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Sample records for plasmodium growth inhibition

  1. Inhibition of the Growth of Plasmodium falciparum in Culture by Stearylamine-Phosphatidylcholine Liposomes

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    Gulam Mustafa Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of stearylamine (SA in liposomes on the viability of Plasmodium falciparum in culture by studying the inhibition of incorporation of [3H]-hypoxanthine in the nucleic acid of parasites. Stearylamine in liposomes significantly inhibits the growth of the parasites depending on the phospholipids composition. The maximum inhibition was observed when SA was delivered through Soya phosphatidylcholine (SPC liposomes. The chain length of alkyl group and density of SA in liposomes play a significant role in inhibiting the growth of the parasites. Incorporation of either cholesterol or Distearylphosphatidylethanolamine−Methoxy-Polyethylene glycol-2000 (DSPE-mPEG-2000 in Soya phosphatidylcholine-stearylamine (SPC-SA liposomes improves the efficacy. Intraerythrocytic entry of intact SPC-SA liposomes into infected erythrocytes was visualized using fluorescent microscopy. No hemolysis was observed in uninfected erythrocytes, and slight hemolysis was noted in infected erythrocytes at high concentrations of SPC-SA liposomes. Overall, our data suggested SA in SPC-liposomes might have potential application in malaria chemotherapy.

  2. Development of fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum for in vitro growth inhibition assays

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    Crabb Brendan S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth inhibition assays are widely used to evaluate and quantify the functional activity of acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies and the anti-malarial activity of known drugs and novel compounds. However, several constraints have limited the use of these assays in large-scale population studies, vaccine trials and compound screening for drug discovery and development. Methods The D10 P. falciparum line was transfected to express green fluorescent protein (GFP. In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed over one or two cycles of P. falciparum asexual replication using inhibitory polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, human serum samples, and anti-malarials. Parasitaemia was evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Transfected parasites expressed GFP throughout all asexual stages and were clearly detectable by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Measurement of parasite growth inhibition was the same when determined by detection of GFP fluorescence or staining with ethidium bromide. There was no difference in the inhibitory activity of samples when tested against the transfected parasites compared to the parental line. The level of fluorescence of GFP-expressing parasites increased throughout the course of asexual development. Among ring-stages, GFP-fluorescent parasites were readily separated from uninfected erythrocytes by flow cytometry, whereas this was less clear using ethidium bromide staining. Inhibition by serum and antibody samples was consistently higher when tested over two cycles of growth compared to one, and when using a 1 in 10 sample dilution compared to 1 in 20, but there was no difference detected when using a different starting parasitaemia to set-up growth assays. Flow cytometry based measurements of parasitaemia proved more reproducible than microscopy counts. Conclusions Flow cytometry based assays using GFP

  3. Griseofulvin impairs intraerythrocytic growth of Plasmodium falciparum through ferrochelatase inhibition but lacks activity in an experimental human infection study

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    Smith, Clare M.; Jerkovic, Ante; Truong, Thy Thuc; Foote, Simon J.; McCarthy, James S.; McMorran, Brendan J.

    2017-01-01

    Griseofulvin, an orally active antifungal drug used to treat dermatophyte infections, has a secondary effect of inducing cytochrome P450-mediated production of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX (N-MPP). N-MPP is a potent competitive inhibitor of the heme biosynthetic-enzyme ferrochelatase, and inhibits the growth of cultured erythrocyte stage Plasmodium falciparum. Novel drugs against Plasmodium are needed to achieve malaria elimination. Thus, we investigated whether griseofulvin shows anti-plasmodial activity. We observed that the intraerythrocytic growth of P. falciparum is inhibited in red blood cells pretreated with griseofulvin in vitro. Treatment with 100 μM griseofulvin was sufficient to prevent parasite growth and induce the production of N-MPP. Inclusion of the ferrochelatase substrate PPIX blocked the inhibitory activity of griseofulvin, suggesting that griseofulvin exerts its activity through the N-MPP-dependent inhibition of ferrochelatase. In an ex-vivo study, red blood cells from griseofulvin-treated subjects were refractory to the growth of cultured P. falciparum. However, in a clinical trial griseofulvin failed to show either therapeutic or prophylactic effect in subjects infected with blood stage P. falciparum. Although the development of griseofulvin as an antimalarial is not warranted, it represents a novel inhibitor of P. falciparum growth and acts via the N-MPP-dependent inhibition of ferrochelatase. PMID:28176804

  4. Licochalcone A, a new antimalarial agent, inhibits in vitro growth of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and protects mice from em>P. yoelii infection

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    Chen, M; Theander, T G; Christensen, S B;

    1994-01-01

    Licochalcone A, isolated from Chinese licorice roots, inhibited the in vitro growth of both chloroquine-susceptible (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum strains in a [3H]hypoxanthine uptake assay. The growth inhibition of the chloroquine-resistant strain by licochalcone A w...

  5. Plasmodium falciparum infection and age influence parasite growth inhibition mediated by IgG in Beninese infants.

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    Adamou, Rafiou; Chénou, Francine; Sadissou, Ibrahim; Sonon, Paulin; Dechavanne, Célia; Djilali-Saïah, Abdelkader; Cottrell, Gilles; Le Port, Agnès; Massougbodji, Achille; Remarque, Edmond J; Luty, Adrian J F; Sanni, Ambaliou; Garcia, André; Migot-Nabias, Florence; Milet, Jacqueline; Courtin, David

    2016-07-01

    Antibodies that impede the invasion of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) merozoites into erythrocytes play a critical role in anti-malarial immunity. The Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA) is an in vitro measure of the functional capacity of such antibodies to limit erythrocyte invasion and/or parasite growth. Up to now, it is unclear whether growth-inhibitory activity correlates with protection from clinical disease and there are inconsistent results from studies performed with GIA. Studies that have focused on the relationship between IgGs and their in vitro parasite Growth Inhibition Activity (GIAc) in infants aged less than two years old are rare. Here, we used clinical and parasitological data to precisely define symptomatic or asymptomatic infection with P. falciparum in groups of infants followed-up actively for 18 months post-natally. We quantified the levels of IgG1 and IgG3 directed to a panel of candidate P. falciparum vaccine antigens (AMA-1, MSP1, 2, 3 and GLURP) using ELISA and the functional activity of IgG was quantified using GIA. Data were then correlated with individuals' infection status. At 18 months of age, infants harbouring infections at the time of blood sampling had an average 19% less GIAc than those not infected (p=0.004, multivariate linear regression). GIAc decreased from 12 to 18 months of age (p=0.003, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). Antibody levels quantified at 18 months in infants were strongly correlated with their exposure to malarial infection, however GIAc was not correlated with malaria infectious status (asymptomatic and symptomatic groups). In conclusion, both infection status at blood draw and age influence parasite growth inhibition mediated by IgG in the GIA. Both factors must be taken into account when correlations between GIAc and anti-malarial protection or vaccine efficacy have to be made.

  6. Inhibition of In Vivo Growth of Plasmodium berghei by Launaea taraxacifolia and Amaranthus viridis in Mice

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    Olorunnisola, Olubukola S.; Adegbola, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Launaea taraxacifolia and Amaranthus viridis used by people of Western Africa in the treatment of malaria and related symptoms were assessed for their antiplasmodial value against the chloroquine sensitive strain of Plasmodium berghei. Crude extracts (200 mg/kg) and chloroquine (5 mg/kg) were administered to different groups of Swiss mice. The percentage of parasitemia, survival time, and haematological parameters were determined. Both extracts significantly (p phytochemical investigations in the search for new and locally affordable antimalarial agents. PMID:28050307

  7. A modified Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition assay (GIA) to assess activity of plasma from malaria endemic areas.

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    Mlambo, Godfree; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2007-02-01

    Plasma samples from patients undergoing treatment in malaria endemic countries often contain anti-malaria drugs, that may overstate effects of specific antibodies in growth inhibition assays (GIA). We describe a modified assay that uses drug resistant P. falciparum parasites (W2) that circumvents the requirement for dialyzing samples that may likely contain drugs such as chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP).

  8. Bisphosphonates inhibit the growth of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium falciparum: a potential route to chemotherapy.

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    Martin, M B; Grimley, J S; Lewis, J C; Heath, H T; Bailey, B N; Kendrick, H; Yardley, V; Caldera, A; Lira, R; Urbina, J A; Moreno, S N; Docampo, R; Croft, S L; Oldfield, E

    2001-03-15

    We have investigated the effects in vitro of a series of bisphosphonates on the proliferation of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Leishmania donovani, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium falciparum. The results show that nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates of the type used in bone resorption therapy have significant activity against parasites, with the aromatic species having in some cases nanomolar or low-micromolar IC(50) activity values against parasite replication (e.g. o-risedronate, IC(50) = 220 nM for T. brucei rhodesiense; risedronate, IC(50) = 490 nM for T. gondii). In T. cruzi, the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate risedronate is shown to inhibit sterol biosynthesis at a pre-squalene level, most likely by inhibiting farnesylpyrophosphate synthase. Bisphosphonates therefore appear to have potential in treating parasitic protozoan diseases.

  9. Anti-apical-membrane-antigen-1 antibody is more effective than anti-42-kilodalton-merozoite-surface-protein-1 antibody in inhibiting plasmodium falciparum growth, as determined by the in vitro growth inhibition assay.

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    Miura, Kazutoyo; Zhou, Hong; Diouf, Ababacar; Moretz, Samuel E; Fay, Michael P; Miller, Louis H; Martin, Laura B; Pierce, Mark A; Ellis, Ruth D; Mullen, Gregory E D; Long, Carole A

    2009-07-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(42)) are leading malaria vaccine candidates. Several preclinical and clinical trials have been conducted, and an in vitro parasite growth inhibition assay has been used to evaluate the biological activities of the resulting antibodies. In a U.S. phase 1 trial with AMA1-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909, the vaccination elicited anti-AMA1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) which showed up to 96% inhibition. However, antibodies induced by MSP1(42)-C1/Alhydrogel plus CPG 7909 vaccine showed less than 32% inhibition in vitro. To determine whether anti-MSP1(42) IgG had less growth-inhibitory activity than anti-AMA1 IgG in vitro, the amounts of IgG that produced 50% inhibition of parasite growth (Ab(50)) were compared for rabbit and human antibodies. The Ab(50)s of rabbit and human anti-MSP1(42) IgGs were significantly higher (0.21 and 0.62 mg/ml, respectively) than those of anti-AMA1 IgGs (0.07 and 0.10 mg/ml, respectively) against 3D7 parasites. Ab(50) data against FVO parasites also demonstrated significant differences. We further investigated the Ab(50)s of mouse and monkey anti-AMA1 IgGs and showed that there were significant differences between the species (mouse, 0.28 mg/ml, and monkey, 0.14 mg/ml, against 3D7 parasites). Although it is unknown whether growth-inhibitory activity in vitro reflects protective immunity in vivo, this study showed that the Ab(50) varies with both antigen and species. Our data provide a benchmark for antibody levels for future AMA1- or MSP1(42)-based vaccine development efforts in preclinical and clinical trials.

  10. Antibodies against the Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein from naturally exposed individuals living in a Brazilian malaria-endemic area can inhibit in vitro parasite growth

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    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Bianco, Cesare; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2011-01-01

    of P. falciparum in vitro, both in the presence (ADCI) and absence (GI) of monocytes. The inhibitory effect on parasite growth was comparable to the effect of IgGs purified from pooled sera from hyperimmune African individuals. Interestingly, in the ADCI test, higher levels of tumour necrosis factor...... alpha (TNF-a) were observed in the supernatant from cultures with higher parasitemias. Our data suggest that the antibody response induced by GLURP-R0 in naturally exposed individuals may have an important role in controlling parasitemia because these antibodies are able to inhibit the in vitro growth...... of P. falciparum with or without the cooperation from monocytes. Our results also indicate that TNF-a may not be relevant for the inhibitory effect on P. falciparum in vitro growth....

  11. Peptide Inhibition of Topoisomerase IB from Plasmodium falciparum

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    Amit Roy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of diseases inflicted by protozoan parasites such as Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium, which pose a serious threat to human health worldwide, depends on a rather small number of antiparasite drugs, of which many are toxic and/or inefficient. Moreover, the increasing occurrence of drug-resistant parasites emphasizes the need for new and effective antiprotozoan drugs. In the current study, we describe a synthetic peptide, WRWYCRCK, with inhibitory effect on the essential enzyme topoisomerase I from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The peptide inhibits specifically the transition from noncovalent to covalent DNA binding of P. falciparum topoisomerase I, while it does not affect the ligation step of catalysis. A mechanistic explanation for this inhibition is provided by molecular docking analyses. Taken together the presented results suggest that synthetic peptides may represent a new class of potential antiprotozoan drugs.

  12. Eleganolone, a Diterpene from the French Marine Alga Bifurcaria bifurcata Inhibits Growth of the Human Pathogens Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum

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    Anne-Marie Rusig

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic extracts of 20 species of French seaweed have been screened against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense trypomastigotes, the parasite responsible for sleeping sickness. These extracts have previously shown potent antiprotozoal activities in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania donovani. The selectivity of the extracts was also evaluated by testing cytotoxicity on a mammalian L6 cell line. The ethyl acetate extract of the brown seaweed, Bifurcaria bifurcata, showed strong trypanocidal activity with a mild selectivity index (IC50 = 0.53 µg/mL; selectivity index (SI = 11.6. Bio-guided fractionation led to the isolation of eleganolone, the main diterpenoid isolated from this species. Eleganolone contributes only mildly to the trypanocidal activity of the ethyl acetate extract (IC50 = 45.0 µM, SI = 4.0. However, a selective activity against P. falciparum erythrocytic stages in vitro has been highlighted (IC50 = 7.9 µM, SI = 21.6.

  13. Eleganolone, a Diterpene from the French Marine Alga Bifurcaria bifurcata Inhibits Growth of the Human Pathogens Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum

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    Gallé, Jean-Baptiste; Attioua, Barthélémy; Kaiser, Marcel; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Lobstein, Annelise; Vonthron-Sénécheau, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Organic extracts of 20 species of French seaweed have been screened against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense trypomastigotes, the parasite responsible for sleeping sickness. These extracts have previously shown potent antiprotozoal activities in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania donovani. The selectivity of the extracts was also evaluated by testing cytotoxicity on a mammalian L6 cell line. The ethyl acetate extract of the brown seaweed, Bifurcaria bifurcata, showed strong trypanocidal activity with a mild selectivity index (IC50 = 0.53 µg/mL; selectivity index (SI) = 11.6). Bio-guided fractionation led to the isolation of eleganolone, the main diterpenoid isolated from this species. Eleganolone contributes only mildly to the trypanocidal activity of the ethyl acetate extract (IC50 = 45.0 µM, SI = 4.0). However, a selective activity against P. falciparum erythrocytic stages in vitro has been highlighted (IC50 = 7.9 µM, SI = 21.6). PMID:23442789

  14. Loading of erythrocyte membrane with pentacyclic triterpenes inhibits Plasmodium falciparum invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staalsø, Trine; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    Lupeol and betulinic acid inhibit the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum parasites by inhibition of the invasion of merozoites into erythrocytes. This conclusion is based on experiments employing parasite cultures synchronized by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Identical inhibitory effects were...

  15. In vitro Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity assay: inhibition of parasite growth by incorporation of stomatocytogenic amphiphiles into the erythrocyte membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staerk, Dan; Christensen, Jette;

    2002-01-01

    and the membrane curvature changes caused by lupeol was observed. Preincubation of erythrocytes with lupeol, followed by extensive washing, made the cells unsuitable for parasite growth, suggesting that the compound incorporates into erythrocyte membrane irreversibly. On the other hand, lupeol-treated parasite...

  16. In vitro Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity assay: inhibition of parasite growth by incorporation of stomatocytogenic amphiphiles into the erythrocyte membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staerk, Dan; Christensen, Jette

    2002-01-01

    and the membrane curvature changes caused by lupeol was observed. Preincubation of erythrocytes with lupeol, followed by extensive washing, made the cells unsuitable for parasite growth, suggesting that the compound incorporates into erythrocyte membrane irreversibly. On the other hand, lupeol-treated parasite...

  17. HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole inhibit plasmodium liver stages.

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    Hobbs, Charlotte V; Voza, Tatiana; De La Vega, Patricia; Vanvliet, Jillian; Conteh, Solomon; Penzak, Scott R; Fay, Michael P; Anders, Nicole; Ilmet, Tiina; Li, Yonghua; Borkowsky, William; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E; Sinnis, Photini

    2012-12-01

    Although nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are usually part of first-line treatment regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), their activity on Plasmodium liver stages remains unexplored. Additionally, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), used for opportunistic infection prophylaxis in HIV-exposed infants and HIV-infected patients, reduces clinical episodes of malaria; however, TMP-SMX effect on Plasmodium liver stages requires further study. We characterized NNRTI and TMP-SMX effects on Plasmodium liver stages in vivo using Plasmodium yoelii. On the basis of these results, we conducted in vitro studies assessing TMP-SMX effects on the rodent parasites P. yoelii and Plasmodium berghei and on the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Our data showed NNRTI treatment modestly reduced P. yoelii liver stage parasite burden and minimally extended prepatent period. TMP-SMX administration significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden, preventing development of patent parasitemia in vivo. TMP-SMX inhibited development of rodent and P. falciparum liver stage parasites in vitro. NNRTIs modestly affect liver stage Plasmodium parasites, whereas TMP-SMX prevents patent parasitemia. Because drugs that inhibit liver stages target parasites when they are present in lower numbers, these results may have implications for eradication efforts. Understanding HIV drug effects on Plasmodium liver stages will aid in optimizing treatment regimens for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected infected patients in malaria-endemic areas.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum metacaspase PfMCA-1 triggers a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease to promote cell death.

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    Benoît Meslin

    Full Text Available Activation of proteolytic cell death pathways may circumvent drug resistance in deadly protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania. To this end, it is important to define the cell death pathway(s in parasites and thus characterize proteases such as metacaspases (MCA, which have been reported to induce cell death in plants and Leishmania parasites. We, therefore, investigated whether the cell death function of MCA is conserved in different protozoan parasite species such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major, focusing on the substrate specificity and functional role in cell survival as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisae. Our results show that, similarly to Leishmania, Plasmodium MCA exhibits a calcium-dependent, arginine-specific protease activity and its expression in yeast induced growth inhibition as well as an 82% increase in cell death under oxidative stress, a situation encountered by parasites during the host or when exposed to drugs such as artemisins. Furthermore, we show that MCA cell death pathways in both Plasmodium and Leishmania, involve a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease. Our data provide evidence that MCA from both Leishmania and Plasmodium falciparum is able to induce cell death in stress conditions, where it specifically activates a downstream enzyme as part of a cell death pathway. This enzymatic activity is also induced by the antimalarial drug chloroquine in erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Interestingly, we found that blocking parasite cell death influences their drug sensitivity, a result which could be used to create therapeutic strategies that by-pass drug resistance mechanisms by acting directly on the innate pathways of protozoan cell death.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum 19-kilodalton merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1)-specific antibodies that interfere with parasite growth in vitro can inhibit MSP1 processing, merozoite invasion, and intracellular parasite development.

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    Moss, David K; Remarque, Edmond J; Faber, Bart W; Cavanagh, David R; Arnot, David E; Thomas, Alan W; Holder, Anthony A

    2012-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) is a target for malaria vaccine development. Antibodies to the 19-kDa carboxy-terminal region referred to as MSP1(19) inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth, with some MSP1-specific antibodies shown to inhibit the proteolytic processing of MSP1 that occurs at invasion. We investigated a series of antibodies purified from rabbits immunized with MSP1(19) and AMA1 recombinant proteins for their ability to inhibit parasite growth, initially looking at MSP1 processing. Although significant inhibition of processing was mediated by several of the antibody samples, there was no clear relationship with overall growth inhibition by the same antibodies. However, no antibody samples inhibited processing but not invasion, suggesting that inhibition of MSP1 processing contributes to but is not the only mechanism of antibody-mediated inhibition of invasion and growth. Examining other mechanisms by which MSP1-specific antibodies inhibit parasite growth, we show that MSP1(19)-specific antibodies are taken up into invaded erythrocytes, where they persist for significant periods and result in delayed intracellular parasite development. This delay may result from antibody interference with coalescence of MSP1(19)-containing vesicles with the food vacuole. Antibodies raised against a modified recombinant MSP1(19) sequence were more efficient at delaying intracellular growth than those to the wild-type protein. We propose that antibodies specific for MSP1(19) can mediate inhibition of parasite growth by at least three mechanisms: inhibition of MSP1 processing, direct inhibition of invasion, and inhibition of parasite development following invasion. The balance between mechanisms may be modulated by modifying the immunogen used to induce the antibodies.

  20. Marine organism sulfated polysaccharides exhibiting significant antimalarial activity and inhibition of red blood cell invasion by Plasmodium.

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    Marques, Joana; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A S; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2016-04-13

    The antimalarial activity of heparin, against which there are no resistances known, has not been therapeutically exploited due to its potent anticoagulating activity. Here, we have explored the antiplasmodial capacity of heparin-like sulfated polysaccharides from the sea cucumbers Ludwigothurea grisea and Isostichopus badionotus, from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis, and from the marine sponge Desmapsamma anchorata. In vitro experiments demonstrated for most compounds significant inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth at low-anticoagulant concentrations. This activity was found to operate through inhibition of erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium, likely mediated by a coating of the parasite similar to that observed for heparin. In vivo four-day suppressive tests showed that several of the sulfated polysaccharides improved the survival of Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice. In one animal treated with I. badionotus fucan parasitemia was reduced from 10.4% to undetectable levels, and Western blot analysis revealed the presence of antibodies against P. yoelii antigens in its plasma. The retarded invasion mediated by sulfated polysaccharides, and the ensuing prolonged exposure of Plasmodium to the immune system, can be explored for the design of new therapeutic approaches against malaria where heparin-related polysaccharides of low anticoagulating activity could play a dual role as drugs and as potentiators of immune responses.

  1. Marine organism sulfated polysaccharides exhibiting significant antimalarial activity and inhibition of red blood cell invasion by Plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A. S.; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The antimalarial activity of heparin, against which there are no resistances known, has not been therapeutically exploited due to its potent anticoagulating activity. Here, we have explored the antiplasmodial capacity of heparin-like sulfated polysaccharides from the sea cucumbers Ludwigothurea grisea and Isostichopus badionotus, from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis, and from the marine sponge Desmapsamma anchorata. In vitro experiments demonstrated for most compounds significant inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum growth at low-anticoagulant concentrations. This activity was found to operate through inhibition of erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium, likely mediated by a coating of the parasite similar to that observed for heparin. In vivo four-day suppressive tests showed that several of the sulfated polysaccharides improved the survival of Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice. In one animal treated with I. badionotus fucan parasitemia was reduced from 10.4% to undetectable levels, and Western blot analysis revealed the presence of antibodies against P. yoelii antigens in its plasma. The retarded invasion mediated by sulfated polysaccharides, and the ensuing prolonged exposure of Plasmodium to the immune system, can be explored for the design of new therapeutic approaches against malaria where heparin-related polysaccharides of low anticoagulating activity could play a dual role as drugs and as potentiators of immune responses. PMID:27071342

  2. Glycerol inhibits water permeation through Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin.

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    Chen, Liao Y

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) is a multifunctional membrane protein in the plasma membrane of P. falciparum, the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. The current literature has established the science of PfAQP's structure, functions, and hydrogen-bonding interactions but left unanswered the following fundamental question: does glycerol modulate water permeation through aquaglyceroporin that conducts both glycerol and water? This paper provides an affirmative answer to this question of essential importance to the protein's functions. On the basis of the chemical-potential profile of glycerol from the extracellular bulk region, throughout PfAQP's conducting channel, to the cytoplasmic bulk region, this study shows the existence of a bound state of glycerol inside aquaglyceroporin's permeation pore, from which the dissociation constant is approximately 14μM. A glycerol molecule occupying the bound state occludes the conducting pore through which permeating molecules line up in single file by hydrogen-bonding with one another and with the luminal residues of aquaglyceroporin. In this way, glycerol inhibits permeation of water and other permeants through aquaglyceroporin. The biological implications of this theory are discussed and shown to agree with the existent in vitro data. It turns out that the structure of aquaglyceroporin is perfect for the van der Waals interactions between the protein and glycerol to cause the existence of the bound state deep inside the conducting pore and, thus to play an unexpected but significant role in aquaglyceroporin's functions.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum Choline Kinase Inhibition Leads to a Major Decrease in Phosphatidylethanolamine Causing Parasite Death

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    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Denton, Helen; Rubio-Ruiz, Belén; López-Gutiérrez, Borja; Entrena, Antonio; Izquierdo, Luis; Smith, Terry K.; Conejo-García, Ana; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by different species of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium, with P. falciparum being the deadliest. Increasing parasitic resistance to existing antimalarials makes the necessity of novel avenues to treat this disease an urgent priority. The enzymes responsible for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine are attractive drug targets to treat malaria as their selective inhibition leads to an arrest of the parasite’s growth and cures malaria in a mouse model. We present here a detailed study that reveals a mode of action for two P. falciparum choline kinase inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. The compounds present distinct binding modes to the choline/ethanolamine-binding site of P. falciparum choline kinase, reflecting different types of inhibition. Strikingly, these compounds primarily inhibit the ethanolamine kinase activity of the P. falciparum choline kinase, leading to a severe decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine levels within P. falciparum, which explains the resulting growth phenotype and the parasites death. These studies provide an understanding of the mode of action, and act as a springboard for continued antimalarial development efforts selectively targeting P. falciparum choline kinase. PMID:27616047

  4. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by pyrazofurin, an inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis de novo.

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    Scott, H V; Gero, A M; O'Sullivan, W J

    1986-01-01

    The effect of pyrazofurin, an inhibitor of UMP synthesis, on Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro has been studied. ID50 values (concentration of compound causing 50% inhibition of [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation) for the FCQ-27, FCI-1 and K-1 (chloroquine-resistant) isolates were 10 +/- 8.7, 6.4 +/- 5.3 and 6.3 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively. Comparative ID50 values for chloroquine were 13.5 +/- 4.2, 22.8 +/- 7.6 and 343 +/- 114 microM, respectively. Over the 48-h intraerythrocytic cycle of tightly synchronized parasites, pyrazofurin both reduced the parasitemia and retarded the maturation of trophozoites and schizonts. Addition of uracil or uridine to the in vitro culture did not decrease the anti-parasitic activity of pyrazofurin. Chloroquine reduced the parasitemia, but did not retard development of the remaining viable parasites. Pyrazofurin (20 microM) caused a 50% inhibition of parasite orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.2.10) and, in the presence of adenosine kinase and ATP, a 73% inhibition of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase (E.C. 4.1.1.23).

  5. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

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    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds.

  6. Inhibition of human lymphocyte proliferative response by serum from Plasmodium falciparum infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G; Svenson, M; Bygbjerg, I C

    1987-01-01

    initiation of treatment suppressed the in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response to both Plasmodium-derived antigens and an unrelated antigen (PPD-tuberculin). The suppressive effect was lost if the serum was incubated at 56 degrees C for 30 min, and the effect was not HLA-restricted since the inhibition...

  7. Optimization and inhibition of the adherent ability of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Smith

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of the 1-2 million malaria associated deaths that occur each year are due to anemia and cerebral malaria (the attachment of erythrocytes containing mature forms of Plasmodium falciparum to the endothelial cells that line the vascular beds of the brain. A "model" system"for the study of cerebral malaria employs amelanotic melanoma cells as the "target"cells in an vitro cytoadherence assay. Using this model system we determined that the optimum pH for adherence is 6.6 to 6.8, that high concentrations of Ca²* (50mM result in increased levels of binding, and that the type of buffer used influences adherence (Bis Tris > MOPS > HEPES > PIPES. We also observed that the ability of infected erythrocytes to cytoadhere varied from (erythrocyte donor to donor. We have produced murine monoclonal antibodies against P. falciparum-infected red cells which recognized modified forms of human band 3; these inhibit the adherence of infected erythrocytes to melanoma cells in a doso responsive fashion. Antimalarials (chloroquine, quinacrine, mefloquine, artemisinin, on the other hand, affected adherence in an indirect fashion i.e. since cytoadherence is due, in part to the presence of knobs on the surface of the infected erythrocyte, and knob formation is dependent on intracellular parasite growth, when plasmodial development is inhibited so is knob production, and consequently adherence is ablated.

  8. Loading of erythrocyte membrane with pentacyclic triterpenes inhibits Plasmodium falciparum invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Hanne L; Staalsø, Trine; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-06-01

    Lupeol and betulinic acid inhibit the proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum parasites by inhibition of the invasion of merozoites into erythrocytes. This conclusion is based on experiments employing parasite cultures synchronized by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Identical inhibitory effects were observed upon incubation of synchronous parasite cultures in the presence of the triterpenoids, and when the parasite cultures were grown in a triterpenoid-free medium with erythrocytes preloaded with the triterpenoids.

  9. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  10. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum oocyst production by membrane-permeant cysteine protease inhibitor E64d.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eksi, S.; Czesny, B.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Eling, W.M.C.; Williamson, K.C.

    2007-01-01

    During asexual intraerythrocytic growth, Plasmodium falciparum utilizes hemoglobin obtained from the host red blood cell (RBC) as a nutrient source. Papain-like cysteine proteases, falcipains 2 and 3, have been reported to be involved in hemoglobin digestion and are targets of current antimalarial d

  11. Computational insights into the suicide inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Fk506-binding protein 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Corey A; Boyd, Russell J

    2015-08-15

    Malaria is a parasite affecting millions of people worldwide. With the risk of malarial resistance reaching catastrophic levels, novel methods into the inhibition of this disease need to be prioritized. The exploitation of active site differences between parasitic and human peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases can be used for suicide inhibition, effectively poisoning the parasite without affecting the patient. This method of inhibition was explored using Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens Fk506-binding proteins as templates for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. Modification of the natural substrate has shown suicide inhibition is a valid approach for novel anti-malarials with little risk for parasitic resistance.

  12. Acquisition of growth-inhibitory antibodies against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J McCallum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies that inhibit the growth of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum may play an important role in acquired and vaccine-induced immunity in humans. However, the acquisition and activity of these antibodies is not well understood. METHODS: We tested dialysed serum and purified immunoglobulins from Kenyan children and adults for inhibition of P. falciparum blood-stage growth in vitro using different parasite lines. Serum antibodies were measured by ELISA to blood-stage parasite antigens, extracted from P. falciparum schizonts, and to recombinant merozoite surface protein 1 (42 kDa C-terminal fragment, MSP1-42. RESULTS: Antibodies to blood-stage antigens present in schizont protein extract and to recombinant MSP1-42 significantly increased with age and were highly correlated. In contrast, growth-inhibitory activity was not strongly associated with age and tended to decline marginally with increasing age and exposure, with young children demonstrating the highest inhibitory activity. Comparison of growth-inhibitory activity among samples collected from the same population at different time points suggested that malaria transmission intensity influenced the level of growth-inhibitory antibodies. Antibodies to recombinant MSP1-42 were not associated with growth inhibition and high immunoglobulin G levels were poorly predictive of inhibitory activity. The level of inhibitory activity against different isolates varied. CONCLUSIONS: Children can acquire growth-inhibitory antibodies at a young age, but once they are acquired they do not appear to be boosted by on-going exposure. Inhibitory antibodies may play a role in protection from early childhood malaria.

  13. Distinct biochemical properties of human serine hydroxymethyltransferase compared with the Plasmodium enzyme: implications for selective inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Chatchadaporn; Maenpuen, Somchart; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group from l-serine to tetrahydrofolate to yield glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. Our previous investigations have shown that SHMTs from Plasmodium spp. (P. falciparum, Pf; P. vivax, Pv) are different from the enzyme from rabbit liver in that Plasmodium SHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. In this report, the biochemical and biophysical properties of the Plasmodium and the human cytosolic form (hcSHMT) enzymes including ligand binding and kinetics were investigated. The data indicate that, similar to Plasmodium enzymes, hcSHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. However, hcSHMT displays many properties that are different from those of the Plasmodium enzymes. The molar absorption coefficient of hcSHMT-bound pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) is much greater than PvSHMT-bound or PfSHMT-bound PLP. The binding interactions of hcSHMT and Plasmodium SHMT with d-serine are different, as only the Plasmodium enzyme undergoes formation of a quinonoid-like species upon binding to d-serine. Furthermore, it has been noted that hcSHMT displays strong substrate inhibition by tetrahydrofolate (THF) (at THF > 40 μm), compared with SHMTs from Plasmodium and other species. The pH-activity profile of hcSHMT shows higher activities at lower pH values corresponding to a pKa value of 7.8 ± 0.1. Thiosemicarbazide reacts with hcSHMT following a one-step model [k1 of 12 ± 0.6 m(-1) ·s(-1) and k-1 of (1.0 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) s(-1) ], while the same reaction with PfSHMT involves at least three steps. All data indicated that the ligand binding environment of SHMT from human and Plasmodium are different, indicating that it should be possible to develop species-selective inhibitors in future studies. serine hydroxymethyltransferase, EC 2.1.2.1; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, EC 1.5.1.5. © 2014 FEBS.

  14. Growth of plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes containing abnormal membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, S. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (USA) City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Roth, E.F. Jr.; Cheng, B.; Rybicki, A.C.; Sussman, I.I.; Wong, M.; Nagel, R.L.; Schwartz, R.S. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (USA)); Wang, W. (St. Judes Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA)); Ranney, H.M. (Univ. of California, San Diego (USA))

    1990-09-01

    To evaluate the role of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane proteins in the invasion and maturation of Plasmodium falciparum, the authors have studied, in culture, abnormal RBCs containing quantitative or qualitative membrane protein defects. These defects included hereditary spherocytosis (HS) due to decreases in the content of spectrin (HS(Sp{sup +})), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) due to protein 4.1 deficiency (HE(4.1{sup 0})), HE due to a spectrin {alpha}I domain structural variant that results in increased content of spectrin dimers (HE(Sp{alpha}{sup I/65})), and band 3 structural variants. Parasite invasion, measured by the initial uptake of ({sup 3}H)hypoxanthine 18 hr after inoculation with merozoites, was normal in all of the pathologic RBCs. In contrast, RBCs from six HS(Sp{sup +}) subjects showed marked growth inhibition that became apparent after the first or second growth cycle. The extent of decreased parasite growth in HS(Sp{sup +}) RBCs closely correlated with the extent of RBC spectrin deficiency. Homogeneous subpopulations of dense HS RBCs exhibited decreased parasite growth to the same extent as did HS whole blood. RBCs from four HE subjects showed marked parasite growth and development.

  15. Methylene blue inhibits lumefantrine-resistant Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Victor Irungu; Mumo, Ruth Mwende; Kiboi, Daniel Muthui; Omar, Sabah Ahmed; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah Waithera; Ozwara, Hastings Suba

    2016-06-30

    Chemotherapy still is the most effective way to control malaria, a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. The large-scale use of the combination therapy artemether-lumefantrine for malaria treatment in Africa predisposes lumefantrine to emergence of resistance. There is need to identify drugs that can be used as substitutes to lumefantrine for use in combination therapy. Methylene blue, a synthetic anti-methemoglobinemia drug, has been shown to contain antimalarial properties, making it a candidate for drug repurposing. The present study sought to determine antiplasmodial effects of methylene blue against lumefantrine- and pyrimethamine-resistant strains of P. berghei. Activity of methylene blue was assessed using the classical four-day test on mice infected with lumefantrine-resistant and pyrimethamine-resistant P. berghei. A dose of 45 mg/kg/day was effective for testing ED90. Parasitemia and mice survival was determined. At 45 mg/kg/day, methylene blue sustained significant parasite inhibition, over 99%, for at least 6 days post-treatment against lumefantrine-resistant and pyrimethamine-resistant P. berghei (p = 0.0086 and p = 0.0191, respectively). No serious adverse effects were observed. Our results indicate that methylene blue at a concentration of 45 mg/kg/day confers over 99% inhibition against lumefantrine- and pyrimethamine-resistant P. berghei for six days. This shows the potential use methylene blue in the development of antimalarials against lumefantrine- and pyrimethamine-resistant parasites.

  16. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Magali; Wall, Richard J; Douglass, Alexander P; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Ferguson, David J P; Kaindama, Mbinda L; Brusini, Lorenzo; Joshi, Nimitray; Rchiad, Zineb; Brady, Declan; Guttery, David S; Wheatley, Sally P; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Holder, Anthony A; Pain, Arnab; Wickstead, Bill; Tewari, Rita

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  17. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes

    KAUST Repository

    Roques, Magali

    2015-11-13

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum avoids change in erythrocytic surface expression of phagocytosis markers during inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Kohnke, Hannes; Maretty, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. It may be produced by a parasite NO synthase (NOS) or by nitrate reduction. The parasite's benefit of NO accumulation is not understood. We investigated if inhibiting the P. falciparum NOS with specific and unspecific N...

  19. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, JVW

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available :235 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/235 Open AccessR E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Research articlePlasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein... and metabolite levels John VW Becker†1, Linda Mtwisha†1, Bridget G Crampton1, Stoyan Stoychev1, Anna C van Brummelen1, Shaun Reeksting2, Abraham I Louw2, Lyn-Marie Birkholtz2 and Dalu T Mancama*1 Abstract Background: Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent...

  20. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA nanoparticle against malaria topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attasart, Pongsopee; Boonma, Siriwan; Sunintaboon, Panya; Tanwilai, Dolpawan; Pothikasikorn, Jinrapa; Noonpakdee, Wilai Tienrungroj

    2016-05-01

    The need to develop new effective antimalarial agents is urgent due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance to all current drugs by the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. A promising avenue is in the development of antimalarials based on RNA interference targeting expression of malaria parasite vital genes, viz. DNA topoisomerase II gene (PfTOP2). Biodegradable chitosan nanoparticle system has proven to be effective in delivering DNA and small double-stranded interfering RNA to target cells. We have employed a long double-stranded (dsRNA) targeting the coding region of PfTOP2 that is complexed with chitosan nanoparticles in order to interfere with the cognate mRNA expression and examined its effect on P. falciparum growth in culture. Exposure of ring stage-infected erythrocytes to 10 μg/ml PfTOP2 chitosan/dsRNA nanoparticles for 48 h resulted in 71% growth inhibition as determined by [(3)H] hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic assays, compared with 41% inhibition using an equivalent amount of free PfTOP2 dsRNA or 12% with unrelated chitosan/dsRNA nanoparticles. This inhibition was shown to occur during maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages. RT-PCR analysis indicated 56% and 38% decrease in PfTOP2 transcript levels in P. falciparum trophozoites treated with PfTOP2 dsRNA nanoparticles and free PfTOP2 dsRNA respectively. These results suggest that chitosan-based nanoparticles might be a useful tool for delivering dsRNA into malaria parasites.

  1. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by substances isolated from Amazonian antimalarial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter F de Andrade-Neto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a quassinoid, neosergeolide, isolated from the roots and stems of Picrolemma sprucei (Simaroubaceae, the indole alkaloids ellipticine and aspidocarpine, isolated from the bark of Aspidosperma vargasii and A. desmanthum (Apocynaceae, respectively, and 4-nerolidylcatechol, isolated from the roots of Pothomorphe peltata (Piperaceae, all presented significant in vitro inhibition (more active than quinine and chloroquine of the multi-drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Neosergeolide presented activity in the nanomolar range. This is the first report on the antimalarial activity of these known, natural compounds. This is also the first report on the isolation of aspidocarpine from A. desmanthum. These compounds are good candidates for pre-clinical tests as novel lead structures with the aim of finding new antimalarial prototypes and lend support to the traditional use of the plants from which these compounds are derived.

  2. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Roques

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  3. Translocation of sickle cell erythrocyte microRNAs into Plasmodium falciparum inhibits parasite translation and contributes to malaria resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMonte, Gregory; Philip, Nisha; Reardon, Joseph; Lacsina, Joshua R; Majoros, William; Chapman, Lesley; Thornburg, Courtney D; Telen, Marilyn J; Ohler, Uwe; Nicchitta, Christopher V; Haystead, Timothy; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2012-08-16

    Erythrocytes carrying a variant hemoglobin allele (HbS), which causes sickle cell disease and resists infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The molecular basis of this resistance, which has long been recognized as multifactorial, remains incompletely understood. Here we show that the dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) composition, of either heterozygous HbAS or homozygous HbSS erythrocytes, contributes to resistance against P. falciparum. During the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum, a subset of erythrocyte miRNAs translocate into the parasite. Two miRNAs, miR-451 and let-7i, were highly enriched in HbAS and HbSS erythrocytes, and these miRNAs, along with miR-223, negatively regulated parasite growth. Surprisingly, we found that miR-451 and let-7i integrated into essential parasite messenger RNAs and, via impaired ribosomal loading, resulted in translational inhibition. Hence, sickle cell erythrocytes exhibit cell-intrinsic resistance to malaria in part through an atypical miRNA activity, which may represent a unique host defense strategy against complex eukaryotic pathogens.

  4. Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Soares de Maria; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of children's morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing nearly one million deaths annually. The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, synthesizes fatty acids employing the Type II fatty acid biosynthesis system (FAS II), unlike humans that rely on the Type I (FAS I) pathway. The FAS II system elongates acyl fatty acid precursors of the cell membrane in Plasmodium. Enoyl reductase (ENR) enzyme is a member of the FAS II system. Here we present steady-state kinetics, pre-steady-state kinetics, and equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy data that allowed proposal of P. falciparum ENR (PfENR) enzyme mechanism. Moreover, building on previous results, the present study also evaluates the PfENR inhibition by the pentacyano(isoniazid)ferrateII compound. This inorganic complex represents a new class of lead compounds for the development of antimalarial agents focused on the inhibition of PfENR. PMID:21603269

  5. Effects of bisphosphonates on the growth of Entamoeba histolytica and Plasmodium species in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhash; Chan, Julian M W; Lea, Christopher R; Meints, Gary A; Lewis, Jared C; Tovian, Zev S; Flessner, Ryan M; Loftus, Timothy C; Bruchhaus, Iris; Kendrick, Howard; Croft, Simon L; Kemp, Robert G; Kobayashi, Seiki; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Oldfield, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The effects of a series of 102 bisphosphonates on the inhibition of growth of Entamoeba histolytica and Plasmodium falciparum in vitro have been determined, and selected compounds were further investigated for their in vivo activity. Forty-seven compounds tested were active (IC(50) histolytica growth in vitro. The most active compounds (IC(50) approximately 4-9 microM) were nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates with relatively large aromatic side chains. Simple n-alkyl-1-hydroxy-1,1-bisphosphonates, known inhibitors of the enzyme farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) synthase, were also active, with optimal activity being found with C9-C10 side chains. However, numerous other nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates known to be potent FPP synthase inhibitors, such as risedronate or pamidronate, had little or no activity. Several pyridine-derived bisphosphonates were quite active (IC(50) approximately 10-20 microM), and this activity was shown to correlate with the basicity of the aromatic group, with activity decreasing with increasing pK(a) values. The activities of all compounds were tested versus a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) cell line to enable an estimate of the therapeutic index (TI). Five bisphosphonates were selected and then screened for their ability to delay the development of amebic liver abscess formation in an E. histolytica infected hamster model. Two compounds were found to decrease liver abscess formation at 10 mg/kg ip with little or no effect on normal liver mass. With P. falciparum, 35 compounds had IC(50) values vivo investigation in a Plasmodium berghei ANKA BALB/c mouse suppressive test. The most active compound, a C9 n-alkyl side chain containing bisphosphonate, caused an 80% reduction in parasitemia with no overt toxicity. Taken together, these results show that bisphosphonates appear to be useful lead compounds for the development of novel antiamebic and antimalarial drugs.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum Bloom homologue, a nucleocytoplasmic protein, translocates in 3' to 5' direction and is essential for parasite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Farhana; Tarique, Mohammed; Tuteja, Renu

    2016-05-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium, particularly Plasmodium falciparum, is the most serious and widespread parasitic disease of humans. RecQ helicase family members are essential in homologous recombination-based error-free DNA repair processes in all domains of life. RecQ helicases present in each organism differ and several homologues have been identified in various multicellular organisms. These proteins are involved in various pathways of DNA metabolism by providing duplex unwinding function. Five members of RecQ family are present in Homo sapiens but P. falciparum contains only two members of this family. Here we report the detailed biochemical and functional characterization of the Bloom (Blm) homologue (PfBlm) from P. falciparum 3D7 strain. Purified PfBlm exhibits ATPase and 3' to 5' direction specific DNA helicase activity. The calculated average reaction rate of ATPase was ~13 pmol of ATP hydrolyzed/min/pmol of enzyme. The immunofluorescence assay results show that PfBlm is expressed in all the stages of intraerythrocytic development of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain. In some stages of development in addition to nucleus PfBlm also localizes in the cytoplasm. The gene disruption studies of PfBlm by dsRNA showed that it is required for the ex-vivo intraerythrocytic development of the parasite P. falciparum 3D7 strain. The dsRNA mediated inhibition of parasite growth suggests that a variety of pathways are affected resulting in curtailing of the parasite growth. This study will be helpful in unravelling the basic mechanism of DNA transaction in the malaria parasite and additionally it may provide leads to understand the parasite specific characteristics of this protein.

  7. Effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) inhibitor SU5416 on in vitro cultures of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Staalsø, Trine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is taken up by parasitized red blood cells during malaria and stimulates intra-erythrocytic growth of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. The cause and consequence of this uptake is not understood. METHODS: Plasmodium falciparum was cultured in vi...

  8. Host PI(3,5)P2 activity is required for Plasmodium berghei growth during liver stage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieleke-Matos, Carolina; da Silva, Mafalda Lopes; Cabrita-Santos, Laura; Pires, Cristiana F; Ramalho, José S; Ikonomov, Ognian; Seixas, Elsa; Shisheva, Assia; Seabra, Miguel C; Barral, Duarte C

    2014-10-01

    Malaria parasites go through an obligatory liver stage before they infect erythrocytes and cause disease symptoms. In the host hepatocytes, the parasite is enclosed by a parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Here, we dissected the interaction between the Plasmodium parasite and the host cell late endocytic pathway and show that parasite growth is dependent on the phosphoinositide 5-kinase (PIKfyve) that converts phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] into phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2 ] in the endosomal system. We found that inhibition of PIKfyve by either pharmacological or non-pharmacological means causes a delay in parasite growth. Moreover, we show that the PI(3,5)P2 effector protein TRPML1 that is involved in late endocytic membrane fusion, is present in vesicles closely contacting the PVM and is necessary for parasite growth. Thus, our studies suggest that the parasite PVM is able to fuse with host late endocytic vesicles in a PI(3,5)P2 -dependent manner, allowing the exchange of material between the host and the parasite, which is essential for successful infection.

  9. Experimental inhibition of nitric oxide increases Plasmodium relictum (lineage SGS1) parasitaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Coraline; Cornet, Stéphane; Larcombe, Stephen; Sorci, Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    Malaria is a widespread vector-borne disease infecting a wide range of terrestrial vertebrates including reptiles, birds and mammals. In addition to being one of the most deadly infectious diseases for humans, malaria is a threat to wildlife. The host immune system represents the main defence against malaria parasites. Identifying the immune effectors involved in malaria resistance has therefore become a major focus of research. However, this has mostly involved humans and animal models (rodents) and how the immune system regulates malaria progression in non-model organisms has been largely ignored. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) as an immune effector contributing to the control of the acute phase of infection with the avian malaria agent Plasmodium relictum. We used experimental infections of domestic canaries in conjunction with the inhibition of the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to assess the protective function of NO during the infection, and the physiological costs paid by the host in the absence of an effective NO response. Our results show that birds treated with the iNOS inhibitor suffered from a higher parasitaemia, but did not pay a higher cost of infection (anaemia). While these findings confirm that NO contributes to the resistance to avian malaria during the acute phase of the infection, they also suggest that parasitaemia and costs of infection can be decoupled.

  10. Gamma ray irradiation inhibits Plasmodium falciparum multiplication in in vitro culture supplemented with tritium labeled hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARRY NUGROHO EKO SURNIYANTORO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Surniyantoro HNE, Darlina, Nurhayati S, Tetriana D, Syaifudin M. 2015. Gamma ray irradiation inhibits Plasmodium falciparum multiplication in in vitro culture supplemented with tritium labeled hypoxanthine. Nusantara Bioscience 8: 8-13. Malaria remains a major public health threat in the world. Therefore an attempt to create malaria vaccine for supporting the control of disease was taken by attenuating parasites with gamma rays and it was proven effective based on microscopic observation. Objective of this research was to assess the effectiveness of gamma rays to attenuate malaria parasites based on isotopic method. A laboratory strain of P. falciparum (3D7 was in vitro cultured with standard procedure and it was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 150-250 Gy and unirradiated parasites served as control. Twenty four hours after 1-2 µCi of 3H-hypoxanthine was added into culture 100 µl of medium was taken and was repeated at various times, then hypoxanthine incorporation was measured with beta counter. Microscopic observation of parasitemia in culture was also done. The results showed that there was a fluctuation in multiplication of parasites post irradiation mainly in higher dose (more than150 Gy. Irradiated of parasites were more active in incorporate with purine precursor up to 48 hours. Parasites returned to their highest activity at 116 hours after hypoxanthine addition. No significant difference was found among doses of irradiation with p of 0.05. This was quite different with the finding from microscopic observation. It was known that dose of 150 Gy was the most effective dose for inhibiting of the parasite multiplication where some factors affecting these facts.

