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Sample records for plasminogen inactivators

  1. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125 I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  2. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive /sup 125/I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 polymers, induced by inactivating amphipathic organochemical ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katrine E; Einholm, Anja P; Christensen, Anni

    2003-01-01

    Negatively charged organochemical inactivators of the anti-proteolytic activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) convert it to inactive polymers. As investigated by native gel electrophoresis, the size of the PAI-1 polymers ranged from dimers to multimers of more than 20 units. As com...

  4. Inactivation of single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator by thrombin in human subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, E. A.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Bos, R.; Haverkate, F.; Lassen, M. R.; de Maat, M. P.; Rijken, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    Thrombin cleaves single-chain urokinase-type plasminogen activator (scu-PA) into a virtually inactive two-chain form (tcu-PA/T), a process that may protect a blood clot from early fibrinolysis. It is not known under what circumstances tcu-PA/T can be generated in vivo. We have studied the occurrence

  5. Biochemical mechanism of action of a diketopiperazine inactivator of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einholm, Anja P; Pedersen, Katrine E; Wind, Troels

    2003-01-01

    -inactivated PAI-1 is inert to reaction with its target proteases and has a decreased susceptibility to non-target proteases, in spite of a generally increased proteolytic susceptibility of specific peptide bonds elsewhere in PAI-1. The properties of XR5118-inactivated PAI-1 were different from those of the so...

  6. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evseeva

    2015-01-01

    fibrin clots preventing bacteria dissemination after bites of infected fleas or subcutaneous challenge is believed to be the main Y. pestis factor responsible for generalization of infectious process. Pla-mediated ability of Y. pestis for selective binding with extracellular matrix and basal membranes may promote further hydrolysis of these structures by the host’s plasmin and overcoming tissue barriers by the pathogen. Y. pestis plasminogen activator also hydrolyses C3 complement component, human antimicrobial peptide — cathelicidin LL-37 and such cytokines as tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 8 and protein 1 of monocyte chemotaxis. The main endogenic TFPI tissue factor pathway inhibitor also highly susceptible to proteolytic action of Pla, and efficiency of TFPI inactivation is much higher than efficacy of plasminogen activation. The review also debates the possibility of using Pla as a molecular target for prophylaxis and treatment of plague. 

  7. Localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor on U937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S H; Behrendt, N; Danø, K

    1990-01-01

    The binding of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) to the surface of the human monocytic cell line U937 was studied by immunological detection of bound u-PA or binding of biotinylated diisopropyl fluorophosphate-inactivated human u-PA visualized by light or electron microscopy...

  8. Does plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 drive lymphangiogenesis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyère, Françoise; Melen-Lamalle, Laurence; Blacher, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the function of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) during pathological lymphangiogenesis. PAI-1, the main physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activators is involved in pathological angiogenesis at least by controlling extracellular proteolysis and...

  9. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  10. Proteolysis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by Yersinia pestis remodulates the host environment to promote virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, J L; Schroeder, J A; Zimbler, D L; Caulfield, A J; Lathem, W W

    2016-09-01

    Essentials Effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 on plague and its Y. pestis cleavage is unknown. An intranasal mouse model of infection was used to determine the role of PAI-1 in pneumonic plague. PAI-1 is cleaved and inactivated by the Pla protease of Y. pestis in the lung airspace. PAI-1 impacts both bacterial outgrowth and the immune response to respiratory Y. pestis infection. Click to hear Dr Bock discuss pathogen activators of plasminogen. Background The hemostatic regulator plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inactivates endogenous plasminogen activators and aids in the immune response to bacterial infection. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, produces the Pla protease, a virulence factor that is required during plague. However, the specific hemostatic proteins cleaved by Pla in vivo that contribute to pathogenesis have not yet been fully elucidated. Objectives To determine whether PAI-1 is cleaved by the Pla protease during pneumonic plague, and to define the impact of PAI-1 on Y. pestis respiratory infection in the presence or absence of Pla. Methods An intranasal mouse model of pneumonic plague was used to assess the levels of total and active PAI-1 in the lung airspace, and the impact of PAI-1 deficiency on bacterial pathogenesis, the host immune response and plasmin generation following infection with wild-type or ∆pla Y. pestis. Results We found that Y. pestis cleaves and inactivates PAI-1 in the lungs in a Pla-dependent manner. The loss of PAI-1 enhances Y. pestis outgrowth in the absence of Pla, and is associated with increased conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Furthermore, we found that PAI-1 regulates immune cell recruitment, cytokine production and tissue permeability during pneumonic plague. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that PAI-1 is an in vivo target of the Pla protease in the lungs, and that PAI-1 is a key regulator of the pulmonary innate immune response. We conclude that the inactivation of PAI-1 by Y

  11. Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator from ... Screening antibody was performed using rhPA milk in an ELISA-elution assay. ... useful for purifying other tPA mutants or other novel recombinant milkderived proteins.

  12. Assessment of plasminogen synthesis in vitro by mouse tumor cells using a competition radioimmunoassay for mouse plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, R.O.; Bell, T.E.; Young, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive, specific competition radioimmunoassay for mouse plasmin(ogen) has been developed in order to determine whether mouse tumor cells can synthesize plasminogen in vitro. The rabbit anti-BALB/c mouse plasminogen antibodies used in the assay react with the plasminogen present in serum from BALB/c, C3H, AKR and C57BL/6 mice, and also recognized mouse plasmin. The competition radiommunoassay can detect as little as 50 ng of mouse plasminogen. No competition was observed with preparations of fetal calf, human and rabbit plasminogens. A variety of virus-transformed and mouse tumor cell lines were all found to contain less than 100 ng mouse plasminogen/mg of cell extract protein. Thus, if the plasminogen activator/plasmin system is important in the growth or movement of this group of tumor cells, the cells will be dependent upon the circulatory system of the host for their plasminogen supply. (Auth.)

  13. Role of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in psychological stress and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common illness worldwide, but the pathogenesis of the disorder remains incompletely understood. The tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade is highly expressed in the brain regions involved in mood regulation and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that tissue-type plasminogen activator and its chief inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are related to stress reaction and depression. Fur...

  14. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pieters (Marlien); S.A. Barnard (Sunelle A.); D.T. Loots (Du Toit); D.C. Rijken (Dingeman)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDue to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable) on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen

  15. Cell-induced potentiation of the plasminogen activation system is abolished by a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the NH2-terminal domain of the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, E; Behrendt, N; Ellis, V

    1991-01-01

    We have raised four monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes within the human cell-surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). One of these antibodies completely abolishes the potentiation of plasmin generation observed upon incubation of the zymogens pro......-u-PA and plasminogen with U937 cells. This antibody, which is also the only one to completely inhibit the binding of DFP-inactivated [125I]-u-PA to U937 cells, is directed against the u-PA binding NH2-terminal domain of u-PAR, a well-defined fragment formed by limited chymotrypsin digestion of purified u......-PAR, demonstrating the functional independence of the u-PA binding domain as well as the critical role of u-PAR in the assembly of the cell-surface plasminogen activation system....

  16. The effects of residual platelets in plasma on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlien Pieters

    Full Text Available Due to controversial evidence in the literature pertaining to the activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in platelets, we examined the effects of residual platelets present in plasma (a potential pre-analytical variable on various plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-related assays. Blood samples were collected from 151 individuals and centrifuged at 352 and 1500 g to obtain plasma with varying numbers of platelet. In a follow-up study, blood samples were collected from an additional 23 individuals, from whom platelet-poor (2000 g, platelet-containing (352 g and platelet-rich plasma (200 g were prepared and analysed as fresh-frozen and after five defrost-refreeze cycles (to determine the contribution of in vitro platelet degradation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen, tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex, plasma clot lysis time, β-thromboglobulin and plasma platelet count were analysed. Platelet α-granule release (plasma β-thromboglobulin showed a significant association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels but weak associations with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and a functional marker of fibrinolysis, clot lysis time. Upon dividing the study population into quartiles based on β-thromboglobulin levels, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen increased significantly across the quartiles while plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and clot lysis time tended to increase in the 4th quartile only. In the follow-up study, plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen was also significantly influenced by platelet count in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels increased further after complete platelet degradation. Residual platelets in plasma significantly influence plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antigen levels mainly

  17. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

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    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  18. Role of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in psychological stress and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-12-22

    Major depressive disorder is a common illness worldwide, but the pathogenesis of the disorder remains incompletely understood. The tissue-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade is highly expressed in the brain regions involved in mood regulation and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that tissue-type plasminogen activator and its chief inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, are related to stress reaction and depression. Furthermore, the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression postulates that compromised neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) function is directly involved in the pathophysiology of depression. In the brain, the proteolytic cleavage of proBDNF, a BDNF precursor, to mature BDNF through plasmin represents one mechanism that can change the direction of BDNF action. We also discuss the implications of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 alterations as biomarkers for major depressive disorder. Using drugs that increase tissue-type plasminogen activator or decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels may open new avenues to develop conceptually novel therapeutic strategies for depression treatment.

  19. Plasminogen activators in inflammation and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlaner, Ch

    2002-01-01

    Mortality of severe sepsis remains at 40% to 50%. Intensive efforts over the past two decades have only marginally improved outcome. Improving outcome in sepsis depends on understanding its pathophysiology, which involves triggers, responses of the organism, and dysfunction. Stress, injury, or infection trigger host responses, including local and systemic orchestrated mechanisms. Dysfunction and outcome depend on both trigger and response. Blood coagulation, inflammation, immunity, and fibrinolysis are critical components of the organism's responses. Understanding their role in sepsis pathophysiology is the key to effective treatment. Relevant studies were identified by a systematic literature search, complemented by manual search of individual citations. Using PubMed, 'sepsis' yields more than 62,000 references, 'plasminogen activators' more than 21,000. The selection of citations was guided by preference for reviews that expand important threads of argumentation. Single original studies were included when relevant to critical points. This analytical review describes the essential elements of pathophysiology and the current status of sepsis treatment. Based on this context, an emerging therapeutic option will be discussed: plasminogen activators.

  20. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  1. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  2. Plasminogen and angiostatin interact with heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudani, Anil K; Mehic, Jelica; Martyres, Anthony

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin bind to endothelial cell (EC) surface-associated actin via their kringles in a specific manner. Heat shock proteins (hsps) like hsp 27 are constitutively expressed by vascular ECs and regulate actin polymerization, cell growth, and migration. Since many hsps have also been found to be highly abundant on cell surfaces and there is evidence that bacterial surface hsps may interact with human plasminogen, the purpose of this study was to determine whether human plasminogen and angiostatin would interact with human hsps. ELISAs were developed in our laboratory to assess these interactions. It was observed that plasminogen bound to hsps 27, 60, and 70. In all cases, binding was inhibited (85-90%) by excess (50 mM) lysine indicating kringle involvement. Angiostatin predominantly bound to hsp 27 and to hsp 70 in a concentration- and kringle-dependent manner. As observed previously for actin, there was concentration-dependent inhibition of angiostatin's interaction with hsp 27 by plasminogen. In addition, 30-fold molar excess actin inhibited (up to 50%), the interaction of plasminogen with all hsps. However, 30-fold molar excess actin could only inhibit the interaction of angiostatin with hsp 27 by 15-20%. Collectively, these data indicate that (i) while plasminogen interacts specifically with hsp 27, 60, and 70, angiostatin interacts predominantly with hsp 27 and to some extent with hsp 70; (ii) plasminogen only partially displaces angiostatin's binding to hsp 27 and (iii) actin only partially displaces plasminogen/angiostatin binding to hsps. It is conceivable therefore that surface-associated hsps could mediate the binding of these ligands to cells like ECs.

  3. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen induced by low dose UVB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Correia, Manuel Guiherme L.P. Marins; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam

    2015-01-01

    that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å......). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase...

  4. Plasminogen-induced aggregation of PANC-1 cells requires conversion to plasmin and is inhibited by endogenous plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshet, Naamit; Lupu-Meiri, Monica; Espinoza, Ingrid; Fili, Oded; Shapira, Yuval; Lupu, Ruth; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Oron, Yoram

    2008-09-01

    PANC-1 cells express proteinase-activated receptors (PARs)-1, -2, and respond to their activation by transient elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and accelerated aggregation (Wei et al., 2006, J Cell Physiol 206:322-328). We studied the effect of plasminogen (PGN), an inactive precursor of the PAR-1-activating protease, plasmin (PN) on aggregation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. A single dose of PGN time- and dose-dependently promoted PANC-1 cells aggregation in serum-free medium, while PN did not. PANC-1 cells express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), which continuously converted PGN to PN. This activity and PGN-induced aggregation were inhibited by the uPA inhibitor amiloride. PGN-induced aggregation was also inhibited by alpha-antiplasmin and by the PN inhibitor epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA). Direct assay of uPA activity revealed very low rate, markedly enhanced in the presence of PGN. Moreover, in PGN activator inhibitor 1-deficient PANC-1 cells, uPA activity and PGN-induced aggregation were markedly potentiated. Two additional human PDAC cell lines, MiaPaCa and Colo347, were assayed for PGN-induced aggregation. Both cell lines responded by aggregation and exhibited PGN-enhanced uPA activity. We hypothesized that the continuous conversion of PGN to PN by endogenous uPA is limited by PN's degradation and negatively controlled by endogenously produced PAI-1. Indeed, we found that PANC-1 cells inactivate PN with t1/2 of approximately 7 h, while the continuous addition of PN promoted aggregation. Our data suggest that PANC-1 cells possess intrinsic, PAI-1-sensitive mechanism for promotion of aggregation and differentiation by prolonged exposure to PGN and, possibly, additional precursors of PARs agonists.

  5. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  6. Plasminogen and angiostatin levels in female benign breast lesions

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    A. A. Tykhomyrov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that benign breast tissue exhibit relatively low angiogenic capacity. Activation of angiogenesis in mammary pre-malignant lesions could be associated with disease progression and high risk of transformation into the breast cancer. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis regulation in non-cancerous breast pathologies is still poorly defined. The purpose of the present study was to determine levels of plasminogen and its proteolytic fragments (angiostatins in mammary dysplasia (mastopathy and breast cyst and benign neoplasms (fibroadenomas. Plasminogen and angiostatins were analyzed using immunoblotting and quantified by densitometric scanning. The significant increase in plasminogen levels was found in fibrocystic, cysts, and non-proliferatious fibroadenoma masses (4.7-, 3.7-, and 3.5-fold, respectively compared to healthy breast tissues (control. In the same benign lesions, 6.7-, 4-, and 3.7-fold increase in plasminogen 50 kDa fragment (angiostatin levels as compared with control were also observed. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9, which was detected using gelatine zymography, could be responsible for plasminogen cleavage and abundance of angiostatin in fibrocystic and cyst masses. In contrast, dramatic decrease of both plasminogen and angiostatin levels (3.8- and 5.3-folds, respectively was shown in tissues of proliferatious form of fibroadenoma in comparison with that of the dormant type of this neoplasm. Based on the obtained results, we concluded that angiostatin, a potent vessel growth inhibitor and anti-inflammatory molecule, can play a crucial role in pathophysiology of non-cancerous breast diseases. Further studies are needed to evaluate potential diagnostic and clinical implications of these proteins for prediction and therapy of benign breast pathologies.

  7. Ligneous Periodontitis in a Child with Plasminogen Deficiency

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Ligneous periodontitis (LP), a rare periodontal disease, is seen secondary to plasminogen deficiency and fibrin deposition. It is characterized by nodular gingival enlargements and progressive destructive membranous periodontal disease. It generally ends with the early loss of teeth. Defective fibrinolysis ...

  8. Ligneous Periodontitis in a Child with Plasminogen Deficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ligneous periodontitis (LP), a rare periodontal disease, is seen secondary to plasminogen deficiency and fibrin deposition. It is characterized by nodular gingival enlargements and progressive destructive membranous periodontal disease. It generally ends with the early loss of teeth. Defective fibrinolysis and abnormal ...

  9. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2003-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous glycosyla...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: complete plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well studied in a large family belonging to the Old Order Amish population of eastern and southern Indiana. Additional cases in North ... Human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency: characterization of a large kindred with a null mutation in the PAI-1 gene. Blood. 1997 Jul 1;90( ...

  11. Glu- and Lys-forms of plasminogen differentially affect phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface

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    D. D. Zhernossekov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen/plasmin system is known for its ability to support hemostatic balance of blood. However, plasminogen may be considered as an adhesive ligand and in this way could affect the functioning of blood cells. We showed that exogenous Lys-plasminogen, but not its Glu-form, inhibited platelet aggregation and suppressed platelet α-granule secretion. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of Glu- and Lys-form of plasminogen on the formation of platelet procoagulant surface using phosphatidylserine exposure as a marker. Human platelets were obtained from human platelet-rich plasma (donors were healthy volunteers, men aged 30-40 years by gel-filtration on Sepharose 2B. Phosphatidylserine exposure on the platelet surface was evaluated by flow cytometry with FITC-conjugated annexin A5. Glu- and Lys-plasminogen have different impact on the platelet functioning. Exogenous Lys-plasminogen has no significant effect on phosphatidylserine exposure, while Glu-plasminogen increases phosphatidylserine exposure on the surface of thrombin- and collagen-activated human platelets. Glu-plasminogen can be considered as a co-stimulator of agonist-induced platelet secretion and procoagulant surface formation. Meanwhile effects of Lys-plasminogen are probably directed at platelet-platelet interactions and not related to agonist-stimulated pro-apoptotic changes. The observed different effects of Glu- and Lys-plasminogen on phosphatidylserine exposure can be explained by their structural peculiarities.

  12. Photonic activation of plasminogen induced by low dose UVB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Correia

    Full Text Available Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm. Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å. Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760-765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the

  13. Ultraviolet inactivation of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugher, J.F.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1975-01-01

    Flash photolysis transient spectra (lambda > 250 nm) of aqueous papain showed that the initial products are the neutral tryptophan radical Trp (lambdasub(max) 510 nm), the tryptophan triplet state 3 Trp (lambdasub(max) 460 nm), the disulfide bridge electron adduct -SS - - (lambdasub(max) 420 nm) and the hydrated electron esub(aq) - . The -SS - - yield was not altered by nitrous oxide or air, indicating that the formation of this product does not involve electrons in the external medium. The original papain preparation was activated by irradiating under nitrogen. The action spectrum supports previous work attributing the low initial activity to blocking of cysteinyl site 25 with a mixed disulfide. Flask lamp irradiation in nitrogen led to activation at low starting activities and inactivation at higher starting activities, while only inactivation at the same quantum yield was observed with air saturation. The results are consistent with photoionization of an essential tryptophyl residue as the key inactivating step. (author)

  14. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous glycosyla......The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous...... with the glycosylation sites could be excluded as explanation for the differential reactivity. The latency transition of non-glycosylated, but not of glycosylated PAI-1, was strongly accelerated by a non-ionic detergent. The different biochemical properties of glycosylated and non-glycosylated PAI-1 depended...

  15. Technetium labelled plasminogen activator - a potential reagent for thrombus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsma-De Waal, J.H.; Boer, A.C. de; Cox, P.H.; Pillay, M.; Stassen, J.H.; Collen, D.

    1987-12-01

    The preparation of a technetium labelled plasminogen activator complex using a solid phase labelling technique is described. The labelled complex showed no significant loss of fibrinolytic activity in vitro and showed in vivo a rapid uptake in thrombi in an animal model and in human volunteer patients with known thrombi when injected into a vein draining to the thrombotic region. Systemic injection showed no uptake in the thrombi probably due to rapid sequestration of the complex by the liver.

  16. Pivotal role of tissue plasminogen activator in the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Mezzasalma, Marco A U; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an important treatment option for major depressive disorders, acute mania, mood disorders with psychotic features, and catatonia. Several hypotheses have been proposed as electroconvulsive therapy's mechanism of action. Our hypothesis involves many converging pathways facilitated by increased synthesis and release of tissue-plasminogen activator. Human and animal experiments have shown that tissue-plasminogen activator participates in many mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy or its animal variant, electroconvulsive stimulus, including improved N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated signaling, activation of both brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, increased bioavailability of zinc, purinergic release, and increased mobility of dendritic spines. As a result, tissue-plasminogen activator helps promote neurogenesis in limbic structures, modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity, improves cognitive function, and mediates antidepressant effects. Notably, electroconvulsive therapy seems to influence tissue-plasminogen activator metabolism. For example, electroconvulsive stimulus increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 isoform in γ-aminobutyric acid-releasing neurons, which enhances the release of tissue-plasminogen activator, and the expression of p11, a protein involved in plasminogen and tissue-plasminogen activator assembling. This paper reviews how electroconvulsive therapy correlates with tissue-plasminogen activator. We suggest that interventions aiming at increasing tissue-plasminogen activator levels or its bioavailability - such as daily aerobic exercises together with a carbohydrate-restricted diet, or normalization of homocysteine levels - be evaluated in controlled studies assessing response and remission duration in patients who undergo electroconvulsive therapy.

  17. Plasminogen stimulates propagation of protease-resistant prion protein in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2010-12-01

    To clarify the role of plasminogen as a cofactor for prion propagation, we conducted functional assays using a cell-free prion protein (PrP) conversion assay termed protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) and prion-infected cell lines. Here, we report that plasminogen stimulates propagation of the protease-resistant scrapie PrP (PrP(Sc)). Compared to control PMCA conducted without plasminogen, addition of plasminogen in PMCA using wild-type brain material significantly increased PrP conversion, with an EC(50) = ∼56 nM. PrP conversion in PMCA was substantially less efficient with plasminogen-deficient brain material than with wild-type material. The activity stimulating PrP conversion was specific for plasminogen and conserved in its kringle domains. Such activity was abrogated by modification of plasminogen structure and interference of PrP-plasminogen interaction. Kinetic analysis of PrP(Sc) generation demonstrated that the presence of plasminogen in PMCA enhanced the PrP(Sc) production rate to ∼0.97 U/μl/h and reduced turnover time to ∼1 h compared to those (∼0.4 U/μl/h and ∼2.5 h) obtained without supplementation. Furthermore, as observed in PMCA, plasminogen and kringles promoted PrP(Sc) propagation in ScN2a and Elk 21(+) cells. Our results demonstrate that plasminogen functions in stimulating conversion processes and represents the first cellular protein cofactor that enhances the hypothetical mechanism of prion propagation.

  18. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  19. Angiostatin generating capacity and anti-tumour effects of D-penicillamine and plasminogen activators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot-Besseling, R. de; Ruers, T.J.M.; Lamers-Elemans, I.L.; Maass, C.N.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Westphal, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upregulation of endogenous angiostatin levels may constitute a novel anti-angiogenic, and therefore anti-tumor therapy. In vitro, angiostatin generation is a two-step process, starting with the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin by plasminogen activators (PAs). Next, plasmin excises

  20. Selection and characterization of camelid nanobodies towards urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczmarek, Jakub; Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a trypsin-like serine protease that plays a vital role in extracellular conversion of inactive plasminogen into catalytically active plasmin. Activated plasmin facilitates the release of several proteolytic enzymes, which control processes like perice...

  1. Plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in children with urinary tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenhagen, Per; Andersen, Jesper Brandt; Hansen, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection.......In this prospective study we investigated the role of plasma levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in children with urinary tract infection....

  2. Measurement of human tissue-type plasminogen activator by a two-site immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijken, D.C.; Juhan-Vague, I.; De Cock, F.; Collen, D.

    1983-01-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for human extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator was developed by using rabbit antibodies raised against plasminogen activator purified from human melanoma cell culture fluid. Samples of 100 μl containing 1 to 100 ng/ml plasminogen activator were incubated in the wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates coated with antibody. The amount of bound extrinsic plasminogen activator was quantitated by the subsequent binding of 125 I-labeled affinospecific antibody. The mean level of plasma samples taken at rest was 6.6 +/- 2.9 ng/ml (n = 54). This level increased approximately threefold by exhaustive physical exercise, venous occlusion, or infusion of DDAVP. Extrinsic plasminogen activator in plasma is composed of a fibrin-adsorbable and active component (1.9 +/- 1.1 ng/ml, n = 54, in resting conditions) and an inactive component that does not bind to a fibrin clot (probably extrinsic plasminogen activator-proteinase inhibitor complexes). The fibrin-adsorbable fraction increased approximately fivefold to eightfold after physical exercise, venous occlusion, or DDAVP injections. Potential applications of the immunoradiometric assay are illustrated by the measurement of extrinsic plasminogen activator in different tissue extracts, body fluids, and cell culture fluids and in oocyte translation products after injection with mRNA for plasminogen activator

  3. Levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in non-small cell lung cancer as measured by quantitative ELISA and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, Helle; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer; Pyke, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The components of the plasminogen activation system have been reported to have prognostic impact in several cancer types, e.g. breast-, colon-, gastric- and lung cancer. Most of these studies have used quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on tumour tissue extracts. However......, results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) studies obtained by quantitative ELISA and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry differ. If the prognostic value of the components of the plasminogen activation system is to be exploited clinically in the future, it is important to choose an easy and valid...... methodology. In the present study we investigated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-I) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), as quantitated by ELISA in tumour extracts from 64 NSCLC patients (38 squamous cell carcinomas, 26 adenocarcinomas), and compared them to staining...

  4. A novel clot lysis assay for recombinant plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamialahmadi, Oveis; Fazeli, Ahmad; Hashemi-Najafabadi, Sameereh; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant plasminogen activator (r-PA, reteplase) is an engineered variant of alteplase. When expressed in E. coli, it appears as inclusion bodies that require refolding to recover its biological activity. An important step following refolding is to determine the activity of refolded protein. Current methods for enzymatic activity of thrombolytic drugs are costly and complex. Here a straightforward and low-cost clot lysis assay was developed. It quantitatively measures the activity of the commercial reteplase and is also capable of screening refolding conditions. As evidence for adequate accuracy and sensitivity of the current assay, r-PA activity measurements are shown to be comparable to those obtained from chromogenic substrate assay.

  5. Bicyclic peptide inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée; Jensen, Berit Paaske; Jiang, Longguang

    2013-01-01

    The development of protease inhibitors for pharmacological intervention has taken a new turn with the use of peptide-based inhibitors. Here, we report the rational design of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), based on the established...... investigated the solution structures of the bicyclic peptide by NMR spectroscopy to map possible conformations. An X-ray structure of the bicyclic-peptide-uPA complex confirmed an interaction similar to that for the previous upain-1/upain-2-uPA complexes. These physical studies of the peptide...

  6. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 in breast cancer - correlation with traditional prognostic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampelj Maja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 play a key role in tumour invasion and metastasis. High levels of both proteolytic enzymes are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between traditional prognostic factors and uPA and PAI-1 expression in primary tumour of breast cancer patients.

  7. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, George J; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R; Holland, Christy K

    2007-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T ≤ 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss Δm(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E eff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole -1 . E eff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole -1 . A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies

  8. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George J [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Dhamija, Ashima [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Bavani, Nazli [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Wagner, Kenneth R [Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Holland, Christy K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States)

    2007-06-07

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T {<=} 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss {delta}m(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E{sub eff} of 42.0 {+-} 0.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. E{sub eff} approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  9. Canine Plasminogen: Spectral Responses to Changes in 6-Aminohexanoate and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A. Kornblatt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the near UV absorption spectrum of canine plasminogen. There are 19 tryptophans, 19 phenylalanines and 34 tyrosines in the protein. 4th derivative spectra optimized for either tryptophan or tyrosine give a measure of the polarity of the environments of these two aromatic amino acids. Plasminogen at temperatures between 0 °C and 37 °C exists as a mixture of four conformations: closed-relaxed, open-relaxed, closed-compact, and open-compact. The closed to open transition is driven by addition of ligand to a site on the protein. The relaxed to compact transition is driven by increasing temperature from 0 °C to above 15–20 °C.When the conformation of plasminogen is mainly closed-relaxed, the 4th derivative spectra suggest that the average tryptophan environment is similar to a solution of 20% methanol at the same temperature. Under the same conditions, 4th derivative spectra suggest that the average tyrosine environment is similar to water. These apparent polarities change as the plasminogen is forced to assume the other conformations. We try to rationalize the information based on the known portions of the plasminogen structure.Abbreviations: 6-AH: 6-aminohexanoate, a homolog of lysine; DPGN: dog plasminogen; HPGN: human plasminogen. NTP: the N-terminal peptide of DPGN (It consists of the fi rst 77 amino acids in the protein.

  10. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Full-Length Human Plasminogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby H.P. Law

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasminogen is the proenzyme precursor of the primary fibrinolytic protease plasmin. Circulating plasminogen, which comprises a Pan-apple (PAp domain, five kringle domains (KR1-5, and a serine protease (SP domain, adopts a closed, activation-resistant conformation. The kringle domains mediate interactions with fibrin clots and cell-surface receptors. These interactions trigger plasminogen to adopt an open form that can be cleaved and converted to plasmin by tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators. Here, the structure of closed plasminogen reveals that the PAp and SP domains, together with chloride ions, maintain the closed conformation through interactions with the kringle array. Differences in glycosylation alter the position of KR3, although in all structures the loop cleaved by plasminogen activators is inaccessible. The ligand-binding site of KR1 is exposed and likely governs proenzyme recruitment to targets. Furthermore, analysis of our structure suggests that KR5 peeling away from the PAp domain may initiate plasminogen conformational change.

  11. Pathogen inactivation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J P R; Transue, S; Snyder, E L

    2006-01-01

    The desire to rid the blood supply of pathogens of all types has led to the development of many technologies aimed at the same goal--eradication of the pathogen(s) without harming the blood cells or generating toxic chemical agents. This is a very ambitious goal, and one that has yet to be achieved. One approach is to shun the 'one size fits all' concept and to target pathogen-reduction agents at the Individual component types. This permits the development of technologies that might be compatible with, for example, plasma products but that would be cytocidal and thus incompatible with platelet concentrates or red blood cell units. The technologies to be discussed include solvent detergent and methylene blue treatments--designed to inactivate plasma components and derivatives; psoralens (S-59--amotosalen) designed to pathogen-reduce units of platelets; and two products aimed at red blood cells, S-303 (a Frale--frangible anchor-linker effector compound) and Inactine (a binary ethyleneimine). A final pathogen-reduction material that might actually allow one material to inactivate all three blood components--riboflavin (vitamin B2)--is also under development. The sites of action of the amotosalen (S-59), the S-303 Frale, Inactine, and riboflavin are all localized in the nucleic acid part of the pathogen. Solvent detergent materials act by dissolving the plasma envelope, thus compromising the integrity of the pathogen membrane and rendering it non-infectious. By disrupting the pathogen's ability to replicate or survive, its infectivity is removed. The degree to which bacteria and viruses are affected by a particular pathogen-reducing technology relates to its Gram-positive or Gram-negative status, to the sporulation characteristics for bacteria, and the presence of lipid or protein envelopes for viruses. Concerns related to photoproducts and other breakdown products of these technologies remain, and the toxicology of pathogen-reduction treatments is a major ongoing area

  12. Free radical inactivation of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudina, Ivana; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    Reactivities of free radical oxidants, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and Cl 3 COO radical and a reductant, CO2-anion radical, with trypsin and reactive protein components were determined by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions at pH 7, 20 0 C. Highly reactive free radicals, radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical, react with trypsin at diffusion controlled rates. Moderately reactive trichloroperoxy radical, k(Cl 3 COO radical + trypsin) preferentially oxidizes histidine residues. The efficiency of inactivation of trypsin by free radicals is inversely proportional to their reactivity. The yields of inactivation of trypsin by radical OH, Br2-anion radical and CO2-anion radical are low, G(inactivation) = 0.6-0.8, which corresponds to ∼ 10% of the initially produced radicals. In contrast, Cl 3 COO radical inactivates trypsin with ∼ 50% efficiency, i.e. G(inactivation) = 3.2. (author)

  13. Partial amino acid sequence of apolipoprotein(a) shows that it is homologous to plasminogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, D.L.; Fless, G.M.; Kohr, W.J.; McLean, J.W.; Xu, Q.T.; Miller, C.G.; Lawn, R.M.; Scanu, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] is a glycoprotein with M/sub r/ ∼ 280,000 that is disulfide linked to apolipoprotein B in lipoprotein(a) particles. Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) are correlated with atherosclerosis. Partial amino acid sequence of apo(a) shows that it has striking homology to plasminogen. Plasminogen is a plasma serine protease zymogen that consists of five homologous and tandemly repeated domains called kringles and a trypsin-like protease domain. The amino-terminal sequence obtained for apo(a) is homologous to the beginning of kringle 4 but not the amino terminus of plasminogen. Apo(a) was subjected to limited proteolysis by trypsin or V8 protease, and fragments generated were isolated and sequenced. Sequences obtained from several of these fragments are highly (77-100%) homologous to plasminogen residues 391-421, which reside within kringle 4. Analysis of these internal apo(a) sequences revealed that apo(a) may contain at least two kringle 4-like domains. A sequence obtained from another tryptic fragment also shows homology to the end of kringle 4 and the beginning of kringle 5. Sequence data obtained from the two tryptic fragments shows homology with the protease domain of plasminogen. One of these sequences is homologous to the sequences surrounding the activation site of plasminogen. Plasminogen is activated by the cleavage of a specific arginine residue by urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator; however, the corresponding site in apo(a) is a serine that would not be cleaved by tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase. Using a plasmin-specific assay, no proteolytic activity could be demonstrated for lipoprotein(a) particles. These results suggest that apo(a) contains kringle-like domains and an inactive protease domain

  14. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  15. Mean inactivation dose (D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Ng, T.C.; Raudkivi, U.; Meaney, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    By predicting treatment outcome to radiotherapy from in vitro radiobiological parameters, not only individual patient treatments can be tailored, but also new promising treatment protocols can be tried in patients in whom unfavorable outcome is predicted. In this respect, choosing the right parameter can be very important. Unlike D 0 and N which provide information of the distal part of the survival curve, mean inactivation dose (D) estimates overall radiosensitivity. However, the parameters reflecting the response at the clinically relevant low-dose region are neglected in the literature. In a literature survey of 98 papers in which survival curves or D 0 /N were used, only in 2 D was used. In 21 papers the D 0 /n values were important in drawing conclusions. By calculating D in 3 of these 21 papers, we show that the conclusion drawn may be altered with the use of D. The importance of ''low-dose-region-parameters'' is reviewed. (orig.)

  16. Platelets retain high levels of active plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helén Brogren

    Full Text Available The vascular fibrinolytic system is crucial for spontaneous lysis of blood clots. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, the principal inhibitor of the key fibrinolytic enzyme tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, is present in platelets at high concentrations. However, the majority of PAI-1 stored in platelets has been considered to be inactive. Our recent finding (Brogren H, et al. Blood 2004 that PAI-1 de novo synthesized in platelets remained active for over 24 h, suggested that PAI-1 stored in the α-granules might be active to a larger extent than previously reported. To re-evaluate this issue, we performed experiments where the fraction of active PAI-1 was estimated by analyzing the tPA-PAI-1 complex formation. In these experiments platelets were lysed with Triton X-100 in the presence of serial dilutions of tPA and subsequently the tPA-PAI-1 complex was evaluated by Western blot. Also, using a non-immunologic assay, tPA was labeled with (125I, and (125I-tPA and (125I-tPA-PAI-1 was quantified by scintigraphy. Interestingly, both methods demonstrated that the majority (>50% of platelet PAI-1 is active. Further analyses suggested that pre-analytical procedures used in previous studies (sonication or freezing/thawing may have substantially reduced the activity of platelet PAI-1, which has lead to an underestimation of the proportion of active PAI-1. Our in vitro results are more compatible with the role of PAI-1 in clot stabilization as demonstrated in physiological and pathophysiological studies.

  17. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  18. Surface-associated plasminogen binding of Cryptococcus neoformans promotes extracellular matrix invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Stie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of illness and death in persons with predisposing factors, including: malignancies, solid organ transplants, and corticosteroid use. C. neoformans is ubiquitous in the environment and enters into the lungs via inhalation, where it can disseminate through the bloodstream and penetrate the central nervous system (CNS, resulting in a difficult to treat and often-fatal infection of the brain, called meningoencephalitis. Plasminogen is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by cancer cells during metastasis and several pathogenic species of bacteria have been found to manipulate the host plasminogen system to facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of plasminogen at their surface.The invasion of the brain and the central nervous system by penetration of the protective blood-brain barrier is a prerequisite to the establishment of meningoencephalitis by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. neoformans. In this study, we examined the ability of C. neoformans to subvert the host plasminogen system to facilitate tissue barrier invasion. Through a combination of biochemical, cell biology, and proteomic approaches, we have shown that C. neoformans utilizes the host plasminogen system to cross tissue barriers, providing support for the hypothesis that plasminogen-binding may contribute to the invasion of the blood-brain barrier by penetration of the brain endothelial cells and underlying matrix. In addition, we have identified the cell wall-associated proteins that serve as plasminogen receptors and characterized both the plasminogen-binding and plasmin-activation potential for this significant human pathogen.The results of this study provide evidence for the

  19. Functional properties of the recombinant kringle-2 domain of tissue plasminogen activator produced in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, O.G.; Jaskunas, S.R.; Vlahos, C.J.; Bang, N.U.

    1990-01-01

    The kringle-2 domain (residues 176-262) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant peptide, which concentrated in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, was isolated, solubilized, chemically refolded, and purified by affinity chromatography on lysine-Sepharose to apparent homogeneity. [35S]Cysteine-methionine-labeled polypeptide was used to study the interactions of kringle-2 with lysine, fibrin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The kringle-2 domain bound to lysine-Sepharose and to preformed fibrin with a Kd = 104 +/- 6.2 microM (0.86 +/- 0.012 binding site) and a Kd = 4.2 +/- 1.05 microM (0.80 +/- 0.081 binding site), respectively. Competition experiments and direct binding studies showed that the kringle-2 domain is required for the formation of the ternary t-PA-plasminogen-intact fibrin complex and that the association between the t-PA kringle-2 domain and fibrin does not require plasmin degradation of fibrin and exposure of new COOH-terminal lysine residues. We also observed that kringle-2 forms a complex with highly purified guanidine-activated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, dissociable by 0.2 M epsilon-aminocaproic acid. The kringle-2 polypeptide significantly inhibited tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 interaction. The kringle-2 domain bound to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a specific and saturable manner with a Kd = 0.51 +/- 0.055 microM (0.35 +/- 0.026 binding site). Therefore, the t-PA kringle-2 domain is important for the interaction of t-PA not only with fibrin, but also with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and thus represents a key structure in the regulation of fibrinolysis

  20. Dynamic changes in plasma tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and beta-thromboglobulin content in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ping; Wo, Da; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Wei, Wei; Mao, Hui-ming

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the corresponding variations of plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activities, and beta-thromboglobulin (β-TG) content in patients during different stages of ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke is a common disease among aging people and its occurrence is associated with abnormalities in the fibrinolytic system and platelet function. However, few reports focus on the dynamic changes in the plasma fibrinolytic system and β-TG content in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients were divided into three groups: acute, convalescent and chronic. Plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities were determined by chromogenic substrate analysis and plasma β-TG content was detected by radioimmunoassay. Patients in the acute stage of ischemic stroke had significantly increased levels of t-PA activity and β-TG content, but PAI-1 activity was significantly decreased. Negative correlations were found between plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities and between plasma t-PA activity and β-TG content in patients with acute ischemic stroke. There were significant differences in plasma t-PA and PAI-1 activities in the aged control group, as well as in the acute, convalescent and chronic groups. It can be speculated that the increased activity of t-PA in patients during the acute stage was the result of compensatory function, and that the increase in plasma β-TG level not only implies the presence of ischemic stroke but is likely a cause of ischemic stroke. During the later stages of ischemic stroke, greater attention is required in monitoring levels of PAI-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of a plasminogen activator from human melanoma cells cultured in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussen, C.

    1982-08-01

    This thesis describes the work that have been done on the isolation and characterization of a plasminogen activator, Mel-PA, that is released by human melanoma cells cultured in vitro. This enzyme was compared to the urinary plasminogen activator, urokinase. The human melanoma cell line released large amounts of Mel-PA into the surrounding medium when cultured under serum-free conditions. These cells released only one type of plasminogen activator. A technique was developed in which plasminogen activators were seperated electrophoretically and detected in polyacrylamide gel slabs. Mel-PA was concentrated and partially purified by affinity chromatography on benzamidine-sepharose. A study of the distribution of plasminogen activators in tissues and body fluids showed that all mammals examined had two immunochemically distinct plasminogen activators that corresponded, in their distribution, to the urokinase-like and Mel-PA like enzymes of man. A comparitive study of the kinetic behaviour of Mel-PA and urokinase showed numerous differences between the catalytic activities of these two enzymes

  2. Determining Human Clot Lysis Time (in vitro with Plasminogen/Plasmin from Four Species (Human, Bovine, Goat, and Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omaira Cañas Bermúdez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, including failures in the plasminogen/plasmin system which is an important factor in poor lysis of blood clots. This article studies the fibrinolytic system in four species of mammals, and it identifies human plasminogen with highest thrombolysis efficiency. It examines plasminogen from four species (human, bovine, goat, and swine and identifies the most efficient one in human clot lysis in vitro. All plasminogens were identically purified by affinity chromatography. Human fibrinogen was purified by fractionation with ethanol. The purification of both plasminogen and fibrinogen was characterized by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE (10%. Human clot formation in vitro and its dissolution by plasminogen/plasmin consisted of determining lysis time from clot formation to its dilution. Purification of proteins showed greater than 95% purity, human plasminogen showed greater ability to lyse clot than animal plasminogen. The article concludes that human plasminogen/plasmin has the greatest catalysis and efficiency, as it dissolves human clot up to three times faster than that of irrational species.

  3. The significance of fibrin binding by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 for the mechanism of tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, H. A.; Pannekoek, H.

    1995-01-01

    The specific, reversible interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and intact fibrin polymers was studied using both purified components and isolated activated platelets as a source of PAI-1. A key reagent in these experiments is a PAI-1 mutant, having its P1 reactive center

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in patients with monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, A; Kruithof, E K; Grob, J P

    1991-06-01

    Plasma and tumor cells from 103 patients with leukemia or lymphoma at initial presentation were investigated for the presence of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) antigen, a potent inhibitor of urokinase. PAI-2 was detected in plasma and leukemic cells of the 21 patients with leukemia having a monocytic component [acute myelomonocytic (M4), acute monoblastic (M5), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemias], and in the three patients with acute undifferentiated myeloblastic leukemia (M0). In contrast, this serine protease inhibitor was undetectable in 79 patients with other subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia or other hematological malignancies. Serial serum PAI-2 determinations in 16 patients with acute leukemia at presentation, during therapy, remission, and relapse revealed that in the five patients with M4-M5, elevated PAI-2 levels rapidly normalized under therapy and during remission, but increased again in the patients with a relapse associated with an M4-M5 phenotype. Thus, PAI-2 seems to be a marker highly specific for the active stages of monocytic leukemia, i.e. presentation and relapse. The presence of PAI-2 in the plasma and cells of patients with M0 may give a clue to a monocytic origin of these cells.

  5. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound [ 125 I]EDP I, [ 125 I]Glu-plasminogen, and [ 125 I]Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of [ 125 I]EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 μM, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. α 2 -Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of [ 125 I]EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor

  7. In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in control and thrombus-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Eriko

    1992-01-01

    In vivo distribution of Tc-99m labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (Tc-99m-rt-PA) was studied in control rats and thrombus-bearing rats. To compare fibrin binding in vivo with that in vitro, Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was also imaged. Rapid blood clearance and accumulation into the liver and kidneys were observed in both control and thrombus-bearing rats. Accumulation in the stomach, which indicates instability of labeled rt-PA in vivo, was very low until two hours after injection. Tc-99m-rt-PA accumulation in the clots was higher than that in skeletal and heart muscles, although it was lower than in blood, liver, and kidneys. Administration of aprotinin, an antifibrinolytic agent, significantly prolonged clot accumulation of Tc-99m-rt-PA at 30 minutes after injection. These results suggest that fibrinolysis is responsible for the low rt-PA concentration in the clots. A scintigram of a thrombus-bearing rat demonstrated increased radioactivity at the clot forming site. On the other hand, Tc-99m-labeled human albumin, which was used as a control, was not accumulated in the clot. Tc-99m-rt-PA binding to fibrin gel in vitro was clearly imaged. By comparison, in vivo fibrin binding of Tc-99m-rt-PA was much lower than in vitro. The reasons for low thrombus uptake in vivo may be: (1) biochemical inactivation of extrinsically administered rt-PA by t-PA inhibitor; (2) fibrinolysis by rt-PA activated plasminogen. Overcoming these limitations will enable Tc-99m-rt-PA to reach the stage of clinical trials. (author)

  8. Tranexamic acid, an inhibitor of plasminogen activation, reduces urinary collagen cross-link excretion in both experimental and rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronday, H.K.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.; Moak, S.A.; Roos, J.A.D.M. de; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The plasminogen activation system is one of the enzyme systems held responsible for bone and cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we evaluated the effect of tranexamic acid (TEA), an inhibitor of plasminogen activation, on urinary collagen cross-link excretion and

  9. Plasminogen activator activity and plasma-coagulum lysis measured by use of optimized fibrin gel structure preformed in microtiter plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Jespersen, J; Gram, J

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a new fibrin plate assay performed in microtiter plates. By means of spectroscopic studies we optimized the structure of the fibrin gel and then used the optimized fibrin gel to determine plasminogen activator activity. Plasminogen activator solutions were applied on top of the fibri...

  10. Two distinct expression patterns of urokinase, urokinase receptor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in colon cancer liver metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illemann, Martin; Bird, Nigel; Majeed, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic growth and invasion by colon cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new tissue environment. Plasmin(ogen) is activated on cell surfaces by urokinase-type PA (uPA), and is regulated by uPAR and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). T...

  11. Effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 on adipogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroyen, Ilse; Jacobs, Frank; Cosemans, Leen; De Geest, Bart; Lijnen, H Roger

    2009-02-01

    To study the functional role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in obesity, the effect of its overexpression on de novo adipogenesis was evaluated in murine models in vivo. Therefore, 3T3-F442A preadipocytes expressing murine PAI-1 (mPAI-1) or control cells were injected in the back of male NUDE mice, which were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for four weeks. De novo fat pads that formed from the PAI-1 expressing cells were larger (21 +/- 2.4 mg vs. 14 +/- 1.4 mg; p = 0.017) and showed a higher adipocyte density (373 +/- 28 mm(-2) vs. 301 +/- 12 mm(-2); p = 0.03) as compared to those formed from control cells. In a second model, male NUDE mice were injected in the tail vein with an adenoviral construct expressing mPAI-1 or with the empty vector, and three days later with 3T3-F442A cells. After four weeks of HFD, total body weight and de novo fat pad weight were comparable for both groups. Mild adipocyte hypotrophy was observed in the de novo fat pads of the PAI-1 overexpressing mice (1180 +/- 33 microm(2) vs. 1285 +/- 32 microm(2); p = 0.024), whereas the blood vessel size was significantly smaller than in controls (30 +/- 1.8 microm(2) vs. 63 +/- 3.6 microm(2); p < 0.0001). Thus, the effect of local or systemic PAI-1 (over)expression on adipocyte or blood vessel size and density of de novo formed fat pads appears to be different, and concentration-dependent. Whereas local expression resulted in larger fat pads, systemic overexpression had no effect on de novo adipogenesis, although angiogenesis appeared to be impaired.

  12. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dessa Sadovnick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D in plasminogen (PLG as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351 in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117, despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87. To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility.

  13. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  14. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Hilary A; Leonhardt, Payton; Ladanyi, Andras; Yamada, S Diane; Montag, Anthony; Im, Hae Kyung; Jagadeeswaran, Sujatha; Shaw, David E; Mazar, Andrew P; Lengyel, Ernst

    2011-02-01

    To understand the functional and preclinical efficacy of targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) in ovarian cancer. Expression of u-PAR was studied in 162 epithelial ovarian cancers, including 77 pairs of corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The effect of an antibody against u-PAR (ATN-658) on proliferation, adhesion, invasion, apoptosis, and migration was assessed in 3 (SKOV3ip1, HeyA8, and CaOV3) ovarian cancer cell lines. The impact of the u-PAR antibody on tumor weight, number, and survival was examined in corresponding ovarian cancer xenograft models and the mechanism by which ATN-658 blocks metastasis was explored. Only 8% of all ovarian tumors were negative for u-PAR expression. Treatment of SKOV3ip1, HeyA8, and CaOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines with the u-PAR antibody inhibited cell invasion, migration, and adhesion. In vivo, anti-u-PAR treatment reduced the number of tumors and tumor weight in CaOV3 and SKOV3ip1 xenografts and reduced tumor weight and increased survival in HeyA8 xenografts. Immunostaining of CaOV3 xenograft tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines showed an increase in active-caspase 3 and TUNEL staining. Treatment with u-PAR antibody inhibited α(5)-integrin and u-PAR colocalization on primary human omental extracellular matrix. Anti-u-PAR treatment also decreased the expression of urokinase, u-PAR, β(3)-integrin, and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 both in vitro and in vivo. This study shows that an antibody against u-PAR reduces metastasis, induces apoptosis, and reduces the interaction between u-PAR and α(5)-integrin. This provides a rationale for targeting the u-PAR pathway in patients with ovarian cancer and for further testing of ATN-658 in this indication. ©2010 AACR.

  15. Fibrin-Enhanced Canonical Wnt Signaling Directs Plasminogen Expression in Cementoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ur Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cementum is a mineralized layer on the tooth’s root surface and facilitates the biomechanical anchoring of fibrous connective tissues as a part of tooth-supportive complexes. Previously, we observed that OCCM30 cementoblasts cultured on fibrin matrices underwent apoptosis due to fibrin degradation through the expression of proteases. Here, we demonstrated that OCCM30 on fibrin matrices (OCCM30-fibrin enhanced canonical Wnt signaling, which directed to plasminogen expression. The OCCM30-fibrin showed higher levels of Wnt3a expression, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and T-cell factor (TCF optimal motif (TOP reporter activity than the cells on tissue culture dishes (OCCM30-TCD, indicating that the OCCM30-fibrin enhanced canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Also, OCCM30-fibrin expressed biomineralization-associated markers at higher levels than OCCM30-TCD, of which levels were further increased with LiCl, a Wnt signaling activator. The OCCM30 cementoblasts simultaneously showed that high levels of plasminogen, a critical component of fibrinolysis, were expressed in the OCCM30-fibrin. Activation of canonical Wnt signaling with LiCl treatment or with forced lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF1-expression increased the expression of plasminogen. On the contrary, the inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling with siRNAs against Wnt3a or β-catenin abrogated fibrin-enhanced plasminogen expression. Furthermore, there are three conserved putative response elements for the LEF1/β-catenin complex in the plasminogen proximal promoter regions (−900 to +54. Site-directed mutations and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that canonical Wnt signaling directed plasminogen expression. Taken together, this study suggests that fibrin-based materials can modulate functional periodontal formations in controlling cementoblast differentiation and fibrin degradation.

  16. Reduction of canine plasminogen leads to an expanded molecule which precipitates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A Kornblatt

    Full Text Available Canine plasminogen is made up of seven domains. In each domain there are several cysteines that are linked by disulfide bonds. Reduction of a limited number of the cystines destabilizes the protein such that it precipitates. The bond or bonds that are broken provide about 14 kcal of stabilization energy. Circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering indicate that there is probably an intermediate that is formed prior to precipitation and that the intermediate is somewhat larger than the compact form of plasminogen.

