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  1. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  2. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  3. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  4. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  5. Plasmid Segregation: Spatial Awareness at the Molecular Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    In bacteria, low-copy number plasmids ensure their stable inheritance by partition loci (par), which actively distribute plasmid replicates to each side of the cell division plane. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopic tracking of segregating plasmid molecules, a new study provides novel insi...

  6. A Bipolar Spindle of Antiparallel ParM Filaments Drives Bacterial Plasmid Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gayathri, P; Fujii, T; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2012-01-01

    To ensure their stable inheritance by daughter cells during cell division, bacterial low copy-number plasmids make simple DNA segregating machines that use an elongating protein filament between sister plasmids. In the ParMRC system of Escherichia coli R1 plasmid, ParM, an actin-like protein, forms...

  7. A DNA polymerase mutation that suppresses the segregation bias of an ARS plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtteman, S W; Elder, R T

    1993-03-01

    Yeast autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids exhibit an unusual segregation pattern during mitosis. While the nucleus divides equally into mother and daughter cells, all copies of the ARS plasmid will often remain in the mother cell. A screen was designed to isolate mutations that suppress this segregation bias. A plasmid with a weak ARS (wARS) that displayed an extremely high segregation bias was constructed. When cells were grown under selection for the wARS plasmid, the resulting colonies grew slowly and had abnormal morphology. A spontaneous recessive mutation that restored normal colony morphology was identified. This mutation suppressed plasmid segregation bias, as indicated by the increased stability of the wARS plasmid in the mutant cells even though the plasmid was present at a lower copy number. An ARS1 plasmid was also more stable in mutant cells than in wild-type cells. The wild-type allele for this mutant gene was cloned and identified as POL delta (CDC2). This gene encodes DNA polymerase delta, which is essential for DNA replication. These results indicate that DNA polymerase delta plays some role in causing the segregation bias of ARS plasmids.

  8. F-actin-like filaments formed by plasmid segregation protein ParM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Ent, Fusinita; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Amos, Linda A.;

    2002-01-01

    It was the general belief that DNA partitioning in prokaryotes is independent of a cytoskeletal structure, which in eukaryotic cells is indispensable for DNA segregation. Recently, however, immunofluorescence microscopy revealed highly dynamic, filamentous structures along the longitudinal axis...... of Escherichia coli formed by ParM, a plasmid-encoded protein required for accurate segregation of low-copy-number plasmid R1. We show here that ParM polymerizes into double helical protofilaments with a longitudinal repeat similar to filamentous actin (F-actin) and MreB filaments that maintain the cell shape...

  9. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat, Tanmay A. M.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Active segregation of E. coli low-copy number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments 1-6 . ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments 3,7-9 . Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles 9,10 . Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods we have investigated the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro an...

  10. Mechanism of DNA Segregation in Prokaryotes: Replicon Pairing by parC of Plasmid R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Lurz, Rudi; Gerdes, Kenn

    1998-07-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes and plasmids encode partitioning systems that are required for DNA segregation at cell division. The systems are thought to be functionally analogous to eukaryotic centromeres and to play a general role in DNA segregation. The parA system of plasmid R1 encodes two proteins ParM and ParR, and a cis-acting centromere-like site denoted parC. The ParR protein binds to parC in vivo and in vitro. The ParM protein is an ATPase that interacts with ParR specifically bound to parC. Using electron microscopy, we show here that parC mediates efficient pairing of plasmid molecules. The pairing requires binding of ParR to parC and is stimulated by the ParM ATPase. The ParM mediated stimulation of plasmid pairing is dependent on ATP hydrolysis by ParM. Using a ligation kinetics assay, we find that ParR stimulates ligation of parC-containing DNA fragments. The rate-of-ligation was increased by wild type ParM protein but not by mutant ParM protein deficient in the ATPase activity. Thus, two independent assays show that parC mediates pairing of plasmid molecules in vitro. These results are consistent with the proposal that replicon pairing is part of the mechanism of DNA segregation in prokaryotes.

  11. Effects of a recombinant gene expression on ColE1-like plasmid segregation in Escherichia coli

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    Ivanov Ivan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segregation of expression plasmids leads to loss of recombinant DNA from transformed bacterial cells due to the irregular distribution of plasmids between the daughter cells during cell division. Under non-selective conditions this segregational instability results in a heterogeneous population of cells, where the non-productive plasmid-free cells overgrow the plasmid-bearing cells thus decreasing the yield of recombinant protein. Amongst the factors affecting segregational plasmid instability are: the plasmid design, plasmid copy-number, host cell genotype, fermentation conditions etc. This study aims to investigate the influence of transcription and translation on the segregation of recombinant plasmids designed for constitutive gene expression in Escherichia coli LE392 at glucose-limited continuous cultivation. To this end a series of pBR322-based plasmids carrying a synthetic human interferon-gamma (hIFNγ gene placed under the control of different regulatory elements (promoter and ribosome-binding sites were used as a model. Results Bacterial growth and product formation kinetics of transformed E. coli LE392 cells cultivated continuously were described by a structured kinetic model proposed by Lee et al. (1985. The obtained results demonstrated that both transcription and translation efficiency strongly affected plasmid segregation. The segregation of plasmid having a deleted promoter did not exceed 5% after 190 h of cultivation. The observed high plasmid stability was not related with an increase in the plasmid copy-number. A reverse correlation between the yield of recombinant protein (as modulated by using different ribosome binding sites and segregational plasmid stability (determined by the above model was also observed. Conclusions Switching-off transcription of the hIFNγ gene has a stabilising effect on ColE1-like plasmids against segregation, which is not associated with an increase in the plasmid copy

  12. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.

  13. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  14. Defining the Role of ATP Hydrolysis in Mitotic Segregation of Bacterial Plasmids

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    Ah-Seng, Yoan; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP), together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability. PMID:24367270

  15. Defining the role of ATP hydrolysis in mitotic segregation of bacterial plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Ah-Seng

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP, together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability.

  16. Resveratrol production in bioreactor: Assessment of cell physiological states and plasmid segregational stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida S. Afonso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a plant secondary metabolite commonly found in peanuts and grapevines with significant health benefits. Recombinant organisms can produce large amounts of resveratrol and, in this work, Escherichia coli BW27784 was used to produce resveratrol in bioreactors while monitoring cell physiology and plasmid stability through flow cytometry and real-time qPCR, respectively. Initially, the influence of culture conditions and precursor addition was evaluated in screening assays and the data gathered was used to perform the bioreactor assays, allowing the production of 160 μg/mL of resveratrol. Cellular physiology and plasmid instability affected the final resveratrol production, with lower viability and plasmid copy numbers associated with lower yields. In sum, this study describes new tools to monitor the bioprocess, evaluating the effect of culture conditions, and its correlation with cell physiology and plasmid segregational stability, in order to define a viable and scalable bioprocess to fulfill the need for larger quantities of resveratrol.

  17. Conjugal plasmid transfer in Streptomyces resembles bacterial chromosome segregation by FtsK/SpoIIIE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Jutta; Ammelburg, Moritz; Finger, Constanze; Guezguez, Jamil; Linke, Dirk; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Muth, Günther

    2011-06-01

    Conjugation is a major route of horizontal gene transfer, the driving force in the evolution of bacterial genomes. Antibiotic producing soil bacteria of the genus Streptomyces transfer DNA in a unique process involving a single plasmid-encoded protein TraB and a double-stranded DNA molecule. However, the molecular function of TraB in directing DNA transfer from a donor into a recipient cell is unknown. Here, we show that TraB constitutes a novel conjugation system that is clearly distinguished from DNA transfer by a type IV secretion system. We demonstrate that TraB specifically recognizes and binds to repeated 8 bp motifs on the conjugative plasmid. The specific DNA recognition is mediated by helix α3 of the C-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix domain of TraB. We show that TraB assembles to a hexameric ring structure with a central ∼3.1 nm channel and forms pores in lipid bilayers. Structure, sequence similarity and DNA binding characteristics of TraB indicate that TraB is derived from an FtsK-like ancestor protein, suggesting that Streptomyces adapted the FtsK/SpoIIIE chromosome segregation system to transfer DNA between two distinct Streptomyces cells.