  11. Structural basis for the inhibition of the essential Plasmodium falciparum M1 neutral aminopeptidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J.; Lowther, Jonathan; Stack, Colin M.; Golding, Sarah J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.; Trenholme, Katharine R.; Teuscher, Franka; Donnelly, Sheila M.; Grembecka, Jolanta; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Pawel; DeGori, Ross; Buckle, Ashley M.; Gardiner, Donald L.; Whisstock, James C.; Dalton, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites are responsible for the major global disease malaria, which results in >2 million deaths each year. With the rise of drug-resistant malarial parasites, novel drug targets and lead compounds are urgently required for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we address this important problem by targeting the malarial neutral aminopeptidases that are involved in the terminal stages of hemoglobin digestion and essential for the provision of amino acids used for parasite growth and development within the erythrocyte. We characterize the structure and substrate specificity of one such aminopeptidase, PfA-M1, a validated drug target. The X-ray crystal structure of PfA-M1 alone and in complex with the generic inhibitor, bestatin, and a phosphinate dipeptide analogue with potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity, hPheP[CH2]Phe, reveals features within the protease active site that are critical to its function as an aminopeptidase and can be exploited for drug development. These results set the groundwork for the development of antimalarial therapeutics that target the neutral aminopeptidases of the parasite. PMID:19196988

  12. Structural basis for the inhibition of the essential Plasmodium falciparum M1 neutral aminopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Lowther, Jonathan; Stack, Colin M; Golding, Sarah J; Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Trenholme, Katharine R; Teuscher, Franka; Donnelly, Sheila M; Grembecka, Jolanta; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Pawel; Degori, Ross; Buckle, Ashley M; Gardiner, Donald L; Whisstock, James C; Dalton, John P

    2009-02-24

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites are responsible for the major global disease malaria, which results in >2 million deaths each year. With the rise of drug-resistant malarial parasites, novel drug targets and lead compounds are urgently required for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we address this important problem by targeting the malarial neutral aminopeptidases that are involved in the terminal stages of hemoglobin digestion and essential for the provision of amino acids used for parasite growth and development within the erythrocyte. We characterize the structure and substrate specificity of one such aminopeptidase, PfA-M1, a validated drug target. The X-ray crystal structure of PfA-M1 alone and in complex with the generic inhibitor, bestatin, and a phosphinate dipeptide analogue with potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity, hPheP[CH(2)]Phe, reveals features within the protease active site that are critical to its function as an aminopeptidase and can be exploited for drug development. These results set the groundwork for the development of antimalarial therapeutics that target the neutral aminopeptidases of the parasite.

  13. Environment-dependent morphology in plasmodium of true slime mold Physarum polycephalum and a network growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Takaba, Eri; Takizawa, Ginjiro

    2009-01-07

    Branching network growth patterns, depending on environmental conditions, in plasmodium of true slime mold Physarum polycephalum were investigated. Surprisingly, the patterns resemble those in bacterial colonies even though the biological mechanisms differ greatly. Bacterial colonies are collectives of microorganisms in which individual organisms have motility and interact through nutritious and chemical fields. In contrast, the plasmodium is a giant amoeba-like multinucleated unicellular organism that forms a network of tubular structures through which protoplasm streams. The cell motility of the plasmodium is generated by oscillation phenomena observed in the partial bodies, which interact through the tubular structures. First, we analyze characteristics of the morphology quantitatively, then we abstract local rules governing the growing process to construct a simple network growth model. This model is independent of specific systems, in which only two rules are applied. Finally, we discuss the mechanism of commonly observed biological pattern formations through comparison with the system of bacterial colonies.

  14. Growth and immunity conferred by a Plasmodium falciparum temperature sensitive mutant in Panamanian owl monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inselburg, J; Rossan, R N; Escajadillo, A

    1989-05-01

    We have compared the growth of the wild type Plasmodium falciparum strain Honduras 1 and a previously isolated temperature sensitive mutant of it, AP1-16, in Panamanian owl monkeys. We examined serially infected splenectomized and normal animals that were initially infected with cultured parasites that had been grown in a mixture of owl monkey and human erythrocytes. Initial infections in splenectomized monkeys were marked by multiple recrudescences. The mutant grew less well than the wild type in the splenectomized monkeys, as determined by lower peak and total parasitemias. In the splenectomized monkeys tested by rechallenge with the wild type parasite, the mutant stimulated a comparable degree of protection. That protection was manifested in 2 ways. There was a marked reduction in the level of the primary parasitemia in the rechallenged monkeys and an absence of recrudescent parasitemias after the primary parasitemia. The potential value of generating and studying temperature sensitive P. falciparum strains that show attenuated growth is considered.

  15. Crystal structures of the free and inhibited forms of plasmepsin I (PMI) from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Horimoto, Yasumi; Xiao, Huogen; Miura, Takuya; Hidaka, Koushi; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Wlodawer, Alexander; Yada, Rickey Y.; Gustchina, Alla (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2011-09-06

    Plasmepsin I (PMI) is one of the four vacuolar pepsin-like proteases responsible for hemoglobin degradation by the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and the only one with no crystal structure reported to date. Due to substantial functional redundancy of these enzymes, lack of inhibition of even a single plasmepsin can defeat efforts in creating effective antiparasitic agents. We have now solved crystal structures of the recombinant PMI as apoenzyme and in complex with the potent peptidic inhibitor, KNI-10006, at the resolution of 2.4 and 3.1 {angstrom}, respectively. The apoenzyme crystallized in the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and the structure has been refined to the final R-factor of 20.7%. The KNI-10006 bound enzyme crystallized in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3} with four molecules in the asymmetric unit and the structure has been refined to the final R-factor of 21.1%. In the PMI-KNI-10006 complex, the inhibitors were bound identically to all four enzyme molecules, with the opposite directionality of the main chain of KNI-10006 relative to the direction of the enzyme substrates. Such a mode of binding of inhibitors containing an allophenylnorstatine-dimethylthioproline insert in the P1-P1' positions, previously reported in a complex with PMIV, demonstrates the importance of satisfying the requirements for the proper positioning of the functional groups in the mechanism-based inhibitors towards the catalytic machinery of aspartic proteases, as opposed to binding driven solely by the specificity of the individual enzymes. A comparison of the structure of the PMI-KNI-10006 complex with the structures of other vacuolar plasmepsins identified the important differences between them and may help in the design of specific inhibitors targeting the individual enzymes.

  16. Crystal structures of the free and inhibited forms of plasmepsin I (PMI) from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Horimoto, Yasumi; Xiao, Huogen; Miura, Takuya; Hidaka, Koushi; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Wlodawer, Alexander; Yada, Rickey Y; Gustchina, Alla

    2011-07-01

    Plasmepsin I (PMI) is one of the four vacuolar pepsin-like proteases responsible for hemoglobin degradation by the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, and the only one with no crystal structure reported to date. Due to substantial functional redundancy of these enzymes, lack of inhibition of even a single plasmepsin can defeat efforts in creating effective antiparasitic agents. We have now solved crystal structures of the recombinant PMI as apoenzyme and in complex with the potent peptidic inhibitor, KNI-10006, at the resolution of 2.4 and 3.1Å, respectively. The apoenzyme crystallized in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and the structure has been refined to the final R-factor of 20.7%. The KNI-10006 bound enzyme crystallized in the tetragonal space group P4(3) with four molecules in the asymmetric unit and the structure has been refined to the final R-factor of 21.1%. In the PMI-KNI-10006 complex, the inhibitors were bound identically to all four enzyme molecules, with the opposite directionality of the main chain of KNI-10006 relative to the direction of the enzyme substrates. Such a mode of binding of inhibitors containing an allophenylnorstatine-dimethylthioproline insert in the P1-P1' positions, previously reported in a complex with PMIV, demonstrates the importance of satisfying the requirements for the proper positioning of the functional groups in the mechanism-based inhibitors towards the catalytic machinery of aspartic proteases, as opposed to binding driven solely by the specificity of the individual enzymes. A comparison of the structure of the PMI-KNI-10006 complex with the structures of other vacuolar plasmepsins identified the important differences between them and may help in the design of specific inhibitors targeting the individual enzymes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Targeted inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Two main strategies have been pursued for the development of an effective and targeted anti-cancer treatment. The first strategy comprised the generation of a targeted nanomedicine for the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation by blocking growth factor receptor pathways. The epidermal growth factor

  18. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez Jorge E

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  19. Cellulose filtration of blood from malaria patients for improving ex vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Minja, Daniel T R; Jespersen, Jakob S;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Establishing in vitro Plasmodium falciparum culture lines from patient parasite isolates can offer deeper understanding of geographic variations of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of malaria pathogenesis and immunity. Cellulose column filtration of blood is an inexpensive, rapid...... and effective method for the removal of host factors, such as leucocytes and platelets, significantly improving the purification of parasite DNA in a blood sample. METHODS: In this study, the effect of cellulose column filtration of venous blood on the initial in vitro growth of P. falciparum parasite isolates....... falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 genotyping was performed using nested PCR on extracted genomic DNA, and the var gene transcript levels were investigated, using quantitative PCR on extracted RNA, at admission and 4 days of culture. RESULTS: The cellulose-filtered parasites grew to higher parasitaemia...

  20. Ingested human insulin inhibits the mosquito NF-¿B-dependent immune response to Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    We showed previously that ingested human insulin activates the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in Anopheles stephensi and increases the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum. In other organisms insulin can alter immune responsiveness through regulation of NF-kB transcription fa...

  1. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the inhibition of SmTGR by Auranofin and its implications for Plasmodium falciparum inhibition

    KAUST Repository

    Caroli, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium falciparum are pathogen parasites that spend part of their lives in the blood stream of the human host and are therefore heavily exposed to fluxes of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). SmTGR, an essential enzyme of the S. mansoni ROS detoxification machinery, is known to be inhibited by Auranofin although the inhibition mechanism has not been completely clarified. Auranofin also kills P. falciparum, even if its molecular targets are unknown. Here, we used computational and docking techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of interaction between SmTGR and Auranofin. Furthermore, we took advantage of the homology relationship and of docking studies to assess if PfTR, the SmTGR malaria parasite homologue, can be a putative target for Auranofin. Our findings support a recently hypothesized molecular mechanism of inhibition for SmTGR and suggest that PfTR is indeed a possible and attractive drug target in P. falciparum. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  3. Hydroxyapatite growth inhibition by osteopontin hexapeptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, L D; Saadia, M; Ishal, J S; Tishbi, N; Leiderman, E; Kuyunov, I; Recca, B; Reitblat, C; Viswanathan, R

    2010-06-15

    The effects of three acidic hexapeptides on in vitro hydroxyapatite growth were characterized by pH-stat kinetic studies, adsorption isotherms, and molecular modeling. The three peptides, pSDEpSDE, SDESDE, and DDDDDD, are equal-length model compounds for the acidic sequences in osteopontin, a protein that inhibits mineral formation in both calcified and noncalcified tissues. Growth rates from 1.67 mM calcium and 1.00 mM phosphate solution were measured at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C in 150 mM NaCl. pSDEpSDE was a strong growth inhibitor when preadsorbed onto hydroxyapatite (HA) seeds from > or = 0.67 mM solutions, concentrations where adsorption isotherms showed relatively complete surface coverage. The nonphosphorylated SDESDE control showed no growth inhibition. Although it adsorbed to almost the same extent as pSDEpSDE, it rapidly desorbed under the pH-stat growth conditions while pSDEpSDE did not. DDDDDD exhibited weak inhibition as its concentration was increased and similar adsorption/desorption behavior to pSDEpSDE. Molecular modeling yielded binding energy trends based on simple adsorption of peptides on the [100] surface that were consistent with observed inhibition, but not for the [001] surface. The relatively unfavorable binding energies for peptides on the [001] surface suggest that their absorption will be primarily on the [100] face. The kinetic and adsorption data are consistent with phosphorylation of osteopontin acting to control mineral formation.

  4. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  5. Effect of clinically approved HDAC inhibitors on Plasmodium, Leishmania and Schistosoma parasite growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Jang Chua

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, schistosomiasis and leishmaniases are among the most prevalent tropical parasitic diseases and each requires new innovative treatments. Targeting essential parasite pathways, such as those that regulate gene expression and cell cycle progression, is a key strategy for discovering new drug leads. In this study, four clinically approved anti-cancer drugs (Vorinostat, Belinostat, Panobinostat and Romidepsin that target histone/lysine deacetylase enzymes were examined for in vitro activity against Plasmodium knowlesi, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania amazonensis and L. donovani parasites and two for in vivo activity in a mouse malaria model. All four compounds were potent inhibitors of P. knowlesi malaria parasites (IC50 9–370 nM, with belinostat, panobinostat and vorinostat having 8–45 fold selectivity for the parasite over human neonatal foreskin fibroblast (NFF or human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells, while romidepsin was not selective. Each of the HDAC inhibitor drugs caused hyperacetylation of P. knowlesi histone H4. None of the drugs was active against Leishmania amastigote or promastigote parasites (IC50 > 20 μM or S. mansoni schistosomula (IC50 > 10 μM, however romidepsin inhibited S. mansoni adult worm parings and egg production (IC50 ∼10 μM. Modest in vivo activity was observed in P. berghei infected mice dosed orally with vorinostat or panobinostat (25 mg/kg twice daily for four days, with a significant reduction in parasitemia observed on days 4–7 and 4–10 after infection (P < 0.05, respectively.

  6. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    to chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity....... High-quality toxicity data are carefully selected from peer-reviewed scientific literature and QSAR databases. This presentation shows how the chemical activity concept can be used to compare and combine toxicity data across compounds and species in order to characterize toxicity – and further how...

  7. Homochiral growth through enantiomeric cross-inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Höfner, S; Nilsson, M

    2004-01-01

    The stability and conservation properties of a recently proposed polymerization model are studied. The achiral (racemic) solution is linearly unstable once the relevant control parameter (here the fidelity of the catalyst) exceeds a critical value. The growth rate is calculated for different fidelity parameters and cross-inhibition rates. A chirality parameter is defined and shown to be conserved by the nonlinear terms of the model. Finally, a truncated version of the model is used to derive a set of two ordinary differential equations and it is argued that these equations are more realistic than those used in earlier models of that form.

  8. Computational and biophysical approaches to protein-protein interaction inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum AMA1/RON2 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan, Emilie; Delgadillo, Roberto F.; Tonkin, Michelle L.; Pugnière, Martine; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J.; Douguet, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Invasion of the red blood cell by Plasmodium falciparum parasites requires formation of an electron dense circumferential ring called the Moving Junction (MJ). The MJ is anchored by a high affinity complex of two parasite proteins: Apical Membrane Antigen 1 ( PfAMA1) displayed on the surface of the parasite and Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 that is discharged from the parasite and imbedded in the membrane of the host cell. Structural studies of PfAMA1 revealed a conserved hydrophobic groove localized to the apical surface that coordinates RON2 and invasion inhibitory peptides. In the present work, we employed computational and biophysical methods to identify competitive P. falciparum AMA1-RON2 inhibitors with the goal of exploring the `druggability' of this attractive antimalarial target. A virtual screen followed by molecular docking with the PfAMA1 crystal structure was performed using an eight million compound collection that included commercial molecules, the ChEMBL malaria library and approved drugs. The consensus approach resulted in the selection of inhibitor candidates. We also developed a fluorescence anisotropy assay using a modified inhibitory peptide to experimentally validate the ability of the selected compounds to inhibit the AMA1-RON2 interaction. Among those, we identified one compound that displayed significant inhibition. This study offers interesting clues to improve the throughput and reliability of screening for new drug leads.

  9. The antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 4: comparative assessment of specificity and growth inhibitory antibody activity to infection-acquired and immunization-induced epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Casilda G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a global public health challenge. It is widely believed that an effective vaccine against malaria will need to incorporate multiple antigens from the various stages of the parasite's complex life cycle. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 4 (MSP4 is a vaccine candidate that has been selected for development for inclusion in an asexual stage subunit vaccine against malaria. Methods Nine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs were produced against Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant MSP4 protein and characterized. These Mabs were used to develop an MSP4-specific competition ELISA to test the binding specificity of antibodies present in sera from naturally P. falciparum-infected individuals from a malaria endemic region of Vietnam. The Mabs were also tested for their capacity to induce P. falciparum growth inhibition in vitro and compared against polyclonal rabbit serum raised against recombinant MSP4 Results All Mabs reacted with native parasite protein and collectively recognized at least six epitopes. Four of these Mabs recognize reduction-sensitive epitopes within the epidermal growth factor-like domain found near the C-terminus of MSP4. These sera were shown to contain antibodies capable of inhibiting the binding of the six Mabs indicating infection-acquired responses to the six different epitopes of MSP4. All of the six epitopes were readily recognized by human immune sera. Competition ELISA titres varied from 20 to 640, reflecting heterogeneity in the intensity of the humoral response against the protein among different individuals. The IgG responses during acute and convalescent phases of infection were higher to epitopes in the central region than to other parts of MSP4. Immunization with full length MSP4 in Freund's adjuvant induced rabbit polyclonal antisera able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro in a manner proportionate to the antibody titre. By contrast, polyclonal antisera raised to

  10. Preconditioning with hemin decreases Plasmodium chabaudi adami parasitemia and inhibits erythropoiesis in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Dalko

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and dysfunctional erythropoiesis are characteristic of malaria and other hemolytic hemoglobinopathies. High concentrations of free heme are common in these conditions but little is known about the effect of heme on adaptive immunity and erythropoiesis. Herein, we investigated the impact of heme (hemin administration on immune parameters and steady state erythropoiesis in BALB/c mice, and on parasitemia and anemia during Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection. Intra-peritoneal injection of hemin (5 mg/Kg body weight over three consecutive days decreased the numbers of splenic and bone marrow macrophages, IFN-γ responses to CD3 stimulation and T(h1 differentiation. Our results show that the numbers of erythroid progenitors decreased in the bone marrow and spleen of mice treated with hemin, which correlated with reduced numbers of circulating reticulocytes, without affecting hemoglobin concentrations. Although blunted IFN-γ responses were measured in hemin-preconditioned mice, the mice developed lower parasitemia following P.c.adami infection. Importantly, anemia was exacerbated in hemin-preconditioned mice with malaria despite the reduced parasitemia. Altogether, our data indicate that free heme has dual effects on malaria pathology.

  11. Preconditioning with Hemin Decreases Plasmodium chabaudi adami Parasitemia and Inhibits Erythropoiesis in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalko, Esther; Gaudreault, Véronique; Sanchez Dardon, Jaime; Moreau, Robert; Scorza, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and dysfunctional erythropoiesis are characteristic of malaria and other hemolytic hemoglobinopathies. High concentrations of free heme are common in these conditions but little is known about the effect of heme on adaptive immunity and erythropoiesis. Herein, we investigated the impact of heme (hemin) administration on immune parameters and steady state erythropoiesis in BALB/c mice, and on parasitemia and anemia during Plasmodium chabaudi adami infection. Intra-peritoneal injection of hemin (5 mg/Kg body weight) over three consecutive days decreased the numbers of splenic and bone marrow macrophages, IFN-γ responses to CD3 stimulation and Th1 differentiation. Our results show that the numbers of erythroid progenitors decreased in the bone marrow and spleen of mice treated with hemin, which correlated with reduced numbers of circulating reticulocytes, without affecting hemoglobin concentrations. Although blunted IFN-γ responses were measured in hemin-preconditioned mice, the mice developed lower parasitemia following P.c.adami infection. Importantly, anemia was exacerbated in hemin-preconditioned mice with malaria despite the reduced parasitemia. Altogether, our data indicate that free heme has dual effects on malaria pathology. PMID:23358441

  12. Structural Insights into the Activation and Inhibition of Histo-Aspartic Protease from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Hidaka, Koushi; Gustchina, Alla; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2012-09-17

    Histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. The sequence of HAP is highly similar to those of pepsin-like aspartic proteases, but one of the two catalytic aspartates, Asp32, is replaced with histidine. Crystal structures of the truncated zymogen of HAP and of the complex of the mature enzyme with inhibitor KNI-10395 have been determined at 2.1 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. As in other proplasmepsins, the propeptide of the zymogen interacts with the C-terminal domain of the enzyme, forcing the N- and C-terminal domains apart, thereby separating His32 and Asp215 and preventing formation of the mature active site. In the inhibitor complex, the enzyme forms a tight domain-swapped dimer, not previously seen in any aspartic proteases. The inhibitor is found in an unprecedented conformation resembling the letter U, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Surprisingly, the location and conformation of the inhibitor are similar to those of the fragment of helix 2 comprising residues 34p-38p in the prosegments of the zymogens of gastric aspartic proteases; a corresponding helix assumes a vastly different orientation in proplasmepsins. Each inhibitor molecule is in contact with two molecules of HAP, interacting with the carboxylate group of the catalytic Asp215 of one HAP protomer through a water molecule, while also making a direct hydrogen bond to Glu278A' of the other protomer. A comparison of the shifts in the positions of the catalytic residues in the inhibitor complex presented here with those published previously gives further hints regarding the enzymatic mechanism of HAP.

  13. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  14. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase as a potential anti-malarial target: inhibition studies using improved methods for enzyme production and assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopitthummakhun Kittipat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs. Thus, it is essential to explore different potential new targets that are unique to the parasite or that are required for its viability in order to develop new interventions for treating the disease. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is a potential target for such new drugs, but convenient methods for producing and assaying the enzyme are still lacking, hampering the ability to screen inhibitors. Methods Production of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum SHMT (PfSHMT and Plasmodium vivax SHMT (PvSHMT, using auto-induction media, were compared to those using the conventional Luria Bertani medium with isopropyl thio-β-D-galactoside (LB-IPTG induction media. Plasmodium SHMT activity, kinetic parameters, and response to inhibitors were measured spectrophotometrically by coupling the reaction to that of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD. The identity of the intermediate formed upon inactivation of Plasmodium SHMTs by thiosemicarbazide was investigated by spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The active site environment of Plasmodium SHMT was probed based on changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum upon addition of amino acids and folate. Results Auto-induction media resulted in a two to three-fold higher yield of Pf- and PvSHMT (7.38 and 29.29 mg/L compared to that produced in cells induced in LB-IPTG media. A convenient spectrophotometric activity assay coupling Plasmodium SHMT and MTHFD gave similar kinetic parameters to those previously obtained from the anaerobic assay coupling SHMT and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; thus demonstrating the validity of the new assay procedure. The improved method was adopted to screen for Plasmodium SHMT inhibitors, of which some were originally designed

  15. Treatment of erythrocytes with the 2-cys peroxiredoxin inhibitor, Conoidin A, prevents the growth of Plasmodium falciparum and enhances parasite sensitivity to chloroquine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Brizuela

    Full Text Available The human erythrocyte contains an abundance of the thiol-dependant peroxidase Peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx2, which protects the cell from the pro-oxidant environment it encounters during its 120 days of life in the blood stream. In malarial infections, the Plasmodium parasite invades red cells and imports Prx2 during intraerythrocytic development, presumably to supplement in its own degradation of peroxides generated during cell metabolism, especially hemoglobin (Hb digestion. Here we demonstrate that an irreversible Prx2 inhibitor, Conoidin A (2,3-bis(bromomethyl-1,4-dioxide-quinoxaline; BBMQ, has potent cytocidal activity against cultured P. falciparum. Parasite growth was also inhibited in red cells that were treated with BBMQ and then washed prior to parasite infection. These cells remained susceptible to merozoite invasion, but failed to support normal intraerythrocytic development. In addition the potency of chloroquine (CQ, an antimalarial drug that prevents the detoxification of Hb-derived heme, was significantly enhanced in the presence of BBMQ. CQ IC50 values decreased an order of magnitude when parasites were either co-incubated with BBMQ, or introduced into BBMQ-pretreated cells; these effects were equivalent for both drug-resistant and drug-sensitive parasite lines. Together these results indicate that treatment of red cells with BBMQ renders them incapable of supporting parasite growth and increases parasite sensitivity to CQ. We also propose that molecules such as BBMQ that target host cell proteins may constitute a novel host-directed therapeutic approach for treating malaria.

  16. Inhibition of hypusine biosynthesis in plasmodium: a possible, new strategy in prevention and therapy of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Ulmer, D; Goebel, T; Holzgrabe, U; Saeftel, M; Hoerauf, A

    2006-11-01

    The increasing drug resistance of malaria parasites against chemotherapeutics enforces new strategies in finding new drugs. Here, we describe a new class of compounds the piperidone 3-carboxylates which show an antiplasmodial effect in vitro and in vivo. This effect might be caused by inhibition of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF-5A).

  17. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  18. Down-regulation of hypusine biosynthesis in Plasmodium by inhibition of S-adenosyl-methionine-decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavid, Robert; Kusch, Peter; Hauber, Joachim; Eschweiler, Ute; Sarite, Salem Ramadan; Specht, Sabine; Deininger, Susanne; Hoerauf, Achim; Kaiser, Annette

    2010-02-01

    An important issue facing global health today is the need for new, effective and affordable drugs against malaria, particularly in resource-poor countries. Moreover, the currently available antimalarials are limited by factors ranging from parasite resistance to safety, compliance, cost and the current lack of innovations in medicinal chemistry. Depletion of polyamines in the intraerythrocytic phase of P. falciparum is a promising strategy for the development of new antimalarials since intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine and spermine are increased during cell proliferation. S-adenosyl-methionine-decarboxylase (AdoMETDC) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of spermidine. The AdoMETDC inhibitor CGP 48664A, known as SAM486A, inhibited the separately expressed plasmodial AdoMETDC domain with a Km( i ) of 3 microM resulting in depletion of spermidine. Spermidine is an important precursor in the biosynthesis of hypusine. This prompted us to investigate a downstream effect on hypusine biosynthesis after inhibition of AdoMETDC. Extracts from P. falciparum in vitro cultures that were treated with 10 microM SAM 486A showed suppression of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) in comparison to the untreated control in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Depletion of eIF-5A was also observed in Western blot analysis with crude protein extracts from the parasite after treatment with 10 microM SAM486A. A determination of the intracellular polyamine levels revealed an approximately 27% reduction of spemidine and a 75% decrease of spermine while putrescine levels increased to 36%. These data suggest that inhibition of AdoMetDc provides a novel strategy for eIF-5A suppression and the design of new antimalarials.

  19. Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with circulating ultra-large von Willebrand multimers and ADAMTS13 inhibition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, Deirdre

    2009-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection results in adhesion of infected erythrocytes to blood vessel endothelium, and acute endothelial cell activation, together with sequestration of platelets and leucocytes. We have previously shown that patients with severe infection or fulminant cerebral malaria have significantly increased circulatory levels of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) and its propeptide, both of which are indices of endothelial cell activation. In this prospective study of patients from Ghana with severe (n = 20) and cerebral (n = 13) P. falciparum malaria, we demonstrate that increased plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag) level is associated with disproportionately increased VWF function. VWF collagen binding (VWF:CB) was significantly increased in patients with cerebral malaria and severe malaria (medians 7.6 and 7.0 IU\\/ml versus 1.9 IU\\/ml; p<0.005). This increased VWF:CB correlated with the presence of abnormal ultra-large VWF multimers in patient rather than control plasmas. Concomitant with the increase in VWF:Ag and VWF:CB was a significant persistent reduction in the activity of the VWF-specific cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (approximately 55% of normal; p<0.005). Mixing studies were performed using P. falciparum patient plasma and normal pooled plasma, in the presence or absence of exogenous recombinant ADAMTS13. These studies demonstrated that in malarial plasma, ADAMTS13 function was persistently inhibited in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect was not associated with the presence of known inhibitors of ADAMTS13 enzymatic function (interleukin-6, free haemoglobin, factor VIII or thrombospondin-1). These novel findings suggest that severe P. falciparum infection is associated with acute endothelial cell activation, abnormal circulating ULVWF multimers, and a significant reduction in plasma ADAMTS13 function which is mediated at least in part by an unidentified inhibitor.

  20. Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with circulating ultra-large von Willebrand multimers and ADAMTS13 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Larkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection results in adhesion of infected erythrocytes to blood vessel endothelium, and acute endothelial cell activation, together with sequestration of platelets and leucocytes. We have previously shown that patients with severe infection or fulminant cerebral malaria have significantly increased circulatory levels of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF and its propeptide, both of which are indices of endothelial cell activation. In this prospective study of patients from Ghana with severe (n = 20 and cerebral (n = 13 P. falciparum malaria, we demonstrate that increased plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag level is associated with disproportionately increased VWF function. VWF collagen binding (VWF:CB was significantly increased in patients with cerebral malaria and severe malaria (medians 7.6 and 7.0 IU/ml versus 1.9 IU/ml; p<0.005. This increased VWF:CB correlated with the presence of abnormal ultra-large VWF multimers in patient rather than control plasmas. Concomitant with the increase in VWF:Ag and VWF:CB was a significant persistent reduction in the activity of the VWF-specific cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (approximately 55% of normal; p<0.005. Mixing studies were performed using P. falciparum patient plasma and normal pooled plasma, in the presence or absence of exogenous recombinant ADAMTS13. These studies demonstrated that in malarial plasma, ADAMTS13 function was persistently inhibited in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect was not associated with the presence of known inhibitors of ADAMTS13 enzymatic function (interleukin-6, free haemoglobin, factor VIII or thrombospondin-1. These novel findings suggest that severe P. falciparum infection is associated with acute endothelial cell activation, abnormal circulating ULVWF multimers, and a significant reduction in plasma ADAMTS13 function which is mediated at least in part by an unidentified inhibitor.

  1. Targeting Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor (AT1R) Inhibits the Harmful Phenotype of Plasmodium-Specific CD8(+) T Cells during Blood-Stage Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Filho, João L; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana A S

    2017-01-01

    CD8(+) T-cell response is critical in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria during blood-stage. Our group and other have been shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), a key effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have immune regulatory effects on T cells. Previously, we showed that inhibition of AT1R signaling protects mice against the lethal disease induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection However, most of the Ang II/AT1R actions were characterized by using only pharmacological approaches, the effects of which may not always be due to a specific receptor blockade. In addition, the mechanisms of action of the AT1R in inducing the pathogenic activity of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells during blood-stage were not determined. Here, we examined how angiotensin II/AT1R axis promotes the harmful response of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T-cell during blood-stage by using genetic and pharmacological approaches. We evaluated the response of wild-type (WT) and AT1R(-/-)Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice infected with a transgenic PbA lineage expressing ovalbumin; and in parallel infected mice receiving WT Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells were treated with losartan (AT1R antagonist) or captopril (ACE inhibitor). Both, AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells and WT OT-I cells from losartan- or captopril-treated mice showed lower expansion, reduced IL-2 production and IL-2Rα expression, lower activation (lower expression of CD69, CD44 and CD160) and lower exhaustion profiles. AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells also exhibit lower expression of the integrin LFA-1 and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to play a key role in the development of cerebral malaria. Moreover, AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells produce lower amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and show lower degranulation upon restimulation. In conclusion, our results show the pivotal mechanisms of AT1R-induced harmful phenotype of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells during blood-stage malaria.

  2. Targeting Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor (AT1R) Inhibits the Harmful Phenotype of Plasmodium-Specific CD8+ T Cells during Blood-Stage Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Filho, João L.; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana A. S.

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T-cell response is critical in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria during blood-stage. Our group and other have been shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), a key effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have immune regulatory effects on T cells. Previously, we showed that inhibition of AT1R signaling protects mice against the lethal disease induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection However, most of the Ang II/AT1R actions were characterized by using only pharmacological approaches, the effects of which may not always be due to a specific receptor blockade. In addition, the mechanisms of action of the AT1R in inducing the pathogenic activity of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells during blood-stage were not determined. Here, we examined how angiotensin II/AT1R axis promotes the harmful response of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T-cell during blood-stage by using genetic and pharmacological approaches. We evaluated the response of wild-type (WT) and AT1R−/− Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells in mice infected with a transgenic PbA lineage expressing ovalbumin; and in parallel infected mice receiving WT Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells were treated with losartan (AT1R antagonist) or captopril (ACE inhibitor). Both, AT1R−/− OT-I cells and WT OT-I cells from losartan- or captopril-treated mice showed lower expansion, reduced IL-2 production and IL-2Rα expression, lower activation (lower expression of CD69, CD44 and CD160) and lower exhaustion profiles. AT1R−/− OT-I cells also exhibit lower expression of the integrin LFA-1 and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to play a key role in the development of cerebral malaria. Moreover, AT1R−/− OT-I cells produce lower amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and show lower degranulation upon restimulation. In conclusion, our results show the pivotal mechanisms of AT1R-induced harmful phenotype of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells during blood-stage malaria. PMID:28261571

  3. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  4. Large-scale growth of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite in a wave bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, John P; Demanga, Corine G; Reiling, Sarah J; Wunderlich, Juliane; Eng, Jenny W L; Rohrbach, Petra

    2012-01-01

    We describe methods for the large-scale in vitro culturing of synchronous and asynchronous blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites in sterile disposable plastic bioreactors controlled by wave-induced motion (wave bioreactor). These cultures perform better than static flask cultures in terms of preserving parasite cell cycle synchronicity and reducing the number of multiple-infected erythrocytes. The straight-forward methods described here will facilitate the large scale production of malaria parasites for antigen and organelle isolation and characterisation, for the high throughput screening of compound libraries with whole cells or extracts, and the development of live- or whole-cell malaria vaccines under good manufacturing practice compliant standards. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control...

  6. Inhibition of spinach bolting by growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Borkowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. plants must be harvested during a short period of time because they bolt just after producing some edible leaves. Maleic hydrazide (MH and its commercial preparation "Antyrost" were found to inhibit bolting very strongly. The preparation Off-shoot-O showed very weak activity in suppressing bolting but diminished markedly the resistance of spinach plants to fungus diseases. Triiodobenzoic acid stimulated bolting, and the retardant succinic acid-2-2-dimethylhydrazide (SADH did not affect bolting. Application of MH to inhibit spinach bolting cannot be recommended in practice before investigating the residues of this compound in leaves.

  7. Endocannabinoids inhibit the growth of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rafik; Pernin, Pierre; Bodennec, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    The cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits the growth of some pathogenic amoebae in vitro and exacerbates amoebic encephalitis in animal models. However, the effects of endogenous cannabinoids on amoebae remain unknown. Therefore, we tested several endocannabinoids (N-acyl ethanolamines and 2-O-acyl glycerol) on different genera of amoebae. The results showed that all of the endocannabinoids tested inhibit amoebic growth at subpharmacological doses, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from 15 to 20 microM. A nonhydrolyzable endocannabinoid had similar effects, showing that the inhibition seen results from endocannabinoids per se rather than from a catabolic product.

  8. 2-Hexadecynoic Acid Inhibits Plasmodial FAS-II Enzymes and Arrest Erythrocytic and Liver Stage Plasmodium Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Tasdemir, Deniz; Sanabria, David; Lauinger, Ina L.; Tarun, Alice; Herman, Rob; Perozzo, Remo; Zloh, Mire; Kappe, Stefan H.; Brun, Reto; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2010-01-01

    Acetylenic fatty acids are known to display several biological activities, but their antimalarial activity has remained unexplored. In this study, we synthesized the 2-, 5-, 6-, and 9-hexadecynoic acids (HDAs) and evaluated their in vitro activity against erythrocytic (blood) stages of Plasmodium falciparum and liver stages of P. yoelii infections. Since the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway (PfFAS-II) has recently been shown to be indispensable for liver stage malaria parasites, the in...

  9. Development of an in vitro assay and demonstration of Plasmodium berghei liver-stage inhibition by TRAP-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea J Longley

    Full Text Available The development of an efficacious vaccine against the Plasmodium parasite remains a top priority. Previous research has demonstrated the ability of a prime-boost virally vectored sub-unit vaccination regimen, delivering the liver-stage expressed malaria antigen TRAP, to produce high levels of antigen-specific T cells. The liver-stage of malaria is the main target of T cell-mediated immunity, yet a major challenge in assessing new T cell inducing vaccines has been the lack of a suitable pre-clinical assay. We have developed a flow-cytometry based in vitro T cell killing assay using a mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, and Plasmodium berghei GFP expressing sporozoites. Using this assay, P. berghei TRAP-specific CD8+ T cell enriched splenocytes were shown to inhibit liver-stage parasites in an effector-to-target ratio dependent manner. Further development of this assay using human hepatocytes and P. falciparum would provide a new method to pre-clinically screen vaccine candidates and to elucidate mechanisms of protection in vitro.

  10. Monitoring Plasmodium falciparum growth and development by UV flow cytometry using an optimized Hoechst-thiazole orange staining strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Brian T; Erickson, John J; Sramkoski, R Michael; Jacobberger, James W; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2008-06-01

    The complex life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) makes it difficult to limit infections and reduce the risk of severe malaria. Improved understanding of Pf blood-stage growth and development would provide new opportunities to evaluate and interfere with successful completion of the parasite's life cycle. Cultured blood stage Pf was incubated with Hoechst 33342 (HO) and thiazole orange (TO) to stain DNA and total nucleic acids, respectively. Correlated HO and TO fluorescence emissions were then measured by flow cytometry. Complex bivariate data patterns were analyzed by manual cluster gating to quantify parasite life cycle stages. The permutations of viable staining with both reagents were tested for optimal detection of parasitized RBC (pRBC). Pf cultures were exposed to HO and TO simultaneously to achieve optimal staining of pRBC and consistent quantification of early and late stages of the replicative cycle (rings through schizonts). Staining of Pf nucleic acids allows for analysis of parasite development in the absence of fixatives, lysis, or radioactivity to enable examination of erythrocytes from parasite invasion through schizont rupture using sensitive and rapid assay procedures. Investigation of the mechanisms by which anti-malarial drugs and antibodies act against different Pf lifecycle stages will be aided by this cytometric strategy. (c) 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of urinary calculi and inhibition of their growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Govani, Jayesh; Reza, Layra; Pinales, Luis

    2009-10-01

    We present here a study of kidney stone formation and growth inhibition based on a traditional medicine approach with Aquatica Lour (RAL) herbal extracts. Kidney stone material systems were synthesized in vitro using a simplified single diffusion gel growth technique. With the objective of revealing the mechanism of inhibition of calculi formation by RAL extracts, samples prepared without the presence of extract, and with the presence of extract, were analyzed using Raman, photoluminescence, and XPS. The unexpected presence of Zn revealed by XPS in a sample prepared with RAL provides an explanation for the inhibition process, and also explains the dramatic reflectance of incident light observed in attempts to obtain infrared transmission data. Raman data are consistent with the binding of the inhibitor to the oxygen of the kidney stone. Photoluminescence data corroborate with the other results to provide additional evidence of Zn-related inhibition.

  12. Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis growth and sporulation by threonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D H; Bott, K F

    1979-01-01

    A 1-mg/ml amount of threonine (8.4 mM) inhibited growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168. Inhibition of sporulation was efficiently reversed by valine and less efficiently by pyruvate, arginine, glutamine, and isoleucine. Inhibition of vegetative growth was reversed by asparate and glutamate as well as by valine, arginine, or glutamine. Cells in minimal growth medium were inhibited only transiently by very high concentrations of threonine, whereas inhibition of sporulation was permanent. Addition of threonine prevented the normal increase in alkaline phosphatase and reduced the production of extracellular protease by about 50%, suggesting that threonine blocked the sporulation process relatively early. 2-Ketobutyrate was able to mimic the effect of threonine on sporulation. Sporulation in a strain selected for resistance to azaleucine was partially resistant. Seventy-five percent of the mutants selected for the ability to grow vegetatively in the presence of high threonine concentrations were found to be simultaneously isoleucine auxotrophs. In at least one of these mutants, the threonine resistance phenotpye could not be dissociated from the isoleucine requirement by transformation. This mutation was closely linked to a known ilvA mutation (recombination index, 0.16). This strain also had reduced intracellular threonine deaminase activity. These results suggest that threonine inhibits B. subtilis by causing valine starvation.

  13. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  14. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfiqar Ahmad

    Full Text Available We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  15. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  16. Synthesis, biological evaluation, hydration site thermodynamics, and chemical reactivity analysis of α-keto substituted peptidomimetics for the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, David J; Shah, Falgun; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Chada, Raji Reddy; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Shivakumar, Develeena; Sherman, Woody; Desai, Prashant; Jung, Jae-Chul; Avery, Mitchell A

    2014-03-01

    A new series of peptidomimetic pseudo-prolyl-homophenylalanylketones were designed, synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases falcipain-2 (FP-2) and falcipain-3 (FP-3). In addition, the parasite killing activity of these compounds in human blood-cultured P. falciparum was examined. Of twenty-two (22) compounds synthesized, one peptidomimetic comprising a homophenylalanine-based α-hydroxyketone linked Cbz-protected hydroxyproline (39) showed the most potency (IC50 80 nM against FP-2 and 60 nM against FP-3). In silico analysis of these peptidomimetic analogs offered important protein-ligand structural insights including the role, by WaterMap, of water molecules in the active sites of these protease isoforms. The pseudo-dipeptide 39 and related compounds may serve as a promising direction forward in the design of competitive inhibitors of falcipains for the effective treatment of malaria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus Probiotic Inhibits the Growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawitri D. Pertami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Candida albicans is the most common organism causing oral candidiasis. Drug resistance to synthetic antifungal medication is becoming a problem in the treatment of oral candidiasis, especially in immunocompromised patients.Probiotic has been known for its health benefits. It produces lactic acid and bacteriocin that has antibacterial effect. Research focuses on antifungal effect of probiotic, escpecially for C. albicans is still needed. Objective: To determinethe inhibition effect of probiotic in the growth of C. albicans. Methods: Three concentrations of Lactobacillus acidophilus-containing probiotic (McFarland 6, 8, 10 were used to determine their inhibition effect on C. albicans (McFarland 0.5 growing in trypticase yeast-extract cystine (TYC agar. The inhibition effect of probiotic was determined by measuring the inhibition zone produced after 48 hours of culture. Difference in inhibition zone among experimental groups was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and LSD post-test. Results: Probiotic with McFarland 10 had the highest inhibition effect against C. albicans and the difference to other experimental groups was statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: L. acidophilus probiotic has inhibition effect in the growth of C. albicans.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i3.196

  18. Plasmodium Immunomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, Denise L.

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium parasite, the causative agent of malaria, is an excellent model for immunomic-based approaches to vaccine development. The Plasmodium parasite has a complex life cycle with multiple stages and stage-specific expression of ~ 5,300 putative proteins. No malaria vaccine has yet been licensed. Many believe that an effective vaccine will need to target several antigens and multiple stages, and will require the generation of both antibody and cellular immune responses. Vaccine efforts to date have been stage-specific and based on only a very limited number of proteins representing Plasmodium parasite life cycle with immune responses implicated in parasite elimination and control. Immunomic approaches which enable the selection of the best possible targets by prioritizing antigens according to clinically relevant criteria may overcome the problem of poorly immunogenic, poorly protective vaccines that has plagued malaria vaccine developers for the past 25 years. Herein, current progress and perspectives regarding Plasmodium immunomics are reviewed. PMID:20816843

  19. GROWTH INHIBITION OF FUSARIUM SP. IN LIVESTOCK FEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Kanižai Šarić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Contamination with phytopathogenic forms of Fusarium, besides field crops, may also occur in stored products. Addition of antifungal substances to stored livestock feed is therefore common. This paper examined the effectiveness of a mixture of synthetic and natural antioxidants against the growth of Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides in a concentrate mixture. The most effective inhibition of growth was achieved with a mixture of butylated hydroxyanisole, propyl paraben and thymol.

  20. a -Difluoromethylornithine Inhibits the Growth of Fungus Macrophomina phaseoli

    OpenAIRE

    PALAVAN-ÜNSAL, Narçin

    2014-01-01

    a -Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific enzyme activated inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), significantly inhibited the mycelial growth of the fungus Macrophomina phaseoli (Tassi) Goidanich. Putrescine (Put), when added to the nutrient medium at a concentration of 0.25 mM, decreased the inhibitory effect of DFMO. These results suggest that polyamines (PAs) are essential for the growth of fungi and that DFMO is applicable to the alleviation or prevention of crop losses due to ph...

  1. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%.

  2. Inhibition of placenta growth factor with TB-403

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    targeting angiogenesis. AREAS COVERED: The data are obtained by searching in the PubMed database. The search terms used included antiangiogenic therapy, TB-403 (RO5323441), placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGFR-1 (Flt-1). We review preclinical data concerning the function and inhibition of Pl......GF and summarize data on expression of PlGF in cancer patients. Data from early-phase clinical trials of TB-403 (RO5323441), a monoclonal antibody inhibiting PlGF, are discussed. Future development strategies, therapeutic potentials and limitations of TB-403 are further evaluated. EXPERT OPINION: There are some...... conflicting data on the function of PlGF and the importance of its role in primary tumor growth. Data from some preclinical models of PlGF inhibition and early-phase clinical trials with TB-403 are, however, promising, although the true potential of the drug is yet to be determined. Further clinical...

  3. Inhibition mechanism of aspartic acid on crystal growth of hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Su-ping; ZHOU Ke-chao; LI Zhi-you

    2007-01-01

    The effects of aspartic acid on the crystal growth, morphology of hydroxyapatite(HAP) crystal were investigated, and the inhibition mechanism of aspartic acid on the crystal growth of hydroxyapatite was studied. The results show that the crystal growth rate of HAP decreases with the increase of the aspartic acid concentration, and the HAP crystal is thinner significantly compared with that without amino acid, which is mainly due to the (10(-)10) surface of HAP crystal being inhibited by the aspartic acids. The calculation analysis indicates that the crystal growth mechanism of HAP, following surface diffusion controlled mechanism, is not changed due to the presence of aspartic acid. AFM result shows that the front of terrace on vicinal growth hillocks is pinned, which suggests that the aspartic acid is adsorbed onto the (10(-)10) surface of HAP and interacts with the Ca2+ ions of HAP surface, so as to block the growth active sites and result in retarding of the growth of HAP crystal.

  4. Development of a Novel High-Density [3H]Hypoxanthine Scintillation Proximity Assay To Assess Plasmodium falciparum Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cózar, Cristina; Caballero, Iván; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Sanz, Laura M; Álvarez-Ruiz, Emilio; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-10-01

    The discovery and development of new antimalarial drugs are becoming imperative because of the spread of resistance to current clinical treatments. The lack of robustly validated antimalarial targets and the difficulties with the building in of whole-cell activity in screening hits are hampering target-based approaches. However, phenotypic screens of structurally diverse molecule libraries are offering new opportunities for the identification of novel antimalarials. Several methodologies can be used to determine the whole-cell in vitro potencies of antimalarial hits. The [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay is considered the "gold standard" assay for measurement of the activity of antimalarial compounds against intraerythrocytic forms of Plasmodium falciparum However, the method has important limitations, as the assay is not amenable for high-throughput screening since it remains associated with the 96-well plate format. We have overcome this drawback by adapting the [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation method to a 384-well high-density format by coupling a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay (SPA) and thus eliminating the limiting filtration step. This SPA has been validated using a diverse set of 1,000 molecules, including both a representative set from the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) of compounds and molecules inactive against whole cells. The results were compared with those from the P. falciparum lactate dehydrogenase whole-cell assay, another method that is well established as a surrogate for parasite growth and is amenable for high-throughput screening. The results obtained demonstrate that the SPA-based [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay is a suitable design that is adaptable to high-throughput antimalarial drug screening and that maintains the features, robustness, and reliability of the standard filtration hypoxanthine incorporation method.

  5. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonami, Hiroshi [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  6. Epidermal growth factor inhibits cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the duodenal ulcerogen cysteamine on secretion of epidermal growth factor from Brunner's gland pouches was studied in the rat. Total output of immunoreactive epidermal growth factor was reduced to approximately 55%, compared with controls, 5 h after administration of cysteamine (300...... mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, measurements on tissue extracts of the pouches revealed that 5 h after cysteamine treatment, Brunner's glands were depleted of epidermal growth factor. The effect on ulcer development of intraduodenally applied exogenous epidermal growth factor (1 micrograms/kg . h) also...... factor used, when tested on chronic fistula rats, had no effect on acid secretion and did not influence bicarbonate secretion from Brunner's gland pouches. These results demonstrate that epidermal growth factor has a cytoprotective effect on the duodenal mucosa, and it is suggested that inhibition...

  7. Reduced erythrocyte susceptibility and increased host clearance of young parasites slows Plasmodium growth in a murine model of severe malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Sebina, Ismail; Haque, Ashraful; Davenport, Miles P.

    2015-05-01

    The best correlate of malaria severity in human Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection is the total parasite load. Pf-infected humans could control parasite loads by two mechanisms, either decreasing parasite multiplication, or increasing parasite clearance. However, few studies have directly measured these two mechanisms in vivo. Here, we have directly quantified host clearance of parasites during Plasmodium infection in mice. We transferred labelled red blood cells (RBCs) from Plasmodium infected donors into uninfected and infected recipients, and tracked the fate of donor parasites by frequent blood sampling. We then applied age-based mathematical models to characterise parasite clearance in the recipient mice. Our analyses revealed an increased clearance of parasites in infected animals, particularly parasites of a younger developmental stage. However, the major decrease in parasite multiplication in infected mice was not mediated by increased clearance alone, but was accompanied by a significant reduction in the susceptibility of RBCs to parasitisation.

  8. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindsamy Vediyappan

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  9. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Inhibition of seed germination and root growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Daohui [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028 (China); Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Xing Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Stockbridge Hall, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)], E-mail: bx@pssci.umass.edu

    2007-11-15

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50 mg/L for radish, and about 20 mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles. - Engineered nanoparticles can inhibit the seed germination and root growth.

  10. Immunisation with recombinant PfEMP1 domains elicits functional rosette-inhibiting and phagocytosis-inducing antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ghumra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rosetting is a Plasmodium falciparum virulence factor implicated in the pathogenesis of life-threatening malaria. Rosetting occurs when parasite-derived P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein One (PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes binds to human receptors on uninfected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 is a possible target for a vaccine to induce antibodies to inhibit rosetting and prevent severe malaria. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We examined the vaccine potential of the six extracellular domains of a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (ITvar9/R29var1 from the R29 parasite strain by immunizing rabbits with recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Antibodies raised to each domain were tested for surface fluorescence with live infected erythrocytes, rosette inhibition and phagocytosis-induction. Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains recognized the surface of live infected erythrocytes down to low concentrations (0.02-1.56 µg/ml of total IgG. Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains except for the second Duffy-Binding-Like region inhibited rosetting (50% inhibitory concentration 0.04-4 µg/ml and were able to opsonize and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes at low concentrations (1.56-6.25 µg/ml. Antibodies to the N-terminal region (NTS-DBL1α were the most effective in all assays. All antibodies were specific for the R29 parasite strain, and showed no functional activity against five other rosetting strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are encouraging for vaccine development as they show that potent antibodies can be generated to recombinant PfEMP1 domains that will inhibit rosetting and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes. However, further work is needed on rosetting mechanisms and cross-reactivity in field isolates to define a set of PfEMP1 variants that could induce functional antibodies against a broad range of P. falciparum rosetting parasites.