  17. Prevotella intermedia stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 expression via multiple signaling pathways in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su-Min; He, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Lei

    2011-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an important periodontal pathogen that induces various inflammatory and immune responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of P. intermedia on the plasminogen system in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells and explored the signaling pathways involved. Using semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-qPCR, we demonstrated that P. intermedia challenge increased tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-2 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but exerted no influence on urokinase-type plasminogen activator and PAI-1mRNA expression in hPDL cells. Prevotella intermedia stimulation also enhanced tPA protein secretion as confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot results revealed that P. intermedia treatment increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38). ERK, JNK and protein kinase C inhibitors significantly attenuated the P. intermedia-induced tPA and PAI-2 expression. Furthermore, p38 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors markedly decreased PAI-2 expression, whereas they showed no or little inhibition on tPA expression. In contrast, inhibition of protein kinase A greatly enhanced the upregulatory effect of P. intermedia on tPA and PAI-2 expression. Our results suggest that P. intermedia may contribute to periodontal tissue destruction by upregulating tPA and PAI-2 expression in hPDL cells via multiple signaling pathways. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the evolution of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Zagorka B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrinolytic activity in the acute stroke was examined by monitoring the level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, as one of the indicators of fibrinolytic activity. Given the role of PAI-1 in the processes of atherogenesis and thrombogenesis, plasma PAI-1 level was measured in 59 patients (up to 50 years of age with atherothrombotic stroke (verified by computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging of brain in the period from 12 to 24 hours (I analysis and 30 days after the onset of stroke (II analysis; then, it was correlated with plasma PAI-1 level in the control group (57 healthy subjects, which was 2.86±0.70 U/ml. It was found that PAI-1 level was significantly higher in the acute stroke (I analysis: PAI-1 =4.10±1.40 U/ml, p<0.001; II analysis: PAI-1 =3.64+0.90 U/ml, p<0.001, while fibrinolytic activity was lower, especially on the first day from the stroke that was not completely increased even after 30 days. There was no difference in PAI-1 levels between the subgroups of patients with infarction and lacunar cerebral ischemia (p>0.05, as well as between females and males (p>0.05. Along with significantly increased fibrinogen level (4.65±1 g/l, in the controls - 2.83±0.64 g/l, p<0.001, significantly higher triglycerides (2.04±0.76 mmol/l, in the controls - 1.38+0.54 mmol/l, p<0.001 and lipoproteins(a (0.405±0.29 g/l, in the controls -0.172±0.14 g/l, p<0.001 were found, correlating with higher plasma PAI-1 level in these patients. The increased plasma level of PAI-1 pointed to possibility of decreased fibrinolytic activity in pathogenesis of ischemie stroke, as well as, risk of reinsult, which had been the greatest after the onset of stroke and declined gradually within several weeks.

  19. Activity of Nanobins Targeted to the Urokinase Plasminogen Activator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, Patrick Leon

    While innovations in nanotechnology have resulted in numerous medical advancements for the treatment of cancer, there remains an urgent unmet need for safe and efficient molecular platforms that facilitate the delivery of potent therapeutics to solid tumors. Nanoscale formulations help to overcome the poor bioavailability and systemic organ toxicity associated with many small molecule drugs. Of these nanoparticle drug delivery systems, the greatest clinical successes to date have employed simple nanoscale lipid bilayer assemblies which encase large payloads of chemotherapeutic. While the nanobin platform we have developed has seen initial success through the passive accumulation into tumors, actively targeting nanobins to tumor specific antigens has the potential to increase the therapeutic index of these nanoparticle drugs. We have identified the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and its cell surface bound receptor (uPAR) as ideal targets for drug delivery due to their selective overexpression in metastatic cancers and their important role in tumor progression. From a panel of monoclonal antibodies targeted to uPA and uPAR, we have selected ATN291 and ATN658 as lead candidates for nanobin targeting based on their tumor cell binding and ability to be internalized by cells. A novel method of conjugating antibodies to liposomes was developed for our nanobin platform that preserves the high binding affinity and specificity of these antibodies. We evaluated these uPA- and uPAR-targeted nanobins in several xenograft tumor models and found that they were well-tolerated over a wide range of doses and demonstrated significantly increased antitumor efficacy over untargeted nanobins in multiple tumor types. Preliminary studies suggest that uPA-targeted nanobins are readily internalized by tumor cells, and we believe this is the mechanism for their increased antitumor effect. A method for radiolabeling nanobins with gallium-67 was developed, and preliminary SPECT

  20. Gingival crevicular fluid tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgan, Ş; Önder, C; Balcı, N; Fentoğlu, Ö; Eser, F; Balseven, M; Serdar, M A; Tatakis, D N; Günhan, M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid levels of tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) in patients with periodontitis, with or without rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifteen patients with RA and chronic periodontitis (RA-P), 15 systemically healthy patients with chronic periodontitis (H-P) and 15 periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers (C) were included in the study. Plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, gingival crevicular fluid t-PA and PAI-2 levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein and disease activity score were evaluated at baseline and 3 mo after mechanical nonsurgical periodontal therapy. All periodontal clinical parameters were significantly higher in the RA-P and H-P groups compared with the C group (p periodontitis groups (p periodontitis and RA, nonsurgical periodontal therapy reduced the pretreatment gingival crevicular fluid t-PA levels, which were significantly correlated with gingival crevicular fluid PAI-2 levels. The significantly higher t-PA and PAI-2 gingival crevicular fluid levels in periodontal patients, regardless of systemic status, suggest that the plasminogen activating system plays a role in the disease process of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  2. Relationships between activators and inhibitors of plasminogen, and the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Shi, G-P

    2003-01-01

    plasmin is a common activator of the known proteolytic systems involved in the aneurysmal degradation, and is reported to be associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The aim of this study was to study the activating pathways of plasminogen as predictors of the progression...

  3. Activation of pro-urokinase and plasminogen on human sarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, R W; Pöllänen, J; Tapiovaara, H

    1989-01-01

    from the cells with tranexamic acid, an analogue of lysine. The bound plasmin was the result of plasminogen activation on the cell surface; plasmin activity was not taken up onto cells after deliberate addition of plasmin to the serum-containing medium. The cell surface plasmin formation was inhibited...

  4. Jet and ultrasonic nebulization of single chain urokinase plasminogen activator (scu-PA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Anna-Marie; Bendstrup, E; Jensen, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    locally by nebulization in a recombinant zymogen form as single chain urokinase plasminogen activator (scu-PA). We aimed to characterize the particle size distribution, drug output, and enzymatic activity of scu-PA after nebulization with a Ventstream jet nebulizer (Medic-Aid, Bognor Regis, UK) and a Syst...

  5. Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ci; Burgess, Stephen; Eicher, John D.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Shin, So Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M.K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M.C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent D.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D; Becker, Lewis C; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei; Hamsten, Anders; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Linda Kao, Wen Hong; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter R.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif C.; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter M.; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, W.T. jr.; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Rasheed, Asif; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V.Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shyong Tai, E.; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby; van der Lugt, Aad; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hofman, Albert; Kraja, Aldi T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ziegler, Andreas; Newman, Anne B; Schillert, Arne; Oostra, Ben A.; Thorsson, Bolli; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Fox, Caroline S.; White, Charles C.; Ballantyne, Christie; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Herrington, David M.; O'Leary, Daniel H.; Siscovick, David S.; Couper, David J; Halperin, Eran; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Ernst, Florian; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Homuth, Georg; Heiss, Gerardo; Usala, Gianluca; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Shen, Haiqing; Erich Wichmann, H.; Schmidt, Helena; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Lüdemann, Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Thiery, Joachim; Seissler, Jochen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Polak, Joseph F.; Cunningham, Julie; North, Kari E.; Petrovic, Katja E; Rice, Kenneth M.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Launer, Lenore J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sitzer, Matthias; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Province, Michael A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Franceschini, Nora; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Schnabel, Renate B.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sanna, Serena; Demissie, Serkalem; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bevan, Steve; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Howard, Timothy D.; Hoffmann, Udo; Schminke, Ulf; Nambi, Vijay; Post, Wendy S.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Cheng, Yu Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association

  6. Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor–PET with 68Ga-NOTA-AE105

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a key component in proteolysis and extracellular matrix degradation during cancer invasion and metastasis. uPAR overexpression is an important biomarker for aggressiveness in several solid tumors and provides independent clinical information...... biomarker in cancer....

  7. The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and its fragments in venous ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Anwar; Saha, Prakash; Evans, Colin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Activation of proteolytic mechanisms at the cell surface through the activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) bound to its receptor, uPAR, is an important process in wound healing. The soluble forms of uPAR (suPAR and its fragments I, II, and III) have nonproteolytic func...

  8. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor as a prognostic marker in men participating in prostate cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellman, A; Akre, O; Gustafsson, O

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is involved in tissue remodelling processes and is up-regulated in many types of malignancies. We investigated whether serum levels of different forms of soluble uPA receptor (suPAR) are associated with survival and in particular with p...

  9. Phenotypic overlap between MMP-13 and the plasminogen activation system during wound healing in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Lund, Leif R

    2011-01-01

    combined completely prevent wound healing. Both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and several matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-3, -9 and -13, are expressed in the leading-edge keratinocytes of skin wounds, which may account for this phenotypic overlap between these classes of proteases....

  10. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor forms in plasma as markers of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Fredrik J; Thurison, Tine; Ryndel, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: To test if circulating forms of the soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are potential biomarkers of plaque vulnerability. DESIGN AND METHODS:: Plasma concentrations of suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III) and uPAR(I) were measured by time-resolved fluorescence immuno...

  11. Endotoxin induction of an inhibitor of plasminogen activator in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-05

    The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) on the fibrinolytic activity of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were examined. Endotoxin suppressed the net fibrinolytic activity of cell extracts and conditioned media in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of endotoxin required at least 6 h for expression. Cell extracts and conditioned media contained a 44-kDa urokinase-like plasminogen activator. Media also contained multiple plasminogen activators with molecular masses of 65-75 and 80-100 kDa. Plasminogen activators in extracts and media were unchanged by treatment of cells with endotoxin. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP)-abolished fibrinolytic activity of extracts and conditioned media. DFP-treated samples from endotoxin-treated but not untreated cells inhibited urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator, but not plasmin. Inhibitory activity was lost by incubation at pH 3 or heating to 56/sup 0/C for 10 min. These treatments did not affect inhibitory activity of fetal bovine serum. Incubation of /sup 125/I-urokinase with DFP-treated medium from endotoxin-treated cells produced an inactive complex with an apparent molecular mass of 80-85 kDa.

  12. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M

    1990-01-01

    The receptor for human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was purified from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated U937 cells by temperature-induced phase separation of detergent extracts, followed by affinity chromatography with immobilized diisopropyl fluorophosphate-treated u...

  13. Effect of Two Lipoprotein (a-Associated Genetic Variants on Plasminogen Levels and Fibrinolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two genetic variants (rs3798220 and rs10455872 in the apolipoprotein (a gene (LPA have been implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD, presumably through their association with lipoprotein (a [Lp(a] levels. While Lp(a is recognized as a lipoprotein with atherogenic and thrombogenic characteristics, it is unclear whether or not the two Lp(a-associated genetic variants are also associated with markers of thrombosis (i.e., plasminogen levels and fibrinolysis. In the present study, we genotyped the two genetic variants in 2919 subjects of the Old Order Amish (OOA and recruited 146 subjects according to the carrier and noncarrier status for rs3798220 and rs10455872, and also matched for gender and age. We measured plasma Lp(a and plasminogen levels in these subjects, and found that the concentrations of plasma Lp(a were 2.62- and 1.73-fold higher in minor allele carriers of rs3798220 and rs10455872, respectively, compared with noncarriers (P = 2.04 × 10−17 and P = 1.64 × 10−6, respectively. By contrast, there was no difference in plasminogen concentrations between carriers and noncarriers of rs3798220 and rs10455872. Furthermore, we observed no association between carrier status of rs3798220 or rs10455872 with clot lysis time. Finally, plasminogen mRNA expression in liver samples derived from 76 Caucasian subjects was not significantly different between carriers and noncarriers of these two genetic variants. Our results provide further insight into the mechanism of action behind two genetic variants previously implicated in CVD risk and show that these polymorphisms are not major modulating factors for plasma plasminogen levels and fibrinolysis.

  14. Antibiotic modulation of the plasminogen binding ability of viridans group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Cristina; Smith, Andrew; Lang, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The ability of viridans group streptococci to bind human plasminogen and its subsequent activation into plasmin may contribute to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis (IE) by leading to a decreased stability of the streptococcal vegetation and facilitating dehiscence of emboli. At levels greater than or equal to their MICs, penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid are efficacious in the treatment of streptococcal endocarditis. However, at sub-MICs, antibiotics can modulate the expression of bacterial genes, including virulence-associated genes, which can have counterproductive effects on the treatment of endocarditis. The effects of 1/8× and 1/4× MICs of penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid on the plasminogen binding ability of IE isolates Streptococcus mitis 881/956, Streptococcus oralis 12601, and Streptococcus sanguinis 12403 were assessed phenotypically and the expression of plasminogen receptors α-enolase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of S. oralis 12601 when exposed to 1/4× MIC of penicillin, was analyzed through quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR. The plasminogen binding ability of S. mitis 881/956 and S. sanguinis 12403 remained unaffected by exposure to sub-MICs of all of the antibiotics tested, while that of S. oralis 12601 was significantly enhanced by all of the antibiotics tested at sub-MICs. qRT-PCR analysis of S. oralis 12601 demonstrated an upregulation of the eno and gapdh genes, indicating an overexpression of plasminogen receptors. These findings suggest that for some endocarditis isolates, the effect of antibiotic sub-MICs, in addition to a reduced antibacterial effect, may influence the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. It remains difficult to accurately predict isolate responses to sub-MIC antimicrobials since there appears to be interspecies variation.

  15. An enzyme-immunobinding assay for fast screening of expression of tissue plasminogen activator cDNA in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.C.T.; Li, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) has been isolated from normal human tissues and certain human cell lines in culture. The enzyme is a serine protease which converts an inactive zymogen, plasminogen to plasmin, and causes lysis of fibrin clots. The high affinity of TPA for fibrin indicates that it is a potential thrombolytic agent and is superior to urokinase-like plasminogen activators. Recently, TPA has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Using TPA as a model protein, the authors report here the development of a direct, sensitive enzyme-immunoassay for the screening of a cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and peroxidase-labeled second antibody

  16. The pro-urokinase plasminogen-activation system in the presence of serpin-type inhibitors and the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Niels; List, Karin; Andreasen, Peter A

    2003-01-01

    The reciprocal pro-enzyme activation system of plasmin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and their respective zymogens is a potent mechanism in the generation of extracellular proteolytic activity. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) acts as a negative regulator. This system...... is complicated by a poorly understood intrinsic reactivity of the uPA pro-enzyme (pro-uPA) before proteolytic activation, directed against both plasminogen and PAI-1. We have studied the integrated activation mechanism under the repression of PAI-1 in a purified system. A covalent reaction between pro...

  17. Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Inhibition of Retinoblastoma Protein Inactivation 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0329 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Seth M...confirmed 108 compounds as giving a dose-response curve with at least 30% inhibition at 10 µM. The flowchart of hit progression is shown on the...Cancer Research Program under Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0329 to S.M.R. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author

  18. Seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells by competing with intracellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and inhibiting uPA-mediated activation of plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Kim, Se-kwon; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Sun Joo

    2014-12-01

    α-Enolase is a glycolytic enzyme and a surface receptor for plasminogen. α-Enolase-bound plasminogen promotes tumor cell invasion and cancer metastasis by activating plasmin and consequently degrading the extracellular matrix degradation. Therefore, α-enolase and plasminogen are novel targets for cancer therapy. We found that the amino acid sequence of a peptide purified from enzymatic hydrolysates of seahorse has striking similarities to that of α-enolase. In this study, we report that this peptide competes with cellular α-enolase for plasminogen binding and suppresses urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated activation of plasminogen, which results in decreased invasive migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In addition, the peptide treatment decreased the expression levels of uPA compared to that of untreated controls. These results provide new insight into the mechanism by which the seahorse-derived peptide suppresses invasive properties of human cancer cells. Our findings suggest that this peptide could emerge as a potential therapeutic agent for cancer.

  19. Gene expression of fibrinolytic factors urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in rabbit temporo-mandibular joint cartilage with disc displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jing; Gu, Zhi-yuan; Wu, Li-qun; Zhang, Yin-kai; Hu, Ji-an

    2005-06-20

    The urokinase plasminogen activator system is believed to play an important role in degradation of the extracellular matrix associated with cartilage and bone destruction; however its precise roles in temporomandibular disorders have not yet been clarified. The aims of this study were to investigate the gene expression of fibrinolytic factors urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the articular cartilage of rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with disc displacement (DD) and to probe the relationship between fibrinolytic activity and cartilage remodeling. Disc displacement of right joints was performed in 36 of 78 rabbits under investigation. The animals were sacrificed at 4 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, respectively. The right joints of these animals were harvested and processed for the examination of mRNA expression of uPA and PAI-1 in articular cartilage using in situ hybridization techniques. The expression of uPA and PAI-1 was co-expressed weakly in the chondrocytes from transitive zone to hypertrophic zone and mineralized zone, while no hybridizing signals were shown in proliferative zone and superficial zone in control rabbits. The most striking was the up-regulation of uPA and PAI-1 mRNA in 4-day rabbits postoperatively at the onset of cartilage degeneration. The strongest hybridizing signals for uPA and PAI-1 were seen in 2-week rabbits postoperatively. After 2 weeks, the expression of uPA and PAI-1 began to decrease and reached nearly normal level at 12 weeks. The expression of the uPA/PAI-1 system coincides with the pathological changes in condylar cartilage after DD. The uPA/PAI-1 system may be one of the essential mediators in articular cartilage remodeling.

  20. Technetium-99m-labeled recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for the imaging of emboli in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Akihiro; Itoh, Kazuo; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Furudate, Masayori; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1993-07-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) effectively lyses activate thrombus by direct action. Recombinant t-PA (rt-PA) was labeled with technetium-99m ([sup 99m]Tc) to investigate the in vivo binding to fibrin clots in a feline cerebral embolism model created by insertion of an artificial fibrin clot within the carotid artery. [sup 99m]Tc-rt-PA administered intravenously provided clearer imaging of clots after priming with cold rt-PA, with uptake peaking 5-10 minutes after the injection. [sup 99m]Tc-labeled human serum albumin was not retained at clot sites. Systemically administered [sup 99m]Tc-rt-PA binds to fibrin clots within carotid arteries in our feline model. Our results suggest that the interaction of intrinsic plasminogen activator inhibitors with extrinsically administered rt-PA may regulate the demonstration of a clot, although the precise mechanism is unclear. (author).

  1. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on invasive cancer cells: A prognostic factor in distal gastric adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpizar, Warner Enrique Alpizar; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cancer causing death worldwide. The five-year survival for this malignancy is below 25% and few parameters have shown an impact on the prognosis of the disease. The receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is involved in extracellular matrix degradation...... by mediating cell surface associated plasminogen activation, and its presence on gastric cancer cells is linked to micrometastasis and poor prognosis. Using immunohistochemistry, the prognostic significance of uPAR was evaluated in tissue samples from a retrospective series of 95 gastric cancer patients. u...... association between the expression of uPAR on tumor cells in the peripheral invasion zone and overall survival of gastric cancer patients (HR = 2.16; 95% CI: 1.13-4.14; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed that uPAR immunoreactivity in cancer cells at the invasive front is an independent prognostic factor...

  2. Characterization of tissue plasminogen activator binding proteins isolated from endothelial cells and other cell types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, D.P.; Wood, L.L.; Moos, M.

    1990-01-01

    Human tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was shown to bind specifically to human osteosarcoma cells (HOS), and human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A-431 cells). Crosslinking studies with DTSSP demonstrated high molecular weight complexes (130,000) between 125 I-t-PA and cell membrane protein on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HOS, and A-431 cells. A 48-65,000 molecular weight complex was demonstrated after crosslinking t-PA peptide (res. 7-20) to cells. Ligand blotting of cell lysates which had been passed over a t-PA affinity column revealed binding of t-PA to 54,000 and 95,000 molecular weight proteins. Several t-PA binding proteins were identified in immunopurified cell lysates, including tubulin beta chain, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and single chain urokinase

  3. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C

    2011-01-01

    Tight regulation of serine proteases is essential for their physiological function, and unbalanced states of protease activity have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. One key example is the presence of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) in different human cancer types......, demonstrating a direct link between conformational changes of the autolysis loop and the creation of a catalytically mature active site. All three antibodies are potent inhibitors of uPA activity, the two pro-uPA-specific ones by inhibiting conversion of pro-uPA to active uPA and the active u......PA-specific antibody by shielding the access of plasminogen to the active site. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence, the conformation-specific antibodies mAb-112 and mAb-12E6B10 enabled us to selectively stain pro-uPA or active uPA on the surface of cultured cells. Moreover, in various independent model systems...

  4. Effect of purified, soluble urokinase receptor on the plasminogen-prourokinase activation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Danø, K

    1996-01-01

    The extracellular proteolytic pathway mediated by the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a cascade system, initiated by activation of the zymogen, pro-uPA. Pro-uPA as well as uPA binds to the cellular uPA receptor (uPAR) which has a central function in cell-dependent acceleration of the cas......The extracellular proteolytic pathway mediated by the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a cascade system, initiated by activation of the zymogen, pro-uPA. Pro-uPA as well as uPA binds to the cellular uPA receptor (uPAR) which has a central function in cell-dependent acceleration...

  5. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P 3 HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction

  6. Association of Geographical Factors With Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisawa, Susumu; Morishima, Toshitaka; Ukawa, Naoto; Ikai, Hiroshi; Otsubo, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Yokota, Chiaki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke if administered within a few hours of stroke onset. Because of this time restriction, tPA administration remains infrequent. Ambulance use is an effective strategy for increasing tPA administration but may be influenced by geographical factors. The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between tPA administration and ambulance use and to examine how patient trave...

  7. Basilar Artery Thrombosis in a Child Treated With Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator and Endovascular Mechanical Thrombectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Jakob Fink; Sonnenborg, Laura; Larsen, Line Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Basilar artery occlusion in children is rare. It has a high mortality and morbidity if recanalization is not achieved before extensive brainstem infarction has occurred. An 11-year-old boy presented with a clinical and radiological "top-of-the-basilar" syndrome. Intravenous tissue plasminogen act...... thrombolysis (4.5 hours), the present case suggests that bridging therapy in pediatric basilar artery occlusion can be safe and effective....

  8. Activity and expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases in human colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Li, Ge; Choi, Hoon; Park, Hae-Duck; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) are involved in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis. There is still debate whether the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 differs between tumors located in the colon and rectum. We designed this study to determine any differences in the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA system between colon and rectal cancer tissues. Cancer tissue samples were obtained from colon carcinoma (n = 12) and rectal carcinomas (n = 10). MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting; their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), were assessed by Western blotting. uPA, uPAR and PAI-1 were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of uPA was assessed by casein-plasminogen zymography. In both colon and rectal tumors, MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 protein levels were higher than in corresponding paired normal mucosa, while TIMP-2 level in tumors was significantly lower than in normal mucosa. The enzyme activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and their endogenous inhibitors did not reach a statistically significant difference between colon and rectal cancer compared with their normal mucosa. In rectal tumors, there was an increased activity of uPA compared with the activity in colon tumors (P = 0.0266), however urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showed no significant difference between colon and rectal cancer tissues. These findings suggest that uPA may be expressed differentially in colon and rectal cancers, however, the activities or protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, PAI-1 and uPAR are not affected by tumor location in the colon or the rectum

  9. Colonic lesions, cytokine profiles, and gut microbiota in plasminogen-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Bill; Krych, Lukasz; Lund, Leif R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen-deficient (FVB/NPan-plg(tm1Jld), plg(tm1Jld)) mice, which are widely used as a wound-healing model, are prone to spontaneous rectal prolapses. The aims of this study were 1) to evaluate the fecal microbiome of plg(tm1Jld) mice for features that might contribute to the development...... the composition of the gut microbiota, and none of the clinical or biochemical parameters correlated with the gut microbiota composition....

  10. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  11. Hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin-induced tissue plasminogen activator- dependent gelatinase activation in mice neonate brain microvessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla L Omouendze

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI and excitotoxicity are validated causes of neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor-mediated pathways. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from neonates in culture, contain and release more t-PA and gelatinases upon glutamate challenge than adult cells. We have studied t-PA to gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity links in HI and excitotoxicity lesion models in 5 day-old pups in wild type and in t-PA or its inhibitor (PAI-1 genes inactivated mice. Gelatinolytic activities were detected in SDS-PAGE zymograms and by in situ fluorescent DQ-gelatin microscopic zymographies. HI was achieved by unilateral carotid ligature followed by a 40 min hypoxia (8%O₂. Excitotoxic lesions were produced by intra parenchymal cortical (i.c. injections of 10 µg ibotenate (Ibo. Gel zymograms in WT cortex revealed progressive extinction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities near day 15 or day 8 respectively. MMP-2 expression was the same in all strains while MMP-9 activity was barely detectable in t-PA⁻/⁻ and enhanced in PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice. HI or Ibo produced activation of MMP-2 activities 6 hours post-insult, in cortices of WT mice but not in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice. In PAI-1⁻/⁻ mice, HI or vehicle i.c. injection increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. In situ zymograms using DQ-gelatin revealed vessel associated gelatinolytic activity in lesioned areas in PAI-1⁻/⁻ and in WT mice. In WT brain slices incubated ex vivo, glutamate (200 µM induced DQ-gelatin activation in vessels. The effect was not detected in t-PA⁻/⁻ mice, but was restored by concomitant exposure to recombinant t-PA (20 µg/mL. In summary, neonatal brain lesion paradigms and ex vivo excitotoxic glutamate evoked t-PA-dependent gelatinases activation in vessels. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities appeared t-PA-dependent. The data suggest that vascular directed protease inhibition may have

  12. Determination of plasminogen/plasmin system components and indicators of lipoproteins oxidative modification under arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Yusova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was investigated of levels of oxidative modification of lipoproteins and content of plasminogen/plasmin system components – tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA and plasminogen activators inhibitor-1 (PAI-I, in patients with stage II arterial hypertension (AHT and resistant form. It was established that t-PA level in blood plasma of the patients is 2 times lower under stage II hypertension than normal and 2.5 times lower under resistant AHT. The inhibitor activity is 1.5 and 2 times higher consequently. It is concluded that patients with AHT have a decreased fibrinolytic potential, which can cause thrombotic states. Our evaluation showed a significant accumulation of products of lipid and protein oxidation, decrease of activity of antioxidant enzymes and changes of the activity of high density-lipoproteins-associated enzymes (decrease of paraoxonase-1 activity, increase of myeloperoxidase activity. Oxidized lipoproteins, t-PA and PAI-1 can be used as prognostic markers of development of complications and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in patients with arterial hypertension.

  13. CipA of Acinetobacter baumannii Is a Novel Plasminogen Binding and Complement Inhibitory Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigs, Arno; Stahl, Julia; Averhoff, Beate; Göttig, Stephan; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen, responsible for up to 10% of gram-negative, nosocomial infections. The global increase of multidrug-resistant and pan-resistant Acinetobacter isolates presents clinicians with formidable challenges. To establish a persistent infection,A. baumannii must overcome the detrimental effects of complement as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. However, the immune evasion principles underlying serum resistance inA. baumannii remain elusive. Here, we identified a novel plasminogen-binding protein, termed CipA. Bound plasminogen, upon conversion to active plasmin, degraded fibrinogen and complement C3b and contributed to serum resistance. Furthermore, CipA directly inhibited the alternative pathway of complement in vitro, irrespective of its ability to bind plasminogen. A CipA-deficient mutant was efficiently killed by human serum and showed a defect in the penetration of endothelial monolayers, demonstrating that CipA is a novel multifunctional protein that contributes to the pathogenesis ofA. baumannii. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Urokinase links plasminogen activation and cell adhesion by cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi, Valentina; Sarra Ferraris, Gian Maria; Madsen, Jeppe B; Lupia, Michela; Andreasen, Peter A; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-07-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system including urokinase (uPA), its inhibitor (PAI-1) and its cell surface receptor (uPAR) have been implicated in a wide variety of biological processes related to tissue homoeostasis. Firstly, the binding of uPA to uPAR favours extracellular proteolysis by enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation. Secondly, it promotes cell adhesion and signalling through binding of the provisional matrix protein vitronectin. We now report that uPA and plasmin induces a potent negative feedback on cell adhesion through specific cleavage of the RGD motif in vitronectin. Cleavage of vitronectin by uPA displays a remarkable receptor dependence and requires concomitant binding of both uPA and vitronectin to uPAR Moreover, we show that PAI-1 counteracts the negative feedback and behaves as a proteolysis-triggered stabilizer of uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to vitronectin. These findings identify a novel and highly specific function for the plasminogen activation system in the regulation of cell adhesion to vitronectin. The cleavage of vitronectin by uPA and plasmin results in the release of N-terminal vitronectin fragments that can be detected in vivo, underscoring the potential physiological relevance of the process. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. The Biochemistry and Regulation of S100A10: A Multifunctional Plasminogen Receptor Involved in Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Madureira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasminogen receptors mediate the production and localization to the cell surface of the broad spectrum proteinase, plasmin. S100A10 is a key regulator of cellular plasmin production and may account for as much as 50% of cellular plasmin generation. In parallel to plasminogen, the plasminogen-binding site on S100A10 is highly conserved from mammals to fish. S100A10 is constitutively expressed in many cells and is also induced by many diverse factors and physiological stimuli including dexamethasone, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-α, interferon-γ, nerve growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor, retinoic acid, and thrombin. Therefore, S100A10 is utilized by cells to regulate plasmin proteolytic activity in response to a wide diversity of physiological stimuli. The expression of the oncogenes, PML-RARα and KRas, also stimulates the levels of S100A10, suggesting a role for S100A10 in pathophysiological processes such as in the oncogenic-mediated increases in plasmin production. The S100A10-null mouse model system has established the critical role that S100A10 plays as a regulator of fibrinolysis and oncogenesis. S100A10 plays two major roles in oncogenesis, first as a regulator of cancer cell invasion and metastasis and secondly as a regulator of the recruitment of tumor-associated cells, such as macrophages, to the tumor site.

  16. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Stubblefield

    Full Text Available We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE.Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI, plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1, thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG and turbidimetry (A405.Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec. Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT.The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  17. Variable Resistance to Plasminogen Activator Initiated Fibrinolysis for Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, William B; Alves, Nathan J; Rondina, Matthew T; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examine the clinical significance and biomarkers of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-catalyzed clot lysis time (CLT) in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE). Platelet-poor, citrated plasma was obtained from patients with PE. Healthy age- and sex-matched patients served as disease-negative controls. Fibrinogen, α2-antiplasmin, plasminogen, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), plasminogen activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombin time and D-dimer were quantified. Clotting was induced using CaCl2, tissue factor, and phospholipid. Lysis was induced using 60 ng/mL tPA. Time to 50% clot lysis (CLT) was assessed by both thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetry (A405). Compared with disease-negative controls, patients with PE exhibited significantly longer mean CLT on TEG (+2,580 seconds, 95% CI 1,380 to 3,720 sec). Patients with PE and a short CLT who were treated with tenecteplase had increased risk of bleeding, whereas those with long CLT had significantly worse exercise tolerance and psychometric testing for quality of life at 3 months. A multivariate stepwise removal regression model selected PAI-1 and TAFI as predictive biomarkers of CLT. The CLT from TEG predicted increased risk of bleeding and clinical failure with tenecteplase treatment for intermediate-risk PE. Plasmatic PAI-1 and TAFI were independent predictors of CLT.

  18. Tissue-type plasminogen activator contributes to remodeling of the rat ductus arteriosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junichi; Nicho, Naoki; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Satoko; Umemura, Masanari; Fujita, Takayuki; Ito, Shuichi; Taniguchi, Hideki; Asou, Toshihide; Masuda, Munetaka; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-01

    Aims The ductus arteriosus (DA) closes after birth to adapt to the robust changes in hemodynamics, which require intimal thickening (IT) to occur. The smooth muscle cells of the DA have been reported to play important roles in IT formation. However, the roles of the endothelial cells (ECs) have not been fully investigated. We herein focused on tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which is a DA EC dominant gene, and investigated its contribution to IT formation in the DA. Methods and results ECs from the DA and aorta were isolated from fetal rats using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RT-PCR showed that the t-PA mRNA expression level was 2.7-fold higher in DA ECs than in aortic ECs from full-term rat fetuses (gestational day 21). A strong immunoreaction for t-PA was detected in pre-term and full-term rat DA ECs. t-PA-mediated plasminogen-plasmin conversion activates gelatinase matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Gelatin zymography revealed that plasminogen supplementation significantly promoted activation of the elastolytic enzyme MMP-2 in rat DA ECs. In situ zymography demonstrated that marked gelatinase activity was observed at the site of disruption in the internal elastic laminae (IEL) in full-term rat DA. In a three-dimensional vascular model, EC-mediated plasminogen-plasmin conversion augmented the IEL disruption. In vivo administration of plasminogen to pre-term rat fetuses (gestational day 19), in which IT is poorly formed, promoted IEL disruption accompanied by gelatinase activation and enhanced IT formation in the DA. Additionally, experiments using five human DA tissues demonstrated that the t-PA expression level was 3.7-fold higher in the IT area than in the tunica media. t-PA protein expression and gelatinase activity were also detected in the IT area of the human DAs. Conclusion t-PA expressed in ECs may help to form IT of the DA via activation of MMP-2 and disruption of IEL. PMID:29304073

  19. Plasminogen fragments K 1-3 and K 5 bind to different sites in fibrin fragment DD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinenko, T V; Kapustianenko, L G; Yatsenko, T A; Yusova, O I; Rybachuk, V N

    2016-01-01

    Specific plasminogen-binding sites of fibrin molecule are located in Аα148-160 regions of C-terminal domains. Plasminogen interaction with these sites initiates the activation process of proenzyme and subsequent fibrin lysis. In this study we investigated the binding of plasminogen fragments K 1-3 and K 5 with fibrin fragment DD and their effect on Glu-plasminogen interaction with DD. It was shown that the level of Glu-plasminogen binding to fibrin fragment DD is decreased by 50-60% in the presence of K 1-3 and K 5. Fragments K 1-3 and K 5 have high affinity to fibrin fragment DD (Kd is 0.02 for K 1-3 and 0.054 μМ for K 5). K 5 interaction is independent and K 1-3 is partly dependent on C-terminal lysine residues. K 1-3 interacts with complex of fragment DD-immobilized K 5 as well as K 5 with complex of fragment DD-immobilized K 1-3. The plasminogen fragments do not displace each other from binding sites located in fibrin fragment DD, but can compete for the interaction. The results indicate that fibrin fragment DD contains different binding sites for plasminogen kringle fragments K 1-3 and K 5, which can be located close to each other. The role of amino acid residues of fibrin molecule Аα148-160 region in interaction with fragments K 1-3 and K 5 is discussed.

  20. Skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Sho; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ohgane, Jun; Hattori, Naka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Shiota, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    In female mammals, dosage compensation for X-linked genes is accomplished by inactivation of one of two X chromosomes. The X-inactivation ratio (a percentage of the cells with inactivated maternal X chromosomes in the whole cells) is skewed as a consequence of various genetic mutations, and has been observed in a number of X-linked disorders. We previously reported that phenotypically normal full-term cloned mouse fetuses had loci with inappropriate DNA methylation. Thus, cloned mice are excellent models to study abnormal epigenetic events in mammalian development. In the present study, we analyzed X-inactivation ratios in adult female cloned mice (B6C3F1). Kidneys of eight naturally produced controls and 11 cloned mice were analyzed. Although variations in X-inactivation ratio among the mice were observed in both groups, the distributions were significantly different (Ansary-Bradley test, P < 0.01). In particular, 2 of 11 cloned mice showed skewed X-inactivation ratios (19.2% and 86.8%). Similarly, in intestine, 1 of 10 cloned mice had a skewed ratio (75.7%). Skewed X-inactivation was observed to various degrees in different tissues of different individuals, suggesting that skewed X-inactivation in cloned mice is the result of secondary cell selection in combination with stochastic distortion of primary choice. The present study is the first demonstration that skewed X-inactivation occurs in cloned animals. This finding is important for understanding both nuclear transfer technology and etiology of X-linked disorders

  1. Prognostic significance of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leissner, Philippe; Verjat, Thibault; Bachelot, Thomas; Paye, Malick; Krause, Alexander; Puisieux, Alain; Mougin, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    One of the most thoroughly studied systems in relation to its prognostic relevance in patients with breast cancer, is the plasminogen activation system that comprises of, among others, the urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA) and its main inhibitor, the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The study included a retrospective series of 87 patients with hormone-receptor positive and axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer. All patients received radiotherapy, adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and five years of tamoxifen treatment. The median patient age was 54 and the median follow-up time was 79 months. Distant relapse occurred in 30 patients and 22 patients died from breast cancer during follow-up. We investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level as measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. uPA and PAI-1 gene expression was not found to be correlated with any of the established clinical and pathological factors. Metastasis-free Survival (MFS) and Breast Cancer specific Survival (BCS) were significantly shorter in patients expressing high levels of PAI-1 mRNA (p < 0.0001; p < 0.0001; respectively). In Cox multivariate analysis, the level of PAI-1 mRNA appeared to be the strongest prognostic factor for MFS (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 10.12; p = 0.0002) and for BCS (HR = 13.17; p = 0.0003). Furthermore, uPA gene expression was not significantly associated neither with MFS (p = 0.41) nor with BCS (p = 0.19). In a Cox-multivariate regression analysis, uPA expression did not demonstrate significant independent prognostic value. These findings indicate that high PAI-1 mRNA expression represents a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor for the development of metastases and for breast cancer specific survival in a population of hormone receptor- and lymph node-positive breast cancer

  2. Prognostic significance of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA expression in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause Alexander

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most thoroughly studied systems in relation to its prognostic relevance in patients with breast cancer, is the plasminogen activation system that comprises of, among others, the urokinase Plasminogen Activator (uPA and its main inhibitor, the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level in lymph node- and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Methods The study included a retrospective series of 87 patients with hormone-receptor positive and axillary lymph node-positive breast cancer. All patients received radiotherapy, adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy and five years of tamoxifen treatment. The median patient age was 54 and the median follow-up time was 79 months. Distant relapse occurred in 30 patients and 22 patients died from breast cancer during follow-up. We investigated the prognostic value of uPA and PAI-1 at the mRNA level as measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results uPA and PAI-1 gene expression was not found to be correlated with any of the established clinical and pathological factors. Metastasis-free Survival (MFS and Breast Cancer specific Survival (BCS were significantly shorter in patients expressing high levels of PAI-1 mRNA (p PAI-1 mRNA appeared to be the strongest prognostic factor for MFS (Hazard Ratio (HR = 10.12; p = 0.0002 and for BCS (HR = 13.17; p = 0.0003. Furthermore, uPA gene expression was not significantly associated neither with MFS (p = 0.41 nor with BCS (p = 0.19. In a Cox-multivariate regression analysis, uPA expression did not demonstrate significant independent prognostic value. Conclusion These findings indicate that high PAI-1 mRNA expression represents a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor for the development of metastases and for breast cancer specific survival in a population of hormone receptor- and lymph node-positive breast cancer patients.

  3. Mhp182 (P102) binds fibronectin and contributes to the recruitment of plasmin(ogen) to the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Lisa M; Jenkins, Cheryl; Deutscher, Ania T; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Padula, Matthew P; Tacchi, Jessica L; Bogema, Daniel R; Eamens, Graeme J; Woolley, Lauren K; Dixon, Nicholas E; Walker, Mark J; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a major, economically damaging respiratory pathogen. Although M. hyopneumoniae cells bind plasminogen, the identification of plasminogen-binding surface proteins and the biological ramifications of acquiring plasminogen requires further investigation. mhp182 encodes a highly expressed 102 kDa protein (P102) that undergoes proteolytic processing to generate surface-located N-terminal 60 kDa (P60) and C-terminal 42 kDa (P42) proteins of unknown function. We show that recombinant P102 (rP102) binds plasminogen at physiologically relevant concentrations (K(D) ~ 76 nM) increasing the susceptibility of plasmin(ogen) to activation by tissue-specific plasminogen activator (tPA). Recombinant proteins constructed to mimic P60 (rP60) and P42 (rP42) also bound plasminogen at physiologically significant levels. M. hyopneumoniae surface-bound plasminogen was activated by tPA and is able to degrade fibrinogen, demonstrating the biological functionality of M. hyopneumoniae-bound plasmin(ogen) upon activation. Plasmin(ogen) was readily detected in porcine ciliated airways and plasmin levels were consistently higher in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from M. hyopneumoniae-infected animals. Additionally, rP102 and rP42 bind fibronectin with K(D) s of 26 and 33 nM respectively and recombinant P102 proteins promote adherence to porcine kidney epithelial-like cells. The multifunctional binding ability of P102 and activation of M. hyopneumoniae-sequestered plasmin(ogen) by an exogenous activator suggests P102 plays an important role in virulence. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) in breast cancer - correlation with traditional prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampelj, Maja; Arko, Darja; Cas-Sikosek, Nina; Kavalar, Rajko; Ravnik, Maja; Jezersek-Novakovic, Barbara; Dobnik, Sarah; Dovnik, Nina Fokter; Takac, Iztok

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) play a key role in tumour invasion and metastasis. High levels of both proteolytic enzymes are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between traditional prognostic factors and uPA and PAI-1 expression in primary tumour of breast cancer patients. 606 primary breast cancer patients were enrolled in the prospective study in the Department of gynaecological oncology and breast oncology at the University Medical Centre Maribor between the years 2004 and 2010. We evaluated the traditional prognostic factors (age, menopausal status, tumour size, pathohistological type, histologic grade, lymph node status, lymphovascular invasion and hormone receptor status), together with uPA and PAI-1. We used Spearman’s rank correlation, Mann Whitney U test and χ 2 test for statistical analysis. Our findings indicate a positive correlation between uPA and tumour size (p < 0.001), grade (p < 0.001), histological type (p < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.01) and a negative correlation between uPA and hormone receptor status (p < 0.001). They also indicate a positive correlation between PAI-1 and tumour size (p = 0.004), grade (p < 0.001), pathohistological type (p < 0.001) and negative correlation between PAI-1 and hormone receptor status (p = 0.002). Our study showed a relationship between uPA and PAI-1 and traditional prognostic factors. Their role as prognostic and predictive factors remains to be further evaluated

  5. Physical inactivation and stabilization of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1979-07-01

    High temperature conditioning of sludge is a stabilization process that insures sterilization. Both thermal pasteurization and irradiation are inactivation processes. Viruses and parasites are inactivated at 70-80 0 C. Total bacterial destruction requires higher temperatures and/or detention time. Radio sensitivity of pathogens and pertinent treatment parameters are examined. If sludge is to be land disposed, disinfection requires irradiation doses ranging 500 Krad; if cattle feeding is considered, the required dose is 1 Mrad

  6. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  7. Mycobacteria inactivation using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Gao, Ya; Branco, Alan; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Lemos, Bernardo; Nardell, Edward; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Airborne transmitted pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cause serious, often fatal infectious disease with enormous global health implications. Due to their unique cell wall and slow growth, mycobacteria are among the most resilient microbial forms. Herein we evaluate the ability of an emerging, chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method to inactivate M. parafortuitum (Mtb surrogate). This method is based on the transformation of atmospheric water vapor into engineered water nano-structures (EWNS) via electrospray. We demonstrate that the EWNS can interact with and inactivate airborne mycobacteria, reducing their concentration levels significantly. Additionally, EWNS can inactivate M. parafortuitum on surfaces eight times faster than the control. The mechanism of mycobacteria inactivation was also investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the EWNS effectively deliver the reactive oxygen species, encapsulated during the electrospray process, to the bacteria oxidizing their cell membrane resulting into inactivation. Overall, this is a method with the potential to become an effective intervention technology in the battle against airborne infections. This study demonstrates the feasibility of mycobacterium inactivation in airborne form or on contact surfaces using electrospray activated water nano-structures. Given that the method is free of toxic chemicals, this might become an important tool in the prevention of mycobacterial infections, which are notoriously hard to treat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell inactivation by heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, E A [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Cell and Molecular Biology Div.

    1992-06-01

    The inactivation of cells resulting in lethal or aberrant effects by charged particles is of growing interest. Charged particles at extremely high LET are capable of completely eliminating cell-type and cell-line differences in repair capacity. It is still not clear however whether the repair systems are inactivated, or merely that heavy-ion lesions are less repairable. Studies correlating the particle inactivation dose of radioresistant cells with intact DNA analyzed with pulse field gel electrophoresis and other techniques may be useful, but more experiments are also needed to assess the fidelity of repair. For particle irradiations between 40-100 keV/{mu}m there is however evidence for particle-induced activation of specific genes in mammalian cells, and certain repair processes in bacteria. New data are available on the inactivation of developmental processes in several systems including seeds, and cells of the nematode C. elegans. Future experimental and theoretical modeling research emphasis should focus on exploring particle-induced inactivation of endpoints assessing functionality and not just lethality, and on analyzing molecular damage and genetic effects arising in damage but non-inactivated survivors. The discrete nature of selective types of particle damage as a function of radiation quality indicates the value of accelerated ions as probes of normal and aberrant biological processes. Information obtained from molecular analyses of damage and repair must however be integrated into the context of cellular and tissue functions of the organism. (orig.).

  9. Tumor necrosis factor increases the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor in human endothelial cells in vitro and in rats in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van; Kooistra, T.; Berg, E.A. van den; Princen, H.M.G.; Fiers, W.; Emeis, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The vascular endothelium plays an important role in fibrinolysis by producing tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The monokine tumor necrosis factor (human recombinant TNF) increased the production of PAI by cultured human endothelial cells from

  10. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves

  11. Identification and characterization of Taenia solium enolase as a plasminogen-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayón-Núñez, Dolores A; Fragoso, Gladis; Espitia, Clara; García-Varela, Martín; Soberón, Xavier; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P; Bobes, Raúl J

    2018-06-01

    The larval stage of Taenia solium (cysticerci) is the causal agent of human and swine cysticercosis. When ingested by the host, T. solium eggs are activated and hatch in the intestine, releasing oncospheres that migrate to various tissues and evolve into cysticerci. Plasminogen (Plg) receptor proteins have been reported to play a role in migration processes for several pathogens. This work is aimed to identify Plg-binding proteins in T. solium cysticerci and determine whether T. solium recombinant enolase (rTsEnoA) is capable of specifically binding and activating human Plg. To identify Plg-binding proteins, a 2D-SDS-PAGE ligand blotting was performed, and recognized spots were identified by MS/MS. Seven proteins from T. solium cysticerci were found capable of binding Plg: fascicilin-1, fasciclin-2, enolase, MAPK, annexin, actin, and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase. To determine whether rTsEnoA binds human Plg, a ligand blotting was performed and the results were confirmed by ELISA both in the presence and absence of εACA, a competitive Plg inhibitor. Finally, rTsEnoA-bound Plg was activated to plasmin in the presence of tPA. To better understand the evolution of enolase isoforms in T. solium, a phylogenetic inference analysis including 75 enolase amino acid sequences was conducted. The origin of flatworm enolase isoforms, except for Eno4, is independent of their vertebrate counterparts. Therefore, herein we propose to designate tapeworm protein isoforms as A, B, C, and 4. In conclusion, recombinant enolase showed a strong plasminogen binding and activating activity in vitro. T. solium enolase could play a role in parasite invasion along with other plasminogen-binding proteins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction and expression of a recombinant antibody-targeted plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnee, J.M.; Runge, M.S.; Matsueda, G.A.; Hudson, N.W.; Seidman, J.G.; Haber, E.; Quertermous, T.

    1987-01-01

    Covalent linkage of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to a monoclonal antibody specific for the fibrin β chain (anti-fibrin 59D8) results in a thrombolytic agent that is more specific and more potent that t-PA alone. To provide a ready source of this hybrid molecule and to allow tailoring of the active moieties for optimal activity, the authors have engineered a recombinant version of the 59D8-t-PA conjugate. The rearranged 59D8 heavy chain gene was cloned and combined in the expression vector pSV2gpt with sequence coding for a portion of the γ2b constant region and the catalytic β chain of t-PA. This construct was transfected into heavy chain loss variant cells derived form the 59D8 hybridoma. Recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed with electrophoretic transfer blots and radioimmunoassay. These revealed a 65-kDa heavy chain-t-PA fusion protein that is secreted in association with the 59D8 light chain in the form of a 170-kDa disulfide-linked dimer. Chromogenic substrate assays showed the fusion protein to have 70% of the peptidolytic activity of native t-PA and to activate plasminogen as efficiently as t-PA. IN a competitive binding assay, reconstituted antibody was shown to have a binding profile similar to that of native 59D8. Thus, by recombinant techniques, they have produced a hybrid protein capable of high affinity fibrin binding and plasminogen activation

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 regulates microglial motility and phagocytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hyejin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is the primary inhibitor of urokinase type plasminogen activators (uPA and tissue type plasminogen activators (tPA, which mediate fibrinolysis. PAI-1 is also involved in the innate immunity by regulating cell migration and phagocytosis. However, little is known about the role of PAI-1 in the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we identified PAI-1 in the culture medium of mouse mixed glial cells by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Secretion of PAI-1 from glial cultures was detected by ELISA and western blotting analysis. Cell migration was evaluated by in vitro scratch-wound healing assay or Boyden chamber assay and an in vivo stab wound injury model. Phagocytic activity was measured by uptake of zymosan particles. Results The levels of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression were increased by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ stimulation in both microglia and astrocytes. PAI-1 promoted the migration of microglial cells in culture via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP 1/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1 axis. PAI-1 also increased microglial migration in vivo when injected into mouse brain. PAI-1-mediated microglial migration was independent of protease inhibition, because an R346A mutant of PAI-1 with impaired PA inhibitory activity also promoted microglial migration. Moreover, PAI-1 was able to modulate microglial phagocytic activity. PAI-1 inhibited microglial engulfment of zymosan particles in a vitronectin- and Toll-like receptor 2/6-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results indicate that glia-derived PAI-1 may regulate microglial migration and phagocytosis in an autocrine or paracrine manner. This may have important implications in the regulation of brain microglial activities in health and disease.

  14. Accessibility of receptor-bound urokinase to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubellis, M.V.; Andreasen, P.; Ragno, P.; Mayer, M.; Dano, K.; Blasi, F. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1989-07-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) interacts with a surface receptor and with specific inhibitors, such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). These interactions are mediated by two functionally independent domains of the molecule: the catalytic domain (at the carboxyl terminus) and the growth factor domain (at the amino terminus). The authors have now investigated whether PAI-1 can bind and inhibit receptor-bound uPA. Binding of {sup 125}I-labeled ATF (amino-terminal fragment of uPA) to human U937 monocyte-like cells can be competed for by uPA-PAI-1 complexes, but not by PAI-1 alone. Preformed {sup 125}I-labeled uPA-PAI-1 complexes can bind to uPA receptor with the same binding specificity as uPA. PAI-1 also binds to, and inhibits the activity of, receptor-bound uPA in U937 cells, as shown in U937 cells by a caseinolytic plaque assay. Plasminogen activator activity of these cells is dependent on exogenous uPA, is competed for by receptor-binding diisopropyl fluorophosphate-treated uPA, and is inhibited by the addition of PAI-1. In conclusion, in U937 cells the binding to the receptor does not shield uPA from the action of PAI-1. The possibility that in adherent cells a different localization of PAI-1 and uPA leads to protection of uPA from PAI-1 is to be considered.