  18. Insight into F plasmid DNA segregation revealed by structures of SopB and SopB–DNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Accurate DNA segregation is essential for genome transmission. Segregation of the prototypical F plasmid requires the centromere-binding protein SopB, the NTPase SopA and the sopC centromere. SopB displays an intriguing range of DNA-binding properties essential for partition; it binds sopC to form a partition complex, which recruits SopA, and it also coats DNA to prevent non-specific SopA–DNA interactions, which inhibits SopA polymerization. To understand the myriad functions of SopB, we dete...

  19. Antigenic variation by Borrelia hermsii occurs through recombination between extragenic repetitive elements on linear plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiyuan; Restrepo, Blanca I; Porcella, Stephen F; Raffel, Sandra J; Schwan, Tom G; Barbour, Alan G

    2006-06-01

    The relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii undergoes multiphasic antigenic variation through gene conversion of a unique expression site on a linear plasmid by an archived variable antigen gene. To further characterize this mechanism we assessed the repertoire and organization of archived variable antigen genes by sequencing approximately 85% of plasmids bearing these genes. Most archived genes shared with the expressed gene a UHS), that surrounded the start codon. The 59 archived variable antigen genes were arrayed in clusters with 13 repetitive, 214 nt long downstream homology sequence (DHS) elements distributed among them. A fourteenth DHS element was downstream of the expression locus. Informative nucleotide polymorphisms in UHS regions and DHS elements were applied to the analysis of the expression site of relapse serotypes from 60 infected mice in a prospective study. For most recombinations, the upstream crossover occurred in the UHS's second half, and the downstream crossover was in the DHS's second half. Usually the closest archival DHS element was used, but occasionally a more distant DHS was employed. The downstream extragenic crossover site in B. hermsii contrasts with the upstream [corrected] extragenic crossover site for antigenic variation in African trypanosomes.

  20. Plasmids of the pRM/pRF family occur in diverse Rickettsia species.

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    Baldridge, Gerald D; Burkhardt, Nicole Y; Felsheim, Roderick F; Kurtti, Timothy J; Munderloh, Ulrike G

    2008-02-01

    The recent discoveries of the pRF and pRM plasmids of Rickettsia felis and R. monacensis have contravened the long-held dogma that plasmids are not present in the bacterial genus Rickettsia (Rickettsiales; Rickettsiaceae). We report the existence of plasmids in R. helvetica, R. peacockii, R. amblyommii, and R. massiliae isolates from ixodid ticks and in an R. hoogstraalii isolate from an argasid tick. R. peacockii and four isolates of R. amblyommii from widely separated geographic locations contained plasmids that comigrated with pRM during pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and larger plasmids with mobilities similar to that of pRF. The R. peacockii plasmids were lost during long-term serial passage in cultured cells. R. montanensis did not contain a plasmid. Southern blots showed that sequences similar to those of a DnaA-like replication initiator protein, a small heat shock protein 2, and the Sca12 cell surface antigen genes on pRM and pRF were present on all of the plasmids except for that of R. massiliae, which lacked the heat shock gene and was the smallest of the plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii plasmid was most similar to pRM and contained apparent homologs of proline/betaine transporter and SpoT stringent response genes on pRM and pRF that were absent from the other plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii, R. helvetica, and R. amblyommii plasmids contained homologs of a pRM-carried gene similar to a Nitrobacter sp. helicase RecD/TraA gene, but none of the plasmids hybridized with a probe derived from a pRM-encoded gene similar to a Burkholderia sp. transposon resolvase gene.

  1. Conjugal plasmid transfer in Streptomyces resembles bacterial chromosome segregation by FtsK/SpoIIIE

    OpenAIRE

    Vogelmann, Jutta; Ammelburg, Moritz; Finger, Constanze; Guezguez, Jamil; LINKE, Dirk; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Muth, Günther

    2011-01-01

    Most bacteria share virulence and resistance genes by transferring single-stranded DNA through a type IV secretion system. Streptomycetes, however, exchange dsDNA, using a system found to closely resemble machineries for prokaryotic chromosome segregation or DNA translocation during spore formation.

  2. Novel actin filaments from Bacillus thuringiensis form nanotubules for plasmid DNA segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shimin; Narita, Akihiro; Popp, David; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Lee, Lin Jie; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Oda, Toshiro; Koh, Fujiet; Larsson, Mårten; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Here we report the discovery of a bacterial DNA-segregating actin-like protein (BtParM) from Bacillus thuringiensis, which forms novel antiparallel, two-stranded, supercoiled, nonpolar helical filaments, as determined by electron microscopy. The BtParM filament features of supercoiling and forming antiparallel double-strands are unique within the actin fold superfamily, and entirely different to the straight, double-stranded, polar helical filaments of all other known ParMs and of eukaryotic F-actin. The BtParM polymers show dynamic assembly and subsequent disassembly in the presence of ATP. BtParR, the DNA-BtParM linking protein, stimulated ATP hydrolysis/phosphate release by BtParM and paired two supercoiled BtParM filaments to form a cylinder, comprised of four strands with inner and outer diameters of 57 Å and 145 Å, respectively. Thus, in this prokaryote, the actin fold has evolved to produce a filament system with comparable features to the eukaryotic chromosome-segregating microtubule.

  3. Persistence Mechanisms of Conjugative Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Are plasmids selfish parasitic DNA molecules or an integrated part of the bacterial genome? This chapter reviews the current understanding of the persistence mechanisms of conjugative plasmids harbored by bacterial cells and populations. The diversity and intricacy of mechanisms affecting...... the successful propagation and long-term continued existence of these extra-chromosomal elements is extensive. Apart from the accessory genetic elements that may provide plasmid-harboring cells a selective advantage, special focus is placed on the mechanisms conjugative plasmids employ to ensure their stable...... maintenance in the host cell. These importantly include the ability to self-mobilize in a process termed conjugative transfer, which may occur across species barriers. Other plasmid stabilizing mechanisms include the multimer resolution system, active partitioning, and post-segregational-killing of plasmid...

  4. Segregation of naturally occurring mitochondrial DNA variants in a mini-pig model

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    Within cells and tissues, the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form and can harbour naturally occurring variants. Whilst high variant load can cause mitochondrial disease, naturally occurring mtDNA variants likely persist at low levels across generations of ...

  5. DNA rearrangement has occurred in the carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1 and the chromosome of its unsuitable host, Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Ohkuma, Moriya; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    The carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1 carries the class II transposon Tn4676, which contains the car and ant genes, essential for conversion of carbazole into anthranilate, and anthranilate into catechol, respectively. In our previous study, DNA rearrangements in pCAR1 were frequently detected in the host Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 in the presence of carbazole, resulting in the improvement of host survivability. Several Pf0-1 mutants harbouring pCAR1 were isolated, and deletion of DNA in the plasmid ant gene was found. Here, we compared genome sequences of the parent strain Pf0-1L(pCAR1::rfp) and one of its mutants, 5EP83, to assess whether other DNA rearrangements occurred in either the plasmid or the host chromosome. We found transposition of Tn4676 into the 5EP83 chromosome. In addition, ISPre1 had transposed into the car gene intergenic region on the pCAR1-derivative plasmid of 5EP83, which inhibited car transcription. As a result of these transpositions, 5EP83 was able to metabolize carbazole due to the Tn4676 on its chromosome, although the car genes on its plasmid were non-functional. We also found that one copy of duplicate carAa genes had been deleted, and that ISPre4 had transposed into both the host chromosome and the plasmid. Our findings suggest that Pf0-1 harbouring pCAR1 is subjected to DNA rearrangements not only on the plasmid but also on its chromosome in the presence of carbazole.