  11. Growth inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lilian; Bech Hansen, T.; Garrido, P.

    2005-01-01

    Aims: This study elucidates the mechanisms by which a nonbacteriocinogenic Carnobacterium piscicola inhibits growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Methods and Results: Listeria monocytogenes was exposed to live cultures of a bacteriocin-negative variant of C. piscicola A9b in co-culture, in a diffusion...... chamber system, and to a cell-free supernatant. Suppression of maximum cell density (0-3.5 log units) of L. monocytogenes was proportional to initial levels of C. pisciola (10(3)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)). Cell-to-cell contact was not required to cause inhibition. The cell-free C. piscicola supernatant caused...... a decrease in L. monocytogenes maximum cell density, which was abolished by glucose addition but not by amino acid, vitamin or mineral addition. The fermentate also gave rise to a longer lag phase and a reduction in growth rate. These effects were independent of glucose and may have been caused by acetate...

  12. DNA Walker-Regulated Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-06-16

    We demonstrate a DNAzyme-based walker system as a controlled oligonucleotide drug AS1411 release platform for breast cancer treatment. In this system, AS1411 strands are released from fuel strands as a walker moves along its carbon nanotube track. The release rate and amount of anticancer oligonucleotides are controlled by the walker operation. With a walker system embedded within the collagen extracellular matrix, we show that this drug release system can be used for in situ cancer cell growth inhibition.

  13. The Theaflavin Monomers Inhibit the Cancer Cells Growth in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Ying TU; An-Bin TANG; Naoharu WATANABE

    2004-01-01

    The inhibition effects of tea theaflavins complex (TFs), theaflavin-3-3 '-digallate (TFDG),theaflavin-3'-gallate (TF2B), and an unidentified compound (UC) on the growth of human liver cancer BEL-7402 cells, gastric cancer MKN-28 cells and acute promyelocytic leukemia LH-60 cells were investigated.TFs was obtained through the catalysis of catechins with immobilized polyphenols oxidase. TFDG, TF2B and UC were isolated from TFs with high speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC). The results showed that TF2B significantly inhibited the growth of all three kinds of cancer cells, TFs, TFDG and UC had some effect on BEL-7402 and MKN-28, but little activity on LH-60. The inhibition effects of TF2B, TFDG, and UC on BEL-7402 and MKN-28 were stronger than TFs. The relationship coefficients between monomer concentration and its inhibition rate against MKN-28 and BEL-7402 were 0.87 and 0.98 for TF2B, 0.96 and 0.98 for UC, respectively. The IC50 values ofTFs, TF2B, and TFDG were 0.18, 0.11, and 0.16 mM on BEL-7402 cells, and 1.11, 0.22, and 0.25 mM on MKN-28 cells respectively.

  14. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Shu-Lin; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2015-02-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It was identified that 3-BrPA exhibited strong inhibitory effects upon xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, the antitumor function of 3-BrPA exhibited a dose-effect association, which was similar to that of the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, 3-BrPA exhibited low toxicity in the blood, liver and kidneys of the nude mice. The present study hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA is achieved through the inhibition of hexokinase activity, which leads to the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression, the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein expression and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. These data suggest that 3-BrPA may be a novel therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  15. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-03-15

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, and 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles.

  16. Inhibition of somatotroph growth and growth hormone biosynthesis by activin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; González-Manchón, C; Potter, E

    1990-01-01

    ]methionine-labeled cells, could be observed after 24 h of activin treatment, and maximal (70%) inhibition of GH biosynthesis was observed after 3 days. Activin inhibited basal as well as GH-releasing factor (GRF)-, glucocorticoid-, and thyroid hormone-stimulated GH biosynthesis. Inhibin, which is known to reverse...... the effect of activin on FSH secretion, did not reverse the effect of activin on GH biosynthesis. Treatment of somatotrophs with activin for 3 days completely inhibited the growth-promoting effect of GRF on somatotrophs. However, no effect of activin on GRF-stimulated expression of the c-fos protooncogene...... was observed. These data demonstrate that activin, in addition to its stimulatory effect on FSH secretion, is able to inhibit both expression of GH and growth of somatotropic cells....

  17. Telmisartan inhibits human urological cancer cell growth through early apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUYAMA, MASAHIDE; FUNAO, KIYOAKI; KURATSUKURI, KATSUYUKI; TANAKA, TOMOAKI; KAWAHITO, YUTAKA; SANO, HAJIME; CHARGUI, JAMEL; TOURAINE, JEAN-LOUIS; YOSHIMURA, NORIO; YOSHIMURA, RIKIO

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are widely used as hypertensive therapeutic agents. In addition, studies have provided evidence that ARBs have the potential to inhibit the growth of several types of cancer cells. It was reported that telmisartan (a type of ARB) has peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activation activity. We previously reported that the PPAR-γ ligand induces growth arrest in human urological cancer cells through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of telmisartan and other ARBs on cell proliferation in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC) and testicular cancer (TC) cell lines. The inhibitory effects of telmisartan and other ARBs (candesartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) on the growth of the RCC, BC, PC and TC cell lines was investigated using an MTT assay. Flow cytometry and Hoechst staining were used to determine whether the ARBs induced apoptosis. Telmisartan caused marked growth inhibition in the urological cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Urological cancer cells treated with 100 μM telmisartan underwent early apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. However, the other ARBs had no effect on cell proliferation in any of the urological cancer cell lines. Telmisartan may mediate potent anti-proliferative effects in urological cancer cells through PPAR-γ. Thus, telmisartan is a potent target for the prevention and treatment of human urological cancer. PMID:22993542

  18. Inhibition of normal human lung fibroblast growth by beryllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, N M; Gary, R K; Marrone, B L; Lehnert, B E

    2001-03-07

    Inhalation of particulate beryllium (Be) and its compounds causes chronic Be disease (CBD) in a relatively small subset ( approximately 1-6%) of exposed individuals. Hallmarks of this pulmonary disease include increases in several cell types, including lung fibroblasts, that contribute to the fibrotic component of the disorder. In this regard, enhancements in cell proliferation appear to play a fundamental role in CBD development and progression. Paradoxically, however, some existing evidence suggests that Be actually has antiproliferative effects. In order to gain further information about the effects of Be on cell growth, we: (1) assessed cell proliferation and cell cycle effects of low concentrations of Be in normal human diploid fibroblasts, and (2) investigated the molecular pathway(s) by which the cell cycle disturbing effects of Be may be mediated. Treatment of human lung and skin fibroblasts with Be added in the soluble form of BeSO(4) (0.1-100 microM) caused inhibitions of their growth in culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Such growth inhibition was found to persist, even after cells were further cultured in Be(2+)-free medium. Flow cytometric analyses of cellular DNA labeled with the DNA-binding fluorochrome DAPI revealed that Be causes a G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest. Western blot analyses indicated that the Be-induced G(0)-G(1)/pre-S phase arrest involves elevations in TP53 (p53) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21(Waf-1,Cip1)). That Be at low concentrations inhibits the growth of normal human fibroblasts suggests the possibility of the existence of abnormal cell cycle inhibitory responses to Be in individuals who are sensitive to the metal and ultimately develop CBD.

  19. Activation of phospholipase D activity in transforming growth factor—beta—induced cell growth inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUBINGHONG; JUNSONGCHEN; 等

    2000-01-01

    Cells regulate phospholipase D(PLD) activity in response to numerous extracellular signals.Here,we investigated the involvement of PLD activity in transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β1)-mediated growth inhibition of epithelial cells.TGF-β1)-mediated growth inhibition of epithelial cells.TGF-β1 inhibits the growth of MDCK,Mv1Lu,and A-549 cells.In the presence of 0.4% butanol,TGF-β1 induces an increase in the formation of phosphatidylbutanol,a unique product catalyzed by PLD.TGF-β1 also induces an increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) level in A-549 and MDCK cells.TGF-β1 induces an increase in the levels of DAG labeled with [3H]-myristic acid in A-549 and MDCK cells but not in Mv1Lu cells.No increase of DAG was observed in cells prelabeled with [3H]-arachidonic acid.The data presented suggest that PLD activation is involved in the TGF-β1-induced cell growth inhibition.

  20. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: inhibition of seed germination and root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-11-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50mg/L for radish, and about 20mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles.

  1. Conditioned medium from neural stem cells inhibits glioma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Zhong, Q; Liu, H; Liu, P; Wu, J; Ma, D; Chen, X; Yang, X

    2016-10-31

    Malignant glioma is one of the most common brain tumors in the central nervous system. Although the significant progress has been made in recent years, the mortality is still high and 5-year survival rate is still very low. One of the leading causes to the high mortality for glioma patients is metastasis and invasion. An efficient method to control the tumor metastasis is a promising way to treat the glioma. Previous reports indicated that neural stem cells (NSCs) were served as a delivery vector to the anti-glioma therapy. Here, we used the conditioned medium from rat NSCs (NSC-CM) to culture the human glioblastoma cell lines. We found that NSC-CM could inhibit the glioma cell growth, invasion and migration in vitro and attenuate the tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, this anti-glioma effect was mediated by the inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Above all, this study provided the direct evidence to put forward a simple and efficient method in the inhibition of glioma cells/tumor growth, potentially advancing the anti-glioma therapy.

  2. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A; Cerise, Jane E; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-10-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells.

  3. Multiple effects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatile compounds: plant growth promotion and growth inhibition of phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Shashidar; Matzén, Staffan; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin; Bejai, Sarosh; Meijer, Johan

    2016-06-01

    Biotic interactions through volatile organic compounds (VOC) are frequent in nature. This investigation aimed to study the role of ITALIC! BacillusVOC for the beneficial effects on plants observed as improved growth and pathogen control. Four ITALIC! Bacillus amyloliquefacienssubsp. ITALIC! plantarumstrains were screened for VOC effects on ITALIC! Arabidopsis thalianaCol-0 seedlings and ITALIC! Brassicafungal phytopathogens. VOC from all four ITALIC! Bacillusstrains could promote growth of ITALIC! Arabidopsisplants resulting in increased shoot biomass but the effects were dependent on the growth medium. Dose response studies with UCMB5113 on MS agar with or without root exudates showed significant plant growth promotion even at low levels of bacteria. ITALIC! BacillusVOC antagonized growth of several fungal pathogens ITALIC! in vitro However, the plant growth promotion efficacy and fungal inhibition potency varied among the ITALIC! Bacillusstrains. VOC inhibition of several phytopathogens indicated efficient microbial antagonism supporting high rhizosphere competence of the ITALIC! Bacillusstrains. GC-MS analysis identified several VOC structures where the profiles differed depending on the growth medium. The ability of ITALIC! Bacillusstrains to produce both volatile and soluble compounds for plant growth promotion and disease biocontrol provides examples of rhizosphere microbes as an important ecosystem service with high potential to support sustainable crop production.

  4. N and P addition inhibits growth of rich fen bryophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Riis, Tenna

    2016-01-01

    vernicosus and paludella squarrosa) rich fen bryophytes were grown in mixed culture and subjected to rainwater or groundwater and three levels of N (0, 1 and 3 mg N L-1) and P (0, 0.05 and 0.1 mg P NL-1). All species responded negatively to higher N-levels and three of four species responded negatively...... to rainwater and higher P-levels. C. cuspidata had highest relative growth rate in all treatments, and the infrequently occurringrare species had lower relative growth rate and were more negatively affected by high levels of N than the frequently occurringcommon species. A negative effect of rainwater seemed...... to be caused by higher background levels of N in rainwater compared to groundwater rather than a pH-effect per se. We found a negative effect of high initial bryophyte density in three of four species indicating density dependent inhibition between species.We suggest that maintenance of oligotrophic conditions...

  5. Inhibition of LPS and Plasmodium falciparum induced cytokine secretion by pentoxifylline and two analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Koch, C; Bendtzen, K

    1997-01-01

    inhibitory activity in vitro than pentoxifylline and HWA138. A small enhancement of cytokine secretion was induced by pentoxifylline and the two analogues at low concentrations. The drugs did not affect cell viability. Pentoxifylline, HWA138 and HWA448 also inhibited LPS induced TNF production in vivo......Pentoxifylline and the two analogues HWA138 and HWA448, at concentrations exceeding 60 micrograms/ml, inhibited malaria antigen or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha secretion, but not IL-6 secretion, from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. HWA448 had lower...

  6. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  7. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Iida

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38 in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231 but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3 when cultured in three dimensional (3D type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  8. Anti-Plasmodium activity of ceramide analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatt Shimon

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sphingolipids are key molecules regulating many essential functions in eukaryotic cells and ceramide plays a central role in sphingolipid metabolism. A sphingolipid metabolism occurs in the intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum and is associated with essential biological processes. It constitutes an attractive and potential target for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Methods The anti-Plasmodium activity of a series of ceramide analogs containing different linkages (amide, methylene or thiourea linkages between the fatty acid part of ceramide and the sphingoid core was investigated in culture and compared to the sphingolipid analog PPMP (d,1-threo-1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol. This analog is known to inhibit the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and block parasite development by preventing the formation of the tubovesicular network that extends from the parasitophorous vacuole to the red cell membrane and delivers essential extracellular nutrients to the parasite. Results Analogs containing methylene linkage showed a considerably higher anti-Plasmodium activity (IC50 in the low nanomolar range than PPMP and their counterparts with a natural amide linkage (IC50 in the micromolar range. The methylene analogs blocked irreversibly P. falciparum development leading to parasite eradication in contrast to PPMP whose effect is cytostatic. A high sensitivity of action towards the parasite was observed when compared to their effect on the human MRC-5 cell growth. The toxicity towards parasites did not correlate with the inhibition by methylene analogs of the parasite sphingomyelin synthase activity and the tubovesicular network formation, indicating that this enzyme is not their primary target. Conclusions It has been shown that ceramide analogs were potent inhibitors of P. falciparum growth in culture. Interestingly, the nature of the linkage between the fatty acid part and the

  9. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Salvador

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H, guaiacyl (G, and syringyl (S lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth.

  10. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase indicates unique perturbation-specific effects in the transcriptome and proteome

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available . The polyamine biosynthetic pathway, responsible for the metabolism of highly abundant amines crucial for parasite growth, proliferation and differentiation, is currently under investigation as an antimalarial target. In order to further evaluate polyamine...

  11. Sulindac metabolites inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor activation and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangburn Heather A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a decreased mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC. NSAIDs induce apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells in vitro and inhibit growth of neoplastic colonic mucosa in vivo however, the biochemical mechanisms required for these growth inhibitory effects are not well defined. We previously reported that metabolites of the NSAID sulindac downregulate extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling and that this effect is both necessary and sufficient for the apoptotic effects of these drugs. The goal of this project was to specifically test the hypothesis that sulindac metabolites block activation and/or expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor (EGFR. Methods HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with EGF, alone, or in the presence of sulindac sulfide or sulindac sulfone. Cells lysates were assayed by immunoblotting for phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR, pY1068, total EGFR, phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2, total ERK1/2, activated caspase-3, and α-tubulin. Results EGF treatment rapidly induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 in HT29 colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with sulindac metabolites for 24 h blocked EGF-induced phosphorylation of both EGFR and ERK1/2 and decreased total EGFR protein expression. Under basal conditions, downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 12 h following sulindac sulfide treatment and persisted through at least 48 h. Sulindac sulfone induced downregulation of pEGFR and total EGFR was detected as early as 1 h and 24 h, respectively, following drug treatment, and persisted through at least 72 h. EGFR downregulation by sulindac metabolites was observed in three different CRC cell lines, occurred prior to the observed downregulation of pERK1/2 and induction of apoptosis by these drugs, and was not dependent of caspase activation. Conclusion These results suggest that

  12. Blockade of nonhormonal fibroblast growth factors by FP-1039 inhibits growth of multiple types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas C; Long, Li; Palencia, Servando; Zhang, Hongbing; Sadra, Ali; Hestir, Kevin; Patil, Namrata; Levin, Anita; Hsu, Amy W; Charych, Deborah; Brennan, Thomas; Zanghi, James; Halenbeck, Robert; Marshall, Shannon A; Qin, Minmin; Doberstein, Stephen K; Hollenbaugh, Diane; Kavanaugh, W Michael; Williams, Lewis T; Baker, Kevin P

    2013-03-27

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in many solid tumors. Although there has long been interest in FGF pathway inhibitors, development has been complicated: An effective FGF inhibitor must block the activity of multiple mitogenic FGF ligands but must spare the metabolic hormone FGFs (FGF-19, FGF-21, and FGF-23) to avoid unacceptable toxicity. To achieve these design requirements, we engineered a soluble FGF receptor 1 Fc fusion protein, FP-1039. FP-1039 binds tightly to all of the mitogenic FGF ligands, inhibits FGF-stimulated cell proliferation in vitro, blocks FGF- and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis in vivo, and inhibits in vivo growth of a broad range of tumor types. FP-1039 antitumor response is positively correlated with RNA levels of FGF2, FGF18, FGFR1c, FGFR3c, and ETV4; models with genetic aberrations in the FGF pathway, including FGFR1-amplified lung cancer and FGFR2-mutated endometrial cancer, are particularly sensitive to FP-1039-mediated tumor inhibition. FP-1039 does not appreciably bind the hormonal FGFs, because these ligands require a cell surface co-receptor, klotho or β-klotho, for high-affinity binding and signaling. Serum calcium and phosphate levels, which are regulated by FGF-23, are not altered by administration of FP-1039. By selectively blocking nonhormonal FGFs, FP-1039 treatment confers antitumor efficacy without the toxicities associated with other FGF pathway inhibitors.

  13. Liver acid sphingomyelinase inhibits growth of metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saibara, Toshiji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These sphingolipids regulate carcinogenesis and proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the role of ASM in host defense against liver metastasis remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of ASM in liver metastasis of colon cancer was examined using Asm-/- and Asm+/+ mice that were inoculated with SL4 colon cancer cells to produce metastatic liver tumors. Asm-/- mice demonstrated enhanced tumor growth and reduced macrophage accumulation in the tumor, accompanied by decreased numbers of hepatic myofibroblasts (hMFs), which express tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), around the tumor margin. Tumor growth was increased by macrophage depletion or by Timp1 deficiency, but was decreased by hepatocyte-specific ASM overexpression, which was associated with increased S1P production. S1P stimulated macrophage migration and TIMP1 expression in hMFs in vitro. These findings indicate that ASM in the liver inhibits tumor growth through cytotoxic macrophage accumulation and TIMP1 production by hMFs in response to S1P. Targeting ASM may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating liver metastasis of colon cancer.

  14. Inhibition of glioblastoma growth by the thiadiazolidinone compound TDZD-8.

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    Diana Aguilar-Morante

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thiadiazolidinones (TDZD are small heterocyclic compounds first described as non-ATP competitive inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β. In this study, we analyzed the effects of 4-benzyl-2-methyl-1,2,4-thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione (TDZD-8, on murine GL261 cells growth in vitro and on the growth of established intracerebral murine gliomas in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our data show that TDZD-8 decreased proliferation and induced apoptosis of GL261 glioblastoma cells in vitro, delayed tumor growth in vivo, and augmented animal survival. These effects were associated with an early activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway and increased expression of EGR-1 and p21 genes. Also, we observed a sustained activation of the ERK pathway, a concomitant phosphorylation and activation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK and an inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at Ser 9. Finally, treatment of glioblastoma stem cells with TDZD-8 resulted in an inhibition of proliferation and self-renewal of these cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that TDZD-8 uses a novel mechanism to target glioblastoma cells, and that malignant progenitor population could be a target of this compound.

  15. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Identification of a specific region of Plasmodium falciparum EBL-1 that binds to host receptor glycophorin B and inhibits merozoite invasion in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuerong; Marinkovic, Marina; Russo, Crystal; McKnight, C James; Coetzer, Theresa L; Chishti, Athar H

    2012-05-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum invades human erythrocytes through multiple pathways utilizing several ligand-receptor interactions. These interactions are broadly classified in two groups according to their dependency on sialic acid residues. Here, we focus on the sialic acid-dependent pathway by using purified glycophorins and red blood cells (RBCs) to screen a cDNA phage display library derived from P. falciparum FCR3 strain, a sialic acid-dependent strain. This screen identified several parasite proteins including the erythrocyte-binding ligand-1, EBL-1. The phage cDNA insert encoded the 69-amino acid peptide, termed F2i, which is located within the F2 region of the DBL domain, designated here as D2, of EBL-1. Recombinant D2 and F2i polypeptides bound to purified glycophorins and RBCs, and the F2i peptide was found to interfere with binding of D2 domain to its receptor. Both D2 and F2i polypeptides bound to trypsin-treated but not neuraminidase or chymotrypsin-treated erythrocytes, consistent with known glycophorin B resistance to trypsin, and neither the D2 nor F2i polypeptide bound to glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes. Importantly, purified D2 and F2i polypeptides partially inhibited merozoite reinvasion in human erythrocytes. Our results show that the host erythrocyte receptor glycophorin B directly interacts with the DBL domain of parasite EBL-1, and the core binding site is contained within the 69 amino acid F2i region (residues 601-669) of the DBL domain. Together, these findings suggest that a recombinant F2i peptide with stabilized structure could provide a protective function at blood stage infection and represents a valuable addition to a multi-subunit vaccine against malaria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The heat shock protein 90 of Plasmodium falciparum and antimalarial activity of its inhibitor, geldanamycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The naturally occurring benzoquinone ansamycin compound, geldanamycin (GA, is a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and is a potential anticancer agent. Since Plasmodium falciparum has been reported to have an Hsp90 ortholog, we tested the possibility that GA might inhibit it and thereby display antiparasitic activity. Results We provide direct recombinant DNA evidence for the Hsp90 protein of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of fatal malaria. While the mRNA of Hsp90 was mainly expressed in ring and trophozoite stages, the protein was found in all stages, although schizonts contained relatively lower amounts. In vitro the parasitic Hsp90 exhibited an ATP-binding activity that could be specifically inhibited by GA. Plasmodium growth in human erythrocyte culture was strongly inhibited by GA with an IC50 of 20 nM, compared to the IC50 of 15 nM for chloroquine (CQ under identical conditions. When used in combination, the two drugs acted synergistically. GA was equally effective against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant strains (3D7 and W2, respectively and on all erythrocytic stages of the parasite. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that an active and essential Hsp90 chaperone cycle exists in Plasmodium and that the ansamycin antibiotics will be an important tool to dissect its role in the parasite. Additionally, the favorable pharmacology of GA, reported in human trials, makes it a promising antimalarial drug.

  18. Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Chryslène; Ize, Bérengère; Salcedo, Suzana P; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins, delivered into the cytoplasm of target bacterial cells, confer to host strain a significant competitive advantage. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminal region of surface-exposed CdiA protein (CdiA-CT) inhibits the growth of CDI- bacteria. CDI+ cells express a specific immunity protein, CdiI, which protects from autoinhibition by blocking the activity of cognate CdiA-CT. CdiA-CT are separated from the rest of the protein by conserved peptide motifs falling into two distinct classes, the "E. coli"- and "Burkholderia-type". CDI systems have been described in numerous species except in Pseudomonadaceae. In this study, we identified functional toxin/immunity genes linked to CDI systems in the Pseudomonas genus, which extend beyond the conventional CDI classes by the variability of the peptide motif that delimits the polymorphic CdiA-CT domain. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model, we identified the translational repressor RsmA as a negative regulator of CDI systems. Our data further suggest that under conditions of expression, P. aeruginosa CDI systems are implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and provide an advantage in competition assays. All together our data imply that CDI systems could play an important role in niche adaptation of Pseudomonadaceae.

  19. Glyphosate and AMPA inhibit cancer cell growth through inhibiting intracellular glycine synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Q

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Qingli Li,1,2 Mark J Lambrechts,1 Qiuyang Zhang,1 Sen Liu,1 Dongxia Ge,1 Rutie Yin,2 Mingrong Xi,2 Zongbing You1 1Departments of Structural and Cellular Biology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Tulane Cancer Center and Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium, Tulane Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, and Tulane Center for Aging, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glycine is a nonessential amino acid that is reversibly converted from serine intracellularly by serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Glyphosate and its degradation product, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA, are analogs to glycine, thus they may inhibit serine hydroxymethyltransferase to decrease intracellular glycine synthesis. In this study, we found that glyphosate and AMPA inhibited cell growth in eight human cancer cell lines but not in two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines. AMPA arrested C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cells in the G1/G0 phase and inhibited entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. AMPA also promoted apoptosis in C4-2B and PC-3 cancer cell lines. AMPA upregulated p53 and p21 protein levels as well as procaspase 9 protein levels in C4-2B cells, whereas it downregulated cyclin D3 protein levels. AMPA also activated caspase 3 and induced cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase. This study provides the first evidence that glyphosate and AMPA can inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of cancer cells but not normal cells, suggesting that they have potentials to be developed into a new anticancer therapy. Keywords: serine hydroxymethyltransferase, prostate cancer, apoptosis

  20. Growth inhibition caused by reused drainage water; quest for cause and measuring method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, van der A.A.; Blok, C.; Driever, S.M.; Warmenhoven, M.G.; Meijer, R.J.M.; Marrewijk, van I.; Holtman, W.; Oppedijk, B.

    2014-01-01

    Growth inhibition is often a reason for growers to refresh the recirculation water and to discharge the excess water. The cause of growth inhibition other than a high concentration of sodium or a disease is usually unclear. Objectives of the study were the determination of the cause of growth

  1. Aurapten, a coumarin with growth inhibition against Leishmania major promastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napolitano H.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several natural compounds have been identified for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Among them are some alkaloids, chalcones, lactones, tetralones, and saponins. The new compound reported here, 7-geranyloxycoumarin, called aurapten, belongs to the chemical class of the coumarins and has a molecular weight of 298.37. The compund was extracted from the Rutaceae species Esenbeckia febrifuga and was purified from a hexane extract starting from 407.7 g of dried leaves and followed by four silica gel chromatographic fractionation steps using different solvents as the mobile phase. The resulting compound (47 mg of shows significant growth inhibition with an LD50 of 30 µM against the tropical parasite Leishmania major, which causes severe clinical manifestations in humans and is endemic in the tropical and subtropical regions. In the present study, we investigated the atomic structure of aurapten in order to determine the existence of common structural motifs that might be related to other coumarins and potentially to other identified inhibitors of Leishmania growth and viability. This compound has a comparable inhibitory activity of other isolated molecules. The aurapten is a planar molecule constituted of an aromatic system with electron delocalization. A hydrophobic side chain consisting of ten carbon atoms with two double bonds and negative density has been identified and may be relevant for further compound synthesis.

  2. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Verónica; Díaz-Martínez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7 μM. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms.

  3. Luteolin inhibits human prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyil Pratheeshkumar

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vascular beds, is essential for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Luteolin is a common dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables. We studied the antiangiogenic activity of luteolin using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. In vitro studies using rat aortic ring assay showed that luteolin at non-toxic concentrations significantly inhibited microvessel sprouting and proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of endothelial cells, which are key events in the process of angiogenesis. Luteolin also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis as revealed by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM and matrigel plug assay. Gelatin zymographic analysis demonstrated the inhibitory effect of luteolin on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin suppressed VEGF induced phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 and their downstream protein kinases AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in HUVECs. Proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α level were significantly reduced by the treatment of luteolin in PC-3 cells. Luteolin (10 mg/kg/d significantly reduced the volume and the weight of solid tumors in prostate xenograft mouse model, indicating that luteolin inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemical staining further revealed that the microvessel density could be remarkably suppressed by luteolin. Moreover, luteolin reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, which were correlated with the downregulation of AKT, ERK, mTOR, P70S6K, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expressions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that luteolin inhibits human prostate tumor growth by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated angiogenesis.

  4. Desferrioxamine suppresses Plasmodium falciparum in Aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S; Rossan, R N; Davidson, D E; Escajadillo, A

    1987-02-01

    Clinical observation has suggested that iron deficiency may be protective in malaria, and we have found that desferrioxamine (DF), an iron-specific chelating agent, inhibited Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro. It was difficult to be confident that DF would be effective in an intact animal, however, because continuous exposure to DF was required in vitro and, in vivo, DF is rapidly excreted. Also, the in vitro effect of DF was overcome by addition of iron to the culture and in vivo there are potentially high local iron concentrations when iron is absorbed from the diet or released from reticuloendothelial cells. We now show that DF given by constant subcutaneous infusion does suppress parasitemia in P. falciparum-infected Aotus monkeys.

  5. The novel oxygenated chalcone, 2,4-dimethoxy-4'-butoxychalcone, exhibits potent activity against human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and rodent parasites Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium yoelii in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, M; Brøgger Christensen, S; Zhai, L

    1997-01-01

    growth of both a chloroquine-susceptible (3D7) and a chloroquine-resistant (Dd2) strain of Plasmodium falciparum in a [3H]hypoxanthine uptake assay. The in vivo activity of 2,4mbc was tested in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei or Plasmodium yoelii and in rats infected with P. berghei. 2,4mbc...

  6. Combined MET inhibition and topoisomerase I inhibition block cell growth of small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Rajani; Surati, Mosmi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Yala, Soheil; Tretiakova, Maria; Arif, Qudsia; Hembrough, Todd; Brand, Toni M; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Bharti, Ajit; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease, and current therapies have not greatly improved the 5-year survival rates. Topoisomerase (Top) inhibition is a treatment modality for SCLC; however, the response is short lived. Consequently, our research has focused on improving SCLC therapeutics through the identification of novel targets. Previously, we identified MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) to be overexpressed and functional in SCLC. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of combinatorial targeting of MET using SU11274 and Top1 using 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). MET and TOP1 gene copy numbers and protein expression were determined in 29 patients with limited (n = 11) and extensive (n = 18) disease. MET gene copy number was significantly increased (>6 copies) in extensive disease compared with limited disease (P = 0.015). Similar TOP1 gene copy numbers were detected in limited and extensive disease. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a significantly higher Top1 nuclear expression in extensive (0.93) versus limited (0.15) disease (P = 0.04). Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was detected between MET gene copy number and Top1 nuclear expression (r = 0.5). In vitro stimulation of H82 cells revealed hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced nuclear colocalization of p-MET and Top1. Furthermore, activation of the HGF/MET axis enhanced Top1 activity, which was abrogated by SU11274. Combination of SN-38 with SU11274 dramatically decreased SCLC growth as compared with either drug alone. Collectively, these findings suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of MET and Top1 is a potentially efficacious treatment strategy for SCLC. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Bryostatin I inhibits growth of breast cancer cells through the inhibition of synuclein-A expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of bryostatin I on the expression of synuclein-A in breast cancer cells. Western blot analysis showed a significant (p<0.005 reduction in the expression of synuclein-A from a concentration of 20 µM in H3922 cells. The inhibitory effect of bryostatin I on synuclein-A expression was further confirmed by the treatment of H3922 cells with known synuclein-A inhibitor, cytokine oncostatin M. Bryostatin I treatment of H3922 cells also significantly increased their sensitivity to the taxol. Incubation of the cells with 25 µM concentration of bryostatin I followed by treatment with 0.5 μM concentration of taxol induced apoptosis in 89% cells compared to 9% cells in the taxol alone treated cultures. Treatment of the H3922 cells with bryostatin I at 25 µM concentration led to a significant increase in the activation of histone H1 protein. The results from MTT assay showed a significant decrease in the cell viability from 10 µM concentration of bryostatin I. Thus, bryostatin I inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells through inhibition of synuclein-A expression and can be used for breast cancer treatment.

  8. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions.

  9. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  10. Perception mechanism of gravity stimuli in hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-10-01

    We reported that elongation growth of plant shoots and roots is suppressed by hypergravity, with the rate decreasing in proportion to logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. In hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of shoots, graviperception is supposed to be independent of that in gravitropism and to involve mechanoreceptors. However, the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is not known. In the present study, we compared the mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots with that in gravitropism. The removal of root cap did not influence hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots, although the gravitropic curvature was completely inhibited. Hypergravity had no effects on growth of azuki bean roots in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium, which are blockers of mechanoreceptors. On the contrary, lanthanum or gadolinium at the same concentration did not influence gravitropism of roots. These results suggest that the graviperception mechanism in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of roots is independent of that in gravitropism. Hypergravity-induced growth inhibition of azuki bean roots was observed irrespective of the direction of stimuli, which disappeared in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. Thus, in the hypergravity-induced growth inhibition, roots may perceive the gravity signal by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane independently of the direction of stimuli, and may utilize it to regulate their growth rate.

  11. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  12. MK615 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth by dual inhibition of Aurora A and B kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshie Okada; Tokihiko Sawada; Tatsushi Osawa; Masakazu Adachi; Keiichi Kubota

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the anti-neoplastic effect of MK615,an anti-neoplastic compound isolated from Japanese apricot,against human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.METHODS:Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1,PK-1,and PK45H were cultured with MK615 at concentrations of 600,300,150,and O μg/mL.Growth inhibition was evaluated by cell proliferation assay,and killing activity was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay.Expression of Aurora A and B kinases was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting.Cell cycle stages were evaluated by flow cytometry.RESULTS:The growth inhibitory rates of MK615 at 150,300,and 600 μg/mL were 2.3% ± 0.9%,8.9% ±3.2% and 67.1% ± 8.1% on PANC1 cells,1.3% ± 0.3%,8.7% ± 4.1% and 45.7 ± 7.6% on PK1 cells,and 1.2 ±0.8%,9.1% ± 2.1% and 52.1% ± 5.5% on PK45H cells,respectively (P<0.05).The percentage cytotoxicities of MK615 at 0,150,300,and 600 μg/mL were 19.6% ±1.3%,26.7% ± 1.8%,25.5% ± 0.9% and 26.4% ± 0.9%in PANC1 cells,19.7% ± 1.3%,24.7% ± 0.8%,25.9% ±0.9% and 29.9% ± 1.1% in PK1 cells,and 28.0% ± 0.9%,31.2% ± 0.9%,30.4% ± 1.1% and 35.3 ± 1.0% in PK45H cells,respectively (P<0.05).Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that MK615 dually inhibited the expression of Aurora A and B kinases.Cell cycle analysis revealed that MK615 increased the population of cells in G2/M phase.CONCLUSION:MK615 exerts an anti-neoplastic effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro by dual inhibition of Aurora A and B kinases.

  13. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  14. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  15. Role of heat-labile serum factor or host complement in the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum sporogonic stages in Anopheles stephensi by gametocyte carriers' serological factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouagna, L.C.; Kolk, M. van der; Roeffen, W.; Verhave, J.P.; Eling, W.M.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Boudin, C.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the significance of serum complement on transmission-reducing activity (TRA) of field sera from 24 infected Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte carriers (from Cameroon) against cultured NF54 P. falciparum. Laboratory-reared Anopheles stephensi were given infectious blood meals

  16. Triiodothyronine inhibits transcription from the human growth hormone promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, A; Louette, J; Voz, M L; Tixier-Vidal, A; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-07-09

    Three DNA constructs, the natural human growth hormone gene (hGH-hGH) its 500 bp promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene (hGH-CAT), and its structural part linked to the herpes virus thymidine kinase promoter (TK-hGH) were introduced into rat pituitary GC cells by DEAE-dextran transfection. Transient expression was followed as a function of triiodothyronine (T3) concentration. The hGH-CAT expression was specifically inhibited by T3 following a typical dose-response curve while hGH-GH gene expression was not significantly modified. The transient expression of TK-hGH increased as a function of T3 concentration. These results indicate that T3 exerts two opposite effects on hGH gene expression. First, it down-regulates expression by acting on the promoter; second, it up-regulates expression by acting on the structural part of the gene. These action could be due to regulation of transcription and mRNA stabilization, respectively.

  17. Muricholic acids inhibit Clostridium difficile spore germination and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Francis

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Clostridium difficile have increased steadily over the past several years. While studies on C. difficile virulence and physiology have been hindered, in the past, by lack of genetic approaches and suitable animal models, newly developed technologies and animal models allow these processes to be studied in detail. One such advance is the generation of a mouse-model of C. difficile infection. The development of this system is a major step forward in analyzing the genetic requirements for colonization and infection. While important, it is equally as important in understanding what differences exist between mice and humans. One of these differences is the natural bile acid composition. Bile acid-mediated spore germination is an important step in C. difficile colonization. Mice produce several different bile acids that are not found in humans. These muricholic acids have the potential to impact C. difficile spore germination. Here we find that the three muricholic acids (α-muricholic acid, β-muricholic acid and ω-muricholic acid inhibit C. difficile spore germination and can impact the growth of vegetative cells. These results highlight an important difference between humans and mice and may have an impact on C. difficile virulence in the mouse-model of C. difficile infection.

  18. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  19. Blue light inhibits the growth of B16 melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, Masayuki; Katoh, Osamu; Watanabe, Hiromitsu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine; Kawashima, Yuzo [Otsuka Pharmaceutical Factory, Inc., Naruto, Tokushima (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Although a number of studies have been carried out to examine the biological effects of radiation and ultraviolet radiation (UV), little is known concerning the effects of visible light. In the present study, exposure of B16 melanoma cells to blue light (wavelength 470 nm, irradiance 5.7 mW/cm{sup 2}) from a light-emitting diode (LED) inhibited cell growth in proportion to the period of exposure, with no increase observed in the number of dead cells. The number of B16 melanoma colonies that formed after exposure to blue light for 20 min was only slightly less than that in non-exposed controls, but the colony size as assessed by the area covered by colonies and cell counts per colony were markedly decreased. The percentages of G0/G1 and G2/M phase cells were markedly increased, with a reduction in S phase cells as determined by flow cytometry after exposure to blue light. Furthermore, analysis of the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into DNA also showed a reduction in the percentage of S phase cells after exposure. These results indicate that blue light exerts cytostatic effects, but not a cytocidal action, on B16 melanoma cells. (author)

  20. Inhibition of bacterial, fungal and plant growth by testa extracts of Citrullus genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai) seed exudates inhibit germination and seedling growth of several plant species and growth of pathogenic fungi and bacteria. This study was conducted to determine if extractable components in testae contribute to the inhibition. T...

  1. OP449 inhibits breast cancer growth without adverse metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomai, Gadi; Zelenko, Zara; Antoniou, Irini Markella; Stasinopoulos, Marilyn; Tobin-Hess, Aviva; Vitek, Michael P; LeRoith, Derek; Gallagher, Emily Jane

    2017-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is associated with a decrease in breast cancer recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Inhibition of insulin receptor signaling is associated with glycemic dysregulation. SET is a direct modulator of PP2A, which negatively regulates the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. OP449, a SET inhibitor, decreases AKT/mTOR activation. The effects of OP449 treatment on breast cancer growth in the setting of pre-diabetes, and its metabolic implications are currently unknown. We found that the volumes and weights of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts were greater in hyperinsulinemic mice compared with controls (P < 0.05), and IR phosphorylation was 4.5-fold higher in these mice (P < 0.05). Human and murine breast cancer tumors treated with OP449 were 47% and 39% smaller than controls (P < 0.05, for both, respectively). AKT and S6RP phosphorylation were 82% and 34% lower in OP449-treated tumors compared with controls (P < 0.05, P = 0.06, respectively). AKT and S6RP phosphorylation in response to insulin was 30% and 12% lower in cells, pre-treated with OP449, compared with control cells (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). However, even with decreased AKT/mTOR activation, body weights and composition, blood glucose and plasma insulin, glucose tolerance, serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels were similar between OP449-treated mice and controls. Xenografts and liver tissue from OP449-treated mice showed a 64% and 70% reduction in STAT5 activation, compared with controls (P < 0.01 and P = 0.06, respectively). Our data support an anti-neoplastic effect of OP449 on human breast cancer cells in vitro and in xenografts in the setting of hyperinsulinemia. OP449 led to the inhibition of AKT/mTOR signaling, albeit, not leading to metabolic derangements. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity.

  3. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7. PMID:28316607

  4. Modeling Synergistic Drug Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth in Murine Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    synergistic drug inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in murine macrophagesw Xin Fang, Anders Wallqvist and Jaques Reifman* Received 15th...inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in murine macrophage cells. We used it to simulate ex vivo bacterial growth inhibition due to 3-nitropropionate (3...is felt worldwide, with 9.4 million new cases and 1.8 million deaths in 2008.1,2 The causative agent of the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  5. Amylase inhibits Neisseria gonorrhoeae by degrading starch in the growth medium.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, M.R.; Gregory, W W; Bruns, D E; Zakowski, J J

    1983-01-01

    Highly purified salivary alpha-amylase inhibited the growth of fresh isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on GC agar base medium supplemented with 2% IsoVitaleX (BBL Microbiology Systems). Hydrolysis of starch in the medium by amylase resulted in a negative starch-iodine test. However, purified amylase did not inhibit gonococcal growth on agar plates that contained hemoglobin (chocolate agar). This effect was not caused by inhibition of amylase, since amylase activity was the same in the presenc...

  6. Inhibition of growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured fibroblasts by human recombinant gamma interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, E R; Guyre, P M

    1984-01-01

    The growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts was inhibited by recombinant human gamma interferon at concentrations of 8 to 16 U/ml. The interferon was titrated by observing a total inhibition of parasite plaque formation 7 days after infection. Inhibition of the growth of T. gondii in the early days after infection was measured by marked reductions in the incorporation of radioactive uracil, a precursor that can only be used by the parasites. This assay showed that when cells were pretreated with gamma interferon for 1 day and then infected, inhibition of T. gondii growth could be readily detected 1 or 2 days after infection. When the pretreatment was omitted and parasites and gamma interferon were added at the same time, no inhibition of parasite growth could be detected 1 day later, although it was apparent after 2 days. Cultures from which the gamma interferon had been removed by washing after a 1-day treatment showed inhibition of T. gondii growth. Gamma interferon had no effect on the viability of extracellular parasites, but it did inhibit the synthesis of host cell RNA and protein by ca. 50% 3 days after treatment. This degree of inhibition is unlikely, of itself, to compromise the growth of T. gondii. Recombinant alpha and beta interferons had no effect on the growth of T. gondii. Images PMID:6425215

  7. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannon, Patrick R., E-mail: phannon2@illinois.edu; Brannick, Katherine E., E-mail: kbran@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: Wei.Wang2@covance.com; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  8. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium cynomolgi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chatterjee, Soumendranath; Mukhopadhyay, Priyanka; Bandyopadhyay, Raktima; Dhal, Paltu; Biswal, Debraj; Bandyopadhyay, Prabir Kumar

    18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of different species of Plasmodium were aligned and analyzed to determine the molecular diversity among different species of Plasmodium. AT content of P. cynomolgi, P. ovale, P. falciparum, P. vivax and P...

  9. Robust inducible Cre recombinase activity in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum enables efficient gene deletion within a single asexual erythrocytic growth cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christine R; Das, Sujaan; Wong, Eleanor H; Andenmatten, Nicole; Stallmach, Robert; Hackett, Fiona; Herman, Jean-Paul; Müller, Sylke; Meissner, Markus; Blackman, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Asexual blood stages of the malaria parasite, which cause all the pathology associated with malaria, can readily be genetically modified by homologous recombination, enabling the functional study of parasite genes that are not essential in this part of the life cycle. However, no widely applicable method for conditional mutagenesis of essential asexual blood-stage malarial genes is available, hindering their functional analysis. We report the application of the DiCre conditional recombinase system to Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most dangerous form of malaria. We show that DiCre can be used to obtain rapid, highly regulated site-specific recombination in P. falciparum, capable of excising loxP-flanked sequences from a genomic locus with close to 100% efficiency within the time-span of a single erythrocytic growth cycle. DiCre-mediated deletion of the SERA5 3' UTR failed to reduce expression of the gene due to the existence of alternative cryptic polyadenylation sites within the modified locus. However, we successfully used the system to recycle the most widely used drug resistance marker for P. falciparum, human dihydrofolate reductase, in the process producing constitutively DiCre-expressing P. falciparum clones that have broad utility for the functional analysis of essential asexual blood-stage parasite genes.

  10. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  11. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors.

  12. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  13. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  14. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  15. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  16. Growth Inhibition of Breast Cancer in Rat by AAV Mediated Angiostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ran; CHEN Hong; REN Chang-shan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe growth inhibition effect of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) mediated angiostatin (ANG) gene on implanted breast cancer in rat and its mechanism. Methods: Gene transfer technique was used to transfer AAV-ANG to the tumor. Growth curves were drawn to observe the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat, and immunohistochemical method was used to detect the effects of angiostatin on microvesel density (MVD) of breast cancer implanted in rat. Results: Angiostatin inhibited the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat and decreased the microvessel density of tumor. Conclusion: Expression of an angiostatin transgene can suppress the growth of breast cancer implanted in rat through the inhibition of the growth of microvessels, surggesting that angiostatin gene transfer technique may be effective against breast cancer.

  17. Inhibition of human gastric carcinoma cell growth by atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Liu; Wei Tang; Xian-Jun Qu; Wen-Fang Xu; Shu-Xiang Cui; Yong Zhou; Yun-Xia Yuan; Ming-Hui Chen; Ruo-Han Wang; Ruo-Yan Gai; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the growth inhibition efficacy of atofluding derivative N3-o-toluyl-fluorouracil (TFU)on human gastric carcinoma cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45.METHODS:Cell growth inhibition by TFU was measured by MTT and clonogenic assays without or with liver microsomal enzymes. Xenografts of cancer cells in nude mice were employed to study the anti-proliferative effects of TFU in vivo,RESULTS:TFU inhibited the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells. However, the inhibitory effects of TFU on cell growth were not significant. The inhibition rates were enhanced in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes, ranging 4.73%-48.57% in SGC-7901 cells and 9.0%-62.02% in MKN-45 cells. In vivo, TFU delayed the growth of SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells in nude mice. The inhibition rates were 40.49%, 63.24%, and 75.98% in SGC-7901 cells and 40.76%, 61.41%, and 82.07% in MKN-45 cells when the oral doses were 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, respectively. TFU treatment was generally well tolerated by mice with less than 20% reduction in body weight.CONCLUSION:TFU inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cells. The inhibition rates are increased in the presence of liver microsomal enzymes. The efficacy of TFU may be associated with the sustaining release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) mediated by the enzymes.

  18. MITF suppression by CH5552074 inhibits cell growth in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Satoshi; Sonobe, Yukiko; Yuhki, Munehiro; Sakata, Kiyoaki; Fujii, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Takakazu

    2017-06-01

    Although treatment of melanoma with BRAF inhibitors and immune checkpoint inhibitors achieves a high response rate, a subset of melanoma patients with intrinsic and acquired resistance are insensitive to these therapeutics, so to improve melanoma therapy other target molecules need to be found. Here, we screened our chemical library to identify an anti-melanoma agent and examined its action mechanisms to show cell growth inhibition activity. We screened a chemical library against multiple skin cancer cell lines and conducted ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) to investigate the mechanisms of CH5552074 activity. Suppression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression levels was determined in melanoma cells treated with CH5552074. Cell growth inhibition activity of CH5552074 was evaluated in MITF-dependent melanoma cell lines. We identified an anti-melanoma compound, CH5552074, which showed remarkable cell growth inhibition activity in melanoma cell lines. The IPA results suggested that CH5552074-sensitive cell lines had activated MITF. In further in vitro studies in the melanoma cell lines, a knockdown of MITF with siRNA resulted in cell growth inhibition, which showed that CH5552074 inhibited cell growth by reducing the expression level of MITF protein. These results suggest that CH5552074 can inhibit cell growth in melanoma cells by reducing the protein level of MITF. MITF inhibition by CH5552074 would be an attractive option for melanoma treatment.

  19. Suramin inhibits growth and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) binding in osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloen, P; Jennings, C L; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J

    1994-01-01

    Autocrine production of growth factors has been shown to be involved in the multistep process of tumorigenesis. The ability of suramin, a polyanionic anti-parasitic drug, to block growth factor-induced cell proliferation makes it a potential antineoplastic drug. We studied the effects of suramin on seven osteosarcoma cell lines. Using clinically achievable concentrations of suramin (50-400 micrograms/ml), we found a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation. We also showed that suramin is able, dose-dependently, to prevent binding of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 to its receptors. DNA synthesis inhibition by suramin was attenuated by TGF-beta 1 in some cell lines. Two cell lines that were inhibited by TGF-beta 1 were affected similarly by suramin as cell lines that were stimulated by TGF-beta 1. In conclusion, in five out of seven osteosarcoma cell lines, we showed a correlation between inhibition of growth factor-stimulated mitogenesis and binding of TGF-beta 1 to its receptor. Similar effects in TGF-beta 1-inhibited osteosarcoma cell lines suggest involvement of other mechanisms and/or growth factors. However, suramin proves to be a potent inhibitor of osteosarcoma cell proliferation in vitro.

  20. PfeIF4E and PfeIF4A colocalize and their double-stranded RNA inhibits Plasmodium falciparum proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuteja, Renu; Pradhan, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Using bioinformatics and biochemical methods in the recent past we have reported the isolation and characterization of the main components of translation initiation complex eIF4F from malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We reported that eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly (A) binding protein (PABP) are structurally and functionally conserved in this parasite. In the present study we report furth...

  1. PfeIF4E and PfeIF4A colocalize and their double-stranded RNA inhibits Plasmodium falciparum proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuteja, Renu; Pradhan, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Using bioinformatics and biochemical methods in the recent past we have reported the isolation and characterization of the main components of translation initiation complex eIF4F from malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We reported that eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly (A) binding protein (PABP) are structurally and functionally conserved in this parasite. In the present study we report furth...