  15. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan, A.L.; Cubellis, M.V.; Masucci, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    , and therefore the capacity of cells to migrate and invade neighboring tissues. We have isolated a 1.4 kb cDNA clone coding for the entire human uPAR. An oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein was used to screen a cDNA library made from SV40 transformed human......, a size very close to that of the cloned cDNA. Expression of the uPAR cDNA in mouse cells confirms that the clone is complete and expresses a functional uPA binding protein, located on the cell surface and with properties similar to the human uPAR. Caseinolytic plaque assay, immunofluorescence analysis......The surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) has been recognized in recent years as a key molecule in regulating plasminogen mediated extracellular proteolysis. Surface plasminogen activation controls the connections between cells, basement membrane and extracellular matrix...

  16. Expression of urokinase plasminogen activator, its receptor and type-1 inhibitor in malignant and benign prostate tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usher, Pernille Autzen; Thomsen, Ole Frøkjær; Iversen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) cascade participates in degradation of extracellular matrix during cancer invasion. We have studied the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) mRNA, uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA and immunoreactivity, and type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) m......RNA and immunoreactivity in 16 prostate adenocarcinomas and 9 benign prostate hyperplasias. uPA mRNA and uPAR mRNA expression were found in 9 and 8 of the adenocarcinomas, respectively, and in 7 and 6 of the benign hyperplasias, respectively. In both malignant and benign lesions, expression of these 2 m...... proximity to cancer cell islands. No immunoreactivity and/or mRNA expression of uPA, uPAR or PAI-1 was observed in cancer cells or in other epithelial cells in any of the cases....

  17. Analysis of the binding of pro-urokinase and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein using a Fab fragment selected from a phage-displayed Fab library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, I. R.; Moestrup, S. K.; van den Berg, B. M.; Pannekoek, H.; Nielsen, M. S.; van Zonneveld, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP) mediates endocytosis of a number of structurally unrelated ligands, including complexes of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase plasminogen

  18. Does intravenous administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke can cause inferior myocardial infarction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Almasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA is one of the main portions of acute ischemic stroke management, but unfortunately has some complications. Myocardial infarction (MI is a hazardous complication of administration of intravenous rTPA that has been reported recently. A 78-year-old lady was admitted for elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. On the second day of admission, she developed acute left hemiparesis and intravenous rTPA was administered within 120 minutes. Three hours later, she has had chest pain. Rescue percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on right coronary artery due to diagnosis of inferior MI, and the symptoms were resolved.

  19. Interconversion of Active and Inactive Conformations of Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhuo; Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of serine proteases depends on a salt-bridge between the amino group of residue 16 and the side chain of Asp194. The salt-bridge stabilizes the oxyanion hole and the S1 specificity pocket of the protease. Some serine proteases exist in only partially active forms, in which...... the amino group of residue 16 is exposed to the solvent. Such a partially active state is assumed by a truncated form of the murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator (muPA), consisting of residues 16-243. Here we investigated the allosteric interconversion between partially active states and the fully...

  20. Analysis of five streptokinase formulations using the euglobulin lysis test and the plasminogen activation assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto L.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptokinase, a 47-kDa protein isolated and secreted by most group A, C and G ß-hemolytic streptococci, interacts with and activates human protein plasminogen to form an active complex capable of converting other plasminogen molecules to plasmin. Our objective was to compare five streptokinase formulations commercially available in Brazil in terms of their activity in the in vitro tests of euglobulin clot formation and of the hydrolysis of the plasmin-specific substrate S-2251(TM. Euglobulin lysis time was determined using a 96-well microtiter plate. Initially, human thrombin (10 IU/ml and streptokinase were placed in individual wells, clot formation was initiated by the addition of plasma euglobulin, and turbidity was measured at 340 nm every 30 s. In the second assay, plasminogen activation was measured using the plasmin-specific substrate S-2251(TM. Streptase(TM was used as the reference formulation because it presented the strongest fibrinolytic activity in the euglobulin lysis test. The Unitinase(TM and Solustrep(TM formulations were the weakest, showing about 50% activity compared to the reference formulation. All streptokinases tested activated plasminogen but significant differences were observed. In terms of total S-2251(TM activity per vial, Streptase(TM (75.7 ± 5.0 units and Streptonase(TM (94.7 ± 4.6 units had the highest activity, while Unitinase(TM (31.0 ± 2.4 units and Strek(TM (32.9 ± 3.3 units had the weakest activity. Solustrep(TM (53.3 ± 2.7 units presented intermediate activity. The variations among the different formulations for both euglobulin lysis test and chromogenic substrate hydrolysis correlated with the SDS-PAGE densitometric results for the amount of 47-kDa protein. These data show that the commercially available clinical streptokinase formulations vary significantly in their in vitro activity. Whether these differences have clinical implications needs to be investigated.

  1. Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) overexpression is an important biomarker for aggressiveness in cancer including prostate cancer (PC) and provides independent clinical information in addition to prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score. This article focuses on uPAR PET...... as a new diagnostic and prognostic imaging biomarker in PC. Many preclinical uPAR-targeted PET imaging studies using AE105 in cancer models have been undertaken with promising results. A major breakthrough was obtained with the recent human translation of uPAR PET in using 64Cu- and 68Ga-labelled versions...

  2. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...... an endothelial cell cDNA library using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and oligonucleotide primers corresponding to the DNA sequence of the receptor cloned from transformed human fibroblasts (Roldan et al, EMBO J 9:467, 1990). The size of the cDNA (approximately 1,054 base pairs, bp) and the presence...

  3. Metastasis of transgenic breast cancer in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almholt, Kasper; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2003-01-01

    , high levels of PAI-1 as well as uPA are equally associated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. PAI-1 is thought to play a vital role for the controlled extracellular proteolysis during tumor neovascularization. We have studied the effect of PAI-1 deficiency in a transgenic mouse model...... of metastasizing breast cancer. In these tumors, the expression pattern of uPA and PAI-1 resembles that of human ductal breast cancer and plasminogen is required for efficient metastasis. In a cohort of 63 transgenic mice that were either PAI-1-deficient or wild-type sibling controls, primary tumor growth...

  4. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... that the plasminogen activation system could play a role in this type of cancer during invasion. In addition a difference in the levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in NSCLC and SCLC is found, which could contribute to the differences in biology....

  5. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  6. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein’s α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  7. Activity deprivation induces neuronal cell death: mediation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldi Schonfeld-Dado

    Full Text Available Spontaneous activity is an essential attribute of neuronal networks and plays a critical role in their development and maintenance. Upon blockade of activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX, neurons degenerate slowly and die in a manner resembling neurodegenerative diseases-induced neuronal cell death. The molecular cascade leading to this type of slow cell death is not entirely clear. Primary post-natal cortical neurons were exposed to TTX for up to two weeks, followed by molecular, biochemical and immunefluorescence analysis. The expression of the neuronal marker, neuron specific enolase (NSE, was down-regulated, as expected, but surprisingly, there was a concomitant and striking elevation in expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that tPA was highly elevated inside affected neurons. Transfection of an endogenous tPA inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, protected the TTX-exposed neurons from dying. These results indicate that tPA is a pivotal player in slowly progressing activity deprivation-induced neurodegeneration.

  8. Roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor in proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Ling; Wu; Dong-Mei; Zhan; Shu-Hong; Xi; Xiang-Lian; He

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of tissue plasminogen activator(t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor(PAI)in proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR) and to discuss the correlations among t-PA, PAI and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) expressions.METHODS:A total of 36 vitreous samples were collected from 36 patients with PDR(PDR group), and 17 vitreous samples from 17 patients with idiopathic macular hole were used as control. The concentrations of t-PA, PAI and VEGF in samples were determined by ELISA method. The correlations among t-PA, PAI and VEGF expressions were discussed.RESULTS:The concentrations of t-PA, PAI and VEGF in the PDR group were significantly higher than those in the control group(P <0.001). The t-PA and PAI expressions were highly correlated with the VEGF expression(P <0.001).CONCLUSION:In addition to VEGF, a variety of bioactive substances, such as t-PA and PAI, are involved in the pathogenesis involved in the angiogenesis of PDR.VEGF can activate t-PA expression, resulting in collagen tissue degradation and angiogenesis. VEGF may also activate the mechanism for endogenous anti-neovascularization.

  9. Glycosaminoglycans affect the interaction of human plasma kallikrein with plasminogen, factor XII and inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozzo A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma kallikrein, a serine proteinase, plays a key role in intrinsic blood clotting, in the kallikrein-kinin system, and in fibrinolysis. The proteolytic enzymes involved in these processes are usually controlled by specific inhibitors and may be influenced by several factors including glycosaminoglycans, as recently demonstrated by our group. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of glycosaminoglycans (30 to 250 µg/ml on kallikrein activity on plasminogen and factor XII and on the inhibition of kallikrein by the plasma proteins C1-inhibitor and antithrombin. Almost all available glycosaminoglycans (heparin, heparan sulfate, bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate, chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced (1.2 to 3.0 times the catalytic efficiency of kallikrein (in a nanomolar range on the hydrolysis of plasminogen (0.3 to 1.8 µM and increased (1.9 to 7.7 times the enzyme efficiency in factor XII (0.1 to 10 µM activation. On the other hand, heparin, heparan sulfate, and bovine and tuna dermatan sulfate improved (1.2 to 3.4 times kallikrein inhibition by antithrombin (1.4 µM, while chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates reduced it (1.3 times. Heparin and heparan sulfate increased (1.4 times the enzyme inhibition by the C1-inhibitor (150 nM.

  10. Inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage with ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, O.E.; Bogdanov, M.V.; Kazantseva, V.A.; Gabrilevskaia, L.N.; Kodkind, G.K.H.

    The study of ozone inactivation of enteroviruses in sewage showed the presence in sewage of suspensions of organic origin and bacterial flora to influence the rate of inactivation. The inactivation rate of poliomyelitis virus in sewage free from organic suspension and bacterial flora was significantly higher than that in sewage containing such suspension and bacterial flora. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses was found not to depend upon the protein and salt composition and pH of sewage or strain appurtenance of viruses. The inactivation rate of enteroviruses directly depended upon the dose of ozone and time of contact with it. Differences in the resistance of different types of poliomyelitis virus, ECHO and Coxsackie viruses to the effect of ozone are likely exist. These differences are manifested within the range of relatively small doses of ozone. E. coli is more resistant to ozone than entero-viruses. The results of laboratory studies were used to choose the regimen of sanitation of urban sewage to be used in technological cycles of industrial enterprises.

  11. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Mariñas, Benito J

    2007-07-15

    The inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium with free chlorine was characterized by two stages: an initial phase at a relatively fast rate followed by a slower second stage of pseudo first-order kinetics. The inactivation rate of each stage was approximately the same for all experiments performed at a certain condition of pH and temperature; however, variability was observed for the disinfectant exposure at which the transition between the two stages occurred. This variability was not a function of the initial disinfectant concentration, the initial bacterial density, or the bacterial stock. However, the transition to the second stage varied more significantly at high temperatures (30 degrees C), while lower variability was observed at lower temperatures (5 and 20 degrees C). Experiments conducted at pH values in the range of 6-9 revealed that the inactivation of M. avium was primarily due to hypochlorous acid, with little contribution from hypochlorite ion within this pH range. The inactivation kinetics was represented with a two-population model. The activation energies for the resulting pseudo first-order rate constants for the populations with fast and slow kinetics were 100.3 and 96.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The magnitude of these values suggested that for waters of relatively high pH and low temperatures, little inactivation of M. avium would be achieved within treatment plants, providing a seeding source for distribution systems.

  12. Bolus dose response characteristics of single chain urokinase plasminogen activator and tissue plasminogen activator in a dog model of arterial thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badylak, S F; Voytik, S; Klabunde, R E; Henkin, J; Leski, M

    1988-11-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and single chain urokinase-plasminogen activator (scu-PA) are relatively "fibrin-specific" thrombolytic drugs with short plasma half lives of 6-8 minutes. Most treatment regimens with these agents utilize a bolus injection followed by continuous drug infusion, usually combined with anticoagulant therapy. The purpose of this study was to establish the dose-response characteristics for scu-PA and t-PA, when given as a single intravenous bolus injection, in a dog model of arterial thrombosis. Eight groups of 6 dogs each were given one of the following doses of scu-PA (mg/kg): 0.20, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00; or t-PA: 0.05, 0.10, 0.20; or an equivalent amount of saline (control group). All doses were given as a single bolus injection 60 minutes after formation of a totally occlusive femoral artery thrombus. Thrombolysis was measured by monitoring the continuous decrement of 125I activity from a radiolabelled thrombus. Ninety minutes after drug injection, all scu-PA treated dogs showed greater thrombolysis (30%, 45%, 56%, and 67%, respectively) than the control group (15%, p less than 0.01). The 0.10 and 0.20 mg/kg t-PA treated dogs showed greater thrombolysis (35% and 49%, respectively) than the control group (15%, p less than 0.01). Both scu-PA and t-PA caused a partial and dose-dependent decrease in alpha 2-antiplasmin activity but scu-PA caused a greater depletion (72% vs. 18%, respectively, p less than 0.05) at 60 minutes after the highest dose of drug administration. Both drugs showed a longer than expected thrombolytic effect based upon the known half lives. Neither drug caused significant changes in the prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, hematocrit, platelet count, or fibrin degradation product concentration. Single bolus injections of scu-PA and t-PA produce safe and effective thrombolysis in this dog model of arterial thrombosis.

  13. Studies on functional and structural role of urokinase receptor and other components of the plasminogen activation system in malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidle, U H; Wöllisch, E; Rønne, E

    1994-01-01

    ) in the intratumoral extracellular matrix and plasminogen activator inhibitor type II (PAI-2) in tumour cells and stromal cells. In order to investigate the role of u-PAR as a prognostic marker, we have developed an assay for quantitation of the receptor. As a first step towards structural investigations, we have...

  14. Crosslinking of fihrinogen by factor XIHa exposes fibrin-specific epitopes and induces enhanced plasminogen activation by t-PA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, W.; Voskuilen, M.; Kevin, R.; Siebenlis; Michael, W.; Mosesson

    1996-01-01

    'Fibrin-specific'epitopes 'Aαl48-160' and 'γ312-324' are exposed when fibrinogen (Fbg) is converted to fibrin (Fb). Particularly, polymerized Fb enhances the t-PA-mediated plasminogen activation. Fb polymerization involves 'D:E' assembly, end-to-end self-association ('D:D') and interactions between

  15. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), tissue factor (TF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Kiss, Katalin; Lelkaitis, Giedrius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumor-specific biomarkers are a prerequisite for the development of targeted imaging and therapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR), Tissue Factor (TF) and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) are three biomarkers that exhib...... with a reduced survival. uPAR seems to be a prognostic biomarker in oral cancer....

  16. Introduction of lysine and clot binding properties in the kringle one domain of tissue-type plasminogen activator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.H.F.; Greef, W. van der; Rehberg, E.F.; Marotti, K.R.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Despite the high overall similarity in primary structure between kringle one (K1) and kringle two (K2) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) there exists an enormous functional difference. It is thought that, in contrast to K1, K2 mediates lysine binding and fibrin binding and is involved in

  17. Kinetic characterization of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and t-PA deletion mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C. [=Carlie J. M.; Veerman, H.; Nesheim, M. E.; Pannekoek, H.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of t-PA to fibrin is mediated both by its "finger" (F) and its "kringle 2" (K2) domain. In addition, these domains are involved in the stimulation of t-PA activity by fibrin. We analyzed the kinetic characteristics of Glu-plasminogen activation by t-PA and a set of t-PA deletion mutants

  18. Low plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in thyroid carcinoma: uPA/PAI-1 paradox in cancer proggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Ucan

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Serum PAI-1 levels were lower in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Our results might support the thesis of PAI-1 is expected to suppress cancer progression due to its ability to inhibit urokinase plasminogen activator activity. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(2.000: 121-125

  19. Quantitative PET of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor with 64Cu-DOTA-AE105

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Morten; Madsen, Jacob; Østergaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Expression levels of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) represent an established biomarker for poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers. The objective of the present study was to explore whether noninvasive PET can be used to perform a quantitative assessment of expressi...

  20. Evaluation of the specificity of antigen assays for plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 : Comparison of two new commercial kits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, L.G.M.; Meijer, P.; Griensven, J. van; Kluft, C.

    1992-01-01

    t-PA depleted citrated plasma was used to prepare standards of different molecular forms of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). These standards were used to evaluate the specificity of two new PAI-1 antigen assays: the TintElize PAI-1 antigen assay (cat. no. 210221) and the Innotest PAI-1.

  1. Interactions of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with vitronectin involve an extensive binding surface and induce mutual conformational rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blouse, Grant E; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Schar, Christine R

    2009-01-01

    In order to explore early events during the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) with its cofactor vitronectin, we have applied a robust strategy that combines protein engineering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and rapid reaction kinetics. Fluorescence stopped-flow experiments de...

  2. Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is associated with parasitemia in children with acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch, M; Kofoed, P; Fischer, TK

    2004-01-01

    Serum levels of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) are significantly elevated and of prognostic value in patients suffering from serious infectious diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis. Our objective was to investigate suPAR levels during symptomatic malaria infection and 7...

  3. Urine albumin is a superior predictor of preeclampsia compared to urine plasminogen in type I diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Hald; Jensen, Boye L; Fuglsang, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Pregnant women with type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are at increased risk of developing preeclampsia (PE). Plasminogen is aberrantly filtrated from plasma into tubular fluid in PE patients and activated to plasmin. Plasmin activates the epithelial sodium channel in the collecting ducts potentially...

  4. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings.

  5. Plasminogen activation independent of uPA and tPA maintains wound healing in gene-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Leif R; Green, Kirsty A; Stoop, Allart A

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous ablation of the two known activators of plasminogen (Plg), urokinase-type (uPA) and the tissue-type (tPA), results in a substantial delay in skin wound healing. However, wound closure and epidermal re-epithelialization are significantly less impaired in uPA;tPA double-deficient mice ...

  6. Studies on the mechanism of fibrate-inhibited expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cultured hepatocytes from cynomolgus monkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Kooistra, T.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrates are widely used drugs in hyperlipidemic disorders. In addition to lowering serum triglyceride levels, fibrates have also been shown to reduce elevated plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in vivo. We demonstrate that fibrates suppress PAI-1 synthesis in cultured

  7. SCM, a novel M-like protein from Streptococcus canis, binds (mini)-plasminogen with high affinity and facilitates bacterial transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulde, Marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Hitzmann, Angela; Preissner, Klaus T; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan Singh; Bergmann, Simone

    2011-03-15

    Streptococcus canis is an important zoonotic pathogen capable of causing serious invasive diseases in domestic animals and humans. In the present paper we report the binding of human plasminogen to S. canis and the recruitment of proteolytically active plasmin on its surface. The binding receptor for plasminogen was identified as a novel M-like protein designated SCM (S. canis M-like protein). SPR (surface plasmon resonance) analyses, radioactive dot-blot analyses and heterologous expression on the surface of Streptococcus gordonii confirmed the plasminogen-binding capability of SCM. The binding domain was located within the N-terminus of SCM, which specifically bound to the C-terminal part of plasminogen (mini-plasminogen) comprising kringle domain 5 and the catalytic domain. In the presence of urokinase, SCM mediated plasminogen activation on the bacterial surface that was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and lysine amino acid analogues. Surface-bound plasmin effectively degraded purified fibrinogen as well as fibrin clots, resulting in the dissolution of fibrin thrombi. Electron microscopic illustration and time-lapse imaging demonstrated bacterial transmigration through fibrinous thrombi. The present study has led, for the first time, to the identification of SCM as a novel receptor for (mini)-plasminogen mediating the fibrinolytic activity of S. canis.

  8. The Complement Binding and Inhibitory Protein CbiA of Borrelia miyamotoi Degrades Extracellular Matrix Components by Interacting with Plasmin(ogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc T. T. Nguyen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia (B. miyamotoi is transmitted by ixodid ticks and causes the so-called hard tick-borne relapsing fever or B. miyamotoi disease (BMD. More recently, we identified a surface-exposed molecule, CbiA exhibiting complement binding and inhibitory capacity and rendering spirochetes resistant to complement-mediated lysis. To gain deeper insight into the molecular principles of B. miyamotoi-host interaction, we examined CbiA as a plasmin(ogen receptor that enables B. miyamotoi to interact with the serine protease plasmin(ogen. Recombinant CbiA was able to bind plasminogen in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, lysine residues appear to play a crucial role in the protein-protein interaction as binding of plasminogen was inhibited by the lysine analog tranexamic acid as well as increasing ionic strength. Of relevance, plasminogen bound to CbiA can be converted by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPa to active plasmin which cleaved both, the chromogenic substrate S-2251 and its physiologic substrate fibrinogen. Concerning the involvement of specific amino acids in the interaction with plasminogen, lysine residues located at the C-terminus are frequently involved in the binding as reported for various other plasminogen-interacting proteins of Lyme disease spirochetes. Lysine residues located within the C-terminal domain were substituted with alanine to generate single, double, triple, and quadruple point mutants. However, binding of plasminogen to the mutated CbiA proteins was not affected, suggesting that lysine residues distant from the C-terminus might be involved in the interaction.

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is an independent prognostic factor of ovarian cancer and IMD-4482, a novel plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor, inhibits ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Erika; Sawada, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Koji; Yoshimura, Akihito; Kinose, Yasuto; Kodama, Michiko; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Makino, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Yanase, Takeshi; Itai, Akiko; Morishige, Ken-Ichirou; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-10-27

    In the present study, the therapeutic potential of targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in ovarian cancer was tested. Tissues samples from 154 cases of ovarian carcinoma were immunostained with anti-PAI-1 antibody, and the prognostic value was analyzed. Among the samples, 67% (104/154) showed strong PAI-1 expression; this was significantly associated with poor prognosis (progression-free survival: 20 vs. 31 months, P = 0.0033). In particular, among patients with stage II-IV serous adenocarcinoma, PAI-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The effect of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, IMD-4482, on ovarian cancer cell lines was assessed and its therapeutic potential was examined using a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. IMD-4482 inhibited in vitro cell adhesion to vitronectin in PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells, followed by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation through dissociation of the PAI-urokinase receptor complex from integrin αVβ3. IMD-4482 caused G0/G1 cell arrest and inhibited the proliferation of PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells. In the xenograft model, IMD-4482 significantly inhibited peritoneal dissemination with the reduction of PAI-1 expression and the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Collectively, the functional inhibition of PAI-1 significantly inhibited ovarian cancer progression, and targeting PAI-1 may be a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus manganese transport protein C (MntC is an extracellular matrix- and plasminogen-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Salazar

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus--particularly nosocomial infections--represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM. Manganese transport protein C (MntC, a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA. The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation.

  11. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  12. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  13. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gominet, M.; Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G.; Darbord, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination

  14. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  15. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-06-24

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin-ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, we analyzed the pattern of CHFR expression in a number of human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We found CpG methylation-dependent silencing of CHFR expression in 45% of cancer cell lines, 40% of primary colorectal cancers, 53% of colorectal adenomas, and 30% of primary head and neck cancers. Expression of CHFR was precisely correlated with both CpG methylation and deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the CpG-rich regulatory region. Moreover, CpG methylation and thus silencing of CHFR depended on the activities of two DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3b, as their genetic inactivation restored CHFR expression. Finally, cells with CHFR methylation had an intrinsically high mitotic index when treated with microtubule inhibitor. This means that cells in which CHFR was epigenetically inactivated constitute loss-of-function alleles for mitotic checkpoint control. Taken together, these findings shed light on a pathway by which mitotic checkpoint is bypassed in cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of checkpoint genes is much more widespread than previously suspected.

  16. Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Detected after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Yoneda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic guidelines of intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA for hyperacute ischemic stroke are very strict. Because of potential higher risk of bleeding complications, the presence of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is a contraindication for systemic thrombolysis with tPA. According to the standard CT criteria, a 66-year-old woman who suddenly developed aphasia and hemiparesis received intravenous tPA within 3 h after ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography during tPA infusion was performed and the presence of a small unruptured cerebral aneurysm was suspected at the anterior communicating artery. Delayed cerebral angiography confirmed an aneurysm with a size of 7 mm. The patient did not experience any adverse complications associated with the aneurysm. Clinical experiences of this kind of accidental off-label thrombolysis may contribute to modify the current rigid tPA guidelines for stroke.

  17. Tetranectin, a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. Cloning and gene expression pattern in human colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tetranectin is a recently discovered protein that binds to kringle 4 region of plasminogen (Clemmensen I, Petersen LC, Kluft C. Eur J Biochem 1986; 156:327. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The mRNA encoding human tetranectin was cloned by using degenerate primers in a reverse transcriptase...... reaction followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification. The resulting polymerase chain reaction product was examined by DNA sequencing and subsequently used as probe for screening a human placental cDNA library. A full length cDNA clone (TET-1) was isolated, characterized, and used for Northern blot...... prominent in the lungs and spleen. No hybridization signal was detected in three carcinoma cell lines examined in parallel. Northern blot analysis of poly A+ RNA isolated from solid tumors revealed a tetranectin specific mRNA band. In situ hybridizations on tissue sections of colon carcinomas and normal...

  18. STUDY OF HEARING OUTCOMES IN SUDDEN SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS TREATED WITH TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Krishna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSHNL is a clinical condition that requires immediate management. There are many treatment options, which may not always revert the hearing to normal. Not only recording the degree of hearing loss, but also establishing the concurrent dysfunction of saccule by VEMP has facilitated a new approach to treatment strategy. Recombinant tissue Plasminogen Activator ((rtPA proved its efficacy in stroke and subsequently considered an option in the management of ISSNHL. The curren t study, conducted at different centres, on 15 patients utilized rtPA. The results showed a promising trend when saccular pathology is also evident by VEMP in association with Hearing loss. We recommend use of rtPA as primary modality in cases of ISSNHL wi th Saccular involvement.

  19. PET imaging of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptors (uPAR) represents an important biomarker for aggressiveness in most common malignant diseases, including prostate cancer (PC). Accordingly, uPAR expression either assessed directly in malignant PC tissue or assessed directly in plasma...... and prognostic imaging method. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of uPAR PET and the relevance within prostate cancer imaging. Novel antibody and small-molecule radiotracers-targeting uPAR, including a series of uPAR-targeting PET ligands, based on the high affinity peptide ligand AE105......, have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo in preclinical murine xenograft models and, recently, in a first-ever clinical uPAR PET study in cancer patients, including patients with PC. In this phase I study, a high and specific uptake of the tracer 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 was found in both primary...

  20. Detection of deep venous thrombosis with indium 111-labelled monoclonal antibody against tissue plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromholt, N.; Hesse, B. (Hilleroed County Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Physiology); Folkenborg, O. (Isotope-Pharmcy, Broenshoej (Denmark)); Selmer, J. (Novo Industri A/S, Bagsvaerd (Denmark)); Nielsen, N.T. (Hilleroed County Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-05-01

    The administration of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody against tissue plasminogen activator allows detection of areas with increased fibrinolytic activity, i.e. those with an active thrombotic lesion. Eight patients with phlebographically verified deep venous thrombosis were examined. At the time of immunoscintigraphy study they were examined receiving anticoagulant therapy. Some 75-85 MBq {sup 111}In-labelled antibody were injected, and scintigrams were obtained after 30 min and after 24 h. The precise site of the thrombus could not be visualized after 30 min due to high background activity, whereas after 24 h it was detectable in all patients. The thrombus/background ratios achieved are twice as high as those observed in a human antifibrin antibody study. These preliminary data suggest a high sensitivity of our PA-specific antibody for the detection of active deep venous thrombosis in man, and our antibody seems to offer theoretical advantages over both platelet and fibrin-specific antibodies. (orig.).

  1. Detection of deep venous thrombosis with indium 111-labelled monoclonal antibody against tissue plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromholt, N.; Hesse, B.; Selmer, J.; Nielsen, N.T.

    1991-01-01

    The administration of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody against tissue plasminogen activator allows detection of areas with increased fibrinolytic activity, i.e. those with an active thrombotic lesion. Eight patients with phlebographically verified deep venous thrombosis were examined. At the time of immunoscintigraphy study they were examined receiving anticoagulant therapy. Some 75-85 MBq 111 In-labelled antibody were injected, and scintigrams were obtained after 30 min and after 24 h. The precise site of the thrombus could not be visualized after 30 min due to high background activity, whereas after 24 h it was detectable in all patients. The thrombus/background ratios achieved are twice as high as those observed in a human antifibrin antibody study. These preliminary data suggest a high sensitivity of our PA-specific antibody for the detection of active deep venous thrombosis in man, and our antibody seems to offer theoretical advantages over both platelet and fibrin-specific antibodies. (orig.)

  2. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Røge, Rasmus; Pristed, Sofie Gry

    2015-01-01

    PAR) is a protein that can be measured in blood samples and reflects the levels of inflammatory activity. It has been associated with mortality and the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. METHODS: suPAR levels in patients with schizophrenia were compared to healthy controls from the Danish......BACKGROUND: The etiology of schizophrenia remains largely unknown but alterations in the immune system may be involved. In addition to the psychiatric symptoms, schizophrenia is also associated with up to 20 years reduction in life span. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (su...... Blood Donor Study. SuPAR levels were dichotomized at >4.0 ng/ml, which is considered the threshold for low grade inflammation. A multiple logistic regression model was used and adjusted for age, sex, and current smoking. RESULTS: In total we included 1009 subjects, 105 cases with schizophrenia (10...

  3. The story of an exceptional serine protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, M; Lesept, F; Vivien, D; Macrez, R

    2016-03-01

    The only acute treatment of ischemic stroke approved by the health authorities is tissue recombinant plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced thrombolysis. Under physiological conditions, tPA, belonging to the serine protease family, is secreted by endothelial and brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes). Although revascularisation induced by tPA is beneficial during a stroke, research over the past 20 years shows that tPA can also be deleterious for the brain parenchyma. Thus, in this review of the literature, after a brief history on the discovery of tPA, we reviewed current knowledge of mechanisms by which tPA can influence brain function in physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induction in Purkinje Neurons After Cerebellar Motor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeds, Nicholas W.; Williams, Brian L.; Bickford, Paula C.

    1995-12-01

    The cerebellar cortex is implicated in the learning of complex motor skills. This learning may require synaptic remodeling of Purkinje cell inputs. An extracellular serine protease, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), is involved in remodeling various nonneural tissues and is associated with developing and regenerating neurons. In situ hybridization showed that expression of tPA messenger RNA was increased in the Purkinje neurons of rats within an hour of their being trained for a complex motor task. Antibody to tPA also showed the induction of tPA protein associated with cerebellar Purkinje cells. Thus, the induction of tPA during motor learning may play a role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity.

  5. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  6. Targeting the autolysis loop of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A; Fogh, Sarah; Bekes, Erin C; Chen, Zhuo; Blouse, Grant E; Jensen, Janni M; Mortensen, Kim K; Huang, Mingdong; Deryugina, Elena; Quigley, James P; Declerck, Paul J; Andreasen, Peter A

    2011-08-15

    Tight regulation of serine proteases is essential for their physiological function, and unbalanced states of protease activity have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. One key example is the presence of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) in different human cancer types, with high levels correlating with a poor prognosis. This observation has stimulated efforts into finding new principles for intervening with uPA's activity. In the present study we characterize the so-called autolysis loop in the catalytic domain of uPA as a potential inhibitory target. This loop was found to harbour the epitopes for three conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies, two with a preference for the zymogen form pro-uPA, and one with a preference for active uPA. All three antibodies were shown to have overlapping epitopes, with three common residues being crucial for all three antibodies, demonstrating a direct link between conformational changes of the autolysis loop and the creation of a catalytically mature active site. All three antibodies are potent inhibitors of uPA activity, the two pro-uPA-specific ones by inhibiting conversion of pro-uPA to active uPA and the active uPA-specific antibody by shielding the access of plasminogen to the active site. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence, the conformation-specific antibodies mAb-112 and mAb-12E6B10 enabled us to selectively stain pro-uPA or active uPA on the surface of cultured cells. Moreover, in various independent model systems, the antibodies inhibited tumour cell invasion and dissemination, providing evidence for the feasibility of pharmaceutical intervention with serine protease activity by targeting surface loops that undergo conformational changes during zymogen activation. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Biochemical Society

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 suppresses endogenous fibrinolysis in a canine model of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, C.F.; Fujita, T.; Hutzelmann, J.E.; Mayer, E.J.; Shebuski, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the specific, fast-acting inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), binds to fibrin and has been found in high concentrations within arterial thrombi. These findings suggest that the localization of PAI-1 to a thrombus protects that same thrombus from fibrinolysis. In this study, clot-bound PAI-1 was assessed for its ability to suppress clot lysis in vivo. Autologous, canine whole blood clots were formed in the presence of increasing amounts of activated PAI-1 (0-30 micrograms/ml). Approximately 6-8% of the PAI-1 bound to the clots under the experimental conditions. Control and PAI-1-enriched clots containing iodine-125-labeled fibrin (ogen) were homogenized, washed to remove nonbound elements, and delivered to the lungs of anesthetized dogs where the homogenates subsequently underwent lysis by the endogeneous fibrinolytic system. 125I-labeled fibrin degradation products appeared in the blood of control animals within 10 minutes and were maximal by 90 minutes. PAI-1 reduced fibrin degradation product release in a dose-responsive manner at all times between 30 minutes and 5 hours (greater than or equal to 76% inhibition at 30 minutes, PAI-1 greater than or equal to 6 micrograms/ml). PAI-1 also suppressed D-dimer release from clots containing small amounts of human fibrin (ogen). t-PA administration attenuated the effects of PAI-1, whereas latent PAI-1 (20 micrograms/ml) had no effect on clot lysis. Blood levels of PA and PAI activity remained unaltered during these experiments. The results indicate that PAI-1 markedly inhibits endogenous fibrinolysis in vivo and, moreover, suggest that the localization of PAI-1 to a forming thrombus is an important physiological mechanism for subsequent thrombus stabilization

  8. Long-term stability of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator at -80 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperling Matthew

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is a thrombolytic widely used clinically in the treatment of acute thrombotic disease such as ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and deep venous thrombosis. This has led to much interest in tPA based lytic therapies leading to laboratory based in-vitro and in-vivo investigations using this drug. However, tPA reconstituted in solution exhibits full activity for only 6–8 hours, according to the manufacturer. Therefore, methods to store reconstituted tPA for long durations while maintaining activity would be of assistance to laboratories using this enzyme. Findings In this work, the enzymatic activity of tPA stored at -80 C over time was measured, using an ELISA technique that measured the amount of active tPA bound to plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 in a given sample. Sample of tPA solution mixed to a concentration of 1 (mg/ml were stored in cryogenic vials at -80 C for up to 7 years. For a given sample, aliquots were assayed for tPA activity, and compared with a tPA standard to determine relative enzymatic activity. Results are reported as means with standard errors, and 12 measurements were performed for each sample age. Conclusion There was no decrease in tPA activity for samples stored up to 7 years. Such cryogenic storage is a viable method for the preservation of tPA solution for laboratory investigations of tPA-based lytic therapies.

  9. Enhanced venous thrombus resolution in plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, S A; Chabasse, C; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hoofnagle, M H; Strickland, D K; Sarkar, R; Antalis, T M

    2014-10-01

    The resolution of deep vein thrombosis requires an inflammatory response and mobilization of proteases, such as urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), to degrade the thrombus and remodel the injured vein wall. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) with unique immunosuppressive and cell survival properties that was originally identified as an inhibitor of uPA. To investigate the role of PAI-2 in venous thrombus formation and resolution. Venous thrombus resolution was compared in wild-type C57BL/6, PAI-2(-/-) , and PAI-1(-/-) mice using the stasis model of deep vein thrombosis. Formed thrombi were harvested, thrombus weights were recorded, and tissue was analyzed for uPA and MMP activities, PAI-1 expression, and the nature of inflammatory cell infiltration. We found that the absence of PAI-2 enhanced venous thrombus resolution, while thrombus formation was unaffected. Enhanced venous thrombus resolution in PAI-2(-/-) mice was associated with increased uPA activity and reduced levels of PAI-1, with no significant effect on MMP-2 and -9 activities. PAI-1 deficiency resulted in an increase in thrombus resolution similar to PAI-2 deficiency, but additionally reduced venous thrombus formation and altered MMP activity. PAI-2-deficient thrombi had increased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL2, which was associated with early enhanced neutrophil recruitment. These data identify PAI-2 as a novel regulator of venous thrombus resolution, which modulates several pathways involving both inflammatory and uPA activity mechanisms, distinct from PAI-1. Further examination of these pathways may lead to potential therapeutic prospects in accelerating thrombus resolution. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. Combined lysis of thrombus with ultrasound and systemic tissue plasminogen activator for emergent revascularization in acute ischemic stroke (CLOTBUST-ER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellinger, Peter D; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barreto, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    events. CONCLUSIONS: Since intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen-activator remains the only medical therapy to reverse ischemic stroke applicable in the emergency department, our trial will determine if the additional use of transcranial ultrasound improves functional outcomes in patients...

  11. Structure, function and expression on blood and bone marrow cells of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, uPAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, T; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M

    1997-01-01

    patients with the rare blood disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) that fail to express glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins including uPAR, show a very significantly reduced transmigration over an endothelial barrier. Cell-associated plasminogen activation by PNH......Several important functions have been assigned to the receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator, uPAR. As implied by the name, uPAR was first identified as a high affinity cellular receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). It mediates the binding of the zymogen, pro......-uPA, to the plasma membrane where trace amounts of plasmin will initiate a series of events referred to as "reciprocal zymogen activation" where plasmin converts pro-uPA to the active enzyme, uPA, which in turn converts plasma membrane-associated plasminogen to plasmin. This is an efficient machinery to generate...

  12. Concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA in induced sputum of asthma patients after allergen challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Moniuszko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its inhibitor (PAI-1 are involved in tiisue remodeling and repair processes associated with acute and chronic inflammation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of allergen challenge on concentration of uPA and PAI-1 in induced sputum of house dust mite allergic asthmatics (HDM-AAs. Thirty HDM-AAs and ten healthy persons (HCswere recruited for the study. In 24 HDM-AAs bronchial challenge with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp and in 6 HDM-AAs sham challenege with saline were performed. In HDM-AAs sputum was induced 24 hours before (T0 and 24 hours (T24 after the challenge. Concentration of uPA and PAI-1 in induced sputum were determined using immunoenzymatic assays. At T0 in HDM-AAs mean sputum uPA (151 Âą 96 pg/ml and PAI-1 (4341 Âą 1262 pg/ml concentrations were higher than in HC (18.8 Âą 6.7 pg/ml; p=0.0002 and 596 Âą 180 pg/ml; p<0.0001; for uPA and PAI-1 respectively. After allergen challenge further increase in sputum uPA (187 Âą 144 pg/ml; p=0.03 and PAI-1 (6252 Âą 2323 pg/ml; p<0.0001 concentrations were observed. Moreover, in Dp challenged, but not in saline challenged HDM-AAs the mean uPA/PAI-1 ratio decreased significantly at T24. No significant increase in the studied parameters were found in sham challenged patients. In HDM-AAs allergen exposure leads to activation of the plasmin system in the airways. Greater increase of the PAI-1 concentration than uPA concentration after allergen challenge may promote airway remodeling and play an important role in the development of bronchial hyperreactivity.

  13. Concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA in induced sputum of asthma patients after allergen challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kowal,

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its inhibitor (PAI-1 are involved in tiisue remodeling and repairprocesses associated with acute and chronic inflammation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of allergen challengeon concentration of uPA and PAI-1 in induced sputum of house dust mite allergic asthmatics (HDM-AAs. ThirtyHDM-AAs and ten healthy persons (HCswere recruited for the study. In 24 HDM-AAs bronchial challenge with Dermatophagoidespteronyssinus (Dp and in 6 HDM-AAs sham challenege with saline were performed. In HDM-AAs sputumwas induced 24 hours before (T0 and 24 hours (T24 after the challenge. Concentration of uPA and PAI-1 in induced sputumwere determined using immunoenzymatic assays. At T0 in HDM-AAs mean sputum uPA (151±96 pg/ml and PAI-1(4341±1262 pg/ml concentrations were higher than in HC (18.8±6.7 pg/ml; p=0.0002 and 596±180 pg/ml; p<0.0001; foruPA and PAI-1 respectively. After allergen challenge further increase in sputum uPA (187±144 pg/ml; p=0.03 and PAI-1(6252±2323 pg/ml; p<0.0001 concentrations were observed. Moreover, in Dp challenged, but not in saline challengedHDM-AAs the mean uPA/PAI-1 ratio decreased significantly at T24. No significant increase in the studied parameters werefound in sham challenged patients. In HDM-AAs allergen exposure leads to activation of the plasmin system in the airways.Greater increase of the PAI-1 concentration than uPA concentration after allergen challenge may promote airway remodelingand play an important role in the development of bronchial hyperreactivity.

  14. Some factors affecting urokinase inactivation. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Hiroo; Iketa, Yoshito

    1985-10-01

    The enzymatic activity of urokinase adsorbed on various polymer surfaces was measured to study the interaction between protein and polymers. The polymer films on which urokinase was adsorbed were exposed to either a high temperature or ..gamma..-radiation. The thermal inactivation rates were higher on hydrophobic polymers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate), nylon 6, and poly(vinylidene fluoride) than hydrophilic polymers like cellulose and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer, indicating their substantial dependence on the interfacial free energy between the polymer and water. A similar dependence was also seen for the ..gamma..-radiation inactivation. Urokinase adsorbed on the hydrophobic polymers lost more easily its enzymatic activity by exposure to ..gamma..-radiation. The interfacial free energy seems to be one of the driving forces to denaturate proteins on polymers.

  15. Inactivation of biological substances by local heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Masahiro [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1982-09-01

    Mechanism of inactivation of biological substances caused by local heating was investigated. The effect of hot-zone formation by local heating on reaction of radicals was previously evaluated. The thermal increase in a hot zone due to low energy LET x-rays had little effect on reactibility of the radicals, but, in a hot zone caused by high energy LET x-rays, formed radicals seemed immediately react to active biological molecules to inactivate them. Direct thermal effect on biological molecules was analysed. Thermal increase in a hot zone may induce degenaration of biological molecules which seems to occur in a short time judged from the extension of a hot zone and the duration of high temperature.

  16. Immunogenicity of UV-inactivated measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorska, R.; Mazur, N.; Korbecki, M.

    1978-01-01

    By means of the antigen extinction limit test it was shown that a triple dose vaccination of guinea pigs with UV-inactivated measles virus gave better results, than a single dose vaccination which was proved by the very low immunogenicity index. For both vaccination schemes (single and triple) the immune response was only sligthly influenced by a change of dose from 10 5 to 10 6 HadU 50 /ml or by the addition of aluminum adjuvant. In the antigen extinction limit test the antibody levels were determined by two methods (HIT and NT) the results of which were statistically equivalent. The UV-inactivated measles virus was also found to induce hemolysis-inhibiting antibodies. (orig.) [de

  17. Inactivation of Smad4 in gastric carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S M; Harper, J C; Hamilton, S R; Robinson, C R; Cummings, O W

    1997-10-01

    Allelic loss of chromosome 18q has been noted in intestinal type gastric adenocarcinomas. Smad4 is a gene located at 18q that was recently cloned in humans and found to be significantly altered in pancreatic cancers. We sought to determine whether Smad4 genetic alterations played a significant role in gastric tumorigenesis by studying 35 gastric adenocarcinomas of all histopathological types and pathological stages. Microdissected specimens were used for mutational analysis of Smad4 at the nucleotide level, including the entire coding region and intron/exon boundaries. Allelic imbalance was also analyzed at the Smad4 locus using two nearby microsatellite markers. One case of apparent biallelic inactivation of Smad4 was found in our study of 35 gastric carcinomas. A nonsense point mutation at codon 334 was demonstrated, which, similar to other Smad4 mutations, is predicted to truncate the conserved COOH-terminal domain of this protein. This Smad4 C to T transition mutation was proven to be somatically acquired. Allelic loss was also noted on chromosome 18q at a marker near Smad4 in this mutated gastric cancer, apparently producing complete inactivation of Smad4 in this tumor. Significant 18q allelic loss (56% of 34 informative cases) was noted in our gastric carcinomas using microsatellite markers near the Smad4 locus, regardless of histological subtype or pathological stage. Additionally, three cases of microsatellite instability were observed. Thus, Smad4 inactivation was noted in our gastric carcinomas; however, this event was rare. The frequent loss of chromosomal arm 18q observed in gastric cancers suggests the presence of other tumor suppressor genes in this region that are involved in gastric tumorigenesis. Further studies are needed to identify these other targets of inactivation during gastric cancer development.

  18. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  19. Inactivation of Anandamide Signaling: A Continuing Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael E. Houssen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first endocannabinoid anandamide was identified in 1992, extensive research has been conducted to characterize the elements of the tightly controlled endocannabinoid signaling system. While it was established that the activity of endocannabinoids are terminated by a two-step process that includes cellular uptake and degradation, there is still a continuing debate about the mechanistic role of these processes in inactivating anandamide signals.

  20. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paronyan, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  1. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin–ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, w...

  2. Inactivation of human norovirus using chemical sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David H; Vincent, Emily M; Meade, Gloria K; Watson, Clytrice L; Fan, Xuetong

    2014-02-03

    The porcine gastric mucin binding magnetic bead (PGM-MB) assay was used to evaluate the ability of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and trisodium phosphate to inactivate human norovirus within 10% stool filtrate. One-minute free chlorine treatments at concentrations of 33 and 189 ppm reduced virus binding in the PGM-MB assay by 1.48 and 4.14 log₁₀, respectively, suggesting that chlorine is an efficient sanitizer for inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV). Five minute treatments with 5% trisodium phosphate (pH~12) reduced HuNoV binding by 1.6 log₁₀, suggesting that TSP, or some other high pH buffer, could be used to treat food and food contact surfaces to reduce HuNoV. One minute treatments with 350 ppm chlorine dioxide dissolved in water did not reduce PGM-MB binding, suggesting that the sanitizer may not be suitable for HuNoV inactivation in liquid form. However a 60-min treatment with 350 ppm chlorine dioxide did reduce human norovirus by 2.8 log₁₀, indicating that chlorine dioxide had some, albeit limited, activity against HuNoV. Results also suggest that peroxyacetic acid has limited effectiveness against human norovirus, since 1-min treatments with up to 195 ppm reduced human norovirus binding by chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) as a HuNoV disinfectant wherever possible. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Radical inactivation of a biological sulphydryl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.S.; Lal, M.; Gaucher, G.M.; Armstrong, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reactive species produced from the free radical-induced chain oxidation of low molecular weight sulphydryl-containing molecules in aerated solutions deactivate the sulphydryl-containing enzyme papain, forming both reparable mixed disulphides and non-reparable products. This inactivation is highly efficient for penicillamine and glutathione, but almost negligible with cysteine, which is a protector of papain for [cysteine] / [papain] >= 5 under all conditions used. In the case of glutathione, superoxide dismutase caused only a small reduction in the inactivation and peroxide yields were small, implying that the deactivating species are not .O 2 - but RSOO. radicals or products from them. For penicillamine, however, dimutase was highly effective and the peroxide yields were relatively large, demonstrating that .O 2 - or a radical with similar capabilities for forming H 2 O 2 and being deactivated by dismutase was involved. Although in the presence of dismutase penicillamine is a better protector of non-reparable papain inactivation than glutathione, it suffers from a deficiency in that the papain-penicillamine mixed disulphide, which is always formed, cannot be repaired by spontaneous reaction with RSH molecules. (author)

  4. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days' irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs

  5. Elevated levels of plasminogen activators in the pathogenesis of delayed radiation damage in rat cervical spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawaya, R.; Rayford, A.; Kono, S.; Rao, J.S.; Ang, K.K.; Feng, Y.; Stephens, L.C. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The pathophysiology of the cellular basis of radiation-induced demyelination and white-matter necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is poorly understood. Preliminary data suggest that tissue damage is partly mediated through changes in the proteolytic enzymes. In this study, we irradiated rat cervical spinal cords with single doses of 24 Gy of 18 MV photons or 20 MeV electrons and measured the levels of plasminogen activators at days 2, 7, 30, 60, 90, 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation, using appropriate controls at each time. Fibrin zymography revealed fibrinolytic bands representing molecular weights of 68,000 and 48,000 in controls and irradiated samples; these bands increased significantly at days 120, 130 and 145 after irradiation. Inhibition of these enzymatic bands with specific antibodies against tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and amiloride, an inhibitor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), confirmed that these bands were tPA and uPA. Enzymatic levels quantified by densitometry showed a twofold elevation in the levels of tPA and more than a tenfold increase in uPA after 120 days` irradiation. Activity of uPA was increased threefold by day 2 and increased steadily with time compared to nonirradiated control samples. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also showed a threefold increase in the tPA content in the extracts of irradiated rat cervical spinal cords at days 120, 130 and 145. This study adds additional information to the proposed role of plasminogen activators in the pathogenic pathways of radiation damage in the CNS. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Promotion of Wound Healing by an Agonist of Adenosine A2A Receptor Is Dependent on Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, M Carmen; Desai-Merchant, Avani; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-12-01

    Impaired wound healing, as it occurs in diabetes mellitus or long-term corticoid treatment, is commonly associated with disability, diminished quality of life, and high economic costs. Selective agonists of the A2A receptor subtype of adenosine, an endogenous regulator of inflammation, promote tissue repair in animal models, both healthy and with impaired healing. Plasmin-mediated proteolysis of fibrin and other matrix proteins is essential for cell migration at sites of injury. Since adenosine A2A receptor activation increases plasminogen activator release from macrophages and mast cells, we studied the effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on full-thickness excisional wound closure in wild-type, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice. Wound closure was impaired in tPA- and uPA-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice, and topical application of CGS-21680 significantly increased the rate at which wounds closed in wild-type mice and uPA-deficient mice, but not in tPA-deficient mice. Immunostaining of tissue sections showed that tPA was present in endothelial cells and histiocytes by day 3 post-wound and also by day 6. In contrast, uPA was more prominent in these cell types only by day 6 post-wound. Our results confirm that plasminogen activation contributes to wound repair and are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptor activation promotes wound closure by a mechanism that depends upon tPA, but not uPA. Moreover, our results suggest that topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful in promotion of wound closure in patients with impaired wound healing.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator-binding RNA aptamers inhibiting low-density lipoprotein receptor family-mediated internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A; Helsen, Nicky; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, trade name Alteplase), currently the only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke, has been implicated in a number of adverse effects reportedly mediated by interactions with the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) family receptors, including neuronal cell death and an increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage. The tissue-type plasminogen activator is the principal initiator of thrombolysis in human physiology, an effect that is mediated directly via localised activation of the plasmin zymogen plasminogen at the surface of fibrin clots in the vascular lumen. Here, we sought to identify a ligand to tPA capable of inhibiting the relevant LDL family receptors without interfering with the fibrinolytic activity of tPA. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was employed to isolate tPA-binding RNA aptamers, which were characterised in biochemical assays of tPA association to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, an LDL receptor family member); tPA-mediated in vitro and ex vivo clot lysis; and tPA-mediated plasminogen activation in the absence and presence of a stimulating soluble fibrin fragment. Two aptamers, K18 and K32, had minimal effects on clot lysis, but were able to efficiently inhibit tPA-LRP-1 association and LDL receptor family-mediated endocytosis in human vascular endothelial cells and astrocytes. These observations suggest that coadministration alongside tPA may be a viable strategy to improve the safety of thrombolytic treatment of cerebral ischaemic stroke by restricting tPA activity to the vascular lumen.