  6. Transfer and loss of naturally-occuring plasmids among isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae in heavy metal contaminated soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakzian, A.; Murphy, P.J.; Giller, K.E.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmid transfer among isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae in heavy metal contaminated soils from a long-term experiment in Braunschweig, Germany, was investigated under laboratory conditions. Three replicate samples each of four sterilized soils with total Zn contents of 54, 104, 208 and

  7. Chromosome replication and segregation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Nicolas, Emilien; Sherratt, David J

    2012-01-01

    In dividing cells, chromosome duplication once per generation must be coordinated with faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes and with cell growth and division. Many of the mechanistic details of bacterial replication elongation are well established. However, an understanding of the complexities of how replication initiation is controlled and coordinated with other cellular processes is emerging only slowly. In contrast to eukaryotes, in which replication and segregation are separate in time, the segregation of most newly replicated bacterial genetic loci occurs sequentially soon after replication. We compare the strategies used by chromosomes and plasmids to ensure their accurate duplication and segregation and discuss how these processes are coordinated spatially and temporally with growth and cell division. We also describe what is known about the three conserved families of ATP-binding proteins that contribute to chromosome segregation and discuss their inter-relationships in a range of disparate bacteria.

  8. Segregation of Central Ventricular Conduction System Lineages in Early SMA+ Cardiomyocytes Occurs Prior to Heart Tube Formation

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    Caroline Choquet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac conduction system (CCS transmits electrical activity from the atria to the ventricles to coordinate heartbeats. Atrioventricular conduction diseases are often associated with defects in the central ventricular conduction system comprising the atrioventricular bundle (AVB and right and left branches (BBs. Conducting and contractile working myocytes share common cardiomyogenic progenitors, however the time at which the CCS lineage becomes specified is unclear. In order to study the fate and the contribution to the CCS of cardiomyocytes during early heart tube formation, we performed a genetic lineage analysis using a Sma-CreERT2 mouse line. Lineage tracing experiments reveal a sequential contribution of early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes to different cardiac compartments, labeling at embryonic day (E 7.5 giving rise to the interventricular septum and apical left ventricular myocardium. Early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes contribute to the AVB, BBs and left ventricular Purkinje fibers. Clonal analysis using the R26-confetti reporter mouse crossed with Sma-CreERT2 demonstrates that early Sma expressing cardiomyocytes include cells exclusively fated to give rise to the AVB. In contrast, lineage segregation is still ongoing for the BBs at E7.5. Overall this study highlights the early segregation of the central ventricular conduction system lineage within cardiomyocytes at the onset of heart tube formation.

  9. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids and chr...

  10. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  11. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact.

  12. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  13. Left-right symmetry breaking in mice by left-right dynein may occur via a biased chromatid segregation mechanism, without directly involving the Nodal gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eSauer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ever since cloning the classic iv mutation identified the ‘left-right dynein’ (lrd gene in mice, most research on body laterality determination has focused on its function in motile cilia at the node embryonic organizer. This model is attractive, as it links chirality of cilia architecture to asymmetry development. However, lrd is also expressed in blastocysts and embryonic stem cells, where it was shown to bias the segregation of recombined sister chromatids away from each other in mitosis. These data suggested that lrd is part of a cellular mechanism that recognizes and selectively segregates sister chromatids based on their replication history: old ‘Watson’ vs. old ‘Crick’ strands. We previously proposed that the mouse left-right axis is established via an asymmetric cell division prior to/or during gastrulation. In this model, left-right dynein selectively segregates epigenetically differentiated sister chromatids harboring a hypothetical ‘left-right axis development 1’ (‘lra1’ gene during the left-right axis establishing cell division. Here, asymmetry development would be ultimately governed by the chirality of the cytoskeleton and the DNA molecule. Our model predicts that randomization of chromatid segregation in lrd mutants should produce embryos with 25% situs solitus, 25% situs inversus, and 50% embryonic death due to heterotaxia and isomerism. Here we confirmed this prediction by using two distinct lrd mutant alleles. Other than lrd, thus far Nodal gene is the most upstream function implicated in visceral organs laterality determination. We next tested whether the Nodal gene constitutes the lra1 gene hypothesized in the model by testing mutant’s effect on 50% embryonic lethality observed in lrd mutants. Since Nodal mutation did not suppress lethality, we conclude that Nodal is not equivalent to the lra1 gene. In summary, we describe the origin of 50% lethality in lrd mutant mice not yet explained by any other

  14. Resolution of Multimeric Forms of Circular Plasmids and Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, Estelle; Fournes, Florian; Cornet, François; Hallet, Bernard; Rousseau, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    One of the disadvantages of circular plasmids and chromosomes is their high sensitivity to rearrangements caused by homologous recombination. Odd numbers of crossing-over occurring during or after replication of a circular replicon result in the formation of a dimeric molecule in which the two copies of the replicon are fused. If they are not converted back to monomers, the dimers of replicons may fail to correctly segregate at the time of cell division. Resolution of multimeric forms of circular plasmids and chromosomes is mediated by site-specific recombination, and the enzymes that catalyze this type of reaction fall into two families of proteins: the serine and tyrosine recombinase families. Here we give an overview of the variety of site-specific resolution systems found on circular plasmids and chromosomes.

  15. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  16. A Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system from Bacillus thuringiensis promotes plasmid retention during spore development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Francesca L; Monson, Rita E; Salmond, George P C

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of bacteria often contain multiple large plasmids, including those encoding virulence factors in B. anthracis. Bacillus species can develop into spores in response to stress. During sporulation the genomic content of the cell is heavily compressed, which could result in counterselection of extrachromosomal genomic elements, unless they have robust stabilization and segregation systems. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are near-ubiquitous in prokaryotes and have multiple biological roles, including plasmid stabilization during vegetative growth. Here, we have shown that a Type III TA system, based on an RNA antitoxin and endoribonuclease toxin, from plasmid pAW63 in Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki HD-73 can dramatically promote plasmid retention in populations undergoing sporulation and germination, and we provide evidence that this occurs through the post-segregational killing of plasmid-free forespores. Our findings show how an extremely common genetic module can be used to ensure plasmid maintenance during stress-induced developmental transitions, with implications for plasmid dynamics in B. cereus s.l. bacteria.

  17. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  18. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  19. Bacterial Mitosis: ParM of Plasmid R1 Moves Plasmid DNA by an Actin-like Insertional Polymerization Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  20. Plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.

    1982-01-01

    DNA recombination in exponential phase and competent Haemophilus influenzae was measured by an electron microscopic assay that relies on the conversion of plasmid RSF0885 monomers into multimeric forms. Dimer circles were present at a frequency of 2% in plasmid preparations from competent Rd (wild-type) cells; multimers were present at a frequency of 0.2% in preparations from exponential phase cells. Thus, plasmid recombination was stimulated in competent cells. Multimer formation occurred efficiently in cells of the transformation defective mutant rec2, implying that the rec2 gene product is not required for plasmid recombination. However, the absence of multimer plasmids in preparations from competent cells of the transformation defective mutant rec1 suggests that the rec1 gene product is required. Digestion of purified plasmids with restriction endonuclease PvuII, which makes a single cut in the monomer, revealed the presence of recombination intermediates composed of two linear plasmids joined to form two pairs of arms resembling the Greek letter chi. Length measurements of these arms taken from a population of recombination intermediates gave evidence that the plasmids were joined at sites of homology. The distributions of individual DNA strands, at the intersections of the four arms, could be resolved in some recombination intermediates and were of two types. The first type of junction appeared as a single-stranded arm appended to each corner. The second type of junction consisted of a single strand of DNA linking the two linear plasmids at a site of homology. The single-stranded linker was frequently situated at the edge of a short gap on one of the plasmids in the pair. The fine structures of the recombinational joints have been interpreted in terms of previously proposed models of recombination.