  2. Tumour growth inhibition and anti-angiogenic effects using curcumin correspond to combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusnina, Abdurazzag; Keravis, Thérèse; Zhou, Qingwei; Justiniano, Hélène; Lobstein, Annelise; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells. Increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) level inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which specifically hydrolyse cyclic nucleotides, are critical in the regulation of this signal transduction. We have previously reported that PDE2 and PDE4 up-regulations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are implicated in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and that inhibition of PDE2 and PDE4 activities prevents the development of the in vitro angiogenesis by increasing cAMP level, as well as the in vivo chicken embryo angiogenesis. We have also shown that polyphenols are able to inhibit PDEs. The curcumin having anti-cancer properties, the present study investigated whether PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors and curcumin could have similar in vivo anti-tumour properties and whether the anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin are mediated by PDEs. Both PDE2/PDE4 inhibitor association and curcumin significantly inhibited in vivo tumour growth in C57BL/6N mice. In vitro, curcumin inhibited basal and VEGF-stimulated HUVEC proliferation and migration and delayed cell cycle progression at G0/G1, similarly to the combination of selective PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP levels in HUVECs were significantly increased by curcumin, similarly to rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and BAY-60-550 (PDE2 inhibitor) association, indicating cAMP-PDE inhibitions. Moreover, curcumin was able to inhibit VEGF-induced cAMP-PDE activity without acting on cGMP-PDE activity and to modulate PDE2 and PDE4 expressions in HUVECs. The present results suggest that curcumin exerts its in vitro anti-angiogenic and in vivo anti-tumour properties through combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

  3. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  4. MAG, myelin and overcoming growth inhibition in the CNS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McKerracher, Lisa; Rosen, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    While neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) have the capacity to regenerate their axons after injury, they fail to do so, in part because regeneration is limited by growth inhibitory proteins present in CNS myelin...

  5. Achieving optimal growth through product feedback inhibition in metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha Goyal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the metabolism of some organisms, such as Escherichia coli, is remarkably efficient, producing close to the maximum amount of biomass per unit of nutrient consumed. This observation raises the question of what regulatory mechanisms enable such efficiency. Here, we propose that simple product-feedback inhibition by itself is capable of leading to such optimality. We analyze several representative metabolic modules--starting from a linear pathway and advancing to a bidirectional pathway and metabolic cycle, and finally to integration of two different nutrient inputs. In each case, our mathematical analysis shows that product-feedback inhibition is not only homeostatic but also, with appropriate feedback connections, can minimize futile cycling and optimize fluxes. However, the effectiveness of simple product-feedback inhibition comes at the cost of high levels of some metabolite pools, potentially associated with toxicity and osmotic imbalance. These large metabolite pool sizes can be restricted if feedback inhibition is ultrasensitive. Indeed, the multi-layer regulation of metabolism by control of enzyme expression, enzyme covalent modification, and allostery is expected to result in such ultrasensitive feedbacks. To experimentally test whether the qualitative predictions from our analysis of feedback inhibition apply to metabolic modules beyond linear pathways, we examine the case of nitrogen assimilation in E. coli, which involves both nutrient integration and a metabolic cycle. We find that the feedback regulation scheme suggested by our mathematical analysis closely aligns with the actual regulation of the network and is sufficient to explain much of the dynamical behavior of relevant metabolite pool sizes in nutrient-switching experiments.

  6. Hypergravity inhibits elongation growth of azuki bean epicotyls independently of the direction of stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    We examined the effects of basipetal, horizontal, and acropetal hypergravity stimulation on growth and cell wall properties of azuki bean seedlings. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity inhibited elongation growth of epicotyls by decreasing the cell wall extensibility, as did basipetal hypergravity. Hypergravity stimulation increased the thickness of cell walls and suppressed xyloglucan breakdown regardless of direction. All hypergravity treatments increased the pH in the apoplastic fluid, which is involved in the processes of the suppression of xyloglucan breakdown. Gadolinium and lanthanum, both blockers of mechanoreceptors, nullified the growth-inhibiting effects of hypergravity. These results show that growth inhibition by hypergravity is independent of its direction in azuki bean epicotyls. The findings also suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane perceive the gravity signal independently of its direction, and affect growth of azuki bean epicotyls.

  7. Plasmodium vivax adherence to placental glycosaminoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Chotivanich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax infections seldom kill directly but do cause indirect mortality by reducing birth weight and causing abortion. Cytoadherence and sequestration in the microvasculature are central to the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the contribution of cytoadherence to pathology in other human malarias is less clear. METHODOLOGY: The adherence properties of P. vivax infected red blood cells (PvIRBC were evaluated under static and flow conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. vivax isolates from 33 patients were studied. None adhered to immobilized CD36, ICAM-1, or thrombospondin, putative ligands for P. falciparum vascular cytoadherence, or umbilical vein endothelial cells, but all adhered to immobilized chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA, the receptors for adhesion of P. falciparum in the placenta. PvIRBC also adhered to fresh placental cells (N = 5. Pre-incubation with chondroitinase prevented PvIRBC adherence to CSA, and reduced binding to HA, whereas preincubation with hyaluronidase prevented adherence to HA, but did not reduce binding to CSA significantly. Pre-incubation of PvIRBC with soluble CSA and HA reduced binding to the immobilized receptors and prevented placental binding. PvIRBC adhesion was prevented by pre-incubation with trypsin, inhibited by heparin, and reduced by EGTA. Under laminar flow conditions the mean (SD shear stress reducing maximum attachment by 50% was 0.06 (0.02 Pa but, having adhered, the PvIRBC could then resist detachment by stresses up to 5 Pa. At 37 °C adherence began approximately 16 hours after red cell invasion with maximal adherence at 30 hours. At 39 °C adherence began earlier and peaked at 24 hours. SIGNIFICANCE: Adherence of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes to glycosaminoglycans may contribute to the pathogenesis of vivax malaria and lead to intrauterine growth retardation.

  8. Inhibition of uropathogenic biofilm growth on silicone rubber in human urine by lactobacilli - a teleologic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Busscher, HJ; Reid, G; van der Mei, HC

    2000-01-01

    The ability of three Lactobacillus strains to inhibit the adhesion and growth of naturally occurring uropathogens on silicone rubber was investigated in human urine. The importance of biosurfactant production by Lactobacillus in discouraging uropathogen growth was determined in relation to the bindi

  9. Enhancement or inhibition of tumor growth by interferon: dependence on treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasko, D M; Fresa, K; Mark, R

    1983-12-15

    MSC cells are tumor cells originally induced in BALB/c mice by Moloney sarcoma virus. In these studies we demonstrated that, although these tumor cells are sensitive in vitro both to lysis by NK or NK-like cells and to the growth-inhibitory effect of murine L-cell interferon (IFN), the growth of the tumor in vivo could be either inhibited or enhanced by IFN. The outcome of in vivo IFN treatment was dependent on the timing and route of IFN administration relative to tumor challenge. IFN given systematically at the same time as tumor challenge resulted in enhancement of primary tumor formation, rate of tumor growth and subsequent progressive tumor growth. In contrast, IFN administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge inhibited tumor formation and growth. Histopathology of tissue sections obtained from the site of tumor challenge confirmed these results. Similar studies performed in mice given 450 rads of X-irradiation showed that IFN could still inhibit tumor growth when administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge. IFN administered simultaneously with tumor challenge, however, did not enhance tumor growth in irradiated mice. These results are consistent with the interpretation that 1) inhibition of MSC-induced tumor growth by IFN has a radioresistant component and 2) the enhancement of MSC-induced tumor formation by IFN is dependent on interaction with a radiosensitive population of cells, possibly lymphoid cells.

  10. Inhibition of uropathogenic biofilm growth on silicone rubber in human urine by lactobacilli - a teleologic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velraeds, MMC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Busscher, HJ; Reid, G; van der Mei, HC

    2000-01-01

    The ability of three Lactobacillus strains to inhibit the adhesion and growth of naturally occurring uropathogens on silicone rubber was investigated in human urine. The importance of biosurfactant production by Lactobacillus in discouraging uropathogen growth was determined in relation to the bindi

  11. Vitamin and co-factor biosynthesis pathways in Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sylke; Kappes, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Vitamins are essential components of the human diet. By contrast, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related apicomplexan parasites synthesise certain vitamins, de novo, either completely or in parts. The occurrence of the various biosynthesis pathways is specific to different apicomplexan parasites, emphasising their distinct requirements for nutrients and growth factors. The absence of vitamin biosynthesis from the human host implies that inhibition of the parasite pathways may be a way to interfere specifically with parasite development. However, the precise role of biosynthesis and potential uptake of vitamins for the overall regulation of vitamin homeostasis in the parasites needs to be established first. In this review Sylke Müller and Barbara Kappes focus mainly on the procurement of vitamin B1, B5 and B6 by Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites. PMID:17276140

  12. Vitamin and cofactor biosynthesis pathways in Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sylke; Kappes, Barbara

    2007-03-01

    Vitamins are essential components of the human diet. By contrast, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related apicomplexan parasites synthesize certain vitamins de novo, either completely or in parts. The various biosynthesis pathways are specific to different apicomplexan parasites and emphasize the distinct requirements of these parasites for nutrients and growth factors. The absence of vitamin biosynthesis in humans implies that inhibition of the parasite pathways might be a way to interfere specifically with parasite development. However, the roles of biosynthesis and uptake of vitamins in the regulation of vitamin homeostasis in parasites needs to be established first. In this article, the procurement of vitamins B(1), B(5) and B(6) by Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites is discussed.

  13. Growth Inhibition Effect of DL-Lysine Acetylalicylate on sw480 Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu; TIAN Xiao-feng; WANG Li-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate on proliferation of colon carcinoma cells line sw480. Methods: After treatment of DL-lysine acetylsalicylate, the study was performed by observing sw480 colorectal cancer cells with phase contrast microscope, making growth curve, and examining the inhibition rate of sw480 cells with MTT assay. Results: The morphology of sw480 cells showed characteristics of apoptosis, the cell growth curve showed inhibited proliferation of sw480 cells when treated with DL-lysine acetylsalicylate (P<0.05). The rate of inhibition was upward when the drug concentration increased. Conclusion: DL-lysine acetylsalicylate for injection can inhibit the growth of sw480 colorectal cancer cells obviously in a dose dependent manner.

  14. MAG, myelin and overcoming growth inhibition in the CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eMcKerracher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While neurons in the central nervous system have the capacity to regenerate their axons after injury, they fail to do so, in part because regeneration is limited by growth inhibitory proteins present in CNS myelin. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG was the first myelin-derived growth inhibitory protein identified, and its inhibitory activity was initially elucidated in 1994 independently by the Filbin lab and the McKerracher lab using cell-based and biochemical techniques, respectively. Since that time we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning the numerous growth inhibitory proteins that are present in myelin, and we also have dissected many of the neuronal signaling pathways that act as stop signs for axon regeneration. Here we give an overview of the early research efforts that led to the identification of myelin-derived growth inhibitory proteins, and the importance of this family of proteins for understanding neurotrauma and CNS diseases. We further provide an update on how this knowledge has been translated towards current clinical studies in regenerative medicine.

  15. l-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    BENAVIDES, MAXIMO A.; BOSLAND, MAARTEN C.; da Silva, Cássio P.; Sares, Claudia T. Gomes; de Oliveira, Alana M. Cerqueira; Kemp,Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B.; Martins,Vilma R.; Sampaio,Suely V.; Bland, Kirby I.; Grizzle, William E.; José S. dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that l-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to l-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without l-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after stai...

  16. Interleukin 2 inhibits in vitro growth of human T cell lines carrying retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamura, K; Nakai, S; Fujii, M; Hinuma, Y

    1985-05-01

    Four human T cell lines, TL-Mor, TL-Su, TL-TerI, and TL-OmI, carrying human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV), were established previously. TL-Mor, TL-Su, and TL-TerI were derived from interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent parental cell lines cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of three healthy HTLV carriers, while TL-OmI was directly established from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia. These four TL cell lines grow autonomously without IL-2. When they were cultured in the presence of IL-2, their growth was inhibited after a few days. This growth inhibition depended on the dose of IL-2, and the effective dose significantly promoted growth of their parental IL-2-dependent cell lines. The growth inhibition is demonstrated to be due to specific binding of IL-2 to receptors on the TL cells.

  17. Inhibition of fungal growth with extreme low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1998-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of foods is effectively controlled by removal of oxygen from the package, especially if this is combined with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. However, great uncertainty exist on just how low the residual oxygen levels in the package must be especially when carbon dioxide...... levels are low. This is especially interesting as high levels of CO2 may have a deleterious effect on the sensorial properties of the product.The objective was to determine the effect of very low oxygen levels (less than 1%) on growth and secondary metabolite production by the most common fungal...... for sequential removal of samples. Fungal metabolites were detected by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).All fungi were unaffected by reduction of oxygen levels to 1.0%, whereas already at 0.5% growth of the fruit spoilage fungi Alternaria infectoria and Botrytis cineria were reduced by 25%. Most...

  18. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth

    OpenAIRE

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A.; Cerise, Jane E.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C.; Clynes, Raphael; Angela M Christiano

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transc...

  19. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Harel, S.; Higgins, CA; Cerise, JE; Dai, Z.; Chen, JC; Clynes, R; Christiano, AM

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transc...

  20. Leaf Litter Inhibits Growth of an Amphibian Fungal Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoler, Aaron B; Berven, Keith A; Raffel, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Past studies have found a heterogeneous distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Recent studies have accounted for some of this heterogeneity through a positive association between canopy cover and Bd abundance, which is attributed to the cooling effect of canopy cover. We questioned whether leaf litter inputs that are also associated with canopy cover might also alter Bd growth. Leaf litter inputs exhibit tremendous interspecific chemical variation, and we hypothesized that Bd growth varies with leachate chemistry. We also hypothesized that Bd uses leaf litter as a growth substrate. To test these hypotheses, we conducted laboratory trials in which we exposed cultures of Bd to leachate of 12 temperate leaf litter species at varying dilutions. Using a subset of those 12 litter species, we also exposed Bd to pre-leached litter substrate. We found that exposure to litter leachate and substrate reduced Bd spore and sporangia densities, although there was substantial variation among treatments. In particular, Bd densities were inversely correlated with concentrations of phenolic acids. We conducted a field survey of phenolic concentrations in natural wetlands which verified that the leachate concentrations in our lab study are ecologically relevant. Our study reinforces prior indications that positive associations between canopy cover and Bd abundance are likely mediated by water temperature effects, but this phenomenon might be counteracted by changes in aquatic chemistry from leaf litter inputs.

  1. Inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2007-12-26

    The inhibition of ice crystal growth in ice cream mix by gelatin hydrolysate produced by papain action was studied. The ice crystal growth was monitored by thermal cycling between -14 and -12 degrees C at a rate of one cycle per 3 min. It is shown that the hydrolysate fraction containing peptides in the molecular weight range of about 2000-5000 Da exhibited the highest inhibitory activity on ice crystal growth in ice cream mix, whereas fractions containing peptides greater than 7000 Da did not inhibit ice crystal growth. The size distribution of gelatin peptides formed in the hydrolysate was influenced by the pH of hydrolysis. The optimum hydrolysis conditions for producing peptides with maximum ice crystal growth inhibitory activity was pH 7 at 37 degrees C for 10 min at a papain to gelatin ratio of 1:100. However, this may depend on the type and source of gelatin. The possible mechanism of ice crystal growth inhibition by peptides from gelatin is discussed. Molecular modeling of model gelatin peptides revealed that they form an oxygen triad plane at the C-terminus with oxygen-oxygen distances similar to those found in ice nuclei. Binding of this oxygen triad plane to the prism face of ice nuclei via hydrogen bonding appears to be the mechanism by which gelatin hydrolysate might be inhibiting ice crystal growth in ice cream mix.

  2. Quantifying the importance of MSP1-19 as a target of growth-inhibitory and protective antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny W Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting blood stage antigens are important in protection against malaria, but the key targets and mechanisms of immunity are not well understood. Merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 is an abundant and essential protein. The C-terminal 19 kDa region (MSP1-19 is regarded as a promising vaccine candidate and may also be an important target of immunity. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Growth inhibitory antibodies against asexual-stage parasites and IgG to recombinant MSP1-19 were measured in plasma samples from a longitudinal cohort of 206 children in Papua New Guinea. Differential inhibition by samples of mutant P. falciparum lines that expressed either the P. falciparum or P. chabaudi form of MSP1-19 were used to quantify MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory antibodies. The great majority of children had detectable IgG to MSP1-19, and high levels of IgG were significantly associated with a reduced risk of symptomatic P. falciparum malaria during the 6-month follow-up period. However, there was little evidence of PfMSP1-19 specific growth inhibition by plasma samples from children. Similar results were found when testing non-dialysed or dialysed plasma, or purified antibodies, or when measuring growth inhibition in flow cytometry or microscopy-based assays. Rabbit antisera generated by immunization with recombinant MSP1-19 demonstrated strong MSP1-19 specific growth-inhibitory activity, which appeared to be due to much higher antibody levels than human samples; antibody avidity was similar between rabbit antisera and human plasma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MSP1-19 is not a major target of growth inhibitory antibodies and that the protective effects of antibodies to MSP1-19 are not due to growth inhibitory activity, but may instead be mediated by other mechanisms. Alternatively, antibodies to MSP1-19 may act as a marker of protective immunity.

  3. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  4. Sumoylation Inhibits the Growth Suppressive Properties of Ikaros.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostol Apostolov

    Full Text Available The Ikaros transcription factor is a tumor suppressor that is also important for lymphocyte development. How post-translational modifications influence Ikaros function remains partially understood. We show that Ikaros undergoes sumoylation in developing T cells that correspond to mono-, bi- or poly-sumoylation by SUMO1 and/or SUMO2/3 on three lysine residues (K58, K240 and K425. Sumoylation occurs in the nucleus and requires DNA binding by Ikaros. Sumoylated Ikaros is less effective than unsumoylated forms at inhibiting the expansion of murine leukemic cells, and Ikaros sumoylation is abundant in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells, but not in healthy peripheral blood leukocytes. Our results suggest that sumoylation may be important in modulating the tumor suppressor function of Ikaros.

  5. Dual effect of metformin on growth inhibition and oestradiol production in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S; Pellat, L; Ahmetaga, A; Bano, G; Mason, H D; Whitehead, S A

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for a role for metformin in reducing breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. It inhibits growth of breast cancer cells via several mechanisms, primarily the AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway. Another possible protective mechanism may be the ability of metformin to inhibit aromatase activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on the basal growth of MCF-7 cells, after oestradiol (E2) stimulation and after the inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin. Secondly, we investigated the effects of metformin on the activity of a number of steroidogenic enzymes and the mRNA expression of aromatase and steroid sulphatase (STS). High doses of metformin significantly inhibited both basal and oestrogen-stimulated cell division. Low-dose rapamycin (10-10 M) did not inhibit growth, but the addition of metformin induced a significant reduction in growth. High-dose rapamycin (10-8 M) inhibited growth, and this was further attenuated by the addition of metformin. Exposure to low (10-7 M) and high (10-4 M) doses of metformin for 7-10 days significantly reduced the conversion of androstenedione (ANDRO) and testosterone (TESTO) (both requiring aromatase), but not the conversion of oestrone or oestrone sulphate (ES) via 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/sulphatase to E2. This attenuation was via a downregulation in the expression of total aromatase mRNA and promoter II, whilst the expression of sulphatase was unaffected by metformin. In conclusion, plasma levels of metformin have a dual therapeutic action, first by directly inhibiting cell proliferation which can be augmented by rapamycin analogues, and secondly, by inhibiting aromatase activity and reducing the local conversion of androgens to E2.

  6. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  7. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  8. Growth Arrest on Inhibition of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Is Mediated by Noncoding RNA GAS5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mourtada-Maarabouni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated decay is a key RNA surveillance mechanism responsible for the rapid degradation of mRNAs containing premature termination codons and hence prevents the synthesis of truncated proteins. More recently, it has been shown that nonsense-mediated decay also has broader significance in controlling the expression of a significant proportion of the transcriptome. The importance of this mechanism to the mammalian cell is demonstrated by the observation that its inhibition causes growth arrest. The noncoding RNA growth arrest specific transcript 5 (GAS5 has recently been shown to play a key role in growth arrest induced by several mechanisms, including serum withdrawal and treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Here we show that inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay in several human lymphocyte cell lines causes growth arrest, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of GAS5 in these cells significantly alleviates the inhibitory effects observed. These observations hold true for inhibition of nonsense-mediated decay both through RNA interference and through pharmacological inhibition by aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamycin and G418. These studies have important implications for ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity caused by gentamycin and for the proposed use of NMD inhibition in treating genetic disease. This report further demonstrates the critical role played by GAS5 in the growth arrest of mammalian cells.

  9. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  10. Neuronal growth inhibitory factor inhibits pheochromo-cytoma PC12 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Neuronal growth inhibitory factor (GIF),named Metaliothioneins-Ⅲ (MT-Ⅲ), is the first protein validated to be capable of inhibiting the growth of neurons in nervous system. We have detected the effects of recombinant GIF on the growth of neuroblastoma SY5Y and pheochromocytoma PC12 by the MTT (Thiazolyl blue) reduction assay. Recombinant GIF inhibited PC12 in vitro; the inhibitory rate was about 25% when GIF was at 100 mg/L; and the inhibitory rate was about 50% when GIF was at 300 mg/L. It is shown that PC12 could serve as a proper model for detecting neuronal growth inhibitory activity of GIF. Recombinant GIF did not inhibit neuroblastoma SY5Y in vitro, a common model of neuroma; it is also shown that GIF could not inhibit neuromata extensively. The reason for GIF inhibiting PC12 may be that PC12 have some properties of cholinergic neuron. It must play an important role in discovering the mechanism of GIF's neuronal growth inhibitory activity.``

  11. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Inhibition of Breast Cancer Growth by IGFBP-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    interacting proteins including putative IGFBP-3 receptor in human breast cancer cells by employing the yeast two-hybrid system. Two cDNA clones matched sequences in the GenBank database: (1) Eps8 - epidermal growth factor receptor kinase substrate, and (2) GRP78/BiP - glucose regulated stress protein, or human immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein. The third cDNA, designated clone 4-33, was not identified in the database and represents a novel gene / protein. I have thus far concentrated my efforts on this novel cDNA clone: (1) synthesis of recombinant human

  13. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Song, Jie (Shrewsbury, MA); Lee, Seung-Wuk (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  14. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in TMZ-resistant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Cho, Heeyeon; Torres, Shering; Wang, Weijun; Schönthal, Axel H; Petasis, Nicos A; Louie, Stan G; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C

    2011-12-22

    Noscapine, a common oral antitussive agent, has been shown to have potent antitumor activity in a variety of cancers. Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with temozolomide (TMZ), its current standard of care, is problematic because the tumor generally recurs and is then resistant to this drug. We therefore investigated the effects of noscapine on human TMZ-resistant GBM tumors. We found that noscapine significantly decreased TMZ-resistant glioma cell growth and invasion. Using the intracranial xenograft model, we showed that noscapine increased survival of animals with TMZ-resistant gliomas. Thus noscapine can provide an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of TMZ-resistant gliomas.

  15. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contributing factor for their pathogenesis in the host. As with other eukaryotes, successful mitosis is an essential requirement for Plasmodium reproduction; however, some aspects of Plasmodium mitosis are quite distinct and not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the architecture and key events of mitosis in Plasmodium falciparum and related parasites and compare them with the traditional mitotic events described for other eukaryotes. PMID:21317311

  16. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  17. Matrine inhibits proliferation of mouse skin fibroblasts induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-an; GAO Chun-fang; WANG Hao; HUANG Chao; KONG Xian-tao

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of matrine on proliferation of mouse skin fibroblasts induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB). Methods: Mouse skin fibroblasts were obtained from newborn ⅠCR mice and propagated in vitro. Proliferation of cell was analyzed by mitochondrial reduction of tetrazolium salt MTT and actual cell count. Results: Matrine (50 to 500 μg/ml) caused dose-dependent reduction of serum-stimulated cell growth. Growth inhibition was totally reversed after removal of the drug. Matrine also inhibited PDGF-BB induced cell growth dose-dependently. Conclusion: Matrine exhibits potent anti-proliferation effect on mouse skin fibroblast. This effect appears to be mediated by decrease of PDGF-induced growth. These results suggest that matrine might have preventive and therapeutic implication in skin fibrosis.

  18. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  19. mTOR inhibitors block Kaposi sarcoma growth by inhibiting essential autocrine growth factors and tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debasmita; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Lucas, Amy; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Ling; Eason, Anthony; Chavakula, Veenadhari; Hilton, Isaac B; Tamburro, Kristen M; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P

    2013-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma originates from endothelial cells and it is one of the most overt angiogenic tumors. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV and the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are endemic, Kaposi sarcoma is the most common cancer overall, but model systems for disease study are insufficient. Here, we report the development of a novel mouse model of Kaposi sarcoma, where KSHV is retained stably and tumors are elicited rapidly. Tumor growth was sensitive to specific allosteric inhibitors (rapamycin, CCI-779, and RAD001) of the pivotal cell growth regulator mTOR. Inhibition of tumor growth was durable up to 130 days and reversible. mTOR blockade reduced VEGF secretion and formation of tumor vasculature. Together, the results show that mTOR inhibitors exert a direct anti-Kaposi sarcoma effect by inhibiting angiogenesis and paracrine effectors, suggesting their application as a new treatment modality for Kaposi sarcoma and other cancers of endothelial origin.

  20. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK signaling prevents growth of canine hemangiosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Nicholas J.; Nickoloff, Brian J.; Dykema, Karl J.; Boguslawski, Elissa A.; Krivochenitser, Roman I.; Froman, Roe E.; Dawes, Michelle J.; Baker, Laurence H.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Kamstock, Debra A.; Kitchell, Barbara E.; Furge, Kyle A.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm of endothelial origin that has limited treatment options and poor five-year survival. As a model for human AS, we studied primary cells and tumorgrafts derived from canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA), which is also an endothelial malignancy with similar presentation and histology. Primary cells isolated from HSA showed constitutive ERK activation. The MEK inhibitor CI-1040 reduced ERK activation and the viability of primary cells derived from visceral, cutaneous, and cardiac HSA in vitro. HSA-derived primary cells were also sensitive to sorafenib, an inhibitor of B-Raf and multi-receptor tyrosine kinases. In vivo, CI-1040 or PD0325901 decreased the growth of cutaneous cell-derived xenografts and cardiac-derived tumorgrafts. Sorafenib decreased tumor size in both in vivo models, although cardiac tumorgrafts were more sensitive. In human AS, we noted that 50% of tumors stained positively for phosphorylated ERK1/2 and that the expression of several MEK-responsive transcription factors was up-regulated. Our data showed that MEK signaling is essential for the growth of HSA in vitro and in vivo and provided evidence that the same pathways are activated in human AS. This indicates that MEK inhibitors may form part of an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of canine HSA or human AS, and it highlights the utility of spontaneous canine cancers as a model of human disease. PMID:23804705

  1. Inhibition of fungal growth with extreme low oxygen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1998-01-01

    Fungal spoilage of foods is effectively controlled by removal of oxygen from the package, especially if this is combined with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. However, great uncertainty exist on just how low the residual oxygen levels in the package must be especially when carbon dioxide...... levels are low. This is especially interesting as high levels of CO2 may have a deleterious effect on the sensorial properties of the product.The objective was to determine the effect of very low oxygen levels (less than 1%) on growth and secondary metabolite production by the most common fungal...... contaminants of a wide range of products, and to determine the limit of growthFungi isolated from a wide range of products were incubated for up to three weeks at 25oC , 90% relative humidity at 1.0, 0.5, 0.25, 0.1, and 0.05% oxygen respectively in a custom made incubator with an interlock system...

  2. Sirolimus inhibits growth of human hepatoma cells alone or combined with tacrolimus, while tacrolimus promotes cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guido Schumacher; Marijke Oidtmann; Anne Rueggeberg; Dietmar Jacob; Sven Jonas; Jan M. Langrehr; Ruth Neuhaus; Marcus Bahra; Peter Neuhaus

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Standard immunosuppression after organ transplantation stimulates tumor growth. Sirolimus has a strong antiproliferative and a tumor inhibiting effect. The purpose is to assess the effect on tumor growth of the immunosuppressive compounds sirolimus and tacrolimus alone and in combination on cells of human hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: We used the human cell lines SK-Hep 1 and Hep 3B derived from hepatocellular carcinoma. Proliferation analyses after treatment with sirolimus, tacrolimus, or the combination of both were performed. FACS analyses were done to reveal cell cycle changes and apoptotic cell death. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins was estimated by Western blots.RESULTS: Sirolimus alone or combined with tacrolimus inhibited the growth of both cell lines after 5 d by up to 35% in SK-Hep 1 cells, and by up to 68% in Hep 3B cells at 25 ng/mL. Tacrolimus alone stimulated the growth by 12% after 5 ng/mL and by 25% after 25 ng/mL in Hep 3B cells. We found an increase of apoptotic Hep 3B cells from 6 to 16%, and a G1-arrest in SK-Hep 1 cells with an increase of cells from 61 to 82%, when sirolimus and tacrolimus were combined. Bcl-2 was down-regulated in Hep 3B, but not in SK-Hep 1 cells after combined treatment.CONCLUSION: Sirolimus appears to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells alone and in combination with tacrolimus. Sirolimus seems to inhibit the growth stimulation of tacrolimus.

  3. The effect of polyamine biosynthesis inhibition on growth and differentiation of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieckenstain, F L; Gárriz, A; Chornomaz, E M; Sánchez, D H; Ruiz, O A

    2001-12-01

    We studied the effects of several polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on growth, differentiation, free polyamine levels and in vivo and in vitro activity of polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) were potent inhibitors of mycelial growth. The effect of DFMO was due to inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). No evidence for the existence of an arginine decarboxylase (ADC) pathway was found. The effect of DFMA was partly due to inhibition of ODC, presumably after its conversion into DFMO by mycelial arginase, as suggested by the high activity of this enzyme detected both in intact mycelium and mycelial extracts. In addition, toxic effects of DFMA on cellular processes other than polyamine metabolism might have occurred. Cyclohexylamine (CHA) slightly inhibited mycelial growth and caused an important decrease of free spermidine associated with a drastic increase of free putrescine concentration. Methylglyoxal bis-[guanyl hydrazone] (MGBG) had no effect on mycelial growth. Excepting MGBG, all the inhibitors strongly decreased sclerotial formation. Results demonstrate that sclerotial development is much more sensitive to polyamine biosynthesis inhibition than mycelial growth. Our results suggest that mycelial growth can be supported either by spermidine or putrescine, while spermidine (or the putrescine/spermidine ratio) is important for sclerotial formation to occur. Ascospore germination was completely insensitive to the inhibitors.

  4. Methoxychlor and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Aberdeen, Graham; Babus, Janice K; Albrecht, Eugene D; Flaws, Jodi A

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles in rodents. MXC metabolites, mono-OH MXC (mono-OH) and bis-OH MXC (HPTE), are thought to be more toxic than the parent compound. Although studies have examined effects of MXC in rodents, few studies have evaluated the effects of MXC in primates. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from adult baboon ovaries and cultured with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide; DMSO), MXC (1-100 micro g/ml), mono-OH (0.1-10 micro g/ml), or HPTE (0.1-10 micro g/ml) for 96 hr. Growth was monitored at 24 hr intervals. After culture, follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE significantly inhibited follicular growth and increased atresia compared to DMSO. Moreover, the adverse effects of MXC and its metabolites on growth and atresia in baboon antral follicles were observed at lower (100-fold) doses than those causing similar effects in rodents. These data suggest that MXC and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles, and that primate follicles are more sensitive to MXC than rodent follicles.

  5. Effect of anaerobic bovine colostrum fermentation on bacteria growth inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Helena Saalfeld

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Efficient handling programs that provide high quality colostrum in adequate amounts to dairy farm calves are needed to assure their health and survival. Replacers (or milk substitutes often become necessary when colostrum presents inadequate quality, or in order to break the cycle of infectious disease transmission. In this study we aimed to assess the effect of anaerobic fermentation processing (colostrum silage on bacterial that represent interest to animal health. Colostrum samples were inoculated with cultures of Brucella abortus , Escherichia coli , Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni , Mycobacterium bovis , Salmonella Enteritidis , Salmonella Typhimurium , Staphylococcus aureus , and Bacillus cereus and then subjected to anaerobic fermentation. On the first day, and every seven days until 30th days after fermentation, the samples were cultured and colony forming units counted. At seven days of fermentation, B. abortus , L. interrogans , and M. bovis were not detected. At 14th days of fermentation, E. coli , S. aureus , S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were no longer detected. However, we were able to detect both lactic acid bacteria and B. cereus until 30th days of fermentation. From this study we suggested that anaerobic fermentation processing can inhibit important bacteria that cause economical losses for the cattle industry. The observations suggested that colostrum silage is a promising form to conserve bovine colostrum.

  6. Carbon monoxide expedites metabolic exhaustion to inhibit tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Gallo, David; Csizmadia, Eva; Harris, Clair; Belcher, John; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Penacho, Nuno; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas; Ahmed, Asif; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Persson, Jenny Liao; Otterbein, Leo E

    2013-12-01

    One classical feature of cancer cells is their metabolic acquisition of a highly glycolytic phenotype. Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the products of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cancer cells, has been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. However, the functional contributions of CO and HO-1 to these processes are poorly defined. In human prostate cancers, we found that HO-1 was nuclear localized in malignant cells, with low enzymatic activity in moderately differentiated tumors correlating with relatively worse clinical outcomes. Exposure to CO sensitized prostate cancer cells but not normal cells to chemotherapy, with growth arrest and apoptosis induced in vivo in part through mitotic catastrophe. CO targeted mitochondria activity in cancer cells as evidenced by higher oxygen consumption, free radical generation, and mitochondrial collapse. Collectively, our findings indicated that CO transiently induces an anti-Warburg effect by rapidly fueling cancer cell bioenergetics, ultimately resulting in metabolic exhaustion.

  7. Growth rate inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi by characterized chitosans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio N. Oliveira Junior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effects of fifteen chitosans with different degrees of polymerization (DP and different degrees of acetylation (F A on the growth rates (GR of four phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus stolonifer were examined using a 96-well microtiter plate and a microplate reader. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the chitosans ranged from 100 µg × mL-1 to 1,000 µg × mL-1 depending on the fungus tested and the DP and F A of the chitosan. The antifungal activity of the chitosans increased with decreasing F A. Chitosans with low F A and high DP showed the highest inhibitory activity against all four fungi. P. expansum and B. cinerea were relatively less susceptible while A. alternata and R. stolonifer were relatively more sensitive to the chitosan polymers. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi grown on culture media amended with chitosan revealed morphological changes.

  8. SHORT PEDF-DERIVED PEPTIDE INHIBITS ANGIOGENESIS AND TUMOR GROWTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirochnik, Yelena; Aurora, Arin; Schulze-Hoepfner, Frank T.; Deabes, Ahmed; Shifrin, Victor; Beckmann, Richard; Polsky, Charles; Volpert, Olga V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor with multiple other functions, some of which enhance tumor growth. Our previous studies mapped PEDF anti-angiogenic and pro-survival activities to distinct epitopes. This study was aimed to determine the minimal fragment of PEDF, which maintains anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor efficacy. Experimental Design We analyzed antigenicity, hydrophilicity, and charge distribution of the angioinhibitory epitope (the 34-mer) and designed three peptides covering its C-terminus, P14, P18 and P23. We analyzed their ability to block endothelial cell (EC) chemotaxis and induce apoptosis in vitro and their anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. The selected peptide was tested for the anti-tumor activity against mildly aggressive xenografted prostate carcinoma and highly aggressive renal cell carcinoma. To verify that P18 acts in the same manner as PEDF, we used immunohistochemistry to measure PEDF targets, VEGFR2 and CD95L expression in P18-treated vasculature. Results P14 and P18 blocked endothelial cell chemotaxis; P18 and P23 induced apoptosis. P18 showed the highest IC50 and blocked angiogenesis in vivo: P23 was inactive and P14 was pro-angiogenic. P18 increased the production of CD95L and reduced the expression of VEGFR-2 by the endothelial cells in vivo. In tumor studies, P18 was more effective in blocking the angiogenesis and growth of the prostate cancer then parental 34-mer; in the renal cell carcinoma P18 strongly decreased angiogenesis and halted the progression of established tumors. Conclusions P18 is a novel and potent anti-angiogenic biotherapeutic agent, which has potential to be developed for the treatment of prostate and renal cancer. PMID:19223494

  9. COMPARE: a web accessible tool for investigating mechanisms of cell growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Daniel W; Holbeck, Susan L; Bowerman, Christopher; Svetlik, Penny A

    2002-01-01

    For more than 10 years the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has tested compounds for their ability to inhibit the growth of human tumor cell lines in culture (NCI screen). Work of Ken Paull [J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 81 (1989) 1088] demonstrated that compounds with similar mechanism of cell growth inhibition show similar patterns of activity in the NCI screen. This observation was developed into an algorithm called COMPARE and has been successfully used to predict mechanisms for a wide variety of compounds. More recently, this method has been extended to associate patterns of cell growth inhibition by compounds with measurements of molecular entities (such as gene expression) in the cell lines in the NCI screen. The COMPARE method and associated data are freely available on the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) web site (http://dtp.nci.nih.gov/). Examples of the use of COMPARE on these web pages will be explained and demonstrated. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  10. 6-Gingerol inhibits hair shaft growth in cultured human hair follicles and modulates hair growth in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Miao

    Full Text Available Ginger (Zingiber officinale has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

  11. Novel EphB4 Monoclonal Antibodies Modulate Angiogenesis and Inhibit Tumor Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Krasnoperov, Valery; Kumar, S. Ram; Ley, Eric; Li, Xiuqing; Scehnet, Jeffrey; Liu, Ren; Zozulya, Sergey; Gill, Parkash S.

    2010-01-01

    EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase and its cognate ligand EphrinB2 regulate induction and maturation of newly forming vessels. Inhibition of their interaction arrests angiogenesis, vessel maturation, and pericyte recruitment. In addition, EphB4 is expressed in the vast majority of epithelial cancers and provides a survival advantage to most. Here, we describe two anti-EphB4 monoclonal antibodies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth by two distinct pathways. MAb131 binds to fibronectin...

  12. Modeling Growth of Cellulomonas cellulans NRRL B 4567 under Substrate Inhibition During Cellulase Production

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, R; Mahanty, B.; Dasu, V. Venkata

    2009-01-01

    Cellulase production study was performed in shake flask and bioreactor system using Cellulomonas cellulans NRRL B 4567 for initial substrate concentration from γS0 = 2 to 12 g L–1. The growth, substrate uptake profile and enzyme activity at different initial substrate concentrations were measured. The results inferred the presence of substrate inhibition kinetics. Various substrate inhibition models were tested and parameters were estimated, using non-linear regression analysis. Han-Levenspie...

  13. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  14. The Lignan-containing Extract of Schisandra chinensis Berries Inhibits the Growth of Chlamydia pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Elina; Hanski, Leena L; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki J; Vuorela, Pia M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and selectivity of an extract of Schisandra chinensis berries against Chlamydia pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. Among the ethnopharmacological uses of the extract from Schisandrae fructus are cough and pneumonia. Therefore we focused on respiratory pathogens. The extract completely inhibited the growth of C. pneumoniae strain CV6 at 250 μg/mL concentration. The inhibition of C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis growth was dose dependent and established with three different strains. The extract inhibited C. pneumoniae production of infectious progeny in a dose dependent manner. Chlamydia selectivity was elucidated with growth inhibition measurements of three other respiratory bacterial species. A pure compound found in Schisandra chinensis berries, schisandrin B at 20.0 μg/mL concentration inhibited the growth of both C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. The extract was found to be non-toxic to the human host cells. These findings highlight the potential of the extract from Schisandra chinensis berries as a source for antichlamydial compounds.

  15. A functional connection between pRB and transforming growth factor beta in growth inhibition and mammary gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah M; Bergsied, Jacqueline; Isaac, Christian E; Coschi, Courtney H; Martens, Alison L; Hojilla, Carlo V; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Dimattia, Gabriel E; Khoka, Rama; Wang, Jean Y J; Dick, Frederick A

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a crucial mediator of breast development, and loss of TGF-beta-induced growth arrest is a hallmark of breast cancer. TGF-beta has been shown to inhibit cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity, which leads to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated pRB. However, unlike other components of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling, pRB is thought to be dispensable for mammary development. Using gene-targeted mice carrying subtle missense changes in pRB (Rb1(DeltaL) and Rb1(NF)), we have discovered that pRB plays a critical role in mammary gland development. In particular, Rb1 mutant female mice have hyperplastic mammary epithelium and defects in nursing due to insensitivity to TGF-beta growth inhibition. In contrast with previous studies that highlighted the inhibition of cyclin/CDK activity by TGF-beta signaling, our experiments revealed that active transcriptional repression of E2F target genes by pRB downstream of CDKs is also a key component of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling. Taken together, our work demonstrates a unique functional connection between pRB and TGF-beta in growth control and mammary gland development.

  16. Curcumin inhibits growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through iron chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minear, Steven; O'Donnell, Allyson F; Ballew, Anna; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Stearns, Tim; Cyert, Martha S

    2011-11-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from turmeric, is an ancient therapeutic used in India for centuries to treat a wide array of ailments. Interest in curcumin has increased recently, with ongoing clinical trials exploring curcumin as an anticancer therapy and as a protectant against neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro, curcumin chelates metal ions. However, although diverse physiological effects have been documented for this compound, curcumin's mechanism of action on mammalian cells remains unclear. This study uses yeast as a model eukaryotic system to dissect the biological activity of curcumin. We found that yeast mutants lacking genes required for iron and copper homeostasis are hypersensitive to curcumin and that iron supplementation rescues this sensitivity. Curcumin penetrates yeast cells, concentrates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, and reduces the intracellular iron pool. Curcumin-treated, iron-starved cultures are enriched in unbudded cells, suggesting that the G(1) phase of the cell cycle is lengthened. A delay in cell cycle progression could, in part, explain the antitumorigenic properties associated with curcumin. We also demonstrate that curcumin causes a growth lag in cultured human cells that is remediated by the addition of exogenous iron. These findings suggest that curcumin-induced iron starvation is conserved from yeast to humans and underlies curcumin's medicinal properties.

  17. Heat stable cell growth inhibiting factor isolated from rat liver microsomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaba,Kozo

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available A heat stable cell growth inhibiting factor was isolated from rat liver microsomes by hot salt extraction, ethanol fractionation and the hot phenol method. The factor was contained in the RNA fraction (designated as mhRNA. mhRNA inhibited the growth of mouse fibroblast (L-929 cells at a relatively low concentration (55 microgram/ml of culture medium. The molecular weight of mhRNA was about 27,000 and the base composition was guanine and cytosine rich.

  18. Epidermal growth factor inhibits hormone- and fibroblast growth factor-induced activation of phospholipase C in rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjek-Kaminska, D; Piiper, A; Caspary, W F; Zeuzem, S

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits cholecystokinin-octapeptide-stimulated amylase release and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (1,4,5-IP3) production in isolated rat pancreatic acini. In the present study, pancreatic acini were used to investigate the effect of EGF on amylase release and 1,4,5-IP3 production induced by secretagogues that activate either phospholipase C-beta (carbachol, bombesin) or phospholipase C-gamma [basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)]. The results show that EGF (100 ng/ml) inhibited bombesin (0.1 nM-1 microM)-induced amylase release almost completely. Similarly, the effect of EGF on carbachol-stimulated amylase release was substantial at submaximal (0.1 microM: 44% inhibition), maximal (1 microM: 75% inhibition), and supramaximal (100 microM: 33% inhibition) carbachol concentrations. EGF reduced amylase release at submaximal bFGF concentrations (0.1 nM: 40% inhibition), but not at supramaximal bFGF concentrations (1 and 10 nM). EGF decreased the peak increase of 1,4,5-IP3 in response to bombesin and carbachol (5 s after beginning of the incubation) and bFGF (15 s after beginning of the incubation) by 81 +/- 19%, 65 +/- 15%, and 56 +/- 18%, respectively. Receptor binding characteristics for secretagogues that activate phospholipase C were not influenced by coincubation with EGF excluding heterologous transmembrane receptor modulation. These results suggest that EGF inhibits the action of phospholipase C-beta- and gamma-isoenzyme-activating secretagogues in the exocrine pancreas by a postreceptor mechanism.

  19. Recombinant scorpine produced using SUMO fusion partner in Escherichia coli has the activities against clinically isolated bacteria and inhibits the Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available Scorpine, a small cationic peptide from the venom of Pandinus imperator, which has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-plasmodial activities, has potential important applications in the pharmaceutical industries. However, the isolation of scorpine from natural sources is inefficient and time-consuming. Here, we first report the expression and purification of recombinant scorpine in Escherichia coli, using small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO fusion partner. The fusion protein was expressed in soluble form in E. coli, and expression was verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis. The fusion protein was purified to 90% purity by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+-NTA resin chromatography. After the SUMO-scorpine fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni2+-NTA column. Tricine/SDS-PAGE gel results indicated that Scorpine had been purified successfully to more than 95% purity. The recombinantly expressed Scorpine showed anti-bacterial activity against two standard bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, and clinically isolated bacteria including S. aureus S, S. aureus R, A. baumannii S, and A. baumannii R. It also produced 100% reduction in Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro. Thus, the expression strategy presented in this study allowed convenient high yield and easy purification of recombinant Scorpine for pharmaceutical applications in the future.

  20. Recombinant scorpine produced using SUMO fusion partner in Escherichia coli has the activities against clinically isolated bacteria and inhibits the Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; He, Xinlong; Gu, Yaping; Zhou, Huayun; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Scorpine, a small cationic peptide from the venom of Pandinus imperator, which has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-plasmodial activities, has potential important applications in the pharmaceutical industries. However, the isolation of scorpine from natural sources is inefficient and time-consuming. Here, we first report the expression and purification of recombinant scorpine in Escherichia coli, using small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion partner. The fusion protein was expressed in soluble form in E. coli, and expression was verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis. The fusion protein was purified to 90% purity by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+-NTA) resin chromatography. After the SUMO-scorpine fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni2+-NTA column. Tricine/SDS-PAGE gel results indicated that Scorpine had been purified successfully to more than 95% purity. The recombinantly expressed Scorpine showed anti-bacterial activity against two standard bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, and clinically isolated bacteria including S. aureus S, S. aureus R, A. baumannii S, and A. baumannii R. It also produced 100% reduction in Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro. Thus, the expression strategy presented in this study allowed convenient high yield and easy purification of recombinant Scorpine for pharmaceutical applications in the future.

  1. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  2. Thiol-reducing agents prevent sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Choi, Boyun; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory potential of sulforaphane against cancer has been suggested for different types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We examined whether this effect is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules related to cell survival and proliferation, in ovarian cancer cells. Sulforaphane at a concentration of 10 μM effectively inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that activation of MAPK pathways by sulforaphane is unlikely to mediate sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Sulforaphane did not generate significant levels of intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with thiol reducers, but not ROS scavengers, prevented sulforaphane-induced growth inhibition. Furthermore, diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent, enhanced both growth inhibition and cell death induced by sulforaphane, suggesting that the effect of sulforaphane on cell growth may be related to oxidation of protein thiols or change in cellular redox status. Our data indicate that supplementation with thiol-reducing agents should be avoided when sulforaphane is used to treat cancer.

  3. [Grape seed extract inhibits the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Ting; Shang, Xue-Jun; Yao, Gen-Hong; Ge, Jing-Ping; Teng, Wen-Hui; Sun, Yi; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells. PC-3 cells were treated with GSE at the concentration of 100, 200 and 300 microg/ml for 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. The the inhibitory effect of GSE on the growth of the PC-3 cells and the kidney cells of SD rats was determined by MTT reduction assay, with primarily cultured kidney cells of 1-3 days old SD rats as the normal control. GSE significantly inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but had only a mild inhibitory effect on the kidney cells. GSE inhibits the growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells and can be used as a new drug for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Dickkopf3 overexpression inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Mei Gu; Yi-Hui Ma; Wu-Gan Zhao; Jie Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the role of dickkopf3 (Dkk3) in human pancreatic cancer cell growth.METHODS: Dkk3 mRNA and protein expression in human pancreatic cancer cell lines were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Methylation of the Dkk3 promoter sequence was examined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) and Dkk3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) treatment. The effects of Dkk3 on cancer cell proliferation and in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine were investigated by CellTiter 96. AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) after transfecting the Dkk3 expression plasmid into human pancreatic cancer cells. The expression of β-catenin, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) was also examined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting after upregulating Dkk3 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells.RESULTS: The results show that the expression levels of both Dkk3 mRNA and protein were low in all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. The Dkk3 promoter sequence was methylated in the MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cell lines, which showed reduced Dkk3 expression. These two cell lines, which initially had a methylated Dkk3 promoter, showed increased Dkk3 mRNA expression that was dependent upon the dosage and timing of the DNA demethylating agent, 5-aza-dC, treatment (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). When Dkk3 expression was upregulated following the transfection of a Dkk3 expression plasmid into MIA PaCa-2 cells, the ability of cells to proliferate decreased (P < 0.01), and the expression of β-catenin and pERK was downregulated (P < 0.01). Sensitivity to gemcitabine was enhanced in Dkk3 expression plasmid-transfected cells.CONCLUSION: Our findings, for the first time, implicate Dkk3 as a tumor suppressor in human pancreatic cancer

  5. Phytochemical potential of Eruca sativa for inhibition of melanoma tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoobchandani, M; Ganesh, N; Gabbanini, S; Valgimigli, L; Srivastava, M M

    2011-06-01

    Solvent extracts from the aerial and root parts and seed oil from E. sativa (rocket salad) were assayed for anticancer activity against melanoma cells. The seed oil (isothiocyanates rich) significantly (p<0.01) reduced the tumor growth comparable to the control. Remarkably, the seed oil inhibited melanoma growth and angiogenesis in mice without any major toxicity. The findings qualify seed oil for further investigations in the real of cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Finetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG E(2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE(2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE(2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 expression. AF3485 reduced PGE(2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. CONCLUSION: Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE(2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth.

