) characteristics measured under irradiation with visible light, the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, and efficiency of solar cells with FTO/Au-added TiO2/(I-/I2-) electrolyte/Pt configuration were evaluated. The short-circuit current and efficiency of the Au-added solar cell were greatly improved, which is supposed to be related to a contribution of the surface plasmon resonance effect.

  4. Surface plasmon polariton propagation in organic nanofiber based plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Lemke, Christoph; Jauernik, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic wave packet propagation is monitored in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides realized from para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited onto a 60 nm thick gold film. Using interferometric time resolved two-photon photoemission electron microscopy we are able to determine...... phase and group velocity of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waveguiding mode (0.967c and 0.85c at λLaser = 812nm) as well as the effective propagation length (39 μm) along the fiber-gold interface. We furthermore observe that the propagation properties of the SPP waveguiding mode are governed...

  5. Effect of radiation damping on the spectral response of plasmonic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Mikhail A; Yu, Nanfang; Genevet, Patrice; Gaburro, Zeno; Capasso, Federico

    2011-10-24

    We explore the relationship between the near-field enhancement, absorption, and scattering spectra of localized plasmonic elements. A simple oscillator model including both internal and radiative damping is developed, and is shown to accurately capture the near- and far-field spectral features of linear optical antennas, including their phase response. At wavelengths away from the interband transitions of the metal, we expect the absorption of a plasmonic element to be red-shifted relative to the scattering, and the near-field to be red-shifted relative to both.

  6. Phase effects in guided mode resonances II: measuring the angular phase of a surface plasmon polariton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, M. J.; Brown, T. G.

    2015-02-01

    We show how the phase of a resonant interaction between a focused beam and a guided mode can be directly observed in a pupil imaging experiment, in which the irradiance leaving the pupil of a standard microscope is relayed to an image sensor through a combination Wollaston prism, calcite beam splitter and polarizer. We apply the method to the observation of a surface plasmon polariton resonance excited in a corrugated silver film fabricated using electron beam lithography. We discuss how this particular imaging configuration could be adapted for applications in plasmonic optical sensing.

  7. Plasmonic sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic sensors typically rely on detection of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding medium. Here, an alternative approach is reported based on electrical surface screening and controlled dissolution of ultrasmall silver nanoparticles (NPs; R < 5 nm) that can result in a great incr...

  8. Laser and Pulsed Power Electron Density Imaging Through Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Stoeckl, Christian; Mileham, Chad; Begischev, Ildar; Theobald, Wolfgang; Bromage, Jake; Regan, Sean; Klein, Salee; Muñoz-Cordovez, Gonzalo; Vescovi, Milenko; Valenzuela-Villaseca, Vicente; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    A Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer was deployed using laser driven and x-pinch x-ray backlighters. The Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer is an ideal electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas with the potential to simultaneously deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single image with source limited resolution. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 10-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using Cu foil targets at the Multi-TeraWatt facility. An areal electron density of 0.050 g/cm2 was obtained at the center of a fluoro-nylon fiber of 300 mm diameter with a source FWHM of 80 µm and resolution of 50 µm. Grating survival and Moiré pattern formation was demonstrated using a Cu x-pinch plasma of FWHM 27 µm, driven by the 350 kA, 350 ns Llampudken pulsed power generator. These results closely match simulations and laboratory results. It was demonstrated that the technique can detect both sharp and smooth density gradients in the range of 2x1023 to 2x1025 cm-3, thus allowing implementation of the electron density technique as a HED plasma diagnostic in both laser and pulsed power experiments U.S. DoE/NNSA and DE-NA0002955.

  9. High-energy x-ray Talbot-Lau radiography of a human knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, F.; Gelse, K.; Jabari, S.; Hauke, C.; Kaeppler, S.; Ludwig, V.; Meyer, P.; Michel, T.; Mohr, J.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Riess, C.; Seifert, M.; Anton, G.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a radiographic measurement of an ex vivo human knee using a grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup and a medical x-ray tube at a tube voltage of 70 kV. The measurement has been carried out using a Talbot-Lau setup that is suitable to achieve a high visibility in the energy regime of medical imaging. In a medical reading by an experienced trauma surgeon signatures of chondrocalcinosis in the medial meniscus have been identified more evidently using the dark-field image in comparison to the conventional attenuation image. The analysis has been carried out at various dose levels down to 0.14 mGy measured as air kerma, which is a dose comparable to clinically used radiographic devices. The diagnosis has been confirmed by a histological analysis of the meniscus tissue. In the introduced high-frequency filtered phase-contrast image the anterior and posterior horn of the medial meniscus and the posterior cruciate ligament have also been visible. Furthermore, atherosclerotic plaque is visible in both imaging modalities, attenuation and dark-field, despite the presence of overlaying bone. This measurement, for the first time, proves the feasibility of Talbot-Lau x-ray imaging at high-energy spectra above 40 kVp and reasonable dose levels with regard to spacious and dense objects.

  10. Nonlinear optical model for strip plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of nonlinear optical properties for strip plasmonic waveguides. The particular waveguides geometry that we investigate contains a gold core, adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. It is shown that the third-order susceptibility of the gold core...... significantly depends on the layer thickness and has the dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the long-range plasmon polariton mode. This results in two nonlinear optical effects in plasmonic waveguides, which we experimentally observed and reported in [Opt. Lett. 41, 317 (2016......)]. The first effect is the nonlinear power saturation of the plasmonic mode, and the second effect is the spectral broadening of the plasmonic mode. Both nonlinear plasmonic effects can be used for practical applications and their appropriate model will be important for further developments in communication...

  11. Plasmonic colour generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders; Yang, Joel K. W.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic colours are structural colours that emerge from resonant interactions between light and metallic nanostructures. The engineering of plasmonic colours is a promising, rapidly emerging research field that could have a large technological impact. We highlight basic properties of plasmonic...

  12. Highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance chemical sensor based on Goos-Hanchen effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaobo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2006-08-01

    The resonance enhanced Goos-Hanchen shifts at attenuated total internal reflection enables the possibility for highly sensitive surface plasmon resonance sensor. The observed giant displacements result from the singular phase retardation at the resonance where the phase is continuous but changes dramatically. The phenomenon is proposed for chemical sensing and the superior sensitivity is demonstrated.

  13. Orientational and quantum plasmonic effects in the optics of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raman Anand

    The classical theory of plasmonics envisions spherical nanoparticles obeying classical electrodynamics. Modern colloidal synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles, in tandem with emerging methods of nanoparticle assembly, transcends the assumptions of this theory. First, strongly nonspherical particles give rise to optical spectra with complicated orientation dependence. An interpolation method is introduced to connect electrodynamic simulation results, generally carried out at fixed orientations, with experimental optical spectra, such as those of randomly oriented ensembles. Second, the ability to manipulate and arrange multiple spherical particles in solution with optical binding demands efficient calculation of the optical forces giving rise to their preferred geometries. A coupled-dipole model is developed to allow for rapid optical force calculations that predict many of the phenomena seen in the laboratory. Third, the prospect of attaching semiconductor quantum dots to metal nanoparticles in the electromagnetic near-field raises new questions about how the quantum behavior of localized surface plasmons affects the nonlinear optical response of the coupled system. Investigating such questions yields several new predictions about the optical response of plasmon-exciton systems. Under ultrafast pulsed illumination, a reversal of a Fano resonance is predicted, turning a dip into a spike in the pulsed optical spectrum. When two quantum dots are coupled to the same metal nanoparticle, it is found that their individual couplings to a quantized plasmon can give rise to coherence between the quantum dots, in particular a state enriched in an antisymmetric dark excitation that can be prepared with pulsed laser illumination. These theoretical tools and predictions, in addition to providing basic insight into plasmonic systems, will serve to guide further developments in colloidal synthesis, nanoparticle assembly, and optical applications.

  14. Electrochemically Programmable Plasmonic Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Zhiping; Fan, Jonathan A

    2016-07-26

    Plasmonic antennas are building blocks in advanced nano-optical systems due to their ability to tailor optical response based on their geometry. We propose an electrochemical approach to program the optical properties of dipole antennas in a scalable, fast, and energy-efficient manner. These antennas comprise two arms, one serving as an anode and the other a cathode, separated by a solid electrolyte. As a voltage is applied between the antenna arms, a conductive filament either grows or dissolves within the electrolyte, modifying the antenna load. We probe the dynamics of stochastic filament formation and their effects on plasmonic mode programming using a combination of three-dimensional optical and electronic simulations. In particular, we identify device operation regimes in which the charge-transfer plasmon mode can be programmed to be "on" or "off." We also identify, unexpectedly, a strong correlation between DC filament resistance and charge-transfer plasmon mode frequency that is insensitive to the detailed filament morphology. We envision that the scalability of our electrochemical platform can generalize to large-area reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces for on-chip and free-space applications.

  15. Coherent and tunable light radiation from nanoscale surface plasmons array via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihao

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate that surface plasmons on a nanoscale metallic array can be transformed into radiation waves via an exotic Smith-Purcell effect. Although the radiation frequency and direction satisfy the Smith-Purcell relation, it is coherent radiation with directions specified, which is essentially different from the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Its radiation spectral density is an order of magnitude higher. By adjusting the material and structure of the array, the radiation frequency can be tuned from an infrared to ultraviolet region. Its remarkable advantages in intensity, coherence, tunability, and miniature size indicate new prospects in developing nanoscale light sources and related techniques.

  16. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers

    OpenAIRE

    Quanshui Li; Zhili Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redsh...

  17. Controlling light with plasmonic multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Iorsh, Ivan V.

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen a new wave of interest in layered media - namely, plasmonic multilayers - in several emerging applications ranging from transparent metals to hyperbolic metamaterials. In this paper, we review the optical properties of such subwavelength metal-dielectric multilayered...... metamaterials and describe their use for light manipulation at the nanoscale. While demonstrating the recently emphasized hallmark effect of hyperbolic dispersion, we put special emphasis to the comparison between multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials and more broadly defined plasmonic-multilayer metamaterials...

  18. The effect of hot electrons and surface plasmons on heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Si Woo; Moon, Song Yi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Hot electrons and surface-plasmon-driven chemistry are amongst the most actively studied research subjects because they are deeply associated with energy dissipation and the conversion processes at the surface and interfaces, which are still open questions and key issues in the surface science community. In this topical review, we give an overview of the concept of hot electrons or surface-plasmon-mediated hot electrons generated under various structural schemes (i.e. metals, metal-semiconductor, and metal-insulator-metal) and their role affecting catalytic activity in chemical reactions. We highlight recent studies on the relation between hot electrons and catalytic activity on metallic surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms for how hot electrons participate in chemical reactions. We also introduce controlled chemistry to describe specific pathways for selectivity control in catalysis on metal nanoparticles.

  19. Investigations of scattering and field enhancement effects in retardation-based plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. G.; Pors, A.; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard;

    2010-01-01

    Modifications in scattering strength of and local field enhancement by retardation-based plasmonic nanoantennas when being transformed from straight nanorods to split-rings are investigated. The scattering properties are monitored by linear reflection and extinction spectroscopy whereas local field......, a feature that we attribute to the decrease in the nanoantenna electric-dipole response in tact with its bending. The experimental observations are corroborated with numerical simulations using the finite-element method....

  20. Surface plasmon effect in nanocrystalline copper/DLC composite films by electrodeposition technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Hussain; A K Pal

    2006-11-01

    Composite films of nanocrystalline copper embedded in DLC matrix prepared by electrodeposition technique were studied for their optical properties. Particle size and metal volume fractions were tailored by varying the amount of copper containing salt in the electrolyte. Blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak in the absorbance spectra of the films was observed with the reduction in size and volume fraction of metal particles. Mie theory was found to describe the experimental spectra quite well.

  1. Know thy nano neighbor. Plasmonic versus electron charging effects of metal nanoparticles in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunbong; Chen, Wei Ta; Kamat, Prashant V

    2012-05-22

    Neighboring metal nanoparticles influence photovoltaic and photocatalytic behavior of semiconductor nanostructures either through Fermi level equilibration by accepting electrons or inducing localized surface plasmon effects. By employing SiO(2)- and TiO(2)-capped Au nanoparticles we have identified the mechanism with which the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is influenced by the neighboring metal nanoparticles. The efficiency of an N719 dye-sensitized solar cell (9.3%) increased to 10.2% upon incorporation of 0.7% Au@SiO(2) and to 9.8% upon loading of 0.7% Au@TiO(2) nanoparticles. The plasmonic effect as monitored by introducing Au@SiO(2) in DSSC produces higher photocurrent. However, Au nanoparticles undergo charge equilibration with TiO(2) nanoparticles and shift the apparent Fermi level of the composite to more negative potentials. As a result, Au@TiO(2) nanoparticle-embedded DSSC exhibit higher photovoltage. A better understanding of these two effects is crucial in exploiting the beneficial aspects of metal nanoparticles in photovoltaics.

  2. Surface plasmon effect of Ag nanodots embedded in amorphous Si window layers deposited on Si solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungil; Ji, HyungYong; Kim, Myeong Jun; Peck, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Keunjoo

    2014-12-01

    We investigated solar cells containing temperature-dependent Ag nanodots embedded in an amorphous Si thin film layer by using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition in order to improve the properties of crystalline Si solar cells. An Ag thin film with a thickness of 10 nm was deposited by DC sputtering followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 250 to 850 degrees C for 15 min under N2 gas. As increasing the annealing temperature, the Ag nanodots were enlarged and the photoreflectances of the samples with Ag nanodots were lower than the reference samples in the spectral range of 200-600 nm, demonstrating the plasmon effect of Ag nanodots. The cell properties on photoluminescence spectra, quantum efficiency, and conversion efficiency were measured with the maximum values for the sample annealed at 450 degrees C, indicating that there exists an optimal size of the Ag nanodots about 15-35 nm to be effective on the enhancement of surface plasmon effect.

  3. Single-Grating Talbot Imaging for Wavefront Sensing and X-Ray Metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grizolli, Walan; Shi, Xianbo; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2017-01-01

    Single-grating Talbot imaging relies on high-spatial-resolution detectors to perform accurate measurements of X-ray beam wavefronts. The wavefront can be retrieved with a single image, and a typical measurement and data analysis can be performed in few seconds. These qualities make it an ideal tool for synchrotron beamline diagnostics and in-situ metrology. The wavefront measurement can be used both to obtain a phase contrast image of an object and to characterize an X-ray beam. In this work, we explore the concept in two cases: at-wavelength metrology of 2D parabolic beryllium lenses and a wavefront sensor using a diamond crystal beam splitter.

  4. Annealing Effects on the Surface Plasmon of MgO Implanted with Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, A.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. -S.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.; Wang, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    Gold ion implantation was carried out with the energy of 1.1 MeV into (100) oriented MgO single crystal. Implanted doses are 1, 3, 6, 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm. The gold irradiation results in the formation of gold ion implanted layer with a thickness of 0.2 microns and defect formation. In order to form gold colloids from the as-implanted samples, we annealed the gold implanted MgO samples in three kinds of atmospheres: (1)Ar only, (2)H2 and Ar, and (3)O2 and Ar. The annealing over 1200 C enhanced the gold colloid formation which shows surface plasmon resonance band of gold. The surface plasmon bands of samples annealed in three kinds of atmospheres were found to be at 535 nm (Ar only), 524 nm(H2+Ar), and 560 nm (02+Ar), The band positions of surface plasmon can be reversibly changed by an additional annealing.

  5. Plasmonic Effect on Exciton and Multiexciton Emission of Single Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Swayandipta; Zhao, Jing

    2016-08-04

    Quantum dots are nanoscale quantum emitters with high quantum yield and size-dependent emission wavelength, holding promises in many optical and electronic applications. When quantum dots are situated close to noble metal nanoparticles, their emitting behavior can be conveniently tuned because of the interaction between the excitons of the quantum dots and the plasmons of the metal nanoparticles. This interaction at the single quantum dot level gives rise to reduced or suppressed photoluminescence blinking and enhanced multiexciton emission, which is difficult to achieve in isolated quantum dots. However, the mechanism of how plasmonic structures cause the changes in the quantum dot emission remains unclear. Because of the complexity of the system, the interfaces between metal, semiconductor, and ligands must be considered, in addition to factors such as geometry, interparticle distance, and spectral overlap. The challenges in the design and fabrication of the hybrid nanostructures as well as in understanding the exciton-plasmon coupling mechanism can be overcome by a cooperative effort in synthesis, optical spectroscopy, and theoretical modeling.

  6. X-ray phase scanning setup for non-destructive testing using Talbot-Lau interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachche, S.; Nonoguchi, M.; Kato, K.; Kageyama, M.; Koike, T.; Kuribayashi, M.; Momose, A.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating interferometry has a great potential for X-ray phase imaging over conventional X-ray absorption imaging which does not provide significant contrast for weakly absorbing objects and soft biological tissues. X-ray Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers which are composed of transmission gratings and measure the differential X-ray phase shifts have gained popularity because they operate with polychromatic beams. In X-ray radiography, especially for nondestructive testing in industrial applications, the feasibility of continuous sample scanning is not yet completely revealed. A scanning setup is frequently advantageous when compared to a direct 2D static image acquisition in terms of field of view, exposure time, illuminating radiation, etc. This paper demonstrates an efficient scanning setup for grating-based Xray phase imaging using laboratory-based X-ray source. An apparatus consisting of an X-ray source that emits X-rays vertically, optical gratings and a photon-counting detector was used with which continuously moving objects across the field of view as that of conveyor belt system can be imaged. The imaging performance of phase scanner was tested by scanning a long continuous moving sample at a speed of 5 mm/s and absorption, differential-phase and visibility images were generated by processing non-uniform moire movie with our specially designed phase measurement algorithm. A brief discussion on the feasibility of phase scanner with scanning setup approach including X-ray phase imaging performance is reported. The successful results suggest a breakthrough for scanning objects those are moving continuously on conveyor belt system non-destructively using the scheme of X-ray phase imaging.

  7. Quantum theory of plasmons in nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kirsten Trøstrup

    . For a theoretical description of plasmon in such materials, where the electrons are heavily confined in one or more directions, a quantum mechanical description of the electrons in the material is necessary. In this thesis, the ab initio methods Density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time-dependent DFT......In this thesis, ab initio quantum-mechanical calculations are used to study the properties of plasmons in nanostructures that involve atomic length-scales. The plasmon is an electronic excitation that corresponds to oscillations in the electron charge density in metals, often visualized as water...... are applied to calculate the properties of plasmons in nanostructures in different dimensions. In order to identify and visualize localized plasmon modes, a method for calculating plasmon eigenmodes within the ab initio framework has been developed. In the studied materials, quantum mechanical effects...

  8. Graphene Plasmons in Triangular Wedges and Grooves

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, P A D; Xiao, Sanshui; Vasilevskiy, M I; Mortensen, N Asger; Peres, N M R

    2016-01-01

    The ability to effectively guide electromagnetic radiation below the diffraction limit is of the utmost importance in the prospect of all-optical plasmonic circuitry. Here, we propose an alternative solution to conventional metal-based plasmonics by exploiting the deep subwavelength confinement and tunability of graphene plasmons guided along the apex of a graphene-covered dielectric wedge or groove. In particular, we present a quasi-analytic model to describe the plasmonic eigenmodes in such a system, including the complete determination of their spectrum and corresponding induced potential and electric field distributions. We have found that the dispersion of wedge/groove graphene plasmons follows the same functional dependence as their flat-graphene plasmons counterparts, but now scaled by a (purely) geometric factor in which all the information about the system's geometry is contained. We believe our results pave the way for the development of novel custom-tailored photonic devices for subwavelength waveg...

  9. Localization of Temperature Using Plasmonic Hot Spots in Metal Nanostructures: The Nano-Optical Antenna Approach and Fano Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Valentine, Jason; Govorov, Alexander O

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to strongly localize temperature in small volumes because heat transfer is a diffusive process. Here we show how to overcome this limitation using electrodynamic hot spots and interference effects in the regime of continuous-wave (CW) excitation. We introduce a set of figures of merit for the localization of temperature and for the efficiency of the plasmonic photo-thermal effect. Our calculations show that the temperature localization in a trimer nanoparticle assembly is a complex function of the geometry and sizes. Large nanoparticles in the trimer play the role of the nano-optical antenna whereas the small nanoparticle in the plasmonic hot spot acts as a nano-heater. Under the peculiar conditions, the temperature increase inside a nanoparticle trimer can be localized in a hot spot region at the small heater nanoparticle and, in this way, a thermal hot spot can be realized. However, the overall power efficiency of temperature generation in this trimer is much smaller than that of a single ...

  10. Surface Plasmon Singularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Martínez-Niconoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to compare the physical features of the electromagnetic field, we describe the synthesis of optical singularities propagating in the free space and on a metal surface. In both cases the electromagnetic field has a slit-shaped curve as a boundary condition, and the singularities correspond to a shock wave that is a consequence of the curvature of the slit curve. As prototypes, we generate singularities that correspond to fold and cusped regions. We show that singularities in free space may generate bifurcation effects while plasmon fields do not generate these kinds of effects. Experimental results for free-space propagation are presented and for surface plasmon fields, computer simulations are shown.

  11. Eco-friendly plasmonic sensors: using the photothermal effect to prepare metal nanoparticle-containing test papers for highly sensitive colorimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shao-Chin; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Wan, Dehui; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Wang, Lon Alex; Wu, Ming-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2012-06-05

    Convenient, rapid, and accurate detection of chemical and biomolecules would be a great benefit to medical, pharmaceutical, and environmental sciences. Many chemical and biosensors based on metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed. However, as a result of the inconvenience and complexity of most of the current preparation techniques, surface plasmon-based test papers are not as common as, for example, litmus paper, which finds daily use. In this paper, we propose a convenient and practical technique, based on the photothermal effect, to fabricate the plasmonic test paper. This technique is superior to other reported methods for its rapid fabrication time (a few seconds), large-area throughput, selectivity in the positioning of the NPs, and the capability of preparing NP arrays in high density on various paper substrates. In addition to their low cost, portability, flexibility, and biodegradability, plasmonic test paper can be burned after detecting contagious biomolecules, making them safe and eco-friendly.

  12. Compact and broadband directional coupling and demultiplexing in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides based on the multimode interference effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhihong; García Ortíz, César Eduardo; Han, Zhanghua

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically, numerically, and experimentally demonstrate that a directional coupling function can be realized with a wide bandwidth (greater than 200 nm) in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides based on the multimode interference effect. The functional size of the structures...... is in the range of several micrometers, which is much shorter than traditional directional couplers consisting of two parallel dielectric or plasmonic metallic waveguides. In addition, 1 × 2 beam splitting and demultiplexing function was realized. Such devices with wide bandwidth and small size indicate potential...

  13. Effect of irregularities of nanosatellites position and size on collective electric and magnetic plasmonic resonances in spherical nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecchi, Andrea; Albani, Matteo; Capolino, Filippo

    2013-03-25

    Spherical nanoclusters (NCs) with a central dielectric core surrounded by several satellite plasmonic nanospheres have been recently investigated as aggregates supporting electric and magnetic collective resonances. Notably, the collective magnetic resonance has been exploited to provide magnetic properties in optics, i.e., materials with macroscopic relative permeability different from unity. The NCs discussed in this paper can be realized using state-of-the-art nanochemistry self-assembly techniques. Accordingly, perfectly regular disposition of the nanoplasmonic satellites is not possible and this paper constitutes the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of such irregularities onto the electric and magnetic collective resonances. In particular we will show that the peak of the scattering cross section associated to the magnetic resonance is very sensitive to certain irregularities and significantly less to others. It is shown here that "artificial magnetic" properties of NCs are preserved for certain degrees of irregularities of the nanosatellites positions, however they are strongly affected by irregularities in the plasmonic nanosatellites sizes and by the presence of "defects" caused by the absence of satellites in the process of self-assembly around the dielectric core. The "artificial electric" resonance is instead less affected by irregularities mainly because of its wider frequency bandwidth.

  14. Edge plasmons and cut-off behavior of graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Haowen; Teng, Jinghua; Palacios, Tomás; Chua, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides with ultra-short plasmon wavelength are a promising candidate for nanoscale photonic applications. Graphene edge plasmons are the fundamental and lowest losses mode. Through finite element method, edge plasmons show large effective refractive index and strong field confinement on nanoscale ribbons. The edge plasmons follow a k1/2 dispersion relation. The wavelengths of the edge plasmons and center plasmons differ by a fixed factor. The width of edge plasmon is inversely proportional to wave vector of edge plasmon kedge. Edge defects associate with graphene nano-ribbon induce extra losses and reduce the propagation length. Cut-off width of edge plasmons reduces with increasing frequency. Cut-off width of center plasmon is enlarged by edge component but the enlargement effect diminishing with the increase of kedge. The results are important for the application of graphene plasmon towards ultra-compact photonic devices.

  15. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  16. Nonlinear plasmonic antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeeb Bin Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to traditional optical elements, plasmonic antennas made from nanostructured metals permit the localization of electromagnetic fields on length scales much smaller than the wavelength of light. This results in huge amplitudes for the electromagnetic field close to the antenna being conducive for the observation of nonlinear effects already at moderate pump powers. Thus, these antennas exhibit a promising potential to achieve optical frequency conversion and all-optical control of light at the nano-scale. This opens unprecedented opportunities for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, sensing devices, on-chip optical frequency conversion, nonlinear optical metamaterials, and novel photon sources. Here, we review some of the recent advances in exploiting the potential of plasmonic antennas to realize robust nonlinear applications.

  17. Surface magneto plasmons and their applications in the infrared frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Bin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their promising properties, surface magneto plasmons have attracted great interests in the field of plasmonics recently. Apart from flexible modulation of the plasmonic properties by an external magnetic field, surface magneto plasmons also promise nonreciprocal effect and multi-bands of propagation, which can be applied into the design of integrated plasmonic devices for biosensing and telecommunication applications. In the visible frequencies, because it demands extremely strong magnetic fields for the manipulation of metallic plasmonic materials, nano-devices consisting of metals and magnetic materials based on surface magneto plasmon are difficult to be realized due to the challenges in device fabrication and high losses. In the infrared frequencies, highly-doped semiconductors can replace metals, owning to the lower incident wave frequencies and lower plasma frequencies. The required magnetic field is also low, which makes the tunable devices based on surface magneto plasmons more practically to be realized. Furthermore, a promising 2D material-graphene shows great potential in infrared magnetic plasmonics. In this paper, we review the magneto plasmonics in the infrared frequencies with a focus on device designs and applications. We investigate surface magneto plasmons propagating in different structures, including plane surface structures and slot waveguides. Based on the fundamental investigation and theoretical studies, we illustrate various magneto plasmonic micro/nano devices in the infrared, such as tunable waveguides, filters, and beam-splitters. Novel plasmonic devices such as one-way waveguides and broad-band waveguides are also introduced.

  18. Compact and broadband directional coupling and demultiplexing in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides based on the multimode interference effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhihong; García Ortíz, César Eduardo; Han, Zhanghua;

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically, numerically, and experimentally demonstrate that a directional coupling function can be realized with a wide bandwidth (greater than 200 nm) in dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides based on the multimode interference effect. The functional size of the structure...

  19. Plasmon excitations in the dimers formed by atom chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hong-jie; Hao, Da-peng; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xiao-mei

    2017-02-01

    Based on the linear response theory in the random-phase approximation and the free-electron gas model, we study the plasmon excitations in the dimers formed by atom chains. With the help of energy absorption spectrum and charge distribution, the evolutions of longitudinal and transverse plasmon, and the effect of the system parameters such as size, atomic separation and electron filling on plasmon are obtained. In addition, the dipole, quadrupole, end and central plasmon are observed.