  1. Prokaryotic ParA-ParB-parS system links bacterial chromosome segregation with the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, Jolanta; Jagura-Burdzy, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    While the essential role of episomal par loci in plasmid DNA partitioning has long been appreciated, the function of chromosomally encoded par loci is less clear. The chromosomal parA-parB genes are conserved throughout the bacterial kingdom and encode proteins homologous to those of the plasmidic Type I active partitioning systems. The third conserved element, the centromere-like sequence called parS, occurs in several copies in the chromosome. Recent studies show that the ParA-ParB-parS system is a key player of a mitosis-like process ensuring proper intracellular localization of certain chromosomal regions such as oriC domain and their active and directed segregation. Moreover, the chromosomal par systems link chromosome segregation with initiation of DNA replication and the cell cycle.

  2. Bacterial mitosis: ParM of plasmid R1 moves plasmid DNA by an actin-like insertional polymerization mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette; Jensen, Rasmus B; Roepstorff, Peter; Gerdes, Kenn

    2003-12-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system act together to generate the force required for plasmid movement during segregation. ParR protein binds cooperatively to the centromeric parC DNA region, thereby forming a complex that interacts with the filament-forming actin-like ParM protein in an ATP-dependent manner, suggesting that plasmid movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating in eukaryotic cells. In addition, we find evidence suggesting that plasmid pairing is required for ParM polymerization.

  3. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  4. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  5. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn;

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...... clusters along the long axis of the cell. The strength of the incompatibility was correlated with the capability of the plasmids to compete for the mid-cell position....

  6. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-29

    render them non-susceptible to K: z plasmid-encoded enzymes. (3) Development of drugs which are selective inhibitor! 1 4, of plasmid DNA replication. (4... Development of drugs which inhibit phenotypic as expression of plasmid genes, and (5) Development of drugs which are inhibitors o, drug-inactivating...Barnes [2] them non-susceptible to plasmid-encoded enzymes, tabulated data on the incidence of Gram-negative 3) development of drugs which are

  7. Mechanisms for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Jean-Yves; Stouf, Mathieu; Lebailly, Elise; Cornet, François

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria face the problem of segregating their gigantic chromosomes without a segregation period restricted in time and space, as Eukaryotes do. Segregation thus involves multiple activities, general or specific of a chromosome region and differentially controlled. Recent advances show that these various mechanisms conform to a “pair and release” rule, which appears as a general rule in DNA segregation. We describe the latest advances in segregation of bacterial chromosomes with emphasis on the different pair and release mechanisms.

  8. Prokaryotic DNA segregation by an actin-like filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Löwe, Jan;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments with prop......The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments...... point for ParM polymerization. Hence, we provide evidence for a simple prokaryotic analogue of the eukaryotic mitotic spindle apparatus....

  9. Plasmid DNA entry into postmitotic nuclei of primary rat myotubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, M E; Williams, P.; G. Zhang; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A

    1995-01-01

    These studies were initiated to elucidate the mechanism of DNA nuclear transport in mammalian cells. Biotin- or gold-labeled plasmid and plasmid DNA expression vectors for Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase or firefly luciferase were microinjected into the cytoplasm of primary rat myotubes in culture. Plasmid DNA was expressed in up to 70% of the injected myotubes, which indicates that it entered intact, postmitotic nuclei. The nuclear transport of plasmid DNA occurred through the nuclear po...

  10. Influence of Single Base Change in Shine-Dalgarno Sequence on the Stability of B.Subtilis Plasmid PSM604

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    B.Subtilis expression plasmids generally require a stringent Shine-Dalgarno Sequence(SDS). Site-directed-mutagenesis was explored to change the Shine-Dalgarno Sequence from AAAAATGGGG (mutant type) to AAAAAGGGGG (wild type) in recombinant plasmid PSM604. The single base substitution made the plasmid with wild SDS unstable in structure and segregation. The interaction of SDS with subtilisin leader sequence of PSM604 might be responsible for the instability of plasmid.

  11. Bacterial DNA segregation by dynamic SopA polymers

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids and chromosomes rely on ParA ATPases for proper positioning within the cell and for efficient segregation to daughter cells. Here we demonstrate that the F-plasmid-partitioning protein SopA polymerizes into filaments in an ATP-dependent manner in vitro, and that the filaments elongate at a rate that is similar to that of plasmid separation in vivo. We show that SopA is a dynamic protein within the cell, undergoing cycles of polymerization and depolymerization, and shut...

  12. Antibiotic resistance of vibrio cholerae: special considerations of R-plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, S

    1978-09-01

    Studies on the transmission of R plasmid by conjugation between enterobacteria and vibrio or related bacteria were reviewed. The majority of the reports confirmed successful transmission from enterobacteria to Vibrio cholerae and related species, although the transmission frequencies were extremely low and the transmitted R plasmid was very unstable except for thermosensitive kanamycin plasmid and usual R plasmid coexisting with P plasmid. Strains of V. cholerae and Aeromonas liquefaciens as well as A. salmonicida bearing R plasmid were detected in nature. R plasmid was relatively unstable in V. cholerae strains with which transmission of R plasmid to enterobacteria was confirmed. At present, only 3 R plasmids have been obtained from naturally occurring strains of V. cholerae. Although the 2 European plasmids belong to the C incompatibility group with 98 megadalton closed covalent circular DNA molecule, one plasmid belongs to the J group with more than 25 megadalton molecular weight, and no CCC of satelite DNA was detected in bacteria harboring this plasmid.

  13. Characterization and comparative overview of complete sequences of the first plasmids of Pandoraea across clinical and non-clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delicia Yong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, information on plasmid analysis in Pandoraea spp. is scarce. To address the gap of knowledge on this, the complete sequences of eight plasmids from Pandoraea spp. namely Pandoraea faecigallinarum DSM 23572 (pPF72-1, pPF72-2, Pandoraea oxalativorans DSM 23570 (pPO70-1, pPO70-2, pPO70-3, pPO70-4, Pandoraea vervacti NS15 (pPV15 and Pandoraea apista DSM 16535 (pPA35 were studied for the first time in this study. The information on plasmid sequences in Pandoraea spp. is useful because these plasmid sequences did not match to any known plasmid sequence deposited in public databases. Replication genes were not identified in some plasmids, a situation that has led to the possibility of host interaction involvement. Some plasmids were also void of par genes and intriguingly, repA gene was also not discovered in these plasmids. This further leads to the hypothesis of host-plasmid interaction. Plasmid stabilization/stability protein-encoding genes were observed in some plasmids but were not established for participating in plasmid segregation. Toxin-antitoxin systems MazEF, VapBC, RelBE, YgiT-MqsR, HigBA and ParDE were identified across the plasmids and their presence would improve plasmid maintenance. Conjugation genes were identified portraying the conjugation ability amongst Pandoraea plasmids. Additionally, we found a shared region amongst some of the plasmids that consists of conjugation genes. The identification of genes involved in replication, segregation, toxin-antitoxin systems and conjugation, would aid the design of drugs to prevent the survival or transmission of plasmids carrying pathogenic properties. Additionally, genes conferring virulence and antibiotic resistance were identified among the plasmids. The observed features in the plasmids shed light on the Pandoraea spp. as opportunistic pathogens.

  14. Growth dependence of conjugation explains limited plasmid invasion in biofilms: an individual‐based modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Lardon, Laurent; Seoane, Jose Miguel;

    2011-01-01

    . By extending an individual‐based model of microbial growth and interactions to include the dynamics of plasmid carriage and transfer by individual cells, we were able to conduct in silico tests of this and other hypotheses on the dynamics of conjugal plasmid transfer in biofilms. For a generic model plasmid...... and scan speed) and spatial reach (EPS yield, conjugal pilus length) are more important for successful plasmid invasion than the recipients' growth rate or the probability of segregational loss. While this study identifies one factor that can limit plasmid invasion in biofilms, the new individual......Plasmid invasion in biofilms is often surprisingly limited in spite of the close contact of cells in a biofilm. We hypothesized that this poor plasmid spread into deeper biofilm layers is caused by a dependence of conjugation on the growth rate (relative to the maximum growth rate) of the donor...