  8. Midazolam Induces Cellular Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Kang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jun Sun; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2013-01-01

    Midazolam is a widely used anesthetic of the benzodiazepine class that has shown cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity in neuronal cells and lymphocytes. This study aims to evaluate the effect of midazolam on growth of K562 human leukemia cells and HT29 colon cancer cells. The in vivo effect of midazolam was investigated in BALB/c-nu mice bearing K562 and HT29 cells human tumor xenografts. The results show that midazolam decreased the viability of K562 and HT29 cells by inducing apoptosis and S phase cell-cycle arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. Midazolam activated caspase-9, capspase-3 and PARP indicating induction of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Midazolam lowered mitochondrial membrane potential and increased apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Midazolam showed reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity through inhibition of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) enzyme activity in K562 cells. Midazolam caused inhibition of pERK1/2 signaling which led to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL and XIAP and phosphorylation activation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bid. Midazolam inhibited growth of HT29 tumors in xenograft mice. Collectively our results demonstrate that midazolam caused growth inhibition of cancer cells via activation of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and inhibited HT29 tumor growth in xenograft mice. The mechanism underlying these effects of midazolam might be suppression of ROS production leading to modulation of apoptosis and growth regulatory proteins. These findings present possible clinical implications of midazolam as an anesthetic to relieve pain during in vivo anticancer drug delivery and to enhance anticancer efficacy through its ROS-scavenging and pro-apoptotic properties. PMID:24008365

  9. Thiazolidinediones enhance vascular endothelial growth factor expression and induce cell growth inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizaki Yumiko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that thiazolidinediones are involved in regulating the expression of various genes, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ; VEGF is a prognostic biomarker for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the mRNA expression of VEGF and its receptors in human NSCLC cell lines, RERF-LC-AI, SK-MES-1, PC-14, and A549. These mRNA expressions were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. We also studied the effect of Je-11, a VEGF inhibitor, on the growth of these cells. Results In NSCLC cells, thiazolidinediones increased the mRNA expression of VEGF and neuropilin-1, but not that of other receptors such as fms-like tyrosine kinase and kinase insert domain receptor-1. Furthermore, the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 completely reversed this thiazolidinedione-induced increase in VEGF expression. Furthermore, the addition of VEGF inhibitors into the culture medium resulted in the reversal of thiazolidinedione-induced growth inhibition. Conclusions Our results indicated that thiazolidinediones enhance VEGF and neuropilin-1 expression and induce the inhibition of cell growth. We propose the existence of a pathway for arresting cell growth that involves the interaction of thiazolidinedione-induced VEGF and neuropilin-1 in NSCLC.

  10. Sorafenib inhibits growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by blocking STAT3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ming Gu; Quan-Lin Li; Qiang Gao; Jia-Hao Jiang; Xiao-Yong Huang; Jin-Feng Pan; Jia Fan; Jian Zhou

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory role and the underlying mechanisms of sorafenib on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Human and rat HCC cell lines were treated with sorafenib. Proliferation and STAT3 dephosphorylation were assessed. Potential molecular mechanisms of STAT3 pathway inhibition by sorafenib were evaluated. In vivo antitumor action and STAT3 inhibition were investigated in an immunocompetent orthotopic rat HCC model. RESULTS: Sorafenib decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at the tyrosine and serine residues (Y705 and S727), but did not affect Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and phospha-tase shatterproof 2 (SHP2), which is associated with growth inhibition in HCC cells. Dephosphorylation of S727 was associated with attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, similar to the effects of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, suggesting that sorafenib induced S727 dephosphorylation by inhibiting MEK/ERK signaling. Meanwhile, sorafenib could also inhibit Akt phosphorylation, and both the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 and Akt knockdown resulted in Y705 dephosphorylation, indicating that Y705 dephosphorylation by sorafenib was mediated by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway. Finally, in the rat HCC model, sorafenib significantly inhibited STAT3 activity, reducing tumor growth and metastasis. CONCLUSION: Sorafenib inhibits growth and metastasis of HCC in part by blocking the MEK/ERK/STAT3 and PI3K/Akt/STAT3 signaling pathways, but independent of JAK2 and SHP2 activation.

  11. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits growth of mouse ovarian antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang2@illinois.edu; Craig, Zelieann R., E-mail: zelieann@illinois.edu; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S., E-mail: mbasava2@illinois.edu; Gupta, Rupesh K., E-mail: drrupesh@yahoo.com; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2012-01-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer that has been shown to inhibit growth of mouse antral follicles, however, little is known about the mechanisms by which DEHP does so. Oxidative stress has been linked to follicle growth inhibition as well as phthalate-induced toxicity in non-ovarian tissues. Thus, we hypothesized that DEHP causes oxidative stress and that this leads to inhibition of the growth of antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice (age 31–35 days) were cultured with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) ± N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant at 0.25–1 mM). During culture, follicles were measured daily. At the end of culture, follicles were collected and processed for in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays to measure the presence of free radicals or for measurement of the expression and activity of various key antioxidant enzymes: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that DEHP inhibits the growth of follicles compared to DMSO control and that NAC (0.25–1 mM) blocks the ability of DEHP to inhibit follicle growth. Furthermore, DEHP (10 μg/ml) significantly increases ROS levels and reduces the expression and activity of SOD1 compared to DMSO controls, whereas NAC (0.5 mM) rescues the effects of DEHP on ROS levels and SOD1. However, the expression and activity of GPX and CAT were not affected by DEHP treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that DEHP inhibits follicle growth by inducing production of ROS and by decreasing the expression and activity of SOD1. -- Highlights: ► DEHP inhibits growth and increases reactive oxygen species in ovarian antral follicles in vitro. ► NAC rescues the effects of DEHP on the growth and reactive oxygen species levels in follicles. ► DEHP decreases the expression and activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, which can be rescued by NAC, in antral

  13. Growth inhibition of shrimp pathogens by isolated gastrointestinal microflora of Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seehanat, S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The useful bacteria which were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man, cultivated in earthen pond at Maha Sarakham province, Thailand, consisted of 14 isolates of Bacillus (B1 – B14 and 18 isolates of Lactic acid bacteria (LA1 – LA18. The abilities of all isolated bacteria on growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were studied by paperdisc plate method. The results showed that the Bacillus B2 and B5 were unable to inhibit the growth of all of the tested pathogens. Bacillus B1, B10 and B12 were capable of inhibiting the growth of 3 of 4 tested pathogen strains. Although all of the isolated lactic acid bacteria (LA1 –LA18 could not inhibit the E. coli growth, all of them could inhibit the growth of B. cereus. The isolated lactic acid bacteria which were capable of inhibiting the growth of 3 tested pathogen strains (excluded E. coli were LA12 , LA13 , LA14 , LA15 , LA16 , LA17 and LA18. In order to select the high potential strain of bacteria for using as probiotics, Bacillus B1 , B3 , B4 , B10 and B12 and lactic acid bacteria LA12 , LA13 , LA14 , LA15 , LA16 , LA17 and LA18 were tested for their growth abilities in various growth conditions. The tested growth conditions included various concentrations of the bile salt and salt (NaCl and various pH and temperatures. The results revealed that Bacillus B1 and B10 and lactic acid bacteria LA13 , LA16 and LA18 exhibited high potential for using as probiotics. The results of biochemical test for identification of these high potential strains showed that Bacillus B1 and B10 were possibly B. licheniformis and B. thuringiensis respectively. The lactic acid bacteria LA13 , LA16 and LA18 were possibly the same strain and belonged to the genus Pediococcus.

  14. Survivin gene silencing sensitizes prostate cancer cells to selenium growth inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xichun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men worldwide. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP protein family that is expressed in the majority of human tumors including prostate cancer, but is barely detectable in terminally differentiated normal cells. Downregulation of survivin could sensitize prostate cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Selenium is an essential trace element. Several studies have shown that selenium compounds inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. The objective of this study is to investigate whether survivin gene silencing in conjunction with selenium treatment could enhance the therapeutic efficacy for prostate cancer and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Expression of survivin was analyzed in a collection of normal and malignant prostatic tissues by immunohistochemical staining. In vitro studies were conducted in PC-3M, C4-2B, and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells. The effect of selenium on survivin expression was analyzed by Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Survivin gene knockdown was carried out by transfecting cells with a short hairpin RNA (shRNA designed against survivin. Cell proliferation was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl- 2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay and apoptosis by propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Finally, in vivo tumor growth assay was performed by establishing PC-3M xenograft in nude mice and monitoring tumor growth following transfection and treatment. Results We found that survivin was undetectable in normal prostatic tissues but was highly expressed in prostate cancers. Survivin knockdown or selenium treatment inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells, but the selenium effect was modest. In contrast to what have been observed in other cell lines, selenium treatment had little or no effect on survivin expression in several androgen

  15. Fibroblast growth factor receptors as therapeutic targets in human melanoma: synergism with BRAF inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzner, Thomas; Bedeir, Alexandra; Held, Gerlinde; Peter-Vörösmarty, Barbara; Ghassemi, Sara; Heinzle, Christine; Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Marian, Brigitte; Holzmann, Klaus; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Pirker, Christine; Micksche, Michael; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Grusch, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a tumor with rising incidence and a very poor prognosis at the disseminated stage. Melanomas are characterized by frequent mutations in BRAF and also by overexpression of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), offering opportunities for therapeutic intervention. We investigated inhibition of FGF signaling and its combination with dacarbazine or BRAF inhibitors as an antitumor strategy in melanoma. The majority of melanoma cell lines displayed overexpression of FGF2 but also FGF5 and FGF18 together with different isoforms of FGF receptors (FGFRs) 1-4. Blockade of FGF signals with dominant-negative receptor constructs (dnFGFR1, 3, or 4) or small-molecule inhibitors (SU5402 and PD166866) reduced melanoma cell proliferation, colony formation, as well as anchorage-independent growth, and increased apoptosis. DnFGFR constructs also significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Combination of FGF inhibitors with dacarbazine showed additive or antagonistic effects, whereas synergistic drug interaction was observed when combining FGFR inhibition with the multikinase/BRAF inhibitor sorafenib or the V600E mutant-specific BRAF inhibitor RG7204. In conclusion, FGFR inhibition has antitumor effects against melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Combination with BRAF inhibition offers a potential for synergistic antimelanoma effects and represents a promising therapeutic strategy against advanced melanoma.

  16. In vivo inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in tobacco ovary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R D; Galston, A W

    1985-01-01

    Post fertilization growth of tobacco ovary tissues treated with inhibitors of polyamine (PA) biosynthesis was examined in relation to endogenous PA titers and the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17). DL-alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), specific, irreversible ("suicide") inhibitors of ODC and ADC in vitro, were used to modulate PA biosynthesis in excised flowers. ODC represented >99% of the total decarboxylase activity in tobacco ovaries. In vivo inhibition of ODC with DFMO resulted in a significant decrease in PA titers, ovary fresh weight and protein content. Simultaneous inhibition of both decarboxylases by DFMO and DFMA produced only a marginally greater depression in growth and PA titers, indicating that ODC activity is rate-limiting for PA biosynthesis in these tissues. Paradoxically, DFMA alone inhibited PA biosynthesis, not as a result of a specific inhibition of ADC, but primarily through the inactivation of ODC. In vivo inhibition of ODC by DFMA appears to result from arginase-mediated hydrolysis of this inhibitor to urea and DFMO, the suicide substrate for ODC. Putrescine conjugates in tobacco appear to function as a storage form of this amine which, upon hydrolysis, may contribute to Put homeostasis during growth.

  17. Resveratrol inhibits myeloma cell growth, prevents osteoclast formation, and promotes osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Andersen, Thomas L; Abdallah, Basem M

    2005-01-01

    of this natural compound on myeloma and bone cells. We found that resveratrol reduces dose-dependently the growth of myeloma cell lines (RPMI 8226 and OPM-2) by a mechanism involving cell apoptosis. In cultures of human primary monocytes, resveratrol inhibits dose-dependently receptor activator of nuclear factor...

  18. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  19. Pathophysiology of chronic nitric oxide synthase inhibition-induced fetal growth restriction in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerhof, M.G.; Synowiec, S.; Khan, S.; Thaete, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the pathophysiology of chronic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition-induced fetal growth restriction (FGR) in the rat. Methods. Timed-pregnant rats received L-NAME (2.5 mg/kg/h) with or without endothelin (ET-1) receptor A (ETA) antagonist from day 14 to 21 of gestation. In

  20. Arecoline inhibits endothelial cell growth and migration and the attachment to mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuei-Kuen Tseng

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Arecoline impaired vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting their growth and migration and their adhesion to U937 mononuclear cells. These results reveal that arecoline may contribute to the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis and cardiovascular diseases by affecting endothelial cell function in BQ chewers.

  1. RNA interference inhibits expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Chun-mei; SUN Bao-chen; LIU Xu-yang; WANG Jin-jin; LI Jun-fa; HAN Song; WANG Ning-li; LU Qing-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a major cause of vision loss, is the result of the increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. It is important to inhibit the expression of VEGF protein in RPE cells.

  2. DIETARY ISOTHIOCYANATE IBERIN INHIBITS GROWTH AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the isothiocyanate iberin, a bioactive agent in Brassicaceae species, in human glioblastoma cells. The human glioblastoma cell cultures were treated with different concentrations of iberin and tested for growth inhibition...

  3. Liposome-encapsulated prednisolone phosphate inhibits growth of established tumors in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, JM; Fens, MHAM; Janssen, APCA; Molema, G; Storm, G

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoids can inhibit solid tumor growth possibly due to an inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. The antitumor effects of the free drugs have only been observed using treatment schedules based on high and frequent dosing for prolonged periods of time. As long-circulating liposomes accumulate at

  4. Quantitative analysis of the modes of growth inhibition by weak organic acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullah, A.; Orij, R.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Weak organic acids are naturally occurring compounds that are commercially used as preservatives in the food and beverage industries. They extend the shelf life of food products by inhibiting microbial growth. There are a number of theories that explain the antifungal properties of these weak acids,

  5. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  6. Inhibition of Galectin-1 Sensitizes HRAS-driven Tumor Growth to Rapamycin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, James V; Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to develop combinatorial application of two drugs currently either in active use as anticancer agents (rapamycin) or in clinical trials (OTX008) as a novel strategy to inhibit Harvey RAS (HRAS)-driven tumor progression. HRAS anchored to the plasma membrane shuttles from the lipid ordered (Lo) domain to the lipid ordered/lipid disordered border upon activation, and retention of HRAS at these sites requires galectin-1. We recently showed that genetically enforced Lo sequestration of HRAS inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, but not phoshatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. Here we show that inhibition of galectin-1 with OTX008 sequestered HRAS in the Lo domain, blocked HRAS-mediated MAPK signaling, and attenuated HRAS-driven tumor progression in mice. HRAS-driven tumor growth was also attenuated by treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin, and this effect was further enhanced in tumors driven by Lo-sequestered HRAS. These drugs also revealed bidirectional cross-talk in HRAS pathways. Moreover, dual pathway inhibition with OTX008 and rapamycin resulted in nearly complete ablation of HRAS-driven tumor growth. These findings indicate that membrane microdomain sequestration of HRAS with galectin-1 inhibition, coupled with mTOR inhibition, may support a novel therapeutic approach to treat HRAS-mutant cancer.

  7. Erythrocytic malaria growth or invasion inhibition assays with emphasis on suspension culture GIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, J David; Moch, J Kathleen; Smoot, Douglas S

    2002-01-01

    Erythrocytic cycle malaria parasite growth or invasion inhibition assays (GIA) compare the effects of various test and control substances on malaria parasite growth in erythrocytes or invasion into erythrocytes in vitro. Although inhibitions by antimalarial drugs in vitro correlate well with drug protective levels required in vivo, as yet there are too few data to know how well inhibitions by antibodies in vitro correlate with the types and degrees of immune protection in vivo. Antibody-mediated GIA is frequently complicated by parasite strain-specific inhibitions, as well as nonspecific inhibitory factors generated in sera collected or stored under nonoptimal conditions. In this chapter, we describe methods for collecting and processing sera, for using different strains of parasite, and a simplified method for staining parasite DNA with Hoechst dye 33342 before quantitating parasites using ultraviolet (UV)-excited flow cytometry. We also describe a new type of GIA using suspension cultures in a 48-well plate. Critical to this method is enclosing the plate in a gassed, heat-sealed plastic bag, which, being low mass, can easily be rested at a 13.5 degrees angle on a rotor platform (114 rpm with 1-in. displacement) to produce gentle pulsatile waves of media in each well. The suspension GIA, which, relative to the static GIA, increased inhibition by one antibody and decreased inhibition by another (Table 1), may better simulate in vivo blood flow and may thus better predict in vivo efficacy.

  8. Inhibition of Tumor Growth in Mice by Endostatin Derived from Abdominal Transplanted Encapsulated Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaining TENG; Ying ZHANG; Wei WANG; Xiaojun MA; Jian FEI

    2007-01-01

    Endostatin, a C-terminal fragment of collagen 18a, inhibits the growth of established tumors and metastases in vivo by inhibiting angiogenesis. However, the purification procedures required for largescale production and the attendant cost of these processes, together with the low effectiveness in clinical tests, suggest that alternative delivery methods might be required for efficient therapeutic use of endostatin.In the present study, we transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with a human endostatin gene expression vector and encapsulated the CHO cells in alginate-poly-L-lysine microcapsules. The release of biologically active endostatin was confirmed using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. The encapsulated endostatin-expressing CHO cells can inhibit the growth of primary tumors in a subcutaneous B16 tumor model when injected into the abdominal cavity of mouse. These results widen the clinical application of the microencapsulated cell endostatin delivery system in cancer treatment.

  9. A synthetic manassantin a derivative inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Liwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Qing; Xie, Ping; Yan, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    The dineolignan manassantin A from Saururaceae was recently identified as a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibitor, but its in-vivo anti-tumor effect has not been explored. We synthesized a series of manassantin A derivatives, and found that replacing the central tetrahydrofuran moiety with a cyclopentane ring yielded a compound (LXY6006) with increased HIF-1-inhibitory activity yet decreased stereochemically complexity amenable to a simplified synthesis scheme. LXY6006 inhibited HIF-1α nuclear accumulation induced by hypoxia, and inhibited cancer cell growth as a consequence of G2/M arrest. Oral administration of LXY6006 significantly inhibited growth of breast, lung, and pancreatic tumors implanted in nude mice. These results indicate that LXY6006 represents a novel class of agents targeting a broad range of human cancers.

  10. A synthetic manassantin a derivative inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Lang

    Full Text Available The dineolignan manassantin A from Saururaceae was recently identified as a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 inhibitor, but its in-vivo anti-tumor effect has not been explored. We synthesized a series of manassantin A derivatives, and found that replacing the central tetrahydrofuran moiety with a cyclopentane ring yielded a compound (LXY6006 with increased HIF-1-inhibitory activity yet decreased stereochemically complexity amenable to a simplified synthesis scheme. LXY6006 inhibited HIF-1α nuclear accumulation induced by hypoxia, and inhibited cancer cell growth as a consequence of G2/M arrest. Oral administration of LXY6006 significantly inhibited growth of breast, lung, and pancreatic tumors implanted in nude mice. These results indicate that LXY6006 represents a novel class of agents targeting a broad range of human cancers.

  11. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Debora; Aguzzi, Maria Simona; Toietta, Gabriele; Facchiano, Angelo M; Facchiano, Francesco; Magenta, Alessandra; Martelli, Fabio; Truffa, Silvia; Cesareo, Eleonora; Ribatti, Domenico; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs) is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001) and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control. PMID:19649203

  12. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Faraone

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001 and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control.

  13. Lidamycin Induces Apoptosis of B-Cell Lymphoma Cells and Inhibits Xenograft Growth in Nude Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Fang; Shenghua Zhang; Qingfang Miao; Dongsheng Xiong; Yongsu Zhen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the cytotoxicity of Lidamycin (LDM) and its induction of apoptosis in Raji and Daudi cells of B-cell lymphoma, and the inhibition of growth of the lymphoma Raji xenograft in nude mice.METHODS MTT assay was used to observe the inhibition by LDM on the proliferation of the Raji and Daudi cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-stain, in combination with flow cytometry (FCM), was used to determine the induction of apoptosis by LDM in Raji cells. The B-cell lymphoma Raji xenograft model in nude mice was set up to detect the in vivo antitumor activity of LDM.RESULTS LDM markedly inhibited the proliferation of the Raji and Daudi cells in vitro, with IC50 values of 7.13×10-11 mol/L and 2.91×10-10 mol/L, respectively. The apoptotic rates of Raji cells were respectively 77.98% and 67.63% at 0.5 nmol/L and 0.25 nmol/L of LDM, indicating an obvious induction of apoptosis in Raji cells. LDM inhibited the formation and growth of human B-cell lymphoma Raji xenograft in nude mice. The inhibition rates of tumor growth were respectively 74.9% and 65.2% in LDM at dosage group of 0.05 mg/kg and 0.025 mg/kg, suggesting an apparent prolongation of survival time in the nude mouse bearing lymphoma.CONCLUSION LDM can effectively induce apoptosis of the B-cell lymphoma cells and inhibit the xenograft growth in nude mice.

  14. The thioamides methimazole and thiourea inhibit growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Greenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an "autoimmune" disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another "autoimmune" affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP. Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. METHODS: The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU were studied in radiometric Bactec culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex. Data are presented as "cumulative growth index," (cGI or "percent decrease in cumulative GI" (%-DeltacGI. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128microg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-DeltacGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-DeltacGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP "Ben" maximally; 70%-DeltacGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. SIGNIFICANCE: We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals.

  15. AtOPR3 specifically inhibits primary root growth in Arabidopsis under phosphate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongyan; Pan, Xiaoying; Deng, Yuxia; Wu, Huamao; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuexian

    2016-01-01

    The primary root plays essential roles in root development, nutrient absorption, and root architectural establishment. Primary root growth is generally suppressed by phosphate (P) deficiency in A. thaliana; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely elusive to date. We found that AtOPR3 specifically inhibited primary root growth under P deficiency via suppressing root tip growth at the transcriptional level, revealing an important novel function of AtOPR3 in regulating primary root response to the nutrient stress. Importantly, AtOPR3 functioned to down-regulate primary root growth under P limitation mostly by its own, rather than depending on the Jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Further, AtOPR3 interacted with ethylene and gibberellin signaling pathways to regulate primary root growth upon P deficiency. In addition, the AtOPR3's function in inhibiting primary root growth upon P limitation was also partially dependent on auxin polar transport. Together, our studies provide new insights into how AtOPR3, together with hormone signaling interactions, modulates primary root growth in coping with the environmental stress in Arabidopsis.

  16. The role of acidification in the inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by vaginal lactobacilli during anaerobic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Jeremy J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal lactobacilli protect the female genital tract by producing lactic acid, bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide or a local immune response. In bacterial vaginosis, normal lactobacilli are replaced by an anaerobic flora and this may increase susceptibility to Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a facultative anaerobe. Bacterial interference between vaginal lactobacilli and N. gonorrhoeae has not been studied in liquid medium under anaerobic conditions. By co-cultivating N. gonorrhoeae in the presence of lactobacilli we sought to identify the relative contributions of acidification and hydrogen peroxide production to any growth inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae. Methods Three strains of N. gonorrhoeae distinguishable by auxotyping were grown in the presence of high concentrations (107-108 cfu/mL of three vaginal lactobacilli (L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii in an anerobic liquid medium with and without 2-(N-morpholino-ethanesulfonic (MES buffer. Fusobacterium nucleatum was used as an indicator of anaerobiosis. Bacterial counts were performed at 15, 20 and 25 h; at 25 h pH and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured. Results Growth of F. nucleatum to >108 cfu/mL at 25 h confirmed anaerobiosis. All bacteria grew in the anaerobic liquid medium and the addition of MES buffer had negligible effect on growth. L. crispatus and L. gasseri produced significant acidification and a corresponding reduction in growth of N. gonorrhoeae. This inhibition was abrogated by the addition of MES. L. jensenii produced less acidification and did not inhibit N. gonorrhoeae. Hydrogen peroxide was not detected in any experiment. Conclusions During anaerobic growth, inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae by the vaginal lactobacilli tested was primarily due to acidification and abrogated by the presence of a buffer. There was no evidence of a specific mechanism of inhibition other than acid production under these conditions and, in particular, hydrogen peroxide was

  17. Clopidogrel inhibits angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing via downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2016-09-01

    Although clopidogrel does not cause gastric mucosal injury, it does not prevent peptic ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients. We explored whether clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing via inhibiting angiogenesis and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Gastric ulcers were induced in Sprague Dawley rats, and ulcer healing and angiogenesis of ulcer margin were compared between clopidogrel-treated rats and controls. The expressions of the proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), bFGF receptor (FGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR1, VEGFR2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)A, PDGFB, PDGFR A, PDGFR B, and phosphorylated form of mitogenic activated protein kinase pathways over the ulcer margin were compared via western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to elucidate how clopidogrel inhibited growth factors-stimulated HUVEC proliferation. The ulcer sizes were significantly larger and the angiogenesis of ulcer margin was significantly diminished in the clopidogrel (2 and 10 mg/kg/d) treated groups. Ulcer induction markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA when compared with those of normal mucosa. Clopidogrel treatment significantly decreased pERK, FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA expression at the ulcer margin when compared with those of the respective control group. In vitro, clopidogrel (10(-6)M) inhibited VEGF-stimulated (20 ng/mL) HUVEC proliferation, at least, via downregulation of VEGFR2 and pERK. Clopidogrel inhibits the angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing at least partially by the inhibition of the VEGF-VEGFR2-ERK signal transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Growth Inhibition by Bupivacaine Is Associated with Inactivation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmad Beigh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation.

  19. Growth inhibition to three red tide microalgae by extracts of Ulva pertusa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Growth inhibition effect of different concentration of distilled water extract and four polar organic solvent (methanol, acetone, ether and chloroform) extracts of Ulva pertusa on three typical red tide microalgae (Heterosigma akashiwo, Alexandrium tamarense and Prorocentrum micans) were investigated. Liquid-liquid fractionation and HPLC analysis for methanol extract of U. pertusa were carried out.Growth of the three microalgae was significantly inhibited by the distilled water extract of U. pertusa at relatively higher concentration. However, the cells of the three microalgae did not die completely even at high concentration. Methanol extract of U. pertusa showed the highest growth inhibition on the three microalgae, and all the cells of the three microalgae were killed at relatively high concentration. The other three organic solvent extracts of U. pertusa had no apparent effect on the three microalgae. The results of bioassays and HPLC analysis suggested that the inhibitory substances in U. pertusa to the microalgal growth had relatively high polarities. H. akashiwo was the most sensitive one while A. tamarense was the most tolerant one to the growth inhibitory substances.

  20. Involvement of allelopathy in inhibition of understory growth in red pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kimura, Fukiko; Ohno, Osamu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2017-07-12

    Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc.) forests are characterized by sparse understory vegetation although sunlight intensity on the forest floor is sufficient for undergrowth. The possible involvement of pine allelopathy in the establishment of the sparse understory vegetation was investigated. The soil of the red pine forest floor had growth inhibitory activity on six test plant species including Lolium multiflorum, which was observed at the edge of the forest but not in the forest. Two growth inhibitory substances were isolated from the soil and characterized to be 15-hydroxy-7-oxodehydroabietate and 7-oxodehydroabietic acid. Those compounds are probably formed by degradation process of resin acids. Resin acids are produced by pine and delivered into the soil under the pine trees through balsam and defoliation. Threshold concentrations of 15-hydroxy-7-oxodehydroabietate and 7-oxodehydroabietic acid for the growth inhibition of L. multiflorum were 30 and 10μM, respectively. The concentrations of 15-hydroxy-7-oxodehydroabietate and 7-oxodehydroabietic acid in the soil were 312 and 397μM, respectively, which are sufficient concentrations to cause the growth inhibition because of the threshold. These results suggest that those compounds are able to work as allelopathic agents and may prevent from the invasion of herbaceous plants into the forests by inhibiting their growth. Therefore, allelopathy of red pine may be involved in the formation of the sparse understory vegetation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Hormone activities and the cell cycle machinery in immunity-triggered growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, M U; Gifford, M L; Schäfer, P

    2015-04-01

    Biotic stress and diseases caused by pathogen attack pose threats in crop production and significantly reduce crop yields. Enhancing immunity against pathogens is therefore of outstanding importance in crop breeding. However, this must be balanced, as immune activation inhibits plant growth. This immunity-coupled growth trade-off does not support resistance but is postulated to reflect the reallocation of resources to drive immunity. There is, however, increasing evidence that growth-immunity trade-offs are based on the reconfiguration of hormone pathways, shared by growth and immunity signalling. Studies in roots revealed the role of hormones in orchestrating growth across different cell types, with some hormones showing a defined cell type-specific activity. This is apparently highly relevant for the regulation of the cell cycle machinery and might be part of the growth-immunity cross-talk. Since plants are constantly exposed to Immuno-activating microbes under agricultural conditions, the transition from a growth to an immunity operating mode can significantly reduce crop yield and can conflict our efforts to generate next-generation crops with improved yield under climate change conditions. By focusing on roots, we outline the current knowledge of hormone signalling on the cell cycle machinery to explain growth trade-offs induced by immunity. By referring to abiotic stress studies, we further introduce how root cell type-specific hormone activities might contribute to growth under immunity and discuss the feasibility of uncoupling the growth-immunity cross-talk.

  2. Cystone, a well-known herbal formulation, inhibits struvite crystal growth formation in single diffusion gel growth technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralhad S. Patki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was aimed to evaluate the beneficial effect of Cystone® against struvite crystal growth in in vitro conditions. Methods: Various concentrations of Cystone® was prepared in 1 M magnesium acetate solution and evaluated for crystal growth inhibition assay by a well-known method called single diffusion gel growth technique in vitro. Results: Cystone®, a well-known polyherbal formulation, at 0.5, 1 and 2% concentrations showed significant and dose-dependent inhibition of struvite crystal growth formation in in vitro by reducing number, total mass and total volume of the struvite crystals formed and also caused fragmentation of grown struvite crystals in the gel matrix. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate, Cystone® significantly retards the formation of struvite stones and also brings about its fragmentation. This could be one of the probable mechanisms behind the beneficial effect offered by Cystone® in the clinical management of urolithiasis and urinary tract infections. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(1: 51-55

  3. Cystine growth inhibition through molecular mimicry: a new paradigm for the prevention of crystal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael H; Sahota, Amrik; Ward, Michael D; Goldfarb, David S

    2015-05-01

    Cystinuria is a genetic disease marked by recurrent kidney stone formation, usually at a young age. It frequently leads to chronic kidney disease. Treatment options for cystinuria have been limited despite comprehensive understanding of its genetic pathophysiology. Currently available therapies suffer from either poor clinical adherence to the regimen or potentially serious adverse effects. Recently, we employed atomic force miscopy (AFM) to identify L-cystine dimethylester (CDME) as an effective molecular imposter of L-cystine, capable of inhibiting crystal growth in vitro. More recently, we demonstrated CDME's efficacy in inhibiting L-cystine crystal growth in vivo utilizing a murine model of cystinuria. The application of AFM to discover inhibitors of crystal growth through structural mimicry suggests a novel approach to preventing and treating crystal diseases.

  4. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 °C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage.

  5. Cellular Adhesion Tripeptide RGD Inhibits Growth of Human Ileocecal Adenocarcinoma Cells HCT-8 and Induces Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; ZENG Hong-bin; YANG Shao-juan; GAO Shen; HUANG Yi-bing; HOU Rui-zhen; ZHAO Mi-feng; XU Li; ZHANG Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The tripeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD) motif is an integrin-recognition site found in adhesive proteins present in extracellular matrices(ECM) and in the blood. HCT-8 cells were treated with cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD at various concentrations. MTT assay was performed to examine the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells after treatment with RGD for 48 h. Haematoxylin and Eosin(HE) staining and electromicroscope were used to observe the morphology of apoptotic cells. Survivin and flow cytometry were also used to analyze the HCT-8 apoptosis. Cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD significantly inhibits the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induces apoptosis of HCT-8. These results indicate that cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD inhibits the growth and proliferation of tumor HCT-8 cell, probably by the aid of inducing apoptosis of HCT-8 cell.

  6. Growth inhibition of thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, in hydrolysates from cassava pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Murata, Yoshinori; Machida, Masashi; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Hirooka, Akiko; Thanapase, Warunee; Dangjarean, Hatairat; Ushiwaka, Satoru; Morimitsu, Kozo; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Vaithanomsat, Pilanee

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the inhibition of Kluyveromyces marxianus TISTR5925 growth and ethanol fermentation in the presence of furan derivatives and weak acids (acetic acid and lactic acid) at high temperatures. Cassava pulp, obtained as the waste from starch processing, was collected from 14 starch factories located in several provinces of Thailand. At a high temperature (42 °C), the cassava pulp hydrolysate from some starch factories strongly inhibited growth and ethanol production of both K. marxianus (strain TISTR5925) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain K3). HPLC detected high levels of lactic acid and acetic acid in the hydrolysates, suggesting that these weak acids impaired the growth of K. marxianus at high temperature. We isolated Trp-requiring mutants that had reduced tolerance to acetic acid compared to the wild-type. This sensitivity to acetic acid was suppressed by supplementation of the medium with tryptophan.

  7. Glucagon Amyloid-like Fibril Morphology Is Selected via Morphology-Dependent Growth Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.B.; Otzen, D.; Christiansen, Gunna

    2007-01-01

    concentrations, we find that the lag time has an unexpected maximum at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, with faster fibrillation at both lower and higher concentrations. Seeding experiments show that small amounts of straight fibril seeds can accelerate fibril growth at both low and high glucagon concentration, while...... twisted fibril seeds cannot grow at high concentrations. We conclude that there exists a morphology-dependent mechanism for inhibition of glucagon fibril growth. Light scattering experiments indicate that glucagon is mainly monomeric below 1 mg/mL and increasingly trimeric above this concentration. We...... propose that the glucagon trimer is able to specifically inhibit growth of the twisted fibril morphology. Such inhibitory binding of molecules in an unproductive conformation could also play a role in the selection of morphologies for other fibril-forming peptides and proteins....

  8. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Meachum, Sharon; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Peretz, Jackye; Yao, Humphrey H; Flaws, Jodi A

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  9. Angiostatin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and growth in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding-Zhong Yang; Jing He; Ji-Cheng Zhang; Zhuo-Ren Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the biologic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the potential value of angiostatin gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.METHODS: The recombinant vector pcDNA3.1(+)-angiostatin was transfected into human pancreatic cancer cells PC-3 with Lipofectamine 2000, and paralleled with the vector and mock control. Angiostatin transcription and protein expression were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. The stable cell line was selected by G418. The supernatant was collected to treat endothelial cells. Cell proliferation and growth in vitro were observed under microscope. Cell growth curves were plotted.The troms-fected or untroms-fected cells overexpressing angiostatin vector were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. The size of tumors was measured, and microvessel density count (MVD) in tumor tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry with primary anti-CD34antibody.RESULTS: After transfected into PC-3 with Lipofectamine 2000 and selected by G418, macroscopic resistant cell clones were formed in the experimental group transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)-angiostatin and vector control. But untreated cells died in the mock control. Angiostatin protein expression was detected in the experimental group by immunofluorescence and Western-blot. Cell proliferation and growth in vitro in the three groups were observed respectively under microscope. After treatment with supernatant, significant differences were observed in endothelial cell (ECV-304) growth in vitro. The cell proliferation and growth were inhibited. In nude mice model, markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and slowed tumor expansion were observed in the experimental group as compared to controls, which was parallel to the decreased microvessel density in and around tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: Angiostatin does not directly inhibit human pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and growth in vitro,but it inhibits endothelial cell growthin vitro. It exerts the anti

  10. Role of bicarbonate/CO2 in the inhibition of Escherichia coli growth by cyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozliak, E I; Fuchs, J A; Guilloton, M B; Anderson, P M

    1995-06-01

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give two CO2 molecules. The gene for cyanase is part of the cyn operon, which includes cynT and cynS, encoding carbonic anhydrase and cyanase, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase functions to prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition (the product CO2 can diffuse out of the cell faster than noncatalyzed hydration back to bicarbonate). Addition of cyanate to the culture medium of a delta cynT mutant strain of E. coli (having a nonfunctional carbonic anhydrase) results in depletion of cellular bicarbonate, which leads to inhibition of growth and an inability to catalyze cyanate degradation. These effects can be overcome by aeration with a higher partial CO2 pressure (M. B. Guilloton, A. F. Lamblin, E. I. Kozliak, M. Gerami-Nejad, C. Tu, D. Silverman, P. M. Anderson, and J. A. Fuchs, J. Bacteriol. 175:1443-1451, 1993). The question considered here is why depletion of bicarbonate/CO2 due to the action of cyanase on cyanate in a delta cynT strain has such an inhibitory effect. Growth of wild-type E. coli in minimal medium under conditions of limited CO2 was severely inhibited, and this inhibition could be overcome by adding certain Krebs cycle intermediates, indicating that one consequence of limiting CO2 is inhibition of carboxylation reactions. However, supplementation of the growth medium with metabolites whose syntheses are known to depend on a carboxylation reaction was not effective in overcoming inhibition related to the bicarbonate deficiency induced in the delta cynT strain by addition of cyanate. Similar results were obtained with a deltacyn strain (since cyanase is absent, this strain does not develop a bicarbonate deficiency when cyanate is added); however, as with the deltacynT strain, a higher partial CO(2) pressure in the aerating gas or expression of carbonic anhydrase activity (which contributes to a higher intercellular

  11. SOX7 is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Shu-Yan Huang; Jing-Xin Feng; Yan-Yan Gao; Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Bai-Qu Huang; Yu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To confirm the role of sex-determining region Y-box 7 (Sox7) in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of COX-independent human colorectal cancer cells.METHODS: The cell survival percentage was examined by MTT (Moto-nuclear cell direc cytotoxicity) assay.SOX7 expression was assessed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. SB203580 was used to inhibit the p38MAPK signal pathway. SOX7 promoter activity was detected by Luciferase reporter assay.RESULTS: SOX7 was upregulated by aspirin and was involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of SW480 human colorectal cancer cells. The p38MAPK pathway played a role in aspirin-induced SOX7 expression, during which the AP1 transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos upregulated SOX7 promoter activities.RESULTS: SOX7 is upregulated by aspirin and is involved in aspirin-mediated growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells.

  12. Liposome-Encapsulated Prednisolone Phosphate Inhibits Growth of Established Tumors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M. Schiffelers

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids can inhibit solid tumor growth possibly due to an inhibitory effect on angiogenesis. The antitumor effects of the free drugs have only been observed using treatment schedules based on high and frequent dosing for prolonged periods of time. As long-circulating liposomes accumulate at sites of malignancy, we investigated the tumor-inhibiting potential of liposome-encapsulated prednisolone phosphate. Liposomal prednisolone phosphate could inhibit tumor growth dose-dependently, with 80% to 90% tumor growth inhibition of subcutaneous B16.F10 melanoma and C26 colon carcinoma murine tumor models at 20 mg/kg by single or weekly doses. Prednisolone phosphate in the free form was completely ineffective at this low-frequency treatment schedule, even when administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg. In vitro studies did not show an inhibitory effect of prednisolone (phosphate on tumor cell, nor on endothelial cell proliferation. Histologic evaluation revealed that liposomal prednisolone phosphate-treated tumors contained a center with areas of picnotic/necrotic cells, which were not apparent in untreated tumors or tumors treated with the free drug. In conclusion, the present study shows potent antitumor effects of liposomal formulations of glucocorticoids in a low dose and lowfrequency schedule, offering promise for liposomal glucocorticoids as novel antitumor agents.

  13. The Involvement of Gibberellins in 1,8-Cineole-Mediated Inhibition of Sprout Growth in Russet Burbank Tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The involvement of gibberellins in 1,8-cineole-mediated inhibition of tuber sprout growth was investigated in non-dormant field- and greenhouse-grown tubers of Russet Burbank. Continuous exposure of tubers to cineole in the vapor-phase resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of sprout growth. Comp...

  14. All-trans-retinoic acid inhibits tumour growth of malignant pleural mesothelioma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, C; Tabata, R; Hirayama, N; Yasumitsu, A; Yamada, S; Murakami, A; Iida, S; Tamura, K; Terada, T; Kuribayashi, K; Fukuoka, K; Nakano, T

    2009-11-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignant tumour of mesothelial origin associated with asbestos exposure. Because MPM has limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the prognosis is very poor. Several researchers have reported that cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 play an important role in the growth of MPM. Previously, it was reported that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) inhibited the production and function of IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in experiments using lung fibroblasts. We investigated whether ATRA had an inhibitory effect on the cell growth of MPM, the origin of which was mesenchymal cells similar to lung fibroblasts, using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model. We estimated the tumour growth and performed quantitative measurements of IL-6, TGF-beta1 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor (PDGFR)-beta mRNA levels both of cultured MPM cells and cells grown in mice with or without the administration of ATRA. ATRA significantly inhibited MPM tumour growth. In vitro studies disclosed that the administration of ATRA reduced 1) mRNA levels of TGF-beta1, TGF-beta1 receptors and PDGFR-beta, and 2) TGF-beta1-dependent proliferation and PDGF-BB-dependent migration of MPM cells. These data may provide a rationale to explore the clinical use of ATRA for the treatment of MPM.

  15. Disulfiram Is a DNA Demethylating Agent and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianqing; Haffner, Michael C.; Zhang, Yonggang; Lee, Byron H.; Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Britton, Justin; Kachhap, Sushant K.; Shim, Joong Sup; Liu, Jun O.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Carducci, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical success of the nucleoside analogs 5-aza-cytidine (5-azaC) and 5-aza-2′deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) as DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors has spurred interest in the development of non-nucleoside inhibitors with improved pharmacologic and safety profiles. Because DNMT catalysis features attack of cytosine bases by an enzyme thiol group, we tested whether disulfiram (DSF), a thiol-reactive compound with known clinical safety, demonstrated DNMT inhibitory activity. METHODS Inhibition of DNMT1 activity by DSF was assessed using methyltransferase activity assays with recombinant DNMT1. Next, prostate cancer cell lines were exposed to DSF and assessed for: i) reduction of global 5-methyl cytosine (5meC) content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS); ii) gene-specific promoter demethylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP); and iii) gene-reactivation by real-time RT-PCR. DSF was also tested for growth inhibition using prostate cancer cell lines propagated in vitro in cell culture and in vivo as xenografts in nude mice. RESULTS Disulfiram showed a dose-dependent inhibition of DNMT1 activity on a hemimethylated DNA substrate. In prostate cancer cells in culture, DSF exposure led to reduction of global genomic 5meC content, increase in unmethylated APC and RARB gene promoters, and associated re-expression of these genes, but did not significantly alter prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. DSF significantly inhibited growth and clonogenic survival of prostate cancer cell lines in culture and showed a trend for reduced growth of prostate cancer xenografts. CONCLUSIONS Disulfiram is a non-nucleoside DNMT1 inhibitor that can reduce global 5meC content, reactivate epigenetically silenced genes, and significantly inhibit growth in prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:20809552

  16. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K.; McBain, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices. PMID:26882309

  17. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Forbes

    Full Text Available Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD; sodium fluoride (FD; stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1; or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC, a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices.

  18. STAT6 Mediates Interleukin-4 Growth Inhibition in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Gooch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to acting as a hematopoietic growth factor, interleukin-4 (IL-4 inhibits growth of some transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, IRS-2, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 are phosphorylated following IL-4 treatment in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. STAT6 DNA binding is enhanced by IL-4 treatment. STAT6 activation occurs even after IRS-1 depletion, suggesting the two pathways are independent. To examine the role of STAT6 in IL-4-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, a fulllength STAT6 cDNA was transfected into MCF-7 cells. Transient overexpression of STAT6 resulted in both cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of the protein, increased DNA binding in response to IL-4, and increased transactivation of an IL-4 responsive promoter. In STAT6-transfected cells, basal proliferation was reduced whereas apoptosis was increased. Finally, stable expression of STAT6 resulted in reduced foci formation compared to vector-transfected cells alone. These results suggest STAT6 is required for IL-4mediated growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

  19. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang-Fan; Yan, Guang-Ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) methyltransferase is the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which acts as a transcription repressor via the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). EZH2 has been recognised as an oncogene in several types of tumors; however, its role in osteosarcoma has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we show that EZH2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma by facilitating re-expression of the imprinting gene tumor-suppressing STF cDNA 3 (TSSC3). Our previous study showed that TSSC3 acts as a tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma. In this study, we found that EZH2 was abnormally elevated in osteosarcoma, and its overexpression was associated with poor prognosis in osteosarcoma. Silencing of EZH2 resulted in tumor growth inhibition, apoptosis and chemosensitivity enhancement. Moreover, suppression of EZH2 markedly inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, EZH2 knockdown facilitated the re-expression of TSSC3 by reducing H3K27me3 in the promoter region. Cotransfection with siEZH2 and siTSSC3 could partially reverse the ability of siEZH2 alone. We have demonstrated that EZH2 plays a crucial role in tumor growth and distant metastasis in osteosarcoma; its oncogenic role is related to its regulation of the expression of TSSC3. PMID:26265454

  20. Human primary brain tumor cell growth inhibition in serum-free medium optimized for neuron survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gregory J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2007-07-09

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults from which about 15,000 patients die each year in the United States. Despite aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, median survival remains only 1 year. Here we evaluate growth of primary human brain tumor cells in a defined nutrient culture medium (Neuregen) that was optimized for neuron regeneration. We hypothesized that Neuregen would inhibit tumor cell growth because of its ability to inhibit gliosis in rat brain. Tumor tissue was collected from 18 patients including 10 males and 8 females (mean age 60+/-12 years) who underwent craniotomy for newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed brain tumors. The tissue was shipped overnight in Hibernate transport medium. Tumor cells were isolated and plated in Neurobasal/serum or Neuregen on culture plastic. After 1 week, growth in Neuregen was significantly less in 9/10 glioblastoma multiforme cases, 5/5 meningioma cases and 3/3 cases of brain metastasis. Analysis of deficient formulations of Neuregen and formulations to which selected components were added back implicate no single active component. However, individual cases were sensitive to corticosterone, selenium, ethanolamine, fatty acids and/or antioxidants. Therefore, a defined culture medium that promotes neuron regeneration inhibits the growth of human primary glioblastoma, meningioma and metastatic tumor cells in culture. The possible in vivo efficacy of Neuregen for treatment of brain tumor resections remains to be determined.

  1. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yang-Fan; Yan, Guang-Ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-Nan

    2015-08-12

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) methyltransferase is the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which acts as a transcription repressor via the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). EZH2 has been recognised as an oncogene in several types of tumors; however, its role in osteosarcoma has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we show that EZH2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma by facilitating re-expression of the imprinting gene tumor-suppressing STF cDNA 3 (TSSC3). Our previous study showed that TSSC3 acts as a tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma. In this study, we found that EZH2 was abnormally elevated in osteosarcoma, and its overexpression was associated with poor prognosis in osteosarcoma. Silencing of EZH2 resulted in tumor growth inhibition, apoptosis and chemosensitivity enhancement. Moreover, suppression of EZH2 markedly inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, EZH2 knockdown facilitated the re-expression of TSSC3 by reducing H3K27me3 in the promoter region. Cotransfection with siEZH2 and siTSSC3 could partially reverse the ability of siEZH2 alone. We have demonstrated that EZH2 plays a crucial role in tumor growth and distant metastasis in osteosarcoma; its oncogenic role is related to its regulation of the expression of TSSC3.

  2. Growth inhibition of Struvite crystals in the presence of juice of Citrus medica Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, C K; Joshi, M J

    2008-10-01

    Struvite, one of the components of urinary stone grows rapidly forming "staghorn-calculi", is a painful urological disorder. It is necessary to study the growth-inhibition of Struvite crystals. This in vitro study has been carried out in the presence of the juice of Citrus medica Linn. by using single diffusion gel growth technique. Sodium metasilicate solution of specific gravity 1.05 and an aqueous solution of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate of 0.5 M concentration were mixed so that the pH value 7.0 could be set. After the gelation, supernatant solutions comprising of pure 1.0 M Magnesium acetate (control solution) as well as mixed with the different concentrations of the juice were gently poured on the set gels. From the study of growth-inhibition behavior of Struvite crystals, it was found that Citrus medica Linn. inhibits the growth of the crystals. This study may be used for formulating the strategy for prevention or dissolution of Struvite.

  3. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany))

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  4. Inhibition of angiogenesis and HCT-116 xenograft tumor growth in mice by kallistatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Diao; Rui-An Xu; Jian Ma; Wei-Dong Xiao; Jia Luo; Xin-Yan Li; Kin-Wah Chu; Peter WC Fung; Nagy Habib; Farzin Farzaneh

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of kallistatin (KAL) on angiogenesis and HCT-116 xenograft tumor growth.METHODS: Heterotopic tumors were induced by subcutaneous injection of 2 × 106 HCT-11 cells in mice.Seven days later, 2 × 1011 rAAV-GFP or rAAV-KAL was injected intratumorally (n = 5 for each group). The mice were sacrificed at d 28, by which time the tumors in the rAAV-GFP group had grown to beyond 5% of the total body weight. Tumor growth was measured by calipers in two dimensions. Tumor angiogenesis was determined with tumor microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistology. Tumor cell proliferation was assessed by Ki-67 staining.RESULTS: Intratumor injection of rAAV-KAL inhibited tumor growth in the treatment group by 78% (171 ±52 mm3) at d 21 after virus infection compared to the control group (776 ± 241 mm3). Microvessel density was significantly inhibited in tumor tissues treated with rAAV-KAL. rAAV-KAL also decreased the proportion of proliferating cells (Ki-67 positive cells) in tumors compared with the control group.CONCLUSION: rAAV-mediated expression of KAL inhibits the growth of colon cancer by reducing angiogenesis and proliferation of tumor cells, and may provide a promising anti-angiogenesis-based approach to the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. Growth inhibition of struvite crystals in the presence of herbal extract Commiphora wightii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, C K; Joshi, M J; Vaidya, A D B

    2009-12-01

    Struvite is one of the components of urinary stone. Large number of people is suffering from urinary stones (calculi) problem all over the globe. These stones can grow rapidly forming "staghorn-calculi", which is more painful urological disorder. Therefore, it is of prime importance to study the growth and inhibition of Struvite crystals. This in vitro study has been carried out in the presence of herbal extract of Commiphora wightii by using single diffusion gel growth technique. Sodium metasilicate solution of specific gravity 1.05 and an aqueous solution of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate of 0.5 M concentration were mixed so that the pH value 7.0 could be set. After the gelation, equal amount of supernatant solutions comprising of pure 1.0 M magnesium acetate as well as the mixtures of magnesium acetate and the herbal extract solutions of 0.5 and 1% concentrations of C. wightii were gently poured on the set gels. From the study of growth and inhibition behavior of Struvite crystals, it was found that C. wightii inhibits the growth of the Struvite. This study incorporates multidisciplinary interests and may be used for formulating the strategy for prevention or dissolution of urinary stones.