  20. Subwavelength plasmonic kinks in arrays of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Noskov, Roman E; Kivshar, Yuri S; 10.1364/OE.20.002733

    2012-01-01

    We analyze nonlinear effects in optically driven arrays of nonlinear metallic nanoparticles. We demonstrate that such plasmonic systems are characterized by a bistable response, and they can support the propagation of dissipative switching waves (or plasmonic kinks) connecting the states with different polarization. We study numerically the properties of such plasmonic kinks which are characterized by a subwavelength extent and a tunable velocity.

  1. The road towards nonlinear magneto-plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Liu, Xiao; Lüpke, Günter; Hanbicki, Aubrey T.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear magneto-plasmonics (NMP) describes systems where nonlinear optics, magnetics and plasmonics are all involved. NMP can be referred to as interdisciplinary studies at the intersection of Nonlinear Plasmonics (NP), Magneto- Plasmonics (MP), and nanoscience. In NMP systems, nanostructures are the bases, Surface Plasmons (SPs) work as catalyst due to strong field enhancement effects, and the nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect (nonlinear MOKE) plays an important role as a characterization method. Many new effects were discovered recently, which include enhanced magnetization-induced harmonic generation, controlled and enhanced magnetic contrast, magneto-chiral effect, correlation between giant magnetroresistance (GMR) and nonlinear MOKE, etc. We review the structures, experiments, findings, and the applications of NMP.

  2. An extension of the talbot-ogden hydrology model to an affine multi-dimensional moisture content domain

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2013-09-01

    The Talbot-Ogden hydrology model provides a fast mass conservative method to compute infiltration in unsaturated soils. As a replacement for a model based on Richards equation, it separates the groundwater movement into infiltration and redistribution for every time step. The typical feature making this method fast is the discretization of the moisture content domain rather than the spatial one. The Talbot-Ogden model rapidly determines how well ground water and aquifers are recharged only. Hence, it differs from models based on advanced reservoir modeling that are uniformly far more expensive computationally since they determine where the water moves in space instead, a completely different and more complex problem.According to the pore-size distribution curve for many soils, this paper extends the one dimensional moisture content domain into a two dimensional one by keeping the vertical spatial axis. The proposed extension can describe any pore-size or porosity distribution as an important soil feature. Based on this extension, infiltration and redistribution are restudied. The unconditional conservation of mass in the Talbot-Ogden model is inherited in this extended model. A numerical example is given for the extended model.

  3. Phonon spectral functions of photo-generated hot carrier plasmas: effects of carrier screening and plasmon-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2017-02-01

    We investigate spectral behavior of phonon spectral functions in an interacting multi-component hot carrier plasma. Spectral analysis of various phonon spectral functions is performed considering carrier-phonon channels of polar and nonpolar optical phonons, acoustic deformation-potential, and piezoelectric Coulomb couplings. Effects of phonon self-energy corrections are examined at finite temperature within a random phase approximation extended to include the effects of dynamic screening, plasmon-phonon coupling, and local-field corrections of the plasma species. We provide numerical data for the case of a photo-generated electron-hole plasma formed in a wurtzite GaN. Our result shows the clear significance of the multiplicity of the plasma species in the phonon spectral functions of a multi-component plasma giving rise to a variety of spectral behaviors of carrier-phonon coupled collective modes. A useful sum rule on the plasma-species-resolved dielectric functions is also found.

  4. Growth mechanisms and origin of localized surface plasmon resonance coupled exciton effects in Cu2_xS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savariraj, Dennyson A.; Kim, Hee-Je; Viswanathan, Kodakkal K.; Vijayakumar, M.; Prabakar, Kandasamy

    2016-02-15

    Cu2-xS thin films prepared by template free single step wet chemical method on fluorine doped tin oxide substrate without any surfactant exhibts localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) coupled exciton effects. Cu2-xS thin films of unique surface morphology and free carrier density due to copper vacancy is controlled by the growth temperature and time. These selectively grown Cu2-xS thin films possess tunable band gap (2.6 - 1.4 eV) due to quantum size effect. Eventhough, all the samples show satellite peak in the X-ray photoelectron spectra due to Cu vacancies, only the samples with higher oxygen concentration show LSPR in the near infrared region.

  5. Light-Driven Overall Water Splitting Enabled by a Photo-Dember Effect Realized on 3D Plasmonic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Gu, Jiajun; Sun, Cheng; Zhao, Yixin; Zhang, Ruoxi; You, Xinyuan; Liu, Qinglei; Zhang, Wang; Su, Yishi; Su, Huilan; Zhang, Di

    2016-07-26

    Photoelectric conversion driven by sunlight has a broad range of energy/environmental applications (e.g., in solar cells and water splitting). However, difficulties are encountered in the separation of photoexcited charges. Here, we realize a long-range (∼1.5 μm period) electric polarization via asymmetric localization of surface plasmons on a three-dimensional silver structure (3D-Ag). This visible-light-responsive effect-the photo-Dember effect, can be analogous to the thermoelectric effect, in which hot carriers are thermally generated instead of being photogenerated. The induced electric field can efficiently separate photogenerated charges, enabling sunlight-driven overall water splitting on a series of dopant-free commercial semiconductor particles (i.e., ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, and WO3) once they are combined with the 3D-Ag substrate. These photocatalytic processes can last over 30 h on 3D-Ag+ZnO, 3D-Ag+CeO2, and 3D-Ag+TiO2, thus demonstrating good catalytic stability for these systems. Using commercial WO3 powder as a reference, the amount of O2 generated with 3D-Ag+CeO2 surpasses even its recently reported counterpart in which sacrificial reagents had to be involved to run half-reactions. This plasmon-mediated charge separation strategy provides an effective way to improve the efficiency of photoelectric energy conversion, which can be useful in photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

  6. Terahertz plasmonic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Padilla, Willie J; Basov, Dimitri N; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Bruzewicz, Derek; Whitesides, George

    2007-03-01

    The dielectric response of a polymer matrix composite can be substantially modified and tuned within a broad frequency band by integrating within the material an artificial plasmon medium composed of periodically distributed, very thin, electrically conducting wires. In the microwave regime, such plasmon/polymer composites have been studied analytically, computationally, and experimentally. This work reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of similar composites for operation at terahertz frequencies. Such composites require significant reduction in the thickness and spacing of the wires. We used numerical modeling to design artificial effective plasmonic media with turn-on frequencies in the terahertz range. Prototype samples were produced by lithographically embedding very thin gold strips into a PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] matrix. These samples were characterized with a Fourier-transform infrared interferometer using the frequency-dependent transmission and Kramers-Kronig relations to determine the electromagnetic properties. We report the characterization results for a sample, demonstrating excellent agreement between theory, computer design, and experiment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the possibility of creating composites with tuned dielectric response at terahertz frequencies.

  7. Plasmonic optical nanotweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Rehab; El Maklizi, Mahmoud; Ismail, Yehea; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic grating structures can be used in many applications such as nanolithography and optical trapping. In this paper, we used plasmonic grating as optical tweezers to trap and manipulate dielectric nano-particles. Different plasmonic grating structures with single, double, and triple slits have been investigated and analyzed. The three configurations are optimized and compared to find the best candidate to trap and manipulate nanoparticles. The three optimized structures results in capability to super focusing and beaming the light effectively beyond the diffraction limit. A high transverse gradient optical force is obtained using the triple slit configuration that managed to significantly enhance the field and its gradient. Therefore, it has been chosen as an efficient optical tweezers. This structure managed to trap sub10nm particles efficiently. The resultant 50KT potential well traps the nano particles stably. The proposed structure is used also to manipulate the nano-particles by simply changing the angle of the incident light. We managed to control the movement of nano particle over an area of (5μm x 5μm) precisely. The proposed structure has the advantage of trapping and manipulating the particles outside the structure (not inside the structure such as the most proposed optical tweezers). As a result, it can be used in many applications such as drug delivery and biomedical analysis.

  8. Superradiance and subradiance in plasmonic nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a plasmonic route to superradiance and subradiance effects over distances comparable to the operating wavelength. Superradiant and subradiant modes are excited by a collection of two-level quantum emitters inside plasmonic nanochannels. These channels can provide an effective epsilon-near-zero operation in their cut-off frequency and Fabry-P\\'erot resonances at higher frequencies. The related plasmonic resonant modes are found to efficiently enhance the constructive (superradiance) or destructive (subradiance) interference between different quantum emitters located inside the nanochannels. By increasing the number of emitters located in the elongated plasmonic channel, the superradiance effect is enhanced at the epsilon-near-zero operation, leading to a strong increase in the collective spontaneous emission rate. In addition, the separation distance between neighboring emitters and their emission wavelengths can be changed to dynamically control the collective emission properties of the plasmon...

  9. Reviews in plasmonics 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2010, the first volume of the new book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonic

  10. Subwavelength Plasmonic Waveguides and Plasmonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of microfabrication technology and advanced computational tools, nanophotonics has been widely studied for high-speed data transmission, sensitive optical detection, manipulation of ultrasmall objects, and visualization of nanoscale patterns. As an important branch of nanophotonics, plasmonics has enabled light-matter interactions at a deep subwavelength length scale. Plasmonics, or surface plasmon based photonics, focus on how to exploit the optical property of metals with abundant free electrons and hence negative permittivity. The oscillation of free electrons, when properly driven by electromagnetic waves, would form plasmon-polaritons in the vicinity of metal surfaces and potentially result in extreme light confinement. The objective of this article is to review the progress of subwavelength or deep subwavelength plasmonic waveguides, and fabrication techniques of plasmonic materials.

  11. Effect of surface plasmon resonance on the photocatalytic activity of Au/TiO2 under UV/visible illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Chang, I-Guo; Tai, Yian; Wu, Kung-Wei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, gold-loaded titanium dioxide was prepared by an impregnation method to investigate the effect of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on photoactivity. The deposited gold nanoparticles (NPs) absorb visible light because of SPR. The effects of both the gold content and the TiO2 size of Au/TiO2 on SPR and the photocatalytic efficiency were investigated. The morphology, crystal structure, light absorption, emission from the recombination of a photoexcited electron and hole, and the degree of aggregation were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible-diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-VIS-DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and turbidimetry, respectively. Photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the decolorization of methyl orange solution over modified titania under UV and UV/GLED (green light emitting diode) illumination. Au/TiO2 NPs exhibited an absorption peak (530-570 nm) because of SPR. The results of our photocatalytic experiments indicated that the UV-inducedly photocatalytic reaction rate was improved by simultaneously using UV and green light illumination; this corresponds to the adsorption region of SPR. Au/TiO2 could use the enhanced electric field amplitude on the surface of the Au particle in the spectral vicinity of its plasmon resonance and thus improve the photoactivity. Experimental results show that the synergistic effect between UV and green light for the improvement of photoactivity increases with increasing the SPR absorption, which in turn is affected by the Au content and TiO2 size.

  12. Plasmonic Solar Cells: From Rational Design to Mechanism Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoon Hee; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Seokhyoung; Quan, Li Na; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2016-12-28

    Plasmonic effects have been proposed as a solution to overcome the limited light absorption in thin-film photovoltaic devices, and various types of plasmonic solar cells have been developed. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art progress on the design and fabrication of plasmonic solar cells and their enhancement mechanism. The working principle is first addressed in terms of the combined effects of plasmon decay, scattering, near-field enhancement, and plasmonic energy transfer, including direct hot electron transfer and resonant energy transfer. Then, we summarize recent developments for various types of plasmonic solar cells based on silicon, dye-sensitized, organic photovoltaic, and other types of solar cells, including quantum dot and perovskite variants. We also address several issues regarding the limitations of plasmonic nanostructures, including their electrical, chemical, and physical stability, charge recombination, narrowband absorption, and high cost. Next, we propose a few potentially useful approaches that can improve the performance of plasmonic cells, such as the inclusion of graphene plasmonics, plasmon-upconversion coupling, and coupling between fluorescence resonance energy transfer and plasmon resonance energy transfer. This review is concluded with remarks on future prospects for plasmonic solar cell use.

  13. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Xihang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-01-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to the Kelvin angle of 19.5 degree for ship waves, has been recently challenged with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semi-angle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a novel physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurement.

  14. Enhancement of QDs photoluminescence by localized surface plasmon effect of Au-NPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Esmaeil; Greco, Tonino; Stumpe, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Photoluminescence enhancement of CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs by localized surface plasmon resonance of large Au-NPs has been investigated. The photoluminescence of the QDs with an emission wavelength at 620 nm in a PMMA matrix is enhanced by immobilized Au-NPs. By considering the lifetime and excitation dependent photoluminescence we realized that the emission and excitation rate enhancements both contributed to the total photoluminescence enhancement. PL measurements were carried out for different sizes of Au-NPs to find out their influences on the emission of QDs. The largest enhancement is achieved by applying 80 nm Au-NPs. Silanization method gives us the opportunity easily to prepare samples with different concentrations of Au-NPs. It is revealed that increasing the concentration of the Au-NPs layer provides higher scattering cross section which contributes in PL enhancement.

  15. Basics of quantum plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a topical review of the theoretical research on the quantum theory of plasmons and plasmon-photon interaction. The plasmons are defined as the quanta of the quantized plasmonic field. The corresponding classical plasmonic field was constructed on the basis of the study of collective oscillations of the electron gas in the solid. The electron-electron Coulomb interaction is taken into account. The explicit forms of the plasmon-photon interaction Lagrangian in canonical quantum mechanics and the plasmon-photon interaction action functional in the functional integral approach are derived. They all show that the interaction processes are nonlocal ones. The physical origin of the nonlocality is the complex structure of plasmons as composite quasiparticles: they cannot be considered as point particles, as was assumed in all phenomenological theories.

  16. Nonclassical effects in plasmonics: an energy perspective to quantify nonclassical effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    propose a nonclassical-impact parameter (NCI) to characterize the degree of nonclassical effects from an energy perspective, i.e., which fraction of the total electromagnetic energy is attributed to classical electrodynamic terms and which fraction is correspondingly to be assigned to nonclassical degrees...... of an infinite work function....

  17. A spiral plasmonic lens with directional excitation of surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingrui; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2016-08-26

    Conventional plasmonic lenses are composed of curved slits carved through metallic films. Here, we propose a new plasmonic lens based on a metallic slit with an auxiliary groove. When the lens is illumined normally, only inward surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can be generated and then focused into a hot spot at the center of the lens. The focusing effect is theoretically investigated by varying the groove parameters and incident polarizations. It is found that this phenomenon exists for both the circular and linear polarizations of incidence. Under optimal groove parameters, the intensity of the focal spot in our lens can be 2.5 times of that in one without grooves for both linearly and circularly polarized illuminations.

  18. Plasmonics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Stefan Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Considered a major field of photonics, plasmonics offers the potential to confine and guide light below the diffraction limit and promises a new generation of highly miniaturized photonic devices. This book combines a comprehensive introduction with an extensive overview of the current state of the art. Coverage includes plasmon waveguides, cavities for field-enhancement, nonlinear processes and the emerging field of active plasmonics studying interactions of surface plasmons with active media.

  19. High precision locating control system based on VCM for Talbot lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lixin; Deng, Qian; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    Aiming at the high precision and efficiency requirements of Z-direction locating in Talbot lithography, a control system based on Voice Coil Motor (VCM) was designed. In this paper, we built a math model of VCM and its moving characteristic was analyzed. A double-closed loop control strategy including position loop and current loop were accomplished. The current loop was implemented by driver, in order to achieve the rapid follow of the system current. The position loop was completed by the digital signal processor (DSP) and the position feedback was achieved by high precision linear scales. Feed forward control and position feedback Proportion Integration Differentiation (PID) control were applied in order to compensate for dynamic lag and improve the response speed of the system. And the high precision and efficiency of the system were verified by simulation and experiments. The results demonstrated that the performance of Z-direction gantry was obviously improved, having high precision, quick responses, strong real-time and easily to expend for higher precision.

  20. Ultracompact beam splitters based on plasmonic nanoslits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanhong; Kohli, Punit

    2011-01-01

    An ultracompact plasmonic beam splitter is theoretically and numerically investigated. The splitter consists of a V-shaped nanoslit in metal films. Two groups of nanoscale metallic grooves inside the slit (A) and at the small slit opening (B) are investigated. We show that there are two energy channels guiding light out by the splitter: the optical and the plasmonic channels. Groove A is used to couple incident light into the plasmonic channel. Groove B functions as a plasmonic scatter. We demonstrate that the energy transfer through plasmonic path is dominant in the beam splitter. We find that more than four times the energy is transferred by the plasmonic channel using structures A and B. We show that the plasmonic waves scattered by B can be converted into light waves. These light waves redistribute the transmitted energy through interference with the field transmitted from the nanoslit. Therefore, different beam splitting effects are achieved by simply changing the interference conditions between the scattered waves and the transmitted waves. The impact of the width and height of groove B are also investigated. It is found that the plasmonic scattering of B is changed into light scattering with increase of the width and the height of B. These devices have potential applications in optical sampling, signal processing, and integrated optical circuits. PMID:21647248

  1. Strong Coupling between Plasmons and Organic Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Bellessa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the properties of organic material in strong coupling with plasmon, mainly based on our work in this field of research. The strong coupling modifies the optical transitions of the structure, and occurs when the interaction between molecules and plasmon prevails on the damping of the system. We describe the dispersion relation of different plasmonic systems, delocalized and localized plasmon, coupled to aggregated dyes and the typical properties of these systems in strong coupling. The modification of the dye emission is also studied. In the second part, the effect of the microscopic structure of the organics, which can be seen as a disordered film, is described. As the different molecules couple to the same plasmon mode, an extended coherent state on several microns is observed.

  2. Nonlinear plasmonic amplification via dissipative soliplasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrando, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a new strategy for the compensation of plasmonic losses based on a recently proposed nonlinear mechanism: the resonant interaction between surface plasmon polaritons and spatial solitons propagating in parallel along a metal/dielectric/Kerr structure. This mechanism naturally leads to the generation of a quasi-particle excitation, the so-called soliplasmon resonance. We analyze the role played by the effective nonlinear coupling inherent to this system and how this can be used to provide a new mechanism of quasi-resonant nonlinear excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. We will pay particular attention to the introduction of asymmetric linear gain in the Kerr medium. The unique combination of nonlinear propagation, nonlinear coupling and gain give rise to a new scenario for the excitation of long- range surface plasmon polaritons with distinguishing characteristics. The connection between plasmonic losses and soliplasmon resonances in the presence of gain will be discussed.

  3. Cancer cell death pathways caused by photothermal and photodynamic effects through gold nanoring induced surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yulu; Hsiao, Jen-Hung; Yu, Jian-He; Tseng, Po-Hao; Hua, Wei-Hsiang; Low, Meng-Chun; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Cai, Cheng-Jin; Hsieh, Cheng-Che; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, C. C.; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2017-07-01

    The different death pathways of cancer cells under the conditions of the photothermal (PT), effect, photodynamic (PD) effect, and their combination are evaluated. By incubating cells with Au nanoring (NRI) either linked with the photosensitizer, AlPcS, or not, the illumination of a visible continuous laser for exciting the photosensitizer or an infrared femtosecond laser for exciting the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au NRI, leads to various PT and PD conditions for study. Three different staining dyes are used for identifying the cell areas of different damage conditions at different temporal points of observation. The cell death pathways and apoptotic evolution speeds under different cell treatment conditions are evaluated based on the calibration of the threshold laser fluences for causing early-apoptosis (EA) and necrosis (NE) or late-apoptosis (LA). It is found that with the PT effect only, strong cell NE is generated and the transition from EA into LA is faster than that caused by the PD effect when the EA stage is reached within 0.5 h after laser illumination. By combining the PT and PD effects, in the first few hours, the transition speed becomes lower, compared to the case of the PT effect only, when both Au NRIs internalized into cells and adsorbed on cell membrane exist. When the Au NRIs on cell membrane is removed, in the first few hours, the transition speed becomes higher, compared to the case of the PD effect only.

  4. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  5. Tunable plasmonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Reno, John L.; Aizin, Gregory

    2015-08-11

    A tunable plasmonic crystal comprises several periods in a two-dimensional electron or hole gas plasmonic medium that is both extremely subwavelength (.about..lamda./100) and tunable through the application of voltages to metal electrodes. Tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges can be realized in materials such as semiconductors and graphene to actively control the plasmonic crystal dispersion in the terahertz and infrared spectral regions. The tunable plasmonic crystal provides a useful degree of freedom for applications in slow light devices, voltage-tunable waveguides, filters, ultra-sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detectors, and THz oscillators.

  6. Morfologia externa de Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. I. Cabeça e apêndices (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae External morphology of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. I. Cabeça e apêndices (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Manuel Saraiva Bizarro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the morphology of the head of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot, 1914 (Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae adults from both sexes is presented. The material was obtained at the city's plant nursery "Horto Florestal de Curitiba", Paraná, Brazil; mainly by rearing eggs and larvae collected there on Cyphomandra betacea (Canavilles Sendtner, 1845 (Solanaceae. When possible, all the results obtained were compared with those already available in the literature concerning external morphology studies pertinent to other Nymphalidae subfamilies (Brassolinae, Morphinae and Danainae.

  7. Tuning the colors of c-Si solar cells by exploiting plasmonic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peharz, G.; Grosschädl, B.; Prietl, C.; Waldhauser, W.; Wenzl, F. P.

    2016-09-01

    The color of a crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell is mainly determined by its anti-reflective coating. This is a lambda/4 coating made from a transparent dielectric material. The thickness of the anti-reflective coating is optimized for maximal photocurrent generation, resulting in the typical blue or black colors of c-Si solar cells. However, for building-integrated photovoltaic (BiPV) applications the color of the solar cells is demanded to be tunable - ideally by a cheap and flexible coating process on standard (low cost) c-Si solar cells. Such a coating can be realized by applying plasmonic coloring which is a rapidly growing technology for high-quality color filtering and rendering for different fields of application (displays, imaging,…). In this contribution, we present results of an approach for tuning the color of standard industrial c-Si solar cells that is based on coating them with metallic nano-particles. In particular, thin films (green and brownish/red. The position of the resonance peak in the reflection spectrum was found to be almost independent from the angle of incidence. This low angular sensitivity is a clear advantage compared to alternative color tuning methods, for which additional dielectric thin films are deposited on c-Si solar cells.

  8. Effect of embedded plasmonic Au nanoparticles on photocatalysis of electrospun TiO2 nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Asha Anish; Kumar, Gopika Gopa; Kalluri, Sujith; Joseph, John; Nagarajan, Sivakumar; Nair, Shantikumar; Subramanian, Kavasseri R V; Balakrishnan, Avinash

    2012-10-01

    The present study demonstrates an original approach by which Au nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm) are embedded into TiO2 fibers via electrospinning. The photocatalytic performance of the resultant fibrous material was studied and related to the architecture and the nature of the internal interfaces in the composite. It was found that embedment of nano Au particles into the TiO2 fiber significantly improved the photocatalytic performance as compared to non-embedded ones. Electrospun fibers with the Au nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm) showed an average fiber diameter of approximately 380 nm. The photocatalytic studies of Au embedded TiO2 fibers using ultra-violet (UV) visible spectroscopy showed approximately 35% increase in photocatalytic activity when compared to the TiO2 fibers without the Au nanoparticles after 7 hrs of UV irradiation. This increase in photocatalysis was attributed to the ability of Au to increase charge separation in TiO2 and also to the ability of Au to transfer plasmonic energy to the dye.

  9. Spoof Plasmon Hybridization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Maier, Stefan A; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon hybridization between closely spaced nanoparticles yields new hybrid modes not found in individual constituents, allowing for the engineering of resonance properties and field enhancement capabilities of metallic nanostructure. Experimental verifications of plasmon hybridization have been thus far mostly limited to optical frequencies, as metals cannot support surface plasmons at longer wavelengths. Here, we introduce the concept of 'spoof plasmon hybridization' in highly conductive metal structures and investigate experimentally the interaction of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in adjacent metal disks corrugated with subwavelength spiral patterns. We show that the hybridization results in the splitting of spoof plasmon modes into bonding and antibonding resonances analogous to molecular orbital rule and plasmonic hybridization in optical spectrum. These hybrid modes can be manipulated to produce enormous field enhancements (larger than 5000) by tuning the separation between disks or alte...

  10. Reviews in plasmonics 2016

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2016, the third volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  11. Reviews in plasmonics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Reviews in Plasmonics 2015, the second volume of the new book series from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of Plasmonics and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year’s progress in surface plasmon phenomena and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews in sufficient detail to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of Plasmonics. Reviews in Plasmonics offers an essential source of reference material for any lab working in the Plasmonics field and related areas. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of Plasmonics will find it an invaluable resource.

  12. Plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of spherical metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lamowski, Simon; Mariani, Eros; Weick, Guillaume; Pauly, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically plasmon polaritons in cubic lattices of interacting spherical metallic nanoparticles. Dipolar localized surface plasmons on each nanoparticle couple through the near field dipole-dipole interaction and form collective plasmons which extend over the whole metamaterial. Coupling these collective plasmons in turn to photons leads to plasmon polaritons. We derive within a quantum model general semi-analytical expressions to evaluate both plasmon and plasmon-polariton dispersions that fully account for nonlocal effects in the dielectric function of the metamaterial. Within this model, we discuss the influence of different lattice symmetries and predict related polaritonic gaps within the near-infrared to the visible range of the spectrum that depend on wavevector direction and polarization.

  13. Efficiency enhancements in Ag nanoparticles-SiO2-TiO2 sandwiched structure via plasmonic effect-enhanced light capturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    TiO2-SiO2-Ag composites are fabricated by depositing TiO2 films on silica substrates embedded with Ag nanoparticles. Enhancement of light absorption of the nanostructural composites is observed. The light absorption enhancement of the synthesized structure in comparison to TiO2 originated from the near-field enhancement caused by the plasmonic effect of Ag nanoparticles, which can be demonstrated by the optical absorption spectra, Raman scattering investigation, and the increase of the photocatalytic activity. The embedded Ag nanoparticles are formed by ion implantation, which effectively prevents Ag to be oxidized through direct contact with TiO2. The suggested incorporation of plasmonic nanostructures shows a great potential application in a highly efficient photocatalyst and ultra-thin solar cell. PMID:23402586

  14. Tuning the spectrometric properties of white light by surface plasmon effect using Ag nanoparticles in a colour converting light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, S.; Ryu, Beo Deul; Uthirakumar, P.; Kang, Ji Hye; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Hyung Gu; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2011-03-01

    We report on the spectral tunability of white light by localized surface plasmon (LSP) effect in a colour converting hybrid device made of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) integrated on InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) are mixed with QDs for generating LSP effect. When the plasmon absorption of Ag NPs is synchronized to the QW emission at 448 nm, the NPs selectively absorb the blue light and subsequently enhance the QD emission. Using this energy transfer scheme, the ( x, y) chromaticity coordinates of the hybrid white LED was tuned from (0.32, 0.17) to (0.43, 0.26), and thereby generated warm white light emission with correlated colour temperature (CCT) around 1800 K. Moreover, a 47% enhancement in the external quantum efficiency (EQE) was realized.

  15. Two-photon excitation of surface plasmon and the period-increasing effect of low spatial frequency ripples on a GaP crystal in air/water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jukun; Jia, Tianqing; Zhao, Hongwei; Huang, Yaoqing

    2016-11-01

    We report the period-increasing effect of low spatial frequency ripples on a GaP crystal irradiated by 1 kHz, 50 fs, 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses. Massive free electrons are excited by a two-photon absorption process and surface plasmon is excited. The Drude model is used to estimate the changing of the dielectric constant of the GaP crystal. The period-increasing effects of low spatial frequency laser-induced ripples are theoretically predicted in air/water, and the experimental results agree well. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that surface plasmon excited by two-photon absorption plays a key role in the formation of low spatial frequency ripples.