  8. Antibody-mediated targeting of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator proteolytic function neutralizes fibrinolysis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Jögi, Annika; Rønø, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    highly potent and inhibitory anti-uPA mAbs (mU1 and mU3). Both mAbs recognize epitopes located on the B-chain of uPA that encompasses the catalytic site. In enzyme activity assays in vitro, mU1 blocked uPA-catalyzed plasminogen activation as well as plasmin-mediated pro-uPA activation, whereas mU3 only...

  9. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  10. Functional role of proteolytic cleavage at arginine-275 of human tissue plasminogen activator as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tate, K.M.; Higgins, D.L.; Holmes, W.E.; Winkler, M.E.; Heyneker, H.L.; Vehar, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Activation of the zymogen form of a serine protease is associated with a conformational change that follows proteolysis at a specific site. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is homologous to mammalian serine proteases and contains an apparent activation cleavage site at arginine-275. To clarify the functional consequences of cleavage at arginine-275 of t-PA, site-specific mutagenesis was performed to convert arginine-275 to a glutamic acid. The mutant enzyme (designated Arg-275 → Glu t-PA) could be converted to the two-chain form by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease but not by plasmin. The one-chain form was 8 times less active against the tripeptide substrate H-D-isoleucyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine-rho-nitroanilide (S-2288), and the ability of the enzyme to activate plasminogen in the absence of fibrinogen was reduced 20-50 times compared to the two-chain form. In contrast, one-chain Arg-275 → Glu t-PA has equal activity to the two-chain form when assayed in the presence of physiological levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen. Fibrin bound significantly more of the one-chain form of t-PA than the two-chain form for both the wild-type and mutated enzymes. One- and two-chain forms of the wild-type and mutated plasminogen activators slowly formed complexes with plasma protease inhibitors, although the one-chain forms showed decreased complex formation with → 2 -macroglobulin. The one-chain form of t-PA therefore is fully functional under physiologic conditions and has a increased fibrin binding compared to the two-chain form

  11. Enablers of the implementation of tissue plasminogen activator in acute stroke care: a cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Grady

    Full Text Available To assess emergency physicians' perceptions of individual and system enablers to the use of tissue Plasminogen Activator in acute stroke.Australian fellows and trainees of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine completed a 57-item online survey assessing enablers to implementation of evidence-based practice across six domains: knowledge, skills, modelling, monitoring, feedback, and maintenance. Demographic and workplace characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were calculated to describe demographic and workplace characteristics of responders, and survey responses. Each domain received an overall score (% based on the number of responders agreeing with all items within the domain.A total of 429 (13% Australasian College for Emergency Medicine members responded. 17.7% of respondents reported they and/or their workplace met all knowledge-related enablers, however only 2.3% had all skill-related enablers in place. Of respondents who decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment, 18.1% agreed that all maintenance-related enablers are in place at their hospital, compared to 6.6% for those who do not decide which patients receive tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment. None of the respondents had all items in place cross all domains.Even when allowing for the low response rate, it seems likely there is a lack of individual and system enablers supporting the implementation of best-practice stroke care in a number of Australian hospitals. Quality improvement programs could target all domains, particularly the skills-training and feedback emergency physicians receive, to aid implementation of tissue Plasminogen Activator treatment for acute stroke.

  12. Binding of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator to its cell surface receptor is inhibited by low doses of suramin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Danø, K

    1993-01-01

    micrograms/ml when using U937 cells and a ligand concentration of 0.3 nM. This concentration of the drug is well below the serum levels found in suramin-treated patients. Inhibition of binding was also demonstrated at the molecular level, using chemical cross-linking or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...... to the anti-invasive properties of suramin by destroying the cellular potential for localized plasminogen activation and proteolytic matrix degradation....

  13. Expression and activity of the urokinase plasminogen activator system in canine primary brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossmeisl JH

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available John H Rossmeisl,1–3 Kelli Hall-Manning,4 John L Robertson,1,3,5 Jamie N King,1,2 Rafael V Davalos,3,5 Waldemar Debinski,3 Subbiah Elankumaran6,† 1Veterinary and Comparative Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, 2Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, 3The Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Comprehensive Cancer Center, Winston-Salem, NC, 4Virginia Tech Animal Laboratory Services, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, 6Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, USA†The authors regret to advise of the passing of Dr Subbiah Elankumaran prior to publicationBackground: The expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein family member, and the activity of its ligand, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, have been associated with the invasive and metastatic potentials of a variety of human brain tumors through their regulation of extracellular matrix degradation. Domesticated dogs develop naturally occurring brain tumors that share many clinical, phenotypic, molecular, and genetic features with their human counterparts, which has prompted the use of the dogs with spontaneous brain tumors as models to expedite the translation of novel brain tumor therapeutics to humans. There is currently little known regarding the role of the uPA system in canine brain tumorigenesis. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression of uPAR and the activity of uPA in canine brain tumors as justification for the development of uPAR-targeted brain tumor therapeutics in dogs.Methods: We investigated the expression of uPAR in 37 primary canine brain tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, real

  14. Composite poly(methyl methacrylate-methacrylic acid-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) latex for immunoassay. The case of plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, B; Wilczynska, M; Cierniewski, C; Basinska, T; Slomkowski, S

    1995-01-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate-methacrylic acid-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) latex (ACRYLAT) was synthesized by radical precipitation polymerization. The mass median diameter (MMD) and the geometrical standard deviation (GSD) of the ACRYLAT particles were 138 nm and 1.2, respectively. The concentration of the titrable carboxylic groups in the surface layer of latex particles was equal to 8.41 x 10(-6) mol m-2. Latex was able to bind up to 2.82 x 10(-7) mol of 1-aminopyrene per 1 m2 of the surface of the latex particles due to the ionic interactions between carboxylate anions and ammonium cations of protonated 1-aminopyrene. ACRYLAT was able to immobilize covalently human serum albumin in amounts up to 0.23 mg m-2. Aggregation of ACRYLAT with immobilized HSA, induced with specific antibodies (anti-HSA), was investigated turbidimetrically. The results indicated that in the model turbidimetric immunoassay, ACRYLAT coated with HSA can be used for the detection of anti-HSA in the goat anti-HSA serum diluted from 50 to 7000-fold. Immobilization of rabbit antibodies to plasminogen (anti-Plg) to ACRYLAT via the epsilon-aminocaproic acid linkers provided particles which were used for the development of the turbidimetric immunoassay for plasminogen. In this assay plasminogen could be detected in concentration ranging from 0.75 to 75 micrograms ml-1 in the blood plasma.

  15. Safety and Efficacy of Intrapleural Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase during Extended Use in Complicated Pleural Space Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. McClune

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase improves outcomes in patients with complicated pleural space infections. However, little data exists for the use of combination intrapleural therapy after the initial dosing period of six doses. We sought to describe the safety profile and outcomes of intrapleural therapy beyond this standard dosing. A retrospective review of patients receiving intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator and DNase was performed at two institutions. We identified 101 patients from January 2013 to August 2015 receiving intrapleural therapy for complicated pleural space infection. The extended use of intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and DNase therapy beyond six doses was utilized in 20% (20/101 of patients. The mean number of doses in those undergoing extended dosing was 9.8 (range of 7–16. Within the population studied there appears to be no statistically significant increased risk of complications, need for surgical referral, or outcome differences when comparing those receiving standard or extended dosing intrapleural therapy. Future prospective study of intrapleural therapy as an alternative option for patients who fail initial pleural drainage and are unable to tolerate/accept a surgical intervention appears a potential area of study.

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is elevated in patients with COPD independent of metabolic and cardiovascular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waschki B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin Waschki,1–3 Henrik Watz,2,3 Olaf Holz,4,5 Helgo Magnussen,2,3 Beata Olejnicka,6 Tobias Welte,5,7 Klaus F Rabe,1,3 Sabina Janciauskiene5,7 1Pneumology, LungenClinic Grosshansdorf, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 2Pulmonary Research Institute at LungenClinic Grosshansdorf, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 3Airway Research Center North (ARCN, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 4Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover, Germany; 5Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH, German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Hannover, Germany; 6Department of Medicine, Trelleborg Hospital, Trelleborg, Sweden; 7Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Introduction: Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, a major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is associated with thrombosis, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and premature aging, which all are coexisting conditions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The role of PAI-1 in COPD with respect to metabolic and cardiovascular functions is unclear. Methods: In this study, which was nested within a prospective cohort study, the serum levels of PAI-1 were cross-sectionally measured in 74 stable COPD patients (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV and 18 controls without lung disease. In addition, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference, blood pressure, smoking status, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, adiponectin, ankle–brachial index, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and history of comorbidities were also determined. Results: The serum levels of PAI-1 were significantly higher in COPD patients than in controls, independent of a broad spectrum of possible confounders including metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. A multivariate regression analysis revealed

  17. Bioconjugation of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator to magnetic nanocarriers for targeted thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang HW

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Wei Yang,1,* Mu-Yi Hua,1,* Kun-Ju Lin,2,* Shiaw-Pyng Wey,3 Rung-Ywan Tsai,4 Siao-Yun Wu,5 Yi-Ching Lu,5 Hao-Li Liu,6 Tony Wu,7 Yunn-Hwa Ma5 1Chang Gung Molecular Medicine Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, 2Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, 4Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsin-chu, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Healthy Aging Research Center, 6Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 7Department of Neurology, Chang Gung University College of Medicine and Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Low-toxicity magnetic nanocarriers (MNCs composed of a shell of poly [aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid aniline] over a Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle core were developed to carry recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA in MNC-rtPA for targeted thrombolysis. With an average diameter of 14.8 nm, the MNCs exerted superparamagnetic properties. Up to 276 µg of active rtPA was immobilized per mg of MNCs, and the stability of the immobilized rtPA was greatly improved during storage at 4°C and 25°C. In vitro thrombolysis testing with a tubing system demonstrated that magnet-guided MNC-rtPA showed significantly improved thrombolysis compared with free rtPA and reduced the clot lysis time from 39.2 ± 3.2 minutes to 10.8 ± 4.2 minutes. In addition, magnet-guided MNC-rtPA at 20% of the regular rtPA dose restored blood flow within 15–25 minutes of treatment in a rat embolism model without triggering hematological toxicity. In conclusion, this improved system is based on magnetic targeting accelerated thrombolysis and is

  18. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × time reaction ) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, E a , induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (COD Mn ) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and COD Mn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Leukemia inhibitory factor promote trophoblast invasion via urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qin; Dai, Kuixing; Cui, Xinyuan; Yu, Ming; Yang, Xuesong; Yan, Bin; Liu, Shuai; Yan, Qiu

    2016-05-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome which can cause perinatal mortality and morbidity. Inadequate invasion by trophoblast cells may lead to poor perfusion of the placenta, even result in preeclampsia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying placentation facilitates the better intervention of preeclampsia. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is involved in the physiological and pathological processes. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is an important regulator in the establishment of pregnancy. However, the expression of uPAR in preeclamptic patients and its relationship with LIF remains unclear. In the current study, we found that the level of uPAR was relatively lower in the placentas from preeclamptic patients as compared with normal pregnant women. LIF promoted trophoblast cell outgrowth by upregulating uPAR in an explants culture, and LIF also enhanced migration and invasion potential through uPAR in trophoblast JAR and JEG-3 cell lines, and with increased gelatinolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2). The effect of LIF and uPAR on trophoblast migration and invasion was mediated by PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Our data indicates the roles of LIF in promoting trophoblast migration and invasion through uPAR and suggest that abnormal expression of uPAR might be associated with the etiology of preeclampsia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Daniel

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact.We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus.Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall.

  1. The interaction of streptococcal enolase with canine plasminogen: the role of surfaces in complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Balhara

    Full Text Available The enolase from Streptococcus pyogenes (Str enolase F137L/E363G is a homo-octamer shaped like a donut. Plasminogen (Pgn is a monomeric protein composed of seven discrete separated domains organized into a lock washer. The enolase is known to bind Pgn. In past work we searched for conditions in which the two proteins would bind to one another. The two native proteins in solution would not bind under any of the tried conditions. We found that if the structures were perturbed binding would occur. We stated that only the non-native Str enolase or Pgn would interact such that we could detect binding. We report here the results of a series of dual polarization interferometry (DPI experiments coupled with atomic force microscopy (AFM, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and fluorescence. We show that the critical condition for forming stable complexes of the two native proteins involves Str enolase binding to a surface. Surfaces that attract Str enolase are a sufficient condition for binding Pgn. Under certain conditions, Pgn adsorbed to a surface will bind Str enolase.

  2. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 in radiation-induced normal tissues injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmani, R.

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential tool for cancer treatment, but there is a balance between benefits and risks related to the use of ionizing radiation: the objective is to deliver a maximum dose to the tumour to destroy or to sterilize it while protecting surrounding normal tissues. Radio-induced damages to normal tissues are therefore a limiting factor when increasing the dose delivered to the tumour. One of the objectives of this research thesis is to bring to the fore a relationship between the initiation of lesions and the development of late damages, more particularly in the intestine, and to identify the involved molecular actors and their inter-connectivity. After a first part presenting ionizing radiation, describing biological effects of ionizing radiation and their use in radiotherapy, presenting the intestine and the endothelium and discussing the intestine radio-sensitivity, discussing the radio-induced intestine damages and radiotherapy-induced complications, and presenting the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and its behaviour in presence of ionizing radiation, two articles are reproduced. The first one addresses the effect of a pharmacological inhibition and of genetic deficiency in PAI-1 on the evolution of radio-induced intestine lesions. The second one discusses the fact that radio-induced PAI-1-related death of endothelial cells determines the severity of early radio-induced intestine lesions

  3. Topical tissue plasminogen activator appears ineffective for the clearance of intraocular fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, J; Latimer, W B

    1998-06-01

    To determine the efficacy of topical tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for the resolution of postoperative or inflammatory intraocular fibrinous exudates. Each treatment consisted of drops of 1 mg/ml tPA given 9 times 5 minutes apart. Records were reviewed and the results at 24 and 48 hours were recorded. Sixty-two patients had a total of 94 treatments. Fibrin exudates following intraocular surgery in 34 patients were treated 44 times. In 6 patients there was a positive result. Fibrin associated with intraocular infection was treated in 9 patients. None showed clear improvement. Nineteen patients had a total of 34 treatments for poorly controlled intraocular pressure (IOP) after glaucoma surgery. Five patients showed adequate control of the IOP, 12 did not change, and 2 had a questionable improvement. Eleven patients had adequate IOP control after additional treatment. Seven required suture lysis, 2 ab interno bleb revision, and 2 YAG capsulotomy or iridotomy to reduce the IOP to an acceptable level. Within the limits of this retrospective study and taking into account that fibrin may resolve spontaneously, it appears that topical tPA drops are not effective for the liquefaction of intraocular fibrin after surgery or in association with intraocular inflammation. They did not improve IOP control after glaucoma surgery.

  4. Quantitation of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne, E; Behrendt, N; Ploug, M

    1994-01-01

    variant of uPAR, suPAR, has been constructed by recombinant technique and the protein content of a purified suPAR standard preparation was determined by amino acid composition analysis. The sensitivity of the assay (0.6 ng uPAR/ml) is strong enough to measure uPAR in extracts of cultured cells and cancer......Binding of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) to a specific cell surface receptor (uPAR) plays a crucial role in proteolysis during tissue remodelling and cancer invasion. An immunosorbent assay for the quantitation of uPAR has now been developed. This assay is based on two monoclonal...... antibodies recognizing the non-ligand binding part of this receptor, and it detects both free and occupied uPAR, in contrast to ligand-binding assays used previously. In a variant of the assay, the occupied fraction of uPAR is selectively detected with a uPA antibody. To be used as a standard, a soluble...

  5. Pericyte protection by edaravone after tissue plasminogen activator treatment in rat cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Kentaro; Liu, Ning; Liu, Wentao; Omote, Yoshio; Kono, Syoichiro; Yunoki, Taijun; Deguchi, Shoko; Yamashita, Toru; Ikeda, Yoshio; Abe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes play a pivotal role in contraction, mediating inflammation and regulation of blood flow in the brain. In this study, changes of pericytes in the neurovascular unit (NVU) were examined in relation to the effects of exogenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and a free radical scavenger, edaravone. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that the overlap between platelet-derived growth factor receptor β-positive pericytes and N-acetylglucosamine oligomers (NAGO)-positive endothelial cells increased significantly at 4 days after 90 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). The number of pericytes and the overlap with NAGO decreased with tPA but recovered with edaravone 4 days after tMCAO with proliferation. Thus, tPA treatment damaged pericytes, resulting in the detachment from astrocytes and a decrease in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor secretion. However, treatment with edaravone greatly improved tPA-induced damage to pericytes. The present study demonstrates that exogenous tPA strongly damages pericytes and destroys the integrity of the NVU, but edaravone treatment can greatly ameliorate such damage after acute cerebral ischemia in rats. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24938625

  6. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator: a new target for male contraception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Han, Yan; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Li, Hong-Gang; Hu, Lian; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is closely related to male reproduction. With the aim of investigating the possibility for uPA as a potential contraceptive target, in the present work, Kunming male mice were immunized by human uPA subcutaneous injection at three separate doses for 3 times. Then the potency of the anti-human uPA antibody in serum was analyzed, and mouse fertility was evaluated. Serum antibody titers for human uPA in immunized groups all reached 1:10,240 or higher levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and mating experiments revealed that pregnancy rates and the mean number of embryos implanted after mating declined obviously (P male mice. Sperm function tests suggested that the sperm concentration, sperm viability, sperm motility, and in vitro fertilization rate for the cauda epididymis sperm in uPA-immunized groups were lower than those in the controls (P male mice could effectively reduce their fertility, and uPA could become a new target for immunocontraception in male contraceptive development.

  7. Interactions between iodinated contrast media and tissue plasminogen activator: In vitro comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, Eszter; Deres, László; Halmosi, Róbert; Várady, Edit; Tóth, Kálmán; Battyáni, István

    2017-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (Xenetix®, Ultravist®, Omnipaque®, Visipaque® and Iomeron®) used for computed tomography (CT) may decrease fibrinolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). We hypothesized that receiving iodinated contrast media before rt-PA may impair thrombolysis as measured by a new model system. Whole blood from Wistar Kyoto rats (n = 10) was obtained and allowed to form blood clots. Thrombolysis was performed by placing individually the prepared clots into 15 mL tubes and adding 5 mL saline buffer, 100μg rt-PA and a different contrast media; adjusting the quantity of iodine to either 30 mg or 60 mg. The thrombolytic efficacy was quantified by measuring the optical density (OD415) of the supernatant at different time points, namely at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min. There was a significant decrease in clot lysis efficiency observed in presence of iodine containing contrast media comparing to positive control group. Moreover, when the quantity of iodine was increased from 30 mg to 60 mg; the dissolution rate downturned with additional ∼50%. In conclusion, our study suggests that high dose of iodine potentially could negatively affect the efficiency of the thrombolytic therapy performed by rt-PA.

  8. Inhibitory effect of amiloride on the urokinase plasminogen activators in prostatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P; Bhatti, R; Gadarowski, J; Bell, N; Nasruddin, S

    1998-01-01

    The diuretic drug amiloride (AMLD), which competitively inhibits the catalytic activity of urokinase plasminogen activators (UPA), was used to study its effects on the proteolytic enzymes implicated in the invasiveness and metastases in a prostatic tumor model carrying two different sublines of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Our data showed that UPA activity was significantly higher, both in the cytosol and pellet of R3327-AT3, a fast-growing highly metastatic and androgen-insensitive tumor, as compared to the G3327-G subline, a slow-growing nonmetastatic tumor of the prostate. The UPA activity in AT3 tumor dropped when the rats were treated with AMLD for 3 weeks. The UPA activity in the sera and tumor effusions from rats with AT3 tumor was significantly higher as compared to those with G subline tumor. The number of pulmonary metastatic foci was the same in untreated rats as compared to those treated with AMLD. The lymph node inspection after 3 weeks revealed no secondary tumor in the AMLD-treated group. The role of UPA in the metastases of prostate cancer is discussed.

  9. Elevated soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) predicts mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mölkänen, T; Ruotsalainen, E; Thorball, C W

    2011-01-01

    The soluble form of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a new inflammatory marker. High suPAR levels have been shown to associate with mortality in cancer and in chronic infections like HIV and tuberculosis, but reports on the role of suPAR in acute bacteremic infections...... are scarce. To elucidate the role of suPAR in a common bacteremic infection, the serum suPAR levels in 59 patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) were measured using the suPARnostic ELISA assay and associations to 1-month mortality and with deep infection focus were analyzed. On day three, after...... the first positive blood culture for S. aureus, suPAR levels were higher in 19 fatalities (median 12.3; range 5.7-64.6 ng/mL) than in 40 survivors (median 8.4; range 3.7-17.6 ng/mL, p = 0.002). This difference persisted for 10 days. The presence of deep infection focus was not associated with elevated su...

  10. IMPACTS OF TISSUE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR (TPA ON NEURONAL SURVIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eChevilley

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA a serine protease is constituted of five functional domains through which it interacts with different substrates, binding proteins and receptors. In the last years, great interest has been given to the clinical relevance of targeting tPA in different diseases of the central nervous system, in particular stroke. Among its reported functions in the central nervous system, tPA displays both neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects. How can the protease mediate such opposite functions remain unclear but several hypotheses have been proposed. These include an influence of the degree of maturity and/or the type of neurons, of the level of tPA, of its origin (endogenous or exogenous or of its form (single chain tPA versus two chain tPA. In this review, we will provide a synthetic snapshot of our current knowledge regarding the natural history of tPA and discuss how it sustains its pleiotropic functions with focus on excitotoxic/ischemic neuronal death and neuronal survival.

  11. Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Levels in Tuberculosis Patients at High Risk for Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR has been shown to be a strong prognostic biomarker for tuberculosis (TB. In the present study, the profiles of plasma suPAR levels in pulmonary TB patients at high risk for multidrug resistance were analyzed and compared with those in multidrug resistant (MDR-TB patients. Forty patients were prospectively included, consisting of 10 MDR-TB patients and 30 TB patients at high risk for MDR, underwent clinical assesment. Plasma suPAR levels were measured using ELISA (SUPARnostic, Denmark and bacterial cultures were performed in addition to drug susceptibility tests. All patients of suspected MDR-TB group demonstrated significantly higher suPAR levels compared with the healthy TB-negative group (1.79 ng/mL. Among the three groups at high risk for MDR-TB, only the relapse group (7.87 ng/mL demonstrated suPAR levels comparable with those of MDR-TB patients (7.67 ng/mL. suPAR levels in the two-month negative acid-fast bacilli conversion group (9.29 ng/mL were higher than positive control, whereas levels in the group consisting of therapy failure patients (5.32 ng/mL were lower. Our results strongly suggest that suPAR levels enable rapid screening of suspected MDR-TB patients, but cannot differentiate between groups.

  12. Inhibition of endothelial cell expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 by gemfibrozil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, S; Sawa, H; Sobel, B E

    1993-10-18

    Increased concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) in plasma are associated with impaired fibrinolysis and venous and arterial thrombo-embolic disease. In pilot studies designed to identify pharmacologic approaches capable of diminishing such increases, we found that gemfibrozil attenuated the stimulation of synthesis of PAI-1 in a human, immortal, hepatoma cell line (Hep G2) induced by platelets. The present study was performed to determine whether it exerts analogous effects in non-immortal endothelial cells and whether it may therefore facilitate fibrinolysis locally in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with pharmacologic concentrations of gemfibrozil. Gemfibrozil, 100 microM, suppressed basal PAI-1 production by 15% and attenuated the augmentation of synthesis of PAI-1 induced by lysates from platelets (4 x 10(7)/ml) by 36% over 24 h without inhibiting overall protein synthesis. In addition, the increases in PAI-1 mRNA otherwise induced by platelet lysates over 6 h were suppressed by 49% (Northern blots) without any demonstrable change in the intracellular half-life of PAI-1 mRNA. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated diminution of PAI-1 protein synthesis in parallel with the changes observed in PAI-1 mRNA. To determine whether these effects of gemfibrozil on endothelial cells in vitro were paralleled by consistent changes in the concentrations of PAI-1 in plasma in vivo, we studied rabbits with induced carotid artery thrombosis and thrombolysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 4G/5G Polymorphism and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Mansour, Malek; Sayeh, Aicha; Bedoui, Ines; Mrad, Meriem; Riahi, Anis; Mrissa, Ridha; Nsiri, Brahim

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Tunisian patients. We analyzed the genotype and allele frequency distribution of the PAI-1 polymorphism in 60 Tunisian patients with AD and 120 healthy controls. The results show a significantly increased risk of AD in carriers of the 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes versus the wild-type 5G/5G genotype (4G/4G: 28.33% in patients vs 10.0% in controls; P 5G: 55.0% in patients vs 38.33% in controls; OR = 4.45; P < 10 -3 ). The 4G allele was also more frequently found in patients compared with controls; P < 10 -3 ; OR = 3.07. For all participants and by gender, homozygotic carriers (4G/4G) were at an increased risk of AD over heterozygotes and women were at an increased risk over their male genotype counterparts. The odds ratio for AD among 4G/4G carriers for any group was approximately twice that of heterozygotes in the same group. Women homozygotes ranked highest for AD risk (OR = 20.8) and, in fact, women heterozygotes (OR = 9.03) ranked higher for risk than male homozygotes (OR = 6.12). These preliminary exploratory results should be confirmed in a larger study.

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luqian; Huang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies were performed to assess the association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive. In the present study, the possible association was investigated by a meta-analysis. Eligible articles were identified for the period up to June 2013. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were appropriately derived from random-effects models or fixed-effects models. Fourteen case-control studies with a total of 2487 cases and 3538 controls were eligible. In recessive model, PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was associated with T2DM risk (OR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.07-1.41; P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was found among Asians (OR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.08-1.51; P = 0.005). This meta-analysis suggested that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism may be associated with T2DM development. PMID:24040470

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor I 4G/5G polymorphism in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armangil, Didem; Yurdakök, Murat; Okur, Hamza; Gürgey, Aytemiz

    2011-08-01

    Fibrin monomers inhibit surfactant function. 4G/5G insertion/deletion polymorphism plays an important role in the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression. To examine the genotype distribution of PAI-1 polymorphism in 60 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and 53 controls, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used. The proportion of 4G/4G, 4G/5G, and 5G/5G genotypes did not differ statistically between the RDS and control groups (P > .05). Having PAI-1 4G/4G genotype polymorphism appears to increase the risk of RDS (odds ratio [OR] =1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-4.3), although it was not statistically significant. No relation was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms and RDS, but there was an increased risk associated with the 4G variant of the PAI-1 gene. We believe that our findings of increased 4G allele of the PAI-1 gene in infants with RDS would also help to clarify the pathogenesis of RDS.

  16. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Aggregation and retention of human urokinase type plasminogen activator in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vladimir N

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion of recombinant proteins in yeast can be affected by their improper folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequent elimination of the misfolded molecules via the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway. Recombinant proteins can also be degraded by the vacuolar protease complex. Human urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA is poorly secreted by yeast but the mechanisms interfering with its secretion are largely unknown. Results We show that in Hansenula polymorpha overexpression worsens uPA secretion and stimulates its intracellular aggregation. The absence of the Golgi modifications in accumulated uPA suggests that aggregation occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion analysis has shown that the N-terminal domains were responsible for poor uPA secretion and propensity to aggregate. Mutation abolishing N-glycosylation decreased the efficiency of uPA secretion and increased its aggregation degree. Retention of uPA in the endoplasmic reticulum stimulates its aggregation. Conclusions The data obtained demonstrate that defect of uPA secretion in yeast is related to its retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accumulation of uPA within the endoplasmic reticulum disturbs its proper folding and leads to formation of high molecular weight aggregates.

  18. Potential cost effectiveness of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator versus streptokinase for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, V; Naylor, C D

    1992-01-01

    An economic evaluation of the potential incremental benefits of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) versus streptokinase (SK) for treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Cost effectiveness analysis from a third-party payer perspective (Ontario Ministry of Health). ECONOMIC INPUTS: Fully allocated costs for cardiovascular procedures and hospitalization for myocardial infarction were obtained anonymously for four Ontario teaching hospitals and converted to 1988 Canadian dollars. Professional charges were taken from the provincial health insurance fee schedule and drug costs obtained from the manufacturers. CLINICAL INPUTS: The baseline analysis was for nonelderly patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarctions; sensitivity analyses allowed extrapolation to higher risk subgroups. Short and longer term mortality and short term invasive procedure rates were estimated using data from clinical trials. If tPA achieves a 1% short term mortality advantage over SK with no advantages for other survivors, cost per life-year gained can be comparable to other cardiovascular interventions at $58,600. In the absence of immediate survival advantages, but assuming greater left ventricular preservation, the constant annual hazard rate advantage must be about 0.5% per year for competitive cost effectiveness ratios. A full range of projections is presented to help guide the policy decisions that will arise in the wake of the Global Utilization of SK and tPA for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) trial. The analysis also illustrates the general importance of considering longer term effects of in-hospital therapies for acute myocardial infarction.

  19. Novel Leptospira interrogans protein Lsa32 is expressed during infection and binds laminin and plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Renan F; Fernandes, Luis G; Romero, Eliete C; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2015-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the aetiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease of human and veterinary concern. The quest for novel antigens that could mediate host-pathogen interactions is being pursued. Owing to their location, these antigens have the potential to elicit numerous activities, including immune response and adhesion. This study focuses on a hypothetical protein of Leptospira, encoded by the gene LIC11089, and its three derived fragments: the N-terminal, intermediate and C terminus regions. The gene coding for the full-length protein and fragments was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(SI) strain by using the expression vector pAE. The recombinant protein and fragments tagged with hexahistidine at the N terminus were purified by metal affinity chromatography. The leptospiral full-length protein, named Lsa32 (leptospiral surface adhesin, 32 kDa), adheres to laminin, with the C terminus region being responsible for this interaction. Lsa32 binds to plasminogen in a dose-dependent fashion, generating plasmin when an activator is provided. Moreover, antibodies present in leptospirosis serum samples were able to recognize Lsa32. Lsa32 is most likely a new surface protein of Leptospira, as revealed by proteinase K susceptibility. Altogether, our data suggest that this multifaceted protein is expressed during infection and may play a role in host-L. interrogans interactions. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. Binding of tissue plasminogen activator to human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of purified, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied in vitro using immunofluorescence as well as radiolabeled tPA. Immunofluorescence was performed on HUVEC grown on round glass coverslips using rabbit anti-human tPA and fluorescein-conjugated anti-rabbit immunoglobulin. Positive fluorescence was observed only after incubation of HUVEC with tPA. HUVEC were grown to confluence in 24-well tissue culture plates, washed, and incubated with a constant amount of 125 I-tPA and various concentrations of unlabeled tPA. The binding of tPA to HUVEC was found to be specific, saturable, and reversible. Scatchard analysis yielded as equilibrium constant (K/sub eq/) of 4.2 x 10 6 M -1 and 1.2 x 10 7 binding sites per cell. Binding was inhibited by positively charged amino acids and by D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-L-arginine chloromethyl ketone but not by carbohydrates including mannose, galactose, N-acetyl glucosamine and N-acetyl galactosamine. Neat human plasma abrogates but does not totally inhibit binding of tPA to HUVEC. Binding was neither enhanced nor inhibited by fibronectin. Although the affinity of binding of tPA to HUVEC is low, the endothelial cell may be involved in regulating plasma levels of tPA in vivo which may have therapeutic significance

  1. Retinal Endovascular Surgery with Tissue Plasminogen Activator Injection for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Takata

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report 2 cases of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO who underwent retinal endovascular surgery with injection of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA into the retinal artery and showed a remarkable improvement in visual acuity and retinal circulation. Methods: Standard 25-G vitrectomy was performed under local anesthesia. Simultaneously, tPA (80,000 units/mL solution was injected into the retinal artery of the optic disc for 2–3 min using a microneedle. Changes in visual acuity, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT, fluorescein angiography, and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG results were examined. Results: Both cases could be treated within 12 h after the onset of CRAO. Case 1 was a 47-year-old woman. Her visual acuity improved from counting fingers before operation to 0.08 logMAR 1 month after the surgery. However, thinning of the retina at the macula was observed by OCT. Case 2 was a 70-year-old man. His visual acuity improved from counting fingers to 0.1 logMAR 2 months after the surgery. Both fluorescein angiography and LSFG showed improvement in retinal circulation after the surgery in case 2. Conclusions: Retinal endovascular surgery with injection of tPA into the retinal artery was feasible and may be a way to improve visual acuity and retinal circulation when performed in the acute phase of CRAO.

  2. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  3. Radiation inactivation of T7 phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.; Redpath, J.L.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation inactivation of T7 phage by 25-MeV electron pulses has been measured in various media containing a wide concentration range of radical scavenging solutes and in the presence of protective and sensitizing agents. The dependence of sensitivity on pulse dose, from 1 mrad to 3.6 krad, is attributed to radical depletion via bimolecular processes. The survival data are analyzed by extending target theory to include diffusive reactions of primary and secondary radicals generated in the medium. It is concluded that OH radicals are the principal primary inactivating species and that secondary radicals from Br - , CNS - , uracil, glucose, ribose, sucrose, tyrosine, and histidine are lethal to some extent. In nutrient broth or 100 mM histidine, psoralen derivatives, Actinomycin D, and Mitomycin C are anoxic sensitizers. It is proposed that the psoralens promote the formation of non-strand break lesions as the sensitization mechanism. The target theory based on diffusional kinetics is applicable to other systems including single cells

  4. Instrument for Study of Microbial Thermal Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, R. W.; Read, R. B.

    1968-01-01

    An instrument was designed for the study of thermal inactivation of microorganisms using heating times of less than 1 sec. The instrument operates on the principle of rapid automatic displacement of the microorganism to and from a saturated steam atmosphere, and the operating temperature range is 50 to 90 C. At a temperature of 70 C, thermometric lag (time required to respond to 63.2% of a step change) of the fluid sample containing microorganisms was 0.12 sec. Heating time required to heat the sample to within 0.1 C of the exposure temperature was less than 1 sec, permitting exposure periods as brief as 1 sec, provided the proper corrections are made for the lethal effect of heating. The instrument is most useful for heat exposure periods of less than 5 min, and, typically, more than 500 samples can be processed for microbial inactivation determinations within an 8-hr period. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:4874466

  5. Influvac, a trivalent inactivated subunit influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Fabiano, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Influenza represents a major sanitary and socio-economic burden and vaccination is universally considered the most effective strategy for preventing the disease and its complications. Traditional influenza vaccines have been on the market since the late 1940s, with million of doses administered annually worldwide, and demonstrated a substantial efficacy and safety. The trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine has been available for more than 25 years and has been studied in healthy children, adults and the elderly and in people affected by underlying chronic medical conditions. We describe vaccine technology focusing on subunit vaccine production procedures and mode of action and provide updated information on efficacy and safety available data. A review of efficacy and safety data in healthy subjects and in high risk populations from major sponsor- and investigator-driven studies. The vaccine showed a good immunogenicity and a favorable safety profile in all target groups. In the panorama of actually available influenza vaccines, trivalent inactivated subunit vaccine represents a well-established tool for preventing flu and the associated complications.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  7. IL26 gene inactivation in Equidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhsi-Niaei, M; Drögemüller, M; Jagannathan, V; Gerber, V; Leeb, T

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL26) is a member of the IL10 cytokine family. The IL26 gene is located between two other well-known cytokines genes of this family encoding interferon-gamma (IFNG) and IL22 in an evolutionary conserved gene cluster. In contrast to humans and most other mammals, mice lack a functional Il26 gene. We analyzed the genome sequences of other vertebrates for the presence or absence of functional IL26 orthologs and found that the IL26 gene has also become inactivated in several equid species. We detected a one-base pair frameshift deletion in exon 2 of the IL26 gene in the domestic horse (Equus caballus), Przewalski horse (Equus przewalskii) and donkey (Equus asinus). The remnant IL26 gene in the horse is still transcribed and gives rise to at least five alternative transcripts. None of these transcripts share a conserved open reading frame with the human IL26 gene. A comparative analysis across diverse vertebrates revealed that the IL26 gene has also independently been inactivated in a few other mammals, including the African elephant and the European hedgehog. The IL26 gene thus appears to be highly variable, and the conserved open reading frame has been lost several times during mammalian evolution. © 2013 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. Scale down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomassen, Y.E.; Oever, van 't R.; Vinke, C.M.; Spiekstra, A.; Wijffels, R.H.; Pol, van der L.A.; Bakker, W.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production

  9. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during

  10. Quantum chromodynamics as the sequential fragmenting with inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the modified leading log approximation of the perturbative QCD and the sequential binary fragmentation process. We will show that in the absence of inactivation, this process is equivalent to the QCD gluodynamics. The inactivation term yields a precise prescription of how to include the hadronization in the QCD equations. (authors)

  11. Quantum chromodynamics as the sequential fragmenting with inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botet, R. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique des Solides; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the relation between the modified leading log approximation of the perturbative QCD and the sequential binary fragmentation process. We will show that in the absence of inactivation, this process is equivalent to the QCD gluodynamics. The inactivation term yields a precise prescription of how to include the hadronization in the QCD equations. (authors). 15 refs.

  12. Mutual inactivation of Notch receptors and ligands facilitates developmental patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sprinzak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental patterning requires juxtacrine signaling in order to tightly coordinate the fates of neighboring cells. Recent work has shown that Notch and Delta, the canonical metazoan juxtacrine signaling receptor and ligand, mutually inactivate each other in the same cell. This cis-interaction generates mutually exclusive sending and receiving states in individual cells. It generally remains unclear, however, how this mutual inactivation and the resulting switching behavior can impact developmental patterning circuits. Here we address this question using mathematical modeling in the context of two canonical pattern formation processes: boundary formation and lateral inhibition. For boundary formation, in a model motivated by Drosophila wing vein patterning, we find that mutual inactivation allows sharp boundary formation across a broader range of parameters than models lacking mutual inactivation. This model with mutual inactivation also exhibits robustness to correlated gene expression perturbations. For lateral inhibition, we find that mutual inactivation speeds up patterning dynamics, relieves the need for cooperative regulatory interactions, and expands the range of parameter values that permit pattern formation, compared to canonical models. Furthermore, mutual inactivation enables a simple lateral inhibition circuit architecture which requires only a single downstream regulatory step. Both model systems show how mutual inactivation can facilitate robust fine-grained patterning processes that would be difficult to implement without it, by encoding a difference-promoting feedback within the signaling system itself. Together, these results provide a framework for analysis of more complex Notch-dependent developmental systems.

  13. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose.

  14. Ebola Virus Inactivation by Detergents Is Annulled in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Tintu, Andrei; Russcher, Henk; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.; Rijken, Mikel; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Koelewijn, Rob; de Jong, Menno D.; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Munster, Vincent J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of blood samples from hemorrhagic fever virus (HFV)-infected patients with 0.1% detergents has been recommended for virus inactivation and subsequent safe laboratory testing. However, data on virus inactivation by this procedure are lacking. Here we show the effect of this procedure on

  15. Method of inactivating reproducible forms of mycoplasma in biological preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veber, P.; Jurmanova, K.; Lesko, J.; Hana, L.; Veber, V.

    1978-01-01

    Inactivation of mycoplasms in biological materials was achieved using gamma radiation with a dose rate of 1x10 4 to 5x10 6 rads/h for 1 to 250 hours. The technique is advantageous for allowing the inactivation of the final form of products (tablets, vaccines, etc.). (J.P.)

  16. Preparation of thermosensitive magnetic liposome encapsulated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for targeted thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hao-Lung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML) prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, distearolyphosphatidyl ethanolamine-N-poly(ethylene glycol) 2000, cholesterol and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles by solvent evaporation/sonication and freeze-thaw cycles method. Response surface methodology was proved to be a powerful tool to predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release. Validation experiments verified the accuracy of the model that provides a simple and effective method for fabricating TML with controllable encapsulation efficiency and predictable temperature-sensitive drug release behavior. The prepared samples were characterized for physico-chemical properties by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA could be confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. A thrombolytic drug delivery system using TML could be proposed for magnetic targeted delivery of rtPA to the site of thrombus followed by temperature-triggered controlled drug release in an alternating magnetic field. - Highlights: • rtPA and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP were encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML). • RSM could predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release from TML. • Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA was confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. • TML-rtPA will be useful as a magnetic targeted nanodrug to improve clinical thrombolytic therapy.

  17. Safety of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator administration with computed tomography evidence of prior infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Michael J; Houston, J Thomas; Boehme, Amelia K; Albright, Karen C; Bavarsad Shahripour, Reza; Palazzo, Paola; Alvi, Muhammed; Rawal, Pawan V; Kapoor, Niren; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2014-07-01

    Prior stroke within 3 months excludes patients from thrombolysis; however, patients may have computed tomography (CT) evidence of prior infarct, often of unknown time of origin. We aimed to determine if the presence of a previous infarct on pretreatment CT is a predictor of hemorrhagic complications and functional outcomes after the administration of intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients treated with IV tPA at our institution from 2009-2011. Pretreatment CTs were reviewed for evidence of any prior infarct. Further review determined if any hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) were present on repeat CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Outcomes included sICH, any HT, poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6), and discharge disposition. Of 212 IV tPA-treated patients, 84 (40%) had evidence of prior infarct on pretreatment CT. Patients with prior infarcts on CT were older (median age, 72 versus 65 years; P=.001) and had higher pretreatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores (median, 10 versus 7; P=.023). Patients with prior infarcts on CT did not experience more sICH (4% versus 2%; P=.221) or any HT (18% versus 14%; P=.471). These patients did have a higher frequency of poor functional outcome at discharge (82% versus 50%; P<.001) and were less often discharged to home or inpatient rehabilitation center (61% versus 73%; P=.065). Visualization of prior infarcts on pretreatment CT did not predict an increased risk of sICH in our study and should not be viewed as a reason to withhold systemic tPA treatment after clinically evident strokes within 3 months were excluded. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5 directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5 on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation.

  19. DNA repair and induction of plasminogen activator in human fetal cells treated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Sharon, R.; Rothman, M.; Miskin, R.

    1984-01-01

    We have tested human fetal fibroblasts for development associated changes in DNA repair by utilizing nucleoid sedimentation as an assay for excision repair. Among skin fibroblasts the rate of excision repair was significantly higher in non-fetal cells than in fibroblasts derived from an 8 week fetus; this was evident by a delay in both the relaxation and the restoration of DNA supercoiling in nucleoids after irradiation. Skin fibroblasts derived at 12 week gestation were more repair proficient than those derived at 8 week gestation. However, they exhibited a somewhat lower rate of repair than non-fetal cells. The same fetal and non-fetal cells were also tested for induction of the protease plasminogen activator (PA) after u.v. irradiation. Enhancement of PA was higher in skin fibroblasts derived at 8 week than in those derived at 12 week gestation and was absent in non-fetal skin fibroblasts. These results are consistent with our previous findings that in human cells u.v. light-induced PA synthesis is correlated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Excision repair and PA inducibility were found to depend on tissue of origin in addition to gestational stage, as shown for skin and lung fibroblasts from the same 12 week fetus. Lung compared to skin fibroblasts exhibited lower repair rates and produced higher levels of PA after irradiation. The sedimentation velocity of nucleoids, prepared from unirradiated fibroblasts, in neutral sucrose gradients with or without ethidium bromide, indicated the presence of DNA strand breaks in fetal cells. It is proposed that reduced DNA repair in fetal cells may result from alterations in DNA supercoiling, and that persistent DNA strand breaks enhance transcription of PA gene(s)

  20. Clinical significance of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity in patients with exercise-induced ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, K.; Kurata, C.; Taguchi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.; Rydzewski, A.; Takada, Y.; Takada, A.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the fibrinolytic system in patients with exercise-induced ischemia and its relation to ischemia and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), 47 patients with CAD confirmed by results of coronary angiography underwent symptom-limited multistage exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. All patients with CAD had exercise-induced ischemia as assessed from thallium-201 images. Pre- and peak exercise blood samples from each patient and preexercise blood samples from control subjects were assayed for several fibrinolytic components and were also assayed for plasma adrenaline. The extent of ischemia was defined as delta visual uptake score (total visual uptake score in delayed images minus total visual uptake score in initial images) and the severity of CAD as the number of diseased vessels. In the basal condition, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity was significantly higher in patients with exercise-induced ischemia as compared to control subjects (p less than 0.01), although there were no significant differences in other fibrinolytic variables between the two groups. Moreover, PAI activity in the basal condition displayed a significantly positive correlation with the extent of ischemia (r = 0.47, p less than 0.01). Patients with exercise-induced ischemia were divided into two groups (24 with single-vessel disease and 23 with multivessel disease). There were no significant differences in coronary risk factors, hemodynamics, or plasma adrenaline levels during exercise between single-vessel and multivessel disease except that delta visual uptake score was significantly higher in multivessel disease (p less than 0.01)

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator-assisted vitrectomy for submacular hemorrhage due to age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment efficacy of vitrectomy combined with subretinal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA and factors affecting visual improvement in patients with submacular hemorrhage (SMH due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with SMH secondary to nAMD were retrospectively reviewed. The initial surgical procedure involved a 23-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy, subretinal r-tPA application through a self-sealing inferior retinotomy, and sulfur hexafluoride gas for tamponade in all patients. The duration, size, and thickness of the hemorrhage and the pre- and post-operative visual acuity (VA using a Snellen chart were recorded. VA was converted to logMAR for statistical analysis. Results: The average duration and size of the SMH were 12.8 ± 18.2 days and 8.6 ± 5.3 disc areas, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 16.9 ± 4.7 months. A statistically significant visual improvement was found when comparing initial VA with postoperative best-corrected VA (BCVA and final BCVA (Wilcoxon rank test, P ≤ 0.01. There was no significant correlation between the size of the hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no statistically significant correlation between the initial VA and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no significant correlation between the duration of hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. The preoperative thickness of hemorrhage (747.5 ± 30 μm was not correlated with postoperative BCVA or final BCVA (Pearson's test. Conclusions: Vitrectomy combined with subretinal r-tPA injection and gas tamponade is an effective surgical intervention to preserve VA in selected patients with apparent SMH.

  2. OmpL1 is an extracellular matrix- and plasminogen-interacting protein of Leptospira spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Vieira, Monica L; Kirchgatter, Karin; Alves, Ivy J; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2012-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with multisystem involvement caused by pathogenic strains of the genus Leptospira. OmpL1 is an outer membrane protein of Leptospira spp. that is expressed during infection. In this work, we investigated novel features of this protein. We describe that OmpL1 is a novel leptospiral extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding protein and a plasminogen (PLG) receptor. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star/pLysS as inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified by metal-chelating chromatography. The protein presented a typical β-strand secondary structure, as evaluated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The recombinant protein reacted with antibodies in serum samples from convalescent leptospirosis patients with a high specificity compared to serum samples from individuals with unrelated diseases. These data strengthen the usefulness of OmpL1 as a diagnostic marker of leptospirosis. The characterization of the immunogenicity of recombinant OmpL1 in inoculated BALB/c mice showed that the protein has the capacity to elicit humoral and cellular immune responses, as denoted by high antibody titers and the proliferation of lymphocytes. We demonstrate that OmpL1 has the ability to mediate attachment to laminin and plasma fibronectin, with K(D) (equilibrium dissociation constant) values of 2,099.93 ± 871.03 nM and 1,239.23 ± 506.85 nM, respectively. OmpL1 is also a PLG receptor, with a K(D) of 368.63 ± 121.23 nM, capable of generating enzymatically active plasmin. This is the first report that shows and characterizes OmpL1 as an ECM-interacting and a PLG-binding protein of Leptospira spp. that may play a role in bacterial pathogenesis when expressed during infection.

  3. Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator Can Be Safely Given without Complete Blood Count Results Back.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Dong

    Full Text Available It is well known that the efficacy of intravenous (i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is time-dependent when used to treat patients with acute ischemic strokes.Our study examines the safety issue of giving IV tPA without complete blood count (CBC resulted.This is a retrospective observational study by examining the database from Huashan Hospital in China and OSF/INI Comprehensive Stroke Center in United States. Patient data collected included demographics, occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, door to needle intervals, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores on admission, CBC results on admission and follow-up modified Rankin Scale scores. Linear regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to identify factors that would have an impact on door-to-needle intervals.Our study included 120 patients from Huashan Hospital and 123 patients from INI. Among them, 36 in Huashan Hospital and 51 in INI received i.v. tPA prior to their CBC resulted. Normal platelet count was found in 98.8% patients after tPA was given. One patient had thrombocytopenia but no hemorrhagic event. A significantly shorter door to needle interval (DTN was found in the group without CBC resulted. There was also a difference in treatment interval between the two hospitals. Door to needle intervals had a strong correlation to onset to treatment intervals and NIHSS scores on admission.In patients presented with acute ischemic stroke, the risk of developing hemorrhagic event is low if i.v. tPA is given before CBC has resulted. The door to needle intervals can be significantly reduced.

  4. Vehicle-dependent Effects of Sphingosine 1-phosphate on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chiharu; Kurano, Makoto; Nishikawa, Masako; Kano, Kuniyuki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Tomo; Aoki, Junken

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been suggested to be a positive regulator of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in adipocytes, while some studies are not consistent with this prothrombotic property of S1P. Since S1P is bound to apolipoprotein M (apoM) on HDL or to albumin in plasma, we compared the properties of these two forms on the PAI-1 induction. Methods: We investigated the associations of S1P, apoM, and PAI-1 concentrations in the plasma of normal coronary artery (NCA), stable angina pectoris (SAP), and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects (n = 32, 71, and 38, respectively). Then, we compared the effects of S1P with various vehicles on the PAI-1 expression in 3T3L1 adipocytes. We also investigated the modulation of the PAI-1 levels in mice infected with adenovirus coding apoM. Results: Among ACS subjects, the PAI-1 level was positively correlated with the S1P level, but not the apoM level. In adipocytes, S1P bound to an apoM-rich vehicle induced PAI-1 expression to a lesser extent than the control vehicle, while S1P bound to an apoM-depleted vehicle induced PAI-1 expression to a greater extent than the control vehicle in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Additionally, apoM overexpression in mice failed to modulate the plasma PAI-1 level and the adipose PAI-1 expression level. S1P bound to albumin increased PAI-1 expression through the S1P receptor 2-Rho/ROCK-NFκB pathway. Conclusion: S1P bound to albumin, but not to apoM, induces PAI-1 expression in adipocytes, indicating that S1P can exert different properties on the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, depending on its vehicle. PMID:28321011

  5. Cardiac macrophages adopt profibrotic/M2 phenotype in infarcted hearts: Role of urokinase plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Signe; Helterline, Deri; Asbe, Laura; Dupras, Sarah; Minami, Elina; Farris, Stephen; Stempien-Otero, April

    2017-07-01

    Macrophages (mac) that over-express urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) adopt a profibrotic M2 phenotype in the heart in association with cardiac fibrosis. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac macs are M2 polarized in infarcted mouse and human hearts and that polarization is dependent on mac-derived uPA. Studies were performed using uninjured (UI) or infarcted (MI) hearts of uPA overexpressing (SR-uPA), uPA null, or nontransgenic littermate (Ntg) mice. At 7days post-infarction, cardiac mac were isolated, RNA extracted and M2 markers Arg1, YM1, and Fizz1 measured with qrtPCR. Histologic analysis for cardiac fibrosis, mac and myofibroblasts was performed at the same time-point. Cardiac macs were also isolated from Ntg hearts and RNA collected after primary isolation or culture with vehicle, IL-4 or plasmin and M2 marker expression measured. Cardiac tissue and blood was collected from humans with ischemic heart disease. Expression of M2 marker CD206 and M1 marker TNFalpha was measured. Macs from WT mice had increased expression of Arg1 and Ym1 following MI (41.3±6.5 and 70.3±36, fold change vs UI, n=8, Padopt a M2 phenotype in association with fibrosis. Plasmin can induce an M2 phenotype in cardiac macs. However, M2 activation can occur in the heart in vivo in the absence of uPA indicating that alternative pathways to activate plasmin are present in the heart. Excess uPA promotes increased fibroblast density potentially via potentiating fibroblast migration or proliferation. Altering macrophage phenotype in the heart is a potential target to modify cardiac fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289.