  6. Methyl anthranilate and γ-decalactone inhibit strawberry pathogen growth and achene Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Alan H; Evans, Shane Alan; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-26

    Plant volatile compounds have been shown to affect microbial growth and seed germination. Here two fruity volatiles found in strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa ), γ-decalactone ("peachlike" aroma) and methyl anthranilate ("grapelike" aroma), were tested for effects on relevant pathogens and seedling emergence. Significant growth reduction was observed for Botrytis cinerea , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , Colletotrichum acutatum , Phomopsis obscurans , and Gnomonia fragariae at 1 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate, and 5 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate supplemented medium resulted in complete cessation of fungal growth. Phytophthora cactorum was especially sensitive to 1 mM γ-decalactone, showing complete growth inhibition. Bacteriostatic effects were observed in Xanthamonas cultures. Postharvest infestations on store-bought strawberries were inhibited with volatile treatment. The γ-decalactone volatile inhibited strawberry and Arabidopsis thaliana germination. These findings show that two compounds contributing to strawberry flavor may also contribute to shelf life and suggest that γ-decalactone may play an ecological role by preventing premature germination.

  7. Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis Inducing Mechanisms of Curcumin on Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Line A2780

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li-duan; TONG Qiang-song; WU Cui-huan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the growth inhibition effects and apoptosis inducing mechanisms of curcumin on human ovarian cancer cell line A2780. Methods: After treatment with 10-50 μmol/L curcumin for 6-24 h, the growth activity of A2780 cancer cells were studied by [ 4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyItetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry. Cellular apoptosis was inspected by flow cytometery and acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining methods. The fragmentation of cellular chromosome DNA was detected by DNA ladder, the ultrastructural change was observed under a transmission electron microscope,and the protein levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, P65) and cysteinyl aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) in ovarian cancer cells were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: After treatment with various concentrations of curcumin, the growth inhibition rates of cancer cells reached 62.05%- 89.24%,with sub-G1 peaks appearing on histogram. Part of the cancer cells showed characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis under fluorescence and electron microscopes, and the rate of apoptosis was 21.5 % -33.5%. The protein expression of NF-κB was decreased, while that of Caspase-3 was increased in a timedependent manner. Conclusion: Curcumin could significantly inhibit the growth of human ovarian cancer cells;inducing apoptosis through up-regulating Caspase-3 and down-regulating gene expression of NF-κB is probably one of its molecular mechanisms.

  8. Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Shi, Aiping; Fan, Zhimin; Du, Ye

    2015-05-01

    Salidroside has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from the plant Rhodiola rosea, and was found to have several important biological properties, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, its anticancer effects are poorly understood. Thus, the present study focused on evaluating the effects of purified salidroside on the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, and on further investigating its possible molecular mechanisms. The human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was incubated with various concentrations of salidroside, and cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, migration and invasion were assayed by several in vitro approaches. As a result, it was found that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, as well as induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in vitro. In addition, we also evaluated the effect of salidroside on tumor growth in a nude mouse model, and found that salidroside treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. We also further disclosed that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and MAPK pathway activation, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth of breast cancer and reduction of oxidative stress. In conclusion, these findings suggest that salidroside may be a promising candidate target for the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.

  9. Piperine inhibits the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenshields, Anna L; Doucette, Carolyn D; Sutton, Kimberly M; Madera, Laurence; Annan, Henry; Yaffe, Paul B; Knickle, Allison F; Dong, Zhongmin; Hoskin, David W

    2015-02-01

    Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, is reported to have anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the effect of piperine on the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Piperine inhibited the in vitro growth of TNBC cells, as well as hormone-dependent breast cancer cells, without affecting normal mammary epithelial cell growth. Exposure to piperine decreased the percentage of TNBC cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, G1- and G2-associated protein expression was decreased and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression was increased in piperine-treated TNBC cells. Piperine also inhibited survival-promoting Akt activation in TNBC cells and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, combined treatment with piperine and γ radiation was more cytotoxic for TNBC cells than γ radiation alone. The in vitro migration of piperine-treated TNBC cells was impaired and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 mRNA was decreased, suggesting an antimetastatic effect by piperine. Finally, intratumoral administration of piperine inhibited the growth of TNBC xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that piperine may be useful in the treatment of TNBC.

  10. Nerve Growth Factor from Cobra Venom Inhibits the Growth of Ehrlich Tumor in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Osipov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF from cobra venom (cvNGF on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC cells inoculated subcutaneously in mice have been studied. The carcinoma growth slows down, but does not stop, during a course of cvNGF injections and restores after the course has been discontinued. The maximal anti-tumor effect has been observed at a dose of 8 nmoles cvNGF/kg body weight. cvNGF does not impact on lifespan of mice with grafted EAC cells. K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates the anti-tumor effect of cvNGF indicating the involvement of TrkA receptors in the process. cvNGF has induced also increase in body weight of the experimental animals. In overall, cvNGF shows the anti-tumor and weight-increasing effects which are opposite to those described for mammalian NGF (mNGF. However in experiments on breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cvNGF showed the same proliferative effects as mNGF and had no cytotoxic action on tumor cells in vitro. These data suggest that cvNGF slows down EAC growth via an indirect mechanism in which TrkA receptors are involved.

  11. Nerve growth factor from cobra venom inhibits the growth of Ehrlich tumor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Alexey V; Terpinskaya, Tatiana I; Kryukova, Elena V; Ulaschik, Vladimir S; Paulovets, Lubov V; Petrova, Elena A; Blagun, Ekaterina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Utkin, Yuri N

    2014-02-26

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) from cobra venom (cvNGF) on growth of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells inoculated subcutaneously in mice have been studied. The carcinoma growth slows down, but does not stop, during a course of cvNGF injections and restores after the course has been discontinued. The maximal anti-tumor effect has been observed at a dose of 8 nmoles cvNGF/kg body weight. cvNGF does not impact on lifespan of mice with grafted EAC cells. K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates the anti-tumor effect of cvNGF indicating the involvement of TrkA receptors in the process. cvNGF has induced also increase in body weight of the experimental animals. In overall, cvNGF shows the anti-tumor and weight-increasing effects which are opposite to those described for mammalian NGF (mNGF). However in experiments on breast cancer cell line MCF-7 cvNGF showed the same proliferative effects as mNGF and had no cytotoxic action on tumor cells in vitro. These data suggest that cvNGF slows down EAC growth via an indirect mechanism in which TrkA receptors are involved.

  12. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of Sulindac on Human gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Lin Wu; Bo Sun; Xue-Jun Zhang; Sheng-Nian Wang; Heng-Yi He; Min-Min Qiao; Jie Zhong; Jia-Yu Xu

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of sulindac in inducing growth inhibition and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells in comparison with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)cells. METHODS: The human gastric cancer cell lines MKN45 and MKN28 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2and SMMC7721 were used for the study. Anti-proliferative effect was measured by MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by Hoechst-33258 staining, electronography and DNA fragmentation. The protein of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX(2) and Bcl-2 were detected by Westem dot blotting. RESULTS: Sulindac could initiate growth inhibition and apoptosis of MKN45, MKN28, HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Growth inhibitory activity and apoptosis were more sensitive in HepG2 cells than in SMMC7721 cells, MKN45 and MKN28 cells. After 24hours incubation with sulindac at 2mmol. L-1 and 4mmol.L-1, the level of COX-2 and Bcl-2 protein were lowered in MKN45, SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells but not in MKN28 cells. CONCLUSION: Sulindac could inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cells and HCC cells effectively in vitro by apoptosis induction, which was associated with regression of COX-2and Bcl-2 expression. The growth inhibition and apoptosis of HCC cells were greater then that of human gastric cancer cells. The different effects of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells may be related to the differentiation of the cells.

  13. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yihui [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Tang, Qingchao [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China); Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 150 Haping Road, 150081 Harbin (China); Wang, Xishan, E-mail: wxshan12081@163.com [Cancer Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, 150086 Harbin (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  14. miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Wei, Furong; Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Xingwu; Li, Baosheng

    2016-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently activated in a wide range of solid tumours and represents an important therapeutic target. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been recognized as a rational and potential modality for anti-EGFR therapies. However, more EGFR-targeting miRNAs need to be explored. In this study, we identified a novel EGFR-targeting miRNA, miRNA-134 (miR-134), in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Luciferase assays confirmed that EGFR is a direct target of miR-134. In addition, the overexpression of miR-134 inhibited EGFR-related signaling and suppressed NSCLC cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, suggesting that miR-134 functions as a tumour suppressor in NSCLC. Further mechanistic investigation including RNAi and rescue experiments suggested that the down-regulation of EGFR by miR-134 partially contributes to the antiproliferative role of miR-134. Last, in vivo experiments demonstrated that miR-134 suppressed tumour growth of A549 xenograft in nude mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the EGFR.

  15. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor overexpression decreases growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiao-qin; CHENG Hai-qing; LI Hong; ZHU Yan; LI Yu-hua; FENG Zhen-qing; ZHANG Jian-ping

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously found that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is highly expressed in a rat model of liver cancer.Here,we examined expression of CTGFin human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and its effect on cell growth.Methods Real-time PCR was used to observe expression of CTGF in human HCC cell lines HepG2,SMMC-7721,MHCC-97H and LO2.siRNA for the CTGFgene was designed,synthesized and cloned into a Plk0.1-GFP-SP6 vector to construct a lentivirus-mediated shRNA/CTGF.CTGF mRNA and protein expression in HepG2 cells treated by CTGF-specific shRNA was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting.3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was utilized to evaluate the growth effect,and a colony formation assay was used for observing clonogenic growth.In vivo,tumor cell proliferation was evaluated in a nude mouse model of xenotransplantation.Statistical significance was determined by t test for comparison between two groups,or analysis of variance (ANOVA) for multiple groups.Results Immunohistochemical staining of CTGF was seen in 35 of 40 HCC samples (87.5%).CTGF was overexpressed 5-fold in 20 HCC tissues,compared with surrounding non-tumor liver tissue.CTGF mRNA level was 5-8-fold higher in HepG2,SMMC-7721 and MHCC-97H than in LO2 cells.This indicated that the inhibition rate of cell growth was 43% after knockdown of CTGF expression (P <0.05).Soft agar colony formation assay showed that siRNA mediated knockdown of CTGF inhibited colony formation in soft agar of HepG2 cells (P <0.05).The volume of tumors from CTGF-shRNA-expressing cells only accounted for 35% of the tumors from the scrambled control-infected HepG2 cells (P <0.05).Conclusions CTGF was overexpressed in human HCC cells and downregulation of CTGF inhibited HCC growth in vitro and in vivo.Knockdown of CTGF may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of HCC.

  16. Nimbolide inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis through ROS-mediated apoptosis and inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Gonzalez, Viviana; Medel, Joshua; Camacho, Fernando; Ortega, Andrew; Bonkoungou, Sandrine; Narayan, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Alok kumar; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity rates of pancreatic cancer are high because of its extremely invasive and metastatic nature. Its lack of symptoms, late diagnosis and chemo–resistance and the ineffective treatment modalities warrant the development of new chemo–therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer. Agents from medicinal plants have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in various human cancers. Nimbolide, an active molecule isolated from Azadirachta indica, has been reported to exhibit several medicinal properties. This study assessed the anticancer properties of nimbolide against pancreatic cancer. Our data reveal that nimbolide induces excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby regulating both apoptosis and autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. Experiments with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine diphosphate salt and the apoptosis inhibitor z-VAD-fmk demonstrated that nimbolide-mediated ROS generation inhibited proliferation (through reduced PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling) and metastasis (through decreased EMT, invasion, migration and colony forming abilities) via mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death but not via autophagy. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that nimbolide was effective in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. Overall, our data suggest that nimbolide can serve as a potential chemo–therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26804739

  17. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  18. Oridonin inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through blocking the Notch signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixin Xia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to inhibit growth and metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Methods: The effect of oridonin on proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in human breast cancer cells. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined by using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expression of Notch receptors (Notch 1–4 was detected by western blot. Results: Oridonin inhibited human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, oridonin significantly induced human breast cancer cells apoptosis. Furthermore, the oridonin treatment not only inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expression of Notch 1-4 protein. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the inhibitive effect of oridonin is likely to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signaling pathway and the resulting increased apoptosis.

  19. Phospho-sulindac inhibits pancreatic cancer growth: NFATc1 as a drug resistance candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Onika T; Wong, Chi C; Vrankova, Kvetoslava; Rigas, Basil

    2014-02-01

    Phospho-sulindac (P-S), a promising anticancer agent, is efficacious in pre-clinical models of human cancer and is apparently safe. Here, we studied the effect of P-S on pancreatic cancer growth. We found that P-S strongly inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, is efficacious in inhibiting the growth of pancreatic xenografts in nude mice, and has an excellent safety profile. Microarray analysis revealed that P-S induced the expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, isoform c1 (NFATc1) gene. NFATc1, a calcineurin-responsive transcription factor associated with aggressive pancreatic cancer. The role of increased NFATc1 expression on the growth inhibitory effect of P-S on cancer growth was evaluated by silencing or by overexpressing it both in vitro and in vivo. We found that when the expression of NFATc1 was abrogated by RNAi, pancreatic cancer cells were more responsive to treatment with P-S. Conversely, overexpressing the NFATc1 gene made the pancreatic cancer cells less responsive to treatment with P-S. NFATc1 likely mediates drug resistance to P-S and is an unfavorable prognostic factor that predicts poor tumor response. We also demonstrated that NFATc1-mediated resistance can be overcome by cyclosporin A (CsA), an NFAT inhibitor, and that the combination of P-S and CsA synergistically inhibited pancreatic cancer cell growth. In conclusion, our preclinical data establish P-S as an efficacious drug for pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, which merits further evaluation.

  20. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and mice gastric mucosa colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Correia

    Full Text Available H. pylori drug-resistant strains and non-compliance to therapy are the major causes of H. pylori eradication failure. For some bacterial species it has been demonstrated that fatty acids have a growth inhibitory effect. Our main aim was to assess the ability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA to inhibit H. pylori growth both in vitro and in a mouse model. The effectiveness of standard therapy (ST in combination with DHA on H. pylori eradication and recurrence prevention success was also investigated. The effects of DHA on H. pylori growth were analyzed in an in vitro dose-response study and n in vivo model. We analized the ability of H. pylori to colonize mice gastric mucosa following DHA, ST or a combination of both treatments. Our data demonstrate that DHA decreases H. pylori growth in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA inhibits H. pylori gastric colonization in vivo as well as decreases mouse gastric mucosa inflammation. Addition of DHA to ST was also associated with lower H. pylori infection recurrence in the mouse model. In conclusion, DHA is an inhibitor of H. pylori growth and its ability to colonize mouse stomach. DHA treatment is also associated with a lower recurrence of H. pylori infection in combination with ST. These observations pave the way to consider DHA as an adjunct agent in H. pylori eradication treatment.

  2. Inhibition of growth and sporulation of Penicillium expansum by extracts of selected Basidiomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Florianowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A screening of antifungal activity of 33 Basidiomycetes strains was realized with their extracts. The influence of aqueous extracts of fruit-bodies of the testeded fungi after addition of spores or hyphae of Penicillium expansum on growth and sporulation of the fitopathogen in vitro was estimated. The species: Hydnum repandum L.: Fr., Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr. Kummer, Coprinus comatus (Műll Fr. S.F. Gray, Coprinus atramentarius (Bull: Fr. Fr. and Lactarius turpis (Weinm. Fr. reduced the mycelial growth and inhibited sporulation of this pathogen.

  3. Algal growth inhibition test in filled, closed bottles for volatile and sorptive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nyholm, Niels; Verbruggen, Eric M. J.;

    2000-01-01

    Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well as to the......Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well...... as to the test container. A simple filled closed bottle test with low algal densities and bicarbonate enrichment is described here as an approach to minimize the loss of test material from solution. The algal medium was enriched with 300 mg NaHCO3/L, the pH was adjusted to 7.0 by addition of HCl...

  4. Inhibition effect of phosphate on the crystal grain growth of nanosized titania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xiaohui; LIE Jingze; LI Ping; ZHANG Yanfeng; WEI Yu

    2009-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate on the crystal grain growth of nanosized titania during high temperature calcination was investigated. Nanosized titanium dioxide powders prepared by hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride were soaked in phosphate solutions with different con-centrations. The obtained powders calcined at various temperatures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS). The grain size of the samples without phosphate treatment in-creased quickly when calcined at high temperatures, while the grain size of the samples with phosphate modification increased slowly when calcined at the same temperature. This phenomenon implies that phosphate treatment plays an important role in inhibiting the crystal grain growth of titania. The possible mechanism of the inhibition effect of phosphate on titania is discussed.

  5. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B): Monoclonal antibody inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlin, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis, a well-recognized characteristic of malignancy, has been exploited more than any other pathway targeted by biologic anti-neoplastic therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is the critical receptor involved in malignant angiogenesis with its activation inducing a number of other cellular modifications resulting in tumor growth and metastases. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B; ImClone Systems Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) is a fully human monoclonal antibody developed to specifically inhibit VEGFR-2. Ramucirumab is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials across a variety of tumor types. Herein, angiogenesis inhibition in cancer is reviewed and up-to-date information on the clinical development of ramucirumab is presented.

  6. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 inhibits cerebellar cell death in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pañeda, Covadonga; Arroba, Ana I; Frago, Laura M; Holm, Anne Mette; Rømer, John; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2003-08-26

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is essential for cerebellar granule neuron survival and a decline in IGF-I is implicated in various age-dependent processes. Here we show that IGF-I mRNA levels are decreased in the cerebellum of old rats compared with young rats and this was associated with increased cell death and activation of caspases 3 and 9. Growth hormone-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, a synthetic ligand for the ghrelin receptor, increased IGF-I mRNA levels, decreased cell death and inhibited caspase 3 and 9 activation in the cerebellum of aged rats. These results suggest that increasing IGF-I expression in the cerebellum can decrease cell death in aged rats via inhibition of caspase 3 and 9 activation.

  7. Growth inhibiting effects of terazosin on androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许克新; 王向红; 凌明达; 王云川

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, terazosin on the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145.Methods Two androgen independent cell lines, PC-3 and DU145, were used to determine cell viability, colony-forming ability, as well as cell cycle distribution, after exposure to terazosin. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP1.Results This study shows that terazosin inhibits not only prostate cancer cell growth but also its colony forming ability, both of which are main targets of clinical treatment. In addition, terazosin is shown to inhibit cell growth through G1 phase cell cycle arrest and the up-regulation of p27KIP1.Conclusion This study provides evidence that the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer.

  8. Selective histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors bearing substituted urea linkers inhibit melanoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Joel A; Woan, Karrune; Perez-Villarroel, Patricio; Villagra, Alejandro; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-11-26

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has dramatically increased in recent years thus requiring the need for improved therapeutic strategies. In our efforts to design selective histone deactylase inhibitors (HDACI), we discovered that the aryl urea 1 is a modestly potent yet nonselective inhibitor. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that adding substituents to the nitrogen atom of the urea so as to generate compounds bearing a branched linker group results in increased potency and selectivity for HDAC6. Compound 5 g shows low nanomolar inhibitory potency against HDAC6 and a selectivity of ∼600-fold relative to the inhibition of HDAC1. These HDACIs were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of B16 melanoma cells with the most potent and selective HDAC6I being found to decrease tumor cell growth. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of HDAC6-selective inhibitors that possess antiproliferative effects against melanoma cells.

  9. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, R M; Willis, W D

    1985-01-01

    We have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. We suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun et al. [Braun, A. G., Emerson, D. J. & Nichinson, B. B. (1979) Nature (London) 282, 507-509] may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo. Images PMID:3862095

  10. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, R.M.; Willis, W.D.

    1985-09-01

    The authors have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. The authors suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo.

  11. Novel synthetic antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling inhibit colorectal cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaler, Jo; Machon, Ondrej; von Kries, Jens Peter; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundenes, Elsa; Wedlich, Doris; Gradl, Dietmar; Paulsen, Jan Erik; Machonova, Olga; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Dinh, Huyen; Krauss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is deregulated in several types of human cancer where it plays a central role in tumor cell growth and progression. Here we report the identification of 2 new small molecules that specifically inhibit canonical Wnt pathway at the level of the destruction complex. Specificity was verified in various cellular reporter systems, a Xenopus double-axis formation assay and a gene expression profile analysis. In human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, the new compounds JW67 and JW74 rapidly reduced active β-catenin with a subsequent downregulation of Wnt target genes, including AXIN2, SP5, and NKD1. Notably, AXIN2 protein levels were strongly increased after compound exposure. Long-term treatment with JW74 inhibited the growth of tumor cells in both a mouse xenograft model of CRC and in Apc(Min) mice (multiple intestinal neoplasia, Min). Our findings rationalize further preclinical and clinical evaluation of these new compounds as novel modalities for cancer treatment.

  12. Constitutive SOCS-3 expression protects T-cell lymphoma against growth inhibition by IFNalpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Lovato, P; Sommer, V H;

    2005-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 is constitutively activated in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), where it protects tumour cells against apoptosis. The constitutive activation of Stat3 leads to a constitutive expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3....... In healthy cells, SOCS-3 is transiently expressed following cytokine stimulation and functions as a negative feedback inhibitor of the Stat3-activating kinases. Here, we attempt to resolve the apparent paradox of a simultaneous SOCS-3 expression and Stat3 activation in the same cells. We show that (i) SOCS-3...... expression in tumour cells is equal to or higher than in cytokine-stimulated nonmalignant T cells, (ii) SOCS-3 is not mutated in CTCL, (iii) overexpression of SOCS-3 blocks IFNalpha-mediated growth inhibition without affecting Stat3 activation, growth, and apoptosis, and (iv) inhibition of SOCS-3...

  13. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Xiu Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tang, Xiuwen, E-mail: xiuwentang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  14. Andrographolide inhibits melanoma tumor growth by inactivating the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Ding, Yi; Liu, Hong-Ying; Lei, Yan; Fang, Hai-Yan; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Cui-Ling; Yang, Yi; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Xuesong; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-12-01

    The TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in tumor progression. Andrographolide (Andro) has been reported to have anticancer activity in multiple types of cancer. However, the pharmacological activities of Andro in melanoma are not completely understood. In this study, we defined the anticancer effects of Andro in melanoma and elucidated its potential mechanisms of action. Our experiments showed that Andro significantly inhibited melanoma tumor growth and metastasis by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, Andro significantly inhibited the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inactivation of TLR4/NF-κB signaling inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 and Bcl-6, which are antitumor genes. This work provides evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target and may also be indispensable in the Andro-mediated anticancer effect in melanoma.

  15. Plasmodium and mononuclear phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Ménard, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium, the causative agent of malaria, initially multiplies inside liver cells and then in successive cycles inside erythrocytes, causing the symptoms of the disease. In this review, we discuss interactions between the extracellular and intracellular forms of the Plasmodium parasite and innate immune cells in the mammalian host, with a special emphasis on mononuclear phagocytes. We overview here what is known about the innate immune cells that interact with parasites, mechanisms used by the parasite to evade them, and the protective or detrimental contribution of these interactions on parasite progression through its life cycle and pathology in the host.

  16. Inhibition of mammary tumor growth and metastases to bone and liver by dietary grape polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Martínez, Joel E; Wall, Kristin M; Cubano, Luis A; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2009-01-01

    The cancer preventive properties of grape products such as red wine have been attributed to polyphenols enriched in red wine. However, much of the studies on cancer preventive mechanisms of grape polyphenols have been conducted with individual compounds at concentrations too high to be achieved via dietary consumption. We recently reported that combined grape polyphenols at physiologically relevant concentrations are more effective than individual compounds at inhibition of ERalpha(-), ERbeta(+) MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and primary mammary tumor growth (Schlachterman et al., Transl Oncol 1:19-27, 2008). Herein, we show that combined grape polyphenols induce apoptosis and are more effective than individual resveratrol, quercetin, or catechin at inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell migration in the highly metastatic ER (-) MDA-MB-435 cell line. The combined effect of dietary grape polyphenols (5 mg/kg each resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin) was tested on progression of mammary tumors in nude mice created from green fluorescent protein-tagged MDA-MB-435 bone metastatic variant. Fluorescence image analysis of primary tumor growth demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in tumor area by dietary grape polyphenols. Molecular analysis of excised tumors demonstrated that reduced mammary tumor growth may be due to upregulation of FOXO1 (forkhead box O1) and NFKBIA (IkappaBalpha), thus activating apoptosis and potentially inhibiting NfkappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) activity. Image analysis of distant organs for metastases demonstrated that grape polyphenols reduced metastasis especially to liver and bone. Overall, these results indicate that combined dietary grape polyphenols are effective at inhibition of mammary tumor growth and site-specific metastasis.

  17. A rho GDP dissociation inhibitor produced by apoptotic T-cells inhibits growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Dhiman, Rohan; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana S; Tripathi, Deepak; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R; Jones, Brenda; Theodorescu, Dan; Barnes, Peter F; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we found that a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3(+)) cells from persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis (M. tb) in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). A soluble factor, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (D4GDI), produced by apoptotic CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3(+)) cells is responsible for this inhibition of M. tb growth in human macrophages and in mice. M. tb-expanded CD4(+C)D25(+)Foxp3(+)D4GDI(+) cells do not produce IL-10, TGF-β and IFN-γ. D4GDI inhibited growth of M. tb in MDMs by enhancing production of IL-1β, TNF-α and ROS, and by increasing apoptosis of M. tb-infected MDMs. D4GDI was concentrated at the site of disease in tuberculosis patients, with higher levels detected in pleural fluid than in serum. However, in response to M. tb, PBMC from tuberculosis patients produced less D4GDI than PBMC from persons with LTBI. M. tb-expanded CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3(+)) cells and D4GDI induced intracellular M. tb to express the dormancy survival regulator DosR and DosR-dependent genes, suggesting that D4GDI induces a non-replicating state in the pathogen. Our study provides the first evidence that a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) (85% Foxp3+) cells enhances immunity to M. tb, and that production of D4GDI by this subpopulation inhibits M. tb growth.

  18. Tumor growth inhibition through targeting liposomally bound curcumin to tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Goutam; Barui, Sugata; Saha, Soumen; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2013-12-28

    Increasing number of Phase I/II clinical studies have demonstrated clinical potential of curcumin for treatment of various types of human cancers. Despite significant anti-tumor efficacies and bio-safety profiles of curcumin, poor systemic bioavailability is retarding its clinical success. Efforts are now being directed toward developing stable formulations of curcumin using various drug delivery systems. To this end, herein we report on the development of a new tumor vasculature targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin containing a lipopeptide with RGDK-head group and two stearyl tails, di-oleyolphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cholesterol. We show that essentially water insoluble curcumin can be solubilized in fairly high concentrations (~500 μg/mL) in such formulation. Findings in the Annexin V/Propidium iodide (PI) binding based flow cytometric assays showed significant apoptosis inducing properties of the present curcumin formulation in both endothelial (HUVEC) and tumor (B16F10) cells. Using syngeneic mouse tumor model, we show that growth of solid melanoma tumor can be inhibited by targeting such liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculature. Results in immunohistochemical staining of the tumor cryosections are consistent with tumor growth inhibition being mediated by apoptosis of tumor endothelial cells. Findings in both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic studies are consistent with the supposition that the presently described liposomal formulation of curcumin inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor endothelium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on inhibiting tumor growth through targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculatures.

  19. A rho GDP dissociation inhibitor produced by apoptotic T-cells inhibits growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivan Venkatasubramanian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we found that a subpopulation of CD4(+CD25(+ (85% Foxp3(+ cells from persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis (M. tb in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs. A soluble factor, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (D4GDI, produced by apoptotic CD4(+CD25(+ (85% Foxp3(+ cells is responsible for this inhibition of M. tb growth in human macrophages and in mice. M. tb-expanded CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+D4GDI(+ cells do not produce IL-10, TGF-β and IFN-γ. D4GDI inhibited growth of M. tb in MDMs by enhancing production of IL-1β, TNF-α and ROS, and by increasing apoptosis of M. tb-infected MDMs. D4GDI was concentrated at the site of disease in tuberculosis patients, with higher levels detected in pleural fluid than in serum. However, in response to M. tb, PBMC from tuberculosis patients produced less D4GDI than PBMC from persons with LTBI. M. tb-expanded CD4+CD25+ (85% Foxp3(+ cells and D4GDI induced intracellular M. tb to express the dormancy survival regulator DosR and DosR-dependent genes, suggesting that D4GDI induces a non-replicating state in the pathogen. Our study provides the first evidence that a subpopulation of CD4(+CD25(+ (85% Foxp3+ cells enhances immunity to M. tb, and that production of D4GDI by this subpopulation inhibits M. tb growth.

  20. Dietary fiber enhances TGF-β signaling and growth inhibition in the gut

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Dietary fiber intake links to decreased risk of colorectal cancers. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, we found that butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber, enhances TGF-β signaling in rat intestinal epithelial cells (RIE-1). Furthermore, TGF-β represses inhibitors of differentiation (Ids), leading to apoptosis. We hypothesized that dietary fiber enhances TGF-β's growth inhibitory effects on gut epithelium via inhibition ...

  1. Resveratrol inhibits growth of orthotopic pancreatic tumors through activation of FOXO transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjit K Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FOXO play a direct role in cellular proliferation, oxidative stress response, and tumorigenesis. The objectives of this study were to examine whether FOXOs regulate antitumor activities of resveratrol in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with resveratrol. Cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis and cell cycle were measured by XTT, soft agar, TUNEL and flow cytometry assays, respectively. FOXO nuclear translocation, DNA binding and transcriptional activities were measured by fluorescence technique, gelshift and luciferase assay, respectively. Mice were orthotopically implanted with PANC1 cells and orally gavaged with resveratrol. The components of PI3K and ERK pathways, FOXOs and their target gene expressions were measured by the Western blot analysis. Resveratrol inhibited cell viability and colony formations, and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation in four pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Hs766T, and AsPC-1. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest by up-regulating the expression of p21/CIP1, p27/KIP1 and inhibiting the expression of cyclin D1. Resveratrol induced apoptosis by up-regulating Bim and activating caspase-3. Resveratrol inhibited phosphorylation of FOXOs, and enhanced their nuclear translocation, FOXO-DNA binding and transcriptional activities. The inhibition of PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways induced FOXO transcriptional activity and apoptosis. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO genes abrogated resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Finally, resveratrol-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, PI3K, AKT, FOXO1 and FOXO3a, and induction of apoptosis and FOXO target genes. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that inhibition of ERK and AKT pathways act together to activate FOXO

  2. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  3. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:20529342

  4. RNA aptamers inhibit the growth of the fish pathogen viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnarak, Porntep; Santos, Mudjekeewis D; Hwang, Seong Don; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Kikuchi, Yo; Aoki, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a serious disease impacting wild and cultured fish worldwide. Hence, an effective therapeutic method against VHSV infection needs to be developed. Aptamer technology is a new and promising method for diagnostics and therapeutics. It revolves around the use of an aptamer molecule, an artificial ligand (nucleic acid or protein), which has the capacity to recognize target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Here, we aimed at selecting RNA aptamers that can specifically bind to and inhibit the growth of a strain of fish VHSV both in vitro and in vivo. Three VHSV-specific RNA aptamers (F1, F2, and C6) were selected from a pool of artificially and randomly produced oligonucleotides using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The three RNA aptamers showed obvious binding to VHSV in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay but not to other tested viruses. The RNA aptamers were tested for their ability to inhibit VHSV in vitro using hirame natural embryo (HINAE) cells. Cytopathic effect and plaque assays showed that all aptamers inhibited the growth of VHSV in HINAE cells. In vivo tests using RNA aptamers produced by Rhodovulum sulfidophilum showed that extracellular RNA aptamers inhibited VHSV infection in Japanese flounder. These results suggest that the RNA aptamers are a useful tool for protection against VHSV infection in Japanese flounder.

  5. Methylthioadenosine (MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment.

  6. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasawa, Wataru [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kei [Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, Box 100278, Room MSB M410A, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, The Advanced Clinical Research Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Rheumatology and Allergy, Research Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  7. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37 °C) and incubation times (24 and 48 h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8 mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37 °C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and at 25 °C for 48 h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products.

  8. Inhibition of Notch pathway prevents osteosarcoma growth by cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Setoguchi, T; Hirotsu, M; Gao, H; Sasaki, H; Matsunoshita, Y; Komiya, S

    2009-06-16

    The study shows constitutive activation of the Notch pathway in various types of malignancies. However, it remains unclear how the Notch pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. We investigated the expression of the Notch pathway molecules in osteosarcoma biopsy specimens and examined the effect of Notch pathway inhibition. Real-time PCR revealed overexpression of Notch2, Jagged1, HEY1, and HEY2. On the other hand, Notch1 and DLL1 were downregulated in biopsy specimens. Notch pathway inhibition using gamma-secretase inhibitor and CBF1 siRNA slowed the growth of osteosarcomas in vitro. In addition, gamma-secretase inhibitor-treated xenograft models exhibited significantly slower osteosarcoma growth. Cell cycle analysis revealed that gamma-secretase inhibitor promoted G1 arrest. Real-time PCR and western blot revealed that gamma-secretase inhibitor reduced the expression of accelerators of the cell cycle, including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, E2, and SKP2. On the other hand, p21(cip1) protein, a cell cycle suppressor, was upregulated by gamma-secretase inhibitor treatment. These findings suggest that inhibition of Notch pathway suppresses osteosarcoma growth by regulation of cell cycle regulator expression and that the inactivation of the Notch pathway may be a useful approach to the treatment of patients with osteosarcoma.

  9. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki [Department of Dermatology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Feril, Loreto B., E-mail: ferilism@yahoo.com [Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Tachibana, Katsuro [Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi [Department of Dermatology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Harada, Yoshimi [Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan); Nakayama, Juichiro [Department of Dermatology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka City 814-0180 (Japan)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  10. Inhibition of autophagy attenuates pancreatic cancer growth independent of TP53/TRP53 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Annan; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2014-09-01

    Basal levels of autophagy are elevated in most pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC). Suppressing autophagy pharmacologically using chloroquine (CQ) or genetically with RNAi to essential autophagy genes inhibits human pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo, which presents possible treatment opportunities for PDAC patients using the CQ-derivative hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). Indeed, such clinical trials are ongoing. However, autophagy is a complex cellular mechanism to maintain cell homeostasis under stress. Based on its biological role, a dual role of autophagy in tumorigenesis has been proposed: at tumor initiation, autophagy helps maintain genomic stability and prevent tumor initiation; while in advanced disease, autophagy degrades and recycles cellular components to meet the metabolic needs for rapid growth. This model was proven to be the case in mouse lung tumor models. However, in contrast to prior work in various PDAC model systems, loss of autophagy in PDAC mouse models with embryonic homozygous Trp53 deletion does not inhibit tumor growth and paradoxically increases progression. This raised concerns whether there may be a genotype-dependent reliance of PDAC on autophagy. In a recent study, our group used a Trp53 heterozygous mouse PDAC model and human PDX xenografts to address the question. Our results demonstrate that autophagy inhibition was effective against PDAC tumors irrespective of TP53/TRP53 status.

  11. Roxatidine- and cimetidine-induced angiogenesis inhibition suppresses growth of colon cancer implants in syngeneic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Kazuyoshi; Izumi, Kazuki; Okabe, Susumu

    2003-11-01

    Cimetidine is known to suppress the growth of several tumors, including gastrointestinal cancer, in humans and animals. Nonetheless, whether other histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists exert such tumor suppressive effects remains unclear. The effect of roxatidine acetate hydrochloride (roxatidine), an H(2)-receptor antagonist, on the growth of colon cancer implanted in mice was examined and compared with that of cimetidine. Drugs were orally delivered for 26 - 29 days beginning before or after implantation of syngeneic colon cancer (Colon 38) in C57BL/6 mice. Tumor volume was determined throughout and histochemical analysis was also performed. Tumor tissue and serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were measured. In vitro cell growth was assessed by the MTT assay. Both roxatidine and cimetidine significantly suppressed the growth of Colon 38 tumor implants. Histologic analysis revealed that such antagonists markedly increased necrotic areas and decreased the density of microvessels in tumor tissue. Both H(2)-receptor antagonists suppressed VEGF levels in tumor tissue and significantly decreased serum VEGF levels in Colon 38-bearing mice. Such drugs, however, failed to suppress in vitro growth of the cell line. In conclusion, both roxatidine and cimetidine were found to exert suppressive effects on the growth of colon cancer implants in mice by inhibiting angiogenesis via reducing VEGF expression.

  12. Amygdalin inhibits the growth of renal cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengel, Eva; Thomas, Anita; Rutz, Jochen; Makarevic, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-01

    Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is a lack of information on the efficacy and toxicity of this natural compound. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amygdalin on the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was examined. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to the RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, for 24 h or 2 weeks. Untreated cells served as controls. Tumor cell growth and proliferation were determined using MTT and BrdU tests, and cell cycle phases were evaluated. Expression of the cell cycle activating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1 and D3 as well as of the cell cycle inhibiting proteins p19 and p27 was examined by western blot analysis. Surface expression of the differentiation markers E- and N-cadherin was also investigated. Functional blockade by siRNA was used to determine the impact of several proteins on tumor cell growth. Amygdalin treatment caused a significant reduction in RCC cell growth and proliferation. This effect was correlated with a reduced percentage of G2/M-phase RCC cells and an increased percentage of cells in the G0/1-phase (Caki-1 and A498) or cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (KTC-26). Furthermore, amygdalin induced a marked decrease in cell cycle activating proteins, in particular cdk1 and cyclin B. Functional blocking of cdk1 and cyclin B resulted in significantly diminished tumor cell growth in all three RCC cell lines. Aside from its inhibitory effects on growth, amygdalin also modulated the differentiation markers, E- and N-cadherin. Hence, exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibited cell cycle progression and tumor cell growth by impairing cdk1 and cyclin B expression. Moreover, we noted that amygdalin affected differentiation markers. Thus, we suggest that amygdalin exerted RCC antitumor effects in vitro.

  13. SL-01, an oral derivative of gemcitabine, inhibited human breast cancer growth through induction of apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Qin, Yi-Zhuo; Wang, Rui-Qi [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Wen-Bao, E-mail: wbli92128@yahoo.com [Sanlugen PharmaTech, Rm 506, No. 2766 Yingxiu Road, Jinan 250101 (China); Qu, Xian-Jun, E-mail: qxj@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine. •SL-01 possessed activity against human breast cancer growth via apoptotic induction. •SL-01’s activity was more potently than that of gemcitabine. •SL-01 inhibited cancer growth without toxicity to mice. -- Abstract: SL-01 is an oral derivative of gemcitabine that was synthesized by introducing the moiety of 3-(dodecyloxycarbonyl) pyrazine-2-carbonyl at N4-position on cytidine ring of gemcitabine. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of SL-01 on human breast cancer growth. SL-01 significantly inhibited MCF-7 proliferation as estimated by colorimetric assay. Flow cytometry assay indicated the apoptotic induction and cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. SL-01 modulated the expressions of p-ATM, p53 and p21 and decrease of cyclin D1 in MCF-7 cells. Further experiments were performed in a MCF-7 xenografts mouse model. SL-01 by oral administration strongly inhibited MCF-7 xenografts growth. This effect of SL-01 might arise from its roles in the induction of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry assay showed the increase of TUNEL staining cells. Western blotting indicated the modulation of apoptotic proteins in SL-01-treated xenografts. During the course of study, there was no evidence of toxicity to mice. In contrast, the decrease of neutrophil cells in peripheral and increase of AST and ALT levels in serum were observed in the gemcitabine-treated mice. Conclusion: SL-01 possessed similar activity against human breast cancer growth with gemcitabine, whereas, with lower toxicity to gemcitabine. SL-01 is a potent oral agent that may supplant the use of gemcitabine.

  14. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery.

  15. Tracing and inhibiting growth of Staphylococcus aureus in barbecue cheese production after product recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, S; Zurfluh, K; Stephan, R

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most prevalent causes of foodborne intoxication worldwide. It is caused by ingestion of enterotoxins formed by Staphylococcus aureus during growth in the food matrix. Following a recall of barbecue cheese due to the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins in Switzerland in July 2015, we analyzed the production process of the respective dairy. Although most cheese-making processes involve acidification to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria, barbecue cheese has to maintain a pH >6.0 to prevent undesired melting of the cheese. In addition, the dairy decided to retain the traditional manual production process of the barbecue cheese. In this study, therefore, we aimed to (1) trace Staph. aureus along the barbecue cheese production process, and (2) develop a sustainable strategy to inhibit growth of Staph. aureus and decrease the risk of staphylococcal food poisoning without changing the traditional production process. To this end, we traced Staph. aureus in a step-wise blinded process analysis on 4 different production days using spa (Staphylococcus protein A gene) typing, DNA microarray profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. We subsequently selected a new starter culture and used a model cheese production including a challenge test assay to assess its antagonistic effect on Staph. aureus growth, as well as its sensory and technological implications. We detected Staph. aureus in 30% (37/124) of the collected samples taken from the barbecue cheese production at the dairy. This included detection of Staph. aureus in the final product on all 4 production days, either after enrichment or using quantitative detection. We traced 2 enterotoxigenic Staph. aureus strains (t073/CC45 and t282/CC45) colonizing the nasal cavity and the forearms of the cheesemakers to the final product. In the challenge test assay, we were able to show that the new starter culture inhibited growth of Staph. aureus while meeting

  16. Methoxychlor inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Miller, Kimberly P; Babus, Janice K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2006-10-01

    The mammalian ovary contains antral follicles, which are responsible for the synthesis and secretion of hormones that regulate estrous cyclicity and fertility. The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) causes atresia (follicle death via apoptosis) of antral follicles, but little is known about the mechanisms by which MXC does so. Oxidative stress is known to cause apoptosis in nonreproductive and reproductive tissues. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from 39-day-old CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]), MXC (1-100 microg/ml), or MXC + the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) (0.1-10 mM). During culture, growth was monitored daily. At the end of culture, follicles were processed for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) mRNA expression or for histological evaluation of atresia. The results indicate that exposure to MXC (1-100 microg/ml) inhibited growth of follicles compared to DMSO controls and that NAC (1-10 mM) blocked the ability of MXC to inhibit growth. MXC induced follicular atresia, whereas NAC (1-10 mM) blocked the ability of MXC to induce atresia. In addition, MXC reduced the expression of SOD1, GPX, and CAT, whereas NAC reduced the effects of MXC on their expression. Collectively, these data indicate MXC causes slow growth and increased atresia by inducing oxidative stress.

  17. Docetaxel inhibits SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells growth and induces apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Xin Geng; Zhao-Chong Zeng; Ji-Yao Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) activity of docetaxel against SMMC-7721 HCC cells and its possible mechanism.METHODS: The HCC cells were given different concentrations of docetaxel and their growth was measured by colony forming assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy (acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining, AO/EB), as well as electronic microscopy. The SMMC-7721 HCC cell reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) were measured after given docetaxel.RESULTS: Docetaxel inhibited the hepatocellular carcinoma cells growth in a concentration dependent manner with IC505×10-10 M. Marked cell apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest were observed after treatment with docetaxel ≥10-8M.Docetaxel promoted SMMC-7721 HCC cells ROS generation and GSH deletion.CONCLUSION: Docetaxel suppressed the growth of SMMC7721 HCC cells in vitro by causing apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest of the human hepatoma cells, and ROS and GSH may play a key role in the inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis.

  18. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R de Bruyn

    Full Text Available We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN, which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation.

  19. The Arabidopsis transcription factor ABIG1 relays ABA signaled growth inhibition and drought induced senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Longhurst, Adam D; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Drought inhibits plant growth and can also induce premature senescence. Here we identify a transcription factor, ABA INSENSITIVE GROWTH 1 (ABIG1) required for abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth inhibition, but not for stomatal closure. ABIG1 mRNA levels are increased both in response to drought and in response to ABA treatment. When treated with ABA, abig1 mutants remain greener and produce more leaves than comparable wild-type plants. When challenged with drought, abig1 mutants have fewer yellow, senesced leaves than wild-type. Induction of ABIG1 transcription mimics ABA treatment and regulates a set of genes implicated in stress responses. We propose a model in which drought acts through ABA to increase ABIG1 transcription which in turn restricts new shoot growth and promotes leaf senescence. The results have implications for plant breeding: the existence of a mutant that is both ABA resistant and drought resistant points to new strategies for isolating drought resistant genetic varieties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13768.001 PMID:27697148

  20. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajam, B; Rajam, M V

    1996-02-01

    Polyamine (PA) biosynthesis inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) and bis-(cyclohexylammonium) sulphate (BCHA) have been tested for their effects on colony diameters at different intervals after inoculation of four plant pathogenic fungi (Helminthosporium oryzae, Curvularia lunata, Pythium aphanidermatum and Colletotrichum capsici). All these inhibitors, except DFMA had strongly retarded the growth of four fungi in a dose- and species-dependent fashion, and H. oryzae and C. lunata were found to be most sensitive to the effects of PA inhibitors. P. aphanidermatum and C. capsici were relatively insensitive and required rather high concentrations of inhibitors to get greater inhibition of mycelial growth, except DFMA which had stimulatory effect on the growth of these two fungi. However DFMA had greatly suppressed the growth of H. oryzae and C. lunata. The effect was generally more pronounced with MGBG than with DFMO and BCHA, and 1 mM Put completely prevented the inhibitory effects of 1 and 5 mM DFMO. Analysis of free and conjugated PAs in two sensitive fungi (H. oryzae and C. lunata) revealed that Put was present in highest concentrations followed by Spd and Spm and their levels were greatly reduced by DFMO application, and such inhibitions were totally reversed by exogenously supplied Put; in fact, PA titers were considerably increased by 1 mM Put alone and in combination with 1 mM DFMO. These results suggest that PA inhibitors, particularly DFMO and MGBG may be useful as target-specific fungicides in plants.

  1. Low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Shu; Gong, Wen; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Hong-Guo; Xu, Heng-Hao; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-04-01

    Plants exhibit reduced root growth when exposed to low temperature; however, how low temperature modulates root growth remains to be understood. Our study demonstrated that low temperature reduces both meristem size and cell number, repressing the division potential of meristematic cells by reducing auxin accumulation, possibly through the repressed expression of PIN1/3/7 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes, although the experiments with exogenous auxin application also suggest the involvement of other factor(s). In addition, we verified that ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (ARR1) and ARR12 are involved in low temperature-mediated inhibition of root growth by showing that the roots of arr1-3 arr12-1 seedlings were less sensitive than wild-type roots to low temperature, in terms of changes in root length and meristem cell number. Furthermore, low temperature reduced the levels of PIN1/3 transcripts and the auxin level to a lesser extent in arr1-3 arr12-1 roots than in wild-type roots, suggesting that cytokinin signaling is involved in the low-temperature-mediated reduction of auxin accumulation. Taken together, our data suggest that low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

  2. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  3. Anthocyanin Induces Apoptosis of DU-145 Cells In Vitro and Inhibits Xenograft Growth of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, U-Syn; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Wang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of anthocyanins extracted from black soybean, which have antioxidant activity, on apoptosis in vitro (in hormone refractory prostate cancer cells) and on tumor growth in vivo (in athymic nude mouse xenograft model). Materials and Methods The growth and viability of DU-145 cells treated with anthocyanins were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis was assessed by DNA laddering. Immunoblotting was conducted to evaluate differences in the expressions of p53, Bax, Bcl, androgen receptor (AR), and prostate specific antigen (PSA). To study the inhibitory effects of anthocyanins on tumor growth in vivo, DU-145 tumor xenografts were established in athymic nude mice. The anthocyanin group was treated with daily oral anthocyanin (8 mg/kg) for 14 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, DU-145 cells (2×106) were inoculated subcutaneously into the right flank to establish tumor xenografts. Tumor dimensions were measured twice a week using calipers and volumes were calculated. Results Anthocyanin treatment of DU-145 cells resulted in 1) significant increase in apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, 2) significant decrease in p53 and Bcl-2 expressions (with increased Bax expression), and 3) significant decrease in PSA and AR expressions. In the xenograft model, anthocyanin treatment significantly inhibit tumor growth. Conclusion This study suggests that anthocyanins from black soybean inhibit the progression of prostate cancer in vitro and in a xenograft model. PMID:25510742

  4. PARP Inhibition Suppresses Growth of EGFR-Mutant Cancers by Targeting Nuclear PKM2

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    Nan Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Upon growth factor stimulation or in some EGFR mutant cancer cells, PKM2 translocates into the nucleus to induce glycolysis and cell growth. Here, we report that nuclear PKM2 binds directly to poly-ADP ribose, and this PAR-binding capability is critical for its nuclear localization. Accordingly, PARP inhibition prevents nuclear retention of PKM2 and therefore suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth. In addition, we found that PAR level correlates with nuclear localization of PKM2 in EGFR mutant brain and lung cancers, suggesting that PAR-dependent nuclear localization of PKM2 likely contributes to tumor progression in EGFR mutant glioblastoma and lung cancers. In addition, some EGFR-inhibitor-resistant lung cancer cells are sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Taken together, our data indicate that suppression of PKM2 nuclear function by PARP inhibitors represents a treatment strategy for EGFR-inhibitor-resistant cancers.