  16. Effects of changes in the interparticle separation induced by alkanethiols on the surface plasmon band and other properties of nanocrystalline gold films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ved Varun; Varghese, Neenu; Kulkarni, G U; Rao, C N R

    2008-03-18

    Effects of changing the interparticle separation on the surface plasmon bands of ultrathin films of gold nanoparticles have been investigated by examining the interaction of alkanethiols of varying chain length on nanocrystalline gold films generated at the organic-aqueous interface. Adsorption of alkanethiols causes blue-shifts of the surface plasmon adsorption band, the magnitude of the shift being proportional to the chain length. The disordered nanocrystals thus created (lambdamax, 530 m) are in equilibrium with the ordered nanocrystals in the film (lambdamax, 700 m) as indicated by an isosbestic point around 600 nm. Long chain thiols disintegrate or disorder the gold films more effectively, as demonstrated by the increased population of the thiol-capped gold nanocrystals in solution. The rate of interaction of the thiols with the film decreases with the decreasing chain length. The effect of an alkanethiol on the spectrum of the gold film is specific, in that the effects with long and short chains are reversible. The changes in the plasmon band of gold due to interparticle separation can be satisfactorily modeled on the basis of the Maxwell-Garnett formalism. Spectroscopic studies, augmented by calorimetric measurements, suggest that the interaction of alkanethiols involves two steps, the first step being the exothermic gold film-thiol interaction and the second step includes the endothermic disordering process followed by further thiol capping of isolated gold particles.

  17. Hydrogen Production on Ag-Pd/TiO2 Bimetallic Catalysts: Is there a Combined Effect of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Schottky Mechanism on the Photo-Catalytic Activity?

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Muhammad A.

    2017-03-28

    Despite many observations that plasmonics can enhance photocatalytic reactions, their relative role in the overall reaction rate is not thoroughly investigated. Here we report that silver nanoparticles contribution in the reaction rate by its plasmonic effect is negligible when compared to that of Pd (Schottky effect). To conduct the study a series of Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production from water in the presence of an organic sacrificial agent. Pd was chosen as a standard high work function metal needed for the Schottky junction to pump away electrons from the conduction band of the semiconductor and Ag (whose work function is ca. 1 eV lower than that of Pd) for its high plasmonic resonance response at the edge of the bandgap of TiO2. While H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag in the Pd−Ag series, the system performed less than that of pure Pd. In other words, the plasmonic contribution of Ag in the Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalyst for hydrogen production, while confirmed using different excitation energies, is small. Therefore, the “possible” synergistic effect of plasmonic (in the case of Ag) and Schottky-mechanism (in the case of Pd) is minor when compared to that of Schottky-effect alone.

  18. Plasmon resonance enhanced optical transmission and magneto-optical Faraday effects in nanohole arrays blocked by metal antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Chengxin; Tang, Zhixiong; Wang, Sihao; Li, Daoyong; Chen, Leyi; Tang, Shaolong; Du, Youwei

    2017-07-01

    The properties of the optical and magneto-optical effects of an improved plasmonic nanohole arrays blocked by gold mushroom caps are investigated by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. It is most noteworthy that the strongly enhanced Faraday rotation along with high transmittance has been achieved simultaneously by optimizing the parameters of nanostructure in a broad spectrum spanning visible to near-infrared frequencies, which is very important in practical application for designing novel optical and magneto-optical devices. In our designed structure, we obtained two extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) resonant peaks along with enhanced Faraday rotation and two peaks of the figure of merit (FOM). By optimizing the geometrical parameters of the structure, we can obtain an almost 10-fold enhancement of Faraday rotation with a corresponding transmittance 50%, and the FOM of 0.752 at the same wavelength. As expected, the optical and magneto-optical effects sensitively depends on the geometrical parameters of our structure, which can be simply tailored by the height of pillar, the diameter of mushroom cap, and the period of the structure, and so on. The physical mechanism of these physical phenomena in the paper has been explained in detail. These research findings are of great theoretical significance in developing the novel magneto-optical devices in the future.

  19. ZnO sensing film thickness effects on the sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance sensors with angular interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Ming; Li Ge; Jiang Dongmei; Cheng Wenjuan [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Ma Xueming, E-mail: xmma@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2010-07-25

    The effects of ZnO sensing film thickness on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curve have been investigated. ZnO sensing films with the thickness of 20 nm, 30 nm, 200 nm, 220 nm and 240 nm have been deposited onto Ag/glass substrates by radio frequency magnetron (RF) sputtering and thermally treated at 300 deg. C in air for 1 h. The surface morphology of the sample was inspected using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The refractive index of the ZnO films was extracted by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Theoretical analysis of the sensitivity of the SPR sensors with different ZnO sensing film thickness is discussed, and the experimental results are in agreement with the calculated value. Also, the theoretical calculation of the effects of ZnO film thickness on the SPR curves in the presence of different analytes are presented and studied. It is demonstrated that SPR sensors with angular interrogation may attain higher sensitivity and can detect higher surface environment refractive index with proper ZnO sensing film thickness.

  20. Imaging standing surface plasmons by photon tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Wig, A.; Meriaudeau, F.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2005-04-01

    We present a direct method for optically exciting and imaging delocalized standing surface plasmons in thin metal films. We show theoretically that when imaging the field of the plasmons with a photon scanning tunneling microscope, the presence of the dielectric probe has a negligible effect on the surface modes of the metal film. We demonstrate that plasmon interference can be sustained in arbitrarily large regions of the metal film in comparison to the excitation wavelength. This knowledge can be important when seeking the relative distance between two scattering centers such as the presence of micron or submicron structures.

  1. Nonlinear graphene plasmonics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Joel D.; Marini, Andrea; Garcia de Abajo, Javier F.

    2016-09-01

    The combination of graphene's intrinsically-high nonlinear optical response with its ability to support long-lived, electrically tunable plasmons that couple strongly with light has generated great expectations for application of the atomically-thin material to nanophotonic devices. These expectations are mainly reinforced by classical analyses performed using the response derived from extended graphene, neglecting finite-size and nonlocal effects that become important when the carbon layer is structured on the nanometer scale in actual device designs. Based on a quantum-mechanical description of graphene using tight-binding electronic states combined with the random-phase approximation, we show that finite-size effects produce large contributions that increase the nonlinear response associated with plasmons in nanostructured graphene to significantly higher levels than previously thought, particularly in the case of Kerr-type optical nonlinearities. Motivated by this finding, we discuss and compare saturable absorption in extended and nanostructured graphene, with or without plasmonic enhancement, within the context of passive mode-locking for ultrafast lasers. We also explore the possibility of high-harmonic generation in doped graphene nanoribbons and nanoislands, where illumination by an infrared pulse of moderate intensity, tuned to a plasmon resonance, is predicted to generate light at harmonics of order 13 or higher, extending over the visible and UV regimes. Our atomistic description of graphene's nonlinear optical response reveals its complex nature in both extended and nanostructured systems, while further supporting the exceptional potential of this material for nonlinear nanophotonic devices.

  2. Nano-plasmonic phenomena in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, Dimitri

    2014-03-01

    Infrared nano-spectroscopy and nano-imaging experiments have uncovered a rich variety of optical effects associated with the Dirac plasmons of graphene [Fei et al. Nano Lett. 11, 4701 (2011)]. We were able to directly image Dirac plasmons propagating over sub-micron distances [Fei et al. Nature 487, 82 (2012)]. We have succeeded in altering both the amplitude and wavelength of these plasmons by gate voltage in common graphene/SiO2/Si back-gated structures. Scanning plasmon interferometry has allowed us to visualize grain boundaries in CVD graphene. These latter experiments revealed that the grain boundaries tend to form electronic barriers that impede both electrical transport and plasmon propagation. Our results attest to the feasibility of using these electronic barriers to realize tunable plasmon reflectors: a precondition for implementation of various metamaterials concepts [Fei et al. Nature Nano 8, 821 (2013)]. Finally, we have carried out pump-probe experiments interrogating ultra-fast dynamics of plasmons in exfoliated graphene with the nano-scale spatial resolution [Wagner et al. (under review)].

  3. Enhancing carrier generation in TiO2 by a synergistic effect between plasmon resonance in Ag nanoparticles and optical interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciato, Giuseppe; Bayle, Maxime; Pugliara, Alessandro; Bonafos, Caroline; Zimbone, Massimo; Privitera, Vittorio; Grimaldi, Maria Grazia; Carles, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been embedded at a few nanometer distance from the free surface of titania/silica multilayers using low energy ion beam synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of 3 nm-sized crystalline particles. Reflectance spectroscopy on these composite substrates shows an increase of the light capture efficiency in the visible range. This behaviour is interpreted as a synergistic effect between plasmon polariton resonance and Fabry-Perot interferences. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy is deeply used to analyze, on one hand confinement of vibrations and electronic excitations in Ag NPs, and on the other hand coupling of polar TiO2 phonons with injected photo-generated carriers. It is shown how these new Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films appear as very promising to enhance the efficiency and enlarge the spectral sensitivity of plasmo-electronics devices.Silver nanoparticles have been embedded at a few nanometer distance from the free surface of titania/silica multilayers using low energy ion beam synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of 3 nm-sized crystalline particles. Reflectance spectroscopy on these composite substrates shows an increase of the light capture efficiency in the visible range. This behaviour is interpreted as a synergistic effect between plasmon polariton resonance and Fabry-Perot interferences. Plasmon-resonant Raman spectroscopy is deeply used to analyze, on one hand confinement of vibrations and electronic excitations in Ag NPs, and on the other hand coupling of polar TiO2 phonons with injected photo-generated carriers. It is shown how these new Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films appear as very promising to enhance the efficiency and enlarge the spectral sensitivity of plasmo-electronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02406d

  4. Plasmon cross transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrzynski, Leonard; Akjouj, Abdellatif; Li, Changsheng, E-mail: Abdellatif.Akjouj@univ-lille1.fr [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille1, Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, Unite de Physique, Batiment P5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-14

    Plasmon cross transmission avoids the frontal collision between two plasmons traveling in opposite directions along a guide. The guide is made out of equidistant identical metal dots. Thanks to two resonator dots, the plasmon frontal impact is avoided by transmission of the two plasmons from the input guide to an output one. The resonator and guide dots are identical in size and metal composition. The dipole-dipole interactions are restricted to first nearest neighbors. A convenient metal doping is assumed to compensate exactly all attenuations. The parameters are the nearest neighbor distances between the dots. These distances are rescaled to the chain nearest neighbor distance d. The system has two symmetry mirror planes. This simple model enables us to obtain two analytic tuning relations for the plasmon cross transmission. The intensities of the transmitted signals versus kd, where k is the plasmon propagation vector, are also given. (paper)

  5. A New Application of Dynamic Data Driven System in the Talbot-Ogden Model for Groundwater Infiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2012-06-02

    The TalbotOgden model is a mass conservative method to simulate flow of a wetting liquid in variably-saturated porous media. The principal feature of this model is the discretization of the moisture content domain into bins. This paper gives an analysis of the relationship between the number of bins and the computed flux. Under the circumstances of discrete bins and discontinuous wetting fronts, we show that fluxes increase with the number of bins. We then apply this analysis to the continuous case and get an upper bound of the difference of infiltration rates when the number of bins tends to infinity. We also extend this model by creating a two dimensional moisture content domain so that there exists a probability distribution of the moisture content for different soil systems. With these theoretical and experimental results and using a Dynamic Data Driven Application System (DDDAS), sensors can be put in soils to detect the infiltration fluxes, which are important to compute the proper number of bins for a specific soil system and predict fluxes. Using this feedback control loop, the extended TalbotOgden model can be made more efficient for estimating infiltration into soils.

  6. Combining Gabor and Talbot bands techniques to enhance the sensitivity with depth in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, Adrian; Marques, Manuel J.; Bouchal, Petr; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to show how to favorably mix two e_ects to improve the sensitivity with depth in Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT): Talbot bands (TB) and Gabor-based fusion (GF) technique. TB operation is achieved by directing the two beams, from the object arm and from the reference arm in the OCT interferometer, along parallel separate paths towards the spectrometer. By changing the lateral gap between the two beams in their path towards the spectrometer, the position for the maximum sensitivity versus the optical path difference in the interferometer is adjusted. For five values of the focus position, the gap between the two beams is readjusted to reach maximum sensitivity. Then, similar to the procedure employed in the GF technique, a composite image is formed by edging together the parts of the five images that exhibited maximum brightness. The combined procedure, TB/GF is examined for four different values of the beam diameters of the two beams. Also we demonstrate volumetric FD-OCT images with mirror term attenuation and sensitivity profile shifted towards higher OPD values by applying a Talbot bands configuration.

  7. Localized surface plasmon resonances dominated giant lateral photovoltaic effect observed in ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui; Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Mei, Chunlian; Huang, Xu; Xia, Yuxing

    2016-03-01

    We report substantially enlarged lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) in the ZnO/Ag/Si nanostructures. The maximum LPE sensitivity (55.05 mv/mm) obtained in this structure is about seven times larger than that observed in the control sample (7.88 mv/mm) of ZnO/Si. We attribute this phenomenon to the strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) induced by nano Ag semicontinuous films. Quite different from the traditional LPE in PN junction type structures, in which light-generated carriers contributed to LPE merely depends on direct excitation of light in semiconductor, this work firstly demonstrates that, by introducing a super thin metal Ag in the interface between two different kinds of semiconductors, the nanoscale Ag embedded in the interface will produce strong resonance of localized field, causing extra intraband excitation, interband excitation and an enhanced direct excitation. As a consequence, these LSPRs dominated contributions harvest much more carriers, giving rise to a greatly enhanced LPE. In particular, this LSPRs-driven mechanism constitutes a sharp contrast to the traditional LPE operation mechanism. This work suggests a brand new LSPRs approach for tailoring LPE-based devices and also opens avenues of research within current photoelectric sensors area.

  8. Bonding and Anti-bonding Modes of Plasmon Coupling Effects in TiO2-Ag Core-shell Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanshui; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Bonding and anti-bonding modes of plasmon coupling effects are numerically investigated in TiO2-Ag core-shell nano dimers. First, splitting phenomena of the coupled anti-bonding modes are observed under the longitudinal polarization when the distance between the monomers decreases to a certain level. Second, one of the split resonance modes is identified to be formed by the dipole anti-bonding mode of the monomers from charge density distribution patterns. Those split modes have similar redshift behaviors as the coupled dipole bonding modes in the same situations. Furthermore, the intensities of those anti-bonding modes weaken with decreasing distance between the monomers, because of the interaction of the induced dipole moment in the monomers and the charge distribution variation on the facing surfaces of the gap by the coulomb attraction. Other split bands are the higher-order mode (octupole-like or triakontadipole-like), which do not have obvious peak-shift behavior, and the intensities have very little attenuation with decreasing distance. Finally, the coupling of the bonding and anti-bonding modes under the longitudinal polarization is symmetric (bonding).

  9. The effect of surface plasmon resonance on optical response in dielectric (core)–metal (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Farjami Shayesteh; Matin Saie

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present the effect of refractive index of an embedding medium, core and shell having various sizes of metallic nanoshells on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties in the spherical dielectric–metal core–shell nanoparticles based on the quasistatic approaches and Mie theory. For the metallic nanoshell with dimensions comparable to the wavelength of light, the quasistatic approximation shows good agreement with the Mie theory results. However, for large nanoparticles the quasistatic approximation is not appropriate and Mie theory illustrates SPR due to dipole and quadrupole in extinction cross-section. The typical cross-section calculations show two peaks that related to inner and outer surfaces. The dimensional dependence of optical constant in the Drude model leads to a decrease in plasma absorption in metal core–shell. By increasing the shell radius and therefore increasing the metal content the SPR at the outer surface shifts to higher energy and the weaker peak (at inner surface) shifts to lower energy. Also, depending on the metal shell materials SPR occurs in different energy regions and therefore can be tuned the SP frequency at higher energy by changing the shell materials. In addition, SPR frequency is sensitive to variation in refractive index of the environment of core-shell.

  10. All-plasmonic switching based on thermal nonlinearity in a polymer plasmonic microring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, David; Wu, Marcelo; Horvath, Cameron; Bachman, Daniel; van, Vien

    2011-07-01

    We experimentally investigated thermal nonlinear effects in a hybrid Au/SiO2/SU-8 plasmonic microring resonator for nonlinear switching. Large ohmic loss in the metal layer gave rise to a high rate of light-to-heat conversion in the plasmonic waveguide, causing an intensity-dependent thermo-optic shift in the microring resonance. We obtained 30 times larger resonance shift in the plasmonic microring than in a similar SU-8 dielectric microring. Using an in-plane pump-and-probe configuration, we also demonstrated all-plasmonic nonlinear switching in the plasmonic microring with an on--off switching contrast of 4dB over 50mW input power.

  11. Combined effect of doping and temperature on the anisotropy of low-energy plasmons in monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Balassis, Antonios; Silkin, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    We compare the two-dimensional (2D) plasmon dispersion relations for monolayer graphene when the sample is doped with carriers in the conduction band and the temperature T is zero with the case when the temperature is finite and there is no doping. Additionally, we have obtained the plasmon excitations when there is doping at finite temperature. The results were obtained in the random-phase approximation which employs energy electronic bands calculated using ab initio density functional theory. We found that in the undoped case the finite temperature results in appearance in the low-energy region of a 2D plasmon which is absent for the T =0 case. Its energy is gradually increased with increasing T . It is accompanied by expansion in the momentum range where this mode is observed as well. The 2D plasmon dispersion in the Γ M direction may differ in substantial ways from that along the Γ K direction at sufficiently high temperature and doping concentrations. Moreover, at temperatures exceeding ≈300 meV a second mode emerges along the Γ K direction at lower energies like it occurs at a doping level exceeding ≈300 meV. Once the temperature exceeds ≈0.75 eV this mode ceases to exist whereas the 2D plasmon exists as a well-defined collective excitation up to T =1.5 eV , a maximal temperature investigated in this work.

  12. Bonding and charge transfer plasmons of conductively bridged nanoparticles: The effects of junction conductance and nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Alemayehu Nana; Lin, Jingquan

    2016-09-01

    A detailed study of charge transfer plasmon properties of conductively bridged nanoparticles is essential for designing artificial molecules and developing plasmonic sensors. In this report, we demonstrate spectral tuning and control of local field responses of conductively bridged and compositionally homogeneous plasmonic nanoparticles of various shapes and sizes. The scattering spectral peaks of connected nanoparticles are tuned by controlling inter-particle feed-gap, junction conductance, and nanoparticle morphology. The far-field spectral responses are further tuned by increasing the number of nanoparticles from dimer to trimer, and a generalized expression for charge transfer plasmon peak shift with junction geometry is developed for various shapes of nanotrimers. The corresponding near-field distributions of the linked nanoparticles also exhibit remarkable features. Specifically, the local field profiles of dimer nanoparticles calculated at the charge transfer wavelengths show strong interaction between the nanoparticles. On the other hand, in the bridged symmetrical nanotrimers, the central nanoparticles act as a bridge and only the rest two of the nanoparticles show bright modes. These findings suggest that using conductively bridged nanoaggregates could play a significant role in tuning far-field spectral responses of plasmonic nanostructures for practical applications in molecular sensing.

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  14. Three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic hot spots for label-free sensing and effective photothermal killing of multiple drug resistant superbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stacy; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Pramanik, Avijit; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2016-11-03

    Drug resistant superbug infection is one of the foremost threats to human health. Plasmonic nanoparticles can be used for ultrasensitive bio-imaging and photothermal killing by amplification of electromagnetic fields at nanoscale "hot spots". One of the main challenges to plasmonic imaging and photothermal killing is design of a plasmonic substrate with a large number of "hot spots". Driven by this need, this article reports design of a three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic "hot spot"-based substrate using gold nanoparticle attached hybrid graphene oxide (GO), free from the traditional 2D limitations. Experimental results show that the 3D substrate has capability for highly sensitive label-free sensing and generates high photothermal heat. Reported data using p-aminothiophenol conjugated 3D substrate show that the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement factor for the 3D "hot spot"-based substrate is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that for the two-dimensional (2D) substrate and five orders of magnitude greater than that for the zero-dimensional (0D) p-aminothiophenol conjugated gold nanoparticle. 3D-Finite-Difference Time-Domain (3D-FDTD) simulation calculations indicate that the SERS enhancement factor can be greater than 10(4) because of the bent assembly structure in the 3D substrate. Results demonstrate that the 3D-substrate-based SERS can be used for fingerprint identification of several multi-drug resistant superbugs with detection limits of 5 colony forming units per mL. Experimental data show that 785 nm near infrared (NIR) light generates around two times more photothermal heat for the 3D substrate with respect to the 2D substrate, and allows rapid and effective killing of 100% of the multi-drug resistant superbugs within 5 minutes.

  15. Quantum effects in the optical response of extended plasmonic gaps: validation of the quantum corrected model in core-shell nanomatryushkas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Mario; Camacho Beltrán, Ángela S; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier

    2015-03-23

    Electron tunneling through narrow gaps between metal nanoparticles can strongly affect the plasmonic response of the hybrid nanostructure. Although quantum mechanical in nature, this effect can be properly taken into account within a classical framework of Maxwell equations using the so-called Quantum Corrected Model (QCM). We extend previous studies on spherical cluster and cylindrical nanowire dimers where the tunneling current occurs in the extremely localized gap regions, and perform quantum mechanical time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of the plasmonic response of cylindrical core-shell nanoparticles (nanomatryushkas). In this axially symmetric situation, the tunneling region extends over the entire gap between the metal core and the metallic shell. For core-shell separations below 0.5 nm, the standard classical calculations fail to describe the plasmonic response of the cylindrical nanomatryushka, while the QCM can reproduce the quantum results. Using the QCM we also retrieve the quantum results for the absorption cross section of the spherical nanomatryushka calculated by V. Kulkarni et al. [Nano Lett. 13, 5873 (2013)]. The comparison between the model and the full quantum calculations establishes the applicability of the QCM for a wider range of geometries that hold tunneling gaps.

  16. Plasmonics analysis of nanostructures for bioapplications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian

    Plasmonics, the science and technology of the plasmons, is a rapidly growing field with substantial broader impact in numerous different fields, especially for bio-applications such as bio-sensing, bio-photonics and photothermal therapy. Resonance effects associated with plasmatic behavior i.e. surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) and localize surface Plasmon resonance (LSPR), are of particular interest because of their strong sensitivity to the local environment. In this thesis, plasmonic resonance effects are discussed from the basic theory to applications, especially the application in photothermal therapy, and grating bio-sensing. This thesis focuses on modeling different metallic nanostructures, i.e. nanospheres, nanorods, core-shell nanoparticles, nanotori and hexagonal closed packed nanosphere structures, to determine their LSPR wavelengths for use in various applications. Experiments regarding photothermal therapy using gold nanorods are described and a comparison is presented with results obtained from simulations. Lastly, experiments of grating-based plasmon-enhanced bio-sensing are also discussed. In chapter one, the physics of plasmonics is reviewed, including surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). In the section on surface plasmon resonance, the physics behind the phenomenon is discussed, and also, the detection methods and applications in bio-sensing are described. In the section on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the phenomenon is described with respect to sub wavelength metallic nanoparticles. In chapter two, specific plasmonic-based bio-applications are discussed including plasmonic and magneto-plasmonic enhanced photothermal therapy and grating-based SPR bio-sening. In chapter three, which is the most important part in the thesis, optical modeling of different gold nanostructures is presented. The modeling tools used in this thesis are Comsol and custom developed Matlab programs. In Comsol, the

  17. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  18. A voltage-controlled silver nanograting device for dynamic modulation of transmitted light based on the surface plasmon polariton effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailong; Li, Haibo; Wang, Yi; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing

    2016-02-01

    An active-controlled plasmonic device is designed and fabricated based on the index-sensitive properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). We utilize a one-dimensional silver nanograting with a period of 320 nm overlayered with a liquid crystal (LC) layer (50 μm in thickness), to transmit selectively the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength. This device realizes the active, reversible and continuous control of the transmitted light wavelength by modulating the external voltage signal applied to the LC layer. This voltage-controlled plasmonic filter has a dynamic wavelength modulation range of 17 nm, a fast respond speed of 4.24 ms and a low driving voltage of 1.06 V μm-1. This study opens up a unique way for the design of tunable nanophotonic devices, such as a micro light sources and switches.An active-controlled plasmonic device is designed and fabricated based on the index-sensitive properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). We utilize a one-dimensional silver nanograting with a period of 320 nm overlayered with a liquid crystal (LC) layer (50 μm in thickness), to transmit selectively the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength. This device realizes the active, reversible and continuous control of the transmitted light wavelength by modulating the external voltage signal applied to the LC layer. This voltage-controlled plasmonic filter has a dynamic wavelength modulation range of 17 nm, a fast respond speed of 4.24 ms and a low driving voltage of 1.06 V μm-1. This study opens up a unique way for the design of tunable nanophotonic devices, such as a micro light sources and switches. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (1) The general theory of the VCP filter; (2) RI sensitivity; (3) the thickness optimization of the Ag grating sandwiched by photoresist layers; (4) image system; (5) detection systems for transmission and reflection spectra; (6) detection system for the response time of the VCP filter. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr

  19. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Downing, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudo-relativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunnelling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontriv...

  20. The Physics and Applications of a 3D Plasmonic Nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Brandon B.

    In this work, the dynamics of electromagnetic field interactions with free electrons in a 3D metallic nanostructure is evaluated theoretically. This dissertation starts by reviewing the relevant fundamentals of plasmonics and modern applications of plasmonic systems. Then, motivated by the need to have a simpler way of understanding the surface charge dynamics on complex plasmonic nanostructures, a new plasmon hybridization tree method is introduced. This method provides the plasmonicist with an intuitive way to determine the response of free electrons to incident light in complex nanostructures within the electrostatic regime. Next, a novel 3D plasmonic nanostructure utilizing reflective plasmonic coupling is designed to perform biosensing and plasmonic tweezing applications. By applying analytical and numerical methods, the effectiveness of this nanostructure at performing these applications is determined from the plasmonic response of the nanostructure to an excitation beam of coherent light. During this analysis, it was discovered that under certain conditions, this 3D nanostructure exhibits a plasmonic Fano resonance resulting from the interference of an in-plane dark mode and an out-of-plane bright mode. In evaluating this nanostructure for sensing changes in the local dielectric environment, a figure of merit of 68 is calculated, which is competitive with current localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensors. By evaluating the Maxwell stress tensor on a test particle in the vicinity of the nanostructure, it was found that under the right conditions, this plasmonic nanostructure design is capable of imparting forces greater than 10.5 nN on dielectric objects of nanoscale dimensions. The results obtained in these studies provides new routes to the design and engineering of 3D plasmonic nanostructures and Fano resonances in these systems. In addition, the nanostructure presented in this work and the design principles it utilizes have shown

  1. Plasmonic Au islands on polymer nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoben, Wout; Brongersma, Sywert H; Crego-Calama, Mercedes, E-mail: wout.knoben@imec-nl.nl [Holst Centre/IMEC, High Tech Campus 31, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-07-22

    The refractive index sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance sensors can be improved by placing the plasmonic metal particles on pillars instead of on a planar substrate. In this paper, a simple and versatile colloidal lithography method for the fabrication of plasmonic Au islands on top of polymer nanopillars is described. The pillar height is controlled by varying the thickness of the initial polymer film. An increased pillar height results in a blue shift of the absorption spectrum of the Au islands. This is explained by a decreased effective refractive index around the islands. For pillars higher than approximately 40 nm no further blue shift is observed, in agreement with the decay length of the electromagnetic field around the islands. Pillar-supported Au islands were also fabricated on a flexible foil, demonstrating the potential of the method described here for the fabrication of flexible plasmonic substrates. Benefits and limitations of the method and of using polymers as the pillar material are discussed.