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is elevated in patients with COPD independent of metabolic and cardiovascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschki, Benjamin; Watz, Henrik; Holz, Olaf; Magnussen, Helgo; Olejnicka, Beata; Welte, Tobias; Rabe, Klaus F; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is associated with thrombosis, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and premature aging, which all are coexisting conditions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of PAI-1 in COPD with respect to metabolic and cardiovascular functions is unclear. Methods In this study, which was nested within a prospective cohort study, the serum levels of PAI-1 were cross-sectionally measured in 74 stable COPD patients (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV) and 18 controls without lung disease. In addition, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference, blood pressure, smoking status, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, ankle–brachial index, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and history of comorbidities were also determined. Results The serum levels of PAI-1 were significantly higher in COPD patients than in controls, independent of a broad spectrum of possible confounders including metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. A multivariate regression analysis revealed triglyceride and hs-CRP levels to be the best predictors of PAI-1 within COPD. GOLD Stages II and III remained independently associated with higher PAI-1 levels in a final regression analysis. Conclusion The data from the present study showed that the serum levels of PAI-1 are higher in patients with COPD and that moderate-to-severe airflow limitation, hypertriglyceridemia, and systemic inflammation are independent predictors of an elevated PAI-1 level. PAI-1 may be a potential biomarker candidate for COPD-specific and extra-pulmonary manifestations. PMID:28356730

  8. Saturated fatty acid intake can influence increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquio, D C L; de Piano, A; Campos, R M S; Sanches, P L; Corgosinho, F C; Carnier, J; Oyama, L M; do Nascimento, C M P O; de Mello, M T; Tufik, S; Dâmaso, A R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if saturated fatty acid intake adjusted by tertiles can influence metabolic, inflammation, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in obese adolescents. Body mass, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, and body composition of 108 obese adolescents were obtained. Fasting glucose, insulin, PAI-1, and CRP were determined. Insulin resistance was assessed by Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity by Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). Dietetic intake was estimated by a 3-day dietary record, and volunteers were divided according to consumption of saturated fatty acids: tertile 1 [Low Saturated Fatty Acid Intake (Low-SFA): ≤12.14 g], tertile 2 [Moderate Saturated Fatty Intake (Moderate SFA intake): 12.15-20.48 g], and tertile 3 [High Saturated Fatty Acid Intake (High-SFA Intake); >20.48 g]. Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA 7.0 software and the significance level was set at pstudy is that Moderate and High-SFA intakes presented significantly higher values of PAI-1 than Low-SFA Intake. PAI-1 was positively associated with saturated fatty intake, waist circumference, mean blood pressure, and HOMA-IR. SFA intake was predictor of PAI-1 independent of body fat, HOMA-IR and total-cholesterol. In addition, PAI-1 was an independent predictor of blood pressure. HOMA-IR and QUICKI presented significantly higher and lower, respectively, in High-SFA compared to Moderate-SFA intake. High-SFA influenced cardiovascular disease risks, since it increased PAI-1 and insulin resistance, and decreased insulin sensibility, leading to vicious cycle among food ingestion, pro-thrombotic state, and cardiovascular risks in obese adolescents. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. ROLE OF GENE POLYMORFISM OF PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR INGIBITOR TYPE I AS A RISK FACTOR FOR PREMATURE RUPTURE OF MEMBRANE AT TERM PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Nikolayeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrospective study was designed to identify association of premature rupture of the fetal membranes (PROM with carrying polymorphisms in genes encoding folate metabolism and hemostasis in 717 women. More than one hundred potential predictors were analyzed including carriage of thrombogenic genes polymorphisms and genes encoding folate metabolism: FV[Arg506Gln], F II [20210 G/A], MTHFR [Ala222Val], (PAI-I[-675 5G/4G]. Study revealed that plasminogen activator ingibitor-1 gene polymorphism increases significantly the risk of premature rupture of the fetal membranes in term pregnancy (PROM: heterozygous plasminogen activator ingibitor-1 gene polymorphism is associated with 3.6-fold (95% CI 2.4–5.4; p < 0.001, homozygous plasminogen activator ingibitor-1 gene polymorphism – with 1.7-fold (95% CI 1.1–2.6; p = 0.01 risk rise of PROM.

  10. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  11. Modelling and application of the inactivation of microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oğuzhan, P.; Yangılar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of consuming contaminated food with toxic microorganisms causing infections and consideration of food protection and new microbial inactivation methods are obligatory situations. Food microbiology is mainly related with unwanted microorganisms spoiling foods during processing and transporting stages and causing diseases. Determination of pathogen microorganisms is important for human health to define and prevent dangers and elongate shelf life. Inactivation of pathogen microorganisms can provide food security and reduce nutrient losses. Microbial inactivation which is using methods of food protection such as food safety and fresh. With this aim, various methods are used such as classical thermal processes (pasteurisation, sterilisation), pressured electrical field (PEF), ionised radiation, high pressure, ultrasonic waves and plasma sterilisation. Microbial inactivation modelling is a secure and effective method in food production. A new microbiological application can give useful results for risk assessment in food, inactivation of microorganisms and improvement of shelf life. Application and control methods should be developed and supported by scientific research and industrial applications

  12. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for a human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Antalis, T M; Clark, M A; Barnes, T; Lehrbach, P R; Devine, P L; Schevzov, G; Goss, N H; Stephens, R W; Tolstoshev, P

    1988-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor (mPAI-2) was purified to homogeneity from the U937 cell line and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence were used to screen a cDNA library prepared from U937 cells. One positive clone was sequenced and contained most of the coding sequence as well as a long incomplete 3' untranslated region (1112 base pairs). This cDNA sequence was shown to encode mPAI-2 by hybrid-select translation. A cDNA clone encoding t...

  13. The liberated domain I of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor--a new tumour marker in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte E; Drivsholm, Lars; Pappot, Helle

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains poor with a 5-year survival rate of 4-6%. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), high levels of intact and cleaved forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) are significantly associated with short overall survival. Our...... measured using time-resolved fluorescence immunoassays (TR-FIA 1-3). Assessment of association of the uPAR forms to overall survival (OS) was done using Cox regression analysis adjusted for clinical covariates [age, gender, stage, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), WHO performance status (PS)]. Multivariate...

  14. Plasma levels of intact and cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in men with clinically localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Gitte; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Lippert, Solvej

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Lymph node metastasis (N1) is an adverse prognostic factor for men with clinically localised prostate cancer (PCa), but the prediction of N1 disease remains difficult. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. We analysed...... analysis and quantified using the areas under the ROC curve (AUC).Results: All soluble uPAR levels were significantly (p=0.03) higher in patients with N1 disease compared with patients with N0/x disease. ROC curves including clinical tumour stage, biopsy Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen and percent...

  15. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetti by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F.; Williams, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79 C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0-64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of hte micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing C. burnetti was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes.

  16. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetii by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F. (Army Medical Research Inst. of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD (USA)); Williams, J.C. (National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79{sup 0}C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0.64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of the micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing 10{sup 11} C. burnetii ml{sup -1} was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes. (author).

  17. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation

  18. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetii by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F.; Williams, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79 0 C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0.64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of the micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing 10 11 C. burnetii ml -1 was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes. (author)

  19. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  20. Polyphenol Oxidase Enzyme and Inactivation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase enzyme is found in vegetables and fruits, as well as in some animal organs and microorganisms. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme responsible for enzymatic browning is a group of copper proteins that catalyses the oxidation of phenolic compounds to quinones, which produce brown pigments, commonly found in fruits and vegetables. During the industrial preparation of fruits and vegetables, results of catalytic effect of polyphenol oxidase causes enzymatic browning. Enzymatic browning impairs the appearance of products containing phenolic compounds along with undesirable colour, odor and taste formation and significant loss of nutritional value of the products. This affects the acceptability of the products by the consumers and causes economic losses. In this review, some characteristics of polyphenol oxidase enzyme in different fruits and vegetables have been reviewed and information about chemical antibrowning agents, thermal applications, irradiation applications and alternative methods such as high pressure processing, pulse electric field, supercritical carbon dioxide and ultrasound applications to inactivate this enzyme has been presented.

  1. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts

  2. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  3. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60 CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60 CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  4. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60 Co gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60 Co radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. We found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  5. Cationic antimicrobial peptides inactivate Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Hollmann, Axel; Martinez, Melina; Semorile, Liliana; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Maffía, Paulo C.; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: 1) direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, 2) cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and 3) inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure) specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  7. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  8. Mammalian protein secretion without signal peptide removal. Biosynthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in U-937 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, R.D.; Wun, T.C.; Sadler, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor that regulates plasmin generation by inhibiting urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. The primary structure of PAI-2 suggests that it may be secreted without cleavage of a single peptide. To confirm this hypothesis we have studied the glycosylation and secretion of PAI-2 in human monocytic U-937 cells by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation, glycosidase digestion, and protein sequencing. PAI-2 is variably glycosylated on asparagine residues to yield intracellular intermediates with zero, one, two, or three high mannose-type oligosaccharide units. Secretion of the N-glycosylated species began by 1 h of chase and the secreted molecules contained both complex-type N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. Enzymatically deglycosylated PAI-2 had an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the nonglycosylated precursor and also to that of PAI-2 synthesized in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate from synthetic mRNA derived from full length PAI-2 cDNA. The amino-terminal protein sequence of secreted PAI-2 began with the initiator methionine residue. These results indicate that PAI-2 is glycosylated and secreted efficiently without the cleavage of a signal peptide. PAI-2 shares this property with its nearest homologue in the serine protease inhibitor family, chicken ovalbumin, and appears to be the first well characterized example of this phenomenon among natural mammalian proteins

  9. Dual role for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 as soluble and as matricellular regulator of epithelial alveolar cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquerlot, François; Galiacy, Stephane; Malo, Michel; Guignabert, Christophe; Lawrence, Daniel A; d'Ortho, Maria-Pia; Barlovatz-Meimon, Georgia

    2006-11-01

    Epithelium repair, crucial for restoration of alveolo-capillary barrier integrity, is orchestrated by various cytokines and growth factors. Among them keratinocyte growth factor plays a pivotal role in both cell proliferation and migration. The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system also influences cell migration through proteolysis during epithelial repair. In addition, the complex formed by uPAR-uPA and matrix-bound plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) exerts nonproteolytic roles in various cell types. Here we present new evidence about the dual role of PAI-1 under keratinocyte growth factor stimulation using an in vitro repair model of rat alveolar epithelial cells. Besides proteolytic involvement of the uPA system, the availability of matrix-bound-PAI-1 is also required for an efficient healing. An unexpected decrease of healing was shown when PAI-1 activity was blocked. However, the proteolytic action of uPA and plasmin were still required. Moreover, immediately after wounding, PAI-1 was dramatically increased in the newly deposited matrix at the leading edge of wounds. We thus propose a dual role for PAI-1 in epithelial cell wound healing, both as a soluble inhibitor of proteolysis and also as a matrix-bound regulator of cell migration. Matrix-bound PAI-1 could thus be considered as a new member of the matricellular protein family.

  10. Luciferase inactivation in the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, C A; Baldwin, T O

    1981-06-01

    Luciferase was rapidly inactivated in stationary-phase cultures of the wild type of the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but was stable in stationary-phase cultures of mutants of V. harveyi that are nonluminous without exogenous aldehyde, termed the aldehyde-deficient mutants. The inactivation in the wild type was halted by cell lysis and was slowed or stopped by O2 deprivation or by addition of KCN and NaF or of chloramphenicol. If KCN and NaF or chloramphenicol were added to a culture before the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation did not occur. However, if these inhibitors were added after the onset of luciferase inactivation, then luciferase inactivation continued for about 2 to 3 h before the inactivation process stopped. The onset of luciferase inactivation in early stationary-phase cultures of wild-type cell coincided with a slight drop in the intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) level from a relatively constant log-phase value of 20 pmol of ATP per microgram of soluble cell protein. Addition of KCN and NaF to a culture shortly after this drop in ATP caused a rapid decrease in the ATP level to about 4 pmol of ATP per microgram whereas chloramphenicol added at this same time caused a transient increase in ATP level to about 25 pmol/microgram. The aldehyde-deficient mutant (M17) showed a relatively constant log-phase ATP level identical with that of the wild-type cells, but rather than decreasing in early stationary phase, the ATP level increased to a value twice that in log-phase cells. We suggest that the inactivation of luciferase is dependent on the synthesis of some factor which is produced during stationary phase and is itself unstable, and whose synthesis is blocked by chloramphenicol or cyanide plus fluoride.

  11. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 removal using dextran sulphate columns. Evidence of PAI-1 homeostasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Vincent M G

    2009-08-01

    Patients with high plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen levels are prone to develop thrombosis. Lowering PAI-1 levels may offer a therapeutic option and help to better understand PAI-1 metabolism. We examined the effect on plasma PAI-1 levels of LDL-apheresis using dextran sulphate (DS) columns in 12 patients (9 male, 3 female, 49 +\\/- 10 years) with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia and coronary artery disease. One plasma volume equivalent (2.3-4.0 l) was treated during each procedure (at flow rates of 23 +\\/- 2 ml\\/min). Lipids and PAI-1 antigen levels were measured in plasma before and immediately after 19 aphereses (once in 7 patients, twice in 3 patients and three times in 2 patients) and also at 3 and 7 days post apheresis in five of these patients and in the column eluates from 8 of these patients. DS-apheresis reduced plasma cholesterol (50 +\\/- 8%), triglyceride (45 +\\/- 27%), apolipoprotein B (59 +\\/- 10%) and PAI-1 antigen levels from 10.2 +\\/- 5.2 to 6.0 +\\/- 3.1 ng\\/ml (P = 0.005). The PAI-I changes were independent of circadian variation. PAI-I bound to the DS-columns (3.51 +\\/- 1.03 ng\\/ml filtered plasma) and the percent of filtered PAI-1 that was bound correlated inversely (r = -0.81, P < 0.02) with basal PAI-1 levels indicating a high affinity saturable binding process. In four patients, plasma PAI-1 levels post-apheresis were higher than expected based on the amount of PAI-removed by the DS columns. The difference between the expected and actual PAI-1 level post apheresis, reflecting PAI-1 secretion or extracellular redistribution, correlated inversely with basal PAI-1 levels (r = -0.83, P = 0.01). PAI-1 levels returned to baseline pre-apheresis values 7 days post apheresis. PAI-1 antigen may be removed from plasma without adverse effect, resulting temporarily in its extracellular redistribution and restoration to baseline levels over one week. PAI-1 redistribution particularly when baseline pre

  12. Thrombolysis by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Current status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Norio

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, the intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) Alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) administration of the within 3 h of the onset of acute ischemic stroke was approved for therapeutic use in the year 2006. t-PA induces thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke, and this method has gradually gained recognition among physicians and the general population. However, the number of patients who were treated using Alteplase is low (4,000-5,000 patients/year), and this figure accounts for only 2-3% of the annual number of cases of ischemic stroke. There is little doubt that Alteplase treatment is a potentially effective modality for some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The post-marketing surveillance of 4,749 Japanese patients treated using Alteplase showed that 33% of the patients had modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 0-1, 17% of patients died and 4.5% presented with symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); these results were comparable to those from other countries. The expansion of the therapeutic time window has been a matter of concern. The investigators of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS) have reported that there was significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of patients with acute ischemie stroke when Alteplase was administered 3-4.5 h after the onset of the symptoms. Mismatches in perfusion- and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images have been used for selecting patients 3 h after the onset of symptoms, and the findings from MRI, dwimages (DWI) and MR angiography are practical predictors of t-PA therapy within 3 h of onset. The Middle Cerebral Artery Embolism Local Fibrinolytic Intervention Trial (MELT) Japan study showed that local intra-arterial fibrinolysis is effective in patients with embolic MCA occlusion within 6 h of the onset of symptoms. Combining the initiation of intravenous t-PA administration with further intra-arterial fibrinolysis or mechanical thrombolectomy may improve the

  13. Thrombolysis by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Current status and future direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanahashi, Norio [Saitama Medical Univ., International Medical Center, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    In Japan, the intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) Alteplase (0.6 mg/kg) administration of the within 3 h of the onset of acute ischemic stroke was approved for therapeutic use in the year 2006. t-PA induces thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke, and this method has gradually gained recognition among physicians and the general population. However, the number of patients who were treated using Alteplase is low (4,000-5,000 patients/year), and this figure accounts for only 2-3% of the annual number of cases of ischemic stroke. There is little doubt that Alteplase treatment is a potentially effective modality for some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The post-marketing surveillance of 4,749 Japanese patients treated using Alteplase showed that 33% of the patients had modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 0-1, 17% of patients died and 4.5% presented with symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); these results were comparable to those from other countries. The expansion of the therapeutic time window has been a matter of concern. The investigators of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS) have reported that there was significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of patients with acute ischemie stroke when Alteplase was administered 3-4.5 h after the onset of the symptoms. Mismatches in perfusion- and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images have been used for selecting patients 3 h after the onset of symptoms, and the findings from MRI, dwimages (DWI) and MR angiography are practical predictors of t-PA therapy within 3 h of onset. The Middle Cerebral Artery Embolism Local Fibrinolytic Intervention Trial (MELT) Japan study showed that local intra-arterial fibrinolysis is effective in patients with embolic MCA occlusion within 6 h of the onset of symptoms. Combining the initiation of intravenous t-PA administration with further intra-arterial fibrinolysis or mechanical thrombolectomy may improve the

  14. Tissue plasminogen activator; identifying major barriers related to intravenous injection in ischemic acute cerebral infraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to previous publications, in patients with acute ischemic cerebral infarction, thrombolytic therapy using intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA necessitates precise documentation of symptoms' onset. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers related to the IV-tPA injection in such patients. Materials and Methods: Between the year 2014-2015, patients with definitive diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction (n = 180 who attended the neurology ward located at the Isfahan Alzahra Hospital were studied. To investigate barriers related to door to IV-tPA needle time, personal reasons, and criteria for inclusion or exclusion of patients, three questionnaire forms were designed based on the Food and Drug Administration-approved indications or contraindications. Results: The mean age of males versus females was 60 versus 77.5 years (ranged 23–93 vs. 29–70 years, respectively. Out of total population, only 10.7% transferred to hospital in <4.5 h after the onset of symptoms. Regarding to eligibility for IV-tPA, 68.9% of total population have had criteria for such treatment. Concerning to both items such as transferring to hospital in <4.5 h after the onset of symptoms and eligibility for IV-tPA, only 6.6% of total population met the criteria for such management. There was ignorance or inattention to symptoms in 75% of population studied. There was a mean of 195.92 ± 6.65 min (182.8–209.04 min for door to IV-tPA needle time. Conclusion: Despite the international guidelines for IV-tPA injection within 3–4.5 h of ischemic stroke symptoms' onset, the results of this study revealed that falling time due to ignorance of symptoms, literacy, and living alone might need further attention. As a result, to decrease death and disability, educational programs related to the symptoms' onset by consultant neurologist in Isfahan/Iran seem to be advantageous.

  15. Association between the polymorphisms of urokinase plasminogen activation system and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Z

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zhen Xu,1,* Li-Li Meng,2,* Jizong Lin,3 Yunbiao Ling,3 Shu-xian Chen,3 Nan Lin31Department of Infectious Diseases, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this studyPurpose: The present study aimed to investigate the potential association between the urokinase plasminogen activation (uPA system polymorphisms (rs4065, rs2227564, and rs344781 and cancer risk.Methods: An extensive search was performed to identify published case–control studies on the association between the uPA system polymorphisms and cancer risk. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to evaluate the relationship between the uPA system polymorphisms and cancer risk.Results: A total of 20 studies comprising 7,037 cancer cases and 10,094 controls were identified and included in the present meta-analysis. Overall, significantly increased cancer risk was associated with the uPA polymorphism rs4065 (T vs C: OR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.19–1.89; TT vs CC: OR 4.63, 95% CI: 3.10–6.91; dominant model: OR 1.93, 95% CI: 1.60–2.33; recessive model: OR 3.02, 95% CI: 1.26–7.25 and the uPA receptor polymorphism rs344781 (T vs C: OR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04–1.23; TC vs CC: OR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.06–1.49; TT vs CC: OR 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.63; dominant model: OR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10–1.52. No significant association was found between the uPA polymorphism rs2227564 and cancer risk. Subgroup analysis suggests that the T allele of the rs4065 (T allele vs C allele: OR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.19–1.89 and rs344781 polymorphisms (T allele vs C allele: OR 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04–1.23 was associated with increased cancer risk in Asians.Conclusion: Our results suggest that the uPA polymorphism rs4065 and the uPA receptor polymorphism rs344781

  16. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: a feasibility and safety study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Hokmabadi E

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Elyar Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, Mehdi Farhoudi, Aliakbar Taheraghdam, Mazyar Hashemilar, Daryous Savadi-Osguei, Reza Rikhtegar, Kaveh Mehrvar, Ehsan Sharifipour, Parisa Youhanaee, Reshad Mirnour Neurosciences Research Center, Neurology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, East Azerbaijan, Iran Background: In developing countries, intravenous thrombolysis (IVT is available at a limited number of centers. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and safety of IVT at Tabriz Imam Reza Hospital. Methods: In a prospective study, over a 55-month period, any patient at the hospital for whom stroke code had been activated was enrolled in the study. Data on demographic characteristics, stroke risk factors, admission blood pressure, blood tests, findings of brain computed tomography (CT scans, time of symtom onset, time of arrival to the emergency department, time of stroke code activation, time of CT scan examination, and the time of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator administration were recorded. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessments were performed before IVT bolus, at 36 hours, at either 7 days or discharge (which ever one was earlier, and at 3-month follow-up. Brain CT scans were done for all patients before and 24 hours after the treatment. Results: Stroke code was activated for 407 patients and IVT was done in 168 patients. The rate of functional independence (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0–1 at 3 months was 39.2% (62/158. The mortality rate at day 7 was 6% (10/168. Hemorrhagic transformation was noted in 16 patients (9.5%. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 5 (3%, all of which were fatal. One case of severe urinary bleeding and one other fatal case of severe angioedema were observed. Conclusion: During the first 4–5 years of administration of IVT in the hospital, it was found to be feasible and safe, but to increase the efficacy, poststroke care should be more organized and a stroke center

  17. Inactivation of viruses in municipal effluent by chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hajenian, H. G.; Butler, M.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the efficiency of chlorine inactivation of two unrelated picornaviruses in a typical urban wastewater effluent was examined. Temperature, unlike pH, had relatively little effect on the rate of inactivation. The pH effect was complex and the two viruses differed. The f2 coliphage was more sensitive to chlorine at low pH, but at all values there was a threshold above which additional chlorine resulted in very rapid inactivation. The amount of chlorine requ...

  18. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  19. Reasons for the lack of benefit of immediate angioplasty during recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a regional wall motion analysis. European Cooperative Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, A. E.; Serruys, P. W.; Rutsch, W.; Simoons, M. L.; de Bono, D. P.; Tijssen, J. G.; Lubsen, J.; Verstraete, M.

    1991-01-01

    Regional ventricular wall motion analysis utilizing three different methods was performed on predischarge left ventriculograms from 291 of 367 patients enrolled in a randomized trial of single chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), aspirin and heparin with and without immediate

  20. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity results in promotion of endogenous thrombolysis and inhibition of thrombus extension in models of experimental thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Biemond, B. J.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; ten Cate, J. W.; Pannekoek, H.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity by a murine monoclonal anti-human PAI-1 antibody (MAI-12) on in vitro thrombolysis and on in vivo thrombolysis and thrombus extension in an experimental animal model for thrombosis. Thrombolysis, mediated

  1. Organization of the gene coding for human protein C inhibitor (plasminogen activator inhibitor-3). Assignment of the gene to chromosome 14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; Chung, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (plasminogen activator inhibitor-3) is a plasma glycoprotein and a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor superfamily. In the present study, the human gene for protein C inhibitor was isolated and characterized from three independent phage that contained overlapping inserts

  2. Degradation of tissue-type plasminogen activator by human monocyte- derived macrophages is mediated by the mannose receptor and by the low- density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, F.; Braat, E.A.M.; Rijken, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The balance of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) production and degradation determines its concentration in blood and tissues. Disturbance of this balance may result in either increased or decreased proteolysis. In the present study, we identified the receptor systems involved in the

  3. The role of the lysyl binding site of tissue-type plasminogen activator in the interaction with a forming fibrin clot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.H.F.; Weening-Verhoeff, E.J.D.; Verheijen, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    To describe the role of the lysyl binding site in the interaction of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA, FGK1K2P) with a forming fibrin clot, we performed binding experiments with domain deletion mutants GK1K2P, K2P, and the corresponding point mutants lacking the lysyl binding site in the

  4. Prognostic value of plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in Danish patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (REOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begum, Farah Diba; Høgdall, Estrid V S; Riisbo, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    The level of the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is elevated in tumour tissue from several types of cancer. This is the first study aiming to predict the prognosis for survival by the use of a pre-chemotherapeutic plasma suPAR value in 71 patients with recurrent epithelial...

  5. Differential effects of tissue plasminogen activator and streptokinase on infarct size and on rate of enzyme release: influence of early infarct related artery patency : The GUSTO Enzyme Substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Baardman (Taco); W.T. Hermens (Wim); G.P. Molhoek; G. Grollier (Gilles); M.E. Pfisterer (Matthias); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); T. Lenderink (Timo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The recent international GUSTO trial of 41,021 patients with acute myocardial infarction demonstrated improved 90-min infarct related artery patency as well as reduced mortality in patients treated with an accelerated regimen of tissue plasminogen activator, compared to

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 released from activated platelets plays a key role in thrombolysis resistance. Studies with thrombi generated in the Chandler loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, H. A.; van Swieten, P.; Heijnen, H. F.; Sixma, J. J.; Pannekoek, H.

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the potential role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), which is released from the alpha-granules of activated platelets, in thrombolysis resistance, we employed a model (the "Chandler loop") that mimics the formation of arterial thrombi in vivo and that can be manipulated in

  7. Exploring soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and its relationship with arterial stiffness in a bi-ethnic population: the SAfrEIC-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutte, Aletta E; Myburgh, Anélda; Olsen, Michael Hecht

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elevated soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) indicates an inflammatory state caused by conditions such as HIV and cancer. Recently suPAR was identified as an indicator of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is highly prevalent in black South Africans...

  8. Evaluation of a weight-adjusted single-bolus plasminogen activator in patients with myocardial infarction - A double-blind, randomized angiographic trial of lanoteplase versus alteplase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, P; Vermeer, F; Ambrosioni, E; Sadowski, Z; Lopez-Sendon, JL; von Essen, R; Beaufils, P; Thadani, U; Adgey, J; Pierard, L; Brinker, J; Davies, RF; Smalling, RW; Wallentin, L; Caspi, A; Pangerl, A; Trickett, L; Hauck, C; Henry, D; Chew, P

    1998-01-01

    Background-Lanoteplase (nPA) is a rationally designed variant of tissue plasminogen activator with greater fibrinolytic potency and slower plasma clearance than alteplase. Methods and Results-InTIME (Intravenous nPA for Treatment of Infarcting Myocardium Early), a multicenter, double-blind,

  9. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor plays a role in neutrophil migration during lipopolysaccharide-induced peritoneal inflammation but not during Escherichia coli-induced peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renckens, Rosemarijn; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is expressed on many different cells, including leukocytes. uPAR has been implicated to play a role in neutrophil migration to sites of inflammation. METHODS: To determine the role that uPAR plays in neutrophil recruitment in response

  10. Comparison of two different methods for inactivation of viruses in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preuss, T.; Kamstrup, Søren; Kyvsgaard, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    enterovirus (PEV) was inactivated within 3 h, The inactivation with electron-beam irradiation resulted in almost linear curves in a semilogarithmic plot of virus titer versus irradiation dose, reflecting a first-order inactivation, The rate of inactivation was almost twice as fast in the liquid samples...

  11. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  12. Fullerene C60 and graphene photosensibiles for photodynamic virus inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, I.; Hvorostovsky, A.; Kiselev, V.; Zarubaev, V.; Kiselev, O.; Piotrovsky, L.; Anfimov, P.; Krisko, T.; Muraviova, T.; Rylkov, V.; Starodubzev, A.; Sirotkin, A.; Grishkanich, A.; Kudashev, I.; Kancer, A.; Kustikova, M.; Bykovskaya, E.; Mayurova, A.; Stupnikov, A.; Ruzankina, J.; Afanasyev, M.; Lukyanov, N.; Redka, D.; Paklinov, N.

    2018-02-01

    A solid-phase photosensitizer based on aggregated C60 fullerene and graphene oxide for photodynamic inactivation of pathogens in biological fluids was studied. The most promising technologies of inactivation include the photodynamic effect, which consists in the inactivation of infectious agents by active oxygen forms (including singlet oxygen), formed when light is activated by the photosensitizer introduced into the plasma. Research shows features of solid-phase systems based on graphene and fullerene C60 oxide, which is a combination of an effective inactivating pathogens (for example, influenza viruses) reactive oxygen species formed upon irradiation of the photosensitizer in aqueous and biological fluids, a high photostability fullerene coatings and the possibility of full recovery photosensitizer from the biological environment after the photodynamic action.

  13. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents

  14. Biocontrol interventions for inactivation of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-harvest interventions for control of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed foods are crucial for food safety. Biocontrol interventions have the primary objective of developing novel antagonists in combinations with physical and chemical interventions to inactivate pathogenic microbes. Ther...

  15. Use of genetic algorithms for high hydrostatic pressure inactivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) for high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores, Bacillus subtilis spores and cells, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, all in milk buffer, were used to demonstrate the utility of genetic algorithms ...

  16. Inactivation of bacterial cells by cyclotron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatagai, F [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Takahashi, T; Matsuyama, A

    1975-06-01

    B. subtilis spores, E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r were bombarded with ..cap alpha..-particles and heavy ions of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen accelerated in the IPCR Cyclotron. The RBE versus LETsub(infinity) curve for B. subtilis spores showed a maximum peak at 120 keV/..mu..m, while those for E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r declined without any maximum as LETsub(infinity) values increased. In the region of ..cap alpha..-particles, the effective inactivation cross section (Ssub(eff)) for these three strains increased with increasing LETsub(infinity), and the rates of increase in Ssub(eff) in the LET region from --30 to --150 keV/..mu..m were 15.0, 1.5 and 2.5 times for B. subtilis spores, E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r, respectively. In the case of B. subtilis spores, Ssub(eff) values for heavy ions were almost independent of their energies, but the other two strains showed a considerable dependence upon beam energy. The characteristic LET dependence of Ssub(eff) observed in this study was fairly well explained by the target theory based on microdose concept.

  17. Inactivation of RNA viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Morimoto, Akinori; Iwatsuki, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Takamasa; Ito, Hitoshi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Ishigaki, Isao.

    1992-01-01

    Four kinds of RNA viruses, Bluetongue virus (BT), Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease virus (BVD·MD), Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (RS), Vesicular Stmatitis virus (VS), were subjected to various doses of gamma irradiation to determine the lethal doses. The D 10 values, which are the dose necessary to decimally reduce infectivity, ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature, and they increased to 2.6 to 5.0 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature. Serum neutralzing antibody titer of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) was not adversely changed by the exposure to 36 kGy of gamma-rays under frozen condition. Analysis of electrophoresis patterns of the bovine serum also reveales that the serum proteins were not remarkably affected, even when exposed to 36 kGy of gamma radiation under frozen condition. The results suggested that gamma irradiation under frozen condition is an effective means for inactivating both DNA and RNA viruses without adversely affecting serum proteins and neutralizing antibody titer. (author)

  18. Inactivation of RNA viruses by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Morimoto, Akinori; Iwatsuki, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Takamasa (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and fisheries, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Animal Quarantine Service); Ito, Hitoshi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Ishigaki, Isao

    1992-09-01

    Four kinds of RNA viruses, Bluetongue virus (BT), Bovine Virus Diarrhea-Mucosal Disease virus (BVD[center dot]MD), Bovine Respiratory Syncytial virus (RS), Vesicular Stmatitis virus (VS), were subjected to various doses of gamma irradiation to determine the lethal doses. The D[sub 10] values, which are the dose necessary to decimally reduce infectivity, ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature, and they increased to 2.6 to 5.0 kGy under frozen condition at dry-ice temperature. Serum neutralzing antibody titer of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR) was not adversely changed by the exposure to 36 kGy of gamma-rays under frozen condition. Analysis of electrophoresis patterns of the bovine serum also reveales that the serum proteins were not remarkably affected, even when exposed to 36 kGy of gamma radiation under frozen condition. The results suggested that gamma irradiation under frozen condition is an effective means for inactivating both DNA and RNA viruses without adversely affecting serum proteins and neutralizing antibody titer. (author).

  19. Inactivation of bacterial cells by cyclotron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatagai, Fumio; Takahashi, Tadashi; Matsuyama, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    B. subtilis spores, E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r were bombarded with α-particles and heavy ions of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen accelerated in the IPCR Cyclotron. The RBE versus LETsub(infinity) curve for B. subtilis spores showed a maximum peak at 120 keV/μm, while those for E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r declined without any maximum as LETsub(infinity) values increased. In the region of α-particles, the effective inactivation cross section (Ssub(eff)) for these three strains increased with increasing LETsub(infinity), and the rates of increase in Ssub(eff) in the LET region from --30 to --150 keV/μm were 15.0, 1.5 and 2.5 times for B. subtilis spores, E. coli Bsub(s-1) and E. coli B/r, respectively. In the case of B. subtilis spores, Ssub(eff) values for heavy ions were almost independent of their energies, but the other two strains showed a considerable dependence upon beam energy. The characteristic LET dependence of Ssub(eff) observed in this study was fairly well explained by the target theory based on microdose concept. (auth.)

  20. Dry-heat inactivation of "Mycobacterium canettii".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubaker Osman, Djaltou; Garnotel, Eric; Drancourt, Michel

    2017-06-09

    "Mycobacterium canettii" is responsible for non-transmissible lymph node and pulmonary tuberculosis in persons exposed in the Horn of Africa. In the absence of direct human transmission, contaminated water and foodstuffs could be sources of contamination. We investigated the dry-heat inactivation of "M. canettii" alone and mixed into mock-infected foodstuffs by inoculating agar cylinders and milk with 10 4 colony-forming units of "M. canettii" CIPT140010059 and two "M. canettii" clinical strains with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv as a control. Exposed to 35 °C, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, "M canettii" CIPT140010059 and "M. canettii" 157 exhibited a survival rate of 108, 95 and 81%, which is significantly higher than that of "M. canettii" 173. However, all tested mycobacteria tolerated a 90-min exposure at 45 °C. In the foodstuff models set at 70 °C, no growing mycobacteria were visualized. This study supports the premise that "M. canettii" may survive up to 45 °C; and suggests that contaminated raw drinks and foodstuffs but not cooked ones may be sources of infection for populations.

  1. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R 2 =0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Photodynamic inactivation of foodborne bacteria by eosin Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, E; Dos Santos, A R; Fiori da Silva, A; Ribeiro, L H; Favero, M E; Campanerut-Sá, P A Z; de Freitas, C F; Caetano, W; Hioka, N; Mikcha, J M G

    2018-03-25

    The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of photodynamic inactivation mediated by eosin Y in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC 14028, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Bacteria (10 7 CFU per ml) were incubated with eosin Y at concentrations ranging from 0·1 to 10 μmol l -1 , irradiated by green LED (λ max 490-570 nm) for 5, 10 and 15 min and the cellular viability was determined. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was completely inactivated when treated with 10 μmol l -1 eosin Y for 10 min. Treatments reduced B. cereus and Salm. Typhimurium counts to 2·7 log CFU per ml and 1·7 log CFU per ml, respectively. Escherichia coli counts were slightly reduced. Staphylococcus aureus presented the highest sensitivity, being completely inactivated by eosin Y at 5 μmol l -1 and 5 min of illumination. The reduction of cellular viability of photoinactivated Staph. aureus was also demonstrated by flow cytometry and morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Eosin Y in combination with LED produced bacterial inactivation, being a potential candidate for photodynamic inactivation. This study evidenced the efficacy of photodynamic inactivation as a novel and promising alternative to bacterial control. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Enhancement of the thrombolytic efficacy of prourokinase by lys-plasminogen in a dog model of arterial thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badylak, S F; Voytik, S L; Henkin, J; Burke, S E; Sasahara, A A; Simmons, A

    1991-05-01

    Current findings suggest that the efficacy of thrombolytic therapy may be limited by the availability of active forms of plasminogen at the thrombus site. The purpose of this study was to determine if the systemic administration of 0.5 mg kg-1 glu-plasminogen (glu-plg) or 0.5 mg kg-1 lys-plasminogen (lys-plg) could safely increase the efficacy of a single intravenous bolus injection of 50,000 U kg-1 prourokinase (proUK) in a dog model of arterial thrombosis. Thrombolysis was measured by monitoring the continuous decrement of 125I-gamma emissions from a radiolabeled thrombus. Reflow was evaluated by direct visual examination. Forty dogs (mean wt 10.3 +/- 2 kg) were randomly sorted into 4 groups of 10 each. The dogs in each group were given either saline plus saline, saline plus proUK, glu-plg plus proUK, or lys-plg plus proUK 60 minutes after formation of an occlusive arterial thrombus. Ninety minutes after drug administration the dogs receiving saline plus proUK, glu-plg plus proUK, and the lys-plg plus proUK showed greater thrombolysis (41%, 43%, and 66%, respectively) than the control (saline plus saline) group (15%, P less than 0.01). The lys-plg plus proUK treatment caused greater lysis than the saline plus proUK or the glu-plg plus proUK treatment (P less than 0.05). All of the dogs (10/10) receiving lys-plg plus proUK had patent vessels at the end of the 90 minute monitoring period, whereas only 4/10 and 5/10 vessels were patent in the saline plus proUK and glu-plg plus proUK groups, respectively. None of the dogs in the saline plus saline group had patent vessels. No significant changes were observed in the various coagulation parameters tested for any of the 4 treatment groups. The results show that lys-plg can safely increase the thrombolytic efficacy of proUK.

  5. Evaluation of Serum Fibrinogen, Plasminogen, α2-Anti-Plasmin, and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Levels (PAI and Their Correlation with Presence of Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefika Burcak Polat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetic retinopathy (DR is the leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinopathy can still progress despite optimal metabolic control. The aim of the study was to determine whether different degrees of DR (proliferative or nonproliferative were associated with abnormally modulated hemostatic parameters in patients with T1DM. Method. 52 T1DM patients and 40 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Patients were subdivided into three categories. Group I was defined as those without retinopathy, group II with NPRP, and group III with PRP. We compared these subgroups with each other and the control group (Group IV according to the serum fibrinogen, plasminogen, alpha2-anti-plasmin (α2-anti-plasmin, and PAI. Results. We detected that PAI-1, serum fibrinogen, and plasminogen levels were similar between the diabetic and control groups (P=0.209, P=0.224, and P=0.244, resp., whereas α2-anti-plasmin was higher in Groups I, II, and III compared to the control group (P<0.01, P<0.05, and P<0.001, resp.. There was a positive correlation between serum α2-anti-plasmin and HbA1c levels (r=0,268, P=0.031. Conclusion. To our knowledge there is scarce data in the literature about α2-anti-plasmin levels in type 1 diabetes. A positive correlation between α2-anti-plasmin with HbA1c suggests that fibrinolytic markers may improve with disease regulation and better glycemic control.

  6. Outcome of stroke patients receiving different doses of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 0.9 mg/kg body weight is associated with a high hemorrhagic transformation (HT) rate. Low-dose tPA (0.6 mg/kg) may have a lower hemorrhage rate but the mortality and disability rates at 90 days cannot be confirmed as non-inferior to standard-dose tPA. Whether the doses 0.7 and 0.8 mg/kg have better efficacy and safety needs further investigation. Therefore, this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of each dose of tPA (0.6, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9 mg/kg body weight) and to investigate the factors affecting early neurological improvement (ENI) and early neurological deterioration (END). For this observational study, data were obtained from 274 patients who received tPA thrombolytic therapy in Chia-Yi Christian Hospital stroke unit. The tPA dose was given at the discretion of each physician. The definition of ENI was a >8 point improvement (compared with baseline) at 24 h following thrombolytic therapy or an improvement in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS) to 0 or 1 toward the end of tPA infusion. The definition of END was a >4 point increase in NIHSS (compared with baseline) within 24 h of tPA infusion. The primary objective was to investigate whether 0.7 and 0.8 mg/kg of tPA have higher ENI rate, lower END rate, and better outcome at 6 months. Poor outcome was defined as having a modified Rankin Scale of 3 to 6 (range, 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]). The secondary objective was to investigate whether low-dose tPA has a lower risk of intracerebral HT than that with standard-dose tPA. We also investigated the factors affecting ENI, END, HT, and 6-month outcome. A total of 274 patients were included during the study period, of whom 260 were followed up for >6 months. There was a trend for the HT rate to increase as the dose increased ( P =0.02). The symptomatic HT rate was not significantly different among the low-dose and standard-dose groups. The ENI and END ( P =0.52) were

  7. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  8. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yushu Chen,1 Li Gong,2 Ning Gao,3 Jichun Liao,1 Jiayu Sun,1 Yuqing Wang,1 Lei Wang,1 Pengjin Zhu,1 Qing Fan,1 Yongqiang Andrew Wang,4 Wen Zeng,2 Hui Mao,3 Lily Yang,5 Fabao Gao11Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 2Sichuan Primed Bio-Tech Group Co, Ltd, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 4Ocean NanoTech, LLC, San Diego, CA, 5Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys.Methods: We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP or without a PEG (ATF-IONP coating.Results: The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells

  9. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  10. Inactivation of an enterovirus by airborne disinfectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The activity of airborne disinfectants on bacteria, fungi and spores has been reported. However, the issue of the virucidal effect of disinfectants spread by fogging has not been studied thoroughly. Methods A procedure has been developed to determine the virucidal activity of peracetic acid-based airborne disinfectants on a resistant non-enveloped virus poliovirus type 1. This virus was laid on a stainless carrier. The products were spread into the room by hot fogging at 55°C for 30 minutes at a concentration of 7.5 mL.m-3. Poliovirus inoculum, supplemented with 5%, heat inactivated non fat dry organic milk, were applied into the middle of the stainless steel disc and were dried under the air flow of a class II biological safety cabinet at room temperature. The Viral preparations were recovered by using flocked swabs and were titered on Vero cells using the classical Spearman-Kärber CPE reading method, the results were expressed as TCID50.ml-1. Results The infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula was kept at 105 TCID50.mL-1 up to 150 minutes at room temperature. Dried inocula exposed to airborne peracetic acid containing disinfectants were recovered at 60 and 120 minutes post-exposition and suspended in culture medium again. The cytotoxicity of disinfectant containing medium was eliminated through gel filtration columns. A 4 log reduction of infectious titer of dried poliovirus inocula exposed to peracetic-based airborne disinfectant was obtained. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the virucidal activity of airborne disinfectants can be tested on dried poliovirus. PMID:23587047

  11. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2018-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human-adapted, gram-negative diplococcus that infects human reproductive tracts and causes gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease, resulting in discharge and inflammation at the urethra, cervix, pharynx, or rectum. Over the years, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance to nearly every drug ever used to treat it, including sulfonamides, penicillin, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones. Drug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae is now considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an urgent threat. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) at 405 and 470 nm for inactivating N. gonorrhoeae and reveal the mechanism of action. Our results showed that an exposure of 45 J/cm2 aBL at 405 nm reduced the bacterial CFU by 7.16-log10. When the aBL exposure was increased to 54 J/cm2, eradication of bacterial CFU was achieved. When the bacteria were exposed to aBL at 470 nm, 3-log10 reduction of CFU was observed at an aBL exposure of higher than 126 J/cm2. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic analyses revealed the presence of endogenous porphyrins and flavins in N. gonorrhoeae cells. The present study indicated that aBL is a potential strategy to control N. gonorrhoeae infections. Endogenous porphyrins play a vital role in the killing effects of aBL. In vivo experiments are ongoing in our laboratory to treat genital tract infections in mice using aBL and explore the potential clinical applications.

  12. Thermal inactivation of Phytophthora capsici oospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Aitzol; Mendarte, Sorkunde; Larregla, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major fungal plant pathogen that causes root and crown rot of pepper crops and its oospores are the most resistant propagules. To evaluate the effect of different temperature regimes and exposure times on the survival of P. capsici oospores. Thermal inactivation treatments simulated field conditions, through the use of different constant and cycling temperature regimes, in moistened sterilized soil (15-53 °C) and sterilized water (45-53 °C). The plasmolysis method evaluated oospore viability. Relationships between oospores viability and exposure time were statistically determined by linear regression. Interpolation was used to calculate the estimated times required to kill a determined percentage of the population. The required time to reduce P. capsici oospores viability decreased with increasing temperatures. Times required to kill 100% of oospores were 199-22-6.6-4.7-1.0 hours at 40-45-47.5-50-53°C respectively in moistened soil and 31-1.0-0.2 hours at 45-50-53 °C in water. Oospores were scarcely affected at temperatures ≤ 35 °C. With 1,680 hours at 15-35 °C, oospores survival in soil ranged from 88 to 36%. The 4 hours-40 °C regime killed 100% of oospores after 28days, while the 5 hours-35°C regime after 70 days killed only 75%. Time required to achieve total oospores death was remarkably shortened in water when compared with moistened soil. The developed models can be used to predict survival values at any exposure time with constant temperatures ranging from 40 to 53 °C in moistened soil and from 45 to 53 °C in water. The weakening of P. capsici oospores under sublethal heating, is a useful observation that can be applied for pathogen control with solarization. Copyright © 2010 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Obstructive Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis Successfully Thrombolysed with Low-Dose Ultra-Slow Infusion of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macit Kalçık

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT is one of the major causes of posthetic heart valve failure. Treatment modalities for this rare but life threatening complication include anticoagulation with heparin, thrombolytic therapy (TT and re-do valve surgery. Guidelines lack definitive class I recommendations due to lack of randomised controlled trials, and usually leave the choice of treatment to the clinician’s experience. Surgery is suggested as a first line strategy in most situations of left sided PVT; however, TT has been recently used with successful outcomes1-3. This report describes a patient with giant thrombus located on the prosthetic mitral valve, which was succesfully treated with ultraslow infusion (25 hours of low dose (25 mg tissue plasminogen activator (tPA under the guidance of two-dimensional (2D and real-time three-dimensional (RT -3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and fluoroscopy.

  14. Plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver in individuals with features of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrañaga, Gabriela; Wingeyer, Silvia Perés; Graffigna, Mabel; Belli, Susana; Bendezú, Karla; Alvarez, Silvia; Levalle, Oscar; Fainboim, Hugo

    2008-07-01

    Fatty liver represents the liver component of metabolic syndrome and may be involved in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) synthesis. We studied plasma PAI-1 levels and relationships with risk factors for metabolic syndrome, including fatty liver, in 170 patients. Liver ultrasound scan was performed on all patients, and a liver biopsy was performed on those patients with chronically elevated transaminase levels. Plasma PAI-1 levels correlated significantly (P < .05) with body mass index, degree of steatosis, insulin resistance, insulin level, waist circumference, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) -cholesterol. However, only body mass index (beta = .455) and HDL-cholesterol (beta = .293) remained predictors of PAI-1 levels. Liver biopsy revealed a significant correlation (P < .05) between insulin resistance (r = 0.381) or insulin level (r = 0.519) and liver fibrosis. In patients presenting features of metabolic syndrome, plasma PAI-1 levels were mainly conditioned by the whole-body fat content.

  15. Lack of association between level of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and estimates of tumor angiogenesis in early breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Birgitte Vrou; Riisbro, Rikke; Knoop, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) is involved in tumor invasion and progression. High levels of PAI-1 are associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and PAI-1 has been shown to play a role in angiogenic processes. Since estimates of tumor angiogenesis may predict poor prognosis...... we studied the relationship between PAI-1 and estimates of angiogenesis in breast cancer. Tumor tissue specimens from 438 breast cancer patients were included. Median follow-up was 10.3 years. Protein levels of PAI-1 were measured using an ELISA. Angiogenesis scores were performed using a Chalkley.......009) were independent markers of death from breast cancer. This study confirms high PAI-1 or high Chalkley counts as markers of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, and suggests that the prognostic impact of PAI-1 is independent of its supposed involvement in tumor angiogenesis. Udgivelsesdato: 2007...

  16. Cryopreserved recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for the restoration of occluded central venous access devices in pediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Y.; Al-Katheri, A.; Al-Sedairy, R.; Al-Omari, A.; Abdullah, Mohammed F.; Crankson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy with urokinase 5000 units has been the standard therapy for restoration of thrombosed central catheters. However, with the decreased availability of urokinase, alternatives needed to be sought. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy, bioactivity, dwell time and cost of cryopreserved recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in the restoration of occluded central venous access devices. For children 10kg, a dose of 1 mg was used. The dwell time was 1-2 hours. Of the 40 courses of rTPA, 39 fully restored central venous line patency (97%). Successful courses were instilled for an average of 1 hour. Cryopreserved rTPA appears to be safe and effective in the dose used to restore the patency of occluded central venous access devices in pediatric oncology patients. (author)

  17. Identification and characterization of the murine cell surface receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, H; Løber, D; Eriksen, J

    1992-01-01

    -blotting analysis. Binding of mouse u-PA to its receptor showed species specificity in ligand-blotting analysis, since mouse u-PA did not bind to human u-PAR and human u-PA did not bind to mouse u-PAR. The apparent M(r) of mouse u-PAR varied between different mouse cell lines and ranged over M(r) 45......,000-60,000. In four of the cell lines, mouse u-PA bound to two mouse u-PAR variant proteins, whereas in the other two cell lines studied, there was only one mouse u-PA-binding protein. In the monocyte macrophage cell line P388D.1, trypsin-treatment of intact cells could remove only the large mouse u-PAR variant (M...... to the cell surface by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. Purification of the two mouse u-PAR variant proteins by diisopropylfluorophosphate-inactivated mouse u-PA-Sepharose affinity chromatography yielded two silver-stained bands when analysed by SDS/PAGE, corresponding in electrophoretic mobility to those seen...

  18. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for a human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalis, T.M.; Clark, M.A.; Barnes, T.; Lehrbach, P.R.; Devine, P.L.; Schevzov, G.; Goss, N.H.; Stephens, R.W.; Tolstoshev, P.