  15. Plasmid transfer between bacteria in soil microcosms and the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Smit

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In ibis review factors influencing conjugal plasmid transfer between bacteria and the possible role of naturally occurring selftransmissible plasmide for the dissemination of recombinant DNA in soil will be discussed. In microcosm studies, plasmid transfer between various species of introduced bacteria has been detected. Moreover, plamid transfer to indigenous soil micoorganisms was observed. Soil is an oligotrophic environment and plasmid transfer occurred mainly under conditions which were nutritionally favourable for bacteria, such as in the plant rhizosphere and in the presence of clay minerais or added nutrients. Mobilizable plasmids, lacking the ability to transfer themselves, have been reported to be transferred in the presence of selftransmissible plasmids. A study comparing conjugal transfer in microcosme with those in the field revealed that the transfer rates found in microcosme and in the field were similar. Transfer of chromosomal DNA by plasmid RP4 could only be shown on filters and was not observed in soil. Transfer of plasmids carrying biodegradative genes appeared to be favoured in the presence of the compound that can be degraded. Evidence was found for the presence of naturally-occurring selftransmissible plasmids in bacteria in the rhizosphere which could mobilize recombinant plasmids.

  16. On the evolutionary stability of Mendelian segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Francisco; Haig, David

    2005-07-01

    We present a model of a primary locus subject to viability selection and an unlinked locus that causes sex-specific modification of the segregation ratio at the primary locus. If there is a balanced polymorphism at the primary locus, a population undergoing Mendelian segregation can be invaded by modifier alleles that cause sex-specific biases in the segregation ratio. Even though this effect is particularly strong if reciprocal heterozygotes at the primary locus have distinct viabilities, as might occur with genomic imprinting, it also applies if reciprocal heterozygotes have equal viabilities. The expected outcome of the evolution of sex-specific segregation distorters is all-and-none segregation schemes in which one allele at the primary locus undergoes complete drive in spermatogenesis and the other allele undergoes complete drive in oogenesis. All-and-none segregation results in a population in which all individuals are maximally fit heterozygotes. Unlinked modifiers that alter the segregation ratio are unable to invade such a population. These results raise questions about the reasons for the ubiquity of Mendelian segregation.

  17. Competing ParA structures space bacterial plasmids equally over the nucleoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ietswaart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Low copy number plasmids in bacteria require segregation for stable inheritance through cell division. This is often achieved by a parABC locus, comprising an ATPase ParA, DNA-binding protein ParB and a parC region, encoding ParB-binding sites. These minimal components space plasmids equally over the nucleoid, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. Here we investigate a model where ParA-ATP can dynamically associate to the nucleoid and is hydrolyzed by plasmid-associated ParB, thereby creating nucleoid-bound, self-organizing ParA concentration gradients. We show mathematically that differences between competing ParA concentrations on either side of a plasmid can specify regular plasmid positioning. Such positioning can be achieved regardless of the exact mechanism of plasmid movement, including plasmid diffusion with ParA-mediated immobilization or directed plasmid motion induced by ParB/parC-stimulated ParA structure disassembly. However, we find experimentally that parABC from Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 increases plasmid mobility, inconsistent with diffusion/immobilization. Instead our observations favor directed plasmid motion. Our model predicts less oscillatory ParA dynamics than previously believed, a prediction we verify experimentally. We also show that ParA localization and plasmid positioning depend on the underlying nucleoid morphology, indicating that the chromosomal architecture constrains ParA structure formation. Our directed motion model unifies previously contradictory models for plasmid segregation and provides a robust mechanistic basis for self-organized plasmid spacing that may be widely applicable.

  18. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  19. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  20. Testing sexual segregation and aggregation: old ways are best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenfant, Christophe; Gaillard, Jean-michel; Dray, Stéphane; Loison, Anne; Royer, Manuela; Chessel, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    The study of sexual segregation has received increasing attention over the last two decades. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the existence of sexual segregation, such as the "predation risk hypothesis," the "forage selection hypothesis," and the "activity budget hypothesis." Testing which hypothesis drives sexual segregation is hampered, however, by the lack of consensus regarding a formal measurement of sexual segregation. By using a derivation of the well-known chi-square (here called the sexual segregation and aggregation statistic [SSAS]) instead of existent segregation coefficients, we offer a reliable way to test for temporal variation in the occurrence of sexual segregation and aggregation, even in cases where a large proportion of animals are observed alone. A randomization procedure provides a test for the null hypothesis of independence of the distributions of males and females among the groups. The usefulness of SSAS in the study of sexual segregation is demonstrated with three case studies on ungulate populations belonging to species with contrasting life histories and annual grouping patterns (isard, red deer, and roe deer). The existent segregation coefficients were unreliable since, for a given value, sexual segregation could or could not occur. Similarly, the existent segregation coefficients performed badly when males and females aggregated. The new SSAS was not prone to such limitations and allowed clear conclusions regarding whether males and females segregate, aggregate, or simply mix at random applicable to all species.

  1. Characterization of the Lactobacillus plantarum plasmid pCD033 and generation of the plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum CD033, a strain isolated from grass silage in Austria, harbors a 7.9 kb plasmid designated pCD033. Sequence analysis identified 14 open reading frames and 8 of these were supposed to be putative coding sequences. Gene annotation revealed no putative essential genes being plasmid encoded, but a plasmid addiction system based on a PemI/PemK-like toxin-antitoxin system, able to stabilize plasmid maintenance. Absence of a replication initiation protein, a double strand origin as well as a single strand origin on plasmid pCD033 suggests replication via a new type of theta mechanism, whereby plasmid replication is potentially initiated and regulated by non-coding RNA. Detailed examination of segregational stability of plasmid vectors consisting of pCD033-fragments, combined with a selection marker, resulted in definition of a stably maintained minimal replicon. A gene encoding a RepB/OrfX-like protein was found to be not essential for plasmid replication. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of this protein with related proteins unveiled a highly conserved amino acid motif (LLDQQQ). L. plantarum CD033 was cured of pCD033 resulting in the novel plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH. Plasmid curing demonstrated that no essential features are provided by pCD033 under laboratory conditions.

  2. The Native Plasmid pML21 Plays a Role in Stress Tolerance in Enterococcus faecalis ML21, as Analyzed by Plasmid Curing Using Plasmid Incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Fang-Lei; Chen, Li-Li; Zeng, Zhu; Feng, Xiu-Juan; Yu, Rui; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Hui-Qin; Chen, Shang-Wu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the role of the native plasmid pML21 in Enterococcus faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses, the plasmid pML21 was cured based on the principle of plasmid incompatibility and segregational instability, generating E. faecalis mutant strain ML0. The mutant and the wild strains were exposed to abiotic stresses: bile salts, low pH, H2O2, ethanol, heat, and NaCl, and their survival rate was measured. We found that curing of pML21 lead to reduced tolerance to stress in E. faecalis ML0, especially oxidative and osmotic stress. Complementation analysis suggested that the genes from pML21 played different role in stress tolerance. The result indicated that pML21 plays a role in E. faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses.

  3. Modeling sRNA-Regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin’s mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, a short half-life of the protein toxin is also beneficial to the function of the toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we study a therapeutic scenario in which a competitor mRNA is introduced to sequester the sRNA antitoxin, causing the toxic protein to be expressed. PMID:28085919

  4. Modeling sRNA-regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Chen Chris

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin's mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, ...

  5. Conjugative botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in Clostridium botulinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Marshall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium botulinum produces seven distinct serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs. The genes encoding different subtype neurotoxins of serotypes A, B, F and several dual neurotoxin-producing strains have been shown to reside on plasmids, suggesting that intra- and interspecies transfer of BoNT-encoding plasmids may occur. The objective of the present study was to determine whether these C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids are conjugative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids pBotCDC-A3 (strain CDC-A3, pCLJ (strain 657Ba and pCLL (strain Eklund 17B were tagged with the erythromycin resistance marker (Erm using the ClosTron mutagenesis system by inserting a group II intron into the neurotoxin genes carried on these plasmids. Transfer of the tagged plasmids from the donor strains CDC-A3, 657Ba and Eklund 17B to tetracycline-resistant recipient C. botulinum strains was evaluated in mating experiments. Erythromycin and tetracycline resistant transconjugants were isolated from donor:recipient mating pairs tested. Transfer of the plasmids to the transconjugants was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern hybridizations. Transfer required cell-to-cell contact and was DNase resistant. This indicates that transfer of these plasmids occurs via a conjugation mechanism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first evidence supporting conjugal transfer of native botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in C. botulinum, and provides a probable mechanism for the lateral distribution of BoNT-encoding plasmids to other C. botulinum strains. The potential transfer of C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids to other bacterial hosts in the environment or within the human intestine is of great concern for human pathogenicity and necessitates further characterization of these plasmids.