  2. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  3. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... for the spontaneous emission of mesoscopic quantum emitters is developed. The light-matter interaction is in this model modied beyond the dipole expectancy and found to both suppress and enhance the coupling to plasmonic modes in excellent agreement with our measurements. We demonstrate that this mesoscopic effect...

  4. Towards Plasmonic Solar to Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Dayton Thomas

    The need to renewably store and utilize energy from chemical bonds has grown with recent economic and environmental concerns. Plasmonically-enabled devices have shown promise in various photosynthetic processes due to their scalable, cost-effective, and robust performance. Utilizing charge carriers derived from localized surface plasmons, these devices can drive various photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactions, however at limited efficiencies due to incomplete solar absorption. To improve broadband solar absorption in wide bandgap semiconductors, the plasmon resonance of different metal nanostructures in the visible are synthesized using anodic and sol-gel templating methods. Preliminary results suggest that gold nanoparticles and helical metal nanowires are well suited for photosensitization of titania for visible light absorption. Characterization by UV-Visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that these templated methods can be utilized as the basis for synthesizing a variety of photoelectrochemical devices as well as unique plasmonic materials for applications including energy storage, sensing, and catalysis.

  5. Visualizing hybridized quantum plasmons in coupled nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Jensen, Kristian Lund; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    We present full quantum-mechanical calculations of the hybridized plasmon modes of two nanowires at small separation, providing real-space visualization of the modes in the transition from the classical to the quantum tunneling regime. The plasmon modes are obtained as certain eigenfunctions...... of the dynamical dielectric function, which is computed using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For freestanding wires, the energy of both surface and bulk plasmon modes deviate from the classical result for low wire radii and high momentum transfer due to effects of electron spill-out, nonlocal...... response, and coupling to single-particle transitions. For the wire dimer, the shape of the hybridized plasmon modes are continuously altered with decreasing separation, and below 6 A˚, the energy dispersion of the modes deviate from classical results due to the onset of weak tunneling. Below 2-3 A...

  6. Solar energy conversion with tunable plasmonic nanostructures for thermoelectric devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yujie; Long, Ran; Liu, Dong; Zhong, Xiaolan; Wang, Chengming; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Yi

    2012-08-01

    The photothermal effect in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) should be fully utilized when integrating plasmonics into solar technologies for improved light absorption. In this communication, we demonstrate that the photothermal effect of silver nanostructures can provide a heat source for thermoelectric devices for the first time. The plasmonic band of silver nanostructures can be facilely manoeuvred by tailoring their shapes, enabling them to interact with photons in different spectral ranges for the efficient utilization of solar light. It is anticipated that this concept can be extended to design a photovoltaic-thermoelectric tandem cell structure with plasmonics as mediation for light harvesting.

  7. Effect of Ag nanostructures and annealing process on the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of Ag-based AZO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Hui, Chaoxian; Liu, Can; Shi, Weimin

    2017-08-01

    Ag nanoparticles were obtained in Ag/AZO and AZO/Ag/AZO films by magnetron sputtering method at room temperature with different deposition time. The morphology of Ag nanoparticles is strongly affected by the particle size, shape and distribution as well as annealing temperatures, which determine the optical response of films. The high quality of AZO film with better crystallinity can enhance the optical transmittance and a good coverage by AZO as top layer on Ag nanoparticles can also enhance the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption of Ag in long wavelengths. The mechanisms involved in shifts and broadening of SPR peaks have been explained detailedly. The effect of annealing process on SPR of Ag and photoelectric properties of AZO/Ag/AZO films can be also discussed. It is shown that the SPR peak of 664 nm only appears in AZO/Ag (5 s)/AZO film and no SPR peaks are found in annealed AZO/Ag/AZO films. The AZO/Ag (20 s)/AZO film annealed at 300 °C shows a great figure of merit (F_{{TC}}) of 4.8 × 10-2 Ω-1 because of high visible optical average transmittance of 85% and low sheet resistance (R_{{S}}) of 4.1 Ω/sq. The overall results reveal that annealing process can improve the electrical property of film and may not be able to promote the SPR of Ag nanoparticles, especially when AZO top layer is added. The introduction of Ag nanoparticles in AZO/Ag/AZO films should be very effective for improving the SPR or photoelectric properties of films depending on deposition conditions and annealing process.

  8. Plasmon-assisted optoelectrofluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndukaife, Justus C.; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    By harnessing the photo-induced heating of a single plasmonic nanostructure and AC E-field in our research at the interface between plasmonics and optofluidics we demonstrate on-demand fluid flow control with unparalleled micron per second-scale velocities. © 2015 OSA....

  9. Plasmon-enhanced four-wave mixing by nanoholes in thin gold films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagman, H.; Bäcke, O.; Kiskis, J.; Svedberg, F.; Jonsson, M.P.; Höök, F.; Enejder, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear plasmonics opens up for wavelength conversion, reduced interaction/emission volumes, and nonlinear enhancement effects at the nanoscale with many compelling nanophotonic applications foreseen. We investigate nonlinear plasmonic responses of nanoholes in thin gold films by exciting the hole

  10. Effect of surface-plasmon polaritons on spontaneous emission and intermolecular energy-transfer rates in multilayered geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marocico, C. A.; Knoester, J.

    2011-01-01

    We use a Green's tensor method to investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a molecule and the energy-transfer rate between molecules placed in two types of layered geometries: a slab geometry and a planar waveguide. We focus especially on the role played by surface-plasmon polaritons in

  11. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  12. Morfologia externa de Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae. III. Abdome e apêndices External morphology of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot. III. Abdomen and appendages (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Manuel Saraiva Bizarro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A detailed study of the abdominal external morphology of both sexes of Thyridia psidii cetoides (Rosenberg & Talbot, 1914 is presented. The material for this research was obtained at the city's plant nursery "Horto Florestal de Curitiba", Paraná, Brazil; mainly by rearing eggs and larvae collected on Cyphomandra betacea (Canavilles Sendtner, 1845 (Solanaceae. When possible, the results obtained were compared with those already available in the literature concerning other Nymphalidae subfamilies morphology (Brassolinae, Morphinae and Danainae; the most striking feature being the asymmetrical valvae of the male and the length and faint sclerotinization of the third abdominal sternite in both sexes. A resume containing the main morphological differences to other nymphalid subfamillies, found throughout this research concerning head, thorax and abdome, is presented.

  13. Effect of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticle Concentration on the Signal of Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktivina, M.; Nurrohman, D. T.; Rinto, A. N. Q. Z.; Suharyadi, E.; Abraha, K.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle concentration on the signal of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectra has been successfully observed. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles with a particle size of about 10.5 ± 0.2 nm were used as active materials to increase the SPR response. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles have a high degree of crystallinity with spinel structure. The SPR system was successfully set up by using a glass prism coupler in a Kretschmann configuration in which gold (Au) thin film was thermally evaporated on the prism base. A green laser of wavelength 543 nm was used as light source. The angular scan in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectra showed a dropping intensity. Those things clearly indicated the appearance of SPR coupling phenomenon on the interface of Au thin film. The SPR spectra of fixed Au masses were also performed with same angular positions of dips. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were deposited on gold thin film as a third layer which was synthesized via co-precipitation method. Hence, it was observed that the variation of Fe3O4 concentration affected the SPR spectra profile. The concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles are 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 mg/ml which correspond to the angle shift of 0.1°, 0.3°, 0.5°, 0.7°, 0.9°, and 1.0°, respectively. The SPR angle of the dip was shifted to higher value due to change of refractive index of the medium as Fe3O4 nanoparticles concentration increases. Based on this result, we can conclude that the angle shift of SPR increases with increasing concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  14. Maximum modulation of plasmon-guided modes by graphene gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Grigorenko, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of graphene in plasmonic electro-optical waveguide modulators has been investigated in detail by finite-element method modelling of various widely used plasmonic waveguiding configurations. We estimated the maximum possible modulation depth values one can achieve with plasmonic...... devices operating at telecom wavelengths and exploiting the optical Pauli blocking effect in graphene. Conclusions and guidelines for optimization of modulation/intrinsic loss trade-off have been provided and generalized for any graphene-based plasmonic waveguide modulators, which should help...

  15. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y; Ishii, Satoshi; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2015-11-30

    We study plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and hyperbolic multilayer claddings. The proposed design provides better performance in terms of propagation length and mode confinement in comparison to conventional designs, such as metal-insulator-metal and insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly coupled, and the propagation length can be on the order of a millimeter.

  16. Long-range plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic cladding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi;

    2015-01-01

    We study plasmonic waveguides with dielectric cores and hyperbolic multilayer claddings. The proposed design provides better performance in terms of propagation length and mode confinement in comparison to conventional designs, such as metal-insulator-metal and insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic...... waveguides. We show that the proposed structures support long-range surface plasmon modes, which exist when the permittivity of the core matches the transverse effective permittivity component of the metamaterial cladding. In this regime, the surface plasmon polaritons of each cladding layer are strongly...

  17. Theory on Plasmon Modes of the Cell Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Nhan, T T; Ngo, V Thanh; Viet, N A

    2007-01-01

    Considering the plasmon oscillation of each layer of the cell membranes as a quasi-particle, we introduce a simple model for the membrane collective charge excitations, take into account the surface effective potential of the plasmon-plasmon interaction between two layers. By using the useful Bogoliubov transformation method, we easily obtained the expressions of the frequencies of plasmon oscillations as a function of wave-number $k$ and membrane thickness $d$, magnitude of these frequencies is in the order of $\\sqrt{kd}$. Our results are in good agreement with ones obtained by E. Manousakis.

  18. Plasmonic interferometry: probing launching dipoles in scanning-probe plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Mollet, O; Genet, C; Huant, S; Drezet, A

    2014-01-01

    We develop a semi-analytical method for analyzing surface plasmon interferometry using near-field scanning optical sources. We compare our approach to Young double hole interferometry experiments using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) discussed in the literature and realize experiments with an aperture near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) source positioned near a ring like aperture slit milled in a thick gold film. In both cases the agreement between experiments and model is very good. We emphasize the role of dipole orientations and discuss the role of magnetic versus electric dipole contributions to the imaging process as well as the directionality of the effective dipoles associated with the various optical and plasmonic sources.

  19. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A; Schatz, George C

    2016-04-13

    Mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  20. Plasmonic Nanocone Arrays as Photoconductive and Photovoltaic Metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyuknin, Andrey B.;

    2014-01-01

    Photoconductive and photovolta ic properties of metamaterials comprising plasmonic nanocone arrays embedded in a semiconductor matrix are studied. Under uniform plane-wave illumination, directed photocurrent and electromotive force arise ne ar asymmetrically shaped nanocones. The resulting giant...... photogalvanic effect is a plasmonic analogue of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectrics....

  1. Light-Directed Reversible Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Enhanced Thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wang, Mingsong; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Mao, Zhangming; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Becker, Michael F; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-09-21

    Reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to modulate their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Common and versatile tools in nanoparticle manipulation and assembly are optical tweezers, but these require tightly focused and high-power (10-100 mW/μm(2)) laser beams with precise optical alignment, which significantly hinders their applications. Here we present light-directed reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles with a power intensity below 0.1 mW/μm(2). Our experiments and simulations reveal that such a low-power assembly is enabled by thermophoretic migration of nanoparticles due to the plasmon-enhanced photothermal effect and the associated enhanced local electric field over a plasmonic substrate. With software-controlled laser beams, we demonstrate parallel and dynamic manipulation of multiple nanoparticle assemblies. Interestingly, the assemblies formed over plasmonic substrates can be subsequently transported to nonplasmonic substrates. As an example application, we selected surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy, with tunable sensitivity. The advantages provided by plasmonic assembly of nanoparticles are the following: (1) low-power, reversible nanoparticle assembly, (2) applicability to nanoparticles with arbitrary morphology, and (3) use of simple optics. Our plasmon-enhanced thermophoretic technique will facilitate further development and application of dynamic nanoparticle assemblies, including biomolecular analyses in their native environment and smart drug delivery.

  2. Evaluation of Talbot's Safety Zone of Infusion Volume and Osmolality in Infusion Therapy for Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuasa,Shiro

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems with infusion therapy for correcting fluid and sodium imbalance in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC were investigated by establishing the safety zone of Talbot et al. for parenteral fluid therapy in 4 DLC patients infused with over 900 ml of fluid each day for at least 9 days. The safety zone was different in each case. The safe infusion volume decreased and the safe electrolyte concentration shifted to a lower osmolality when there was ascites with renal failure than ascites without renal failure. Infusion therapy was performed without deterioration of the water and sodium balance in those patients whose infusion volume and fluid osmolality were in the safety zone. In contrast, ascites retention increased and peripheral edema appeared in patients whose infusion volume and osmolality were out of the safety zone. Therefore, the safety zone should be determined repeatedly during infusion therapy.

  3. High power terahertz emission from a single gate AlGaN/GaN field effect transistor with periodic Ohmic contacts for plasmon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Toshikazu; Tanigawa, Tatsuya; Takigawa, Shinichi

    2010-08-01

    We report on room temperature terahertz (THz) emission by a single, short gate AlGaN/GaN field effect transistor with grating Ohmic contacts. The fingers of metal contacts are fabricated at the nanoscale in length and spacing in order to work as a radiation coupler of electron plasmons in the THz range. Spectrum analysis revealed a broadband emission centered at 1.5 THz with a controlled polarization by the grating contacts. The measured output power is linearly increased with the drain input power and reached up to 1.8 μW.

  4. Modeling and optimizing the performance of plasmonic solar cells using effective medium theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralaee, M.; Asgari, A.; Siahpoush, V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the effects of random Ag nanoparticle used within the active layer of Si based thin film solar cell are investigated. To avoid the complexity of taking into account all random nanoparticles, an effective dielectric function for random Ag nanoparticles and Si nanocomposites is used that is the Maxwell-Garnet theory along with Percus-Yevick correction term. Considering the energy reservation law and using the effective dielectric function, the absorbance of the active layer, therefore, the solar cell's maximum short current density is obtained. Also, the maximum external quantum efficiency of the solar cell is obtained using the optimum values for the radius and filling fraction of Ag nanoparticles.

  5. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  6. Biomedical Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Naomi

    2010-03-01

    The near infrared region of the optical spectrum provides a window into the human body that can be exploited for diagnostics and therapeutics, offering an opportunity to merge these concepts. We have shown that the strong light-absorbing and light-scattering properties of noble metal nanoparticles can be controlled by manipulating their shape: in a core-shell geometry, the metallic shell layer can be easily tuned to this spectral region. This `nanoshell' geometry has proven to be ideal for enhancing both diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for cancer. Nanoshells can serve as light scattering beacons, strong enhancers of fluorescent markers for optical tomography, and impart a highly effective, targeted therapeutic response via their unparalleled light-to-heat conversion properties. This latter effect has been used to induce cell death and tumor remission in animals at greater than 90% efficacy, and is currently in clinical trials. This nanoparticle platform can be combined with MRI contrast agents for the enhancement of dual imaging modalities, and also shows promise as a light-controlled nonviral vector for intracellular gene delivery.

  7. Plasmonic-Electronic Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    resonances in two dimensional electron gases. Tunable plasmon absorption resonances were observed and studied in InP-based and GaN -based HEMTs . The...Resonant terahertz absorption by plasmons in grating-gate GaN HEMT structures,” A. V. Muravjov, D. B. Veksler, X. Hu, R. Gaska, N. Pala, H. Saxena...Nov. 2009, Singapore. 4. “Terahertz Plasmons in Grating-Gate AlGaN/ GaN HEMTs ,” A.V. Muravjov, D.B. Veksler, V.V. Popov, M.S. Shur, N. Pala, X. Hu, R

  8. Plasmonics in Topological Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Lai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With strong spin-orbit coupling, topological insulators have an insulating bulk state, characterized by a band gap, and a conducting surface state, characterized by a Dirac cone. Plasmons in topological insulators show high frequency-tunability in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectral regions with transverse spin oscillations, also called “spin-plasmons”. This paper presents a discussion and review of the developments in this field from the fundamental theory of plasmons in bulk, thin-film, and surface-magnetized topological insulators to the techniques of plasmon excitation and future applications.

  9. Exploring the Effects of Argon Plasma Treatment on Plasmon Frequency and the Chemiresistive Properties of Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Metacomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rivera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metacomposites, composite materials exhibiting negative permittivity, represent an opportunity to create materials with depressed plasmon frequency without the need to create complex structural geometries. Although many reports exist on the synthesis and characterizations of metacomposites, very few have ventured into exploring possible applications that could take advantage of the unique electrical properties of these materials. In this article, we report on the chemiresistive properties of a polymer-CNT metacomposite and explore how these are affected by Argon plasma treatment.

  10. Near-field observation of spatial phase shifts associated with Goos-Hänschen and Surface Plasmon Resonance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, J; Segerink, F B; Korterik, J P; Offerhaus, H L

    2008-02-04

    We report the near-field observation of the phase shifts associated with total internal reflection on a glass-air interface and surface plasmon resonance on a glass-gold-air system. The phase of the evanescent waves on glass and gold surfaces, as a function of incident angle, is measured using a phase-sensitive Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscope (PSTM) and shows a good agreement with theory.

  11. Exploring the Effects of Argon Plasma Treatment on Plasmon Frequency and the Chemiresistive Properties of Polymer-Carbon Nanotube Metacomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel; Rahaman, Mostafizur; Velázquez, Rafael; Zhou, Andrew F.; Feng, Peter X.

    2017-01-01

    Metacomposites, composite materials exhibiting negative permittivity, represent an opportunity to create materials with depressed plasmon frequency without the need to create complex structural geometries. Although many reports exist on the synthesis and characterizations of metacomposites, very few have ventured into exploring possible applications that could take advantage of the unique electrical properties of these materials. In this article, we report on the chemiresistive properties of a polymer-CNT metacomposite and explore how these are affected by Argon plasma treatment. PMID:28837097

  12. Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion and Dynamical Casimir Effect for Surface Plasmon Polaritons and Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hižnjakov V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of biphotons states generated via spontaneous four-wave mixing in nanofibers with a variable cross-section are studied. The spectral amplitude of the biphoton field is calculated and the effects of interference and phase modulation of the biphoton field in such structures is discussed.

  13. Nonlinear effects in propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in gold strip waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Malureanu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    thickness. The theoretical model of these effects is based on the third-order susceptibility of the constituent materials. The linear and nonlinear parameters of the LRSPP mode are obtained, and the nonlinear Schrodinger equation is solved. The dispersion length is much larger than the waveguides length...

  14. Effect of a dielectric coating on terahertz surface plasmon polaritons on metal wires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Valk, N.C.J.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present measurements and calculations on the effect of thin dielectric coatings on the propagation of terahertz pulses along the surface of metal wires. Our measurements show that propagation over only a few centimeters of wire having a thin dielectric coating, strongly distorts the tera

  15. Catalytic effects of silver plasmonic nanoparticles on the redox reaction leading to ABTS˙(+) formation studied using UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Leis, A; Jancura, D; Antalik, M; Garcia-Ramos, J V; Sanchez-Cortes, S; Jurasekova, Z

    2016-09-29

    ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) is a compound extensively employed to evaluate the free radical trapping capacity of antioxidant agents and complex mixtures such as biological fluids or foods. This evaluation is usually performed by using a colourimetric experiment, where preformed ABTS radical cation (ABTS˙(+)) molecules are reduced in the presence of an antioxidant causing an intensity decrease of the specific ABTS˙(+) UV-visible absorption bands. In this work we report a strong effect of silver plasmonic nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on ABTS leading to the formation of ABTS˙(+). The reaction of ABTS with Ag NPs has been found to be dependent on the interfacial and plasmonic properties of NPs. Specifically, this reaction is pronounced in the presence of spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with hydroxylamine (AgH) and in the case of star-shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNS). On the other hand, spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with citrate apparently do not react with ABTS. Additionally, the formation of ABTS˙(+) is investigated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and the assignment of the most intense vibrational bands of this compound is performed. The SERS technique enables us to detect this radical cation at very low concentrations of ABTS (∼2 μM). Altogether, these findings allow us to suggest the use of ABTS/Ag NPs-systems as reliable and easy going substrates to test the antioxidant capacity of various compounds, even at concentrations much lower than those usually used in the spectrophotometric assays. Moreover, we have suggested that ABTS could be employed as a suitable agent to investigate the interfacial and plasmonic properties of the metal nanoparticles and, thus, to characterize the nanoparticle metal systems employed for various purposes.

  16. Plasmonic silicon solar cell comprised of aluminum nanoparticles: Effect of nanoparticles' self-limiting native oxide shell on optical and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Piyush K.; Sharma, R. P.; Komarala, Vamsi K.

    2016-10-01

    The aluminum nanoparticles' (Al NPs) morphology is optimized initially, for maximum light confinement into a silicon substrate. With self-limiting native oxide shell on the Al NPs after ageing, the maximum photocurrent enhancement (from 26.89 to 29.21 mA/cm2) from a silicon solar cell is observed as compared to the bare cell, in surface plasmon resonance and off-resonance regions due to improved light forward scattering, with no occurrence of Fano resonances. Related to the electrical properties of the plasmonic device, an increase in fill factor (from 56.11 to 62.58) and a decrease in series resistance (from 1.80 Ω to 1.24 Ω) are also observed after the oxide layer formation on Al NPs. The passive partial dielectric oxide layer at the interface helped in electrical passivation by reducing lateral resistance to current flow along the plane of the interface. A finite-element method is also adapted to calculate spatial and angular radiative dipole field distributions for the experimentally optimized Al NPs' size on a silicon substrate, without and with oxide inclusion in NPs for explaining the plasmonic device performance enhancement. With oxide inclusion, Al NPs' dipole field exhibited a large shift towards a silicon due to the modified dielectric environment as compared to without oxide. Bruggeman effective medium theory (for dielectric response) is also used to explain the results with the modification in peak radiative power, spectral field distribution, and spatial and angular radiative dipole field distributions of Al NPs with oxide inclusion in Al.

  17. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs.

  18. A magneto-electro-optical effect in a plasmonic nanowire material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, João; Ou, Jun-Yu; Plum, Eric; Youngs, Ian J.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-01-01

    Electro- and magneto-optical phenomena play key roles in photonic technology enabling light modulators, optical data storage, sensors and numerous spectroscopic techniques. Optical effects, linear and quadratic in external electric and magnetic field are widely known and comprehensively studied. However, optical phenomena that depend on the simultaneous application of external electric and magnetic fields in conventional media are barely detectable and technologically insignificant. Here we report that a large reciprocal magneto-electro-optical effect can be observed in metamaterials. In an artificial chevron nanowire structure fabricated on an elastic nano-membrane, the Lorentz force drives reversible transmission changes on application of a fraction of a volt when the structure is placed in a fraction-of-tesla magnetic field. We show that magneto-electro-optical modulation can be driven to hundreds of thousands of cycles per second promising applications in magneto-electro-optical modulators and field sensors at nano-tesla levels. PMID:25906761

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Plasmon effect for enzymatic bionanocomplexes characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowska-Nowak, Renata; Polit, Jacek; Broda, Daniel; Bobitski, Yaroslaw; Starowicz, Zbigniew; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Sheregii, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (ChOX) enzyme is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics as well as food production, and the developing of innovative solutions for improving the selectivity and accuracy of the analysis including bio-nanotechnological approaches is still ongoing. The Surface Plazmon Resonance (SPR) and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as specific for nanocurriers effects were observed what enable us to research the oscillation spectra of the ChOX enzyme. The vibrational lines are attributed to chemical functional groups existing in enzyme, for example, amino acids, amide groups as well as for cofactor. For the improving the SERS effect the gold nanoparticles - ChOX bionanocomplexes were analyzed in combination with gold-coating gratings as a promising plazmonic material.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Plasmon effect for enzymatic bionanocomplexes characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnarowska-Nowak Renata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChOX enzyme is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics as well as food production, and the developing of innovative solutions for improving the selectivity and accuracy of the analysis including bio-nanotechnological approaches is still ongoing. The Surface Plazmon Resonance (SPR and the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS as specific for nanocurriers effects were observed what enable us to research the oscillation spectra of the ChOX enzyme. The vibrational lines are attributed to chemical functional groups existing in enzyme, for example, amino acids, amide groups as well as for cofactor. For the improving the SERS effect the gold nanoparticles – ChOX bionanocomplexes were analyzed in combination with gold-coating gratings as a promising plazmonic material.

  1. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  2. Multi-Periodicity Induces Prominent Optical Phenomena in Plasmonic Multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlov, Alexey A.; Krylova, A. K.; Zhukovsky, Sergei;

    2014-01-01

    We introduce multi-periodicity in plasmonic multilayers and develop a general theory for the description of their eigenwaves. We define the order of multi-periodicity as the number of different kinds of plasmonic interfaces present in the multilayer, and investigate the optical effects that arise...

  3. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying...

  4. Optically tunable plasmonic color filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. J.; Si, G. Y.; Leong, E. S. P.; Wang, B.; Danner, A. J.; Yuan, X. C.; Teng, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    We fabricated sub-wavelength patterned gold plasmonic nanostructures on a quartz substrate through the focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The perforated gold film demonstrated optical transmission peaks in the visible range, which therefore can be used as a plasmonic color filter. Furthermore, by integrating a layer of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with the gold nanostructure to form a hybrid system, we observed a red-shift of transmission peak wavelength. More importantly, the peak intensity can be further enhanced more than 10% in transmittance due to the refractive index match of the media on both sides of it. By optically pumping the hybrid system using a UV light, nematic-isotropic phase transition of the LCs was achieved, thus changing the effective refractive index experienced by the impinging light. Due to the refractive index change, the transmission peak intensity was modulated accordingly. As a result, an optically tunable plasmonic color filter was achieved. This kind of color filters could be potentially applied to many applications, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, liquid crystal display devices, light emitting diodes, etc.

  5. Self-assembled plasmonic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlig, Stefan; Cunningham, Alastair; Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf; Bürgi, Thomas; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays for the sake of convenience most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by top-down nanofabrication technologies. This offers great degrees of freedom to tailor the geometry with unprecedented precision. However, it often causes disadvantages as well. The structures available are usually planar and periodically arranged. Therefore, bulk plasmonic structures are difficult to fabricate and the periodic arrangement causes undesired effects, e.g., strong spatial dispersion is observed in metamaterials. These limitations can be mitigated by relying on bottom-up nanofabrication technologies. There, self-assembly methods and techniques from the field of colloidal nanochemistry are used to build complex functional unit cells in solution from an ensemble of simple building blocks, i.e., in most cases plasmonic nanoparticles. Achievable structures are characterized by a high degree of nominal order only on a short-range scale. The precise spatial arrangement across larger dimensions is not possible in most cases; leading essentially to amorphous structures. Such self-assembled nanostructures require novel analytical means to describe their properties, innovative designs of functional elements that possess a desired near- and far-field response, and entail genuine nanofabrication and characterization techniques. Eventually, novel applications have to be perceived that are adapted to the specifics of the self-assembled nanostructures. This review shall document recent progress in this field of research. Emphasis is put on bottom-up amorphous metamaterials. We document the state-of-the-art but also critically assess the problems that have to be overcome.