  5. Atrial natriuretic factor inhibits mitogen-induced growth in aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, P M; De Vito, P; Fraziano, M; Mattioli, P; Luly, P; Di Nardo, P

    2002-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a polypeptide able to affect cardiovascular homeostasis exhibiting diuretic, natriuretic, and vasorelaxant activities. ANF shows antimitogenic effects in different cell types acting through R(2) receptor. Excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells is a common phenomenon in diseases such as atherosclerosis, but the role of growth factors in the mechanism which modulate this process has yet to be clarified. The potential antimitogenic role of ANF on the cell growth induced by growth factors appears very intriguing. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of ANF on rat aortic smooth muscle (RASM) cells proliferation induced by known mitogens and the mechanism involved. Our data show that ANF, at physiological concentration range, inhibits RASM cell proliferation induced by known mitogens such as PDGF and insulin, and the effect seems to be elicited through the modulation of phosphatidic acid (PA) production and MAP kinases involvement.

  6. The NTS-DBL2X region of VAR2CSA Induces cross-reactive antibodies that inhibit adhesion of several Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chondroitin sulfate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigey, Pascal; Gnidehou, Sédami; Doritchamou, Justin

    2011-01-01

    is difficult. Methods. Using genetic immunization, we raised polyclonal antisera against overlapping segments of VAR2CSA in mice and rabbits. The adhesion-inhibition capacities of induced antisera and of specific antibodies purified from plasma of malaria-exposed pregnant women were assessed on laboratory....... The latter has been clearly associated to increased morbidity and mortality of the infants. Acquired anti-VAR2CSA antibodies have been associated with improved pregnancy outcomes, suggesting a vaccine could prevent the syndrome. However, identifying functionally important regions in the large VAR2CSA protein......-adapted parasite lines and field isolates expressing VAR2CSA. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to analyze functional resemblance between antibodies induced in animals and those naturally acquired by immune multigravidae. Results. Antibodies targeting the N-terminal sequence (NTS...

  7. Mifepristone Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyeneche, Alicia A.; Carón, Rubén W.; Telleria, Carlos M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose These studies were designed to determine whether the synthetic steroid mifepristone inhibits ovarian cancer growth in vitro and in vivo and the molecular mechanisms involved. Experimental Design The effect of mifepristone on ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro was studied in ovarian cancer cell lines of different genetic backgrounds (SK-OV-3, Caov-3, OV2008, and IGROV-1). In addition, the growth inhibition capacity of mifepristone on ovarian carcinoma xenografts was tested in nude mice. Results Mifepristone inhibited ovarian cancer cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cytostatic effect of mifepristone was confirmed in a clonogenic survival assay and was not linked to loss of viability. Mifepristone blocked DNA synthesis, arrested the cell cycle at the G1-to-S transition, up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors p21cip1 and p27kip1, down-regulated transcription factor E2F1, decreased expression of the E2F1 regulated genes, cdk1 (cdc2) and cyclin A, and modestly decreased cdk2 and cyclin E levels. The abrupt arrest in cell growth induced by mifepristone correlated with reduced cdk2 activity, increased association of cdk2 with p21cip1 and p27kip1, increased nuclear localization of the cdk inhibitors, and reduced nuclear abundance of cdk2 and cyclin E. In vivo, mifepristone significantly delayed the growth of ovarian carcinoma xenografts in a dose-dependent manner and without apparent toxic effects for the animals. Conclusions These preclinical studies demonstrate that mifepristone is effective as a single agent in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the growth of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Mifepristone markedly reduces cdk2 activity likely due to increased association of cdk2 with the cdk inhibitors p21cip1 and p27kip1 and reduced nuclear cdk2/cyclin E complex availability. Acting as a cytostatic agent mifepristone promises to be of translational significance in ovarian cancer therapeutics. PMID:17545545

  8. Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase from Plasmodium vivax, the neglected human malaria parasite: molecular cloning, expression and specific inhibition by the 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Anyigoh Atemnkeng

    Full Text Available Primaquine, an 8-aminoquinoline, is the only drug which cures the dormant hypnozoites of persistent liver stages from P. vivax. Increasing resistance needs the discovery of alternative pathways as drug targets to develop novel drug entities. Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH completes hypusine biosynthesis in eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF-5A which is the only cellular protein known to contain the unusual amino acid hypusine. Modified EIF-5A is important for proliferation of the malaria parasite. Here, we present the first successful cloning and expression of DOHH from P. vivax causing tertiary malaria. The nucleic acid sequence of 1041 bp encodes an open reading frame of 346 amino acids. Histidine tagged expression of P. vivax DOHH detected a protein of 39.01 kDa in E. coli. The DOHH protein from P. vivax shares significant amino acid identity to the simian orthologues from P. knowlesi and P. yoelii strain H. In contrast to P. falciparum only four E-Z-type HEAT-like repeats are present in P. vivax DOHH with different homology to phycocyanin lyase subunits from cyanobacteria and in proteins participating in energy metabolism of Archaea and Halobacteria. However, phycocyanin lyase activity is absent in P. vivax DOHH. The dohh gene is present as a single copy gene and transcribed throughout the whole erythrocytic cycle. Specific inhibition of recombinant P. vivax DOHH is possible by complexing the ferrous iron with zileuton, an inhibitor of mammalian 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX. Ferrous iron in the active site of 5-LOX is coordinated by three conserved histidines and the carboxylate of isoleucine(673. Zileuton inhibited the P. vivax DOHH protein with an IC50 of 12,5 nmol determined by a relative quantification by GC/MS. By contrast, the human orthologue is only less affected with an IC50 of 90 nmol suggesting a selective iron-complexing strategy for the parasitic enzyme.

  9. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration.

  10. Human tumor cell growth inhibition by nontoxic anthocyanidins, the pigments in fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2005-02-11

    Anthocyanidins, the aglycones of anthocyanins, impart brilliant colors in many fruits and vegetables. The widespread consumption of diets rich in anthocyanin and anthocyanidins prompted us to determine their inhibitory effects on human cancer cell proliferation. Five anthocyanidins, cyanidin (1), delphinidin (2), pelargonidin (3), petunidin (4) and malvidin (5), and four anthocyanins, cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside and pelargonidin-3-galactoside were tested for cell proliferation inhibitory activity against human cancer cell lines, AGS (stomach), HCT-116 (colon), MCF-7 (breast), NCI H460 (lung), and SF-268 (Central Nervous System, CNS) at 12.5-200 microg/mL concentrations. The viability of cells after exposure to anthocyanins and anthocyanidins was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) colorimetric methods. The anthocyanins assayed did not inhibit cell proliferation of cell lines tested at 200 microg/mL. However, anthocyanidins showed cell proliferation inhibitory activity. Malvidin inhibited AGS, HCT-116, NCI-H460, MCF-7 and SF-268 cell growth by 69, 75.7, 67.7, 74.7 and 40.5%, respectively, at 200 microg/mL. Similarly, pelargonidin inhibited AGS, HCT-116, NCI H460, MCF-7 and SF-268 cell growth by 64, 63, 62, 63 and 34%, respectively, at 200 microg/mL. At 200 microg/mL, cyanidin, delphinidin and petunidin inhibited the breast cancer cell growth by 47, 66 and 53%, respectively. This is the first report of tumor cell proliferation inhibitory activity by anthocyanidins.

  11. Gallium-Protoporphyrin IX Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth by Targeting Cytochromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Sarah; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a challenging pathogen due to both innate and acquired resistance to antibiotics. It is capable of causing a variety of infections, including chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Given the importance of iron in bacterial physiology and pathogenicity, iron-uptake and metabolism have become attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial compounds. P. aeruginosa can acquire iron from a variety of sources to fulfill its nutritional requirements both in the environment and in the infected host. The adaptation of P. aeruginosa to heme iron acquisition in the CF lung makes heme utilization pathways a promising target for the development of new anti-Pseudomonas drugs. Gallium [Ga(III)] is an iron mimetic metal which inhibits P. aeruginosa growth by interfering with iron-dependent metabolism. The Ga(III) complex of the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (GaPPIX) showed enhanced antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, although no inhibitory effect has been reported on P. aeruginosa. Here, we demonstrate that GaPPIX is indeed capable of inhibiting the growth of clinical P. aeruginosa strains under iron-deplete conditions, as those encountered by bacteria during infection, and that GaPPIX inhibition is reversed by iron. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as model organism, we show that GaPPIX enters cells through both the heme-uptake systems has and phu, primarily via the PhuR receptor which plays a crucial role in P. aeruginosa adaptation to the CF lung. We also demonstrate that intracellular GaPPIX inhibits the aerobic growth of P. aeruginosa by targeting cytochromes, thus interfering with cellular respiration.

  12. Effects of salvianolic acid B on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-An

    2012-01-01

    AIM To observe the effects of salvianolic acid B (SalB) on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma HXO-RB44 cells. METHODS The effects of SalB on the HXO-RB44 cells proliferation in vitro were observed by MTT colorimetric method. The morphological changes of apoptosis before and after the treatment of SalB were observed by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining method. Apoptosis rate and cell cycle changes of HXO-RB44 cells were detected by flow cytometer at 48 hours after treated by SalB. The expression changes of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells were detected by Western Blot. RESULTS SalB significantly inhibited the growth of HXO-RB44 cells, while the inhibition was in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The results of fluorescent staining method indicated that HXO-RB44 cells showed significant phenomenon of apoptosis including karyorrhexis, fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies, etc. after 24, 48 and 72 hours co-culturing of SalB and HXO-RB44 cells. The results of flow cytometer showed that the apoptosis rate and the proportion of cells in S phase were gradually increased at 48 hours and 72 hours after treated by different concentrations of SalB. Western Blot strip showed that the expression of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells was gradually increased with the increase of the concentration of SalB. CONCLUSION SalB can significantly affect on HXO-RB44 cells growth inhibition and apoptosis induction which may be achieved through the up-regulation of Caspase-3 expression and the induction of cell cycle arrest. PMID:22773971

  13. Delphinidin Inhibits Tumor Growth by Acting on VEGF Signalling in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keravis, Thérèse; Favot, Laure; Abusnina, Abdurrazag A; Anton, Anita; Justiniano, Hélène; Soleti, Raffaella; Alabed Alibrahim, Eid; Simard, Gilles; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The vasculoprotective properties of delphinidin are driven mainly by its action on endothelial cells. Moreover, delphinidin displays anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models and thereby might prevent the development of tumors associated with excessive vascularization. This study was aimed to test the effect of delphinidin on melanoma-induced tumor growth with emphasis on its molecular mechanism on endothelial cells. Delphinidin treatment significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth induced by B16-F10 melanoma cell xenograft in mice. In vitro, delphinidin was not able to inhibit VEGFR2-mediated B16-F10 melanoma cell proliferation but it specifically reduced basal and VEGFR2-mediated endothelial cell proliferation. The anti-proliferative effect of delphinidin was reversed either by the MEK1/2 MAP kinase inhibitor, U-0126, or the PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002. VEGF-induced proliferation was reduced either by U-0126 or LY-294002. Under these conditions, delphinidin failed to decrease further endothelial cell proliferation. Delphinidin prevented VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK and decreased the expression of the transcription factors, CREB and ATF1. Finally, delphinidin was more potent in inhibiting in vitro cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), PDE1 and PDE2, compared to PDE3-PDE5. Altogether delphinidin reduced tumor growth of melanoma cell in vivo by acting specifically on endothelial cell proliferation. The mechanism implies an association between inhibition of VEGF-induced proliferation via VEGFR2 signalling, MAPK, PI3K and at transcription level on CREB/ATF1 factors, and the inhibition of PDE2. In conjunction with our previous studies, we demonstrate that delphinidin is a promising compound to prevent pathologies associated with generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis.

  14. Delphinidin Inhibits Tumor Growth by Acting on VEGF Signalling in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse Keravis

    Full Text Available The vasculoprotective properties of delphinidin are driven mainly by its action on endothelial cells. Moreover, delphinidin displays anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models and thereby might prevent the development of tumors associated with excessive vascularization. This study was aimed to test the effect of delphinidin on melanoma-induced tumor growth with emphasis on its molecular mechanism on endothelial cells. Delphinidin treatment significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth induced by B16-F10 melanoma cell xenograft in mice. In vitro, delphinidin was not able to inhibit VEGFR2-mediated B16-F10 melanoma cell proliferation but it specifically reduced basal and VEGFR2-mediated endothelial cell proliferation. The anti-proliferative effect of delphinidin was reversed either by the MEK1/2 MAP kinase inhibitor, U-0126, or the PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002. VEGF-induced proliferation was reduced either by U-0126 or LY-294002. Under these conditions, delphinidin failed to decrease further endothelial cell proliferation. Delphinidin prevented VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK and decreased the expression of the transcription factors, CREB and ATF1. Finally, delphinidin was more potent in inhibiting in vitro cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs, PDE1 and PDE2, compared to PDE3-PDE5. Altogether delphinidin reduced tumor growth of melanoma cell in vivo by acting specifically on endothelial cell proliferation. The mechanism implies an association between inhibition of VEGF-induced proliferation via VEGFR2 signalling, MAPK, PI3K and at transcription level on CREB/ATF1 factors, and the inhibition of PDE2. In conjunction with our previous studies, we demonstrate that delphinidin is a promising compound to prevent pathologies associated with generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis.

  15. The RARgamma selective agonist CD437 inhibits gastric cell growth through the mechanism of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S Y; Lin, D Y; Shyu, R Y; Reichert, U; Yeh, M Y

    1999-04-01

    Retinoids are differentiation-inducing agents that exhibit multiple functions. Their activities are mediated through interaction with nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR). We have investigated the activities of synthetic retinoids on the growth of five gastric cancer cell lines. The effects of agonists selective for RARalpha, RARbeta and RARgamma (AM580, CD2019 and CD437, respectively) on cell growth were determined, in comparison to all-trans retinoic acid, by measuring total cellular DNA. AM580 and CD2019 had little or no effect on the growth of all five cell lines. In contrast, the RARgamma agonist CD437 inhibited cell growth up to 90-99% in both retinoic acid sensitive and resistant gastric cancer cells at a concentration of 1 microM. The growth suppression caused by CD437 was accompanied by the induction of apoptosis as judged by morphological criteria and DNA ladder formation. However, the extent of CD437-induced growth suppression was not correlated with RARgamma mRNA levels, which indicates that CD437 induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via an RARgamma independent pathway.

  16. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING, PLANT GROWTH INHIBITION, AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY STUDIES OF XYLOCARPUS GRANATUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A F M SHAHID-UD-DAULA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical analysis of the methanolic extract of Xylocarpus granatum Koen indicated the presence of carbohydrates, saponins, tannins and flavonoid types of compounds. Alkaloids and glycosides were found to be absent from the extract. The primary methanolic extract exhibited a potent growth inhibitory effect. Inhibition of both the rootlet and shoot showed a dosedependent response. The residual methanolic extract also has a growth inhibitory effect. Bothmethanolic extracts have a greater inhibitory effect on rootlet growth than shoot growth. The residual methanolic extract has a lesser inhibitory effect than the primary methanolic extract.Removal of the non-polar compounds (by n-hexane and chloroform from the primary methanolic extract reduced the inhibitory activity on both the rootlet and shoot growth, which suggests that the non-polar fractions may contain growth inhibitory principles. The primary extract demonstrated antibacterial activity against the gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and the gram negative bacteria Proteus vulgaris. The primary methanolic extract was found to be inactive against Escherichia coli andPseudomonas aeruginosa. The primary methanolic extract was more active against grampositive bacteria than gram-negative bacteria. The residual methanolic extract was also found to be inactive against all the tested microorganisms.

  17. Growth inhibition by tungsten in the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Atsunori; Muraoka, Tadashi; Maeda, Terunobu; Takeuchi, Fumiaki; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo; Sugio, Tsuyoshi

    2005-11-01

    Growth of five strains of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, including strain NB1-3, was inhibited completely by 50 microM of sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4)). When the cells of NB1-3 were incubated in 0.1 M beta-alanine-SO(4)(2-) buffer (pH 3.0) with 100 microM Na(2)WO(4) for 1 h, the amount of tungsten bound to the cells was 33 microg/mg protein. Approximately 10 times more tungsten was bound to the cells at pH 3.0 than at pH 7.0. The tungsten binding to NB1-3 cells was inhibited by oxyanions such as sodium molybdenum and ammonium vanadate. The activities of enzymes involved in elemental sulfur oxidation of NB1-3 cells such as sulfur oxidase, sulfur dioxygenase, and sulfite oxidase were strongly inhibited by Na(2)WO(4). These results indicate that tungsten binds to NB1-3 cells and inhibits the sulfur oxidation enzyme system of the cells, and as a result, inhibits cell growth. When portland cement bars supplemented with 0.075% metal nickel and with 0.075% metal nickel and 0.075% calcium tungstate were exposed to the atmosphere of a sewage treatment plant containing 28 ppm of H(2)S for 2 years, the weight loss of the portland cement bar with metal nickel and calcium tungstate was much lower than the cement bar containing 0.075% metal nickel.

  18. Inhibition of bone resorption and growth of breast cancer in the bone microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Jeroen T; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Papapoulos, Socrates E; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, where tumor cells induce osteoclasts to locally destroy bone. During bone resorption, growth factors are locally released that may support bone metastatic growth. Differently from most other tissues, drugs that can limit local turnover, such as bisphosphonates and osteoprotegerin (OPG), are available for bone. We examined the hypothesis that inhibition of bone resorption by two different mechanisms may also affect the growth of cancer cells in bone. For this, we tested the effects of high doses of OPG and zoledronic acid (ZOL) on progression of MDA-231-B/Luc+ breast cancer cells in the bone microenvironment using whole body bioluminescent reporter imaging (BLI). Both treatments significantly inhibited the development of radiographically detectable osteolytic lesions. Histologic examination corroborated the radiographic findings, showing that both treatments preserved the integrity of bone trabeculae and prevented bone destruction (significantly higher trabecular bone volumes vs. vehicle). However, whereas practically no TRAcP-positive osteoclasts were observed in tibiae preparations of animals treated with Fc-OPG, TRAcP-positive osteoclasts were still present in the animals treated with ZOL. Intra-bone tumor burden was reduced with ZOL and Fc-OPG treatment. Although there appeared to be a trend for less overall total tumor burden upon treatment with both compounds, this was not significant as assessed by BLI and histomorphometric analysis due to the extramedullary growth of cancer cells which was not affected by these treatments. Collectively, anti-resorptive agents with different mechanisms of action - ZOL and OPG - significantly reduced cancer-induced osteolysis and intra-osseous tumor burden, but failed to restrain local tumor growth. However, interference with the bone micro-environmental growth support could still be of therapeutic relevance when given to patients early in the course of bone metastatic disease.

  19. Characterization of growth inhibition of oral bacteria by sophorolipid using a microplate-format assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaiman, Daniel K Y; Ashby, Richard D; Uknalis, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Sophorolipid (SL) is a class of glycolipid biosurfactant produced by yeast and has potent antimicrobial activity against many microorganisms. In this paper, a microplate-based method was developed to characterize the growth inhibition by SL on five representative species of caries-causing oral bacteria. Bacterial growth on microplate in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of SL was continuously monitored by recording the absorbance at 600nm of the cultures using a microplate reader. The results showed that SL completely inhibited the growth of the Lactobacilli at ≥1mg/ml and the Streptococci at much lower concentrations of ≥50μg/ml. More importantly, we further defined the mechanism of antimicrobial activity of SL by analyzing the pattern of the cell growth curves. SL at sublethal concentrations (<1mg/ml) is bactericidal towards the Lactobacilli; it lengthens the apparent cell-doubling time (Td) and decreases the final cell density (as indicated by A600nm) in a concentration-dependent manner. Against the oral Streptococci, on the other hand, SL at sublethal concentrations (<50μg/ml) is bacteriostatic; it delays the onset of cell growth in a concentration-dependent fashion, but once the cell growth is commenced there is no noticeable adverse effect on Td and the final A600nm. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study of L. acidophilus grown in sublethal concentration of SL reveals extensive structural damage to the cells. S. mutans grown in sublethal level of SL did not show morphological damage to the cells, but numerous protruding structures could be seen on the cell surface. At the respective lethal levels of SL, L. acidophilus cells were lysed (at 1mg/ml SL) and the cell surface structure of S. mutans (at 130μg/ml SL) was extensively deformed. In summary, this paper presents the first report on a detailed analysis of the effects of SL on Lactobacilli and Streptococci important to oral health and hygiene.

  20. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash; Singh, Harminder Pal; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 microW cm(-2); 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at > or =2 h), and radicle and plumule growths (> or =1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H(2)O(2) accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  1. Maximum Inhibition of Breast Cancer/Stem Cell Growth by Concomitant Blockage of Key Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mossa Gardaneh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The blockage of cancer cell growth and division is the prime objective in clinical cancer therapy both at early stages and for inhibition of minimal residual disease and relapse. The failure of conventional therapies in treating breast cancer (BC has prompted dissection of signalling pathways involved in BC cell growth and characterisation of cellular receptors. Specific sets of membrane-bound receptors promote disarrayed self-renewal of BC stem cells and deregulated BC cell proliferation. Individual blockage of each receptor promotes only incomplete inhibition of BC cell growth and partial regression of metastasis. Such monotherapies are based on either chemotherapy or monoclonal antibodies. However, they do not provide long-lasting benefits and are further compromised by increasing resistance the cancer cells acquire against therapeutic agents, by their evasion of receptor blockage and by adoption of alternative growth routes that are induced by cross-talks between key receptors. On the other hand, dual targeting approaches, including receptor blockage combined with chemotherapy, produce prolonged overall survival but, nevertheless, complicate treatment by inducing side effects. Based on the complex nature of BC, combined targeted strategies that potentially confer maximum coverage for treatment cannot be effective without overcoming drug resistance initiated and further induced by inter-receptor communications. This implies that a comprehensive strategy based on concomitant inhibition of key receptors could provide an ultimate solution for effective treatment of aggressive types of BC. Such a strategy would likely be capable of targeting breast tumour cells and BC stem cells alike eventually forcing the cancer to regress.

  2. Grape seed extract inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manjinder; Singh, Rana P; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2006-10-15

    Accumulating evidences suggest the beneficial effects of fruit-and-vegetable consumption in lowering the risk of various cancers, including colorectal cancer. Herein, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects and associated mechanisms of grape seed extract (GSE), a rich source of proanthocyanidins, against colorectal cancer. Effects of GSE were examined on human colorectal cancer HT29 and LoVo cells in culture for proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. The in vivo effect of oral GSE was examined on HT29 tumor xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. Xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for proliferation and apoptosis. The molecular changes associated with the biological effects of GSE were analyzed by Western blot analysis. GSE (25-100 microg/mL) causes a significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth with concomitant increase in cell death. GSE induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest along with a marked increase in Cip1/p21 protein level and a decrease in G1 phase-associated cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. GSE-induced cell death was apoptotic and accompanied by caspase-3 activation. GSE feeding to mice at 200 mg/kg dose showed time-dependent inhibition of tumor growth without any toxicity and accounted for 44% decrease in tumor volume per mouse after 8 weeks of treatment. GSE inhibited cell proliferation but increased apoptotic cell death in tumors. GSE-treated tumors also showed enhanced Cip1/p21 protein levels and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. GSE may be an effective chemopreventive agent against colorectal cancer, and that growth inhibitory and apoptotic effects of GSE against colorectal cancer could be mediated via an up-regulation of Cip1/p21.

  3. Growth Inhibition of Struvite Crystals in the Presence of Herbal Extract Boerhaavia diffusa Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Chauhan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The formation of a urinary stone, known as nephrolithiasis, urolithiasis, renal calculi or kidney stone is a serious, debilitating problem in all societies throughout the world. Struvite or Ammonium Magnesium Phosphate Hexahydrate (AMPH is one of the components of urinary stone (calculi. Struvite stones are commonly found in women. Struvites form in humans as a result of urinary tract infection with ureolithic urea splitting micro organisms. These stones can grow rapidly forming "staghorn-calculi", which is more painful urological disorder. Therefore, it is of prime importance to study the growth and inhibition of Struvite crystals. Approach: This in vitro study had been carried out in the presence of herbal extract of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. by using single diffusion gel growth technique. Sodium metasilicate solution of specific gravity 1.05 and an aqueous solution of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate of 0.5 M concentration were mixed so that the pH value 7.0 could be set. After the gelation, equal amount of supernatant solution of 1.0 M magnesium acetate prepared with 0.5 and 1% concentrations of the herbal extract of B. diffusa Linn. were gently poured on the set gels in the respective test tubes in the aseptic medium. Results: The growth of crystals without and with herbal extracts was monitored at regular time intervals. As the concentration of B. diffusa Linn. increased, the inhibition of crystals also increased in the gel media as well as the dissolution of crystals at the gel-liquid interface increases. The de-fragmentation of some grown crystals was also noticed. Conclusion: The herbal extract of B. diffusa Linn. inhibited the growth of struvite crystals in vitro. This study incorporated multidisciplinary interests and may be used for formulating the strategy for prevention or dissolution of urinary stones.

  4. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tao, Ze-Zhang, E-mail: zezhangtao@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  5. Metformin inhibits growth and decreases resistance to anoikis in medullary thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubo-Gwiezdzinska, Joanna; Jensen, Kirk; Costello, John; Patel, Aneeta; Hoperia, Victoria; Bauer, Andrew; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard; Vasko, Vasyl

    2012-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is associated with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Recent studies showed that the antidiabetic agent metformin decreases proliferation of cancer cells through 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent inhibition of mTOR. In the current study, we assessed the effect of metformin on MTC cells. For this purpose, we determined growth, viability, migration, and resistance to anoikis assays using two MTC-derived cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1). Expressions of molecular targets of metformin were examined in MTC cell lines and in 14 human MTC tissue samples. We found that metformin inhibited growth and decreased expression of cyclin D1 in MTC cells. Treatment with metformin was associated with inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K/pS6 signaling and downregulation of pERK in both TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells. Metformin had no significant effects on pAKT in the cell lines examined. Metformin-inducible AMPK activation was noted only in TT cells. Treatment with AMPK inhibitor (compound C) or AMPK silencing did not prevent growth inhibitory effects of metformin in TT cells. Metformin had no effect on MTC cell migration but reduced the ability of cells to form multicellular spheroids in nonadherent conditions. Immunostaining of human MTC showed over-expression of cyclin D1 in all tumors compared with corresponding normal tissue. Activation of mTOR/p70S6K was detected in 8/14 (57.1%) examined tumors. Together, these findings indicate that growth inhibitory effects in MTC cells are associated with downregulation of both mTOR/6SK and pERK signaling pathways. Expression of metformin's molecular targets in human MTC cells suggests its potential utility for the treatment of MTC in patients.

  6. Mobile phone radiation inhibits Vigna radiata (mung bean) root growth by inducing oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ved Parkash [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Zoology, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Singh, Harminder Pal, E-mail: hpsingh_01@yahoo.com [Department of Environment and Vocational Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Batish, Daizy Rani [Department of Botany, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2009-10-15

    During the last couple of decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the use of cell phones. It has significantly added to the rapidly increasing EMF smog, an unprecedented type of pollution consisting of radiation in the environment, thereby prompting the scientists to study the effects on humans. However, not many studies have been conducted to explore the effects of cell phone EMFr on growth and biochemical changes in plants. We investigated whether EMFr from cell phones inhibit growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through induction of conventional stress responses. Effects of cell phone EMFr (power density: 8.55 {mu}W cm{sup -2}; 900 MHz band width; for 1/2, 1, 2, and 4 h) were determined by measuring the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in terms of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) content, root oxidizability and changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes. Our results showed that cell phone EMFr significantly inhibited the germination (at {>=}2 h), and radicle and plumule growths ({>=}1 h) in mung bean in a time-dependent manner. Further, cell phone EMFr enhanced MDA content (indicating lipid peroxidation), and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation and root oxidizability in mung bean roots, thereby inducing oxidative stress and cellular damage. In response to EMFr, there was a significant upregulation in the activities of scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases, catalases and glutathione reductases, in mung bean roots. The study concluded that cell phone EMFr inhibit root growth of mung bean by inducing ROS-generated oxidative stress despite increased activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  7. Mechanoreceptors rather than sedimentable amyloplasts perceive the gravity signal in hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth in azuki bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    Elongation of primary roots of azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) was suppressed under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation, such that the growth rate decreased in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of the gravity. The removal of the root cap did not influence the hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth, although it completely inhibited the gravitropic root curvature. Lanthanum and gadolinium, blockers of mechanoreceptors, nullified the growth-inhibitory effect of hypergravity. These results suggest that the gravity signal for the hypergravity-induced inhibition of root growth is perceived independently from that of gravitropism, which involves amyloplasts as statoliths. Horizontal and basipetal hypergravity suppressed root growth as did acropetal hypergravity, all of which were nullified by the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. These findings suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane perceive the gravity signal independently of the direction of the stimuli and roots may utilise it to regulate their growth rate.

  8. Inhibition of C. difficile and C. perfringens by commercial and potential probiotic strains and their in-vitro growth characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.;

    2012-01-01

    and their growth characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of commercial and potential probiotic on C. difficile and C. perfringens and assess their growth characteristics in-vitro. The inhibitory effect of a cell free probiotic supernatant of 17 commercial bacterial...... strains (Lactobacilli n=16, Bifidobacteria n=1) on growth of clostridia spp was assessed in an agar well diffusion assay and broth co-culture experiment, using supernatant harvested at different growth phases and with and without pH adjustment. To study growth characteristics MRS broth was adjusted to pH2...... it was harvested. 10/17 probiotic supernatants inhibited C. difficile in a pH dependant manner when harvested in the stationary growth phase. In the broth co-culture 5/17 probiotics inhibited C. perfringens and 10/17 inhibited C. difficile both in a pH dependant manner. All probiotic strains were able to grow at p...

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B differentially affects thyroid cancer cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweppe Rebecca E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a key role in promoting cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. Our understanding of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer, however, is limited. In this study, we have investigated the role of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis using selective genetic inhibition of NF-κB in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Results Three pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB differentially inhibited growth in a panel of advanced thyroid cancer cell lines, suggesting that these NF-κB inhibitors may have off-target effects. We therefore used a selective genetic approach to inhibit NF-κB signaling by overexpression of a dominant-negative IκBα (mIκBα. These studies revealed decreased cell growth in only one of five thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, which occurred through a block in the S-G2/M transition. Resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis was observed in all cell lines, likely through an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of NF-κB by mIκBα sensitized a subset of cell lines to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cell lines displayed sustained activation of the stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK pathway, defining a potential mechanism of response. Finally, NF-κB inhibition by mIκBα expression differentially reduced thyroid cancer cell invasion in these thyroid cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines demonstrated approximately a two-fold decrease in invasion, which was associated with differential expression of MMP-13. MMP-9 was reduced by mIκBα expression in all cell lines tested. Conclusions These data indicate that selective inhibition of NF-κB represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced thyroid. However, it is apparent that global regulation of thyroid cancer cell growth and invasion is not achieved by NF-κB signaling alone. Instead, our

  10. Growth Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii in Experimentally Contaminated Powdered Infant Formula by Kefir Supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kang, Il-Byeong; Kim, Hyunsook; Kim, Hong-Seok; Song, Kwang-Young; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    Kefir is a type of fermented milk containing lactic and acetic acid bacteria and yeast. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula (PIF). In a spot-on-lawn test, the growth of 20 C. sakazakii strains, including 10 clinical and 10 food isolates, was completely inhibited in the presence of kefir supernatant. Significant differences in the diameters of inhibition zones were observed upon treatment with kefir compared with the results for Lactobacillus kefiri and Candida kefyr culture supernatants or solutions of lactic and acetic acid and ethyl alcohol in the agar well diffusion test (P < 0.05). The addition of 100 μl of kefir supernatant to 1 ml of nutrient broth completely inhibited the growth of C. sakazakii, as evaluated by spectrophotometry. The antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant in experimentally contaminated PIF was also tested; we found no viable C. sakazakii cells remaining in PIF rehydrated with 30% kefir supernatant solution for 1 h, demonstrating that the antimicrobial activity of kefir supernatant against C. sakazakii could be applied in real food samples.

  11. Growth Inhibition Occurs Independently of Cell Mortality in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Exposed to High Cadmium Concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine Delpérée; Stanley Lutts

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the adaptation potential of tomato shoots to a sudden increase in Cd concentration, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. Ailsa Craig) were exposed under controlled environmental conditions to a high dose of this heavy metal (250 μM CdCl2>) in nutrient solution for 7 and 14 d. Both root and shoot growth was completely inhibited but all plants remained alive until the end of the treatment. Cell viability remained unaffected but the activity of the mitochondrial alternative pathway was stimulated by Cd stress at the expense of the cytochrome pathway. Cadmium concentration was higher in roots than in shoots and a decrease In the rate of net Cd translocation was noticed during the second week of stress. Cadmium decreased both leaf conductance (g1>) and chlorophyll concentration. However, the effect on net CO2 assimilation remained limited and soluble sugars accumulated in leaves. Photochemical efficiency of PSll (FvlFm) was not affected despite a decrease in the number of reaction centers and an inhibition of electron transfer to acceptors of PSII. It is concluded that tomato shoot may sustain short term exposure to high doses of cadmium despite growth inhibition. This property implies several physiological strategies linked to both avoidance and tolerance mechanisms.

  12. IL-17A promotes intracellular growth of Mycobacterium by inhibiting apoptosis of infected macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eCruz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The fate of infected macrophages is a critical aspect of immunity to mycobacteria. By depriving the pathogen of its intracellular niche, apoptotic death of the infected macrophage has been shown to be an important mechanism to control bacterial growth. Here we show that IL-17 inhibits apoptosis of Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages thus hampering their ability to control bacterial growth. Mechanistically, we show that IL-17 inhibits p53, and impacts on the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, by increasing the Bcl2 and decreasing Bax expression, decreasing cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. The same effect of IL-17 was observed in infected macrophages upon blockade of p53 nuclear translocation. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the IL-17/p53 axis in the regulation of mycobacteria-induced apoptosis and can have important implications in a broad spectrum of diseases where apoptosis of the infected cell is an important host defense mechanism. .

  13. Suppression of pancreatic carcinoma growth by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ involves angiogenesis inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wei Dong; Xing-Peng Wang; Kai Wu

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the possible actions and mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a ligand-activated transcription factor, in pancreatic carcinogenesis,especially in angiogenesis.METHODS: Expressions of PPARγ and retinoid acid receptor (RXRα) were examined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with immunocytochemical staining. Pancreatic carcinoma cells, PANC-1,were treated either with 9-cis-RA, a ligand of RXRα,or with 15-deoxy-Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2(15d-PGJ2), a ligand of PPARγ, or both. Antiproliferative effect was evaluated by cell viability using methyltetrazolium (MTT) assay. A pancreatic carcinoma xenograft tumor model of nude mice was established by inoculating PANC-1 cells subcutaneously. Rosiglitazone, a specific ligand of PPARγ, was administered via water drinking in experimental group of nude mice. After 75 d, all mice were sacrificed. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumor tissue was examined with immunohistochemical staining. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in PANC-1 cells, which were treated with 15d-PGJ2 or 9-cis-RA at variousconcentrations or different duration, was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of Rosiglitazone on changes of microvascular density (MVD) and VEGF expression were investigated in xenograft tumor tissue. Neovasculature was detected with immunohistochemistry staining labeled with anti-Ⅳ collagen antibody, and indicated by MVD.RESULTS: RT-PCR and immunocytochemical staining showed that PPARγ and RXRα were expressed in PANC-1 cells at both transcription level and translation level. MTT assay demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2, 9-cis-RA and their combination inhibited the growth of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. 9-cis-RA had a combined inhibiting action with 15d-PGJ2 on the growth of pancreatic carcinoma. In vivo studies revealed that Rosiglitazone significantly suppressed the growth of pancreatic carcinoma

  14. CytoregR inhibits growth and proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells via induction of apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanhi M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is one of the devastating neovascular diseases that incapacitate so many people the world over. Recent reports from the National Cancer Institute indicate some significant gain therapy and cancer management as seen in the increase in the 5-year survival rate over the past two decades. Although near-perfect cure rate have been reported in the early-stage disease, these data reveal high recurrence rate and serious side effects including second malignancies and fatalities. Most of the currently used anticancer agents are only effective against proliferating cancer cells. Thus attention has been focused on potential anti-cancer agents capable of killing cancer cells independent of the cell cycle state, to ensure effective elimination of most cancer cells. The objective of this study was to test the chemosensitivity and potential mechanism of action of a novel cancer drug, CytoregR, in a panel of human cancer cells. Methods the study was performed using a series of bioassays including Trypan blue exclusion, MTS Growth inhibition, LDH-cytotoxicity, TUNEL-Terminal DNA fragmentation Apoptosis Assay, and the Caspase protease CPP32 activity assays. Results CytoregR induced significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth in all the cells; with significant differences in chemosensitivity (P < 0.05 between the target cells becoming more apparent at 48 hr exposure. CytoregR showed no significant effect on normal cells relative to the tumor cells. Growth inhibition in all the cells was due to induction of apoptosis at lower concentrations of cytoregR (> 1:300. CytoregR-induced caspase protease-3 (CPP32 activation significantly and positively correlated with apoptosis induction and growth inhibition; thus implicating CPP32 as the principal death pathway in cytoregR-induced apoptosis. Conclusion CytoregR exerted a dose-and time-dependent growth inhibitory effect in all the target cells through induction of apoptosis via the

  15. High efficacy of anti DBL4e-VAR2CSA antibodies in inhibition of CSA-binding Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes from pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magistrado, Pamela A; Minja, Daniel; Doritchamou, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a major cause of intra-uterine growth-retardation and infant death in sub-Saharan Africa. Ideally, this could be prevented by a vaccine delivered before the first pregnancy. Antibodies against domain DBL4¿ from VAR2CSA has been shown to inhibit adhesion of laboratory i...... elicited antibodies with similar efficacy as pooled plasma from immune multi-gravid African women....

  16. Proanthocyanidins inhibit mitogenic and survival-signaling in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Syed Musthapa; Katiyar, Santosh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) induces apoptosis of A431 cells. Here, we report that treatment of A431 cells with GSPs inhibits constitutive as well as EGF-induced higher levels of phosphorylated proteins of MAPK family in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is associated with the reactivation of MAP kinase phosphatases. Western blot analysis reveals that GSPs decrease: (i) the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the phosphorylation of Akt at ser473, and (ii) the constitutive activation of NF-kappaB/p65. As NF-kappaB-targeted genes play crucial roles in tumor cell proliferation and differentiation, we assessed the effect of GSPs on proteins encoded by these genes. Treatment with GSPs results in inhibition of the expression of COX-2, iNOS, PCNA, cyclin D1 and MMP-9 in A431 cells compared with non-GSPs-treated controls. Treatment of athymic nude mice with GSPs by oral gavage (50 or 100 mg/kg body weight/mouse) reduces the growth of A431-xenografts in mice, which is associated with the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation in xenografts as indicated by the inhibition of mRNA expression of PCNA and cyclin D1, and of NF-kappaB activity. Together, the data suggest that GSPs might be effective in the treatment of skin cancers.

  17. Inhibition of non-homologous end joining repair impairs pancreatic cancer growth and enhances radiation response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Li

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is amongst the deadliest of human cancers, due to its late diagnosis as well as its intense resistance to currently available therapeutics. To identify mechanisms as to why PDAC are refractory to DNA damaging cytoxic chemotherapy and radiation, we performed a global interrogation of the DNA damage response of PDAC. We find that PDAC cells generally harbor high levels of spontaneous DNA damage. Inhibition of Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ repair either pharmacologically or by RNAi resulted in a further accumulation of DNA damage, inhibition of growth, and ultimately apoptosis even in the absence of exogenous DNA damaging agents. In response to radiation, PDAC cells rely on the NHEJ pathway to rapidly repair DNA double strand breaks. Mechanistically, when NHEJ is inhibited there is a compensatory increase in Homologous Recombination (HR. Despite this upregulation of HR, DNA damage persists and cells are significantly more sensitive to radiation. Together, these findings support the incorporation of NHEJ inhibition into PDAC therapeutic approaches, either alone, or in combination with DNA damaging therapies such as radiation.

  18. Gyramides prevent bacterial growth by inhibiting DNA gyrase and altering chromosome topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendram, Manohary; Hurley, Katherine A; Foss, Marie H; Thornton, Kelsey M; Moore, Jared T; Shaw, Jared T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-06-20

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division.

  19. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells.

  20. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Firestone, Mary K; Brodie, Eoin L; Beissinger, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  1. Aluminium localization and toxicity symptoms related to root growth inhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M N Alvim; F T Ramos; D C Oliveira; R M S Isaias; M G C França

    2012-12-01

    We correlated root growth inhibition with aluminium (Al3+) localization and toxicity symptoms in rice roots using seedlings of two genotypes (tolerant and sensitive) that were exposed to different AlCl3 concentrations. Al3+ localization was evaluated by hematoxylin in primary roots and by morin in cross-sections of the root tips. Neutral invertase enzyme activity and callose (1$\\to$3, -D-glucan) accumulation were observed and compared with Al3+ accumulation sites. Root growth was inhibited by Al3+ in a concentration-specific manner and proportional to the increase of hematoxylin staining, being more pronounced in the sensitive genotype. Morin staining showed the presence of Al3+ deep within the roots of the sensitive genotype, indicating that the metal was able to penetrate beyond the first few cell layers. In the tolerant genotype, Al3+ penetration was restricted to the first two cell layers. Ruptures in exodermis and epidermis layers by lateral root protrusions in both genotypes allowed Al3+ to enter into the roots. More intense activity of invertase in roots of the tolerant genotype was also observed, which could be related to greater root growth of this cultivar when submitted to Al3+ stress. Moreover, Al3+-induced callose accumulation was a late response occurring in the same areas where Al3+ was present.

  2. Interleukin-2 inhibits proliferation of HPV-associated tumor cells and halts tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Patricia H; Hernandez, Hector; Arana, Manuel J

    2002-12-20

    Previous studies have shown inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth by treatment with high concentrations of IL-2. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of recombinant human IL-2 on HPV-associated tumor cells (3T3-16). Treatment of 3T3-16 cells with rhIL-2 for 72 h inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was evidenced at nanomolar concentrations. These tumor cells expressed mRNA for beta and gamma subunits of the IL-2 receptor, which are required for signal transduction. In experiments to explore the effect of IL-2 on the growth of the HPV-associated tumor, mice received rhIL-2 through different routes: (i) intraperitoneal; (ii) subcutaneous, at the tumor inoculation site; or (iii) subcutaneous, distant from the tumor inoculation site. An effective antitumor response was observed only in those animals that received IL-2 at the tumor site (P<0.01). These results indicate the potential adequacy of therapeutic strategies based on local administration of rhIL-2 for cervical carcinoma, not only based on the ability of this cytokine to stimulate cellular-mediated immunity but also because of its direct effects on tumor cells.

  3. Hybrid liposomes inhibit tumor growth and lung metastasis of murine osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hideki; Komizu, Yuji; Ichihara, Hideaki; Goto, Koichi; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-06-01

    Antitumor effects of hybrid liposomes (HL) composed of l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene(23) dodecyl ether (C₁₂(EO)₂₃) on the metastatic growth of murine osteosarcoma (LM8) cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Remarkable inhibitory effects of HL-23 on the growth of LM8 cells were obtained through the induction of apoptotic cell death in vitro. It was also indicated that HL-23 should dramatically suppress the invasion of LM8 cells and the formation of filopodia on the cell surface in vitro. Furthermore, significantly high therapeutic effects were observed in the homograft mouse models of LM8 cells with lung metastasis after the treatment with HL-23 in vivo. That is, the histological analysis demonstrated that the primary tumor growth of LM8 cells implanted subcutaneously into the mice was inhibited along with the induction of apoptosis. In addition, it was found that HL-23 significantly decreased the lung metastasis of LM8 cells in the mouse models through the inhibition of primary tumor invasion. These results suggest that HL-23 could be a novel agent for the chemotherapy of osteosarcoma.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen promotes malignant glioma cell growth and inhibits cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Gang; Zhan, Yi-Ping; Pan, Shu-Yi; Wang, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Dun-Xiao; Gao, Kai; Qi, Xue-Ling; Yu, Chun-Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequently diagnosed intracranial malignant tumor in adults. Clinical studies have indicated that hyperbaric oxygen may improve the prognosis and reduce complications in glioma patients; however, the specific mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. The present study investigated the direct effects of hyperbaric oxygen stimulation on glioma by constructing an intracranial transplanted glioma model in congenic C57BL/6J mice. Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) was used to assess the growth of intracranial transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo, while flow cytometric and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect and compare the expression of the biomarkers, Ki-67, CD34 and TUNEL, reflecting the cell cycle, apoptosis and angiogenesis. BLI demonstrated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted the growth of intracranially transplanted GL261-Luc glioma cells in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that hyperbaric oxygen promoted GL261-Luc glioma cell proliferation and also prevented cell cycle arrest. In addition, hyperbaric oxygen inhibited the apoptosis of the transplanted glioma cells. Immunohistochemical analysis also indicated that hyperbaric oxygen increased positive staining for Ki-67 and CD34, while reducing staining for TUNEL (a marker of apoptosis). The microvessel density was significantly increased in the hyperbaric oxygen treatment group compared with the control group. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen treatment promoted the growth of transplanted malignant glioma cells in vivo and also inhibited the apoptosis of these cells.

  5. Isthmin is a novel secreted angiogenesis inhibitor that inhibits tumour growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wei; Ke, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Grace Ho-Yuet; Irwan, Ishak Darryl; Sulochana, K N; Potturi, Padma; Wang, Zhengyuan; Yang, He; Wang, Jingyu; Zhuo, Lang; Kini, R Manjunatha; Ge, Ruowen

    2011-02-01

    Anti-angiogenesis represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various malignancies. Isthmin (ISM) is a gene highly expressed in the isthmus of the midbrain-hindbrain organizer in Xenopus with no known functions. It encodes a secreted 60 kD protein containing a thrombospondin type 1 repeat domain in the central region and an adhesion-associated domain in MUC4 and other proteins (AMOP) domain at the C-terminal. In this work, we demonstrate that ISM is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. Recombinant mouse ISM inhibited endothelial cell (EC) capillary network formation on Matrigel through its C-terminal AMOP domain. It also suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induced in vivo angiogenesis in mouse. It mitigated VEGF-stimulated EC proliferation without affecting EC migration. Furthermore, ISM induced EC apoptosis in the presence of VEGF through a caspase-dependent pathway. ISM binds to αvβ(5) integrin on EC surface and supports EC adhesion. Overexpression of ISM significantly suppressed mouse B16 melanoma tumour growth through inhibition of tumour angiogenesis without affecting tumour cell proliferation. Knockdown of isthmin in zebrafish embryos using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides led to disorganized intersegmental vessels in the trunk. Our results demonstrate that ISM is a novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor with functions likely in physiological as well as pathological angiogenesis.

  6. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Shawkey

    Full Text Available Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  7. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  8. Iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit tumour growth by inducing pro-inflammatory macrophage polarization in tumour tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Hutter, Gregor; Spitler, Ryan; Lenkov, Olga; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shaw, Aubie; Pajarinen, Jukka Sakari; Nejadnik, Hossein; Goodman, Stuart; Moseley, Michael; Coussens, Lisa Marie; Daldrup-Link, Heike Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Until now, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved iron supplement ferumoxytol and other iron oxide nanoparticles have been used for treating iron deficiency, as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and as drug carriers. Here, we show an intrinsic therapeutic effect of ferumoxytol on the growth of early mammary cancers, and lung cancer metastases in liver and lungs. In vitro, adenocarcinoma cells co-incubated with ferumoxytol and macrophages showed increased caspase-3 activity. Macrophages exposed to ferumoxytol displayed increased mRNA associated with pro-inflammatory Th1-type responses. In vivo, ferumoxytol significantly inhibited growth of subcutaneous adenocarcinomas in mice. In addition, intravenous ferumoxytol treatment before intravenous tumour cell challenge prevented development of liver metastasis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and histopathology studies showed that the observed tumour growth inhibition was accompanied by increased presence of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in the tumour tissues. Our results suggest that ferumoxytol could be applied 'off label' to protect the liver from metastatic seeds and potentiate macrophage-modulating cancer immunotherapies.

  9. Berberine inhibits the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuchen; Xia, Qing; Luo, Rongzhen; Huang, Peiyu; Sun, Yueli; Shi, Yanxia; Jiang, Wenqi

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Huanglian, and has long been used as an antibiotic. Its antineoplastic properties were subsequently discovered in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of berberine on the growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that berberine inhibited human colorectal adenocarcinoma (LoVo) cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A WST-1 assay showed that the IC50 value after 72 h was 40.79 ± 4.11 μM. Cell cycle analysis of 40 μM berberine-treated LoVo cells by flow cytometry showed accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. The inhibition of LoVo cell growth by berberine was associated with the suppression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c proteins. Berberine at a dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1) showed inhibitory rates of 45.3% in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenograft in nude mice. The combination of berberine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) had a higher inhibitory rate (59.8%) than the berberine group (36.4%, P = 0.01), but no significant difference was observed between the 5-FU group (43.0%, P = 0.06) and the combination group. These results support the possibility that berberine may be useful as an alternative therapy for colorectal carcinoma.

  10. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (Psalinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (PSalinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (Psalinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  11. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  12. Sinefungin, a Natural Nucleoside Analogue of S-Adenosylmethionine, Inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal colonization and disease is often associated with biofilm formation, in which the bacteria exhibit elevated resistance both to antibiotics and to host defense systems, often resulting in infections that are persistent and difficult to treat. We evaluated the effect of sinefungin, a nucleoside analogue of S-adenosylmethionine, on pneumococcal in vitro biofilm formation and in vivo colonization. Sinefungin is bacteriostatic to pneumococci and significantly decreased biofilm growth and inhibited proliferation and structure of actively growing biofilms but did not alter growth or the matrix structure of established biofilms. Sinefungin significantly reduced pneumococcal colonization in rat middle ear. The quorum sensing molecule (autoinducer-2 production was significantly reduced by 92% in sinefungin treated samples. The luxS, pfs, and speE genes were downregulated in biofilms grown in the presence of sinefungin. This study shows that sinefungin inhibits pneumococcal biofilm growth in vitro and colonization in vivo, decreases AI-2 production, and downregulates luxS, pfs, and speE gene expressions. Therefore, the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM inhibitors could be used as lead compounds for the development of novel antibiofilm agents against pneumococci.