  6. Towards understanding the molecular basis of bacterial DNA segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria ensure the fidelity of genetic inheritance by the coordinated control of chromosome segregation and cell division. Here, we review the molecules and mechanisms that govern the correct subcellular positioning and rapid separation of newly replicated chromosomes and plasmids towards the cell...... poles and, significantly, the emergence of mitotic-like machineries capable of segregating plasmid DNA. We further describe surprising similarities between proteins involved in DNA partitioning (ParA/ParB) and control of cell division (MinD/MinE), suggesting a mechanism for intracellular positioning...... common to the two processes. Finally, we discuss the role that the bacterial cytoskeleton plays in DNA partitioning and the missing link between prokaryotes and eukaryotes that is bacterial mechano-chemical motor proteins. Udgivelsesdato: Mar 29...

  7. Commentary: Genger Segregation in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, Eleanor E.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of the preceding articles in this journal issue. Considers the timing of gender segregation, compatibility between play styles and gender segregation, possible physiological processes underlying gender segregation in play, children's cognitive knowledge about gender, and the consequences of gender segregation. (BAC)

  8. Plasmid-to-plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    No recombination between plasmids was observed after conjugal transfer of a plasmid into a cell carrying another plasmid. Two types of such recombination took place after transformation, one type being Rec/sup +/ dependent and suggesting a preferred site of recombination. The other much rarer type was at least partially Rec/sup +/ independent.

  9. Transport analogy for segregation and granular rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siying; McCarthy, Joseph J.

    2017-08-01

    Here, we show a direct connection between density-based segregation and granular rheology that can lead to insight into both problems. Our results exhibit a transition in the rate of segregation during simple shear that occurs at I ˜0.5 and mimics a coincident regime change in flow rheology. We propose scaling arguments that support a packing fraction criterion for this transition that can both explain our segregation results as well as unify existing literature studies of granular rheology. By recasting a segregation model in terms of rheological parameters, we establish an approach that not only collapses results for a wide range of conditions, but also yields a direct relationship between the coordination number z and the segregation velocity. Moreover, our approach predicts the precise location of the observed regime change or saturation. This suggests that it is possible to rationally design process operating conditions that lead to significantly lower segregation extents. These observations can have a profound impact on both the study of granular flow or mixing as well as industrial practice.

  10. Understanding Segregation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth

    There is growing consensus that living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty increases the likelihood of social problems such as teenage parenthood, drug and alcohol use, crime victimization, and chronic unemployment. Neighborhood inequality is also implicated in studies of enduring race/ethnic health disparities, and there are recent moves to broaden the definition of health care policy to policies targeting social inequality (Mechanic 2007). Residential segregation affects health outcomes in several different ways. First, income, education, and occupation are all strongly related to health (Adler and Newman 2002). Segregation is a key mechanism through which socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and reinforced, as it hinders the upward mobility of disadvantaged groups by limiting their educational and employment opportunities. Second, segregation increases minority exposure to unhealthy neighborhood environments. Residential segregation creates areas with concentrated poverty and unemployment, both of which are key factors that predict violence and create racial differences in homicide (Samson and Wilson 1995). Neighborhood characteristics, such as exposure to environmental hazards, fear of violence, and access to grocery stores, affect health risks and health behaviors (Cheadle et al. 1991). Tobacco and alcohol industries also advertise their products disproportionately in poor, minority areas (Moore, Williams, and Qualls 1996). Finally, residential segregation leads to inequalitie in health care resources, which contributes to disparities in quality of treatment (Smedley, Stith, and Nelson 2002).

  11. Recruiting a microtubule-binding complex to DNA directs chromosome segregation in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Andrew W.; Lacefield, Soni; Lau, Tsz Cham Derek

    2009-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on the kinetochore, the complex of proteins that link microtubules to centromeric DNA1. The budding yeast kinetochore consists of more than 80 proteins assembled on a 125bp region of DNA1. We studied the assembly and function of kinetochore components by fusing individual kinetochore proteins to the lactose repressor (LacI) and testing their ability to improve the segregation of a plasmid carrying tandem repeats of the lactose operator (LacO). Targeting...

  12. Measuring Inequality and Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I introduce the Divergence Index, a conceptually intuitive and methodologically rigorous measure of inequality and segregation. The index measures the difference between a distribution of interest and another empirical, theoretical, or normative distribution. The Divergence Index provides flexibility in specifying a theoretically meaningful basis for evaluating inequality. It evaluates how surprising an empirical distribution is given a theoretical distribution that represents equality. I demonstrate the unique features of the new measure, as well as deriving its mathematical equivalence with Theil's Inequality Index and the Information Theory Index. I compare the dynamics of the measures using simulated data, and an empirical analysis of racial residential segregation in the Detroit, MI, metro area. The Information Theory Index has become the gold standard for decomposition analyses of segregation. I show that although the Information Theory Index can be decomposed for subareas, it is misleadi...

  13. Requirements for the evaluation of computational speech segregation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Tobias; Dau, Torsten

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies on computational speech segregation reported improved speech intelligibility in noise when estimating and applying an ideal binary mask with supervised learning algorithms. However, an important requirement for such systems in technical applications is their robustness to acoustic conditions not considered during training. This study demonstrates that the spectro-temporal noise variations that occur during training and testing determine the achievable segregation performance. In particular, such variations strongly affect the identification of acoustical features in the system associated with perceptual attributes in speech segregation. The results could help establish a framework for a systematic evaluation of future segregation systems.

  14. Requirements for the evaluation of computational speech segregation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Tobias; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on computational speech segregation reported improved speech intelligibility in noise when estimating and applying an ideal binary mask with supervised learning algorithms. However, an important requirement for such systems in technical applications is their robustness to acoustic...... conditions not considered during training. This study demonstrates that the spectro-temporal noise variations that occur during training and testing determine the achievable segregation performance. In particular, such variations strongly affect the identification of acoustical features in the system...... associated with perceptual attributes in speech segregation. The results could help establish a framework for a systematic evaluation of future segregation systems....

  15. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  16. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J.; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.; Austin, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks. PMID:17905986

  17. A Question of Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quedas, Fátima; Ponte, João; Trindade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    than 40 per cent of breads were indeed over the labelling threshold, and should be labelled. This includes GM maize that is not cultivated in the EU and enters the supply chain via international trade. We conclude that the realisation of coexistence and segregation requires involvement of the full...

  18. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process.

  19. The evolution of collective restraint: policing and obedience among non-conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzoglanakis, Kyriakos; García López, Diana; Brown, Sam P; Goldstein, Richard A

    2013-04-01

    The repression of competition by mechanisms of policing is now recognized as a major force in the maintenance of cooperation. General models on the evolution of policing have focused on the interplay between individual competitiveness and mutual policing, demonstrating a positive relationship between within-group diversity and levels of policing. We expand this perspective by investigating what is possibly the simplest example of reproductive policing: copy number control (CNC) among non-conjugative plasmids, a class of extra-chromosomal vertically transmitted molecular symbionts of bacteria. Through the formulation and analysis of a multi-scale dynamical model, we show that the establishment of stable reproductive restraint among plasmids requires the co-evolution of two fundamental plasmid traits: policing, through the production of plasmid-coded trans-acting replication inhibitors, and obedience, expressed as the binding affinity of plasmid-specific targets to those inhibitors. We explain the intrinsic replication instabilities that arise in the absence of policing and we show how these instabilities are resolved by the evolution of copy number control. Increasing levels of policing and obedience lead to improvements in group performance due to tighter control of local population size (plasmid copy number), delivering benefits both to plasmids, by reducing the risk of segregational loss and to the plasmid-host partnership, by increasing the rate of cell reproduction, and therefore plasmid vertical transmission.