  6. Enhanced piezo/solar-photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods arising from the coupling of surface plasmon resonance and piezophototronic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Dan; He, Haoxuan; Wang, Qiang; Xing, Lili; Xue, Xinyu

    2017-03-01

    Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods are synthesized in mass production via a simple thermal-evaporation/hydrothermal route, and Ag nanoparticles are randomly coated on ZnO nanotetrapods. Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods can co-use the solar and mechanical energy to degrade various organic pollutants, and the solar-photocatalytic activity is significantly enhanced by the piezo-assistance. For instance, under ultrasonic stimulation (200 W) and solar illumination (500 W), Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods can completely degrade methyl orange (MO) within 25 min. The high piezo/solar-photocatalytic efficiency of Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods can be ascribed to the coupling of surface plasmon resonance and piezophototronic effect in the solar-photocatalytic process. The localized surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag nanoparticles can increase the visible light absorption. Ag/ZnO interface can facilitate the interfacial charge transfer and induce the separation of photo-induced charge carriers. The piezoelectric field originated from the deformation of ZnO nanotetrapods can further enhance the separation of photo-induced electron/hole pairs. Our results imply that Ag/ZnO nanotetrapods have great potentials of using sustainable energy in the nature for environmental remediation.

  7. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F.

    2016-11-01

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ˜1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  8. Talbot-Lau x-ray deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia, M. P., E-mail: mpvaldivia@pha.jhu.edu; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Klein, S. R. [Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysical Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States); Muñoz-Cordovez, G.; Vescovi, M.; Valenzuela-Villaseca, V.; Veloso, F. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-11-15

    Talbot-Lau X-ray deflectometry (TXD) has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density (HED) plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping were demonstrated for 25–29 J, 8–30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moiré pattern formation and grating survival were also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ∼1 kA/ns. These results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  9. Optical antennas and plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Q-Han

    2009-01-01

    Optical antenna is a nanoscale miniaturization of radio or microwave antennas that is also governed by the rule of plasmonics. We introduce various types of optical antenna and make an overview of recent developments in optical antenna research. The role of local and surface plasmons in optical antenna is explained through antenna resonance and resonance conditions for specific metal structures are explicitly obtained. Strong electric field is shown to exist within a highly localized region o...

  10. Plasmonic Graphene Transparent Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    www.MaterialsViews.com www.advopticalmat.de FU LL P A P ER Guowei Xu,* Jianwei Liu, Qian Wang , Rongqing Hui, Zhijun Chen, Victor A. Maroni, and Judy Wu Plasmonic...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UU...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS surface plasmon, graphene, transparent conductors Guowei Xu, Jianwei Liu, Qian

  11. Effects of particle size and surrounding media on optical radiation efficiencies of spherical plasmonic metal nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinayak A Dhumale; Preeti V Shah; Rishi B Sharma; Katsuaki Tanabe

    2012-04-01

    The optical radiation efficiency (), the ratio of scattering cross-section to extinction cross-section, of spherical metal nanoparticles (M= Al, Ag, Au and Cu) surrounded by glass and water was calculated using classical electrostatics. The effect of varying particle diameter (∼100 nm) on was also studied for free space wavelengths in the range of 400–1200 nm. The variations in the value of with the diameter () of the metal nanoparticles were calculated on the basis of quasi-static approximation. The increases with the size of metal nanoparticles. Corresponding to a metal nanoparticle, was found to exhibit a sharp dip (dip) at a characteristic wavelength ()M in a particular medium ( = air, glass and water). ()M was independent of particle size. The (medium)M was found to be slightly blue shifted for all metal nanoparticles surrounded by glass or water with respect to those in the air.

  12. Inducing an Incipient Terahertz Finite Plasmonic Crystal in Coupled Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Dyer, Gregory C; Preu, Sascha; Vinh, N Q; Allen, S James; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    We measured a change in the current transport of an antenna-coupled, multi-gate, GaAs/AlGaAs field-effect transistor when terahertz electromagnetic waves irradiated the transistor and attribute the change to bolometric heating of the electrons in the two-dimensional electron channel. The observed terahertz absorption spectrum indicates coherence between plasmons excited under adjacent biased device gates. The experimental results agree quantitatively with a theoretical model we developed that is based on a generalized plasmonic transmission line formalism and describes an evolution of the plasmonic spectrum with increasing electron density modulation from homogeneous to the crystal limit. These results demonstrate an electronically induced and dynamically tunable plasmonic band structure.

  13. Collective plasmon-modes in gain media quantum emitters and plasmonic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, V A G; Ledemi, Y; Messaddeq, Y; Marega Jr , E

    2015-01-01

    This book represents the first detailed description, including both theoretical aspects and experimental methods, of the interaction of rare-earth ions with surface plasmon polariton from the point of view of collective plasmon-photon interactions via resonance modes (metal nanoparticles or nanostructure arrays) with quantum emitters (rare-earth ions). These interactions are of particular interest for applications to optical telecommunications, optical displays, and laser solid state technologies. Thus, our main goal is to give a more precise overview of the rapidly emerging field of nanophotonics by means of the study of the quantum properties of light interaction with matter at the nanoscale. In this way, collective plasmon-modes in a gain medium result from the interaction/coupling between a quantum emitter (created by rare-earth ions) with a metallic surface, inducing different effects such as the polarization of the metal electrons (so-called surface plasmon polariton - SPP), a field enhancement sustaine...

  14. An assembly and interaction of upconversion and plasmonic nanoparticles on organometallic nanofibers: enhanced multicolor upconversion, downshifting emission and the plasmonic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyam; Shahi, Praveen Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Bahadur Rai, Shyam

    2017-10-01

    We present novel inorganic–organic hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) constituting inorganic NPs, NaY0.78Er0.02Yb0.2F4, and organometallic nanofiber, Tb(ASA)3Phen (TAP). X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption and transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that prepared ultrafine upconversion NPs (UCNPs (5–8 nm)) are dispersed on the surface of the TAP nanofibers. We observe that the addition of TAP in UCNPs effectively limits the surface quenching to boost the upconversion (UC) intensity and enables tuning of UC emission from the green to the red region by controlling the phonon frequency around the Er3+ ion. On the other hand, TAP is an excellent source of green emission under ultraviolet exposure. Therefore prepared HNPs not only give enhanced and tunable UC but also emit a strong green color in the downshifting (DS) process. To further enhance the dual-mode emission of HNPs, silver NPs (AgNPs) are introduced. The emission intensity of UC as well as DS emission is found to be strongly modulated in the presence of AgNPs. It is found that AgNPs enhance red UC emission. The possible mechanism involved in enhanced emission intensity and color output is investigated in detail. The important optical properties of these nano-hybrid materials provide a great opportunity in the fields of biological imaging, drug delivery and energy devices.

  15. Effect of number density on optimal design of gold nanoshells for plasmonic photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Debabrata; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Cheng, Wenlong; Premaratne, Malin

    2013-01-01

    Despite much research efforts being devoted to the design optimization of metallic nanoshells, no account is taken of the fact that the number of the nanoshells that can be delivered to a given cancerous site vary with their size. In this paper, we study the effect of the nanoshell number density on the absorption and scattering properties of a gold-nanoshell ensemble exposed to a broadband near-infrared radiation, and optimize the nanoshells' dimensions for efficient cancer treatment by analyzing a wide range of human tissues. We first consider the general situation in which the number of the delivered nanoshells decreases with their mean radius R as ∝ R(-β), and demonstrate that the optimal design of nanoshells required to treat cancer most efficiently depends critically on β. In the case of β = 2, the maximal energy absorbed (scattered) by the ensemble is achieved for the same dimensions that maximize the absorption (scattering) efficiency of a single nanoshell. We thoroughly study this special case by the example of gold nanoshells with silica core. To ensure that minimal thermal injury is caused to the healthy tissue surrounding a cancerous site, we estimate the optimal dimensions that minimize scattering by the nanoshells for a desired value of the absorption efficiency. The comparison of gold nanoshells with different cores shows that hollow nanoshells exhibiting relatively low absorption efficiency are less harmful to the healthy tissue and, hence, are preferred over the strongly absorbing nanoshells. For each of the cases analyzed, we provide approximate analytical expressions for the optimal nanoshell dimensions, which may be used as design guidelines by experimentalists, in order to optimize the synthesis of gold nanoshells for treating different types of human cancer at their various growth stages.

  16. Small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT) using a Talbot-Lau interferometerand a rotating anode x-ray tube:theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua

    2010-06-01

    X-ray differential phase contrast imaging methods, including projection imaging and the corresponding computed tomography (CT), have been implemented using a Talbot interferometer and either a synchrotron beam line or a low brilliance x-ray source generated by a stationary-anode x-ray tube. From small-angle scattering events which occur as an x-ray propagates through a medium, a signal intensity loss can be recorded and analyzed for an understanding of the micro-structures in an image object. This has been demonstrated using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a stationary-anode x-ray tube. In this paper, theoretical principles and an experimental implementation of the corresponding CT imaging method are presented. First, a line integral is derived from analyzing the cross section of the small-angle scattering events. This method is referred to as small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT). Next, a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a rotating-anode x-ray tube were used to implement SAS-CT. A physical phantom and human breast tissue sample were used to demonstrate the reconstructed SAS-CT image volumes.

  17. Surface plasmon polaritons in topological Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2016-06-01

    We consider theoretically surface plasmon polaritons in Weyl semimetals. These materials contain pairs of band touching points—Weyl nodes—with a chiral topological charge, which induces an optical anisotropy and anomalous transport through the chiral anomaly. We show that these effects, which are not present in ordinary metals, have a direct fundamental manifestation in the surface plasmon dispersion. The retarded Weyl surface plasmon dispersion depends on the separation of the Weyl nodes in energy and momentum space. For Weyl semimetals with broken time-reversal symmetry, the distance between the nodes acts as an effective applied magnetic field in momentum space, and the Weyl surface plasmon polariton dispersion is strikingly similar to magnetoplasmons in ordinary metals. In particular, this implies the existence of nonreciprocal surface modes. In addition, we obtain the nonretarded Weyl magnetoplasmon modes, which acquire an additional longitudinal magnetic field dependence. These predicted surface plasmon results are observable manifestations of the chiral anomaly in Weyl semimetals and might have technological applications.

  18. Leaky wave lenses for spoof plasmon collimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaretos, Anastasios H; Werner, Douglas H

    2016-06-27

    We theoretically demonstrate the feasibility of collimating radiating spoof plasmons using a leaky wave lens approach. Spoof plasmons are surface waves excited along reactance surfaces realized through metallic corrugations. By employing a periodic perturbation to the geometric profile of this type of reactance surface, it becomes feasible to convert the excited spoof plasmons into free-space radiating leaky wave modes. It is demonstrated that by structurally modifying such a corrugated surface through the introduction of a non-uniform sinusoidally modulated reactance profile, then a tapered wavenumber, with a real part less than that of free space, can be established along the surface. In this way the radiating properties of the structure (amplitude and phase) can be locally controlled thereby creating a radiating effect similar to that of a non-uniform current distribution. By properly engineering the space dependent wavenumber along the corrugated surface, different regions of the structure will emit spoof plasmon energy at different angles with varying intensity. The combined effect is the emission of an electromagnetic wave exhibiting a converging wave-front that eventually collimates spoof plasmon energy at some desired focal point.

  19. The influences of surface plasmons and thermal effects on femtosecond laser-induced subwavelength periodic ripples on Au film by pump-probe imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kan; Jia, Xin; Jia, Tianqing; Cheng, Ke; Cao, Kaiqiang; Zhang, Shian; Feng, Donghai; Sun, Zhenrong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the influences of surface plasmons and thermal effects on the formation of subwavelength periodic ripples on Au films irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses were studied by collinear pump-probe imaging. The spatial and temporal resolutions of the experiment were 300 nm and 1 ps, respectively. No periodic ripples were observed on the Au film during ablation by the first pump pulse, but during ablation by the second pump pulse the appearance of transient ripples was evident from a delay time of hundreds of picoseconds to several nanoseconds. These ripples, however, were not retained after solidification. When the sample was immersed in water during ablation, however, the ripples were retained. It is proposed that, during the second laser pulse irradiation, the surface defects produced by the first pulse induced surface plasmon polaritons on the Au film, which caused a modulated energy deposition and the formation of transient ripples. The weak electron-phonon coupling and significant residual heat erase these ripples after the molten surface was solidified.

  20. Engineering plasmon dispersion relations : hybrid nanoparticle chain - substrate plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaijen, Paul J.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    We consider the dispersion relations of the optical excitations in a chain of silver nanoparticles situated above a metal substrate and show that they are hybrid plasmon polaritons, composed of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons. We demonstrate a strong dependence of the syste

  1. Au@ZnO nanostructures on porous silicon for photocatalysis and gas-sensing: the effect of plasmonic hot-electrons driven by visible-light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured heterojunctions play key role for transfer and separation of interfacial photo-carriers. At visible light illumination, the effects of Au nanoparticles (NPs) for the photocatalysis and gas-sensing performance of Au@ZnO nanstructures on porous silicon layer are reported. At optimized loading amount of Au NPs, the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of Au NPs is studied. Generated by visible light irradiation, the LSPR effect of Au NPs promotes desorption and activation of surface adsorption oxygen species -{{{{O}}}2}-, which is initiated by hot electrons transfer through Au-ZnO nanojunctions. This mechanism is responsible for the enhanced photocatalysis of methyl orange molecular, as well as enhancing the detecting performance for ammonia (NH3) gas at room temperature.

  2. Quantum optical properties in plasmonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic metallic particle (MP) can affect the optical properties of a quantum system (QS) in a remarkable way. We develop a general quantum nonlinear formalism with exact vectorial description for the scattered photons by the QS. The formalism enables us to study the variations of the dielectric function and photon spectrum of the QS with the particle distance between QS and MP, exciting laser direction, polarization and phase in the presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the MP. The quantum formalism also serves as a powerful tool for studying the effects of these parameters on the nonclassical properties of the scattered photons. The plasmonic effect of nanoparticles has promising possibilities as it provides a new way for manipulating quantum optical properties of light in nanophotonic systems.

  3. Gap Surface Plasmon Waveguide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic waveguides supporting gap surface plasmons (GSPs) localized in a dielectric spacer between metal films are investigated numerically and the waveguiding properties at telecommunication wavelengths are presented. Especially, we emphasize that the mode confinement can advantageously...

  4. Plasmonic components fabrication via nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A review report on nanoimprinted plasmonic components is given. The fabrication of different metal–dielectric geometries and nanostructured surfaces that support either propagating or localized surface plasmon modes is discussed. The main characteristics and advantages of the nanoimprint technolo...

  5. Effect of dielectric cladding on active plasmonic device based on InGaAsP multiple quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yicen; Zhang, Hui; Mei, Ting; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Dao Hua; Teng, Jinghua

    2014-10-20

    The Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) planar waveguide with amorphous silicon (α-Si) cladding is studied, for empowering the device modulation response. The device is fabricated with multiple quantum wells (MQWs) as the gain media electrically pumped for compensating SPP propagation loss on Au film waveguide. The SPP propagation greatly benefits from the modal gain for the long-range hybrid mode, which is optimized by adopting an α-Si cladding layer accompanied with minimal degradation of mode confinement. The proposed structure presented more sensitive response to electrical manipulation than the one without cladding in experiment.

  6. Thin metal island plasmon sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Downey, Todd R.; Passian, A.; Oden, Patrick I.; Wig, A. G.; Crilly, P. B.; Mangeant, S.; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    1998-12-01

    The effects of the local dielectric environment on the surface-plasmon resonances of annealed gold-island films are studied experimentally and modeled theoretically. Gold- island films were annealed at 600 degree(s)C to produce spheroidal shape particles which exhibit well-resolved resonances in polarized, angle-resolved, absorption spectra. These resonances are shifted in different amounts by the depolarization effect of the surrounding medium (liquids with various refraction indices). Cross-section calculations based upon non-retarded, single-particle, dielectric interaction for these various configurations are presented and found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  8. Fabricating plasmonic components for nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Jeppesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed.......We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed....

  9. Backside configured surface plasmonic enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun, E-mail: xuejun-lu@uml.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Vaillancourt, Jarrod [Applied NanoFemto Technologies, LLC, 181 Stedman St. 2, Lowell, MA 01851 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In this work, we fabricated, measured and compared the quantum dots infrared photodetector enhancement by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures. The backside configured plasmonic structure can provide much higher device performance enhancement. Furthermore, the excitation of the surface plasmonic waves by the top- and backside- configured plasmonic structures was analyzed. Detailed simulation results of the electric field at different wavelength from top illumination and backside illumination were provided. The stronger electric field from the backside illumination attributed to the higher enhancement.

  10. A plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojaverian, Neda; Gu, Guiru; Lu, Xuejun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report a full-wavelength plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP). The plasmonic dipole optical antenna can effectively modify the EM wave distribution and convert free-space propagation infrared light to localized surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) within the nanometer (nm) gap region of the full-wavelength dipole antenna. The plasmonic dipole optical antenna coupled QDIP shows incident-angle-dependent photocurrent enhancement. The angular dependence follows the far-field pattern of a full-wavelength dipole antenna. The directivity of the plasmonic dipole optical antenna is measured to be 1.8 dB, which agrees well with the antenna simulation. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the antenna far-field and directivity measurement. The agreement of the detection pattern and the directivity with antenna theory confirms functions of an optical antenna are similar to that of a RF antenna.

  11. Characteristics of surface plasmon coupled quantum well infrared photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Cheng; Ling, Hong-Shi; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Lee, Chien-Ping

    2017-06-01

    Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs) with different structures were characterized for the study of surface plasmon wave coupling. Detailed comparisons between surface plasmon coupled and etched grating coupled devices were investigated. A bias dependence for the enhancement of the responsivity of surface plasmon coupled devices was found, especially for the samples with non-uniform quantum wells. The non-uniform QWIPs with surface plasmon coupling showed an asymmetric enhancement with respect to the bias directions. Stronger enhancements were shown under the biases when a higher effective electric field region is close to the collector. The change of the photocarrier escape probability due to the narrow coupling bandwidth of the surface plasmon wave is attributed to this unexpected bias dependence.

  12. Magneto-Plasmonic Nanoantennas: Basics and Applications (Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Maksymov, Ivan S

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoantennas is a hot and rapidly expanding research field. Here we overview basic operating principles and applications of novel magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas, which are made of ferromagnetic metals and driven not only by light, but also by external magnetic fields. We demonstrate that magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas enhance the magneto-optical effects, which introduces additional degrees of freedom in the control of light at the nano-scale. This property is used in conceptually new devices such as magneto-plasmonic rulers, ultra-sensitive biosensors, one-way subwavelength waveguides and extraordinary optical transmission structures, as well as in novel biomedical imaging modalities. We also point out that in certain cases 'non-optical' ferromagnetic nanostructures may operate as magneto-plasmonic nanoantennas. This undesigned extra functionality capitalises on established optical characterisation techniques of magnetic nanomaterials and it may be useful for the integration of nanophotonics and nan...

  13. Trapping and guiding surface plasmons in curved graphene landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Daria; Wang, Zheng; Kivshar, Yuri S; Khanikaev, Alexander B

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that graphene placed on top of structured substrates offers a novel approach for trapping and guiding surface plasmons. A monolayer graphene with a spatially varying curvature exhibits an effective trapping potential for graphene plasmons near curved areas such as bumps, humps and wells. We derive the governing equation for describing such localized channel plasmons guided by curved graphene and validate our theory by the first-principle numerical simulations. The proposed confinement mechanism enables plasmon guiding by the regions of maximal curvature, and it offers a versatile platform for manipulating light in planar landscapes. In addition, isolated deformations of graphene such as bumps are shown to support localized surface modes and resonances suggesting a new way to engineer plasmonic metasurfaces.

  14. Nonlinear plasmonics with Kerr-like media for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, Sihon H.; Ruffin, Paul B.; Edwards, Eugene; Brantley, Christina L.

    2014-04-01

    Sensing technologies are currently needed for better maintainability, reliability, safety, and monitoring small variable changes on microscopic and nanoscale systems. Plasmonic sensor research has contributed to chemical and biological sensing needs by monitoring ultrafast temporal and spatial changes in optoelectronic systems. Nonlinear plasmonic waveguides with subwavelength confinement can further enhance the capabilities of plasmonic devices. Results in this paper highlight the derivation of the full-vector Maxwell Equations for the single metal- dielectric slot waveguide and the metal -dielectric -metal waveguide with the dielectric having a Kerr-like nonlinearity. These waveguides, typically have metallic losses that compete with nonlinearity at certain frequencies that can hinder surface plasmon wave propagation. By considering temporal and spatial beam propagation in these waveguides one expects to observe novel effects that could be used for sensing applications such as femtosecond pulse propagation with plasmon self-focusing, self-trapping, and frequency conversion with reduction in metallic losses.

  15. Optical Sensitivity Gain in Silica-Coated Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Francesco; Figus, Cristiana; Fornasari, Lucia; Patrini, Maddalena; Pellacani, Paola; Marchesini, Gerardo; Valsesia, Andrea; Artizzu, Flavia; Marongiu, Daniela; Saba, Michele; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Marabelli, Franco; Quochi, Francesco

    2014-09-04

    Ultrathin films of silica realized by sol-gel synthesis and dip-coating techniques were successfully applied to predefined metal/polymer plasmonic nanostructures to spectrally tune their resonance modes and to increase their sensitivity to local refractive index changes. Plasmon resonance spectral shifts up to 100 nm with slope efficiencies of ∼8 nm/nm for increasing layer thickness were attained. In the ultrathin layer regime (<10 nm), which could be reached by suitable dilution of the silica precursors and optimization of the deposition speed, the sensitivity of the main plasmonic resonance to refractive index changes in aqueous solution could be increased by over 50% with respect to the bare plasmonic chip. Numerical simulations supported experimental data and unveiled the mechanism responsible for the optical sensitivity gain, proving an effective tool in the design of high-performance plasmonic sensors.

  16. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  17. Nonlocal inhomogeneous broadening in plasmonic nanoparticle ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Maack, Johan Rosenkrantz; Liu, Z.

    Nonclassical effects are increasingly more relevant in plasmonics as modern nanofabrication techniques rapidly approach the extreme nanoscale limits, for which departing from classical electrodynamics becomes important. One of the largest-scale necessary corrections towards this direction...... is to abandon the local response approximation (LRA) and take the nonlocal response of the metal into account, typically through the simple hydrodynamic Drude model (HDM), which predicts a sizedependent deviation of plasmon modes from the quasistatic (QS) limit. While this behaviour has been explored for simple...... averaging through both HDM and the recent Generalized Nonlocal Optical Response (GNOR) theory, which apart from the resonance frequency shifts accounts successfully for size-dependent damping as well. We examine NPs made of either ideal Drude-like metals [of plasmon frequency (wavelength) ωp (λp...

  18. Energy and Charge Transfer in Open Plasmonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Niket

    Coherent and collective charge oscillations in metal nanoparticles (MNPs), known as localized surface plasmons, offer unprecedented control and enhancement of optical processes on the nanoscale. Since their discovery in the 1950's, plasmons have played an important role in understanding fundamental properties of solid state matter and have been used for a variety of applications, from single molecule spectroscopy to directed radiation therapy for cancer treatment. More recently, experiments have demonstrated quantum interference between optically excited plasmonic materials, opening the door for plasmonic applications in quantum information and making the study of the basic quantum mechanical properties of plasmonic structures an important research topic. This text describes a quantitatively accurate, versatile model of MNP optics that incorporates MNP geometry, local environment, and effects due to the quantum properties of conduction electrons and radiation. We build the theory from first principles, starting with a silver sphere in isolation and working our way up to complex, interacting plasmonic systems with multiple MNPs and other optical resonators. We use mathematical methods from statistical physics and quantum optics in collaboration with experimentalists to reconcile long-standing discrepancies amongst experiments probing plasmons in the quantum size regime, to develop and model a novel single-particle absorption spectroscopy, to predict radiative interference effects in entangled plasmonic aggregates, and to demonstrate the existence of plasmons in photo-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. These examples show more broadly that the theory presented is easily integrated with numerical simulations of electromagnetic scattering and that plasmonics is an interesting test-bed for approximate methods associated with multiscale systems.

  19. Modulation of multiple photon energies by use of surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passian, A.; Lereu, A. L.; Arakawa, E. T.; Wig, A.; Thundat, T.; Ferrell, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    A form of optical modulation at low pulse rates is reported in the case of surface plasmons excited by 1.55-µm photons in a thin gold foil. Several visible-photon energies are shown to be pulsed by the action of the infrared pulses, the effect being maximized when each visible beam also excites surface plasmons. The infrared surface plasmons are implicated as the primary cause of thermally induced changes in the foil. The thermal effects dissipate in sufficiently small times so that operation up to the kilohertz range in pulse repetition frequency is obtained. Unlike direct photothermal phenomena, no phase change is necessary for the effect to be observed.

  20. Plasmonic rack-and-pinion gear with chiral metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetski, Yuri; Karabchevsky, Alina

    2016-04-01

    The effect of circularly polarized beaming excited by traveling surface plasmons, via chiral metasurface is experimentally studied. Here we show that the propagation direction of the plasmonic wave, evanescently excited on the thin gold film affects the handedness of the scattered beam polarization. Nanostructured metasurface leads to excitation of localized plasmonic modes whose relative spatial orientation induces overall spin-orbit interaction. This effect is analogical to the rack-and-pinion gear: the rotational motion into the linear motion converter. From the practical point of view, the observed effect can be utilized in integrated optical circuits for communication systems, cyber security and sensing.

  1. Bidirectional bending splitter of designer surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin Zhou, Yong; Jiang, Quan; Jun Cui, Tie

    2011-09-01

    We propose and experimentally verify a bidirectional bending splitter of designer surface plasmons which is composed of two metallic gratings of trapezoid grooves. A metal wire is used to excite the designer surface plasmons propagating along the gratings. A full-wave numerical method has been used to simulate the performance of the bending splitter. The experimental verifications in the microwave frequencies have excellent agreements to the simulations. It is demonstrated that the splitter can not only split the electromagnetic waves at different frequencies, but also guide the electromagnetic waves effectively for large-angle bending.

  2. Surface Plasmon Nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    The development of advanced dielectric photonic structures has enabled tremendous control over the propagation and manipulation of light. Structures such as waveguides, splitters, mixers, and resonators now play a central role in the telecommunications industry. This book will discuss an exciting new class of photonic devices, known as surface plasmon nanophotonic structures. Surface plasmons are easily accessible excitations in metals and semiconductors and involve a collective motion of the conduction electrons. These excitations can be exploited to manipulate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies ("light") in new ways that are unthinkable in conventional dielectric structures. The field of plasmon nanophotonics is rapidly developing and impacting a wide range of areas including: electronics, photonics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The book will highlight several exciting new discoveries that have been made, while providing a clear discussion of the underlying physics, the nanofabrication issues...

  3. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    CERN Document Server

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  4. Nonlinear organic plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Fainberg, B D

    2015-01-01

    Purely organic materials with negative and near-zero dielectric permittivity can be easily fabricated. Here we develop a theory of nonlinear non-steady-state organic plasmonics with strong laser pulses. The bistability response of the electron-vibrational model of organic materials in the condensed phase has been demonstrated. Non-steady-state organic plasmonics enable us to obtain near-zero dielectric permittivity during a short time. We have proposed to use non-steady-state organic plasmonics for the enhancement of intersite dipolar energy-transfer interaction in the quantum dot wire that influences on electron transport through nanojunctions. Such interactions can compensate Coulomb repulsions for particular conditions. We propose the exciton control of Coulomb blocking in the quantum dot wire based on the non-steady-state near-zero dielectric permittivity of the organic host medium.