    1988-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor (mPAI-2) was purified to homogeneity from the U937 cell line and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence were used to screen a cDNA library prepared from U937 cells. One positive clone was sequenced and contained most of the coding sequence as well as a long incomplete 3' untranslated region (1112 base pairs). This cDNA sequence was shown to encode mPAI-2 by hybrid-select translation. A cDNA clone encoding the remainder of the mPAI-2 mRNA was obtained by primer extension of U937 poly(A) + RNA using a probe complementary to the mPAI-2 coding region. The coding sequence for mPAI-2 was placed under the control of the λ P/sub L/ promoter, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli formed a complex with urokinase that could be detected immunologically. By nucleotide sequence analysis, mPAI-2 cDNA encodes a protein containing 415 amino acids with a predicted unglycosylated M/sub r/ of 46,543. The predicted amino acid sequence of mPAI-2 is very similar to placental PAI-2 and shows extensive homology with members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. mPAI-2 was found to be more homologous to ovalbumin (37%) than the endothelial plasminogen activator inhibitor, PAI-1 (26%). The 3' untranslated region of the mPAI-2 cDNA contains a putative regulatory sequence that has been associated with the inflammatory mediators

  19. Sickle Mice Are Sensitive to Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Stroke but Respond to Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Yo; Lee, Jolly; Huang, Henry; Wagner, Mary B; Joiner, Clinton H; Archer, David R; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2017-12-01

    The effects of lytic stroke therapy in patients with sickle cell anemia are unknown, although a recent study suggested that coexistent sickle cell anemia does not increase the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. This finding calls for systemic analysis of the effects of thrombolytic stroke therapy, first in humanized sickle mice, and then in patients. There is also a need for additional predictive markers of sickle cell anemia-associated vasculopathy. We used Doppler ultrasound to examine the carotid artery of Townes sickle mice tested their responses to repetitive mild hypoxia-ischemia- and transient hypoxia-ischemia-induced stroke at 3 or 6 months of age, respectively. We also examined the effects of tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator) treatment in transient hypoxia-ischemia-injured sickle mice. Three-month-old sickle cell (SS) mice showed elevated resistive index in the carotid artery and higher sensitivity to repetitive mild hypoxia-ischemia-induced cerebral infarct. Six-month-old SS mice showed greater resistive index and increased flow velocity without obstructive vasculopathy in the carotid artery. Instead, the cerebral vascular wall in SS mice showed ectopic expression of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and P-selectin, suggesting a proadhesive and prothrombotic propensity. Indeed, SS mice showed enhanced leukocyte and platelet adherence to the cerebral vascular wall, broader fibrin deposition, and higher mortality after transient hypoxia-ischemia. Yet, post-transient hypoxia-ischemia treatment with tPA reduced thrombosis and mortality in SS mice. Sickle mice are sensitive to hypoxia/ischemia-induced cerebral infarct but benefit from thrombolytic treatment. An increased resistive index in carotid arteries may be an early marker of sickle cell vasculopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Enzyme immunoassay for measurement of murine plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, employing a specific antibody produced by the DNA vaccine method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takayuki; Takagi, Akira; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Yamamoto, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Matsushita, Tadashi; Murate, Takashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2003-01-01

    We developed a sensitive immunoassay to determine the concentration of mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The assay was a non-competitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the production of a specific polyclonal antibody against mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) used both as a trapping and detecting antibody. This antibody was raised in a rabbit by direct introduction of the expression vector plasmid DNA encoding mouse PAI-1, instead of conventional immunization with the purified protein. The standard curve was constructed with a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mouse PAI-1 fusion protein (GST-mPAI-1) and dose-response of the assay was linear for GST-mPAI-1 between 6.25 and 100 pM. In order to assess the consistency of the assay, we measured PAI-1 antigen in normal mouse pooled plasma several times. We found that the intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were 4.8% and 9.2%, respectively, indicating that the ELISA would be sufficiently repeatable and reproducible. In this assay, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice showed substantially higher levels (22-fold) of plasma PAI-1 antigen than did control mice (12.5+/-2.4 vs. 0.58+/-0.16 nM), similar to results reported elsewhere. Taken together, the DNA vaccine method is extremely useful for preparing specific antibodies against mouse PAI-1, which can be utilized to establish the ELISA and analyze the profile of PAI-1 distributions in mice under various conditions. This approach might also be useful for immunological investigation of other coagulation factors and related proteins.

  1. Cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for a human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antalis, T M; Clark, M A; Barnes, T; Lehrbach, P R; Devine, P L; Schevzov, G; Goss, N H; Stephens, R W; Tolstoshev, P

    1988-02-01

    Human monocyte-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor (mPAI-2) was purified to homogeneity from the U937 cell line and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence were used to screen a cDNA library prepared from U937 cells. One positive clone was sequenced and contained most of the coding sequence as well as a long incomplete 3' untranslated region (1112 base pairs). This cDNA sequence was shown to encode mPAI-2 by hybrid-select translation. A cDNA clone encoding the remainder of the mPAI-2 mRNA was obtained by primer extension of U937 poly(A)+ RNA using a probe complementary to the mPAI-2 coding region. The coding sequence for mPAI-2 was placed under the control of the lambda PL promoter, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli formed a complex with urokinase that could be detected immunologically. By nucleotide sequence analysis, mPAI-2 cDNA encodes a protein containing 415 amino acids with a predicted unglycosylated Mr of 46,543. The predicted amino acid sequence of mPAI-2 is very similar to placental PAI-2 (3 amino acid differences) and shows extensive homology with members of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. mPAI-2 was found to be more homologous to ovalbumin (37%) than the endothelial plasminogen activator inhibitor, PAI-1 (26%). Like ovalbumin, mPAI-2 appears to have no typical amino-terminal signal sequence. The 3' untranslated region of the mPAI-2 cDNA contains a putative regulatory sequence that has been associated with the inflammatory mediators.

  2. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above

  3. Immunoradiometric quantitation of tissue plasminogen activator-related antigen in human plasma: crypticity phenomenon and relationship to plasma fibrinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wun, T.C.; Capuano, A.

    1987-05-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen has been developed using immunoaffinity purified antibody. Various treatments enhanced the detection of tPA antigen in the plasma samples. Maximum detection was obtained by acidification of plasma to pH 4.8 to 6.5 or addition of 0.5 mol/L of L-lysine or L-arginine. Acidification or addition of lysine to plasma is also required for maximum immunoadsorption of plasma tPA antigen on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose. These results indicate that plasma tPA antigen is partially cryptic to antibody in untreated plasma. The plasma tPA antigen isolated by immunoadsorption of either untreated plasma or acidified plasma on anti-tPA-Ig-sepharose consists mainly of a 100-kd plasminogen activator species as determined by fibrin-agar zymography. The 100-kd activity is possibly a tPA:inhibitor complex. A standardized sample preparation method was conveniently adopted by mixing 3 vol of plasma and 1 vol of 2 mol/L of L-lysine for the assay. Reconstitution and recovery studies showed that the method is specific and permits full detection of both free tPA and tPA:inhibitor complex. The validity of the assay is further supported by the finding that the spontaneous plasma fibrinolysis previously demonstrated to be dependent on plasma tPA antigen is correlated with tPA antigen content. Using the standardized assay, we found that tPA antigen concentrations in 16 blood bank plasmas are equivalent to 3.7 to 20 ng of 60 kd tPA/mL. In all the plasma tested, more than half of the antigen is undetected unless the plasma is treated as described above.

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism, factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutations and the risk of VTE recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, Kristina; Wang, Xiao; Svensson, Peter J; Sundquist, Jan; Hedelius, Anna; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Zöller, Bengt; Memon, Ashfaque A

    2015-11-25

    Plasminogen-activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important inhibitor of the plasminogen/plasmin system. PAI-1 levels are influenced by the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 promoter. We investigated the relationship between the PAI-1 polymorphism and VTE recurrence, and its possible modification by factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin (PTM) mutations. Patients (n=1,069) from the Malmö Thrombophilia Study were followed from discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of the study (maximum follow-up 9.8 years). One hundred twenty-seven patients (11.9 %) had VTE recurrence. PAI-1 was genotyped by TaqMan PCR. Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and acquired risk factors of VTE showed no evidence of an association between PAI-1 genotype and risk of VTE recurrence in the study population as a whole. However, by including an interaction term in the analysis we showed that FVL but not PTM modified the effect of PAI-1 genotype: patients with the 4G allele plus FVL had a higher risk of VTE recurrence [hazard ratio (HR) =2.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) =1.5-3.3] compared to patients with the 4G allele but no FVL (reference group) or FVL irrespective of PAI-1 genotype (HR=1.8, 95 % CI=1.3-2.5). Compared to reference group, 5G allele irrespective of FVL was associated with lower risk of VTE recurrence only when compared with 4G allele together with FVL. In conclusion, FVL has a modifying effect on PAI-1 polymorphism in relation to risk of VTE recurrence. The role of PAI-1 polymorphism as a risk factor of recurrent VTE may be FVL dependent.

  5. 1H NMR structural characterization of a recombinant kringle 2 domain from human tissue-type plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, I.J.L.; Llinas, M.; Kelley, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The kringle 2 domain of human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) has been characterized via 1 H NMR spectroscopy at 300 and 620 MHz. The experiments were performed on the isolated domain obtained by expression of the 174-263 portion of t-PA in Escherichia coli. The spectrum of t-Pa kringle 2 is characteristic of a globular structure and shows overall similarity to that of the plasminogen (PGN) kringle 4. Spectral comparison with human and bovine PGN kringle 4 identified side-chain resonances from Leu 46 , which afford a fingerprint of kringle folding, and from most of the aromatic ring spin systems. Ligand-binding studies confirm that t-PA kringle 2 binds L-lysine with an association constant K a ∼ 11.9 mM -1 . The data indicate that homologous or conserved residues relative to those that compose the lysine-binding sites of PGN kringles 1 and 4 are involved in the binding of L-lysine to t-PA kringle 2. These include Tyr 36 and, within the kringle inner loop, Trp 62 , His 64 , Trp 72 , and Tyr 74 . Several labile NH protons of t-PA kringle 2 exhibit retarded H-exchange kinetics, requiring more than a week in 2 H 2 O for full deuteration in the presence of L-lysine at 37 degree C. This reveals that kringle 2 is endowed with a compact, dynamically stable conformation. Proton Overhauser experiments in 1 H 2 O, centered on well-resolved NH resonances between 9.8 and 12 ppm, identify signals arising from the His 48a imidazole NH3 proton and the three Trp indole NH1 protons. Overall, the data indicate a highly structured conformation for the recombinant t-PA kringle 2 that is closely related to that of the previously investigated PGN kringles 1, 4, and 5

  6. The Use of Tissue Plasminogen Activator in the Treatment of Wallenberg Syndrome Caused by Vertebral Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alexis; Cotter, Bradford V; Winters, Michael E

    2017-05-01

    Acute cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a devastating cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Up to 10% of acute CVAs in young patients are caused by dissection of the vertebral or carotid artery. Wallenberg syndrome results from a CVA in the vertebral or posterior inferior artery of the cerebellum and manifests as various degrees of cerebellar dysfunction. The administration of a thrombolytic medication has been recommended in the treatment of patients with stroke caused by cervical artery dissection. Surprisingly, there is scant literature on the use of this medication in the treatment of this condition. We describe a 42-year-old man with the sudden onset of headache, left-sided neck pain, vomiting, nystagmus, and ataxia 1 h after completing a weightlifting routine. Computed tomography angiography revealed a grade IV left vertebral artery injury with a dissection flap extending distally and resulting in complete occlusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging and angiography demonstrated acute left cerebellar and lateral medullary infarcts, consistent with Wallenberg syndrome. The patient was treated with tissue plasminogen activator, which failed to resolve his symptoms. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians frequently manage patients with acute CVAs. For select patients, the administration of tissue plasminogen activator can improve outcomes. However, the risk of major hemorrhage with this medication is significant. Cervical artery dissection is an important cause of acute stroke in young patients and is often missed on initial presentation. It is imperative for the emergency physician to consider acute cervical artery dissection as a cause of stroke and to be knowledgeable regarding the efficacy of thrombolytic medications for this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overexpression of SERBP1 (Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein) in human breast cancer is correlated with favourable prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serce, Nuran Bektas; Knuechel, Ruth; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Dahl, Edgar; Boesl, Andreas; Klaman, Irina; Serényi, Sonja von; Noetzel, Erik; Press, Michael F; Dimmler, Arno; Hartmann, Arndt; Sehouli, Jalid

    2012-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) overexpression is an important prognostic and predictive biomarker in human breast cancer. SERBP1, a protein that is supposed to regulate the stability of PAI-1 mRNA, may play a role in gynaecological cancers as well, since upregulation of SERBP1 was described in ovarian cancer recently. This is the first study to present a systematic characterisation of SERBP1 expression in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue at both the mRNA and the protein level. Using semiquantitative realtime PCR we analysed SERBP1 expression in different normal human tissues (n = 25), and in matched pairs of normal (n = 7) and cancerous breast tissues (n = 7). SERBP1 protein expression was analysed in two independent cohorts on tissue microarrays (TMAs), an initial evaluation set, consisting of 193 breast carcinomas and 48 normal breast tissues, and a second large validation set, consisting of 605 breast carcinomas. In addition, a collection of benign (n = 2) and malignant (n = 6) mammary cell lines as well as breast carcinoma lysates (n = 16) were investigated for SERBP1 expression by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, applying non-radioisotopic in situ hybridisation a subset of normal (n = 10) and cancerous (n = 10) breast tissue specimens from the initial TMA were analysed for SERBP1 mRNA expression. SERBP1 is not differentially expressed in breast carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue, both at the RNA and protein level. However, recurrence-free survival analysis showed a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between abundant SERBP1 expression in breast carcinoma and favourable prognosis. Interestingly, overall survival analysis also displayed a tendency (P = 0.09) towards favourable prognosis when SERBP1 was overexpressed in breast cancer. The RNA-binding protein SERBP1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and may represent a novel breast tumour marker with prognostic significance. Its potential involvement in the

  8. Urokinase vs Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator for Thrombolytic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating form of stroke, which leads to a high rate of mortality and poor neurological outcomes worldwide. Thrombolytic evacuation with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA or tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA has been showed to be a hopeful treatment for ICH. However, to the best of our knowledge, no clinical trials were reported to compare the efficacy and safety of these two fibrinolytics administrated following minimally invasive stereotactic puncture (MISP in patients with spontaneous basal ganglia ICH. Therefore, the authors intended here to evaluate the differential impact of uPA and tPA in a retrospective study. In the present study, a total of 86 patients with spontaneous ICH in basal ganglia using MISP received either uPA (uPA group, n = 45 or tPA (tPA group, n = 41, respectively. The clinical baseline characteristics prior to the operation were collected. In addition, therapeutic responses were assessed by the short-term outcomes within 30 days postoperation, as well as long-term outcomes at 1 year postoperation. Our findings showed that, in comparison with tPA, uPA was able to better promote hematoma evacuation and ameliorate perihematomal edema, but the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the long-term functional outcomes of both groups were similar, with no statistical difference. In conclusion, these results provide evidence supporting that uPA and tPA are similar in the efficacy and safety for thrombolytic evacuation in combination with MISP in patients with spontaneous basal ganglia ICH.

  9. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baare, J.; Pagnon, J.; Cameron, P.; Vardaxis, N.; Middlekoop, E.; Crowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  10. [Kinetics of catalase inactivation induced by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic patterns of sonication-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase (CAT) were studied in buffer solutions (pH 4-11) within the temperature range from 36 to 55 degrees C. Solutions of CAT were exposed to low-frequency (20.8 kHz) ultrasound (specific power, 48-62 W/cm2). The kinetics of CAT inactivation was characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s-1) of total inactivation (kin), thermal inactivation (*kin), and ultrasonic inactivation (kin(us)). In all cases, the following inequality was valid: kin > *kin. The value of kin(us) increased with the ultrasound power (range, 48-62 W/cm2) and exhibited a strong dependence on pH of the medium. On increasing the initial concentration of CAT (0.4-4.0 nM), kin(us) decreased. The three rate constants were minimum within the range of pH 6.5-8; their values increased considerably at pH 9. At 36-55 degrees C, temperature dependence of kin(us) was characterized by an activation energy (Eact) of 19.7 kcal/mol, whereas the value of Eact for CAT thermoinactivation was equal to 44.2 kcal/mol. Bovine serum and human serum albumins (BSA and HSA, respectively) inhibited sonication-induced CAT inactivation; complete prevention was observed at concentrations above 2.5 micrograms/ml. Dimethyl formamide (DMFA), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (HO.), prevented sonication-induced CAT inactivation at 10% (kin and *kin increased with the content of DMFA at concentrations in excess of 3%). The results obtained indicate that free radicals generated in the field of ultrasonic cavitation play a decisive role in the inactivation of CAT, which takes place when its solutions are exposed to low-frequency ultrasound. However, the efficiency of CAT inactivation by the radicals is determined by (1) the degree of association between the enzyme molecules in the reaction medium and (2) the composition thereof.

  11. ERADIKASI POLIO DAN IPV (INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrowahyuhono Gendrowahyuhono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the year 1988, World Health Organization (WHO claims that polio viruses should be eradicated after year 2000. However, until year 2010 the world have not been free from polio viruses circulation. So many effort had been achieved and it is estimated that the world will be free from polio virus after the year 2013. Control of poliomyelitis in Indonesia has been commenced since 1982 with routine immunization of polio program and the National Immunization Days (NID has been commenced since 1995,1996,2005 and 2006. When the world is free from polio virus, WHO suggests several alternative effort to maintain the world free from polio viruses : I stop the OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine and no polio immunization, 2 stop OPV and stock pile mOPV (monovalent OPV, 3 use OPV and IPV (Inactivated Polio Vaccine in a certain times, 4 use IPV only in a certain times. IPV has been used routinely in develop countries but has not been used in the developing countries. Several studies in development countries has been conducted, but had not been done in the developing countries. Indonesia collaboration with WHO has conducted the study of IPV in Yogyakarta Province since year 2002 until year 2010. The overall aim of the study is to compile the necessary data that will inform global and national decision-making regarding future polio immunization policies for the OPV cessation era. The data generated from the study will be particularly important to make decisions regarding optimal IPV use in developing tropical countries. It is unlikely that this data can be assembled through other means than through this study. The tentative result of the study shows that OPV immunization coverage in the year 2004 is 99% in four district and 93 % in the Yogyakarta city. Environment surveillance shows that there are 65.7% polio virus detected from 137 sewage samples pre IPV swich, and 4.8% polio virus detected from 83 sewage samples post IPV swich. Survey polio antibody serologis shows

  12. Structure of suicide-inactivated β-hydroxydecanoyl-thioester dehydrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, J.M.; Ho, C.K.; Li, W.B.; Townsend, C.A.; Salituro, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    β-Hydroxydecanoylthioester dehydrase, the key enzyme in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids under anaerobic conditions, equilibrates thioesters of (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, E-2-decenoic acid, and Z-3-decenoic acid. Dehydrase is irreversibly inactivated by the N-acetylcysteamine thioester of 3-decynoic acid (3-decynoyl-NAC), via dehydrase-catalyzed isomerization to 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC. To probe the relationship between normal catalysis and suicide inactivation, the structure of the inactivated enzyme has been studied. 3-[2- 13 C]Decynoyl-NAC was synthesized and incubated with dehydrase. 13 C NMR showed that attack of 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC by the active site histidine gives 3-histidinyl-3-decenoyl-NAC, which slowly rearranges to the more stable Δ 2 isomer. Model histidine-allene adducts have been made and characterized. Analysis of NMR data show that the C=C configuration of the decenoyl moiety of enzyme-bound inactivator is E. The suggestion that the mechanism of dehydrase inactivation parallels its normal mechanism of action is supported these findings

  13. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as · OH and ONOO - . In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  14. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra, E-mail: olakow@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Serafin, Eligiusz, E-mail: serafin@biol.uni.lodz.p [Laboratory of Computer and Analytical Techniques, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Puchala, Mieczyslaw, E-mail: puchala@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as {sup {center_dot}}OH and ONOO{sup -}. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  15. Inactivation of complement by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Finke, J H; Elgert, K D; Cambell, B J; Barrett, J T

    1979-07-01

    Zymosan depletion of serum complement in guinea pigs rendered them highly resistant to lesion by Loxosceles reclusa spider venom. Guinea pigs deficient in C4 of the complement system are as sensitive to the venom as normal guinea pigs. The injection of 35 micrograms of whole recluse venom intradermally into guinea pigs lowered their complement level by 35.7%. Brown recluse spider venom in concentrations as slight as 0.02 micrograms protein/ml can totally inactivate one CH50 of guinea pig complement in vitro. Bee, scorpion, and other spider venoms had no influence on the hemolytic titer of complement. Fractionation of recluse spider venom by Sephadex G-200 filtration separated the complement-inactivating property of the venom into three major regions which could be distinguished on the basis of heat stability as well as size. None was neutralized by antivenom. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of venom resolved the complement inactivators into five fractions. Complement inactivated by whole venom or the Sephadex fractions could be restored to hemolytic activity by supplements of fresh serum but not by heat-inactivated serum, pure C3, pure C5, or C3 and C5 in combination.

  16. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, B.; Wiebe, M.E.; Lippin, A.; Vandersande, J.; Stryker, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated

  17. Pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for Bacillus subtilis inactivation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arias, A. N.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; López-Callejas, R.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; de la Piedad Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus subtilis bacteria in water has been experimentally studied by means of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) in a coaxial reactor endowed with an alumina dielectric. The plasma source is capable of operating at atmospheric pressure with gas, water or hybrid gas-liquid media at adjustable 25 kV pulses, 30 μs long and at a 500 Hz frequency. In order to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of the system, a set of experiments were designed on the basis of oxygen flow control. The initial data have showed a significant bacterial rate reduction of 103-107 CFU/mL. Additional results proved that applying an oxygen flow for a few seconds during the PDBD treatment inactivates the Bacillus subtilis population with 99.99% effectiveness. As a reference, without gas flow but with the same exposure times, this percentage is reduced to ~90%. The analysis of the relationship between inactivation rate and chemical species in the discharge has been carried out using optical emission spectroscopy as to identifying the main reactive species. Reactive oxygen species such as atomic oxygen and ozone tuned out to be the dominant germicidal species. Some proposed inactivation mechanisms of this technique are discussed.

  18. Removal of detergents from SDS-inactivated dextransucrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husman, D.W.; Mayer, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dextransucrase, which is rapidly inactivated by SDS, can be reactivated upon the addition of Triton X-100. Purification of the enzyme, in good yield and homogeneity, has been achieved by chromatography in the presence of SDS. The purified enzyme can be reactivated with Triton, but has large amounts of detergents. It was important to develop procedures for their removal. Density gradient centrifugation of SDS-inactivated or Triton-reactivated enzyme, treatment with Extracti-Gel D (Pierce) or chromatography on hydroxyl apatite (HA), have been examined for their effectiveness in providing detergent-free enzyme in good yield. Ultracentrifugation of SDS-inactivated protein provided limited recovery of active enzyme, but suggested that reactivation could be achieved by the simple removal of the detergent. While similar behavior was observed when the enzyme was eluted from Extracti-Gel, it was also shown that the limited recovery was a result of irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. Recovery could be improved if the enzyme was collected in solutions containing Triton, which has been reported to be a stabilizer. Chromatography of SDS-inactivated enzyme on HA also yielded active enzyme. Good recovery was obtained when Triton-reactivated enzyme was employed in these studies. The degree of detergent removal was determined by utilizing radiolabelled SDS and Triton X-100

  19. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for Bacillus subtilis inactivation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Arias, A N; López-Callejas, R; De la Piedad Beneitez, A; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Barocio, S R; Muñoz-Castro, A E

    2012-01-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus subtilis bacteria in water has been experimentally studied by means of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) in a coaxial reactor endowed with an alumina dielectric. The plasma source is capable of operating at atmospheric pressure with gas, water or hybrid gas-liquid media at adjustable 25 kV pulses, 30 μs long and at a 500 Hz frequency. In order to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of the system, a set of experiments were designed on the basis of oxygen flow control. The initial data have showed a significant bacterial rate reduction of 10 3 -10 7 CFU/mL. Additional results proved that applying an oxygen flow for a few seconds during the PDBD treatment inactivates the Bacillus subtilis population with 99.99% effectiveness. As a reference, without gas flow but with the same exposure times, this percentage is reduced to ∼90%. The analysis of the relationship between inactivation rate and chemical species in the discharge has been carried out using optical emission spectroscopy as to identifying the main reactive species. Reactive oxygen species such as atomic oxygen and ozone tuned out to be the dominant germicidal species. Some proposed inactivation mechanisms of this technique are discussed.

  1. Inactivation of Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water by circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Daolun; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The discharge of alien ballast water is a well-known, major reason for marine species invasion. Here, circular orifice plate-generated hydrodynamic cavitation was used to inactivate Heterosigma akashiwo in ballast water. In comparison with single- and multihole orifice plates, the conical-hole orifice plate yielded the highest inactivation percentage, 51.12%, and consumed only 6.84% energy (based on a 50% inactivation percentage). Repeating treatment, either using double series-connection or circling inactivation, elevated the inactivation percentage, yet consumed much more energy. The results indicate that conical-hole-generated hydrodynamic cavitation shows great potential as a pre-inactivation method for ballast water treatment.

  2. Microbial electrolytic disinfection process for highly efficient Escherichia coli inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Xiaohu

    2018-01-01

    extensively studied for recalcitrant organics removal, its application potential towards water disinfection (e.g., inactivation of pathogens) is still unknown. This study investigated the inactivation of Escherichia coli in a microbial electrolysis cell based bio-electro-Fenton system (renamed as microbial......Water quality deterioration caused by a wide variety of recalcitrant organics and pathogenic microorganisms has become a serious concern worldwide. Bio-electro-Fenton systems have been considered as cost-effective and highly efficient water treatment platform technology. While it has been......]OH was identified as one potential mechanism for disinfection. This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of bio-electro-Fenton process for pathogens inactivation, which offers insight for the future development of sustainable, efficient, and cost-effective biological water treatment technology....

  3. Chlorine inactivation of fungal spores on cereal grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S; Pardoel, D; Harun, A; Treloar, T

    1997-04-01

    Although 0.4% chlorine for 2 min has been recommended for surface disinfection of food samples before direct plating for fungal enumeration, this procedure may not be adequate for highly contaminated products. The effectiveness of a range of chlorine solutions was investigated using barley samples artificially contaminated with four different concentrations of Aspergillus flavus. A. niger, A. ochraceus, Eurotium repens, Penicillium brevicompactum P. chrysogenum and Cladosporium cladosporioides. At initial contamination levels greater than 10(4)/g, 0.4% chlorine did not inactivate sufficient spores to produce less than 20% contamination. Of the test fungi, ascospores of E. repens were the most resistant to chlorine inactivation, whereas the conidia of C. cladosporioides were the most sensitive. Rinsing the samples with 70% ethanol improved the effectiveness of the recommended surface disinfection procedure. However, some ethanol appears to permeate into the grains and may inactivate sensitive internal fungi, although a minimal effect only was observed on wheat infected with Alternaria.

  4. Lipase inactivation in wheat germ by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Kudachikar, V.B.; Kumar, Sourav

    2013-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the shelf life of wheat germ by optimizing processing conditions involving γ-irradiation. Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of γ-irradiation (0–30 kGy doses) on the chemical composition of wheat germ with respect to variation in moisture, total ash, crude fat, free fatty acid, protein and lipase activity. The results demonstrate that shelf stability of wheat germ was achieved by inactivation of lipase at doses of γ-irradiation greater than 12 kGy. - Highlights: Ø γ-irradiation was found to inactivate Lipase present in Wheat Germ. Ø The treatment did not result in significant changes in Total Ash, Moisture and Protein Content of Wheat Germ. Ø The irradiation at 30 kGy resulted in 31.2 % inactivation of Lipase in Wheat Germ

  5. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in milk by pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, L D; Jin, Z T; Zhang, Q H; Yousef, A E

    1998-09-01

    Pasteurized whole, 2%, and skim milk were inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes Scott A and treated with high-voltage pulsed electric field (PEF). The effects of milk composition (fat content) and PEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, and treatment temperature) on the inactivation of the bacterium were studied. No significant differences were observed in the inactivation of L. monocytogenes Scott A in three types of milk by PEF treatment. With treatment at 25 degrees C, 1- to 3-log reductions of L. monocytogenes were observed. PEF lethal effect was a function of field strength and treatment time. Higher field strength or longer treatment time resulted in a greater reduction of viable cells. A 4-log reduction of the bacterium was obtained by increasing the treatment temperature to 50 degrees C. Results indicate that the use of a high-voltage PEF is a promising technology for inactivation of foodborne pathogens.

  6. Development of inactivated-local isolate vaccine for infectious bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darminto

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious bronchitis (IB is an acute highly contagious viral respiratory disease of poultry caused by coronavirus. The disease causes high mortality in young chicks, reduce body weight gain in broilers and remarkable drop in egg production. IB can only be controlled by vaccination, but due to the antigenic variation among serotypes of IB viruses, the effective IB vaccine should be prepared from local isolates. The aim of this research is to develop inactivated IB vaccine derived from local IB isolates. Local isolates of IB viruses designated as I-37, I-269 and PTS-III were propagated respectively in specific pathogen free (SPF chicken eggs, the viruses then were inactivated by formaline at final concentration of 1:1,000. Subsequently, the inactivated viruses were mixed and emulsified in oil emulsion adjuvant with sorbitant mono-oleic as an emulsifier. The vaccine then was tested for its safety, potency and efficacy in broiler chickens. Birds inoculated twice with a two-week interval by inactivated vaccine did not show any adverse reaction, either systemic or local reaction. The inoculated birds developed antibody responses with high titre, while antibody of the control birds remain negative. In addition, efficacy test which was conducted in broilers demonstrated that birds vaccinated by live-commercial vaccine and boosted three weeks later by Balitvet inactivated vaccine showed high level of antibody production which provided high level of protection against challenged virus (76% against I-37, 92% against I-269 and 68% against PTS-III challenge viruses. From this study, it can be concluded that inactivated local IB vaccine is considered to be safe, potent and efficacious. The vaccine stimulates high titre of antibody responses, which provide high level of protection against challenged viruses.

  7. Inactivation of VHSV by infiltration and salt under experimental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Jørgensen, Claus; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by infiltration. To evaluate the inactivation effect of infiltration on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid...... be a valuable method to sanitize VHSV infected water. Changes in temperature, pH, earth types in the area used for infiltration etc. may change the virus reduction, though. As some of the fish cutting plants are also smoking rainbow trout fillets, the question arose whether a brine solution will inactivate VHSV...

  8. Monitoring of chemotherapy successfulness of Platina/Taxol chemotherapy protocol by using determination of serum urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR in patients with ovarian carcinoma FIGO II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dženita Ljuca

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In about 70% of cases, ovarian carcinoma has been diagnosed at an advanced stage. Invasion and metastasis of solid tumors request protease activity resulting in basal membrane destruction and surrounding matrix. In that process, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR play a key role, that via plasmin activation lead to basal membrane and matrix degradation in surrounding of the tumor, enable to its invasion and metastasis. Determination of serum concentration of those tumor markers can be useful in preoperative as well as in postoperative period. Their serum concentrations in ovarian cancer patients may help in good monitoring of remission or progression during chemotherapy treatment. In late 1950s and eariy 1960s, when it was found out that malignant ovarian tumors were chemosensitive, their chemotherapy treatment has begun. In the beginning it was used only mono-therapy, and by discovering new cytostatics it was replaced by poly-chemotherapy. Now days, in the therapy of advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma combination of cisplatine or carboplatine with paclitaxel is considering as standard treatment. Aim of this study was to determine serum uPA, suPAR and CEA in FIGO II and III patients with different histo-logical type (serous, mucinous, clear cell tumor before and after PT chemotherapy protocol during following three cycles. In this prospective study we have analyzed 17 patients with ovarian carcinoma, those have been after surgery treated by chemotherapy. Serum levels of uPA and suPAR have been determined by ELISA-test (Imubind uPA, Imubind uPAR, American Diagnostica, and CEA by OPUS Imunoassay method. Results of this study have shown that uPA, suPAR and CEA met criteria for prognostic markers for monitoring of successful-ness of platina/taxol chemotherapy protocol for serous, mucinous and clear cell tumor FIGO II and III stage of ovarian carcinoma. In case of PT chemotherapy

  9. Analysis of a two-domain binding site for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex in low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O M; Petersen, H H; Jacobsen, C; Moestrup, S K; Etzerodt, M; Andreasen, P A; Thøgersen, H C

    2001-07-01

    The low-density-lipoprotein-receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) is composed of several classes of domains, including complement-type repeats (CR), which occur in clusters that contain binding sites for a multitude of different ligands. Each approximately 40-residue CR domain contains three conserved disulphide linkages and an octahedral Ca(2+) cage. LRP is a scavenging receptor for ligands from extracellular fluids, e.g. alpha(2)-macroglobulin (alpha(2)M)-proteinase complexes, lipoprotein-containing particles and serine proteinase-inhibitor complexes, like the complex between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In the present study we analysed the interaction of the uPA-PAI-1 complex with an ensemble of fragments representing a complete overlapping set of two-domain fragments accounting for the ligand-binding cluster II (CR3-CR10) of LRP. By ligand blotting, solid-state competition analysis and surface-plasmon-resonance analysis, we demonstrate binding to multiple CR domains, but show a preferential interaction between the uPA-PAI-1 complex and a two-domain fragment comprising CR domains 5 and 6 of LRP. We demonstrate that surface-exposed aspartic acid and tryptophan residues at identical positions in the two homologous domains, CR5 and CR6 (Asp(958,CR5), Asp(999,CR6), Trp(953,CR5) and Trp(994,CR6)), are critical for the binding of the complex as well as for the binding of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) - the folding chaperone/escort protein required for transport of LRP to the cell surface. Accordingly, the present work provides (1) an identification of a preferred binding site within LRP CR cluster II; (2) evidence that the uPA-PAI-1 binding site involves residues from two adjacent protein domains; and (3) direct evidence identifying specific residues as important for the binding of uPA-PAI-1 as well as for the binding of RAP.

  10. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gingiva with periodontitis of type I plasminogen deficiency compared to gingiva with gingivitis and periodontitis and healthy gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus Waschulewski, Idil; Gökbuget, Aslan Y; Christiansen, Nina M; Ziegler, Maike; Schuster, Volker; Wahl, Gerhard; Götz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Type I plasminogen deficiency (Plgdef) is an uncommon chronic inflammation of mucous membranes. Gingival enlargements usually proceed with progressive periodontal destruction and tooth-loss. Plasmin(ogen)-independent enzymatic mechanisms for fibrin clearance have already been discussed in the literature. Our primary objective was to verify, immunohistochemically, the occurrence of different enzymatic factors involved in tissue breakdown of inflamed compared to healthy gingiva. Secondly, we tried to find out, if these patients have a similar microbiological profile to the patients with known gingivitis and periodontitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of enzymes elastase, plasminogen (plg), cathepsin G, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-7 and of glycoprotein fibrinogen were performed with gingival tissues from 3 healthy controls, 8 patients with Plgdef and 3 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Furthermore, plaque from 5 patients with plasminogen deficiency were also obtained to determine the microbiological profile. Significantly high numbers of elastase positive leukocytes were detected in all samples. Staining for MMP-3 and MMP-7 was seen in samples with gingivitis and periodontitis with a stronger staining in samples with periodontitis by Plgdef. Fibrinogen was detectable in all samples. Staining for plg was stronger in samples with periodontitis than in other samples. Staining for cathepsin G was weak in gingivitis and periodontitis. Subgingival microbial flora showed elevated colony forming units of Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Fusobacterium spp., Eikenella corrodens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and viridans streptococci. Strong staining of elastase, MMP-3 and MMP-7 and weak staining of plg in Plgdef samples supports the plasmin(ogen) - independent fibrin clearance. Similar subgingival microbiological flora was observed in periodontitis with Plgdef as in other periodontal diseases. Further investigations should determine the exact pathomechanism

  11. Mapping the topographic epitope landscape on the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) by surface plasmon resonance and X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Gandhi, Sonu; Yuan, Cai

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR or CD87) is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein often expressed in the microenvironment of invasive solid cancers and high levels are generally associated with poor patient prognosis (Kriegbaum et al., 2011 [1]). uPAR is organized as a dy...... of these mAbs by X-ray crystallography alone and in complex with uPAR [deposited in the PDB database as 4QTH and 4QTI, respectively]....

  12. Activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates breast cancer cell metastatic behaviors through inhibition of plasminogen activation and extracellular proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzi, Zainab A.; Lanoue, Danielle; El-Youssef, Mouhanned; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Tubman, Janice; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Porter, Lisa A.; Boffa, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a plasma zymogen, which can be converted to activated TAFI (TAFIa) through proteolytic cleavage by thrombin, plasmin, and most effectively thrombin in complex with the endothelial cofactor thrombomodulin (TM). TAFIa is a carboxypeptidase that cleaves carboxyl terminal lysine and arginine residues from protein and peptide substrates, including plasminogen-binding sites on cell surface receptors. Carboxyl terminal lysine residues play a pivotal role in enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation to plasmin. Plasmin has many critical functions including cleaving components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which enhances invasion and migration of cancer cells. We therefore hypothesized that TAFIa could act to attenuate metastasis. To assess the role of TAFIa in breast cancer metastasis, in vitro migration and invasion assays, live cell proteolysis and cell proliferation using MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells were carried out in the presence of a TAFIa inhibitor, recombinant TAFI variants, or soluble TM. Inhibition of TAFIa with potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor increased cell invasion, migration and proteolysis of both cell lines, whereas addition of TM resulted in a decrease in all these parameters. A stable variant of TAFIa, TAFIa-CIIYQ, showed enhanced inhibitory effects on cell invasion, migration and proteolysis. Furthermore, pericellular plasminogen activation was significantly decreased on the surface of MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells following treatment with various concentrations of TAFIa. Taken together, these results indicate a vital role for TAFIa in regulating pericellular plasminogen activation and ultimately ECM proteolysis in the breast cancer microenvironment. Enhancement of TAFI activation in this microenvironment may be a therapeutic strategy to inhibit invasion and prevent metastasis of breast cancer cells

  13. Dimerization Is Not a Determining Factor for Functional High Affinity Human Plasminogen Binding by the Group A Streptococcal Virulence Factor PAM and Is Mediated by Specific Residues within the PAM a1a2 Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97–125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83–145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1–2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg126-His127) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg113, His114, Glu116, Arg126, His127), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. PMID:24962580

  14. Dimerization is not a determining factor for functional high affinity human plasminogen binding by the group A streptococcal virulence factor PAM and is mediated by specific residues within the PAM a1a2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sarbani; Liang, Zhong; Quek, Adam J; Ploplis, Victoria A; Law, Ruby; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-08-01

    A emm53 subclass of Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) interacts tightly with human plasma plasminogen (hPg) and plasmin (hPm) via the kringle 2 (K2hPg) domain of hPg/hPm and the N-terminal a1a2 regions of a GAS coiled-coil M-like protein (PAM). Previous studies have shown that a monomeric PAM fragment, VEK30 (residues 97-125 + Tyr), interacted specifically with isolated K2hPg. However, the binding strength of VEK30 (KD = 56 nm) was ∼60-fold weaker than that of full-length dimeric PAM (KD = 1 nm). To assess whether this attenuated binding was due to the inability of VEK30 to dimerize, we defined the minimal length of PAM required to dimerize using a series of peptides with additional PAM residues placed at the NH2 and COOH termini of VEK30. VEK64 (PAM residues 83-145 + Tyr) was found to be the smallest peptide that adopted an α-helical dimer, and was bound to K2hPg with nearly the same affinity as PAM (KD = 1-2 nm). However, addition of two PAM residues (Arg(126)-His(127)) to the COOH terminus of VEK30 (VEK32) maintained a monomeric peptidic structure, but exhibited similar K2hPg binding affinity as full-length dimeric PAM. We identified five residues in a1a2 (Arg(113), His(114), Glu(116), Arg(126), His(127)), mutation of which reduced PAM binding affinity for K2hPg by ∼ 1000-fold. Replacement of these critical residues by Ala in the GAS genome resulted in reduced virulence, similar to the effects of inactivating the PAM gene entirely. We conclude that rather than dimerization of PAM, the five key residues in the binding domain of PAM are essential to mediate the high affinity interaction with hPg, leading to increased GAS virulence. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Fibrin-specific and effective clot lysis requires both plasminogen activators and for them to be in a sequential rather than simultaneous combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, R; Li, S; Gurewich, V

    2017-08-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been a disappointment and has now been replaced by an endovascular procedure whenever possible. Nevertheless, thrombolysis remains the only means by which circulation in a thrombosed artery can be restored rapidly. In contrast to tPA monotherapy, endogenous fibrinolysis uses both tPA and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), whose native form is a proenzyme, prouPA. This combination is remarkably effective as evidenced by the fibrin degradation product, D-dimer, which is invariably present in plasma. The two activators have complementary mechanisms of plasminogen activation and are synergistic in combination. Since tPA initiates fibrinolysis when released from the vessel wall and prouPA is in the blood, they induce fibrinolysis sequentially. It was postulated that this may be more effective and fibrin-specific. The hypothesis was tested in a model of clot lysis in plasma in which a clot was first exposed to tPA for 5 min, washed and incubated with prouPA. Lysis was compared with that of clots incubated with both activators simultaneously. The sequential combination was almost twice as effective and caused less fibrinogenolysis than the simultaneous combination (p < 0.0001) despite having significantly less tPA, as a result of the wash. A mechanism is described by which this phenomenon can be explained. The findings are believed to have significant therapeutic implications.

  16. The association between the 4G/5G polymorphism in the promoter of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene and extension of postsurgical calf vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Filippo; Meli, Francesco; Raimondi, Francesco; Montalto, Salvatore; Cospite, Valentina; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the presence of a plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) promoter polymorphism 4G/5G could significantly influence the proximal extension of vein thrombosis in spite of anticoagulant treatment in patients with calf vein thrombosis (CVT) following orthopaedic, urological and abdominal surgery. We studied 168 patients with CVT, who had undergone orthopaedic, urological and abdominal surgery, subdivided as follows: first, 50 patients with thrombosis progression; second, 118 patients without thrombosis progression. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 was evaluated in all patients and in 70 healthy matched controls. We also studied PAI-1 activity in plasma. The presence of 4G/5G genotype was significantly increased in the group of patients with the extension of thrombotic lesions and was associated with an increase in CVT extension risk (odds ratio adjusted for sex 2.692; 95% confidence interval 1.302-4.702). Moreover, we observed a significant increase of PAI-1 plasma activity in patients with extension of thrombotic lesion vs. patients without extension (P=0.0001). Patients with 4G/5G genotype in the promoter of the plasminogen activator inhibitor - 1 gene present a higher risk of extension of thrombotic lesions.

  17. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/flu.html CDC review information for Inactivated Influenza VIS: ...

  18. Use of In Situ-Generated Dimethyldioxirane for Inactivation of Biological Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, William H; Bushway, Karen E; Miller, Susan D; Delcomyn, Carrie A; Renard, Jean J; Henley, Michael V

    2005-01-01

    ...) at neutral pH, was investigated for inactivation of biological warfare agent simulants. The DMDO solution inactivated bacterial spores, fungal spores, vegetative bacterial cells, viruses, and protein by 7 orders of magnitude in less than 10 min...

  19. High pressure processing's potential to inactivate norovirus and other fooodborne viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure processing (HPP) can inactivate human norovirus. However, all viruses are not equally susceptible to HPP. Pressure treatment parameters such as required pressure levels, initial pressurization temperatures, and pressurization times substantially affect inactivation. How food matrix ...

  20. Cadmium exposure is associated with soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating marker of inflammation and future cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerberg, Björn; Borné, Yan; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Forsgard, Niklas; Hedblad, Bo; Persson, Margaretha; Engström, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diet and smoking are the main sources of cadmium exposure in the general population. Cadmium increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and experimental studies show that it induces inflammation. Blood cadmium levels are associated with macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an emerging biomarker for cardiovascular events related to inflammation and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim was to examine whether blood cadmium levels are associated with circulating suPAR and other markers of inflammation. Methods: A population sample of 4648 Swedish middle-aged women and men was examined cross-sectionally in 1991–1994. Plasma suPAR was assessed by ELISA, leukocytes were measured by standard methods, and blood cadmium was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Prevalent cardiovascular disease, ultrasound-assessed carotid plaque occurrence, and several possible confounding factors were recorded. Results: After full adjustment for risk factors and confounding variables, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with an 10.9% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.001). In never-smokers, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with a 3.7% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.01) after full adjustment. Blood cadmium was not associated with C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and Lp-PLA2 but with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in one of two statistical models. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium was associated with increased plasma suPAR in the general population, independently of smoking and cardiovascular disease. These results imply that cadmium is a possible cause for raised levels of this inflammatory marker. - Highlights: • Cadmium is a toxic proinflammatory, proatherosclerotic metal. • Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in plasma is a promising proinflammatory marker of atherosclerosis. • Blood cadmium and plasma su

  1. Different radiolabelling methods alter the pharmacokinetic and biodistribution properties of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 2 (PAI-2) forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranson, Marie; Berghofer, Paula; Vine, Kara L.; Greguric, Ivan; Shepherd, Rachael; Katsifis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tumour-associated urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is a critical marker of invasion and metastasis, and it is recognised as having strong prognostic relevance as well as being a therapeutic target. The specific uPA inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2, SerpinB2) specifically targets cell bound uPA and is internalised. Furthermore, preclinical studies have established the “proof-of-principle” of uPA-targeting by PAI-2-cytotoxin conjugates in human carcinoma models. However, these studies also suggest that PAI-2 is rapidly cleared via the renal system with low total dose reaching the tumour. In this study, a comparative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and biodistribution (BD) analysis of different forms of PAI-2 labelled with the radioisotopes iodine-123 ( 123 I) and technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) was undertaken. Methods: The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties and BD of wild-type, ΔCD-loop and PEGylated ΔCD-loop PAI-2 labelled with the commonly used diagnostic SPECT radioisotopes 99m Tc or 123 I were compared in mouse models of human prostate carcinoma. Whole body SPECT imaging was also performed. Results: Both wild-type and the shorter but active ΔCD-loop form of PAI-2 123 I-labelled indirectly via conjugation to free amine groups (termed 123 I-Bn-PAI-2) exhibited low tumour uptake, rapid excretion and similar PK profiles. Preliminary studies with a short branched-chain PEGylated 123 I-Bn-PAI-2 ΔCD-loop indicated an increase in blood retention time and tumour uptake. All 123 I-Bn-labelled radiotracers were largely excreted through the kidneys. By comparison, both wild-type 123 I-PAI-2 (labelled directly via tyrosine residues) and 99m Tc-PAI-2 displayed different PK/BD patterns compared to 123 I-Bn-PAI-2, suggesting greater liver based catabolism and thus slower elimination. SPECT imaging mimicked the BD results of all radiotracers. Conclusion: The different labelling methods gave distinct PAI-2 BD and tumour

  2. Expression profiles of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Clonorchis sinensis: a glycolytic enzyme with plasminogen binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Zhang, Erhong; Huang, Lisi; Li, Wenfang; Liang, Pei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-12-01

    Globally, 15-20 million people are infected with Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) which results in clonorchiasis. In China, clonorchiasis is considered to be one of the fastest-growing food-borne parasitic diseases. That more key molecules of C. sinensis are characterized will be helpful to understand biology and pathogenesis of the carcinogenic liver fluke. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) from many species have functions other than their catalytic role in glycolysis. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence and structure of GAPDH from C. sinensis (CsGAPDH) by using bioinformatics tools and obtained its recombinant protein by prokaryotic expression system, to learn its expression profiles and molecular property. CsGAPDH could bind to human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cell in vivo and in vitro by the method of immunofluorescence assays. CsGAPDH also disturbed in lumen of biliary tract near to the parasite in the liver of infected rat. Western blotting analysis together with immunofluorescence assay indicated that CsGAPDH was a component of excretory/secretory proteins (CsESPs) and a surface-localized protein of C. sinensis. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) and Western blotting demonstrated that CsGAPDHs are expressed at the life stages of adult worm, metacercaria, and egg, but the expression levels were different from each other. Recombinant CsGAPDH (rCsGAPDH) was confirmed to have the capacity to catalyze the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to D-glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate which was inhibited by AMP in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rCsGAPDH was able to interact with human plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The interaction could be inhibited by lysine. The plasminogen binding capacity of rCsGAPDH along with the distribution of CsGAPDH in vivo and in the liver of C. sinensis-infected rat hinted that surface-localized CsGAPDH might play an important role in host invasion of the worm besides its glycolytic

  3. Cadmium exposure is associated with soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a circulating marker of inflammation and future cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerberg, Björn, E-mail: bjorn.fagerberg@wlab.gu.se [Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Wallenberg Laboratory for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Gothenburg (Sweden); Borné, Yan [Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, CRC, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, SE-205 02 Malmö (Sweden); Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg (Sweden); Forsgard, Niklas [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Gothenburg (Sweden); Hedblad, Bo; Persson, Margaretha; Engström, Gunnar [Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, CRC, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, SE-205 02 Malmö (Sweden)

    2017-01-15

    Background: Diet and smoking are the main sources of cadmium exposure in the general population. Cadmium increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, and experimental studies show that it induces inflammation. Blood cadmium levels are associated with macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is an emerging biomarker for cardiovascular events related to inflammation and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim was to examine whether blood cadmium levels are associated with circulating suPAR and other markers of inflammation. Methods: A population sample of 4648 Swedish middle-aged women and men was examined cross-sectionally in 1991–1994. Plasma suPAR was assessed by ELISA, leukocytes were measured by standard methods, and blood cadmium was analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Prevalent cardiovascular disease, ultrasound-assessed carotid plaque occurrence, and several possible confounding factors were recorded. Results: After full adjustment for risk factors and confounding variables, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with an 10.9% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.001). In never-smokers, a 3-fold increase in blood cadmium was associated with a 3.7% increase in suPAR concentration (p<0.01) after full adjustment. Blood cadmium was not associated with C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and Lp-PLA2 but with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in one of two statistical models. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium was associated with increased plasma suPAR in the general population, independently of smoking and cardiovascular disease. These results imply that cadmium is a possible cause for raised levels of this inflammatory marker. - Highlights: • Cadmium is a toxic proinflammatory, proatherosclerotic metal. • Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) in plasma is a promising proinflammatory marker of atherosclerosis. • Blood cadmium and plasma su

  4. Inactivation of proteinaceous protease inhibitors of soybeans by isolated fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.T.; Spekking, W.T.J.; Sijtsma, L.; Bont, de J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Proteinaceous protease inhibitors, Kunitz Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor (KSTI) and Bowman Birk Inhibitor (BBI), in legume seeds reduce the digestibility of proteins in feed of monogastric animals. Enzymatic inactivation of these inhibitors will increase the nutritional value of the feed. The aim of this

  5. Efficient Bacteria Inactivation by Ultrasound in Municipal Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Ernesto Amabilis-Sosa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The reuse of treated wastewaters could contribute to reducing water stress. In this research, ultrasound application on bacterial inactivation in municipal wastewater (MWW was evaluated. Total and fecal coliforms were used as standard fecal indicators; volatile suspended solids (VSS were analyzed too. Samples were taken from the effluent of secondary clarifiers. In addition, inactivation tests were carried out on pure cultures of E. coli (EC and B. subtilis (BS. Sonication was performed at 20 kHz, 35% amplitude and 600 W/L for 15, 30 and 45 min. After 15 min of sonication, bacterial density was reduced by 1.85 Log10 MPN/100 mL for EC and 3.16 Log10 CFU/mL for BS. After 30 min, no CFU/mL of BS were observed in MWW and, after 45 min, the reduction of total and fecal coliforms was practically 6.45 Log10 MPN/100mL. Inactivation mechanism was made by cavitation, which causes irreversible damage to the cell wall. Although high bacterial densities were employed, percentages of inactivation >99% were reached at 45 min. This research contributes to the implementation of ultrasound as a disinfection technique with high potential due to its high efficiency without producing byproducts. In fact, the water meets the guidelines for reuse in direct human contact services.

  6. Inactivation of dairy manure-borne pathogens by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Anaerobic digestion of animal manure has the potential to inactivate enteric pathogens, thereby reducing exposures to livestock and humans when the products of digestion are disposed by land-spreading or irrigation or returned to livestock uses such as bedding. Data on digester effectiv...