  13. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  14. In-vitro growth characteristics of commercial probiotic strains and their potential for inhibition of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, A.; Kokotovic, Branko; Permin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics have gained importance in human and veterinary medicine to prevent enteric disease. Little information is available on commercial probiotic strains regarding their growth characteristics and inhibition of equine enteric pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens...

  15. Flipping the transcriptional switch from myelin inhibition to axon growth in the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Carmel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Poor regeneration of severed axons in the central nervous system (CNS limits functional recovery. Regeneration failure involves an interplay of inhibitory environmental elements and the growth state of the neuron. To find internal changes in gene expression that might overcome inhibitory environmental cues, we compared several paradigms that allow growth in the inhibitory environment. Conditions that allow axon growth by axotomized and cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons on CNS myelin include immaturity (the first few postnatal days, high levels of cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (cAMP, and conditioning with a peripheral nerve lesion before explant. This shift from inhibition to growth depends on transcription. Seeking to understand the transcriptome changes that allow axon growth in the CNS, we collaborated with the Marie Filbin laboratory to identify several mRNAs that are functionally relevant, as determined by gain- and loss-of-function studies. In this Perspective, we review evidence from these experiments and discuss the merits of comparing multiple regenerative paradigms to identify a core transcriptional program for CNS axon regeneration.

  16. Inhibition of ice growth and recrystallization by zirconium acetate and zirconium acetate hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahy, Ortal; Bar-Dolev, Maya; Guy, Shlomit; Braslavsky, Ido

    2013-01-01

    The control over ice crystal growth, melting, and shaping is important in a variety of fields, including cell and food preservation and ice templating for the production of composite materials. Control over ice growth remains a challenge in industry, and the demand for new cryoprotectants is high. Naturally occurring cryoprotectants, such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs), present one solution for modulating ice crystal growth; however, the production of AFPs is expensive and inefficient. These obstacles can be overcome by identifying synthetic substitutes with similar AFP properties. Zirconium acetate (ZRA) was recently found to induce the formation of hexagonal cavities in materials prepared by ice templating. Here, we continue this line of study and examine the effects of ZRA and a related compound, zirconium acetate hydroxide (ZRAH), on ice growth, shaping, and recrystallization. We found that the growth rate of ice crystals was significantly reduced in the presence of ZRA and ZRAH, and that solutions containing these compounds display a small degree of thermal hysteresis, depending on the solution pH. The compounds were found to inhibit recrystallization in a manner similar to that observed in the presence of AFPs. The favorable properties of ZRA and ZRAH suggest tremendous potential utility in industrial applications.

  17. Knockdown of Stat3 expression using RNAi inhibits growth of laryngeal tumors in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-fang GAO; Lian-ji WEN; Hao YU; Ling ZHANG; Yan MENG; Yue-ting SHAO; De-qi XU; Xue-jian ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To study the effect of pSilencer1.0-U6-siRNA-stat3 on the growth of human laryngeal tumors in nude mice.Methods:Hep2 cells were transplanted into nude mice,then at the time of tumor fornaation,growth rates were observed.After the tumor formed,pSilencer1.0-U6-siRNA-stat3 was injected.Tumor volumes were calculated,and growth curves were plotted.Representative histological sections were taken from mice beating transplantation tumors in both treated and control groups,and stat3,Ptyr-star3,Bcl-2,cyclin D1,and survivin expression were detected by Western blotting.survivin Mrna levels were detected by Northern blotting,hematoxylin and cosin staining and terminal deoxvribonucleotidvl transferase-mediated Dutp-digoxigenin nick end-1abeling (TUNEL)assay to confirm the apoptosis of tumors.Results:In nude mice,pSilencer1.0-U6-siRNA-stat3 significantly suppressed the growth of tumors compared with controls (P<0.001). It suppressed stat3 expression,and downregulated BcL2,cyclin D1,and survivin expression within the tumor.This significantly induced apoptosis of the tumors.Conclusion:pSilencer1.0-U6-siRNA-stat3 was able to inhibit the growth of transplanted human laryngeal tumors in nude mice and induce apoptosis.

  18. Inhibition of ice growth and recrystallization by zirconium acetate and zirconium acetate hydroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortal Mizrahy

    Full Text Available The control over ice crystal growth, melting, and shaping is important in a variety of fields, including cell and food preservation and ice templating for the production of composite materials. Control over ice growth remains a challenge in industry, and the demand for new cryoprotectants is high. Naturally occurring cryoprotectants, such as antifreeze proteins (AFPs, present one solution for modulating ice crystal growth; however, the production of AFPs is expensive and inefficient. These obstacles can be overcome by identifying synthetic substitutes with similar AFP properties. Zirconium acetate (ZRA was recently found to induce the formation of hexagonal cavities in materials prepared by ice templating. Here, we continue this line of study and examine the effects of ZRA and a related compound, zirconium acetate hydroxide (ZRAH, on ice growth, shaping, and recrystallization. We found that the growth rate of ice crystals was significantly reduced in the presence of ZRA and ZRAH, and that solutions containing these compounds display a small degree of thermal hysteresis, depending on the solution pH. The compounds were found to inhibit recrystallization in a manner similar to that observed in the presence of AFPs. The favorable properties of ZRA and ZRAH suggest tremendous potential utility in industrial applications.

  19. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  20. BTA Film Growth on Copper and Its Corrosion Inhibition Investigated by UHV-STM and LEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kye Hyun [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering College of Engineering, Yeungnam University, Kyungbook (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-25

    The adsorption and film growth of the organic inhibitor(Benzotriazole: BTA) on the copper single crystal were investigated by the UHV-STM(Scanning Tunnelling Microscope) and LEED. The BTA adsorbed structure on the clean Cu(110)-1*1 surface exhibited well-ordered c(4*2) structure by STM image and LEED pattern. Further deposition of BTA on monolayer film, BTA film growth on the clean surface exhibited 2-dimensional growth mode with commensurate growth film. On the other hand, the BTA adsorbed structure on oxygen induced Cu(110)-2*1 surface was a fully-disordered cluster-like structure. For the multilayer film on the oxygen induced Cu(110)-2*1 surface, the BTA film was grown by 3-dimensional growth mode. BTA preferential adsorption was seen the oxygen induced Cu(110)-2*1 surface. The inhibition mechanism of the BTA on copper single crystal on both the clean Cu(110)-1*1 surface and the oxygen induced Cu(110)-2*1 surface was exerted by the complete blocking of the polymerized multi-layer film. (author). 24 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Dabigatran Potentiates Gemcitabine-Induced Growth Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kun; Damhofer, Helene; Daalhuisen, Joost; ten Brink, Marieke; Richel, Dick J; Spek, C Arnold

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid malignancies, with few treatment options. We have recently shown that expression of protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 in the tumor microenvironment drives the progression and induces the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer. As thrombin is the prototypical PAR-1 agonist, here we address the effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on pancreatic cancer growth and drug resistance in an orthotropic pancreatic cancer model. We show that dabigatran treatment did not affect primary tumor growth, whereas it significantly increased tumor dissemination throughout the peritoneal cavity. Increased dissemination was accompanied by intratumoral bleeding and increased numbers of aberrant and/or collapsed blood vessels in the primary tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, dabigatran treatment limited primary tumor growth, did not induce bleeding complications and prevented tumor cell dissemination. Dabigatran was, however, not as efficient as genetic ablation of PAR-1 in our previous study, suggesting that thrombin is not the main PAR-1 agonist in the setting of pancreatic cancer. Overall, we show that dabigatran potentiates gemcitabine-induced growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer but does not affect primary tumor growth when used as monotherapy. PMID:28182192

  2. Inhibition by the essential oils of peppermint and spearmint of the growth of pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, H; Osawa, K; Yasuda, H; Hamashima, H; Arai, T; Sasatsu, M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the, essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), spearmint Mentha spicata L.) and Japanese mint (Mentha, arvensis L.), of four major constituents of the esssential oil of peppermint, and of three major constituents of the essential oil of spearmint, on the proliferation of Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococccus aureus (MSSA) were examined. The essential oils and the various constituents inhibited the proliferation of each strain in liquid culture in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, they exhibited bactericidal activity in phosphate-buffered saline. The antibacterial activities varied among the bacterial species tested but were almost the same against antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-sensitive strains of Helicobacter pylori and S. aureus. Thus, the essential oils and their constituents may be useful as potential antibacterial agents for inhibition of the growth of pathogens.

  3. Neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells inhibit the growth of low-differentiated glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Savchenko, E A; Bykovskaya, S N; Yusubalieva, G M; Viktorov, I V; Bryukhovetskii, A S; Bryukhovetskii, I S; Chekhonin, V P

    2012-02-01

    The effects of neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells on C6 glioma cells were studied in in vivo and in vitro experiments. Considerable inhibition of proliferation during co-culturing of glioma cells with neural progenitor cells was revealed by quantitative MTT test and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation test. Labeled neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells implanted into the focus of experimental cerebral glioma C6 survive in the brain of experimental animals for at least 7 days, migrate with glioma cells, and accumulate in the peritumoral space. Under these conditions, neural progenitor cells differentiate with the formation of long processes. Morphometric analysis of glioma cells showed that implantation of neural progenitor and hemopoietic stem cells is accompanied by considerable inhibition of the growth of experimental glioma C6 in comparison with the control. The mechanisms of tumor-suppressive effects of neural and hemopoietic stem cells require further investigation.

  4. Inhibition of microbial growth by spice extracts and their effect of irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Meixu, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1994-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of black pepper, rosemary and red pepper has been tested against 12 microorganisms. Alcoholic extracts of these spices were not exhibited strong activity against gram-negative bacteria in laboratory media. The growth of Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium botulinum type A was inhibited by 1% of black pepper, 0.5% rosemary and 0.03% red pepper. A little reduction of antimicrobial activity to B. subtilis was observed on extracts of gamma-irradiated black pepper or rosemary at 10 and 50 kGy. In the case of red pepper, irradiation of 10 or 50 kGy enhanced a little of antimicrobial activity to B. subtilis. Similar effect of irradiation was also observed on the inhibition of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus in SL broth. (author).

  5. [Effects of green tea on growth inhibition and immune regulation of Lewis lung cancer in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M; Gong, Y; Ge, G

    1997-11-01

    C57/BL6J mice were inoculated with Lewis lung cancer cells as an experimental model to study the effects of green tea on cancer prevention, inhibition of tumor growth and immune regulation in mice with tumor. Results showed that weight of thymus in C57/BL6J mice and its index declined, proportion of positive CD4 subgroup of T lymphocyte and ratio of CD4+, to CD8+ reduced, baseline chemilumi-nescence decreased in peripheral white blood cells, yeast zymosan stimulated chemiluminescence increased, and number of immunoglobulin M formation cells decreased. It indicated that green tea had obvious inhibition in Lewis lung cancer and protective effects, to various extent, on adverse changes of above indices.

  6. Two novel herbicide candidates affect Arabidopsis thaliana growth by inhibiting nitrogen and phosphate absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chongchong; Jin, Yujian; He, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; He, Hongwu; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-09-01

    Both 2-[(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetoxy](methy)lmethyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIa) and 2-[(4-chloro-2-methyl-phenoxy)-acetoxy](methyl)methyl-5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphinan-2-one (termed as IIr) are novel herbicide candidates that positively affect herbicidal activity via the introduction of a phosphorus-containing heterocyclic ring. This report investigated the mechanism of IIa and IIr on weed control in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana at physiological, ultrastructural and molecular levels. IIa and IIr significantly inhibited the growth of A. thaliana and altered its root structure by inhibiting energy metabolism and lipid or protein biosynthesis. These compounds also significantly affected the absorption of nitrogen and phosphorus by down-regulating the transcripts of nitrate transporter-related genes, ammonium transporter-related genes and phosphorus transporter-related genes.

  7. 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth through regulating VEGF-Src-FAK signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengfu, He; Hu, Zhang; Huiwen, Miao; Zhijun, Li [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Jiaojie, Zhou [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiaoyi, Yan, E-mail: xiaoyiyan163@163.com [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Xiujun, Cai, E-mail: xiujuncaomaj@163.com [Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-08-21

    The search for safe, effective and affordable therapeutics against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other lung cancers is important. Here we explored the potential effect of 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a novel extract from Inula britannica-F, on angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth. We demonstrated that ABL dose-dependently inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary structure formation of cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). In vivo, ABL administration suppressed VEGF-induced new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs. For the mechanism investigations, we found that ABL largely inhibited VEGF-mediated activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of A549 NSCLC cells with ABL resulted in cell growth inhibition and Src-FAK in-activation. Significantly, administration of a single dose of ABL (12 mg/kg/day) remarkably suppressed growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vivo microvessels formation and Src activation were also significantly inhibited in ABL-treated xenograft tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that ABL suppresses angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth possibly via regulating the VEGFR-Src-FAK signaling. - Highlights: • 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. • ABL inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC migration, proliferation, capillary tube formation. • ABL inhibits VEGF-mediated activation of Src and FAK in HUVECs. • ABL inhibits growth and Src-FAK activation in A549 cells. • ABL administration inhibits A549 tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice.

  8. Grape seed extract inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wei; Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Keqiang; Chen, Shiuan

    2008-12-01

    Blockade of angiogenesis is an important approach for cancer treatment and prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most critical factors that induce angiogenesis and has thus become an attractive target for antiangiogenesis treatment. However, most current anti-VEGF agents often cause some side effects when given chronically. Identification of naturally occurring VEGF inhibitors derived from diet would be one alternative approach with an advantage of known safety. Grape seed extract (GSE), a widely used dietary supplement, is known to have antitumor activity. In this study, we have explored the activity of GSE on VEGF receptor and angiogenesis. We found that GSE could directly inhibit the kinase activity of purified VEGF receptor 2, a novel activity of GSE that has not been characterized. GSE could also inhibit the VEGF receptor/mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signaling pathway in endothelial cells. As a result, GSE could inhibit VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration as well as sprout formation from aorta ring. In vivo assay further showed that GSE could inhibit tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in mice. Consistent with the in vitro data, GSE treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to concomitant reduction of blood vessel density and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Depletion of polyphenol with polyvinylpyrrolidone abolished the antiangiogenic activity of GSE, suggesting a water-soluble fraction of polyphenol in GSE is responsible for the antiangiogenic activity. Taken together, this study indicates that GSE is a well-tolerated and inexpensive natural VEGF inhibitor and could potentially be useful in cancer prevention or treatment.

  9. Expression of Smad7 inhibits fibrogenic responses of keratocytes to transforming growth factor β2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ti; ZHOU Xing-tao; YU Yan; DAI Jin-hui; QU Xiao-mei; LE Qi-hua; CHU Ren-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is one of the most important growth factors in the development of fibrosis and scarring on cornea. Smad7, an inhibitory Smad, can inhibit TGFβ signal transaction. In recent years, effects of lentiviral-mediated Smad7 on inhibition of fibrosis on some organs have been studied, while little is known about the effects on cornea. This study aimed to determine the effects of lentiviral-mediated Smad7 gene expression on keratocyte proliferation and fibrosis induced by TGF β2 in vitro.Methods Keratocytes were cultured from comeal tissue isolated from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and transfected with Smad7 expressing lentiviral vector (Lv-Smad7) or non-functioning control vector (Lv-blank). Following the exposure to TGFβ2, keratocytes were processed for immunoblotting to assess the phosphorylation of Smad2 as down-stream event of TGFβ/Smad signaling. Expression of fibrotic markers α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), type Ⅲ collagen (collagen Ⅲ) were measured by Western blotting and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall cell proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dipheny1tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the expression of cell cycle-related marker Ki67 at both mRNA and protein levels.Results The Smad7 gene transfer suppressed TGFβ/Smad signaling in keratocytes by down-regulating phosphorylation of Smad2. Markers of cell proliferation and fibrosis including Ki67, α-SMA, collagen Ⅲ were inhibited by introduction of Smad 7 into TGFβ exposed keratocytes. Consequently, the rate of cell proliferation was attenuated.Conclusion Smad7 gene transfer inhibited fibrogenic responses of keratocytes to TGFβ2.

  10. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ji [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Feng [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Lin, Yanting [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei [Department of Interventional Therapy, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Jiang, Jiaji, E-mail: jiang_jjcn@yahoo.com.cn [Liver Diseases Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  11. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by muscadine grape skin extract and resveratrol through distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Tamaro S; Hartle, Diane K; Hursting, Stephen D; Nunez, Nomeli P; Wang, Thomas T Y; Young, Heather A; Arany, Praveen; Green, Jeffrey E

    2007-09-01

    The phytochemical resveratrol contained in red grapes has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth, in part, through its antioxidant activity. Muscadine grapes contain unique phytochemical constituents compared with other grapes and are potentially a source for novel compounds with antitumor activities. We compared the antitumor activities of muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE), which we show contains no resveratrol, with that of resveratrol using primary cultures of normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and the prostate cancer cell lines RWPE-1, WPE1-NA22, WPE1-NB14, and WPE1-NB26, representing different stages of prostate cancer progression. MSKE significantly inhibited tumor cell growth in all transformed prostate cancer cell lines but not PrEC cells. Prostate tumor cell lines, but not PrEC cells, exhibited high rates of apoptosis in response to MSKE through targeting of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase survival pathways. The reduction in Akt activity by MSKE is mediated through a reduction in Akt transcription, enhanced proteosome degradation of Akt, and altered levels of DJ-1, a known regulator of PTEN. In contrast to MSKE, resveratrol did not induce apoptosis in this model but arrested cells at the G(1)-S phase transition of the cell cycle associated with increased expression of p21 and decreased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 proteins. These results show that MSKE and resveratrol target distinct pathways to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in this system and that the unique properties of MSKE suggest that it may be an important source for further development of chemopreventive or therapeutic agents against prostate cancer.

  12. Inhibition of casein kinase 2 prevents growth of human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kengo; Setoguchi, Takao; Tsuru, Arisa; Saitoh, Yoshinobu; Nagano, Satoshi; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Shingo; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komiya, Setsuro

    2017-02-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and surgical treatment have improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma. However, more than 20% of patients with osteosarcoma still have a poor prognosis. We investigated the expression and function of casein kinase 2 (CK2) in osteosarcoma growth. We then examined the effects of CX-4945, a CK2 inhibitor, on osteosarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo to apply our findings to the clinical setting. We examined the expression of CK2α and CK2β by western blot analysis, and performed WST-1 assays using CK2α and CK2β siRNA or CX-4945. Flow cytometry and western blot analyses were performed to evaluate apoptotic cell death. Xenograft models were used to examine the effect of CX-4945 in vivo. Western blot analysis revealed upregulation of CK2α and CK2β in human osteosarcoma cell lines compared with human osteoblast cells or mesenchymal stem cells. WST assay showed that knockdown of CK2α or CK2β by siRNA inhibited the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells. Treatment with 3 µM of CX-4945 inhibited osteosarcoma cell proliferation; however, the same concentration of CX-4945 did not affect the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Additionally, treatment with CX-4945 inhibited the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot and flow cytometry analyses showed that treatment with CX-4945 promoted apoptotic death of osteosarcoma cells. The xenograft model showed that treatment with CX-4945 significantly prevented osteosarcoma growth in vivo compared with control vehicle treatment. Our findings indicate that CK2 may be an attractive therapeutic target for treating osteosarcoma.

  13. 40 CFR 798.5500 - Differential growth inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: âBacterial DNA damage or repair tests.â 798.5500 Section... inhibition of repair proficient and repair deficient bacteria: “Bacterial DNA damage or repair tests.” (a... killing or growth inhibition of repair deficient bacteria in a set of repair proficient and deficient...

  14. Optimizing cyanobacteria growth conditions in a sealed environment to enable chemical inhibition tests with volatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tylor J; Zahler, Jacob D; Baldwin, Emily L; Zhou, Ruanbao; Gibbons, William R

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are currently being engineered to photosynthetically produce next-generation biofuels and high-value chemicals. Many of these chemicals are highly toxic to cyanobacteria, thus strains with increased tolerance need to be developed. The volatility of these chemicals may necessitate that experiments be conducted in a sealed environment to maintain chemical concentrations. Therefore, carbon sources such as NaHCO3 must be used for supporting cyanobacterial growth instead of CO2 sparging. The primary goal of this study was to determine the optimal initial concentration of NaHCO3 for use in growth trials, as well as if daily supplementation of NaHCO3 would allow for increased growth. The secondary goal was to determine the most accurate method to assess growth of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in a sealed environment with low biomass titers and small sample volumes. An initial concentration of 0.5g/L NaHCO3 was found to be optimal for cyanobacteria growth, and fed-batch additions of NaHCO3 marginally improved growth. A separate study determined that a sealed test tube environment is necessary to maintain stable titers of volatile chemicals in solution. This study also showed that a SYTO® 9 fluorescence-based assay for cell viability was superior for monitoring filamentous cyanobacterial growth compared to absorbance, chlorophyll α (chl a) content, and biomass content due to its accuracy, small sampling size (100μL), and high throughput capabilities. Therefore, in future chemical inhibition trials, it is recommended that 0.5g/L NaHCO3 is used as the carbon source, and that culture viability is monitored via the SYTO® 9 fluorescence-based assay that requires minimum sample size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cloning of WWOX Gene and Its Growth-inhibiting Effects on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊宙芳; 胡沙; 王泽华

    2010-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase(WWOX) gene on ovarian cancer cell line A2780 were investigated.The full length cDNA of human WWOX gene was amplified from normal human ovary tissues.The correct cDNA of full length WWOX was subcloned into eukaryocytic expression vector pCMV.After introduction of WWOX gene into cancer cells with liposome,the WWOX mRNA and protein level in the cancer cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reactio...

  16. Cetuximab insufficiently inhibits glioma cell growth due to persistent EGFR downstream signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is present in 35-45% of primary glioblastoma multiforme tumors and has been correlated with a poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of cetuximab and intracellular signaling pathways downstream...... of EGFR, important for cell survival and proliferation. We show insufficient EGFR downregulation and competition with endogenous EGFR ligands upon cetuximab treatment. Dose-response experiments showed inhibition of EGFR phosphorylation without affecting two of the prominent downstream signaling pathways...

  17. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yang-Fan Lv; Guang-Ning Yan; Gang Meng; Xi Zhang; Qiao-Nan Guo

    2015-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) methyltransferase is the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which acts as a transcription repressor via the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). EZH2 has been recognised as an oncogene in several types of tumors; however, its role in osteosarcoma has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we show that EZH2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma by facilitating re-expression of the imprintin...

  18. [Inhibition of aflatoxin production and fungal growth on stored corn by allyl isothiocyanate vapor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kiyoshi; Ose, Ayaka; Takai, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Misao; Nishioka, Chikako; Ohzu, Yuji; Odano, Masayoshi; Sekiyama, Yasushi; Mizukami, Yuichi; Nakamura, Nobuya; Ichinoe, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) vapor treatment with a commercial mustard seed extract (Wasaouro(®)) in controlling aflatoxin-producing fungi on stored corn. The concentration of AIT in the closed container peaked at 54.6 ng/mL on the 14th day and remained at 21.8 ng/mL on the 42nd day. AIT inhibited visible growth of aflatoxigenic molds in unsterilized corn and in sterilized corn inoculated with various aflatoxigenic fungi. However, fungi such as Aspergillus glaucus group, A. penicillioides and A. restrictus were detected by means of culture methods.

  19. Isolation of bacteria producing chitinase and inhibiting growth of Rhizoctonia solani

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Five bacteria strains with higher chitinase activity were isolated by using a technique of enriched cell wall of R. solani. All of them showed inhibiting effect on the growth of R. solani. Being cultured 3 d, strain CH-1 showed higher chitinase activity on the chitin plate. The diameter of the transparent circle reached 8.7 mm (4 replications) . In the antagonistic test to R. solani in PDA plate, the circle was 18.1 mm. It was also observed that the antagonistic ability of some strains was not consistent with the chitinase activity (Table 1). It may be connected with the secretion of chitinase at different culture situations.

  20. An Engineered Arginase FC Protein Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arginine is a semiessential amino acid required for the growth of melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and the enzymatic removal of arginine by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI or arginase is being tested clinically. Here, we report a genetically engineered arginase FC fusion protein exhibiting a prolonged half-life and enhanced efficacy. The use of this enzyme to treat different tumor lines both inhibited cell proliferation and impaired cellular migration in vitro and in vivo. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that nutritional depletion is a key strategy for cancer treatment.

  1. Tudor domain proteins in protozoan parasites and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum tudor staphylococcal nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Shivani; Mohmmed, Asif; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, V S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, a multitude of RNA-binding proteins with several RNA-binding domains/motifs have been described. Here, we show the existence of two Tudor domain containing proteins, a survival of motor neuron (SMN)-like protein and a Staphylococcus aureus nuclease homologue referred to as TSN, in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites. Activity analysis shows that Plasmodium falciparum TSN (PfTSN) possesses nuclease activity and Tudor domain is the RNA-binding domain. A specific inhibitor of micrococcal nucleases, 3',5'-deoxythymidine bisphosphate (pdTp) inhibits the nuclease as well as RNA-binding activities of the protein. PfTSN shows a predominant nuclear localization. Treatment of P. falciparum with pdTp, inhibited in vitro growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, while a four fold concentration of pdTp did not have any significant effect on the mammalian cell line, Huh-7D12. Altogether, these results suggest that PfTSN is an essential enzyme in the parasite's life cycle.

  2. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  3. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  4. Allelopathy in two species of Chenopodium -inhibition of germination and seedling growth of certain weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of washed leaf and inflorescence material of Chenopodium ambrosioides and C. murale, decaying leaves and inflorescences, and field soils collected beneath Chenopodium plants were examined in terms of the inhibition of seed germination and seedling growth of five weeds, viz. Abutilon indicum, Cassia sophera var. purpurea, C. tora, Evolvulus numularius and Tephrosia hamiltonii. The allelopathic pattern varied in each of the two test species and this depended on the type of test matter. However, the germination as well as the root and hypocotyl growth of A. indicum and E. nummularius were more hampered by phytotoxins or inhibitors from Chenopodium than were the other weeds. Since the leaf and inflorescence of Chenopodium formed the source of inhibitors, the respective plant-parts from the two species were chemically analysed and the presence of three terpenes (p-cymene, ascaridole and aritazone from C. ambrosioides and an organic acid (oxalic acid from C. murale were implicated in the allelopathic effect.

  5. Inhibition of beta cell growth and function by bone morphogenetic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Jacobsen, Marie L B

    2014-01-01

    of diabetes, there is an increase in the expression of inhibitory factors that prevent the beta cells from adapting to the increased need for insulin. We evaluated the effects of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 and -4 on beta cells. METHODS: The effects of BMP2 and -4 on beta cell proliferation, apoptosis......: BMP2 and -4 were found to inhibit basal as well as growth factor-stimulated proliferation of primary beta cells from rats and mice. Bmp2 and Bmp4 mRNA and protein were expressed in islets and regulated by inflammatory cytokines. Neutralisation of endogenous BMP activity resulted in enhanced....../INTERPRETATION: These data show that BMP2 and -4 exert inhibitory actions on beta cells in vitro and suggest that BMPs exert regulatory roles of beta cell growth and function....

  6. New class of additives to inhibit tree growth in solid extruded cable insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devins, J C; Rzad, S J; Reed, C W; Bartosh, D K; Stines, T W

    1976-03-01

    There is now substantial evidence that in many dielectric failures of solid polyolefinic and other polymeric materials the final disruption may be preceded by the long-time progressive development of a three-dimensional pattern of irregular, sometimes (though not always) carbonized hollow channels diverging from a central stem, and that the ultimate failure follows one of these channels. These minute channels are referred to as ''trees'' and the phenomenon as ''treeing.'' Research conducted from May to Sept. 1975 on techniques for evaluating tree growth and on the development of additives to inhibit tree growth in solid extruded polymeric insulation for electric cables is reported. (LCL)

  7. Can growth inhibition assays (GIA) predict blood-stage malaria vaccine efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Hill, Adrian V S; Ellis, Ruth D

    2012-06-01

    An effective vaccine against P. falciparum malaria remains a global health priority. Blood-stage vaccines are an important component of this effort, with some indications of recent progress. However only a fraction of potential blood-stage antigens have been tested, highlighting a critical need for efficient down-selection strategies. Functional in vitro assays such as the growth/invasion inhibition assays (GIA) are widely used, but it is unclear whether GIA activity correlates with protection or predicts vaccine efficacy. While preliminary data in controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies indicate a possible association between in vitro and in vivo parasite growth rates, there have been conflicting results of immunoepidemiology studies, where associations with exposure rather than protection have been observed. In addition, GIA-interfering antibodies in vaccinated individuals from endemic regions may limit assay sensitivity in heavily malaria-exposed populations. More work is needed to establish the utility of GIA for blood-stage vaccine development.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products inhibit staphylococcal growth, and disrupt established biofilms produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Liang; Qu, Di

    2009-01-01

    Multiple bacterial species often coexist as communities, and compete for environmental resources. Here, we describe how an opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses extracellular products to interact with the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms...... and planktonic cultures were challenged with P. aeruginosa supernatant cultures overnight. Results indicated that quorum-sensing-controlled factors from P. aeruginosa supernatant inhibited S. epidermidis growth in planktonic cultures. We also found that P. aeruginosa extracellular products, mainly...... in overnight cultures had no effect on established P. aeruginosa biofilms and planktonic growth. These findings reveal that P. aeruginosa extracellular products are important microbial competition factors that overcome competition with S. epidermidis, and the results may provide clues for the development...

  9. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight.

  10. Squalamine inhibits angiogenesis and solid tumor growth in vivo and perturbs embryonic vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, A K; Williams, J I; Tyler, B M; Epstein, D S; Sipos, E P; Davis, J D; McLane, M P; Pitchford, S; Cheshire, K; Gannon, F H; Kinney, W A; Chao, T L; Donowitz, M; Laterra, J; Zasloff, M; Brem, H

    1998-07-01

    The novel aminosterol, squalamine, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in multiple animal models. This effect is mediated, at least in part, by blocking mitogen-induced proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, thus preventing neovascularization of the tumor. Squalamine has no observable effect on unstimulated endothelial cells, is not directly cytotoxic to tumor cells, does not alter mitogen production by tumor cells, and has no obvious effects on the growth of newborn vertebrates. Squalamine was also found to have remarkable effects on the primitive vascular bed of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, which has striking similarities to tumor capillaries. Squalamine may thus be well suited for treatment of tumors and other diseases characterized by neovascularization in humans.

  11. Insulin like growth factor-1/insulin bypasses Pref-1/FA1-mediated inhibition of adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Nøhr, Jane; Jensen, Charlotte Harken;

    2003-01-01

    of Pref-1/FA1 in 3T3-L1 or 3T3-F442A cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation when insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was omitted from the differentiation mixture. We demonstrate that the level of the mature form of the IGF-1 receptor is reduced and that IGF-1-dependent activation of p42/p44......, and adipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jun-6......Pref-1 is a highly glycosylated Delta-like transmembrane protein containing six epidermal growth factor-like repeats in the extracellular domain. Pref-1 is abundantly expressed in preadipocytes, but expression is down-regulated during adipocyte differentiation. Forced expression of Pref-1 in 3T3-L1...

  12. The resveratrol analogue trimethoxystilbene inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing multipolar cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Gianandrea; Fiore, Mario; Percario, Zulema; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2017-03-01

    Natural compounds are extensively studied for their potential use in traditional and non-traditional medicine. Several natural and synthetic Resveratrol analogues have shown interesting biological activities in the field of cancer chemoprevention. In the present study, we have focused on the ability of Resveratrol and two methoxylated derivatives (Trimethoxystilbene and Pterostilbene) to inhibit human cancer cell growth particularly analyzing their ability to interfere with tubulin dynamics at mitosis. We show that Trimethoxystilbene, differently from Resveratrol and Pterostilbene, alters microtubule polymerization dynamics in HeLa cells specifically inducing multipolar spindles and mitotic arrest coupled to a reduction of cell growth and an increase in apoptotic death by mitotic catastrophe. This work demonstrates that the structural modification of Rsv causes substantial changes in the mechanism of action of the derivatives. The presence of three extra methyl groups renders Trimethoxy very efficient in impairing cell proliferation by inducing mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  14. Inhibition of human breast cancer xenograft growth by cruciferous vegetable constituent benzyl isothiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warin, Renaud; Xiao, Dong; Arlotti, Julie A; Bommareddy, Ajay; Singh, Shivendra V

    2010-05-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a constituent of cruciferous vegetables such as garden cress, inhibits growth of human breast cancer cell lines in culture. The present study was undertaken to determine in vivo efficacy of BITC against MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts. The BITC administration retarded growth of MDA-MB-231 cells subcutaneously implanted in female nude mice without causing weight loss or any other side effects. The BITC-mediated suppression of MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth correlated with reduced cell proliferation as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis for Ki-67 expression. Analysis of the vasculature in the tumors from BITC-treated mice indicated smaller vessel area compared with control tumors based on immunohistochemistry for angiogenesis marker CD31. The BITC-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis in vivo correlated with downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 protein levels in the tumor. Consistent with these results, BITC treatment suppressed VEGF secretion and VEGF receptor 2 protein levels in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, the BITC-treated MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited reduced capacity for migration compared with vehicle-treated control cells. In contrast to cellular data, BITC administration failed to elicit apoptotic response as judged by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of BITC against MDA-MB-231 xenografts in association with reduced cell proliferation and suppression of neovascularization. These preclinical observations merit clinical investigation to determine efficacy of BITC against human breast cancers.

  15. Thermal treatment and leaching of biochar alleviates plant growth inhibition from mobile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel V. Gale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses of plant responses to biochar boast positive average effects of between 10 and 40%. Plant responses, however, vary greatly across systems, and null or negative biochar effects are increasingly reported. The mechanisms responsible for such responses remain unclear. In a glasshouse experiment we tested the effects of three forestry residue wood biochars, applied at five dosages (0, 5, 10, 20, and 50 t/ha to a temperate forest drystic cambisol as direct surface applications and as complete soil mixes on the herbaceous pioneers Lolium multiflorum and Trifolium repens. Null and negative effects of biochar on growth were found in most cases. One potential cause for null and negative plant responses to biochar is plant exposure to mobile compounds produced during pyrolysis that leach or evolve following additions of biochars to soil. In a second glasshouse experiment we examined the effects of simple leaching and heating techniques to ameliorate potentially phytotoxic effects of volatile and leachable compounds released from biochar. We used Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS to qualitatively describe organic compounds in both biochar (through headspace extraction, and in the water leachates (through direct injection. Convection heating and water leaching of biochar prior to application alleviated growth inhibition. Additionally, growth was inhibited when filtrate from water-leached biochar was applied following germination. SPME-GC-MS detected primarily short-chained carboxylic acids and phenolics in both the leachates and solid chars, with relatively high concentrations of several known phytotoxic compounds including acetic acid, butyric acid, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and benzoic acid. We speculate that variable plant responses to phytotoxic organic compounds leached from biochars may largely explain negative plant growth responses and also account for strongly species

  16. Inhibition of tubulointerstitial fibrosis by pentoxifylline is associated with improvement of vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-gen ZHOU; Fa-lei ZHENG; Fan-fan HOU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Recent information indicates that pentoxifylline (PTX) has the ability to suppress inflammation and profibrotic cell proliferation. In this study, we investigated the effect of PTX on tubulointerstitial fibrosis and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a rat model of obstructive nephropathy. Methods: Wistar rats with left ureteral ligation were divided into control and PTX-treated groups. The histopathologic degree of tubulointerstitial fibrosis was scored with PAS and Masson-stained sections. The protein and mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were semiquantitatively measured with immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The pro-tein for transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and hypoxia-induced factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) was determined by Western blot. Results: Compared with the control group, PTX treatment reduced fibrosis scores at d 7 and d 14 (P<0.05). The reduction was accompanied by inhibited expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1), a key cytokine in tubulointerstitial fibrogenesis (P<0.01). Meanwhile, VEGF protein and mRNA in the kidney were increased in the PTX-treated group com-pared with the control group (P<0.01). PTX up-regulated expression of VEGF mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent man-ner in cultured HK-2 cells (P<0.01). However, expression of HIF-1α (a key transcription factor for VEGF gene expression) was unchanged by PTX treatment. PTX prolonged the half-life of VEGF mRNA by a 1.07-fold increase. Conclusions: PTX inhibited tubulointerstitial fibrosis in a rat model of obstructive nephropathy while preventing loss of VEGF. PTX up-regulated expression of VEGF mRNA through stabilization of its mRNA in cultured renal tubular epithelial cells.

  17. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  18. beta-Sitosterol inhibits HT-29 human colon cancer cell growth and alters membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, A B; Chen, Y C; Fink, C S; Hennessey, T

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-sitosterol, the main dietary phytosterol on the growth of HT-29 cells, a human colon cancer cell line. In addition, the incorporation of this phytosterol into cellular membranes and how this might influence the lipid composition of the membranes were investigated. Tumor cells were grown in DMEM containing 10% FBS and supplemented with sterols (cholesterol or beta-sitosterol) at final concentrations up to 16 microM. The sterols were supplied to the media in the form of sterol cyclodextrin complexes. The cyclodextrin used was 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The sterol to cyclodextrin molar ratio was maintained at 1:300. The study indicated that 8 and 16 microM beta-sitosterol were effective at cel growth inhibition as compared to cholesterol or to the control (no sterol supplementation). After supplementation with 16 microM beta-sitosterol for 9 days, cell growth was only one-third that of cells supplemented with equimolar concentration of cholesterol. No effect was observed on total membrane phospholipid concentration. At 16 microM beta-sitosterol supplementation, membrane cholesterol was reduced by 26%. Cholesterol supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio compared to either beta-sitosterol supplemented cells or controls. There was a 50% reduction in membrane sphingomyelin (SM) of cells grown in 16 microM beta-sitosterol. Additional changes were observed in the fatty acid composition of minor phospholipids of beta-sitosterol supplemented cells, such as SM, phosphatidylserine (PS), and phosphatidylinositol (PI). Only in the case of PI, was there an effect of these fatty acid changes on the unsaturation index, beta-sitosterol incorporation resulted in an increase in the U.I. It is possible that the observed growth inhibition by beta-sitosterol may be mediated through the influence of signal transduction pathways that involve membrane phospholipids.

  19. GROWTH INHIBITION OF HUMAN LARYNGEAL CANCER CELL WITH THE ADENOVIRUS-MEDIATED p53 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; HAN De-min; WANG Wen-ge; WU Zu-ze; ZHANG Wei

    1999-01-01

    Objective: In most laryngeal cancers, the function of p53 gene is down regulated. To explore the potential use of p53 in gene therapy of laryngeal cancer, by introducing wild-type p53 into laryngeal cancer cell line via a recombinant adenoviral vector, Ad5CMV-p53 and analyzing its effects on cell and tumor growth. Methods: A human laryngeal cancer cell line Hep-2 was used.Recombinant cytomegalovirus-promoted adenoviruses containing human wild-type p53 cDNA was transiently introduced into Hep-2 line. The growth suppression of the Hep-2 cells and established s.c. squamous carcinoma model was examined. The p53 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The transduction efficiencies of Hep-2 cell line were 100% at a multiplicity of 100 or greater. The p53 protein expression peaked on day 2 after infection and lasted far 5 days. In vitro growth assays revealed cell death following Ad5CMV-p53 infected. In vivo studies, Ad5CMV-p53 inhibited the tumorigenicity of Hep-2 cell, and in nude mice with established s.c. squamous carcinoma nodules showed that tumor volumes were significantly reduced in mice that received peritumoral infiltration of Ad5CMV-p53. Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated antitumor therapy carrying the p53 gene is an efficient method to inhibit laryngeal cancer growth. Transfection of laryngeal cancer cells with the wild-type p53 gene via Ad5CMV-p53 is a potential novel approach to the therapy of laryngeal cancer.

  20. Fluxes in ;Free; and Total Zinc Are Essential for Progression of Intraerythrocytic Stages of Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvin, Rebecca G.; Wolford, Janet L.; Kidd, Matthew J.; Murphy, Sean; Ward, Jesse; Que, Emily L.; Mayer, Meghan L.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Haldar, Kasturi; O; Halloran, Thomas V. (Michigan); (UWASH); (NWU); (Notre)

    2012-10-23

    Dynamic fluxes in the concentration of ions and small molecules are fundamental features of cell signaling, differentiation, and development. Similar roles for fluxes in transition metal concentrations are less well established. Here, we show that massive zinc fluxes are essential in the infection cycle of an intracellular eukaryotic parasite. Using single-cell quantitative imaging, we show that growth of the blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasite requires acquisition of 30 million zinc atoms per erythrocyte before host cell rupture, corresponding to a 400% increase in total zinc concentration. Zinc accumulates in a freely available form in parasitophorous compartments outside the food vacuole, including mitochondria. Restriction of zinc availability via small molecule treatment causes a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential and severely inhibits parasite growth. Thus, extraordinary zinc acquisition and trafficking are essential for parasite development.

  1. Analysis of Antibodies Directed against Merozoite Surface Protein 1 of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehlbier, Ute; Epp, Christian; Kauth, Christian W.; Lutz, Rolf; Long, Carole A.; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Kouyaté, Bocar; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Bujard, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The 190-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum, an essential component in the parasite's life cycle, is a primary candidate for a malaria vaccine. Rabbit antibodies elicited by the heterologously produced MSP-1 processing products p83, p30, p38, and p42, derived from strain 3D7, were analyzed for the potential to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte invasion by the parasite and parasite growth. Our data show that (i) epitopes recognized by antibodies, which inhibit parasite replication, are distributed throughout the entire MSP-1 molecule; (ii) when combined, antibodies specific for different regions of MSP-1 inhibit in a strictly additive manner; (iii) anti-MSP-1 antibodies interfere with erythrocyte invasion as well as with the intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite; and (iv) antibodies raised against MSP-1 of strain 3D7 strongly cross-inhibit replication of the heterologous strain FCB-1. Accordingly, anti-MSP-1 antibodies appear to be capable of interfering with parasite multiplication at more than one level. Since the overall immunogenicity profile of MSP-1 in rabbits closely resembles that found in sera of Aotus monkeys immunized with parasite-derived MSP-1 and of humans semi-immune to malaria from whom highly inhibiting antigen-specific antibodies were recovered, we consider the findings reported here to be relevant for the development of MSP-1-based vaccines against malaria. PMID:16428781

  2. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  3. Cripto Binds Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) and Inhibits TGF-β Signaling▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter C.; Shani, Gidi; Aung, Kevin; Kelber, Jonathan; Vale, Wylie

    2006-01-01

    Cripto is a developmental oncoprotein and a member of the epidermal growth factor-Cripto, FRL-1, Cryptic family of extracellular signaling molecules. In addition to having essential functions during embryogenesis, Cripto is highly expressed in tumors and promotes tumorigenesis. During development, Cripto acts as an obligate coreceptor for transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) ligands, including nodals, growth and differentiation factor 1 (GDF1), and GDF3. As an oncogene, Cripto is thought to promote tumor growth via mechanisms including activation of mitogenic signaling pathways and antagonism of activin signaling. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel mechanism in which Cripto inhibits the tumor suppressor function of TGF-β. Cripto bound TGF-β and reduced the association of TGF-β with its type I receptor, TβRI. Consistent with its ability to block receptor assembly, Cripto suppressed TGF-β signaling in multiple cell types and diminished the cytostatic effects of TGF-β in mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, targeted disruption of Cripto expression by use of small inhibitory RNA enhanced TGF-β signaling, indicating that endogenous Cripto plays a role in restraining TGF-β responses. PMID:17030617

  4. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  5. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability.

  6. Blockade of S100A3 activity inhibits murine hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, W; Deng, Q; Yu, X L; Yuan, Y S; Gao, J; Li, J J; Zhou, L; Xia, P; Han, G Y Q; Han, W; Yu, Y

    2015-10-28

    Using mouse gene expression microarray analysis, we obtained dynamic expression profiles of the whole genome in a depilation-induced hair growth mouse model. S100A3 expression increased during the anagen phase and returned to normal during the telogen phase. The effects of S100A3 blockade on the hair growth cycle were examined in mice after subcutaneous injection of an anti-mouse S100A3 antibody. Protein localization of S100A3 was confined to the hair shafts during the anagen phase and the sebaceous glands during the telogen phase. S100A3 blockade delayed hair follicle entry into the anagen phase, decreased hair elongation, and reduced the number of hair follicles in the subcutis, which correlated with the downregulated expression of hair growth induction-related genes in vivo. The present study demonstrates that anti-S100A3 antibody inhibits mouse hair growth, suggesting that S100A3 can be used as a target for hair loss treatment.

  7. Inhibition of cell growth and telomerase activity in osteosarcoma cells by DN-hTERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Rao, Yaojian; Zhu, Wentao; Guo, Fengjin

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effects of dominant negative human telomerase reverse transcriptase (DN-hTERT) on cell growth and telomerase activity in osteosarcoma cell line MG63, MG63 cells were transfected with DN-hTERT-IRES2-EGFP9 (DN) or IRES2-EGF (I, blank vector) with lipofectamine 2000. The stably transfected cells were selected with G-418. Cell growth properties were examined under a fluorescence microscope. The hTERT mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Telomerase activities were measured by TRAP-ELISE. The tumorigenicity was studied with tumor xenografts by subcutaneous injection of cancer cells into nude mice. The results showed that cell growth was suppressed in MG63 cells transfected with DN-hTERT. The hTERT mRNA was increased in N-hTERT transfected-MG63 cells (MG63/DN). The telomerase activity was 2.45-0.11 in MG63/DN cells, while 3.40+/-0.12 in the cells transfected with blank vector (MG63/I), (PDN-hTERT-expressing clones did not form tumors in 2 weeks, but the ratio of tumorigenesis was 30 % in nude mice bearing MG63/I (PDN-hTERT could specifically inhibit the cell growth and telomerase activity in MG63 cells.

  8. High iron sequestrating bifidobacteria inhibit enteropathogen growth and adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vazquez-Gutierrez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota plays an important role in host health, in particular by its barrier effect and competition with exogenous pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the competition of Bifidobacterium pseudolongum PV8-2 (Bp PV8-2 and Bifidobacterium kashiwanohense PV20-2 (Bk PV20-2, isolated from anemic infant gut microbiota and selected for their high iron sequestration properties was investigated against Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhi and Escherichia coli O157:H45 (EHEC by using co-culture tests and assays with intestinal cell lines. Single and co-cultures were carried out anaerobically in chemically semi-defined low iron (1.5 µM Fe medium (CSDLIM without and with added ferrous iron (30 µM Fe. Surface properties of the tested strains were measured by bacterial adhesion to solvent xylene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and to extracellular matrix molecules, mucus II, collagen I, fibrinogen, fibronectin. HT29-MTX mucus-secreting intestinal cell cultures were used to study bifidobacteria competition, inhibition and displacement of the enteropatogens. During co-cultures in CSDLIM we observed strain-dependent inhibition of bifidobacterial strains on enteropathogens, independent of pH, organic acid production and supplemented iron. Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 inhibited S. Typhi N15 and EHEC after 24 h compared to single culture growth. In contrast Bk PV20-2 showed less inhibition on S. Typhi N15 than Bp PV8-2, and no inhibition on EHEC. Affinity for intestinal cell surface glycoproteins was strain-specific, with high affinity of Bp PV8-2 for mucin and Bk PV20-2 for fibronectin. Bk PV20-2 showed high adhesion potential (15.6 +/- 6.0 % to HT29-MTX cell layer compared to Bp PV8-2 (1.4 +/- 0.4 %. In competition, inhibition and displacement tests, Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 reduced S. Typhi N15 and EHEC adhesion, while Bk PV20-2 was only active on S. Typhi N15 adhesion. To conclude, bifidobacterial strains selected for their high iron binding

  9. Effect of crude saponins from Gaultheria trichophylla extract on growth inhibition in human colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiaz Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria also comprised of species with reported cytotoxic activities. Current research work was carried out to evaluate G. trichophylla crude extract and respective saponins fraction against human colorectal cancer cell line (Caco-2 based on cell viability assays. Caco-2 cells treated with the crude extract showed significant growth inhibition (p< 0.001 in a dose dependent manner with apparent IC50 value of 200 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL in MTT and NRU assays respectively. The fractioned crude saponins showed an enhanced response and inhibited the growth of Caco-2 by 93.6 and 97.4% in MTT and NRU assays respectively, with compared to actinomycin-D (65%. The DAPI staining of cell treated with crude saponins observed under confocal microscope showed shrunken nuclei with apparent nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation indicating apoptosis mode of cell death. The study exhibited that the G. Trichophylla saponins induced apoptosis of Caco-2 cell lines. This study provides new evidences to further explore this plant for the novel targets in anticancer drug development.

  10. [Quercetin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human gastric carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yan; Guo, Liang-miao; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Xue-hua; Cheng, Cai-lian; Wu, Mian-yun; He, Li-ya

    2006-09-01

    To study the effect of quercetin on the growth and apoptosis of human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC-803. The measurement of inhibitory rate and apoptotic index(AI) of quercetin were done by MTT assay and TUNEL assay. The positive expression rate of P53, C-myc and P16 were detected by immunocytochemical staining. Quercetin at concentrations ranging from 40 mumol/L to 100 mumol/L significantly inhibited the proliferation of MGC-803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner (Pquercetin-treated group was greater than that in the control group (Pquercetin induction in a dose-dependent manner, whereas P16 expression increased significantly compared with that of the control group (PQuercetin can inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of MGC-803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Its mechanisms may be relevant to the down-regulation of P53 and C-myc protein expression as well as up-regulation of P16 expression.

  11. HELICOBACTER PYLORI GROWTH INHIBITION BY SUBSTANCE PRODUCED PSEUDOMONAS BY AEROGINOSA: IN VTRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A FAZELI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of H.pylori against metronidazole is increasingly appeared in reports of investigators of gastric infections. So that, seeking to find more effective anti-helicobacter drugs is a necessity. In this study, inhibitory effect of the P. aeroginosa-produced substance on H. pylori growth was determined using two methods, Cross-streak and Well-diffusion Only two out of 37 P. aeroginosa isalates were able to inhibit H. pylori growth which one of them was chosen for further investigation. Its antibacterial activity was tested on 31 isolat