  5. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  6. Topographical coloured plasmonic coins

    CERN Document Server

    Guay, Jean-Michel; Côté, Guillaume; Charron, Martin; Ramunno, Lora; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The use of metal nanostructures for colourization has attracted a great deal of interest with the recent developments in plasmonics. However, the current top-down colourization methods based on plasmonic concepts are tedious and time consuming, and thus unviable for large-scale industrial applications. Here we show a bottom-up approach where, upon picosecond laser exposure, a full colour palette independent of viewing angle can be created on noble metals. We show that colours are related to a single laser processing parameter, the total accumulated fluence, which makes this process suitable for high throughput industrial applications. Statistical image analyses of the laser irradiated surfaces reveal various distributions of nanoparticle sizes which control colour. Quantitative comparisons between experiments and large-scale finite-difference time-domain computations, demonstrate that colours are produced by selective absorption phenomena in heterogeneous nanoclusters. Plasmonic cluster resonances are thus fo...

  7. Optical Isolator Utilizing Surface Plasmons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yuasa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of usage of surface plasmons in a new design of an integrated optical isolator has been studied. In the case of surface plasmons propagating at a boundary between a transition metal and a double-layer dielectric, there is a significant difference of optical loss for surface plasmons propagating in opposite directions. Utilizing this structure, it is feasible to fabricate a competitive plasmonic isolator, which benefits from a broad wavelength operational bandwidth and a good technological compatibility for integration into the Photonic Integrated Circuits (PIC. The linear dispersion relation was derived for plasmons propagating in a multilayer magneto-optical slab.

  8. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applications in the design of low-loss, large dynamic range amplitude modulation, and surface plasmon based terahertz devices.

  9. Handbook of molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Fabio Della

    2013-01-01

    While several reviews and books on surface nanophotonics and fluorescence spectroscopy are available, an updated focus on molecular plasmonics, including both theoretical methods and experimental aspects, is still lacking. This handbook is a comprehensive overview on the physics of the plasmon-emitter interaction, ranging from electromagnetism to quantum mechanics, from metal-enhanced fluorescence to surface-enhanced Raman scattering, from optical microscopy to synthesis of metal nanoparticles, filling the gap in the literature of this merging field. It allows experimentalists to have a solid

  10. Plasmonic Nanoguides and Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Modern communication systems dealing with huge amounts of data at ever increasing speed try to utilize the best aspects of electronic and optical circuits. Electronic circuits are tiny but their operation speed is limited, whereas optical circuits are extremely fast but their sizes are limited by diffraction. Waveguide components utilizing surface plasmon (SP) modes were found to combine the huge optical bandwidth and compactness of electronics, and plasmonics thereby began to be considered as the next chip-scale technology. In this book, the authors concentrate on the SP waveguide configurati

  11. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  12. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  13. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  14. Sensitive Glycoprotein Sandwich Assays by the Synergistic Effect of In Situ Generation of Raman Probes and Plasmonic Coupling of Ag Core-Au Satellite Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoshuang; Li, Xueyuan; Chen, Dong; Du, Xuezhong

    2016-05-01

    Sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assays of glycoproteins have been proposed using p-aminothiophenol (PATP)-embedded Ag core-Au satellite nanostructures modified with p-mercaptophenylboronic acid (PMBA) and the self-assembled monolayer of PMBA on a smooth gold-coated wafer. The apparent Raman probe PATP on the surfaces of the Ag cores underwent a photodimerization to generate 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) in situ upon excitation of laser, and the in situ generated DMAB acted as the actual Raman probe with considerably strong SERS signals, which was further enhanced by the plasmonic coupling of the Ag core-Au satellite nanostructures due to the synergistic effect. The sandwich assays of glycoproteins showed high sensitivity and excellent selectivity against nonglycoproteins. The Ag core-Au satellite SERS nanostructures can be used for highly sensitive SERS assays of other analytes.

  15. Effects of plasmonic coupling and electrical current on persistent photoconductivity of single-layer graphene on pristine and silver-nanoparticle-coated SiO2/Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Yi; Liang, Kengchih; Chang, Chun-Cheng; Tzeng, Yonhua

    2012-09-24

    Effects and mechanisms of conductivity variation of chemically vapor deposited single-layer graphene covering silver nanoparticles on SiO(2)/Si are reported based on blue-light (405 nm) induced plasmonic coupling and electrical current induced annealing and desorption of surface adsorbates. With 1V applied voltage, photoconductivity is positive except a brief negative period when the graphene is first illuminated by light. At 10 mV applied voltage, negative photoconductivity persists for hours. In comparison, negative photoconductivity of graphene on pristine SiO(2)/Si persists for tens of hours. When the applied voltage is increased to 1V, it takes tens of hours of light illumination to change to positive photoconductivity.

  16. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  17. Arbitrary Bending Plasmonic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Itai

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation, and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and non-paraxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field-scanning-optical-microscope.

  18. Terahertz Nonlinearity in Graphene Plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-wavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, sub-wavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a THz pump-THz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by two orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results.

  19. Supramolecular Organic Nanowires as Plasmonic Interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armao, Joseph J; Domoto, Yuya; Umehara, Teruhiko; Maaloum, Mounir; Contal, Christophe; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Decher, Gero; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-02-23

    Metallic nanostructures are able to interact with an incident electromagnetic field at subwavelength scales by plasmon resonance which involves the collective oscillation of conduction electrons localized at their surfaces. Among several possible applications of this phenomenon, the theoretical prediction is that optical circuits connecting multiple plasmonic elements will surpass classical electronic circuits at nanoscale because of their much faster light-based information processing. However, the placement and coupling of metallic elements smaller than optical wavelengths currently remain a formidable challenge by top-down manipulations. Here, we show that organic supramolecular triarylamine nanowires of ≈1 nm in diameter are able to act as plasmonic waveguides. Their self-assembly into plasmonic interconnects between arrays of gold nanoparticles leads to the bottom-up construction of basic optical nanocircuits. When the resonance modes of these metallic nanoparticles are coupled through the organic nanowires, the optical conductivity of the plasmonic layer dramatically increases from 259 to 4271 Ω(-1)·cm(-1). We explain this effect by the coupling of a hot electron/hole pair in the nanoparticle antenna with the half-filled polaronic band of the organic nanowire. We also demonstrate that the whole hybrid system can be described by using the abstraction of the lumped circuit theory, with a far field optical response which depends on the number of interconnects. Overall, our supramolecular bottom-up approach opens the possibility to implement processable, soft, and low cost organic plasmonic interconnects into a large number of applications going from sensing to metamaterials and information technologies.

  20. On the optical properties of plasmonic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Langhammer, Christoph; Apell, S. Peter

    2014-12-01

    We report on the optical properties of plasmonic glasses which are metal-dielectric composites composed of metallic inclusions in a host dielectric medium. The investigated structures are of quasi-random nature, described by the pair correlation function, featuring a minimum center-to-center distance between metallic inclusions and long range randomness. Plasmonic glasses exhibiting short-range order only may be fabricated using bottom-up, self-assembly methods and have been utilized in a number of applications such as plasmonic sensing or plasmon-enhanced solar harvesting, and may be also employed for certain non-linear applications. It is therefore important to quantify their properties. Using theoretical methods we investigate optical of 1D, 2D, and 3D structures composed of amorphous distributions of metallic spheres. It is shown, that the response of the constituent element, i.e. the single sphere localized surface plasmon resonance, is modified by the scattered fields of the other spheres in such a way that its peak position, peak amplitude, and full-width at half-maximum exhibit damped oscillations. The oscillation amplitude is set by the particle density and for the peak position may vary by up to 0.3 eV in the optical regime. Using a modified coupled dipole approach we calculate the effective (average) polarizability of plasmonic glasses and discuss their spectra as a function of the dimensionality, angle of incidence and polarization, and the minimum center-to-center distance. The analytical model is complemented and validated by T-Matrix calculations of the optical cross-sections of amorphous arrays of metallic spheres obtained using a modification of the Random Sequential Adsorption algorithm for lines, surfaces, and volumes.

  1. Topological collective plasmons in bipartite chains of metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Charles A.; Weick, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We study a bipartite linear chain constituted by spherical metallic nanoparticles, where each nanoparticle supports a localized surface plasmon. The near-field dipolar interaction between the localized surface plasmons gives rise to collective plasmons, which are extended over the whole nanoparticle array. We derive analytically the spectrum and the eigenstates of the collective plasmonic excitations. At the edge of the Brillouin zone, the spectrum is of a pseudorelativistic nature similar to that present in the electronic band structure of polyacetylene. We find the effective Dirac Hamiltonian for the collective plasmons and show that the corresponding spinor eigenstates represent one-dimensional Dirac-like massive bosonic excitations. Therefore, the plasmonic lattice exhibits similar effects to those found for electrons in one-dimensional Dirac materials, such as the ability for transmission with highly suppressed backscattering due to Klein tunneling. We also show that the system is governed by a nontrivial Zak phase, which predicts the manifestation of edge states in the chain. When two dimerized chains with different topological phases are connected, we find the appearance of the bosonic version of a Jackiw-Rebbi midgap state. We further investigate the radiative and nonradiative lifetimes of the collective plasmonic excitations and comment on the challenges for experimental realization of the topological effects found theoretically.

  2. Plasmon transmutation: inducing new modes in nanoclusters by adding dielectric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Ye, Jian; Liu, Na; Van Dorpe, Pol; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-09-12

    Planar clusters of coupled plasmonic nanoparticles support nanoscale electromagnetic "hot spots" and coherent effects, such as Fano resonances, with unique near and far field signatures, currently of prime interest for sensing applications. Here we show that plasmonic cluster properties can be substantially modified by the addition of individual, discrete dielectric nanoparticles at specific locations on the cluster, introducing new plasmon modes, or transmuting existing plasmon modes to new ones, in the resulting metallodielectric nanocomplex. Depositing a single carbon nanoparticle in the junction between a pair of adjacent nanodisks induces a metal-dielectric-metal quadrupolar plasmon mode. In a ten-membered cluster, placement of several carbon nanoparticles in junctions between multiple adjacent nanoparticles introduces a collective magnetic plasmon mode into the Fano dip, giving rise to an additional subradiant mode in the metallodielectric nanocluster response. These examples illustrate that adding dielectric nanoparticles to metallic nanoclusters expands the number and types of plasmon modes supported by these new mixed-media nanoscale assemblies.

  3. Plasmonics light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are waves propagating at the interface between a metal and a dielectric and, due to their tight confinement, may be used for nanoscale control of the light propagation. Thus, photonic integrated circuits can benefit from devices using SPPs because of their highly...

  4. Photocatalysis: Plasmonic solar desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Li, Yat

    2016-06-01

    The sustainability of many existing desalination technologies is questionable. Plasmon-mediated solar desalination has now been demonstrated for the first time, using an aluminium structure that absorbs photons spanning the 200 nm to 2,500 nm wavelength range, and is both cheap and 'clean'.

  5. Aluminum for Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    in plasmon-enhanced light harvesting,14 photocatalysis ,511 surface- enhanced spectroscopies,1216 optics-based sensing,1722 nonlinear optics,2326...optical response of Al nanoparticles has appeared inconsistent relative to calculated spectra, even forwell-characterized geometries. Some studies have...model- ing their optical response. These results pro- vide a method for estimating the metallic purity of aluminum nanoparticles directly from their

  6. Cathodoluminescence plasmon microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuttge, M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic waves that are strongly coupled to the collective oscillation of free electrons at an interface between a dielectric and a metal. Strong confinement of the electromagnetic field and tunability of SPP dispersion allow two-dimensional optics. This

  7. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    -beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...

  8. Titanium nitride based hybrid plasmonic-photonic waveguides for on-chip plasmonic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, A.; Saha, S.; Kinsey, N.; Guler, U.; Shalaev, V. M.; Boltasseva, A.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past few decades, photonic technologies have emerged as a promising technology for data communications. They offer advantages such as high data bandwidths at comparable or even lower power consumption than electronics. However, photonic integrated circuits suffer from the diffraction limit of light which is a major obstacle in achieving small device footprints and densely packed on-chip interconnects. In recent years, plasmonics has emerged as a possible solution for densely packed on-chip nanophotonic circuitry. The field of plasmonics deals with oscillations of free electrons in a metal coupled to an electromagnetic field. The large wave-vector associated with these oscillations enables light to be localized in volumes much smaller than the diffraction limit. Consequently, there have been many demonstrations of plasmonic interconnects for on-chip communications, using well known metals such as gold and silver. However these materials are not CMOS compatible and hence their use is not technologically feasible. The growing need for plasmonic materials which are robust, cost-effective, and CMOS-compatible has led to the study of alternate plasmonic materials. For the visible and near infrared ranges, transition metal nitrides have been shown to be suitable metals for plasmonic applications These materials have optical properties comparable to that of gold and are CMOS-compatible, hence, they can be easily integrated into a silicon platform for on-chip applications. In this work, we demonstrate titanium nitride based plasmonic interconnects in an all-solid state geometry which can be easily integrated on a silicon platform.

  9. Morphology dependent two photon absorption in plasmonic structures and plasmonic-organic hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Kaweri; Ray, Bhumika; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Sharma, Parag

    2017-05-01

    Two photon absorption coefficients of two distinct plasmonic structures, namely, gold nanoflowers (GNF) and gold nanopebbles (GNP) have been investigated and compared with conventional gold nanospheres (GNS). All three different nanoshapes were synthesized by changing the reaction solvent under the same experimental procedure. Further, hybrids of these plasmonic structures were prepared with an organic dye Eosin yellow (EY), to investigate the morphology effect of plasmonic structures on plasmonic-organic hybrids in terms of their linear extinction spectra and two photon absorption coefficients. The NLO investigations were conducted using 20 ps laser pulses of wavelength 532 nm as an excitation source in single beam Z-scan setup. UV/visible spectroscopy was employed for monitoring plasmon resonances and changes in linear extinction spectra. The experimental outcomes revealed two photon absorption coefficients of EY increased 120%, 32% and 39%, while 69%, 60% and 53% enhancement in the peaks of linear extinction maxima of EY has been observed, when hybridized with GNF, GNS and GNP, respectively. This boost in the optical coefficients may be attributed to dimerization of EY molecules on the surface of nanoparticles. Keeping the toxicity of EY in view, we propose that the two photon absorption coefficients of this dye and control thereof, by the addition of plasmonic structures would be helpful not only in understanding the interactions between plasmons and fluorophore, but also pave an efficient way, to reduce the operative concentration of this hazardous dye in a wide range of applications and thereby, mitigating the environmental degradation caused by its highly concentrated effluents.

  10. Plasmonics based micro/nano manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Quincy

    the metal layer. The surface plasmons allow for features well below the wavelength of the incident light to be produced. Along with this technique, a unique texturing effect was discovered using the same photomask and 400 nm UV lamp source. The developed technique promises to greatly reduce the cost and complexity of sub-100 nm photolithography using only a UV light source and the novel plasmonic photomask.

  11. The properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals based on the magneto-optical Voigt effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu, Shao-Bin, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Tang, Yi-Jun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the properties of the extraordinary mode and surface plasmon modes in the three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) with face-centered-cubic lattices that are composed of the core tellurium (Te) spheres with surrounded by the homogeneous magnetized plasma shells inserted in the air, are theoretically investigated in detail by the plane wave expansion method, as the magneto-optical Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is perpendicular to the external magnetic field at any time). The optical switching or wavelength division multiplexer can be realized by the proposed 3D MPPCs. Our analyses demonstrate that the complete photonic band gaps (PBGs) and two flatbands regions for the extraordinary mode can be observed obviously. PBGs can be tuned by the radius of core Te sphere, the plasma density and the external magnetic field. The flatbands regions are determined by the existence of surface plasmon modes. Numerical simulations also show that if the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is larger than a threshold value, the band structures of the extraordinary mode will be similar to those obtained from the same structure containing the pure magnetized plasma spheres. In this case, the band structures also will not be affected by the inserted core spheres. It is also provided that the upper edges of two flatbands regions will not depend on the topology of lattice. However, the frequencies of lower edges of two flatbands regions will be convergent to the different constants for different lattices, as the thickness of magnetized plasma shell is close to zero.

  12. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  13. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Dominic; Carrier, Dominic; Jiménez, Alvaro; Beauvais, Jacques; Dubowski, Jan J

    2011-05-17

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  14. Ultrafast Surface Plasmonic Switch in Non-Plasmonic Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Bévillon, E; Recoules, V; Zhang, H; Li, C; Stoian, R

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast carrier excitation can drastically affect electronic structures and induce brief surface plasmonic response in non-plasmonic metals, potentially creating a plasmonic switch. Using first-principles molecular dynamics and Kubo-Greenwood formalism for laser-excited tungsten we show that carrier heating mobilizes d electrons into collective inter and intraband transitions leading to a sign flip in the imaginary optical conductivity, activating plasmonic properties for the initial non-plasmonic phase. The drive for the optical evolution can be visualized as an increasingly damped quasi-resonance at visible frequencies for pumping carriers across a chemical potential located in a d-band pseudo-gap with energy-dependent degree of occupation. The subsequent evolution of optical indices for the excited material is confirmed by time-resolved ultrafast ellipsometry. The large optical tunability extends the existence spectral domain of surface plasmons in ranges typically claimed in laser se...

  15. Young's modulus measurement based on surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfalian, Ali; Jandaghian, Ali; Saghafifar, Hossein; Mohajerani, Ezzedin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, Young's modulus of polymers is experimentally measured using pressure sensors based on surface plasmon polariton. Theoretical relationships of changes in polymer reflective index due to applying pressure are investigated as well as the dependence of surface plasmon to the polymer reflective index. For the purpose of investigating the effects of the layers thicknesses, numerical simulation is performed using transfer matrix. Changes in resonance angle of surface plasmon due to applying pressure are experimentally studied as well. Practically, a sample of silicon rubber, as one of the most widely-used polymers, is checked and its Young's modulus is measured as 8.1 MPa.

  16. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 15......, 30 and 45 nm. The fabrication process of such plasmonic waveguides with width in the range of 1-100 μm and their quality inspection are described. The results of optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides using a high power laser with the peak power wavelength 1064 nm show significant deviation...

  17. Propagation of plasmons in designed single crystalline silver nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Shailesh; Lu, Ying-Wei; Huck, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate propagation of plasmons in single crystalline silver nanostructures fabricated using a combination of a bottom-up and a top-down approach. Silver nanoplates of thickness around 65 nm and a surface area of about 100 μm2 are made using a wet chemical method. Silver nanotips...... and nanowires are then sculptured by focused ion beam milling. The plasmons are excited by using the fluorescence from the redeposited silver clusters during the milling process. Propagation of plasmons in the nanowires is observed in the visible spectral region. We also observe a cavity effect by measuring...

  18. Fluorescence excitation by enhanced plasmon upconversion under continuous wave illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasgin, Mehmet Emre; Salakhutdinov, Ildar; Kendziora, Dania; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Turkpence, Deniz; Piantanida, Luca; Fruk, Ljiljana; Lazzarino, Marco; Bek, Alpan

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate effective background-free continuous wave nonlinear optical excitation of molecules that are sandwiched between asymmetrically constructed plasmonic gold nanoparticle clusters. We observe that near infrared photons are converted to visible photons through efficient plasmonic second harmonic generation. Our theoretical model and simulations demonstrate that Fano resonances may be responsible for being able to observe nonlinear conversion using a continuous wave light source. We show that nonlinearity enhancement of plasmonic nanostructures via coupled quantum mechanical oscillators such as molecules can be several orders larger as compared to their classical counterparts.

  19. Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbazyan, Tigran V

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantum-mechanical theory for Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures larger that the characteristic length for nonlocal effects. We show that the electron surface scattering, which facilitates plasmon decay in small nanostructures, can be incorporated into the metal dielectric function on par with phonon and impurity scattering. The derived surface scattering rate is determined by the plasmon local field polarization relative to the metal surface, and is highly sensitive to the system geometry. We illustrate our model by providing analytical results for surface scattering rate in some common shape nanostructures.

  20. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage Dominic; Carrier Dominic; Jiménez Alvaro; Beauvais Jacques; Dubowski Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral r...

  1. Chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics: an optical near-field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zebo; Wang, Weiliang; Ma, Teng; Deng, Zexiang; Ke, Yanlin; Zhan, Runze; Zou, Qionghui; Ren, Wencai; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Huanjun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-10-01

    One of the most fascinating and important merits of graphene plasmonics is their tunability over a wide range. While chemical doping has proven to be a facile and effective way to create graphene plasmons, most of the previous studies focused on the macroscopic behaviors of the plasmons in chemically-doped graphene and little was known about their nanoscale responses and related mechanisms. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first experimental near-field optical study on chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics. By using a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM), we managed to show that the graphene plasmons can be tuned and improved using a facile chemical doping method. Specifically, the plasmon interference patterns near the edge of the monolayer graphene were substantially enhanced via nitric acid (HNO3) exposure. The plasmon-related characteristics can be deduced by analyzing such plasmonic fringes, which exhibited a longer plasmon wavelength and reduced plasmon damping rate. In addition, the local carrier density and therefore the Fermi energy level (EF) of graphene can be obtained from the plasmonic nano-imaging, which indicated that the enhanced plasmon oscillation originated from the injection of free holes into graphene by HNO3. These findings were further corroborated by theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT). We believe that our findings provide a clear nanoscale picture on improving graphene plasmonics by chemical doping, which will be helpful for optimizing graphene plasmonics and for elucidating the mechanisms of two-dimensional light confinement by atomically thick materials.

  2. Mechanically tunable terahertz graphene plasmonics using soft metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Xin; Zang, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    This letter presents a new approach to continuously tune the resonances of graphene plasmons in terahertz soft metasurface. The continuous tunability of plasmon resonance is either unachievable in conventional plasmonic materials like noble metals or requires gate voltage regulation in graphene. Here we investigate a simplest form of terahertz metasurface, graphene nanoribbon arrays (GNRAs), and demonstrate the graphene plasmon resonance modes can be tailored by mechanical deformation of the elastomeric substrate using finite element method (FEM). By integrating the electric doping with substrate deformation, we have managed to tune the resonance wavelength from 13.7 to 50.6 μm. The 36.9 μm tuning range is nearly doubled compared with that by electric doping regulation only. Moreover, we observe the plasmon coupling effect in GNRAs on waved substrate and its evolution with substrate curvature. A new decoupling mechanism enabled by the out-of-plane separation of the adjacent ribbons is revealed. The out-of-plane setup of plasmonic components extends the fabrication of plasmonic devices into three-dimensional space, which simultaneously increases the nanoribbon density and decreases the coupling strength. Our findings provide an additional degree of freedom to design reconfigurable metasurfaces and metadevices.

  3. Simulation of dark-field imaging of micro-calcifications in human breast tissue with X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, A.; Anton, G.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Weber, T.; Zang, A.; Michel, T.

    2014-05-01

    A simulation of dark-field imaging of sub-resolution structures with X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry is presented. Data obtained from the simulation shows good agreement to a signal found in the dark-field image of a surgically removed sample of human breast tissue containing micro calcifications. A measure for the type of micro calcifications is introduced which can be calculated from dark-field signals. In a further analysis of the simulated data, it can be shown that the measure can be used to discriminate between different calcifications types.

  4. Plasmon Enhanced Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-08

    Next generation ultrabright light sources will operate at megahertz repetition rates with temporal resolution in the attosecond regime. For an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) to operate at such repetition rate requires a high quantum efficiency (QE) cathode to produce electron bunches of 300 pC per 1.5 μJ incident laser pulse. Semiconductor photocathodes have sufficient QE in the ultraviolet (UV) and the visible spectrum, however, they produce picosecond electron pulses due to the electron-phonon scattering. On the other hand, metals have two orders of magnitude less QE, but can produce femtosecond pulses, that are required to form the optimum electron distribution for high efficiency FEL operation. In this work, a novel metallic photocathode design is presented, where a set of nano-cavities is introduced on the metal surface to increase its QE to meet the FEL requirements, while maintaining the fast time response. Photoemission can be broken up into three steps: (1) photon absorption, (2) electron transport to the surface, and (3) crossing the metal-vacuum barrier. The first two steps can be improved by making the metal completely absorbing and by localizing the fields closer to the metal surface, thereby reducing the electron travel distance. Both of these effects can be achieved by coupling the incident light to an electron density wave on the metal surface, represented by a quasi-particle, the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP). The photoemission then becomes a process where the photon energy is transferred to an SPP and then to an electron. The dispersion relation for the SPP defines the region of energies where such process can occur. For example, for gold, the maximum SPP energy is 2.4 eV, however, the work function is 5.6 eV, therefore, only a fourth order photoemission process is possible. In such process, four photons excite four plasmons that together excite only one electron. The yield of such non-linear process depends strongly on the light intensity. In

  5. Plasmon-Exciton-Polariton Lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I; Feist, Johannes; Rodriguez, Said Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J; Gómez-Rivas, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of Frenkel excitons with surface plasmons leads to the formation of bosonic quasi-particles known as plasmon-exciton-polaritons (PEPs).Localized surface plasmons in nanoparticles are lossy due to radiative and nonradiative decays, which has hampered the realization of polariton lasing in a plasmonic system, i.e., PEP lasing. These losses can be reduced in collective plasmonic resonances supported by arrays of nanoparticles. Here we demonstrate PEP lasing in arrays of silver nanoparticles by showing the emergence of a threshold in the photoluminescence accompanied by both a superlinear increase of the emission and spectral narrowing. We also observe a reduction of the threshold by increasing the coupling between the molecular excitons and the resonances supported by the array despite the reduction of the quantum efficiency of the emitters. The coexistence of bright and dark collective modes in this plasmonic system allows for a 90?-change of polarization in the emission beyond the threshold.

  6. Interband Plasmonics with p-block Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Toudert, Johann

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the near-ultraviolet visible plasmonic properties of three elemental materials from the p-block: Bi, Sb and Ga, with the aim to achieve and exploit unconventional plasmonic effects beyond those provided by noble metals. At such aim, we review and analyze a broad range of optically-determined dielectric functions e of these elemental materials available in the literature, covering a wide photon energy range (from 0.03 to 24 eV). It is shown that the contribution of Drude-like carriers to e1 (real part of e) in the near-ultraviolet visible is negligible for Bi and Sb and moderate for Ga. In contrast, the interband transitions of these elemental materials show a high oscillator strength that yields a strong negative contribution to e1 in the near-ultraviolet visible. Therefore in these materials interband transitions are not a mere damping channel detrimental to plasmonic properties. Remarkably, these interband transitions induce fully (partially) the localized surface plasmon-like r...

  7. The Effect of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer on Two-Plasmon Decay in Direct-Drive Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Henchen, R. J.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Solodov, A. A.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J. G.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) in direct-drive implosions was shown to increase the hot electrons generated by two-plasmon decay. Reducing the diameter of the laser spots by 30% significantly reduces CBET and the laser absorption was measured to increase from 75% to nearly 90%. The reduced CBET leads to higher intensity at the quarter-critical density surface, increasing the hot-electron production by a factor of 7 . Adding a thin layer (0.6 to 1.1 μm) of Si to the target ablator reduced the hot-electron fraction by a factor of 2 . Spatially resolved Thomson-scattering measurements show an 15 % increase in the electron temperature and an increase in the Si fraction at the quarter-critical surface when the Si layer is added. Three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations of hot-electron production using the code LPSE show that in addition to the reduced gain (smaller ILn Te), the observed reduction in hot electrons results from increased electron-ion collision frequencies and reduced Landau damping of ion-acoustic waves. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Effective approach to strengthen plasmon resonance localized on top surfaces of Ag nanoparticles and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zhibing; Xu, Rui; Zheng, Xianzheng; Fu, Qun; Wu, Minghong; Lei, Yong

    2016-11-01

    The spatial distribution of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) plays a key role in many plasmonic applications. Based on the thermal stability of alumina templates, this work reports a novel approach to manipulate the distribution of LSPR and exhibits its significance for an important plasmonic application, the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A suitable thermal annealing sharpens the edges in top surfaces (far from the substrates) of Ag nanoparticles, which significantly strengthens the distal mode (DM) with the LSPR excited on the top surfaces. Because the top surface is the major place to adsorb probe molecules, this manipulation greatly improves the detection sensitivity of SERS. Our research provides a new way to improve the sensitivity of SERS, which also indicates that great care has to be taken on special LSPR mode which is largely responsible for a certain plasmonic application (e.g., the DM for SERS although it is not the major mode).