  7. Light-driven photosensitizer uptake increases Candida albicans photodynamic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Silva, Ana P da; Kurachi, Cristina; Guimarães, Francisco E G

    2017-11-01

    Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) is based on the use of a photosensitizer (PS) and light that results mainly in the production of reactive oxygen species, aiming to produce microorganism cell death. PS incubation time and light dose are key protocol parameters that influence PDI response; the correct choice of them can increase the efficiency of inactivation. The results of this study show that a minor change in the PDI protocol, namely light-driven incubation leads to a higher photosensitizer and more uniform cell uptake inside the irradiated zone. Furthermore, as the uptake increases, the damage caused by PDI also increases. The proposed light-driven incubation prior to the inactivation illumination dose has advantages when compared to the traditional PDI treatments since it can be more selective and effective. Using a violet light as pre-illumination (light-driven incubation) source and a red-light system as PDI source, it was possible to demonstrate that when compared to the traditional protocol of dark incubation, the pre-illuminated cell culture showed an inactivation increase of 7 log units. These in vitro results performed in Candida albicans cells may result in the introduction of a new protocol for PDI. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. High pressure processing inactivates human norovirus within oysters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumption of raw bivalve mollusks can result in norovirus infection. One potential intervention for virus-contaminated shellfish is high pressure processing (HPP). Currently HPP is known to inactivate Vibrio bacteria, hepatitis A virus, and murine norovirus within oysters. To evaluate the potentia...

  9. Method of inactivation of viral and bacterial blood contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, R.; Goodrich, R.P.; Van Borssum Waalkes, M.; Wong, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for inactivating viral and/or bacterial contamination in blood cellular matter, such as erythrocytes and platelets, or protein fractions. The cells or protein fractions are mixed with chemical sensitizers and irradiated with, for example, gamma or X-ray radiation

  10. Efficiency of inactivation of trypsin inhibitory activity in some selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypsin inhibitor (TI) levels in the crop seeds varied between 0.0 in Adansonia digitata and 40.8 TIU/mg in Pterocarpus osun. Efficiency of inactivation of TI by autoclaving ranged from 58.1% in Millettia thonningii to 100% in Sesbania pachycarpa and Lonchocarpus. sericeus. It is concluded that the effect of heat treatment on ...

  11. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended

  12. Role of polyols in thermal inactivation of shark ornithine transcarbamoylase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellocco, E.; Lagana, G.; Barreca, D.; Ficarra, S.; Tellone, E.; Magazu, S.; Branca, C.; Kotyk, Arnošt; Galtieri, A.; Leuzzi, U.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2005), s. 395-402 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : ornithine transcarbamoylase * thermal inactivation * shark enzyme Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  13. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research August 2016; 15 (8): 1595-1603 ... Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent apoptosis in ... apoptosis induced by a selective iNOS inhibitor, N-[(3-aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine (1400W), .... and nitrate. ... Nitrite production was measured in culture media.

  14. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research was initiated to confirm and expand the current database for the inactivation of Giardia spp. using ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Initially, previous research that used in vitro excystation as the indicator for UV effectiveness was confirmed. Later, the in vitro excys...

  15. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVEIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts of Giardia muris were inactivated using a low pressure ultravolet (UV) light source. Cyst viability was detemined by both in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Cyst doeses were counted using a flow cytometer for the animal infectivity experiments. Using in vitro excy...

  16. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, G.A.; Kapila, Smita; Kelkar, V.B.; Negi, Shobha; Modi, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    The survival of certain bacterial cultures suspended in sewage sludge and exposed to gamma-radiation was studied. The inactivation patterns of most of the organisms were significantly different when irradiation was performed using sewage samples collected in the summer and monsoon seasons. The summer sample collected from the anaerobic digester afforded significant protection to both Gram negative and Gram positive organisms. This was evident by the increase in dose required to bring about a 6 log cycle reduction in viable count of the bacterial cultures, when suspended in sewage samples instead of phosphate buffer. The observations made using monsoon digester samples were quite different. This sewage sludge greatly enhanced inactivation by gamma-radiation in most cases. The effects of certain chemicals on the inactivation patterns of two organisms - Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexneri - were examined. Arsenate, mercury and lead salts sensitised S. typhi, while barium acetate and sodium sulphide protected this culture against gamma-radiation. In the case of Sh. flexneri, barium acetate and iodacetamide proved to be radioprotectors. The effects of some chemicals on the inactivation pattern of Sh. flexneri cells irradiated in sludge are also discussed. (author)

  17. The radiation inactivation of glutamate and isocitrate dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Failat, R.R.A.

    1980-12-01

    The reaction of free radicals produced by ionizing radiation with the enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADP + -specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) have been studied by steady-state and pulse radiolysis techniques. In de-aerated GDH solutions, hydroxyl radicals have been found to be the most efficient of the primary radicals generated from water in causing inactivation. The effect of reaction with the enzyme of selective free radicals (SCN) 2 - , (Br) 2 - and (I) 2 - on its activity has also been studied. In neutral solutions, the order of inactivating effectiveness is (I) 2 - > (Br) 2 - > (SCN) 2 - . In the case of the thiocyanate radical anion (SCN) 2 - , the inactivation efficiency is found to depend on KSCN concentration. The radiation inactivation of GDH at both neutral and alkaline pH is accompanied by the loss of sulphydryl groups. Pulse radiolysis was also used to determine the rate constants and the transient absorption spectra following the reaction of the free radicals with GDH. 60 Co-γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were also used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of ICDH. The results obtained were similar to those of GDH. (author)

  18. Inactivation of carbenicillin by some radioresistant mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahiera, T.S.; Mahmoud, M.I.; Bashandy, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity test of five bacterial species to carbenicillin was performed microbiologically. The bacterial species were previously isolated from high level radiation environment. All the studied species could either highly decrease the antibiotic activity or even inactivate it completely. Detailed study of the inactivation of carbenicillin by the radioresistant mutant strains B. Laterosporus, B. firmus and M. roseus was performed, in the present study. Using high performace liquid chromatography technique. The gram-positive m. roseus mutant strain seemed to be the most active mutant in degrading the antibiotic. The left over of the antibiotic attained a value of 9% of the original amount after 14 day incubation of the antibiotic with this mutant strain, while the value of the left over reached 36% and 32% after the same period of incubation with the mutants B. laterosporus and B. firmus respectively. In the case of bacillus species, the degradation of the antibiotic started at the same moment when it was added to the bacterial cultures. This fact may indicate that the inactivation of the studied antibiotic by these bacillus species was due to extracellular enzymes extracted rapidly in the surrounding medium. In the case of M. roseus the inactivation process started later. after the addition of the antibiotic to the mutant culture

  19. Indicators for suicide substrate inactivation: A kinetic investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sharmistha Dhatt

    2017-11-20

    Nov 20, 2017 ... practical ones, that can decisively conclude enzyme inactivation are considered. Steady-state approximation ... nase 1 and 2 enzymes), Exemesteme - a drug used in the treatment of breast cancer (inhibitor of aromatase enzyme), AZT and .... for a next indicator that can serve as a diagnostic tool for enzyme ...

  20. Inactivation of VHSV by Percolation and Salt Under Experimental Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Jørgensen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by percolation. To evaluate the inactivation effect of percolation on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid l...

  1. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  2. The inactivation of papain by high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Sims, H.E.; Burns, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of varying LET over a wide range (0.2-1570 eV/nm) on the radiation-induced inactivation of the enzyme papain in dilute aqueous solution has been investigated. Measurements of total, reparable and non-reparable inactivation G values in oxygen, nitrous oxide and argon saturated solutions have allowed the contributions to inactivation from radicals and hydrogen peroxide to be evaluated. At high LET the results demonstrate an increasing component due to reaction of the superoxide radical, formed from oxygen produced in the track as a primary radiolysis product. This effect was not observed in our previous study with ribonuclease due to the insensitivity of ribonuclease to inactivation by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. The results obtained with papain clearly demonstrate a maximum in G(H 2 O 2 ) at an LET of equivalent to 140 eV/nm. Generation of O 2 within the track as a primary radiolysis product at high LET now appears to be confirmed as an important mechanism leading to reduction in the oxygen enhancement ratio for cellular systems exposed to high LET radiations (Baverstock and Burns 1981). (author)

  3. Studies on disappearance and inactivation of viruses in sewage, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Kazuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Fumiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of inactivating viruses in wastewater were studied. Polio visuses were added to the distilled water until the number of viruses reached 10sup(6.8) TCID 50 /ml, and liquid layer was 2 mm. The inactivation rate of viruses was determined at each time of ultraviolet (U.V.) irradiation (from 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 to 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 ). A linear correlation was seen between the inactivation rate of viruses and the time of U.V. irradiation obtained from logarithmic transformation. The irradiation time required for inactivation of 99.9% viruses was 15 sec when U.V. intensity was 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 and 9.6 min when it was 0.423 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 . When the U.V. intensity was 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 , the time required for inactivation was dependent on the number of viruses (120 sec in cases of 10sup(3.8) TCID 50 /ml of viruses and 720 sec in cases of 10sup(7.8) TCID 50 /ml of viruses). When viruses were added to the distilled water until the number reached 10sup(5.8) TCID 50 /ml, and the depth of water was designated as 2 mm, 10 cm, and 15 cm, the U.V. permeability was more than 89% at any depth of water, and a sixteen-min U.V. irradiation inactivated more than 99.99% of viruses. When polio viruses were added to triple step-treated water until the number reached 10sup(5.3) TCID 50 /ml, the irradiation time required for inactivation of more than 99.99% was one min when the U.V. intensity was 10.0 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 and 20 min when it was 0.425 x 10 4 μw/cm 2 . (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Strategy to inactivate Clostridium perfringens spores in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Torres, J Antonio; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2009-05-01

    The current study aimed to develop an inactivation strategy for Clostridium perfringens spores in meat through a combination of spore activation at low pressure (100-200 MPa, 7 min) and elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min); spore germination at high temperatures (55, 60 or 65 degrees C); and inactivation of germinated spores with elevated temperatures (80 and 90 degrees C, 10 and 20 min) and high pressure (586 MPa, at 23 and 73 degrees C, 10 min). Low pressures (100-200 MPa) were insufficient to efficiently activate C. perfringens spores for germination. However, C. perfringens spores were efficiently activated with elevated temperature (80 degrees C, 10 min), and germinated at temperatures lethal for vegetative cells (>or= 55 degrees C) when incubated for 60 min with a mixture of L-asparagine and KCl (AK) in phosphate buffer (pH 7) and in poultry meat. Inactivation of spores (approximately 4 decimal reduction) in meat by elevated temperatures (80-90 degrees C for 20 min) required a long germination period (55 degrees C for 60 min). However, similar inactivation level was reached with shorter germination period (55 degrees C for 15 min) when spore contaminated-meat was treated with pressure-assisted thermal processing (568 MPa, 73 degrees C, 10 min). Therefore, the most efficient strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in poultry meat containing 50 mM AK consisted: (i) a primary heat treatment (80 degrees C, 10 min) to pasteurize and denature the meat proteins and to activate C. perfringens spores for germination; (ii) cooling of the product to 55 degrees C in about 20 min and further incubation at 55 degrees C for about 15 min for spore germination; and (iii) inactivation of germinated spores by pressure-assisted thermal processing (586 MPa at 73 degrees C for 10 min). Collectively, this study demonstrates the feasibility of an alternative and novel strategy to inactivate C. perfringens spores in meat products formulated with germinants specific for C

  5. Inactivation as a new regulatory mechanism for neuronal Kv7 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2007-01-01

    neuronal channels and are important for controlling excitability. Kv7.1 channels have been considered the only Kv7 channels to undergo inactivation upon depolarization. However, here we demonstrate that inactivation is also an intrinsic property of Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 channels, which inactivate to a larger...

  6. Influence of pH, Salt and Temperature on Pressure Inactivation of Hepatitis A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pH (3-7), NaCl (0-6%), and temperature on pressure inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) were determined. The HAV samples were treated at 400 MPa for 1 min at 5, 20, and 50C. Decreasing solution pH enhanced pressure inactivation of HAV. This enhanced inactivation effect was most e...

  7. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. Inactivation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase involves oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J N; Zhang, Z; John, P; Baldwin, J E; Schofield, C J

    1997-03-25

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of the plant signaling molecule ethylene. It is a member of the ferrous iron dependent family of oxidases and dioxygenases and is unusual in that it displays a very short half-life under catalytic conditions, typically less than 20 min, and a requirement for CO2 as an activator. The rates of inactivation of purified, recombinant ACC oxidase from tomato under various combinations of substrates and cofactors were measured. Inactivation was relatively slow in the presence of buffer alone (t1/2 > 1 h), but fast in the presence of ferrous iron and ascorbate (t1/2 approximately 10 min). The rate of iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was increased by the addition of ACC, unaffected by the addition of CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate) but decreased by the addition of catalase or ACC + CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate). Iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was accompanied by partial proteolysis as observed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The fragmentation pattern was altered when ACC was also included, suggesting that ACC can bind to ACC oxidase in the absence of bicarbonate. N-terminal sequencing of fragments resulted in identification of an internal cleavage site which we propose is proximate to active-site bound iron. Thus, ACC oxidase inactivates via relatively slow partial unfolding of the catalytically active conformation, oxidative damage mediated via hydrogen peroxide which is catalase protectable and oxidative damage to the active site which results in partial proteolysis and is not catalase protectable.

  9. Nucleus incertus inactivation impairs spatial learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nategh, Mohsen; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    Nucleus incertus (NI) is a pontine nucleus which releases mainly GABA and relaxin-3 in rats. Its suggested functions include response to stress, arousal, and modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. Since the role of NI in learning and memory has not been well characterized, therefore the involvement of this nucleus in spatial learning and memory and the aftermath hippocampal levels of c-fos and pCREB were evaluated. NI was targeted by implanting cannula in male rats. For reference memory, NI was inactivated by lidocaine (0.4 μl, 4%) at three stages of acquisition, consolidation and retrieval in Morris water maze paradigm. For working memory, NI was inactivated in acquisition and retrieval phases. Injection of lidocaine prior to the first training session of reference memory significantly increased the distance moved, suggesting that inactivation of NI delays acquisition in this spatial task. Inactivation also interfered with the retrieval phase of spatial reference memory, as the time in target quadrant for lidocaine group was less, and the escape latency was higher compared to the control group. However, no difference was observed in the consolidation phase. In the working memory task, with inter-trial intervals of 75 min, the escape latency was higher when NI was inactivated in the retrieval phase. In addition, c-fos and pCREB/CREB levels decreased in NI-inhibited rats. This study suggests that nucleus incertus might participate in acquisition of spatial reference, and retrieval of both spatial reference and working memory. Further studies should investigate possible roles of NI in the hippocampal plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  11. Effective inactivation of a wide range of viruses by pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröner, Albrecht; Broumis, Connie; Fang, Randel; Nowak, Thomas; Popp, Birgit; Schäfer, Wolfram; Roth, Nathan J

    2018-01-01

    Careful selection and testing of plasma reduces the risk of blood-borne viruses in the starting material for plasma-derived products. Furthermore, effective measures such as pasteurization at 60°C for 10 hours have been implemented in the manufacturing process of therapeutic plasma proteins such as human albumin, coagulation factors, immunoglobulins, and enzyme inhibitors to inactivate blood-borne viruses of concern. A comprehensive compilation of the virus reduction capacity of pasteurization is presented including the effect of stabilizers used to protect the therapeutic protein from modifications during heat treatment. The virus inactivation kinetics of pasteurization for a broad range of viruses were evaluated in the relevant intermediates from more than 15 different plasma manufacturing processes. Studies were carried out under the routine manufacturing target variables, such as temperature and product-specific stabilizer composition. Additional studies were also performed under robustness conditions, that is, outside production specifications. The data demonstrate that pasteurization inactivates a wide range of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses of diverse physicochemical characteristics. After a maximum of 6 hours' incubation, no residual infectivity could be detected for the majority of enveloped viruses. Effective inactivation of a range of nonenveloped viruses, with the exception of nonhuman parvoviruses, was documented. Pasteurization is a very robust and reliable virus inactivation method with a broad effectiveness against known blood-borne pathogens and emerging or potentially emerging viruses. Pasteurization has proven itself to be a highly effective step, in combination with other complementary safety measures, toward assuring the virus safety of final product. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  12. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Treatment with Thrombus Fragmentation and Local Fibrinolysis with Recombinant Human-Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Klaus Wilhelm; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Schnabel, Karl Jakob; Bongartz, Georg; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of thrombus fragmentation in combination with local fibrinolysis using recombinant human-tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Methods: Five patients with massive pulmonary embolism were treated with thrombus fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary injection of rtPA. Clot fragmentation was performed with a guidewire, angiographic catheter, and balloon catheter. Three patients had undergone recent surgery; one of them received a reduced dosage of rtPA. Results: All patients survived and showed clinical improvement with a resultant significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the pulmonary blood pressure (mean systolic pulmonary blood pressure before treatment, 49 mmHg; 4 hr after treatment, 28 mmHg). Angiographic follow-up in three patients revealed a decrease in thrombus material and an increase in pulmonary perfusion. Two patients developed retroperitoneal hematomas requiring transfusion. Conclusion: Clot fragmentation and local fibrinolysis with rtPA was an effective therapy for massive pulmonary embolism. Bleeding at the puncture site was a frequent complication

  13. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor levels are elevated and associated with complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Lyngbaek, S; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. We investigated the associations between suPAR and diabetes, including diabetes duration and complications, in patients with type 1 diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS......: From 2009 to 2011, 667 patients with type 1 diabetes and 51 nondiabetic control subjects were included in a cross-sectional study at Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. suPAR levels were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The investigated diabetic......% confidence interval) values per 1 ln unit increase in suPAR were as follows: 2.5 (1.1-5.7) for CVD: 2.7 (1.2-6.2) for autonomic dysfunction; 3.8 (1.3-10.9) for albuminuria and 2.5 (1.1-6.1) for a high degree of arterial stiffness (P ≤ 0.039). CONCLUSION: The suPAR level is higher in patients with type 1...

  14. Thrombolysis with Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA) Predicts Favorable Discharge Disposition in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifejika-Jones, Nneka L.; Harun, Nusrat; Mohammed-Rajput, Nareesa A.; Noser, Elizabeth A.; Grotta, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute ischemic stroke patients receiving IV tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within 3 hours of symptom onset are 30% more likely to have minimal disability at three months. During hospitalization, short-term disability is subjectively measured by discharge disposition, whether to home, Inpatient Rehabilitation (IR), Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) or Subacute Care (Sub). There are no studies assessing the role of rt-PA use as a predictor of post-stroke disposition. Methods Retrospective analysis of all ischemic stroke patients admitted to the University of Texas Houston Medical School (UTHMS) Stroke Service between Jan 2004 and Oct 2009. Baseline demographics and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score were collected. Cerebrovascular disease risk factors were used for risk stratification. Results Home vs. IR, SNF, Sub Of 2225 acute ischemic stroke patients, 1019 were discharged home, 1206 to another level of care. Patients who received rt-PA therapy were 1.9 times more likely to be discharged home (P = stroke patients, 719 patients were discharged to acute IR, 371 were discharged to SNF, 116 to Sub. There were no differences in disposition between patients who received rt-PA therapy. Conclusions Stroke patients who receive IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke are more 1.9 times more likely to be discharged directly home after hospitalization. This study is limited by its retrospective nature and the undetermined role of psychosocial factors related to discharge. PMID:21293014

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome risk: a meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Sun, Mei-Guo; Jiang, Rong; Ding, Rui; Che, Zhen; Chen, Yan-Yan; Yao, Ci-Jiang; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Ji-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have reported that excessive amounts of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) might increase the incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS), but so far the published results were inconsistent. The aim of this study was to further investigate the association between PAI-1 gene polymorphism and the susceptibility to PCOS by performing a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted on google scholar, PubMed, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM). This meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 11.0 software and the pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Ten case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis with a total of 2,079 cases and 1,556 controls. The results showed that PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism may increase the risk of PCOS, especially among Asian populations. However, there was no statistically significant association between the polymorphism and PCOS risk in Caucasians. Our meta-analysis suggests that PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism may contribute to increasing susceptibility to PCOS in Asians. Detection of the PAI-1 gene polymorphism might be a promising biomarker for the susceptibility of PCOS.

  16. Efficacy and safety of a modified intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator regimen in Chinese patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu-Ming; Liu, Jia-Fu; Liu, Ming; Shen, Sa; Li, Hao-Jun; Dai, Li-Hua; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2013-07-01

    Thrombolytic treatment with intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA; 0.90 mg/kg, with a maximum dose of 90 mg) has been recommended as the standard management for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) thrombolysis. However, the dose of IV rtPA in Asia remains controversial. This study was designed to verify the safety and efficacy of IV rtPA treatment for AIS with a lower dosage (0.90 mg/kg, with a maximum dose of 50 mg). Patients were divided into 3 dosage groups according to body weight (BW): group 1, 67 kg for descent were included in the study. The baseline characteristics of the 3 dosage groups were well matched. In group 1 (BW 67 kg for <0.75 mg/kg; n = 31; P = .362). There were no significantly statistical differences in the incidence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage and mortality rate. This IV rtPA regimen (0.90 mg/kg, with a maximum dose of 50 mg) not only shows sufficient favorable outcome in clinical practice in Chinese patients with AIS but also good health economic savings. This regimen could be suitable for many developing countries. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DRAGON score predicts functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients receiving both intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Arthur; Pednekar, Noorie; Lehrer, Rachel; Todo, Akira; Sahni, Ramandeep; Marks, Stephen; Stiefel, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    The DRAGON score, which includes clinical and computed tomographic (CT) scan parameters, predicts functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA). We assessed the utility of the DRAGON score in predicting functional outcome in stroke patients receiving both IV tPA and endovascular therapy. A retrospective chart review of patients treated at our institution from February 2009 to October 2015 was conducted. All patients with computed tomography angiography (CTA) proven large vessel occlusions (LVO) who underwent intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy were included. Baseline DRAGON scores and modified Rankin Score (mRS) at the time of hospital discharge was calculated. Good outcome was defined as mRS ≤3. Fifty-eight patients with LVO of the anterior circulation were studied. The mean DRAGON score of patients on admission was 5.3 (range, 3-8). All patients received IV tPA and endovascular therapy. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that DRAGON scores ≥7 was associated with higher mRS ( P DRAGON scores ≤6. Patients with DRAGON scores of 7 and 8 on admission had a mortality rate of 3.8% and 40%, respectively. The DRAGON score can help predict better functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients receiving both IV tPA and endovascular therapy. This data supports the use of the DRAGON score in selecting patients who could potentially benefit from more invasive therapies such as endovascular treatment. Larger prospective studies are warranted to further validate these results.

  18. Effects of edaravone on early outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Inokuchi, Ryota; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Matsubara, Takehiro; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    We investigated whether edaravone could improve early outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA). We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. We identified patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke from 1 July 2010 to 31 March 2012 and treated with rtPA on the same day of stroke onset or the following day. Thereafter, we selected those who received edaravone on the same day of rtPA administration (edaravone group), and those who received rtPA without edaravone (control group). The primary outcomes were modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at discharge. One-to-one propensity-score matching was performed between the edaravone and control groups. An ordinal logistic regression analysis for mRS scores at discharge was performed with adjustment for possible variables as well as clustering of patients within hospitals using a generalized estimating equation. We identified 6336 eligible patients for inclusion in the edaravone group (n=5979; 94%) and the control group (n=357; 6%) as the total population. In 356 pairs of the propensity-matched population, the ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that edaravone was significantly associated with lower mRS scores of patients at discharge (adjusted odds ratio: 0.74; 95% confidence interval: 0.57-0.96). Edaravone may improve early outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with rtPA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-vitrectomizing vitreous surgery and adjuvant intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator for non-recent massive premacular hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Tien Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Massive premacular hemorrhage can cause sudden visual loss. We sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety and visual outcome of nonvitrectomizing vitreous surgery with intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (t-pa for long-lasting thick premacular hemorrhage. This retrospective, interventional study examined three consecutive eyes of three patients who received nonvitrectomizing vitreous surgery with intravitreal t-pa for the treatment of non-recent massive premacular hemorrhage. Detailed ophthalmoscopic examinations were performed pre- and postoperatively to evaluate the visual outcome, the resolution of premacular hemorrhage and the changes in lenticular opacity.In all three eyes, the premacular hemorrhage cleared after the procedure. Final best-corrected visual acuities improved from 6/30 to 6/10 in patient 1, 2/60 to 6/4 in patient 2, and 3/60 to 6/6 in patient 3. Operated and fellow eyes did not differ in terms of nuclear sclerosis. No complications from the procedure were noted.In these selected cases, nonvitrectomizing vitreous surgery with intravitreal t-pa was an effective and safe alternative treatment for non-recent massive premacular hemorrhage.

  20. Distribution patterns of Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Shigeru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Nakoto; Ozawa, Shun

    1994-01-01

    In patients who received thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we observed 3 distinct patterns in gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. To clarify the significance of these distribution patterns of Gd-DTPA, 20 consecutive patients underwent Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging 7-10 days after AMI. All of the patients received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) within 6 h of onset. Echocardiograms were obtained prior to and serially over 10 days, and interpreted for regional wall motion. Coronary angiograms were obtained the day before discharge. None of the 6 patients with a closed infarct-related artery, and 9 of the 14 patients with an open artery, demonstrated subendocardial enhancement (p<0.05). All of these latter 9 patients demonstrated a significant improvement in wall motion between days 1 and 10 after AMI. In contrast, only 1 of the 7 patients with transmural enhancement and none of the 4 patients with non-homogeneous enhancement demonstrated improvement of wall motion on day 10 (p<0.05). We concluded that subendocardial enhancement was a fair prognostic sign for restoration of regional cardiac function in patients who received IVTPA during AMI. (author)

  1. The influence of dehydration on the prognosis of acute ischemic stroke for patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Fan; Hung, Yen-Chu; Tsai, Y H; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Liow, Chia-Wei; Lee, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chung-Jen; Peng, Tsung-I; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2017-06-13

    Many studies have determined that dehydration is an independent predictor of outcome after ischemic stroke (IS); however, none have determined if the use of thrombolytic therapy modifies the negative impact of poor hydration. To inform the stroke registry established at our institution, we conducted a retrospective study to determine if dehydration remains a negative prognostic factor after IS patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Between 2007 and 2012, we recruited 382 subjects; 346 had data available and were divided into 2 groups on the basis of their blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio. Dehydrated subjects had a BUN/Cr ratio ≥ 15; hydrated subjects had a BUN/Cr dehydration group had a greater mean age; more women; lower mean levels of hemoglobin, triglycerides, and sodium; and higher mean potassium and glucose levels. A favorable outcome as assessed by the mRS (≤2) was significantly less frequent among dehydrated subjects, but a favorable outcome by the BI (≥60) was not. Logistic regression and multivariate models confirmed that dehydration is an independent predictor of poor outcome by both the mRS and the BI; however, it was not predictive when patients were stratified by Trial of Org 10,172 in Acute Stroke Treatment subtype. Our findings indicate that use of thrombolytic therapy does not eliminate the need to closely monitor hydration status in patients with IS.

  2. Acute radiation effects on the content and release of plasminogen activator activity in cultured aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ts'ao, C.H.; Ward, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Confluent monolayers from three lines of bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to a single dose of 10 Gy of 60 Co γ rays. Seventy-two hours later, the morphology of the irradiated and sham-irradiated monolayers was examined, and cellular DNA and protein contents were determined. In addition, the release of plasminogen activator (PA) activity into the culture media and PA activity in the cell lysates were assayed. DNA and protein contents in the irradiated monolayers were reduced to 43-50% and 72-95% of the control levels, respectively. These data indicate that radiation induced cell loss (detachment and/or lysis) from the monolayer, with hypertrophy of surviving (attached) cells to preserve the continuity of the monolayer surface. Total PA activity (lysate plus medium) in the irradiated dishes was reduced to 50-75% of the control level. However, when endothelial PA activity was expressed on the basis of DNA content, the irradiated monolayers from two of the three cell lines contained significantly more PA activity than did sham-irradiated monolayers. These data suggest that fibrinolytic defects observed in irradiated tissues in situ may be attributable at least in part to a radiation-induced inhibition of PA release by vascular endothelial cells

  3. Meta-analysis of the association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism and recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejiao; Liu, Yukun; Zhang, Rui; Tan, Jianping; Chen, Libin; Liu, Yinglin

    2015-04-11

    The association between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) risk is still contradictory. We thus performed a meta-analysis. Relevant studies were searched for in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane Library. An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to assess the association between PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and RPL risk. A total of 22 studies with 4306 cases and 3076 controls were included in this meta-analysis. We found that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased RPL risk (OR=1.89; 95% CI 1.34-2.67; P=0.0003). In the subgroup analysis by race, PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased RPL risk in Caucasians (OR=2.23; 95% CI 1.44-3.46; P=0.0003). However, no significant association was observed in Asians (OR=1.47; 95% CI 0.84-2.59; P=0.18). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism might be associated with RPL development in Caucasians.

  4. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene 4G/5G alleles frequency distribution in the Lebanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammaa, Dina M R; Sabbagh, Amira S; Taher, Ali T; Zaatari, Ghazi S; Mahfouz, Rami A R

    2008-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is an inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Increased plasma PAI-1 levels play an essential role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular risk and other diseases associated with thrombosis. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 promoter region has been extensively studied in different populations. We studied 160 healthy unrelated Lebanese individuals using a reverse hybridization PCR assay to detect the 5G/5G, 4G/5G and, 4G/4G genotypes of the PAI-1 gene and the frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles. We found that 4G/5G genotype was the most prevalent (45.6%) followed by 5G/5G (36.9%) and 4G/4G (17.5%). The frequencies of the 4G and 5G alleles were calculated to be 0.403 and 0.597, respectively. Compared to other ethnic communities, the Lebanese population was found to harbour a relatively high prevalence of the rare 4G allele. This, in turn, may predispose this population to develop cardiovascular diseases and other thrombotic clinical conditions. This study aids to enhance our understanding of the genetic features of the Lebanese population.

  5. Impact of the 4G/5G polymorphism in the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene on primary nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuezhong; Wang, Chao; Tu, Haitao

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the four guanosines (4G)/five guanosines (5G) polymorphism in the gene coding for plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) affects the clinical features of primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS). A cohort of 200 biopsy-diagnosed PNS patients was studied, with 40 healthy subjects as controls. The PAI-1 gene polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Associations between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and clinical features and pathological types of PNS were analyzed. The results indicated that the PAI-1 genotype distribution is significantly different between patients with PNS and healthy controls, with significantly higher numbers of the 4G/4G genotype and lower numbers of the 5G5G genotype detected in PNS patients compared to controls (both P5G genotypes, as well as of the 4G allele. The increased 4G frequency was also detected in patients with minimal change disease (MCD). Significantly increased international normalized ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were observed in 4G/4G compared to 5G/5G PNS subjects. The response to steroids was not significantly different among the three genotypes. In conclusion, the 4G allele of the PAI-1 gene appears to be associated with PNS, especially in MN and IgAN patients. These findings suggest that specific targeting may be required for the treatment of PNS patients with the 4G/4G genotype.

  6. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G/5G and -844G/A variants in idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdoud, Kalthoum; Herbepin, Viviana G; Touraine, Renaud; Almawi, Wassim Y; Mahjoub, Touhami

    2013-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates fibrinolysis, and the common promoter region variants -675G/A (4G/5G) and -844G/A are associated with increased thrombotic risk. Despite evidence linking altered fibrinolysis with adverse pregnancy events, including idiopathic recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), the contribution of PAI-1 variants to RPL risk remains controversial. We investigated the association between the PAI-1 -844G/A and 4G/5G (-675G/A) variants with altered risk of RPL. This was a case-control study involving 304 women with confirmed RPL and 371 age- and ethnically matched control women. PAI-1 genotyping was performed by PCR single-specific primer -675 (G/A) and real-time PCR (-844G/A) analysis. Minor allele frequency (MAF) of 4G/5G (P 5G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was significantly associated with RPL under additive, dominant, and recessive genetic models; no association of -844G/A with RPL was seen irrespective of the genetic model tested. Taking common -844G/5G haplotype as reference (OR = 1.00), multivariate analysis confirmed the association of 4G-containing -844A/4G (P 5G, but not -844G/A, PAI-1 variant is associated with an increased risk of RPL. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of 12-Lipoxygenase (12-LOX and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 as Prognostic Markers in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Gondek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In carcinoma of prostate, a causative role of platelet 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 for tumor progression has been firmly established in tumor and/or adjacent tissue. Our goal was to investigate if 12-LOX and/or PAI-1 in patient’s plasma could be used to predict outcome of the disease. The study comprised 149 patients (age 70±9 divided into two groups: a study group with carcinoma confirmed by positive biopsy of prostate (n=116 and a reference group (n=33 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. The following parameters were determined by the laboratory test in plasma or platelet-rich plasma: protein level of 12-LOX, PAI-1, thromboglobulin (TGB, prostate specific antigen (PSA, C-reactive protein (CRP, hemoglobin (HGB, and hematocrit (HCT, as well as red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC, number of platelets (PLT, international normalized ratio of blood clotting (INR, and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT. The only difference of significance was noticed in the concentration of 12-LOX in platelet rich plasma, which was lower in cancer than in BPH group. Standardization to TGB and platelet count increases the sensitivity of the test that might be used as a biomarker to assess risk for prostate cancer in periodically monitored patients.

  8. ELISA for complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator and its receptor in lung cancer tissue extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Witte, H; Pappot, H; Brünner, N

    1997-01-01

    A sandwich-type ELISA has been developed for the assessment of complexes between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) in extracts of squamous cell lung carcinomas. The assay is based on a combination of rabbit polyclonal anti-uPA antibodies and a biotinylated mouse...... anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody (MAb). The detection limit of the assay is approximately 0.5 fmol/ml. A linear dose-response is obtained with up to 40 fmol/ml of uPA:uPAR complexes, while uPA and uPAR separately do not cause any response in the ELISA. A buffer which has been used previously for optimal...... extraction of uPAR yields the highest amounts of uPA:uPAR complexes. Absorption of tumor extracts with anti-uPA or anti-uPAR MAbs results in a complete disappearance of the ELISA signal, demonstrating the specificity of the ELISA. The recovery of chemically cross-linked uPA:uPAR complexes added to tumor...

  9. Pentoxifylline Regulates Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Expression and Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation in Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Geol Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF is a serious late complication of radiotherapy. In vitro studies have demonstrated that pentoxifylline (PTX has suppressing effects in extracellular matrix production in fibroblasts, while the antifibrotic action of PTX alone using clinical dose is yet unexplored. Materials and Methods. We used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histopathological analysis to evaluate the antifibrotic effects of PTX in a rat model of RILF. Results. Micro-CT findings showed that lung density, volume loss, and mediastinal shift are significantly increased at 16 weeks after irradiation. Simultaneously, histological analysis demonstrated thickening of alveolar walls, destruction of alveolar structures, and excessive collagen deposition in the irradiated lung. PTX treatment effectively attenuated the fibrotic changes based on both micro-CT and histopathological analyses. Western analysis also revealed increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor- (PAI- 1 and fibronectin (FN and PTX treatment reduced expression of PAI-1 and FN by restoring protein kinase A (PKA phosphorylation but not TGF-β/Smad in both irradiated lung tissues and epithelial cells. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate the antifibrotic effect of PTX on radiation-induced lung fibrosis and its effect on modulation of PKA and PAI-1 expression as possible antifibrotic mechanisms.

  10. Updated cannulation technique for tissue plasminogen activator injection into peripapillary retinal vein for central retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Overdam, Koen A; Missotten, Tom; Spielberg, Leigh H

    2015-12-01

    To update the surgical technique in which a vitrectomy is performed and a retinal branch vein is cannulated and infused with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (RTPA) to treat central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in patients who present with very low visual acuity (VA). Twelve consecutive patients (12 eyes) with CRVO and low VA (logMAR >1.00) at presentation were treated using this method. Cannulation of a peripapillary retinal vein and stable injection of RTPA was successfully performed without surgery-related complications in all 12 eyes. At 12 months after surgery, 8 of the 12 patients (67%) experienced at least one line of improvement in best corrected visual acuity; 6 of the 12 (50%) improved ≥5 lines and 2 (17%) improved ≥8 lines. After additional grid laser and/or subconjunctival or intravitreal corticosteroids, the mean decrease in central foveal thickness was 260 μm, and the mean total macular volume decreased from 12.10 mm(3) to 9.24 mm(3) . Four patients received panretinal photocoagulation to treat either iris neovascularization (n = 2) or neovascularization of the retina and/or disc (n = 2). Administration of RTPA via a peripapillary vein using this updated technique provides an alternative or additional treatment option for patients with very low VA after CRVO. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prognostic significance of circulating intact and cleaved forms of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor in inoperable chemotherapy treated cholangiocarcinoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Christensen, I J; Lassen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High levels of intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in both tissue and blood are associated with poor survival in several cancer diseases. The prognostic significance of uPAR in cholangiocarcinoma is unknown. The aims of this study were...... to determine if pre-treatment serum levels of uPAR forms and a decrease in levels during chemotherapy are predictive of survival in patients with inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with inoperable cholangiocarcinoma were consecutively included in the training set (n=108). A test set......PAR(I-III)+uPAR(II-III) after 2cycles of chemotherapy was associated with poor survival (HR=1.79, 95% CI:1.08-2.97, p=0.023, n=57). This predictor, however, was not significant in the test set (p=0.21, 26 events in 27 patients). CONCLUSION: The baseline level of uPAR(I-III)+uPAR(II-III) is a predictor of survival in inoperable...

  12. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; Pmuscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  13. Plasminogen Binding Proteins and Plasmin Generation on the Surface of Leptospira spp.: The Contribution to the Bacteria-Host Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica L. Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is considered a neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern. Although extensive investigations on host-pathogen interactions have been pursued by several research groups, mechanisms of infection, invasion and persistence of pathogenic Leptospira spp. remain to be elucidated. We have reported the ability of leptospires to bind human plasminogen (PLG and to generate enzimatically active plasmin (PLA on the bacteria surface. PLA-coated Leptospira can degrade immobilized ECM molecules, an activity with implications in host tissue penetration. Moreover, we have identified and characterized several proteins that may act as PLG-binding receptors, each of them competent to generate active plasmin. The PLA activity associated to the outer surface of Leptospira could hamper the host immune attack by conferring the bacteria some benefit during infection. The PLA-coated leptospires obstruct complement C3b and IgG depositions on the bacterial surface, most probably through degradation. The decrease of leptospiral opsonization might be an important aspect of the immune evasion strategy. We believe that the presence of PLA on the leptospiral surface may (i facilitate host tissue penetration, (ii help the bacteria to evade the immune system and, as a consequence, (iii permit Leptospira to reach secondary sites of infection.

  14. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byeongchun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. Results In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p 6 PFU/mL PRRSV vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p Conclusions The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  15. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/

  16. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 35, No 1-2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. THE ANTIGENIC POTENCY OF EPIDEMIC INFLUENZA VIRUS FOLLOWING INACTIVATION BY ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas E.; Lavin, G. I.; Francis, Thomas

    1940-01-01

    A study of the antigenic potency of influenza virus inactivated by ultraviolet radiation has been made. Virus so inactivated is still capable of functioning as an immunizing agent when given to mice by the intraperitoneal route. In high concentrations inactivated virus appears to be nearly as effective as active virus but when quantitative comparisons of the immunity induced by different dilutions are made, it is seen that a hundredfold loss in immunizing capacity occurs during inactivation. Virus in suspensions prepared from the lungs of infected mice is inactivated more rapidly than virus in tissue culture medium. A standard for the comparison of vaccines of epidemic influenza virus is proposed. PMID:19871057

  18. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (FXa and its cofactor FVa plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC, an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative

  19. Germination and Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris Spores Induced by Moderate Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Skapska, Sylwia; Fonberg-Broczek, Monika; Niezgoda, Jolanta; Porebska, Izabela; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Rzoska, Sylwester J

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of spoilage caused by Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris for the fruit juice industry, the objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores induced by moderate hydrostatic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure treatment can induce the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores. At low pH, spore germination of up to 3.59-3.75 log and inactivation of 1.85-2.04 log was observed in a low pressure window (200-300 MPa) applied at 50 degrees C for 20 min. Neutral pH suppressed inactivation, the number of spores inactivated at pH 7.0 was only 0.24-1.06 log. The pressurization temperature significantly affected spore germination and inactivation. The degree of germination in apple juice after pressurization for 30 min with 200 MPa at 20 degrees C was 2.04 log, with only 0.61 log of spores being inactivated, while at 70 degrees C spore germination was 5.94 log and inactivation 4.72 log. This temperature strongly stimulated germination and inactivation under higher (500 MPa) than lower (200 MPa) pressure. When the oscillatory mode was used, the degree of germination and inactivation was slightly higher than at continuous mode. The degree of germination and inactivation was inversely proportional to the soluble solids content and was lowest in concentrated apple juice.

  20. Tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of cathepsin B, cathepsin L, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, CEA and CA 19-9 in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herszényi, László; Farinati, Fabio; Cardin, Romilda; István, Gábor; Molnár, László D; Hritz, István; De Paoli, Massimo; Plebani, Mario; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin B and L (CATB, CATL), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 play an important role in colorectal cancer invasion. The tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of these proteases have not been evaluated in the same experimental setting and compared with that of CEA and CA-19-9. Protease, CEA and CA 19-9 serum or plasma levels were determined in 56 patients with colorectal cancer, 25 patients with ulcerative colitis, 26 patients with colorectal adenomas and 35 tumor-free control patients. Protease, CEA, CA 19-9 levels have been determined by ELISA and electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, respectively; their sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy have been calculated and correlated with clinicopathological staging. The protease antigen levels were significantly higher in colorectal cancer compared with other groups. Sensitivity of PAI-1 (94%), CATB (82%), uPA (69%), CATL (41%) were higher than those of CEA or CA 19-9 (30% and 18%, respectively). PAI-1, CATB and uPA demonstrated a better accuracy than CEA or CA 19-9. A combination of PAI-1 with CATB or uPA exhibited the highest sensitivity value (98%). High CATB, PAI-1, CEA and CA 19-9 levels correlated with advanced Dukes stages. CATB (P = 0.0004), CATL (P = 0.02), PAI-1 (P = 0.01) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.004) had a significant prognostic impact. PAI-1 (P = 0.001), CATB (P = 0.04) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.02) proved as independent prognostic variables. At the time of clinical detection proteases are more sensitive indicators for colorectal cancer than the commonly used tumor markers. Determinations of CATB, CATL and PAI-1 have a major prognostic impact in patients with colorectal cancer

  1. Polio endgame: the global introduction of inactivated polio vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish; Zipursky, Simona; Orenstein, Walt; Garon, Julie; Zaffran, Michel

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, the World Health Assembly endorsed a plan that calls for the ultimate withdrawal of oral polio vaccines (OPV) from all immunization programs globally. The withdrawal would begin in a phased manner with removal of the type 2 component of OPV in 2016 through a global switch from trivalent OPV to bivalent OPV (containing only types 1 and 3). To mitigate risks associated with immunity gaps after OPV type 2 withdrawal, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts has recommended that all 126 OPV-only using countries introduce at least one dose of inactivated polio vaccine into routine immunization programs by end-2015, before the trivalent OPV-bivalent OPV switch. The introduction of inactivated polio vaccine would reduce risks of reintroduction of type 2 poliovirus by providing some level of seroprotection, facilitating interruption of transmission if outbreaks occur, and accelerating eradication by boosting immunity to types 1 and 3 polioviruses.

  2. Fast neutron radiation inactivation of Bacillus subtilis: Absorbed dose determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Lingli; Zheng Chun; Ai Zihui; Li Junjie; Dai Shaofeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, fast neutron inactivation effects of Bacillus subtilis were investigated with fission fast neutrons from CFBR-II reactor of INPC (Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry) and mono-energetic neutrons from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Peking University. The method for determining the absorbed dose in the Bacillus subtilis suspension contained in test tubes is introduced. The absorbed dose, on account of its dependence on the volume and the form of confined state, was determined by combined experiments and Monte Carlo method. Using the calculation results of absorbed dose, the fast neutron inactivation effects on Bacillus subtilis were studied. The survival rates and absorbed dose curve was constructed. (authors)

  3. Some non-thermal microbial inactivation methods in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangilar, F.; Kabil, E.

    2013-01-01

    During the production of dairy products, some thermal processes such as pasteurization and sterilization are used commonly to inactive microorganisms. But as a result of thermal processes, loss of nutrient and aroma, non-enzymatic browning and organoleptic differentiation especially in dairy products are seen. Because of this, alternative methods are needed to provide microbial inactivation and as major problems are caused by high temperatures, non-thermal processes are focused on. For this purpose, some methods such as high pressure (HP), pulsed light (PL), ultraviolet radiation (UV), supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or pulsed electric field (PEF) are used in food. These methods products are processed in ambient temperature and so not only mentioned losses are minimized but also freshness and naturality of products can be preserved. In this work, we will try to be given information about methods of non-thermal microbial inactivation of dairy products. (author) [tr

  4. X-chromosome inactivation in development and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaligné, Ronan; Heard, Edith

    2014-08-01

    X-chromosome inactivation represents an epigenetics paradigm and a powerful model system of facultative heterochromatin formation triggered by a non-coding RNA, Xist, during development. Once established, the inactive state of the Xi is highly stable in somatic cells, thanks to a combination of chromatin associated proteins, DNA methylation and nuclear organization. However, sporadic reactivation of X-linked genes has been reported during ageing and in transformed cells and disappearance of the Barr body is frequently observed in cancer cells. In this review we summarise current knowledge on the epigenetic changes that accompany X inactivation and discuss the extent to which the inactive X chromosome may be epigenetically or genetically perturbed in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inactivation of microorganisms for high pressures in the wine industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montana B, Jaime Nelson; Ortegon T, Sandra Patricia

    2000-01-01

    In order to evaluate experimentally the capacity of N 2 and CO 2 under pressure to inactivate wild yeasts, which remain in the Puntalarga vineyard grape, musts were exposed to hyperbaric treatment with these gases. At the end of the pascalization (after 2 hours), CO 2 at 15 degrades Celsius under pressures from 1 to 5 MPa, reached high inactivation percentages of yeast cells (> 90%). Contrary to CO 2 treatment the use of N 2 at 15 degrades Celsius at 4 and 10 MPa failed to exert microbicide effect in a same treatment time. While CO 2 gas with high solubility in water has the potential to reduce microbial loads in musts, N 2 gas with low solubility in water have not effect on the survival of the pathogenic microorganisms in these juices

  6. Patulin reduction in apple juice by inactivated Alicyclobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, X; Hatab, S; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Yue, T

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reduction of patulin (PAT) in apple juice by 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains. The reduction rate of PAT by each strain was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that the removal of PAT was strain specific. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris 92 and A. acidoterrestris 96 were the most effective ones among the 12 tested strains in the removal of PAT. Therefore, these two strains were selected to study the effects of incubation time, initial PAT concentration and bacteria powder amount on PAT removal abilities of Alicyclobacillus. The highest PAT reduction rates of 88·8 and 81·6% were achieved after 24-h incubation with initial PAT concentration of 100 μg l(-1) and bacteria powder amount of 40 g l(-1) , respectively. Moreover, it was found that the treatment by these 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains had no negative effect on the quality parameters of apple juice. Similar assays were performed in supermarket apple juice, where inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells could efficiently reduce PAT content. Taken together, these data suggest the possible application of this strategy as a means to detoxify PAT-contaminated juices. Inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells can efficiently reduce patulin concentration in apple juice. It provides a theoretical foundation for recycling of Alicyclobacillus cells from spoiled apple juice to reduce the source of pollution and the cost of juice industry. This is the first report on the use of Alicyclobacillus to remove patulin from apple juice. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  8. Intradermal Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: A Preclinical Dose-Finding Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kouiavskaia, Diana; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Troy, Stephanie; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Intradermal delivery of vaccines has been shown to result in dose sparing. We tested the ability of fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) delivered intradermally to induce levels of serum poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies similar to immunization through the intramuscular route. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of IPV was studied by comparing intramuscular and intradermal immunization of Wistar rats using NanoPass MicronJet600 microneedles. Intradermal delivery of partial...

  9. Protective effect by EDTA in radiation inactivation of enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, M; Kaetsu, I

    1985-11-05

    Protective effect by EDTA in radiation inactivation of enzymes such as glucoamylase, cellulase, and urease was studied. A remarkable protective effect by EDTA was observed and had a maximum at certain EDTA concentration. The protective effect was compared with other protective agents in the irradiation of urease, in which the protective ability of EDTA was greater than those of sulfhydryl compounds such as cysteine. (author).

  10. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human norovirus (NoV) causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA) for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v)] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v)] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA) on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes). Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces. PMID:19583832

  11. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  12. Development of methods to measure virus inactivation in fresh waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, R L; Winston, P E

    1985-01-01

    This study concerns the identification and correction of deficiencies in methods used to measure inactivation rates of enteric viruses seeded into environmental waters. It was found that viable microorganisms in an environmental water sample increased greatly after addition of small amounts of nutrients normally present in the unpurified seed virus preparation. This burst of microbial growth was not observed after seeding the water with purified virus. The use of radioactively labeled poliovi...

  13. Bioburden assessment and gamma radiation inactivation patterns in parchment documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Inês; Mesquita, Nuno; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Carolino, Maria Manuela; Portugal, António; Botelho, Maria Luísa

    2013-01-01

    Parchment documents are part of our cultural heritage and, as historical artifacts that they are, should be preserved. The aim of this study was to validate an appropriate methodology to characterize the bioburden of parchment documents, and to assess the growth and gamma radiation inactivation patterns of the microbiota present in that material. Another goal was to estimate the minimum gamma radiation dose (D min ) to be applied for the decontamination of parchment as an alternative treatment to the current toxic chemical and non-chemical decontamination methods. Two bioburden assessment methodologies were evaluated: the Swab Method (SM) and the Destructive Method (DM). The recovery efficiency of each method was estimated by artificial contamination, using a Cladosporium cladosporioides spore suspension. The parchment samples' microbiota was typified using morphological methods and the fungal isolates were identified by ITS-DNA sequencing. The inactivation pattern was assessed using the DM after exposure to different gamma radiation doses, and using C. cladosporioides as reference. Based on the applied methodology, parchment samples presented bioburden values lower than 5×10 3 CFU/cm 2 for total microbiota, and lower than 10 CFU/cm 2 for fungal propagules. The results suggest no evident inactivation trend for the natural parchment microbiota, especially regarding the fungal community. A minimum gamma radiation dose (D min ) of 5 kGy is proposed for the decontamination treatment of parchment. Determining the minimal decontamination dose in parchment is essential for a correct application of gamma radiation as an alternative decontamination treatment for this type of documents avoiding the toxicity and the degradation promoted by the traditional chemical and non-chemical treatments. - Highlights: • Characterization of the microbial population of parchment documents. • Study the inactivation pattern of parchment microbiota by gamma radiation. • Assessment of

  14. Plasma inactivation of food-related microorganisms in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsili, Lisa; Espie, Steven; Anderson, J.G.John G.; MacGregor, S.J.Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on a plasma process that inactivates microorganisms in liquids through the application of high-voltage pulses. These pulses result in breakdown of the gas and liquid layers, producing many active species such as UV photons, ozone, free radicals and free electrons. Several test microorganisms representing a range of problematic microorganisms were investigated. Significant reductions in microbial population were achieved, demonstrating the effectiveness of using the plasma discharge process to treat contaminated liquids

  15. Inactivation of Aerosolized Biological Agents using Filled Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    radiation dose absorbed) roentgen shake slug torr (mm Hg, 0 0 C) *The bacquerel (Bq) is the SI unit of radioactivity ; 1 Bq = 1 event/s...setup was made of stainless steel. The setup was assembled and operated inside a class II biosafety cabinet (Model 6TX, Baker Co., Inc., Sanford, ME...system; (ii) Effectiveness of the facility decontamination conducted between the tests; (iii) Inactivation of spores exposed to combustion of strands

  16. Enteric virus removal inactivation by coal-based media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Chaudhuri, M. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-02-01

    Four coal-based media, viz. alum-pretreated or ferric hydroxide-impregnated Giridih bituminous coal and lignite (alum-GBC, Fe-GBC; alum-lignite and Fe-Lignite) were laboratory tested to assess their potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses in water. Batch-sorption screening tests, employing a poliovirus-spiked canal water, indicated high poliovirus sorption by Fe-GBC and alum-GBC in a short contact time of 5 min. Based on the results of further batch-sorption tests, using silver incorporated media (alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC-Ag and Fe-GBC-Ag), as well as aesthetic water quality consideration and previous findings on removal of coliforms and turbidity, alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC and alum-GBC-AG were included in downflow column studies employing poliovirus-spiked canal water. All three media showed potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses. In a separate column study employing a joint challenge of poliovirus and rotavirus, alum/Ag-GBC removed 59.3-86.5% of the viruses along with more than 99% reduction in indigenous heterotrophic bacteria. Alum/silver-pretreated bituminous coal medium appears promising for use in household water filters in rural areas of the developing world. However, improved medium preparation to further enhance its efficiency is needed; also, its efficacy in removing/inactivating indigenous enteric bacteria, viruses and protozoa has to be ensured and practicalities or economics of application need to be considered.