  20. The evolution of collective restraint: policing and obedience among non-conjugative plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Kentzoglanakis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The repression of competition by mechanisms of policing is now recognized as a major force in the maintenance of cooperation. General models on the evolution of policing have focused on the interplay between individual competitiveness and mutual policing, demonstrating a positive relationship between within-group diversity and levels of policing. We expand this perspective by investigating what is possibly the simplest example of reproductive policing: copy number control (CNC among non-conjugative plasmids, a class of extra-chromosomal vertically transmitted molecular symbionts of bacteria. Through the formulation and analysis of a multi-scale dynamical model, we show that the establishment of stable reproductive restraint among plasmids requires the co-evolution of two fundamental plasmid traits: policing, through the production of plasmid-coded trans-acting replication inhibitors, and obedience, expressed as the binding affinity of plasmid-specific targets to those inhibitors. We explain the intrinsic replication instabilities that arise in the absence of policing and we show how these instabilities are resolved by the evolution of copy number control. Increasing levels of policing and obedience lead to improvements in group performance due to tighter control of local population size (plasmid copy number, delivering benefits both to plasmids, by reducing the risk of segregational loss and to the plasmid-host partnership, by increasing the rate of cell reproduction, and therefore plasmid vertical transmission.

  1. Transfer of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance from Haemophilus to Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires an intervening organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, P J; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus species have been implicated as the source of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Previous attempts to transfer conjugally the resistance plasmids from Haemophilus species to N. gonorrhoeae have met with limited success. Using both biparental and triparental mating systems, it was found that transfer will occur if the commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria cinerea, is used as a transfer intermediate. This organism stably maintains resistance plasmids of Haemophilus and facilitates transfer of these plasmids to N. gonorrhoeae, in a triparental mating system, at a transfer frequency of 10(-8). Both Haemophilus ducreyi and N. gonorrhoeae carry mobilizing plasmids capable of mediating conjugal transfer of the same resistance plasmids. However, restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA hybridization studies indicate that the mobilizing plasmids are distinctly different molecules. Limited homology is present within the transfer region of these plasmids.

  2. Dynamic instability--a common denominator in prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA segregation and cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuesler, John A; Li, Hsin-Jung Sophia

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic instability is an essential phenomenon in eukaryotic nuclear division and prokaryotic plasmid R1 segregation. Although the molecular machines used in both systems differ greatly in composition, strong similarities and requisite nuances in dynamics and segregation mechanisms are observed. This brief examination of the current literature provides a functional comparison between prokaryotic and eukaryotic dynamically unstable filaments, specifically ParM and microtubules. Additionally, this mini-review should support the notion that any dynamically unstable filament could serve as the molecular machine driving DNA segregation, but these machines possess auxiliary features to adapt to temporal and spatial disparities in either system.

  3. Continuous utility factor in segregation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Parna; Sen, Parongama

    2016-02-01

    We consider the constrained Schelling model of social segregation in which the utility factor of agents strictly increases and nonlocal jumps of the agents are allowed. In the present study, the utility factor u is defined in a way such that it can take continuous values and depends on the tolerance threshold as well as the fraction of unlike neighbors. Two models are proposed: in model A the jump probability is determined by the sign of u only, which makes it equivalent to the discrete model. In model B the actual values of u are considered. Model A and model B are shown to differ drastically as far as segregation behavior and phase transitions are concerned. In model A, although segregation can be achieved, the cluster sizes are rather small. Also, a frozen state is obtained in which steady states comprise many unsatisfied agents. In model B, segregated states with much larger cluster sizes are obtained. The correlation function is calculated to show quantitatively that larger clusters occur in model B. Moreover for model B, no frozen states exist even for very low dilution and small tolerance parameter. This is in contrast to the unconstrained discrete model considered earlier where agents can move even when utility remains the same. In addition, we also consider a few other dynamical aspects which have not been studied in segregation models earlier.

  4. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  5. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  6. New perspectives on ethnic segregation over time and space: A domains approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ham, M.; Tammaru, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic segregation has most often been studied at the place of residence, segregation being defined on the basis of the relative presence of different groups within city neighbourhoods. It is increasingly recognized, however, that segregation occurs in different ways in different domains (such as th

  7. The ParB-parS Chromosome Segregation System Modulates Competence Development in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Minnen, Anita; Kjos, Morten; Gruber, Stephan; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: ParB proteins bind centromere-like DNA sequences called parS sites and are involved in plasmid and chromosome segregation in bacteria. We previously showed that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae contains four parS sequences located close to the origin of replicati

  8. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lejček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary segregation, their dependence on volume solid solubility, mutual solute–solute interaction and pressure effect in ferrous alloys is demonstrated.

  9. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  10. [Influence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis virulence for chickens. I. Occurrence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis large virulence plasmid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madajczak, Grzegorz; Binek, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Many Salmonella Enteritidis virulence factors are encoded by genes localized on plasmids, especially large virulence plasmid, in highly conserved fragment, they create spv plasmid gene group. The aims of realized researches were spv genes occurrence evaluation and composition analysis among Salmonella Enteritidis strains caused infection in chickens. Researches were realized on 107 isolates, where in every cases large virulence plasmid 59 kbp size were detected. Specific nucleotides sequences of spv genes (spvRABCD) were detected in 47.7% of isolates. In the rest of examined bacteria spv genes occurred variably. Most often extreme genes of spv group, like spvR and spvD were absent, what could indicate that factors encoded by them are not most important for Salmonella Enteritidis live and their expressed virulence.

  11. Conjugative plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Pachulec

    Full Text Available Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233 or containing Dutch (pEP5289 or American (pEP5050 type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids

  12. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  13. Segregation and layering in the flow of wet granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Azadeh; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2000-11-01

    We report the effect of interstitial fluid on the extent of segregation by imaging the pile that results after bidisperse color-coded glass particles are poured into a silo. Segregation is sharply reduced and the angle of repose increases when a small volume fraction of fluid is added. The phase diagram of segregation as a function of volume fraction of the fluid and the size ratio of the particles is obtained. We also find that viscous forces in addition to capillary forces have an important effect on the extent of segregation and the angle of repose. We show that the sharp initial change and the subsequent saturation in the extent of segregation and angle of repose occurs over similar volume fraction of the fluid. Preferential clumping of small particles causes layering to occur when the size of the clumps of small particles exceeds the size of smoother large particles. We calculate the azimuthal correlation function of particle density inside the pile to characterize the layering. Finally the progress of segregation in the limit where particles are completely immersed in a fluid was measured. In this case liquid bridges and capillary forces are absent but viscous forces are present. We find that a transition back to segregation can occur when the particles are completely immersed in a fluid at low viscosities.

  14. Source Segregation and Collection of Source-Segregated Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Segregation of individual material fractions at the waste source and keeping the fractions separate for collection is one of the key issues in modern waste management. In most cases the waste is just kept segregated from other waste according to certain criteria that improve the possibility...... the more important it is to consider source segregation of the waste, since the amount of waste links to the possibility of obtaining manageable amounts of segregated waste with reasonable logistics as well as to the manpower that can be allocated at the source to perform source segregation of waste....... Therefore, source segregation usually makes most sense in industry, where the waste often also is more well defined and cleaner, while residential waste containing relatively small amounts of each material fraction is a bigger and much more difficult challenge. This chapter describes the main issues...