  9. Graphene plasmons embedded in a gain medium: layer and ribbon plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altares Menendez, Galaad; Rosolen, Gilles; Maes, Bjorn

    2016-12-01

    Graphene plasmonics has attracted much attention due to its remarkable properties such as tunable conductivity and extreme confinement. However, losses remain one of the major drawbacks to developing more efficient devices based on graphene plasmons. Here we show that when a gain medium is introduced around a 1D graphene sheet, lossless propagation can be achieved for a critical gain value. Both numerics and analytics are employed; and with the Drude approximation the analytical expression for this critical gain becomes remarkably simple. Furthermore, we examine a single 2D graphene nanoribbon within a gain environment. We report that the plasmonic resonant modes exhibit a spasing effect for a specific value of the surrounding gain. This feature is indicated by an absorption cross section that strongly increases and narrows. Finally, we manage to connect the ribbon results to the 1D sheet critical gain, by taking external coupling into account.

  10. Collective plasmon modes in a compositionally asymmetric nanoparticle dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyi Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon coupling phenomenon of heterodimers composed of silver, gold and copper nanoparticles of 60 nm in size and spherical in shape were studied theoretically within the scattered field formulation framework. In-phase dipole coupled σ-modes were observed for the Ag-Au and Ag-Cu heterodimers, and an antiphase dipole coupled π-mode was observed for the Ag-Au heterodimer. These observations agree well with the plasmon hybridization theory. However, quadrupole coupled modes dominate the high energy wavelength range from 357-443 nm in the scattering cross section of the D=60 nm Ag-Au and Ag-Cu heterodimer. We demonstrate for the first time that collective plasmon modes in a compositionally asymmetric nanoparticle dimer have to be predicted from the dipole-dipole approximation of plasmon hybridization theory together with the interband transition effect of the constitutive metals and the retardation effect of the nanoparticle size.

  11. Broadband Excitation and Active Control of Terahertz Plasmons in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Khorrami, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A novel broadband technique to effectively launch plasmons along a single graphene layer at terahertz (THz) frequencies is proposed. To this end, the coupling of the electromagnetic wave from a readily available plasmonic waveguide established by a periodically corrugated metallic surface to the graphene sheet is proposed. As will be shown, this technique can significantly surmount the need for efficient excitation of plasmons in graphene. For this purpose, an analytical technique based on transmission line theory is employed to calculate the scattering parameters of the connection of the plasmonic waveguides. In this manner, the gating effects of the graphene waveguide on the input reflection and transmission of the junction are also investigated. For comparison, a full wave numerical simulator is employed.

  12. Searching for better plasmonic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, P.; Ishii, S.; Naik, G.;

    2010-01-01

    Plasmonics is a research area merging the fields of optics and nanoelectronics by confining light with relatively large free-space wavelength to the nanometer scale - thereby enabling a family of novel devices. Current plasmonic devices at telecommunication and optical frequencies face significant...... challenges due to losses encountered in the constituent plasmonic materials. These large losses seriously limit the practicality of these metals for many novel applications. This paper provides an overview of alternative plasmonic materials along with motivation for each material choice and important aspects...

  13. An Introduction to Graphene Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, P.A.D.; Peres, N. M. R.

    This book is meant as an introduction to graphene plasmonics and aims at the advanced undergraduate and graduate students entering the field of plasmonics in graphene. In it different theoretical methods are introduced, starting with an elementary description of graphene plasmonics and evolving...... the chapters to get acquainted with the field of plasmonics in graphene or reading the chapters and studying the appendices to get a working knowledge of the topic. The study of the material in this book will bring the students to the forefront of the research in this field....

  14. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individ...

  15. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch

    OpenAIRE

    Emboras, A.; Niegemann, J.; Ma, P.; Haffner, C; Pedersen, A.; Luisier, M.; Hafner, C.; Schimmel, T.; Leuthold, J.

    2016-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore’s law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocat...

  16. Linear and Nonlinear Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Capretti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the present Thesis, the electromagnetic properties of metal nanostructures are theoretically and experimentally investigated, for applications ranging from chemical sensing to integrated optical devices. Collective resonances of the conduction electrons occur on the surface of metal particles with nanoscale sizes, if visible or infrared light interacts with them. These resonances, usually referred to as Localized Surface Plasmons (LSPs), are able to confine the incident light into regions...

  17. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  18. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  19. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  20. Quantum Statistics of Surface Plasmon Polaritons in Metallic Stripe Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Di Martino, Giuliana; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Tame, Mark; Özdemir, Şahin K; Kim, M S; Maier, Stefan A

    2012-01-01

    Single surface plasmon polaritons are excited using photons generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The mean excitation rates, intensity correlations and Fock state populations are studied. The observed dependence of the second order coherence in our experiment is consistent with a linear uncorrelated Markovian environment in the quantum regime. Our results provide important information about the effect of loss for assessing the potential of plasmonic waveguides for future nanophotonic circuitry in the quantum regime.

  1. Electrical Modulation of Fano Resonance in Plasmonic Nanostructures Using Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Kildishev, Alexander V.;

    2014-01-01

    Pauli blocking of interband transistions gives rise to tunable optical properties in single layer graphene (SLG). This effect is exploited in a graphene-nanoantenna hybrid device where Fano resonant plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated on top of a graphene sheet. The use of Fano resonant......-element simulations. Our approach can be used for development of next generation of tunable plasmonic and hybrid nanophotonic devices....

  2. Plasmonic shock waves and solitons in a nanoring

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We apply the hydrodynamic theory of electron liquid to demonstrate that a circularly polarized radiation induces the diamagnetic, helicity-sensitive dc current in a ballistic nanoring. This current is dramatically enhanced in the vicinity of plasmonic resonances. The resulting magnetic moment of the nanoring represents a giant increase of the inverse Faraday effect. With increasing radiation intensity, linear plasmonic excitations evolve into the strongly non-linear plasma shock waves. These ...

  3. Accumulation-layer surface plasmons in transparent conductive oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardad, Shima; Alexander Ramos, E; Salandrino, Alessandro

    2017-05-15

    A rigorous analytical study of the eigenmodes supported by a charge accumulation layer within a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) is presented. The new class of surface plasmons termed accumulation-layer surface plasmons (ASPs) is introduced. Near resonance ASPs are tightly bound and display a vast effective index tunability that could be of great practical interest. The suppression of ASPs in the presence of epsilon-near zero regions is discussed.

  4. Using of the surface plasmon resonance cytosensor for real-time and non-invasive monitoring of cellular effects in living C6 cells induced by PMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Developing novel instruments and technologies for spatio-temporal and dynamic measurements of the intricate cellular effects involving molecular translocation, signal transduction, and molecular interactions inside living cells is essential for the cell and molecular biology science. For the purpose of monitoring and investigating molecular events in living cells at real-time, the surface plasmon resonance based cytosensor (SBCS) for cell culturing and signal monitoring was established, and on the basis of it, the corresponding technology was also established by monitoring and analyzing SPR responses induced in rat C6 glioma cells by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The SPR signals induced by PMA in living C6 cells were significantly different from those groups without cells. These responses were strongly dependent on and saturable to the concentrations of PMA, and could be suppressed by the specific and potent PKC inhibitors, which indicated that the measured signal could be the reflection of the redistribution of intracellular components near the cell membrane triggered by the activation of PKC. This research provides a quantitative and non-invasive technique to study the spatio-temporal characteristics of the cellular effects in living cells at real-time. Furthermore, this technology could also be widely used in the basic research as well as applied realms, such as space effects evaluation, environmental safety assessment, biological weapon detection, cellular and molecular research, and drug screening.

  5. The assesment of effectiveness of plasmonic resonance photothermal therapy in tumor-bearing rats after multiple intravenous administration of gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla B.; Maslyakova, Galina N.; Navolokin, Nikita A.; Terentyuk, Georgy S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPT) multiple intravenous strategy of gold nanorods (GNRs) administration was used before laser exposure. The model of alveolar liver cancer PC-1 was used in male outbred albino rats, which were intravenously administrated by single and multiple injections of GNRs and then were treated by PPT. The gold dosage was 400 μg (single injection group), 800 μg (double injection group), 1200 μg (triple injection group), and absorption maximum of gold nanorods suspension was at the wavelength of 808 nm. 24 hours after last injection the tumors were irradiated by the 808-nm diode laser during 15 min at power density 2.3 W/cm2. Temperature control of the tumor heating was provided by IR imager. 24 hours after the PPT the half of animals from each group was withdrawn from the experiments and the sampling tumor tissue for morphological study was performed. In survived animals the growth of tumors was evaluated during 21 days after the PPT. The antitumor effects of PPT after triple intravenous injection were comparable with those obtained at direct intratumoral administration of similar total dose of GNRs. The effectiveness of PPT depended on gold accumulation in tumor, probably, due to sufficient vascularization of tumor tissue.

  6. Controlling successive ionic layer absorption and reaction cycles to optimize silver nanoparticle-induced localized surface plasmon resonance effects on the paper strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Wansun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates why a silver nanoparticle (SNP)-induced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) paper chip fabricated at low successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles leads to a high SERS enhancement factor (7 × 108) with an inferior nanostructure and without generating a hot spot effect. The multi-layered structure of SNPs on cellulose fibers, verified by magnified scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed by a computational simulation method, was hypothesized as the reason. The pattern of simulated local electric field distribution with respect to the number of SILAR cycles showed good agreement with the experimental Raman intensity, regardless of the wavelength of the excitation laser sources. The simulated enhancement factor at the 785-nm excitation laser source (2.8 × 109) was 2.5 times greater than the experimental enhancement factor (1.1 × 109). A 532-nm excitation laser source exhibited the highest maximum local electric field intensity (1.9 × 1011), particularly at the interparticle gap called a hot spot. The short wavelength led to a strong electric field intensity caused by strong electromagnetic coupling arising from the SNP-induced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects through high excitation energy. These findings suggest that our paper-based SILAR-fabricated SNP-induced LSPR model is valid for understanding SNP-induced LSPR effects.

  7. Graphene plasmonics: physics and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shenyang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon in graphene possesses many unique properties. It originates from the collective motion of massless Dirac fermions, and the carrier density dependence is distinctively different from conventional plasmons. In addition, graphene plasmon is highly tunable and shows strong energy confinement capability. Most intriguingly, as an atom-thin layer, graphene and its plasmon are very sensitive to the immediate environment. Graphene plasmons strongly couple to polar phonons of the substrate, molecular vibrations of the adsorbates, and lattice vibrations of other atomically thin layers. In this review, we present the most important advances in graphene plasmonics field. The topics include terahertz plasmons, mid-infrared plasmons, plasmon-phonon interactions, and potential applications. Graphene plasmonics opens an avenue for reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces; it is an exciting and promising new subject in the nanophotonics and plasmonics research field.

  8. Molecular imaging and sensing using plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Matthew James

    Noble metal nanoparticles exhibit unique optical properties that are beneficial to a variety of applications, including molecular imaging. The large scattering cross sections of nanoparticles provide high contrast necessary for biomarkers. Unlike alternative contrast agents, nanoparticles provide refractive index sensitivity revealing information regarding the local cellular environment. Altering the shape and composition of the nanoparticle shifts the peak resonant wavelength of scattered light, allowing for implementation of multiple spectrally distinct tags. In this project, nanoparticles that scatter in different spectral windows are functionalized with various antibodies recognizing extra-cellular receptors integral to cancer progression. A hyperspectral imaging system is developed, allowing for visualization and spectral characterization of cells labeled with these conjugates. Various molecular imaging and microspectroscopy applications of plasmonic nanoparticles are then investigated. First, anti-EGFR gold nanospheres are shown to quantitatively measure receptor expression with similar performance to fluorescence assays. Second, anti-EGFR gold nanorods and novel anti-IGF-1R silver nanospheres are implemented to indicate local cellular refractive indices. Third, because biosensing capabilities of nanoparticle tags may be limited by plasmonic coupling, polarization mapping is investigated as a method to discern these effects. Fourth, plasmonic coupling is tested to monitor HER-2 dimerization. Experiments reveal the interparticle conformation of proximal HER-2 bound labels, required for plasmonic coupling-enhanced dielectric sensing. Fifth, all three functionalized plasmonic tags are implemented simultaneously to indicate clinically relevant cell immunophenotype information and changes in the cellular dielectric environment. Finally, flow cytometry experiments are conducted utilizing the anti-EGFR nanorod tag to demonstrate profiling of receptor expression

  9. Thermo-Plasmonics for Localized Graphitization and Welding of Polymeric Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnaf Usman Zillohu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in modulating the temperature under the illumination of light. As a heat source, metal nanoparticles (NPs have played an important role to pave the way for a new branch of plasmonics, i.e., thermo-plasmonics. While thermo-plasmonics have been well established in photo-thermal therapy, it has received comparatively less attention in materials science and chemistry. Here, we demonstrate the first proof of concept experiment of local chemistry and graphitization of metalized polymeric nanofibers through thermo-plasmonic effect. In particular, by tuning the plasmonic absorption of the nanohybrid through a change in the thickness of the deposited silver film on the fibers, the thermo-plasmonic effect can be adjusted in such a way that high enough temperature is generated enabling local welding and graphitization of the polymeric nanofibers.

  10. Tunable Omnidirectional Surface Plasmon Resonance in Cylindrical Plasmonic Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi; WANG Bing; ZHOU Zhi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ The tunable omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance in the optical range is theoretically demonstrated in a cylindrical plasmonic crystal by using rigorous coupled-wave analysis.The cylindrical plasmonic crystal consists of an infinite chain of two-dimensional cylindrical metal-dielectric-dielectric-metal structures.The dispersion relation of the cylindrical plasmonic crystal is obtained by calculating the absorptance as a function of a TM-polarized incident plane wave and its in-plane wave vector.The omnidirectional surface plasmon resonance can be tuned from UV region to visible region by adjusting the thickness of the cylindrical dielectric layers.The absorption spectrum of the infinite chain of nanocylinders is also investigated for comparison.

  11. Excitation of a surface plasmon with an elastomeric grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, A.; Dâna, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2006-07-01

    We report on a new method to excite surface plasmon polaritons on a thin metal slab surface using an elastomeric grating which is fabricated by replica molding technique. The grating is placed on the metal surface which creates a periodic perturbation on the surface matching the momentum of the incident light to that of the surface plasmon. The conformal contact between the metal surface and the elastomeric grating changes the dielectric medium periodically and allows the observation of an effective surface plasmon polariton at the metal-air and metal-polymer interfaces of the grating. To clarify the nature of the observed plasmon, comparison of the elastomeric grating with elastomeric slabs was performed with the attenuated total reflection method.

  12. Anisotropic plasmons, excitons, and electron energy loss spectroscopy of phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Barun; Kumar, Piyush; Thakur, Anmol; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh; Bhowmick, Somnath; Agarwal, Amit

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we explore the anisotropic electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) in monolayer phosphorene based on ab initio time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations. Similarly to black phosphorus, the EELS of undoped monolayer phosphorene is characterized by anisotropic excitonic peaks for energies in the vicinity of the band gap and by interband plasmon peaks for higher energies. On doping, an additional intraband plasmon peak also appears for energies within the band gap. Similarly to other two-dimensional systems, the intraband plasmon peak disperses as ωpl∝√{q } in both the zigzag and armchair directions in the long-wavelength limit and deviates for larger wave vectors. The anisotropy of the long-wavelength plasmon intraband dispersion is found to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ratio of the effective masses: ωpl(q y ̂) /ωpl(q x ̂) =√{mx/my } .

  13. Design guideline for plasmonic 16-QAM optical modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-mfrji, Alhuda A.; Tawfeeq, Shelan K.; Fyath, Raad S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design and investigation of 16-QAM optical modulator based on plasmonic-polymer hybrid slot waveguides. The design is CMOS-compatible and uses dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM) followed by a phase modulator (PM). Careful consideration is given to design low loss photonic-plasmonic interfaces to ensure efficient coupling between silicon and plasmonic waveguide. The effect of slot widths on device performance is investigated comprehensively using COMSOL software simulation along with analytical analysis for both gold and silver contact. The results can be used as a guideline to design compact and high speed all-plasmonic 16-QAM modulators for 1550 nm wavelength communication systems.

  14. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dep...

  15. Three types of couplings between asymmetric plasmonic dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yen-Chun; Tseng, Hsuan-Chi; Chang, Kao-Der; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2012-01-30

    We report extensive numerical studies on plasmonic dimers of different configurations and find that their coupling effects can be categorized into three types of phenomena. First, like ordinary mechanical systems, the plasmonic dimers can exhibit positive couplings that show anti-crossing behavior. Second, they can also be arranged to exhibit negative couplings that display opposite trends in resonant frequency shifts. Third, when there are surface currents in proximity to each other, the resonance frequencies of the dimers exhibit unusual redshifts that do not have any analogies in conventional systems. Our work suggests that in addition to the well-known electric and magnetic dipolar interactions, contributions from the inductance of displacement currents in the near field cannot be ignored. Overall, asymmetric plasmonic dimers exhibit better sensitivities than the symmetric counterparts and our extensive studies also enable us to identify the plasmonic dimer with the highest sensing capabilities.

  16. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  17. Novel oscillator model with damping factor for plasmon induced transparency in waveguide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingzhuo; Li, Hongjian; He, Zhihui; Chen, Zhiquan; Xu, Hui; Zheng, Mingfei

    2017-09-06

    We introduce a novel two-oscillator model with damping factor to describe the plasmon induced transparency (PIT) in a bright-dark model plasmonic waveguide system. The damping factor γ in the model can be calculated from metal conductor damping factor γ c and dielectric damping factor γ d . We investigate the influence of geometry parameters and damping factor γ on transmission spectra as well as slow-light effects in the plasmonic waveguide system. We can find an obvious PIT phenomenon and realize a considerable slow-light effect in the double-cavities system. This work may provide guidance for optical switching and plasmon-based information processing.

  18. Coherent resonance of quantum plasmons in the graphene-gold cluster hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Hong; Li, Chikang

    2015-05-14

    Noble metal nanoparticles can modify the optical properties of graphene. Here we present a detailed theoretical analysis of the coherent resonance of quantum plasmons in the graphene-gold cluster hybrid system by using time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). This plasmon coherent effect is mainly attributed to the electromagnetic field coupling between the graphene and the gold cluster. As a result, the optical response of the hybrid system exhibits a remarkably strong, selectable tuning and polarization dependent plasmon resonance enhanced in wide frequency regions. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the plasmon enhancement effect in a graphene-based photoelectric device.

  19. Effective Energy Transfer via Plasmon-Activated High-Energy Water Promotes Its Fundamental Activities of Solubility, Ionic Conductivity, and Extraction at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Ping; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Water is a ubiquitous solvent in biological, physical, and chemical processes. Unique properties of water result from water’s tetrahedral hydrogen-bonded (HB) network (THBN). The original THBN is destroyed when water is confined in a nanosized environment or localized at interfaces, resulting in corresponding changes in HB-dependent properties. In this work, we present an innovative idea to validate the reserve energy of high-energy water and applications of high-energy water to promote water’s fundamental activities of solubility, ionic conductivity, and extraction at room temperature. High-energy water with reduced HBs was created by utilizing hot electrons with energies from the decay of surface plasmon excited at gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs). Compared to conventional deionized (DI) water, solubilities of alkali metal-chloride salts in high-energy water were significantly increased, especially for salts that release heat when dissolved. The ionic conductivity of NaCl in high-energy water was also markedly higher, especially when the electrolyte’s concentration was extremely low. In addition, antioxidative components, such as polyphenols and 2,3,5,4’-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-beta-d-glucoside (THSG) from teas, and Polygonum multiflorum (PM), could more effectively be extracted using high-energy water. These results demonstrate that high-energy water has emerged as a promising innovative solvent for promoting water’s fundamental activities via effective energy transfer.

  20. Improved electron transfer and plasmonic effect in dye-sensitized solar cells with bi-functional Nb-doped TiO2/Ag ternary nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Tae; Chi, Won Seok; Jeon, Harim; Kim, Jong Hak

    2014-03-07

    TiO2 nanoparticles are surface-modified via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with a hydrophilic poly(oxyethylene)methacrylate (POEM), which can coordinate to the Ag precursor, i.e. silver trifluoromethanesulfonate (AgCF3SO3). Following the reduction of Ag ions, a Nb2O5 doping process and calcination at 450 °C, bi-functional Nb-doped TiO2/Ag ternary nanostructures are generated. The resulting nanostructures are characterized by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the Nb-doped TiO2/Ag nanostructure photoanode with a polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) as the solid polymer electrolyte shows an overall energy conversion efficiency (η) of 6.9%, which is much higher than those of neat TiO2 (4.7%) and Nb-doped TiO2 (5.4%). The enhancement of η is mostly due to the increase of current density, attributed to the improved electron transfer properties including electron injection, collection, and plasmonic effects without the negative effects of charge recombination or problems with corrosion. These properties are supported by intensity modulated photocurrent/voltage spectroscopy (IMPS/IMVS) and incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) measurements.

  1. Synergistic Effect of Surface Plasmonic particles and Surface Passivation layer on ZnO Nanorods Array for Improved Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichong; Yan, Xiaoqin; Kang, Zhuo; Li, Yong; Shen, Yanwei; Sun, Yihui; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional zinc oxide nanorods array exhibit excellent electron mobility and thus hold great potential as photoanode for photoelelctrochemical water splitting. However, the poor absorption of visible light and the prominent surface recombination hider the performance improvement. In this work, Au nanoparticles and aluminium oxide were deposited onto the surface of ZnO nanorods to improve the PEC performance. The localized surface plasmon resonance of Au NPs could expand the absorption spectrum to visible region. Simultaneously, the surface of passivation with Au NPs and Al2O3 largely suppressed the photogenerated electron-hole recombination. As a result, the optimal solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of ZnO/Au/Al2O3 with 5 cycles was 6.7 times that of pristine ZnO, ascribed to the synergistic effect of SPR and surface passivation. This research reveals that the synergistic effect could be used as an important method to design efficient photoanodes for photoelectrochemical devices. PMID:27443692

  2. Embedded plasmonic nanoparticles in high refractive index TiOx matrix for photovoltaics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco

    light in ultrathin solar cells. Colloidal plasmonic oligomers are obtained following a cost-effective selfassembly strategy and incorporated in organic based cells produced using spincoating techniques in ambient air conditions. An interesting increase is observed of both external quantum efficiency...... (EQE) and short-circuit current for solar cells loaded with plasmonic oligomers compared with reference organic cells.Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the wavelength dependent EQE enhancement is a resonant process due to the increased scattering efficiency in plasmonic antennas allowed...

  3. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  4. Photothermal modification of plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    There is presented a method for geometrically modifying plasmonic structures on a support structure, such as for printing or recording, said method comprising changing a geometry specifically of plasmonic structures, wherein said changing the geometry is carried out by photothermally melting...

  5. Exceptional enhancement of H2 production in alkaline environment over plasmonic Au/TiO2 photocatalyst under visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianguang Meng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A reaction environment modulation strategy was employed to promote the H2 production over plasmonic Au/semiconductor composites. It is shown that the fast consumption of the holes in plasmonic Au nanoparticles by methanol in alkaline reaction environment remarkably increases H2 generation rate under visible light. The photocatalytic reaction is mainly driven by the interband transition of plasmonic Au nanoparticles, and the apparent quantum efficiency of plasmon-assisted H2 production at pH 14 reaches 6% at 420 nm. The reaction environment control provides a simple and effective way for the highly efficient solar fuel production from biomass reforming through plasmonic photocatalysis in future.

  6. Plasmonic ELISA for the ultrasensitive detection of Treponema pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xin-Min; Huang, Rong; Dong, Cai-Xia; Tang, Li-Juan; Gui, Rong; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2014-08-15

    In this report, we have developed a plasmonic ELISA strategy for the detection of syphilis. Plasmonic ELISA is an enzyme-linked immunoassay combined with enzyme-mediated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Immune response of the Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) antibodies triggers the acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine to produce abundant thiocholine. The positive charged thiol, in turn, alters the surface charge distribution the AuNPs and leads to the agglomeration of the AuNPs. The induced strong localized SPR effect of the agglomerate AuNPs can, thus, allow the quantitative assay of T. pallidum antibodies due to the remarkable color and absorption spectral response changes of the reaction system. The plasmonic ELISA exhibited a quasilinear response to the logarithmic T. pallidum antibody concentrations in the range of 1pg/mL-10ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.98pg/mL. Such a low detection limit was 1000-fold improvements in sensitivity over a conventional ELISA. The results of plasmonic ELISA in syphilis assays of serum specimens from 60 patients agreed with those obtained using a conventional ELISA method. The plasmonic ELISA has characteristics (analyte specific, cost-effective, ease of automatic, low limit of detection) that provide potential for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of syphilis.

  7. Wavefront Engineering of Quantum Cascade Lasers Using Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2012-12-01

    We review recent work on beam shaping of mid-infrared and far-infrared (terahertz) quantum cascade lasers using plasmonics. Essentials of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are discussed; these include the operating principle based on bandstructure engineering, and beam quality problems associated with laser waveguide design. We explain how metal and semiconductor microstructures can effectively tailor the dispersion properties of mid- and far-infrared surface plasmon polaritons, and therefore can be used as important building blocks for optical devices in these frequencies. The physical principles of three structures are discussed: plasmonic Bragg gratings, designer (spoof) surface plasmon polariton structures, and channel polariton structures. We demonstrate the effectiveness of these structures by realizing various functionalities in QCLs, ranging from beam collimation, polarization control, to multibeam emission, and spatial wavelength demultiplexing. Plasmonics offers a monolithic, compact, and low-loss solution to the problem of poor beam quality of QCLs and may have a large impact on applications such as sensing, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), free-space optical communication, and heterodyne detection of chemicals. The plasmonic designs are scalable and applicable to near-infrared active or passive optical devices.

  8. Quantum analysis of plasmonic coupling between quantum dots and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, SalmanOgli

    2016-10-01

    In this study, interaction between core-shells nanoparticles and quantum dots is discussed via the full-quantum-theory method. The electromagnetic field of the nanoparticles is derived by the quasistatic approximation method and the results for different regions of the nanoparticles are quantized from the time-harmonic to the wave equation. Utilizing the optical field quantization, the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' deriving amplitudes contributing to the excitation waves are determined. In the current model, two counterpropagating waves with two different frequencies are applied. We derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations from the Heisenberg-Langevin equations; thus the nanoparticles-quantum dots interaction is perused. Moreover, by full quantum analyzing of the analytical expression, the quantum-plasmonic coupling relation and the Purcell factor are achieved. We show that the spontaneous emission of quantum dots can be dramatically manipulated by engineering the plasmon-plasmon interaction in the core-shells nanoparticles. This issue is a very attractive point for designing a wide variety of quantum-plasmonic sensors. Through the investigation of the nanoparticle plasmonic interaction effects on absorbed power, the results show that the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' absorption saturation state can be switched to each other just by manipulation of their deriving amplitudes. In fact, we manage the interference between the two waves' deriving amplitudes just by the plasmonic interactions effect.