  17. Inactivation model for disinfection of biofilms in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicki, A.; O'Leary, K.C.; Gagnon, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate experimentally the effects of free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide on the removal of biofilm growth in water as it applies to drinking water in distribution systems. In particular, biofilm kill for a particular dosage of disinfectant was measured as a function of time for each disinfectant over a range of disinfectant concentrations. These results were used to formulate concentration-time (Ct) inactivation values for each disinfectant to compare the efficacy of the three disinfectants for biofilm control. The biofilm reactor system consisted of a 125 mL columns, each containing tightly packed 3 mm glass beads on which heterotrophic bacterial biofilm is established. Following an initial biofilm inoculation period, the glass beads were removed from the columns and placed into glass jars for disinfection with free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide. Cell counts were determined on a time series basis with the goal of achieving a Ct inactivation model that is similar to models presently used for inactivation of suspended cells. Ultimately this research could be used to develop a rationale method for setting regulatory values for secondary disinfection in drinking water distribution systems, which presently in only a few states and provinces. (author)

  18. Chemical Addressability of Ultraviolet-Inactivated Viral Nanoparticles (VNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Chris; Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Destito, Giuseppe; Estrada, Mayra N.; Gonzalez, Maria J.; Manchester, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Background Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) is increasingly being used as a nanoparticle platform for multivalent display of molecules via chemical bioconjugation to the capsid surface. A growing variety of applications have employed the CPMV multivalent display technology including nanoblock chemistry, in vivo imaging, and materials science. CPMV nanoparticles can be inexpensively produced from experimentally infected cowpea plants at high yields and are extremely stable. Although CPMV has not been shown to replicate in mammalian cells, uptake in mammalian cells does occur in vitro and in vivo. Thus, inactivation of the virus RNA genome is important for biosafety considerations, however the surface characteristics and chemical reactivity of the particles must be maintained in order to preserve chemical and structural functionality. Methodology/Principal Findings Short wave (254 nm) UV irradiation was used to crosslink the RNA genome within intact particles. Lower doses of UV previously reported to inactivate CPMV infectivity inhibited symptoms on inoculated leaves but did not prohibit systemic virus spread in plants, whereas higher doses caused aggregation of the particles and an increase in chemical reactivity further indicating broken particles. Intermediate doses of 2.0–2.5 J/cm2 were shown to maintain particle structure and chemical reactivity, and cellular binding properties were similar to CPMV-WT. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that it is possible to inactivate CPMV infectivity while maintaining particle structure and function, thus paving the way for further development of CPMV nanoparticles for in vivo applications. PMID:18830402

  19. Chemical addressability of ultraviolet-inactivated viral nanoparticles (VNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Rae

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV is increasingly being used as a nanoparticle platform for multivalent display of molecules via chemical bioconjugation to the capsid surface. A growing variety of applications have employed the CPMV multivalent display technology including nanoblock chemistry, in vivo imaging, and materials science. CPMV nanoparticles can be inexpensively produced from experimentally infected cowpea plants at high yields and are extremely stable. Although CPMV has not been shown to replicate in mammalian cells, uptake in mammalian cells does occur in vitro and in vivo. Thus, inactivation of the virus RNA genome is important for biosafety considerations, however the surface characteristics and chemical reactivity of the particles must be maintained in order to preserve chemical and structural functionality.Short wave (254 nm UV irradiation was used to crosslink the RNA genome within intact particles. Lower doses of UV previously reported to inactivate CPMV infectivity inhibited symptoms on inoculated leaves but did not prohibit systemic virus spread in plants, whereas higher doses caused aggregation of the particles and an increase in chemical reactivity further indicating broken particles. Intermediate doses of 2.0-2.5 J/cm(2 were shown to maintain particle structure and chemical reactivity, and cellular binding properties were similar to CPMV-WT.These studies demonstrate that it is possible to inactivate CPMV infectivity while maintaining particle structure and function, thus paving the way for further development of CPMV nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  20. Gamma-irradiation to inactivate thioglucosidase of crucifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessman, K.J.; McCaslin, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The crucifers contain glucosinolates which through enzymatic hydrolysis give rise to toxicants that limit the use of oil-free meal obtainable from this plant family. Seeds from three crucifers were used to test gamma irradiation to inactivate enzyme systems as a step toward detoxification. Seeds of Crambe abyssinica Hochst (crambe), ground seeds of Sinapis alba L. (mustard), and seeds of Brassica napus L. (rape) were subjected to gamma-irradiation (6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50.4 Mrad) to inactivate thioglucosidase and/or destroy glucosinolates. Samples of ground seeds, their oil-free meals, previously irradiated ground seeds and their oil-free meals were assayed for glucose, a product of enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates present in the crucifer seeds. The 50.4 Mrad exposure inactivated thioglucosidase but did not destroy glucosinolates. The fatty acid contents of extracted oils were affected. The amino acid profile of defatted crambe protein meal was affected, while that of white mustard was not

  1. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya Sridhar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection.

  2. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  3. Functional size analysis of bioactive materials by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    1994-01-01

    When the research on various proteins including enzymes is carried out, first molecular weight is measured. The physical chemical methods used for measuring molecular weight cannot measure it in the state of actually acting in living bodies. Radiation inactivation method is the unique method which can measure the molecular weight of the active substances in living bodies. Paying attention to this point, recently it is attempted to measure the activity unit of enzymes, receptors and others, and to apply to the elucidation of their functions. In this report, the concept of the method of measuring molecular size based on radiation inactivation, the detailed experimental method and the points to which attention must be paid are described. Also its application to the elucidation of living body functions according to the example of the studies by the author is reported. The concept of the measurement of molecular weight by radiation inactivation is based on target theory. The preparation of samples, the effect of oxygen, radiation sources, dosimetry, irradiation temperature, internal standard process and so on are reported. The trend of the research is shown. (K.I.)

  4. Expression of recombinant staphylokinase, a fibrin-specific plasminogen activator of bacterial origin, in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most dynamically developing sectors of green biotechnology is molecular farming using transgenic plants as natural bioreactors for the large scale production of recombinant proteins with biopharmaceutical and therapeutic values. Such properties are characteristic of certain proteins of bacterial origin, including staphylokinase. For many years, work has been carried out on the use of this protein in thrombolytic therapy. In this study, transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants expressing a CaMV::sak-mgpf-gusA gene fusion, were obtained. AGL1 A. tumefaciens strain was used in the process of transformation. The presence of the staphylokinase gene was confirmed by PCR in 22.5% of the investigated plants. The expression of the fusion transgene was detected using the β-glucuronidase activity assay in 32 putative transgenic plants. Furthermore, on the basis of the GUS histochemical reaction, the transgene expression pattern had a strong, constitutive character in seven of the transformants. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a protein extract from the SAK/PCR-positive plants, revealed the presence of a119 kDa protein that corresponds to that of the fusion protein SAK-mGFP-GUSA. Western blot analysis, using an antibody against staphylokinase, showed the presence of the staphylokinase domain in the 119 kDa protein in six analyzed transformants. However, the enzymatic test revealed amidolytic activity characteristic of staphylokinase in the protein extract of only one plant. This is the first report on a Solanum tuberosum plant producing a recombinant staphylokinase protein, a plasminogen activator of bacterial origin.

  5. Truncated Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Protein Protects From Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Irradiation in a Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eun Joo; McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su; White, Ayla; Scroggins, Bradley T. [Radiation Oncology, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branches, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Mulligan-Kehoe, Mary Jo [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Citrin, Deborah, E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov [Radiation Oncology, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the delivery of recombinant truncated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein (rPAI-1{sub 23}) would protect from the development of radiation-induced lung injury. Methods and Materials: C57Bl/6 mice received intraperitoneal injections of rPAI-1{sub 23} (5.4 μg/kg/d) or vehicle for 18 weeks, beginning 2 days before irradiation (IR) (5 daily fractions of 6 Gy). Cohorts of mice were followed for survival (n=8 per treatment) and tissue collection (n=3 per treatment and time point). Fibrosis in lung was assessed with Masson-Trichrome staining and measurement of hydroxyproline content. Senescence was assessed with staining for β-galactosidase activity in lung and primary pneumocytes. Results: Hydroxyproline content in irradiated lung was significantly reduced in mice that received rPAI-1{sub 23} compared with mice that received vehicle (IR+vehicle: 84.97 μg/lung; IR+rPAI-1{sub 23}: 56.2 μg/lung, P=.001). C57Bl/6 mice exposed to IR+vehicle had dense foci of subpleural fibrosis at 19 weeks, whereas the lungs of mice exposed to IR+rPAI-1{sub 23} were largely devoid of fibrotic foci. Cellular senescence was significantly decreased by rPAI-1{sub 23} treatment in primary pneumocyte cultures and in lung at multiple time points after IR. Conclusions: These studies identify that rPAI-1{sub 23} is capable of preventing radiation-induced fibrosis in murine lungs. These antifibrotic effects are associated with increased fibrin metabolism, enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression, and reduced senescence in type 2 pneumocytes. Thus, rPAI-1{sub 23} is a novel therapeutic option for radiation-induced fibrosis.

  6. Tissue- and agonist-specific regulation of human and murine plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoters in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, M; Painter, C A; Gleaves, L A; Schoenhard, J A; Atkinson, J B; Brown, N J; Vaughan, D E

    2003-11-01

    Numerous studies have described regulatory factors and sequences that control transcriptional responses in vitro. However, there is a paucity of information on the qualitative and quantitative regulation of heterologous promoters using transgenic strategies. In order to investigate the physiological regulation of human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (hPAI-1) expression in vivo compared to murine PAI-1 (mPAI-1) and to test the physiological relevance of regulatory mechanisms described in vitro, we generated transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the proximal -2.9 kb of the hPAI-1 promoter. Transgenic animals were treated with Ang II, TGF-beta1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to compare the relative activation of the human and murine PAI-1 promoters. Ang II increased EGFP expression most effectively in brain, kidney and spleen, while mPAI-1 expression was quantitatively enhanced most prominently in heart and spleen. TGF-beta1 failed to induce activation of the hPAI-1 promoter but potently stimulated mPAI-1 in kidney and spleen. LPS administration triggered robust expression of mPAI-1 in liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen and lung, while EGFP was induced only modestly in heart and kidney. These results indicate that the transcriptional response of the endogenous mPAI-1 promoter varies widely in terms of location and magnitude of response to specific stimuli. Moreover, the physiological regulation of PAI-1 expression likely involves a complex interaction of transcription factors and DNA sequences that are not adequately replicated by in vitro functional studies focused on the proximal -2.9 kb promoter.

  7. Hypoxia dysregulates the production of adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 independent of reactive oxygen species in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baoying; Lam, Karen S.L.; Wang Yu; Wu Donghai; Lam, Michael C.; Shen Jiangang; Wong Laiching; Hoo, Ruby L.C.; Zhang Jialiang; Xu Aimin

    2006-01-01

    Low plasma levels of adiponectin (hypoadiponectinemia) and elevated circulating concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 are causally associated with obesity-related insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanism that mediates the aberrant production of these two adipokines in obesity remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on production of adiponectin and PAI-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative PCR and immunoassays showed that ambient hypoxia markedly suppressed adiponectin mRNA expression and its protein secretion, and increased PAI-1 production in mature adipocytes. Dimethyloxallyl glycine, a stabilizer of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), mimicked the hypoxia-mediated modulations of these two adipokines. Hypoxia caused a modest elevation of ROS in adipocytes. However, ablation of intracellular ROS by antioxidants failed to alleviate hypoxia-induced aberrant production of adiponectin and PAI-1. On the other hand, the antioxidants could reverse hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-induced dysregulation of adiponectin and PAI-1 production. H 2 O 2 treatment decreased the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα), but had no effect on HIF-1α, whereas hypoxia stabilized HIF-1α and decreased expression of C/EBPα, but not PPARγ. Taken together, these data suggest that hypoxia and ROS decrease adiponectin production and augment PAI-1 expression in adipocytes via distinct signaling pathways. These effects may contribute to hypoadiponectinemia and elevated PAI-1 levels in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases

  8. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1 -/- knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1 -/- mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  9. Uric acid therapy improves the outcomes of stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and mechanical thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Ángel; Amaro, Sergio; Castellanos, Mar; Gomis, Meritxell; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Arenillas, Juan F; Román, Luis S; Muñoz, Roberto; Macho, Juan; Cánovas, David; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Leira, Enrique C; Planas, Anna M

    2017-06-01

    Background Numerous neuroprotective drugs have failed to show benefit in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, making the search for new treatments imperative. Uric acid is an endogenous antioxidant making it a drug candidate to improve stroke outcomes. Aim To report the effects of uric acid therapy in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Forty-five patients with proximal vessel occlusions enrolled in the URICO-ICTUS trial received intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 h after stroke onset and randomized to intravenous 1000 mg uric acid or placebo (NCT00860366). These patients also received mechanical thrombectomy because a brain computed tomogaphy angiography confirmed the lack of proximal recanalization at the end of systemic thrombolysis. The primary outcome was good functional outcome at 90 days (modified Rankin Score 0-2). Safety outcomes included mortality, symptomatic intracerebral bleeding, and gout attacks. Results The rate of successful revascularization was >80% in the uric acid and the placebo groups but good functional outcome was observed in 16 out of 24 (67%) patients treated with uric acid and 10 out of 21 (48%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.12 (95% CI 1.08-34.56)). Mortality was observed in two out of 24 (8.3%) patients treated with uric acid and one out of 21 (4.8%) treated with placebo (adjusted Odds Ratio, 3.74 (95% CI 0.06-226.29)). Symptomatic cerebral bleeding and gout attacks were similar in both groups. Conclusions Uric acid therapy was safe and improved stroke outcomes in stroke patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Validation of this simple strategy in a larger trial is urgent.

  10. Association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme polymorphisms with recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shakarami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL defined by two or more failed pregnancies before 20 weeks of gestation. Several factors play a role in RPL including thrombophilic conditions which can be influenced by gene polymorphisms. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE genes are closely related to fibrinolytic process, embryonic development and pregnancy success. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between RPL and common polymorphisms in ACE and PAI-1 genes. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 100 women with recurrent abortions (at least two were selected as cases and 100 healthy women with two or more normal term deliveries without a history of abortion as controls. Total genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The status of the PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE (D/I polymorphism was determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: Homozygosity for PAI-1 4G polymorphism was seen in 17 cases (17%, and 5 controls (5% (p=0.006 so patients with homozygote 4G mutation were significantly more prone to RPL in contrast to control group (OR: 4.63, % 95 CI: 1.55-13.84. In addition, 7 patients (7 %, and no one from the control group, were homozygote (I/I for ACE polymorphism (p=0.034, suggesting no significant associations between ACE D allele or DD genotype and RPL. Conclusion: Considering these results, because 4G/4G polymorphism for PAI-1 gene could be a thrombophilic variant leading to abortion, analysis of this mutation and other susceptibility factors are recommended in patients with RPL.

  11. Whole grain wheat sourdough bread does not affect plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in adults with normal or impaired carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, K A; Tucker, A J; Duncan, A M; Graham, T E; Robinson, L E

    2012-09-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest whole grain consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly through alterations in glucose metabolism and subsequent effects on plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, a novel biomarker for CVD. Our aim was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole grain wheat sourdough bread consumption versus refined white bread on PAI-1. Normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic (NGI; n = 14; age 53 ± 6 y; BMI 26.5 ± 2.9 kg/m(2)) and hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic (HGI; n = 14; age 57 ± 7 y; BMI 35.7 ± 5.7 kg/m(2)) adults incorporated whole grain wheat sourdough (162.5 g) or white (168.8 g) bread into their diet, for 6 wk in a randomized crossover study. Pre- and post-intervention, fasting blood samples were analyzed for PAI-1 (primary outcome), as well as glucose, insulin and glucagon (secondary outcomes) at fasting and postprandially after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Anthropometric measures, fasting glucose, insulin, glucagon and PAI-1 antigen and activity were not different between treatments in either NGI or HGI adults. Glucose incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was lower (19%, P = 0.02) after 6 wk consumption of whole grain wheat sourdough bread compared to white bread in the HGI group, with no differences in insulin or glucagon iAUC in either group. Our data showed decreased glucose iAUC after an OGTT following 6 wk whole grain wheat bread consumption in adults with differing glycemic/insulinemic status, but no improvements in PAI-1 or fasting glycemic parameters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Four-Year Experience of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Following Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator at a Comprehensive Stroke Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Alessandro; Wagner, Jeffrey C; Fanale, Christopher V; Whaley, Michelle; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bar-Or, David

    2016-04-01

    To describe the 4-year experience of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) rate at a high-volume comprehensive stroke center. All admitted adult (≥18 years) patients presenting with an ischemic stroke from 2010 to 2013 were included in this study. The primary outcome was sICH, defined as any hemorrhage with neurological deterioration (change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥4) within 36 hours of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) treatment, or any hemorrhage resulting in death. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and having a favorable modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score (≤2). A total of 1925 did not receive intravascular (IV) or intra-arterial (IA) therapy; only 451 received IV therapy; and 175 received both IV and IA therapies. In IV-only patients, the overall rate of sICH was 2.2%; in IV and IA patients, the rate was 5.7%; and in patients who received no therapy, the rate was .4%. The IV-only group had an sICH rate of .9% in 2013. There were no differences in the adjusted odds of dying in the hospital between the study groups. IV-only treatment offered significantly better odds of achieving a favorable functional outcome, compared to no therapy, among patients with moderate stroke severity, whereas IV and IA treatments offered significantly better odds among patients with severe strokes. The odds of achieving a favorable functional outcome by discharge were decreased by 97% if patients suffered an sICH (OR = .03, 95%CI = .004, .19). Despite an increased risk of sICH with IV-tPA, treatment with IV-tPA continues to be associated with increased odds of a favorable discharge mRS. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Truncated Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Protein Protects From Pulmonary Fibrosis Mediated by Irradiation in a Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Eun Joo; McKay-Corkum, Grace; Chung, Su; White, Ayla; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Mitchell, James B.; Mulligan-Kehoe, Mary Jo; Citrin, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the delivery of recombinant truncated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein (rPAI-1_2_3) would protect from the development of radiation-induced lung injury. Methods and Materials: C57Bl/6 mice received intraperitoneal injections of rPAI-1_2_3 (5.4 μg/kg/d) or vehicle for 18 weeks, beginning 2 days before irradiation (IR) (5 daily fractions of 6 Gy). Cohorts of mice were followed for survival (n=8 per treatment) and tissue collection (n=3 per treatment and time point). Fibrosis in lung was assessed with Masson-Trichrome staining and measurement of hydroxyproline content. Senescence was assessed with staining for β-galactosidase activity in lung and primary pneumocytes. Results: Hydroxyproline content in irradiated lung was significantly reduced in mice that received rPAI-1_2_3 compared with mice that received vehicle (IR+vehicle: 84.97 μg/lung; IR+rPAI-1_2_3: 56.2 μg/lung, P=.001). C57Bl/6 mice exposed to IR+vehicle had dense foci of subpleural fibrosis at 19 weeks, whereas the lungs of mice exposed to IR+rPAI-1_2_3 were largely devoid of fibrotic foci. Cellular senescence was significantly decreased by rPAI-1_2_3 treatment in primary pneumocyte cultures and in lung at multiple time points after IR. Conclusions: These studies identify that rPAI-1_2_3 is capable of preventing radiation-induced fibrosis in murine lungs. These antifibrotic effects are associated with increased fibrin metabolism, enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression, and reduced senescence in type 2 pneumocytes. Thus, rPAI-1_2_3 is a novel therapeutic option for radiation-induced fibrosis.

  14. Clinicopathological significance of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism in breast cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Younghye; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Young-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Transcriptional expression of the PAI-1 can be controlled by PAI-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism. However, the significance of PAI-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism in breast cancer patients is contentious. To address this controversy, we conducted a meta-analysis for the relationships between PAI-1 promoter polymorphism and clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer. Relevant published studies were identified using a search of PubMed, Embase, and the ISI Web of Science. The effect sizes of PAI-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism on breast cancer risk, lymph node metastasis, histologic grade, and overall survival were calculated by odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio. The effect sizes were combined using a random-effects model. Individuals with 4G/4G genotype had a higher risk of breast cancer than those with the combined 4G/5G and 5G/5G genotypes (OR = 1.388; p = 0.031). Breast cancer patients with the 5G/5G genotype displayed lymph node metastasis more than patients with either the combined other genotypes (OR = 1.495; p = 0.027) or with the 4G/4G genotype (OR = 1.623; p = 0.018). However, the PAI-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism was not associated with histological grade or overall survival. PAI-1 promoter 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with a relatively increased risk of breast cancer development and lymph node metastasis. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 5G/5G genotype is a protecting factor preventing posttransplant diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Horng-Rong; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Wu, Sheng-Wen; Tsai, Hui-Ching; Hung, Tung-Wei; Huang, Jun-Huang; Lian, Jong-Da

    2011-01-30

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. A connection between gestational diabetes mellitus and the functional -675 PAI-1 genotype has been reported. Therefore, we examined the role of the PAI-1 gene polymorphism in kidney transplant recipients. A total of 376 kidney transplant recipients were prospectively screened for posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). Eighty-one (21.5%) patients were diagnosed with PTDM and the other 295 patients were non-diabetic following kidney transplantation. DNA samples were isolated from the sera and analyzed for the functional -675 4G/5G promoter polymorphisms of the PAI-1 gene. Kidney transplant recipients with PTDM were significantly associated with tacrolimus use (p=0.03), older age (p=0.036), and higher body mass index (p=0.001). The genotype distribution was significantly different between the patients with PTDM (genotype 4G/4G:4G/5G:5G/5G=33.3%:60.5%:6.2%) and those without PTDM (genotype 4G/4G:4G/5G:5G/5G=36.9%:44.1%:19.0%) (p=0.018). Patients with homozygosity for 5G had a significantly lower rate of PTDM (aOR, 0.286, p=0.022) and higher cumulative event-free probability of time to PTDM (log rank test, p=0.0058). Homozygosity for the 5G allele of the PAI-1 gene constitutes a protecting factor for the development of PTDM. Our findings are similar to a previous study on gestational diabetes mellitus, and strongly support a possible genetic role of PAI-1 in the development of PTDM. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk: a meta-analysis in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuezhou; Chen, Weixian; Qian, Yun; Zeng, Yanying; Liu, Wenhua

    2014-12-01

    The guanosine insertion/deletion polymorphism (4G/5G) of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene has been suggested as a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS), but direct evidence from genetic association studies remains inconclusive even in Chinese population. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate this association. All of the relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database and Chinese Wanfang database up to September 2013. Statistical analyses were conducted with Revman 5.2 and STATA 12.0 software. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) values were applied to evaluate the strength of the association. Heterogeneity was evaluated by Q-test and the I² statistic. The Begg's test and Egger's test were used to assess the publication bias. A significant association and a borderline association between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and IS were found under the recessive model (OR = 1.639, 95% CI = 1.136-2.364) and allelic model (OR = 1.256, 95% CI = 1.000-1.578), respectively. However, no significant association was observed under homogeneous comparison model (OR = 1.428, 95% CI = 0.914-2.233), heterogeneous comparison model (OR = 0.856, 95% CI = 0.689-1.063) and dominant model (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 0.846-1.270). This meta-analysis suggested that 4G4G genotype of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism might be a risk factor for IS in the Chinese population.

  17. Estriol-induced fibrinolysis due to the activation of plasminogen to plasmin by nitric oxide synthesis in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Pradipta; Maiti, Smarajit; Kahn, Nighat N; Sinha, Asru K

    2015-04-01

    Estriol, an oestrogen, at 0.6 nmol/l was reported to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation through nitric oxide synthesis. As nitric oxide has been reported to cause fibrinolysis due to the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, the role of estriol as a fibrinolytic agent was investigated. Also, the mechanism of estriol-induced nitric oxide synthesis in anucleated platelets was investigated. The estriol-induced lysis of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) clot was determined by photography of the clot lysis and by the assay of fibrin degradation products in the lysate and was obtained by SDS-PAGE. Nitric oxide was determined by methemoglobin method. The platelet membrane protein was isolated from the platelets by using Triton X-100 (0.05% v/v). The binding of estriol to the protein was determined by Scatchard plot by using an ELISA for estriol. Estriol at 0.6 nmol/l was found to lyse the clotted PRP due to fibrinolysis that produced fibrin degradation products in the lysate. The amino acid analysis of the platelet membrane protein, which resembles with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, was activated nearly 10-fold over the control in the presence of estriol and was identified to be a human serum albumin precursor (Mr. 69 kDa) that binds to estriol with Kd1 of 6.0 × 10 mol/l and 39 ± 2 molecules of estriol bound the NOS molecule. The estriol-induced nitric oxide is capable of inducing fibrinolysis of the clotted PRP. The binding of estriol to platelet membrane NOS activated the enzyme in the absence of DNA in the platelet.

  18. The urokinase plasminogen activator system components are regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor D in bovine oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Daniela C; Russo-Maenza, Agostina; Miceli, Dora C; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2018-06-08

    SummaryThe mammalian oviduct plays a pivotal role in the success of early reproductive events. The urokinase plasminogen activator system (uPAS) is present in the bovine oviduct and is involved in extracellular matrix remodelling through plasmin generation. This system can be regulated by several members of the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and their receptors. In this study, the VEGF-D effect on the regulation of uPAS was evaluated. First, RT-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses were used to evidence the expression of VEGF-D and its receptors in oviductal epithelial cells (BOEC). VEGF-D, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 transcripts were found in ex vivo and in vitro BOEC, while only VEGFR2 mRNA was present after in vitro conditions. VEGF-D showed a regulatory effect on uPAS gene expression in a dose-dependent manner, inducing an increase in the expression of both uPA and its receptor (uPAR) at 24 h post-induction and decreases in the expression of its inhibitor (PAI-1). In addition, the regulation of cell migration induced by VEGF-D and uPA in BOEC monolayer cultures was analyzed. The wound areas of monolayer cultures incubated with VEGF-D 10 ng/ml or uPA 10 nM were modified and significant differences were found at 24 h for both stimulations. These results indicated that uPAS and VEGF-D systems can modify the arrangement of the bovine oviductal epithelium and contribute to the correct maintenance of the oviductal microenvironment.

  19. Elevated plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 is an independent predictor of coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naya, Masanao; Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Inubushi, Masayuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Furumoto, Tomoo; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    Elevated plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is related to cardiovascular events, but its role in subclinical coronary microvascular dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, in the present study it was investigated whether elevated plasma PAI-1 activity is associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction in hypertensive patients. Thirty patients with untreated essential hypertension and 10 age-matched healthy controls were studied prospectively. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured by using 15 O-water positron emission tomography. Clinical variables associated with atherosclerosis (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, triglyceride, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), and PAI-1 activity) were assessed to determine their involvement in coronary microvascular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced hyperemic MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were significantly lower in hypertensive patients than in healthy controls (ATP-induced MBF: 2.77±0.82 vs 3.49±0.71 ml·g -1 ·min -1 ; p<0.02 and CFR: 2.95±1.06 vs 4.25±0.69; p<0.001). By univariate analysis, CFR was positively correlated with HDL-cholesterol (r=0.46, p<0.02), and inversely with HOMA-IR (r=-0.39, p<0.05) and PAI-1 activity (r=-0.61, p<0.001). By multivariate analysis, elevated PAI-1 activity remained a significant independent determinant of diminished CFR. Elevated plasma PAI-1 activity was independently associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction, which suggests that plasma PAI-1 activity is an important clue linking hypofibrinolysis to the development of atherosclerosis. (author)

  20. Lsa30, a novel adhesin of Leptospira interrogans binds human plasminogen and the complement regulator C4bp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Natalie M; Vieira, Monica L; Alves, Ivy J; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2012-09-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Surface proteins have the potential to promote several activities, including adhesion. This work aimed to study the leptospiral coding sequence (CDS) LIC11087, genome annotated as hypothetical outer membrane protein. The LIC11087 gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain by using the expression vector pAE. The recombinant protein tagged with N-terminal 6XHis was purified by metal-charged chromatography and characterized by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The recombinant protein has the ability to mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) components, laminin and plasma fibronectin, and was named Lsa30 (Leptospiral surface adhesin of 30 kDa). Lsa30 binds to laminin and to plasma fibronectin in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, with dissociation equilibrium constants (K(D)) of 292 ± 24 nm and 157 ± 35 nm, respectively. Moreover, the Lsa30 is a plasminogen (PLG) receptor, capable of generating plasmin, in the presence of activator. This protein may interfere with the complement cascade by interacting with C4bp regulator. The Lsa30 is probably a new surface protein of Leptospira as revealed by immunofluorescence assays with living organisms and the reactivity with antibodies present in serum samples of experimentally infected hamsters. Thus, Lsa30 is a novel versatile protein that may play a role in mediating adhesion and may help pathogenic Leptospira to overcome tissue barriers and to escape the immune system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prognostic value analysis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in oral squamous cell carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchiocchi, Roberta; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazioli, Francesca; Rubini, Corrado; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Borghetti, Giulia; Procacci, Pasquale; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Santarelli, Andrea; Rocchetti, Romina; Ciavarella, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most common oral malignancy. Despite recent advances in therapy, up to 50% of the cases have relapse and/or metastasis. There is therefore a strong need for the identification of new biological markers able to predict the clinical behaviour of these lesions in order to improve quality of life and overall survival. Among tumour progression biomarkers, already known for their involvement in other neoplasia, a crucial role is ascribed to the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), which plays a multiple role in extracellular proteolysis, cell migration and tissue remodelling not only as a receptor for the zymogen pro-uPA but also as a component for cell adhesion and as a chemoattractant. The purpose of this study was to gain information on the expression of uPAR in OSCC and to verify whether this molecule can have a role as a prognostic/predictive marker for this neoplasia. In a retrospective study, a cohort of 189 OSCC patients was investigated for uPAR expression and its cellular localization by immunohistochemistry. As standard controls, 8 normal oral mucosal tissues free of malignancy, obtained from patients with no evidence or history of oral cavity tumours, were similarly investigated. After grouping for uPAR expression, OSCCs were statistically analyzed for the variables age, gender, histological grading (G), tumour size, recurrence, TNM staging and overall survival rate. In our immunohistochemical study, 74 cases (39.1%) of OSCC showed a mostly cytoplasmic positivity for uPAR, whereas 115 were negative. uPAR expression correlated with tumour differentiation grade and prognosis: percentage of positive cases was the greatest in G3 (70.4%) and patients positives for uPAR expression had an expectation of life lower than those for uPAR negatives. The results obtained in this study suggest a role of uPAR as a potential biomarker useful to identify higher risk subgroups of OSCC patients

  2. Could soluble urokinase plasminogen receptor (suPAR) be used as a diagnostic biomarker for ventilator-associated pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Adıyaman, Fırat; Binici, Irfan; Soyoral, Lokman

    2017-11-01

    Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a biomarker that is increasingly used for evaluation of systemic inflammation. This study was performed to investigate whether suPAR may possess a diagnostic value in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This clinical study was performed in the anesthesia intensive care units (ICUs) of our university. In addition to descriptive data, WBC, serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and suPAR prior to and after development of VAP were noted and compared in 31 patients (22 men, 9 women) diagnosed with VAP (Study Group) and 19 patients without VAP (Control Group) in ICU (14 men, 5 women). The suPAR (P = 0.023), CRP (P = 0.037), WBCs (P = 0.024) in patients with VAP were significantly higher than patients without VAP. There was no remarkable difference in terms of WBCs (P = 0.052) and suPAR levels (P = 0.616) between groups on the first day of connection to mechanical ventilator. The suPAR and CRP levels in patients with VAP were significantly higher than prior to development of VAP (P = 0.001 for both). Area under curve value after diagnosis of pneumonia was found 0.248 (P = 0.002). To conclude, our results suggest that suPAR can be a useful diagnostic biomarker in patients with VAP. However, clinical trials on larger series are warranted to explore the clinical significance more accurately. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Triglyceride concentration and waist circumference influence alcohol-related plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity increase in black South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Marlien; de Lange, Zelda; Hoekstra, Tiny; Ellis, Suria M; Kruger, Annamarie

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the association between alcohol consumption and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity (PAI-1act) and fibrinogen concentration in a black South African population presenting with lower PAI-1act and higher fibrinogen than what is typically observed in white populations. We, furthermore, wanted to investigate the effect of urbanization, sex, central obesity, increased triglycerides, 4G/5G polymorphism (PAI-1 only) and BMI on the association of alcohol with PAI-1act and fibrinogen. Data from 2010 apparently healthy, randomly collected black South African volunteers from the Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study were cross-sectionally analyzed. Alcohol consumption was recorded using quantitative food frequency questionnaires and fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis including PAI-1act and fibrinogen. Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with significantly increased PAI-1act, in the total population as well as in the women separately, and tended to be so in men. This alcohol-related PAI-1act increase was observed in volunteers with increased triglycerides and central obesity but not in volunteers with normal levels and waist circumference. Urbanization, the 4G/5G polymorphism and BMI did not affect the association of alcohol with PAI-1act. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with decreased fibrinogen concentration. Sex and level of urbanization did not affect the association of alcohol with fibrinogen. Fibrinogen decreased in normal and overweight volunteers but not in obese and centrally obese volunteers following moderate alcohol consumption. Triglyceride levels and waist circumference influence alcohol-related PAI-1act increase potentially through modulating adipocyte and triglyceride-induced PAI-1 production. Obesity prevented alcohol-related fibrinogen decrease possibly by counteracting the anti-inflammatory effect of moderate alcohol consumption.

  4. High-density lipoprotein-based therapy reduces the hemorrhagic complications associated with tissue plasminogen activator treatment in experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapergue, Bertrand; Dang, Bao Quoc; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Ortiz-Munoz, Guadalupe; Delbosc, Sandrine; Loyau, Stéphane; Louedec, Liliane; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Mazighi, Mikael; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous injection of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) was neuroprotective in an embolic stroke model. We hypothesized that HDL vasculoprotective actions on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may decrease hemorrhagic transformation-associated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in acute stroke. We used tPA alone or in combination with HDLs in vivo in 2 models of focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (embolic and 4-hour monofilament MCAO) and in vitro in a model of BBB. Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to MCAO, n=12 per group. The rats were then randomly injected with tPA (10 mg/kg) or saline with or without human plasma purified-HDL (10 mg/kg). The therapeutic effects of HDL and BBB integrity were assessed blindly 24 hours later. The integrity of the BBB was also tested using an in vitro model of human cerebral endothelial cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation. tPA-treated groups had significantly higher mortality and rate of hemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours in both MCAO models. Cotreatment with HDL significantly reduced stroke-induced mortality versus tPA alone (by 42% in filament MCAO, P=0.009; by 73% in embolic MCAO, P=0.05) and tPA-induced intracerebral parenchymal hematoma (by 92% in filament MCAO, by 100% in embolic MCAO; Phemorrhagic transformation in rat models of MCAO. Both in vivo and in vitro results support the vasculoprotective action of HDLs on BBB under ischemic conditions.

  5. Extension of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment Window by Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Thromboembolic Rat Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike C. dela Peña

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available When given beyond 4.5 h of stroke onset, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA induces deleterious side effects in the ischemic brain, notably, hemorrhagic transformation (HT. We examined the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in reducing delayed tPA-induced HT, cerebral infarction, and neurological deficits in a thromboembolic (TE stroke model, and whether the effects of G-CSF were sustained for longer periods of recovery. After stroke induction, rats were given intravenous saline (control, tPA (10 mg/kg, or G-CSF (300 μg/kg + tPA 6 h after stroke. We found that G-CSF reduced delayed tPA-associated HT by 47%, decreased infarct volumes by 33%, and improved motor and neurological deficits by 15% and 25%, respectively. It also prevented delayed tPA treatment-induced mortality by 46%. Immunohistochemistry showed 1.5- and 1.8-fold enrichment of the endothelial progenitor cell (EPC markers CD34+ and VEGFR2 in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, and 1.7- and 2.8-fold increases in the expression of the vasculogenesis marker von Willebrand factor (vWF in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, in G-CSF-treated rats compared with tPA-treated animals. Flow cytometry revealed increased mobilization of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of rats given G-CSF. These results corroborate the efficacy of G-CSF in enhancing the therapeutic time window of tPA for stroke treatment via EPC mobilization and enhancement of vasculogenesis.

  6. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated va...

  7. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  8. The immune marker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is associated with new-onset diabetes in non-smoking women and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, S B; Andersen, O; Hansen, T W

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To explore the putative association of new-onset diabetes and the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), which is a new and stable plasma marker of immune function and low-grade inflammation. This association has been previously suggested by using the less sensitive...... International Classification of Disease system to detect incident diabetes in the Danish MONICA 10 cohort. Methods: The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled more accurate identification of incident diabetes during a median follow-up of 13.8 years in the Danish MONICA 10 cohort (n = 2353 generally healthy......-onset diabetes (P...

  9. A specific inactivator of mammalian C'4 isolated from nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J A

    1969-08-01

    A material which specifically inactivates mammalian C'4 was isolated from low ionic strength precipitates of nurse shark serum. The C'4 inactivator was not detected in whole serum. The conditions of its generation and its immunoelectrophoretic behavior seem to indicate that it is an enzymatically formed cleavage product of a precursor contained in whole shark serum. The inactivator was partially purified and characterized. It had an S-value of 3.3 (sucrose gradient) which was in agreement with its retardation on gel filtration, was stable between pH 5.0 and 10.0, had a half-life of 5 min at 56 degrees C, pH 7.5, was inactivated by trypsin and was nontoxic. Its powerful anticomplementary activity in vitro and in vivo was solely due to the rapid inactivation of C'4; no other complement components were affected. No cofactor requirement was observed for the equally rapid inactivation of highly purified human and guinea pig C'4. The kinetics of C'4 inactivation and TAME hydrolysis, the greater anodic mobility of inactivated human C'4, and the influence of temperature on the rate of inactivation suggest that the inactivator is an enzyme and C'4 its substrate. This conclusion was supported by the more recent detection of a split product of C'4. Intravenous administration of the C'4 inactivator could prevent lethal Forssman shock and suppress the Arthus reaction in guinea pigs; it prolonged significantly the rejection time of renal xenografts but had no detectable effect on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Anaphylatoxin could be generated in C'4 depleted guinea pig serum with the cobra venom factor, but not with immune precipitates. The possible relationship between C'1 esterase and the C'4 inactivator is discussed on the basis of similarities and dissimilarities.

  10. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by ionizing radiation, heat, and thermoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, J.R.; Langley, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    For purposes of animal feeding or fertilizer usage on edible crops, sewage sludge must be free of pathogenic organisms. Bacterial inactivation by a combination of heat and irradiation is shown to be effective. These results must be viewed in conjunction with those from studies of parasite egg inactivation, virus inactivation, and physical-chemical benefits in order to make a fair assessment of the value of the thermoradiation treatment compared to other possible sludge treatment processes

  11. A label-free photoelectrochemical biosensor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator detection based on a g-C3N4/CdS nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-Pei; Chen, Jing-Shuai; Mao, Chang-Jie; Niu, He-Lin; Song, Ji-Ming; Jin, Bao-Kang

    2018-09-26

    Herein, we established a novel ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical biosensor for detecting urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), based on a g-C 3 N 4 /CdS nanocomposite. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thus indicating that the nanocomposite was prepared successfully. In the typical process, the prepared nanocomposite was deposited on the surface of a bare FTO electrode. After being air-dried, the g-C 3 N 4 /CdS nanocomposite modified electrode was successively incubated with antibody against urokinase-type plasminogen activator and the blocking agent BSA to produce a photoelectrochemical biosensor for u-PA. In the presence of target u-PA antigen, the photocurrent response of the prepared biosensor electrode decreased significantly. The proposed novel photoelectrochemical biosensor exhibited good sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility for u-PA detection, and a low detection limit of 33 fg mL -1 , ranging from 1 μg mL -1 -0.1 pg mL -1 . The proposed strategy should provide a promising method for detection of other biomarkers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the plasminogen activator of herpesvirus-transformed cells and examination of its correlation with the tumorigenic and metastatic ability of in vivo-derived sublines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2-transformed hamster embryo fibroblasts (333-8-9 cells) produce increased amounts of plasminogen activator (PA) compared with normal hamster cells. The 333-8-9 PA activity was quantitated in comparison to a PA standard, urokinase (UK). Using a direct PA assay in which 125 I-labeled plasminogen is cleaved, a linear dose-response was seen over a 1000-fold range in UK concentration when plotted on a semi-logarithmic scale. Extracellular PA activity secreted by the HSV-2-transformed cell line, 333-8-9, followed a similar dose-response slop. The optimum pH and osmolarity for detection of the 333-8-9 extracellular PA activity were pH 8.9 and approximately 150 mOsmol, respectively. Secretion of PA by the 333-8-9 cells did not vary significantly on a per cell basis over cell densities ranging from 0.1 to 8.0 x 10 7 cells/T-75 cm 2 flask. This assay was accurate, reproducible, and demonstrated that the 333-8-9 cells produced at least a 20-fold greater amount of PA activity than their normal cell counterparts. Based on the molecular weight (50-58 Kd) of the secreted 333-8-9 cell PA and lack of fibrin stimulation of the PA activity, it is concluded to be a urokinase-type PA

  13. Lysosomal degradation of receptor-bound urokinase-type plasminogen activator is enhanced by its inhibitors in human trophoblastic choriocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Henning; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Ebbesen, P.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the effect of plasminogen activator inhibitors PAI-1 and PAI-2 on the binding of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) to its receptor in the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR. With 125I-labeled ligands in whole-cell binding assays, both uncomplexed u-PA and u......, with the highest density of grains over the membrane at cell-cell interphases, but, after incubation at 37 degrees C, 17 and 27% of the grains for u-PA and u-PA-PAI-1 complexes, respectively, appeared over lysosomal-like bodies. These findings suggest that the u-PA receptor possesses a clearance function......-PA-inhibitor complexes bound to the receptor with a Kd of approximately 100 pM at 4 degrees C. Transferring the cells to 37 degrees C led to degradation to amino acids of up to 50% of the cell-bound u-PA-inhibitor complexes, whereas the degradation of uncomplexed u-PA was 15%; the remaining ligand was recovered...

  14. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-κB, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment

  15. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene is located at region q21.3-q22 of chromosome 7 and genetically linked with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, K.W.; Winqvist, R.; Riccio, A.

    1987-01-01

    The regional chromosomal location of the human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI1) was determined by three independent methods of gene mapping. PAI1 was localized first to 7cen-q32 and then to 7q21.3-q22 by Southern blot hybridization analysis of a panel of human and mouse somatic cell hybrids with a PAI1 cDNA probe and in situ hybridization, respectively. The authors frequent HindIII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PAI1 gene with an information content of 0.369. In family studies using this polymorphism, genetic linkage was found between PAI1 and the loci for erythropoietin (EPO), paraoxonase (PON), the met protooncogene (MET), and cystic fibrosis (CF), all previously assigned to the middle part of the long arm of chromosome 7. The linkage with EPO was closest with an estimated genetic distance of 3 centimorgans, whereas that to CF was 20 centimorgans. A three-point genetic linkage analysis and data from previous studies showed that the most likely order of these loci is EPO, PAI1, PON, (MET, CF), with PAI1 being located centromeric to CF. The PAI1 RFLP may prove to be valuable in ordering genetic markers in the CF-linkage group and may also be valuable in genetic analysis of plasminogen activation-related diseases, such as certain thromboembolic disorders and cancer

  16. Inactivation of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Tsutsumi, Takamasa (Animal Quarantine Service, Yokohama (Japan)); Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1990-10-01

    Radiation inactivation of Infectious Boivne Rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus was investigated by suspending in a commercial preparation medium (c.p.m.) or IBR antibody free serum and irradiated at room temperature or dry ice frozen condition. Normal pooled serum was also analysed by electrophoresis with cellulose acetate membrane after irradiation at frozen and non-frozen condition. The virus inactivation was determined by MDBK cell line which 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID{sub 50}) was calculated by Behrens Kaerber method. D{sub 10} value at non-frozen condition in serum was obtained as 1.1-1.2 kGy and that in c.p.m. was 1.3-1.4 kGy. On the other hand, D{sub 10} value was increased to 3.4-3.6 kGy in serum and 3.9 kGy in c.p.m. at frozen condition. On the irradiation effect of bovine serum, four peaks of albumin, {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}-globulin fraction were obtained from non-irradiation and irradiated serum up to 2 kGy at non-frozen condition by electrophoresis. More than 4 kGy irradiation, the peaks of globulin fractions became not clear and at more than 8 kGy, changed to one large peak. On the other hand, these changes of electrophoretic patterns were not observed even at 30 kGy irradiation in frozen condition. From these results, necessary dose was decided as 20-25 kGy at frozen condition for inactivation of IBR virus in serum. (author).

  17. Inactivation of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonomiya, Takashi; Yamashiro, Tomio; Tsutsumi, Takamasa; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation inactivation of Infectious Boivne Rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus was investigated by suspending in a commercial preparation medium (c.p.m.) or IBR antibody free serum and irradiated at room temperature or dry ice frozen condition. Normal pooled serum was also analysed by electrophoresis with cellulose acetate membrane after irradiation at frozen and non-frozen condition. The virus inactivation was determined by MDBK cell line which 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 ) was calculated by Behrens Kaerber method. D 10 value at non-frozen condition in serum was obtained as 1.1-1.2 kGy and that in c.p.m. was 1.3-1.4 kGy. On the other hand, D 10 value was increased to 3.4-3.6 kGy in serum and 3.9 kGy in c.p.m. at frozen condition. On the irradiation effect of bovine serum, four peaks of albumin, α, β and γ-globulin fraction were obtained from non-irradiation and irradiated serum up to 2 kGy at non-frozen condition by electrophoresis. More than 4 kGy irradiation, the peaks of globulin fractions became not clear and at more than 8 kGy, changed to one large peak. On the other hand, these changes of electrophoretic patterns were not observed even at 30 kGy irradiation in frozen condition. From these results, necessary dose was decided as 20-25 kGy at frozen condition for inactivation of IBR virus in serum. (author)

  18. Inactivation of Salmonella during cocoa roasting and chocolate conching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Maristela da Silva do; Brum, Daniela Merlo; Pena, Pamela Oliveira; Berto, Maria Isabel; Efraim, Priscilla

    2012-10-15

    The high heat resistance of Salmonella in foods with low water activity raises particular issues for food safety, especially chocolate, where outbreak investigations indicate that few colony-forming units are necessary to cause salmonellosis. This study evaluated the efficiency of cocoa roasting and milk chocolate conching in the inactivation of Salmonella 5-strain suspension. Thermal resistance of Salmonella was greater in nibs compared to cocoa beans upon exposure at 110 to 130°C. The D-values in nibs were 1.8, 2.2 and 1.5-fold higher than those calculated for cocoa beans at 110, 120 and 130°C. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the matrices only at 140°C. Since in the conching of milk chocolate the inactivation curves showed rapid death in the first 180 min followed by a lower inactivation rate, and two D-values were calculated. For the first time interval (0-180 min) the D-values were 216.87, 102.27 and 50.99 min at 50, 60 and 70°C, respectively. The other D-values were determined from the second time interval (180-1440 min), 1076.76 min at 50°C, 481.94 min at 60°C and 702.23 min at 70°C. The results demonstrated that the type of matrix, the process temperature and the initial count influenced the Salmonella resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultraviolet inactivation of avian sarcoma virus: biological and biochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, M.; Ihara, S.; Toyoshima, K.; Kozai, Y.; Sugino, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The rate of inactivation by ultraviolet light of the focus-forming capacity of avian sarcoma virus was almost the same as that of the virus-producing capacity, measured as plaque formation. In addition, no significant difference was observed in inactivation of the transforming capacity assayed on C/BE chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), which carry endogenous avian tumor virus DNA, and on duck embryo fibroblasts (DEF), which are known to be devoid of this DNA. All foci induced by nonirradiated virus produced infectious sarcoma virus, but some of the foci induced by uv-irradiated virus did not produce infectious virus of either transforming or transformation-defective type. The proportion of nonproducer foci was 3.4 times more in DEF than in gs - chf - CEF. RNAs extracted from uv-irradiated virions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatment were found to be composed of 60--70 S and 4 S RNAs by analysis in a sucrose gradient containing 0.5 percent SDS. The large RNA, however, became hydrophobic after irradiation and was sedimented with SDS by addition of one drop of saturated potassium chloride solution. This RNA was not dissociated into 30--40S components by heating at 100 0 for 45 sec, unlike 60--70 S RNA from uv-irradiated virions. After SDS--Pronase treatment, the 60--70 S RNA from uv-irradiated virions no longer had these altered characteristics. Reverse transcriptase activity with the endogenous template decreased in parallel with increase in the uv dose. The reduction rate was similar to that assayed with exogenous template or in the presence of actinomycin D. These data strongly suggest that RNA damage is not the only cause of virus inactivation by uv light

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Endotoxin by Soft Hydrothermal Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toru; Okano, Shinya; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharides, are a fever-producing by-product of gram-negative bacteria commonly known as pyrogens. It is essential to remove endotoxins from parenteral preparations since they have multiple injurious biological activities. Because of their strong heat resistance (e.g., requiring dry-heat sterilization at 250°C for 30 min) and the formation of various supramolecular aggregates, depyrogenation is more difficult than sterilization. We report here that soft hydrothermal processing, which has many advantages in safety and cost efficiency, is sufficient to assure complete depyrogenation by the inactivation of endotoxins. The endotoxin concentration in a sample was measured by using a chromogenic limulus method with an endotoxin-specific limulus reagent. The endotoxin concentration was calculated from a standard curve obtained using a serial dilution of a standard solution. We show that endotoxins were completely inactivated by soft hydrothermal processing at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system. Moreover, it is easy to remove endotoxins from water by soft hydrothermal processing similarly at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min, without any requirement for ultrafiltration, nonselective adsorption with a hydrophobic adsorbent, or an anion exchanger. These findings indicate that soft hydrothermal processing, applied in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system, can inactivate endotoxins and may be useful for the depyrogenation of parenterals, including end products and medical devices that cannot be exposed to the high temperatures of dry heat treatments. PMID:19502435