  9. Active components for integrated plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasavin, A.V.; Bolger, P.M.; Zayats, A.V.;

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides.......We present a comprehensive study of highly efficient and compact passive and active components for integrated plasmonic circuit based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides....

  10. Hybridization of photon-plasmon modes in metal-coated microtubular cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yin; Engemaier, Vivienne; Giudicatti, Silvia; Naz, Ehsan Saei Ghareh; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of resonant light and surface plasmons in metal layer coated optical microcavities results in the formation of hybrid photon-plasmon modes. Here, we comprehensively investigate the hybridization mechanism of photon-plasmon modes based on opto-plasmonic microtubular cavities. By changing the cavity structure and the metal layer thickness, weakly, moderately and strongly hybridized resonant modes are demonstrated depending on the photon-plasmon coupling strength. An effective potential approach is applied to illustrate the hybridization of photon-plasmon modes relying on the competition between light confinement by the cavity wall and the potential barrier introduced by the metal layer. Our work reveals the basic physical mechanisms for the generation of hybrid modes in metal-coated whispering-gallery-mode microcavities, and is of importance for the study of enhanced light-matter interactions and potential sensing applications.

  11. Ultrafast, broadband, and configurable midinfrared all-optical switching in nonlinear graphene plasmonic waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin J. A. Ooi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphene plasmonics provides a unique and excellent platform for nonlinear all-optical switching, owing to its high nonlinear conductivity and tight optical confinement. In this paper, we show that impressive switching performance on graphene plasmonic waveguides could be obtained for both phase and extinction modulations at sub-MW/cm2 optical pump intensities. Additionally, we find that the large surface-induced nonlinearity enhancement that comes from the tight confinement effect can potentially drive the propagating plasmon pump power down to the pW range. The graphene plasmonic waveguides have highly configurable Fermi-levels through electrostatic-gating, allowing for versatility in device design and a broadband optical response. The high capabilities of nonlinear graphene plasmonics would eventually pave the way for the adoption of the graphene plasmonics platform in future all-optical nanocircuitry.

  12. 2010 PLASMONICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE/GORDON-KENAN GRADUATE STUDENT SEMINAR, JUNE 13-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naomi Halas

    2010-06-18

    The field of plasmonics lies at the forefront of current revolutionary developments in optics at nanoscale dimensions, with broad applications in the fields of biology, chemistry, and engineering. Advancing these applications will require an enhanced focus on the fundamental science of plasmonics in new and exotic regimes. This 2010 Gordon Conference on Plasmonics will focus on recent advances in fundamental and applied plasmonics. As with past conferences, this meeting will bring together top researchers and future leaders for substantial interactions between students, young speakers, and senior figures in the field. Participants should expect lively discussion during the sessions, intermingled with unstructured time where ideas move, collaborations form, and connections are made. Invited talks will cover a diverse range of topics, including active devices, coherence effects, metamaterials and cloaking, quantum optical phenomena, and plasmons in exotic media and in new wavelength regimes. At the conclusion of the conference, our final session will look forward and begin defining upcoming challenges and opportunities for plasmonics.

  13. Hybridized plasmon resonant modes in molecular metallodielectric quad-triangles nanoantenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Sinha, Raju; Pala, Nezih

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the plasmon response for both metallic and metallodielectric nanoantennas composed of four gold (Au) triangles in a quadrumer orientation. Tailoring an artificial metallic quad-triangles nanoantenna, it is shown that the structure is able to support pronounced plasmon and Fano resonances in the visible spectrum. Using plasmon transmutation effect, we showed that the plasmonic response of the proposed cluster can be enhanced with the placement of carbon nanoparticles in the offset gaps between the proximal triangles. It is verified that this structural modification gives rise to formation of new collective magnetic antibonding (dark) plasmon modes. Excitation of these subradiant dark modes leads to formation of narrower and deeper Fano resonances in the spectral response of the metallodielectric nanoantenna. To investigate the practical applications of the metallodielectric structure, we immersed the nano-assembly in various liquids with different refractive indices to define its sensitivity to the environmental perturbation as a plasmonic biological sensor.

  14. Preliminary physical stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and geophysical data of the USGS South Dover Bridge Core, Talbot County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán González, Wilma B.; Powars, David S.; Seefelt, Ellen L.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Durand, Colleen T.; Schultz, Arthur P.; McLaughlin, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    The South Dover Bridge (SDB) corehole was drilled in October 2007 in Talbot County, Maryland. The main purpose for drilling this corehole was to characterize the Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the aquifers and confining units of this region. The data obtained from this core also will be used as a guide to geologic mapping and to help interpret well data from the eastern part of the Washington East 1:100,000-scale map near the town of Easton, Md. Core drilling was conducted to a depth of 700 feet (ft). The Cretaceous section was not penetrated due to technical problems during drilling. This project was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center (EGPSC) as part of the Geology of the Atlantic Watersheds Project; this project was carried out in cooperation with the Maryland Geological Survey (MGS) through partnerships with the Aquifer Characterization Program of the USGS’s Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Water Science Center and the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. The SDB corehole was drilled by the USGS drilling crew in the northeastern corner of the Trappe 7.5-minute quadrangle, near the type locality of the Boston Cliffs member of the Choptank Formation. Geophysical logs (gamma ray, single point resistance, and 16-inch and 64-inch normal resistivity) were run to a depth of 527.5 ft; the total depth of 700.0 ft could not be reached because of the collapse of the lower part of the hole. Of the 700.0 ft drilled, 531.8 ft of core were recovered, representing a 76 percent core recovery. The elevation of the top of the corehole is approximately 12 ft above mean sea level; its coordinates are lat 38°44′49.34″N. and long 76°00′25.09″W. (38.74704N., 76.00697W. in decimal degrees). A groundwater monitoring well was not installed at this site. The South Dover Bridge corehole was the first corehole that will be used to better understand the geology and

  15. Source apportionment of single particles sampled at the industrially polluted town of Port Talbot, United Kingdom by ATOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, Adewale M.; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, David C. S.; Shi, Zongbo

    2014-11-01

    Single particle analysis of an industrially polluted atmosphere in Port Talbot, South Wales, United Kingdom was conducted using Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS). During the four week sampling campaign, a total of 5,162,018 particles were sized in the size range 0.2-1.9 μm aerodynamic diameter. Of these, 580,798 were successfully ionized generating mass spectra. K-means clustering employed for analysing ATOFMS data utilized 96% of the hit particles to generate 20 clusters. Similar clusters were merged together and 17 clusters were generated from which 7 main particle groups were identified. The particle classes include: K-rich particles (K-CN, K-NO3, K-EC, K-Cl-PO3 and K-HSO4), aged sea salt (Na-NO3), silicate dust (Na-HSiO2), sulphate rich particles (K-HSO4), nitrate rich particles (AlO-NO3), Ca particles (Ca-NO3), carbon-rich particles (Mn-OC, Metallic-EC, EC, EC-NO3 and OC-EC), and aromatic hydrocarbon particles (Arom-CN, Fe-PAH-NO3 and PAH-CN). With the aid of wind sector plots, the K-Cl-PO3 and Na-HSiO2 particle clusters were related to the steelworks blast furnace/sinter plant while Ca-rich particles arose from blast furnace emissions. K-CN, K-EC, Na-HSiO2, K-HSO4, Mn-OC, Arom-CN, Fe-PAH-NO3, and PAH-CN particles were closely linked with emissions from the cokemaking and mills (hot and cold) steelworks sections. The source factors identified by the ATOFMS were compared with those derived from multivariate analysis using Multilinear Engine (ME-2) applied to filter samples analysed off-line. Both methods of source apportionment identified common source factors including those within the steelworks (blast furnace, sinter, cokemaking), as well as marine, traffic and secondary particles, but quantitative attribution of mass is very different.

  16. The resonant, near-resonant, and off-resonant plasmon coupling effects for the bonding modes in two types of asymmetric dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quanshui; Hu, Jianling; Wang, Ziya; Wang, Fengping; Bao, Yongjun

    2014-07-01

    The resonant, near-resonant, and off-resonant plasmon coupling effects for the bonding modes in asymmetric dimers are illustrated by two types of configuration, one formed by a gold nanoparticle and a TiO2-Ag core-shell nanoparticle and the other formed by two TiO2-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with suitable sizes. The redshift and blueshift behaviours of the coupled bonding modes with decreasing gap are found under longitudinal and transverse polarization of light for these dimers in the resonant situation, respectively. Under the near-resonant situation, the redshift behaviours of the coupled bonding modes still remain under longitudinal polarization, whereas the two separated modes of monomers after coupling under transverse polarization exhibit no obvious peak-shift behaviours, and the one on the lower frequency side shows an apparent attenuation in the strength. Under the off-resonant situation, the redshift behaviours not only occur in the coupled modes under longitudinal polarization, but also occur in two separated modes under transverse polarization.

  17. Graphene-protected copper and silver plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravets, V. G.; Jalil, R.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    suitable for plasmonic applications. To this end, there has been a continuous search for alternative plasmonic materials that are also compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Here we show that copper and silver protected by graphene are viable candidates. Copper films covered...... with one to a few graphene layers show excellent plasmonic characteristics. They can be used to fabricate plasmonic devices and survive for at least a year, even in wet and corroding conditions. As a proof of concept, we use the graphene-protected copper to demonstrate dielectric loaded plasmonic...... waveguides and test sensitivity of surface plasmon resonances. Our results are likely to initiate wide use of graphene-protected plasmonics....

  18. Projected Dipole Model for Quantum Plasmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2015-01-01

    Quantum effects of plasmonic phenomena have been explored through ab initio studies, but only for exceedingly small metallic nanostructures, leaving most experimentally relevant structures too large to handle. We propose instead an effective description with the computationally appealing features...... of classical electrodynamics, while quantum properties are described accurately through an infinitely thin layer of dipoles oriented normally to the metal surface. The nonlocal polarizability of the dipole layer-the only introduced parameter-is mapped from the free-electron distribution near the metal surface...... as obtained with 1D quantum calculations, such as time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and is determined once and for all. The model can be applied in two and three dimensions to any system size that is tractable within classical electrodynamics, while capturing quantum plasmonic aspects...

  19. Plasmonic resonant solitons in metallic nanosuspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardad, Shima; Salandrino, Alessandro; Heinrich, Matthias; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2014-05-14

    Robust propagation of self-trapped light over distances exceeding 25 diffraction lengths has been demonstrated for the first time in plasmonic nanosuspensions. This phenomenon results from the interplay between optical forces and enhanced polarizability that would have been otherwise impossible in conventional dielectric dispersions. Plasmonic nanostructures such as core-shell particles, nanorods, and spheres are shown to display tunable polarizabilities depending on their size, shape, and composition, as well as the wavelength of illumination. Here we discuss nonlinear light-matter dynamics arising from an effective positive Kerr effect, which in turn allows for deep penetration of long needles of light through dissipative colloidal media. Our findings may open up new possibilities toward synthesizing soft-matter systems with customized optical nonlinearities.

  20. Plasmonic and silicon spherical nanoparticle antireflective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, K. V.; Petrov, M. I.; Babicheva, V. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic antireflecting nanostructures have been extensively studied to be utilized in various optical and optoelectronic systems such as lenses, solar cells, photodetectors, and others. The growing interest to all-dielectric photonics as an alternative optical technology along with plasmonics motivates us to compare antireflective properties of plasmonic and all-dielectric nanoparticle coatings based on silver and crystalline silicon respectively. Our simulation results for spherical nanoparticles array on top of amorphous silicon show that both silicon and silver coatings demonstrate strong antireflective properties in the visible spectral range. For the first time, we show that zero reflectance from the structure with silicon coatings originates from the destructive interference of electric- and magnetic-dipole responses of nanoparticle array with the wave reflected from the substrate, and we refer to this reflection suppression as substrate-mediated Kerker effect. We theoretically compare the silicon and silver coating effectiveness for the thin-film photovoltaic applications. Silver nanoparticles can be more efficient, enabling up to 30% increase of the overall absorbance in semiconductor layer. Nevertheless, silicon coatings allow up to 64% absorbance increase in the narrow band spectral range because of the substrate-mediated Kerker effect, and band position can be effectively tuned by varying the nanoparticles sizes.

  1. Plasmonic harvesting of light energy for Suzuki coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Chuanhao; Chen, Huanjun; Jiang, Ruibin; Sun, Ling-Dong; Li, Quan; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-04-17

    The efficient use of solar energy has received wide interest due to increasing energy and environmental concerns. A potential means in chemistry is sunlight-driven catalytic reactions. We report here on the direct harvesting of visible-to-near-infrared light for chemical reactions by use of plasmonic Au-Pd nanostructures. The intimate integration of plasmonic Au nanorods with catalytic Pd nanoparticles through seeded growth enabled efficient light harvesting for catalytic reactions on the nanostructures. Upon plasmon excitation, catalytic reactions were induced and accelerated through both plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion. Under the illumination of an 809 nm laser at 1.68 W, the yield of the Suzuki coupling reaction was ~2 times that obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. Moreover, the yield was also ~2 times that obtained from Au-TiOx-Pd nanostructures under the same laser illumination, where a 25-nm-thick TiOx shell was introduced to prevent the photocatalysis process. This is a more direct comparison between the effect of joint plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion with that of sole photothermal conversion. The contribution of plasmonic photocatalysis became larger when the laser illumination was at the plasmon resonance wavelength. It increased when the power of the incident laser at the plasmon resonance was raised. Differently sized Au-Pd nanostructures were further designed and mixed together to make the mixture light-responsive over the visible to near-infrared region. In the presence of the mixture, the reactions were completed within 2 h under sunlight, while almost no reactions occurred in the dark.

  2. Plasmonic percolation: Plasmon-manifested dielectric-to-metal transition

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huanjun

    2012-08-28

    Percolation generally refers to the phenomenon of abrupt variations in electrical, magnetic, or optical properties caused by gradual volume fraction changes of one component across a threshold in bicomponent systems. Percolation behaviors have usually been observed in macroscopic systems, with most studies devoted to electrical percolation. We report on our observation of plasmonic percolation in Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures. When the Pd volume fraction in the shell consisting of palladium and water approaches the plasmonic percolation threshold, ∼70%, the plasmon of the nanostructure transits from red to blue shifts with respect to that of the unshelled Au nanorod. This plasmonic percolation behavior is also confirmed by the scattering measurements on the individual core-shell nanostructures. Quasistatic theory and numerical simulations show that the plasmonic percolation originates from a positive-to-negative transition in the real part of the dielectric function of the shell as the Pd volume fraction is increased. The observed plasmonic percolation is found to be independent of the metal type in the shell. Moreover, compared to the unshelled Au nanorods with similar plasmon wavelengths, the Au nanorod core-Pd shell nanostructures exhibit larger refractive index sensitivities, which is ascribed to the expulsion of the electric field intensity from the Au nanorod core by the adsorbed Pd nanoparticles. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Particle-Film Plasmons on Periodic Silver Film over Nanosphere (AgFON): A Hybrid Plasmonic Nanoarchitecture for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Zhang, Qianpeng; Park, Seungyoung; Choe, Ayoung; Fan, Zhiyong; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2016-01-13

    Plasmonic systems based on particle-film plasmonic couplings have recently attracted great attention because of the significantly enhanced electric field at the particle-film gaps. Here, we introduce a hybrid plasmonic architecture utilizing combined plasmonic effects of particle-film gap plasmons and silver film over nanosphere (AgFON) substrates. When gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are assembled on AgFON substrates with controllable particle-film gap distances, the AuNP-AgFON system supports multiple plasmonic couplings from interparticle, particle-film, and crevice gaps, resulting in a huge surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect. We show that the periodicity of AgFON substrates and the particle-film gaps greatly affects the surface plasmon resonances, and thus, the SERS effects due to the interplay between multiple plasmonic couplings. The optimally designed AuNP-AgFON substrate shows a SERS enhancement of 233 times compared to the bare AgFON substrate. The ultrasensitive SERS sensing capability is also demonstrated by detecting glutathione, a neurochemical molecule that is an important antioxidant, down to the 10 pM level.

  4. Hydrogen production using Ag-Pd/TiO2 bimetallic catalysts: is there a combined effect of surface plasmon resonance with the Schottky mechanism on the photo-catalytic activity?(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad Amtiaz; Idriss, Hicham; Al-Oufi, Maher; Ahmed, Khaja Wahab; Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-10-01

    A series of Ag-Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production activities from water in the presence of organic sacrificial agents. The synergistic effect of metallic properties (plasmonic and Schottky mechanisms) was investigated. XPS results indicated that silver is present in the form of its oxides (Ag2O and AgO) at 0.2-0.4 wt. % loading while palladium is present as PdO and Pd metal at similar loading. However, metallic character for silver particles increases while that of palladium metal particles decreases with increasing their % in the investigated range (0-1 wt. %). HRTEM results coupled with EDX analyses indicated the presence of two types of Ag containing particles (large ones with about 4-6 nm and smaller ones with ca. 1nm in size). Palladium was only found forming Ag-Pd alloy/composite with a wide size distribution range between 10-60 nm. Both particles are composed of silver and palladium, however. Optimal photocatalytic H2 production rates were obtained for catalysts with a palladium to silver ratios between 4 and 1.5 in the case of bimetallic catalysts. In addition, H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag. The study demonstrates that increased H2 production rates can be achieved from an understanding of plasmonic and Schottky properties of metals loaded on top of the semiconductor.

  5. Mathematical analysis of plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles: The full Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Habib; Ruiz, Matias; Yu, Sanghyeon; Zhang, Hai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we use the full Maxwell equations for light propagation in order to analyze plasmonic resonances for nanoparticles. We mathematically define the notion of plasmonic resonance and analyze its shift and broadening with respect to changes in size, shape, and arrangement of the nanoparticles, using the layer potential techniques associated with the full Maxwell equations. We present an effective medium theory for resonant plasmonic systems and derive a condition on the volume fraction under which the Maxwell-Garnett theory is valid at plasmonic resonances.

  6. Size dependence of multipolar plasmon resonance frequencies and damping rates in simple metal spherical nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachova, A

    2008-01-01

    Multipolar plasmon oscillation frequencies and corresponding damping rates for nanospheres formed of the simplest free-electron metals are studied. The possibility of controlling plasmon features by choosing the size and dielectric properties of the sphere surroundings is discussed. Optical properties of the studied metals are described within the Drude-Sommerfeld model of the dielectric function with effective parameters acounting for the contribution of conduction electrons and of interband transitions. No approximation is made in respect of the size of a particle; plasmon size characteristics are described rigorously. The results of our experiment on sodium nanodroplets [1] are compared with the oscillation frequency size dependence of dipole and quadrupole plasmon.

  7. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    substrates is presented, which relies on the coverage of gold nanostructures with diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films of thicknesses 25, 55 and 105 nm. DLC thin films were grown by direct hydrocarbon ion beam deposition. In order to find the optimum balance between optical and mechanical properties...... and breaking. DLC coating with thicknesses between 25 and 105 nm is found to considerably increase the mechanical strength of the substrates while at the same time ensuring conservation of sufficient field enhancements of the gold plasmonic substrates....

  8. Plasmonic-Enhanced Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    photocurrent on a chemically modified gold thin film of metal- semiconductor (TiO2) Schottky diodes. • Intrinsic correlation between the hot electron flow...Surface Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Flow Probed with Metal- semiconductor Nanodiodes,” Y. K. Lee, C. H. Jung, J. Park, H. Seo, G. A. Somorjai, J. Park. Nano... Photocatalytic Activity of Iron Oxide on Gold Nanopillars,” H. Gao, C. Liu, H. E. Jeong, P. Yang, ACS Nano. 6, 234, 2012. “Ag Nanoparticle-Alumina Hybrid

  9. Quantum plasmonics for next-generation optical and sensing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaied, Modjtaba; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2015-12-01

    Classical plasmonics has mostly focused on structures characterized by large dimension, for which the quantummechanical effects have nearly no impact. However, recent advances in technology, especially on miniaturized plasmonics devices at nanoscale, have made it possible to imagine experimental applications of plasmons where the quantum nature of free charge carriers play an important role. Therefore, it is necessary to use quantum mechanics to model the transport of charge carriers in solid state plasma nanostructures. Here, a non-local quantum model of permittivity is presented by applying the Wigner equation with collision term in the kinetic theory of solid state plasmas where the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the electron-lattice collisions. The surface plasmon resonance of ultra-small nanoparticles is investigated using this non-local quantum permittivity and its dispersion relation is obtained. The successful application of this theory in ultra-small plasmonics structures such as surface plasmon polariton waveguides, doped semiconductors, graphene, the metamaterials composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, and the quantum droplets is anticipated.

  10. Molecular focusing and alignment with plasmon fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, Maxim; Seideman, Tamar

    2010-12-01

    We show the possibility of simultaneously aligning molecules and focusing their center-of-mass motion near a metal nanoparticle in the field intensity gradient created by the surface plasmon enhancement of incident light. The rotational motion is described quantum mechanically while the translation is treated classically. The effects of the nanoparticle shape on the alignment and focusing are explored. Our results carry interesting implications to the field of molecular nanoplasmonics and suggest several potential applications in nanochemistry.

  11. Modeling plasmonic efficiency enhancement in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Y; Apter, B; Katz, E A; Efron, U

    2015-09-10

    Efficiency enhancement of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells by means of the plasmonic effect is investigated by using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) optical simulations combined with analytical modeling of exciton dissociation and charge transport efficiencies. The proposed method provides an improved analysis of the cell performance compared to previous FDTD studies. The results of the simulations predict an 11.8% increase in the cell's short circuit current with the use of Ag nano-hexagons.

  12. Large Optical Nonlinearity of Surface Plasmon Modes on Thin Gold Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Witthaut, Dirk; Kumar, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the optical nonlinear effects of a long-range surface plasmon polariton mode propagating on a thin gold film. These effects may play a key role in the design of future nanophotonic circuits as they allow for the realization of active plasmonic elements. We demonstrate a significant...

  13. Chiral near fields generated from plasmonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic fields are usually considered non-chiral because of the transverse magnetic polarization of surface plasmon modes. We however show here that plasmonic lattices built from coherent superpositions of surface plasmons can generate optical chirality in the interfering near field. We reveal in particular the emergence of plasmonic potentials relevant to the generation of near-field chiral forces. This draws promising perspectives for performing enantiomeric separation schemes within the near field.

  14. Active Molecular Plasmonics: Controlling Plasmon Resonances with Molecular Switches

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing

    2009-02-11

    A gold nanodisk array, coated with bistable, redox-controllable [2]rotaxane molecules, when exposed to chemical oxidants and reductants, undergoes switching of its plasmonic properties reversibly. By contrast, (i) bare gold nanodisks and (ii) disks coated with a redox-active, but mechanically inert, control compound do not display surface-plasmon-based switching. Along with calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory, these experimental observations suggest that the nanoscale movements within surface-bound “molecular machines” can be used as the active components in plasmonic devices.

  15. Effect of Surface Plasmon Coupling to Optical Cavity Modes on the Field Enhancement and Spectral Response of Dimer-Based sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrasheed, Salma

    2017-09-05

    We present a theoretical approach to narrow the plasmon linewidth and enhance the near-field intensity at a plasmonic dimer gap (hot spot) through coupling the electric localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance of a silver hemispherical dimer with the resonant modes of a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The strong coupling is demonstrated by the large anticrossing in the reflection spectra and a Rabi splitting of 76 meV. Up to 2-fold enhancement increase can be achieved compared to that without using the cavity. Such high field enhancement has potential applications in optics, including sensors and high resolution imaging devices. In addition, the resonance splitting allows for greater flexibility in using the same array at different wavelengths. We then further propose a practical design to realize such a device and include dimers of different shapes and materials.

  16. Nanobump assembly for plasmonic organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyung-Jun; Jung, Kinam; Lee, Gunhee; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Choi, Mansoo; Lee, Changhee

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate novel plasmonic organic solar cells (OSCs) by embedding an easy processible nanobump assembly (NBA) for harnessing more light. The NBA is consisted of precisely size-controlled Ag nanoparticles (NPs) generated by an aerosol process at atmospheric pressure and thermally deposited molybdenum oxide (MoO3) layer which follows the underlying nano structure of NPs. The active layer, spin-casted polymer blend solution, has an undulated structure conformably covering the NBA structure. To find the optimal condition of the NBA structure for enhancing light harvest as well as carrier transfer, we systematically investigate the effect of the size of Ag NPs and the MoO3 coverage on the device performance. It is observed that the photocurrent of device increases as the size of Ag NP increases owing to enhanced plasmonic and scattering effect. In addition, the increased light absorption is effectively transferred to the photocurrent with small carrier losses, when the Ag NPs are fully covered by the MoO3 layer. As a result, the NBA structure consisted of 40 nm Ag NPs enclosed by 20 nm MoO3 layer leads to 18% improvement in the power conversion efficiency compared to the device without the NBA structure. Therefore, the NBA plasmonic structure provides a reliable and efficient light harvesting in a broad range of wavelength, which consequently enhances the performance of organic solar cells.

  17. Plasmonic properties and applications of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yurong

    Plasmonic properties and the related novel applications are studied on various types of metallic nano-structures in one, two, or three dimensions. For 1D nanostructure, the motion of free electrons in a metal-film with nanoscale thickness is confined in its normal dimension and free in the other two. Describing the free-electron motion at metal-dielectric surfaces, surface plasmon polariton (SPP) is an elementary excitation of such motions and is well known. When further perforated with periodic array of holes, periodicity will introduce degeneracy, incur energy-level splitting, and facilitate the coupling between free-space photon and SPP. We applied this concept to achieve a plasmonic perfect absorber. The experimentally observed reflection dip splitting is qualitatively explained by a perturbation theory based on the above concept. If confined in 2D, the nanostructures become nanowires that intrigue a broad range of research interests. We performed various studies on the resonance and propagation of metal nanowires with different materials, cross-sectional shapes and form factors, in passive or active medium, in support of corresponding experimental works. Finite- Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations show that simulated results agrees well with experiments and makes fundamental mode analysis possible. Confined in 3D, the electron motions in a single metal nanoparticle (NP) leads to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that enables another novel and important application: plasmon-heating. By exciting the LSPR of a gold particle embedded in liquid, the excited plasmon will decay into heat in the particle and will heat up the surrounding liquid eventually. With sufficient exciting optical intensity, the heat transfer from NP to liquid will undergo an explosive process and make a vapor envelop: nanobubble. We characterized the size, pressure and temperature of the nanobubble by a simple model relying on Mie calculations and continuous medium assumption. A

  18. Plasmonic color tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Yun, Hansik; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Hwi

    2016-03-01

    In general, color filter is an optical component to permit the transmission of a specific color in cameras, displays, and microscopes. Each filter has its own unchangeable color because it is made by chemical materials such as dyes and pigments. Therefore, in order to express various colorful images in a display, one pixel should have three sub-pixels of red, green, and blue colors. Here, we suggest new plasmonic structure and method to change the color in a single pixel. It is comprised of a cavity and a metal nanoaperture. The optical cavity generally supports standing waves inside it, and various standing waves having different wavelength can be confined together in one cavity. On the other hand, although light cannot transmit sub-wavelength sized aperture, surface plasmons can propagate through the metal nanoaperture with high intensity due to the extraordinary transmission. If we combine the two structures, we can organize the spatial distribution of amplitudes according to wavelength of various standing waves using the cavity, and we can extract a light with specific wavelength and amplitude using the nanoaperture. Therefore, this cavity-aperture structure can simultaneously tune the color and intensity of the transmitted light through the single nanoaperture. We expect that the cavity-apertures have a potential for dynamic color pixels, micro-imaging system, and multiplexed sensors.

  19. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  20. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.