  15. Conjugation efficiency depends on intra and intercellular interactions between distinct plasmids: Plasmids promote the immigration of other plasmids but repress co-colonizing plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode the genes responsible for the synthesis of conjugative pili and plasmid transfer. Expression of the conjugative machinery (including conjugative pili) may be costly to bacteria, not only due to the energetic/metabolic cost associated with their expression but also because they serve as receptors for certain viruses. Consequently, the presence of two plasmids in the same cell may be disadvantageous to each plasmid, because they may impose a higher fitness cost on the host. Therefore, plasmids may encode mechanisms to cope with co-resident plasmids. Moreover, it is possible that the transfer rate of a plasmid is affected by the presence of a distinct plasmid in the recipient cell. In this work, we measured transfer rates of twelve natural plasmids belonging to seven incompatibility groups in three situations, namely when: (i) donor cells contain a plasmid and recipient cells are plasmid-free; (ii) donor cells contain two unrelated plasmids and recipient cells are plasmid-free; and (iii) half of the cells contain a given plasmid and the other half contain another, unrelated, plasmid. In the third situation, recipient cells of a plasmid are the donor cells of the other plasmid. We show that there are more negative interactions (reduction of a plasmid's conjugative efficiency) between plasmids if they reside in the same cell than if they reside in different cells. However, if plasmids interacted intercellularly, the transfer rate of one of the plasmids was often higher (when the unrelated conjugative plasmid was present in the recipient cell) than if the recipient cell was plasmid-free - a positive effect. Experimental data retrieved from the study of mutant plasmids not expressing conjugative pili on the cell surface suggest that positive effects result from a higher efficiency of mating pair formation. Overall, our results suggest that negative interactions are significantly more frequent when plasmids occupy the same cell. Such

  16. Liquid-Crystalline Mesophases of Plasmid DNA in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Ziv; Wachtel, Ellen J.; Minsky, Abraham

    1994-06-01

    Bacterial plasmids may often reach a copy number larger than 1000 per cell, corresponding to a total amount of DNA that may exceed the amount of DNA within the bacterial chromosome. This observation highlights the problem of cellular accommodation of large amounts of closed-circular nucleic acids, whose interwound conformation offers negligible DNA compaction. As determined by x-ray scattering experiments conducted on intact bacteria, supercoiled plasmids segregate within the cells into dense clusters characterized by a long-range order. In vitro studies performed at physiological DNA concentrations indicated that interwound DNA spontaneously forms liquid crystalline phases whose macroscopic structural properties are determined by the features of the molecular supercoiling. Because these features respond to cellular factors, DNA supercoiling may provide a sensitive regulatory link between cellular parameters and the packaging modes of interwound DNA in vivo.

  17. Instability of multiple drug resistance plasmids in Salmonella typhimurium isolated from poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D J; Threlfall, E J; Rowe, B

    1991-04-01

    Plasmids in five strains of Salmonella typhimurium resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, neomycin/kanamycin, streptomycin, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim (ACGKSSuTTm), CGKSSuTTm, ACSSuT or CSSuT which had been isolated from poultry in the first 3 months of 1989 have been characterized and compared with plasmids in two strains of R-types ACGKSSuTTm and ASSuTTm isolated from two patients later in the year. With the exception of the human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm, all strains carried two non-conjugative plasmids, one coding for SSu and belonging to incompatibility group Q, and a second coding for multiple resistance and belonging to the FIme incompatibility group. The human isolate of R-type ASSuTTm did not carry the IncQ SSu plasmid but like the poultry isolates, carried a non-conjugative FIme plasmid. Restriction endonuclease digestion with the enzymes EcoR I, Pst I and Hind III demonstrated that the FIme plasmids from strains of different R-types showed a high degree of homology but exhibited numerous fragment size polymorphisms. The restriction digest fingerprint of plasmids in the human isolate of R-type ACGKSSuTTm was indistinguishable from a poultry isolate of the same R-type. Analysis of segregants of one of the poultry isolates of R-type ACGKSSuTTm demonstrated that resistance determinants could be rapidly lost from the FIme plasmid to give rise to a number of R-types and fingerprint patterns. Loss of tetracycline resistance from this plasmid appeared to be correlated with the integration of other plasmid-mediated resistances into the bacterial chromosome. Evidence is presented for the rapid loss of antimicrobial resistance determinants from a multiple resistance plasmid of the FIme incompatibility group in response to withdrawal of antibiotic selective pressure.

  18. In vitro replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Daniell, H; McFadden, B

    1994-09-01

    Little knowledge of DNA replication in cyanobacteria is available. In this study, we report the development and characterization of an in vitro system for studies of replication of the endogenous plasmids from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. This system (fraction III) was isolated at high salt concentrations and partially purified on a heparin-agarose column. DNA polymerases in Synechocystis 6803 appeared to be associated with membranes and could be released by the addition of ammonium sulfate to 20% saturation. DNA synthesis in fraction III was dependent on the addition of cyanobacterial plasmids isolated from the same strain. The in vitro replication products consist mostly of the supercoiled form of the plasmids. Unlike replication of many Escherichia coli plasmids, replication of cyanobacterial plasmids did not require added ATP, was not inhibited by omission of the ribonucleotides, and was insensitive to the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampicin and the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, but was inhibited by ethidium bromide. These data suggest that RNA may not be involved in the initiation of replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis 6803. In addition, intermediates of replication have been detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Density labeling experiments also indicate that cyanobacterial plasmid synthesis in vitro occurs by a semiconservative replication.

  19. Patterns of Residential Segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Louf

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes-low, middle and higher income-out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density-and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities-we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities.

  20. pTAR-Encoded Proteins in Plasmid Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Kalnin, Kirill; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Yarmolinsky, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465–478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream g...

  1. In Silico Detection and Typing of Plasmids using PlasmidFinder and Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Zankari, Ea; García-Fernández, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    In the work presented here, we designed and developed two easy-to-use Web tools for in silico detection and characterization of whole-genome sequence (WGS) and whole-plasmid sequence data from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. These tools will facilitate bacterial typing based on draft...... genomes of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae species by the rapid detection of known plasmid types. Replicon sequences from 559 fully sequenced plasmids associated with the family Enterobacteriaceae in the NCBI nucleotide database were collected to build a consensus database for integration...... sequences identified in the 559 fully sequenced plasmids. For plasmid multilocus sequence typing (pMLST) analysis, a database that is updated weekly was generated from www.pubmlst.org and integrated into a Web tool called pMLST. Both databases were evaluated using draft genomes from a collection...

  2. Chromosome Segregation in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, R.; Jha, J.; Chattoraj, DK

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae com...

  3. Chromosome segregation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Revathy; Jha, Jyoti; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae compare with those in other bacteria, and highlight some of the remaining questions regarding the process of bacterial chromosome segregation.

  4. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  5. Remarkable stability of an instability-prone lentiviral vector plasmid in Escherichia coli Stbl3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Tolmachov, Oleg E; Zambetti, Lia Paola; Tchetchelnitski, Viktoria; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-02-01

    Large-scale production of plasmid DNA to prepare therapeutic gene vectors or DNA-based vaccines requires a suitable bacterial host, which can stably maintain the plasmid DNA during industrial cultivation. Plasmid loss during bacterial cell divisions and structural changes in the plasmid DNA can dramatically reduce the yield of the desired recombinant plasmid DNA. While generating an HIV-based gene vector containing a bicistronic expression cassette 5'-Olig2cDNA-IRES-dsRed2-3', we encountered plasmid DNA instability, which occurred in homologous recombination deficient recA1 Escherichia coli strain Stbl2 specifically during large-scale bacterial cultivation. Unexpectedly, the new recombinant plasmid was structurally changed or completely lost in 0.5 L liquid cultures but not in the preceding 5 mL cultures. Neither the employment of an array of alternative recA1 E. coli plasmid hosts, nor the lowering of the culture incubation temperature prevented the instability. However, after the introduction of this instability-prone plasmid into the recA13E. coli strain Stbl3, the transformed bacteria grew without being overrun by plasmid-free cells, reduction in the plasmid DNA yield or structural changes in plasmid DNA. Thus, E. coli strain Stbl3 conferred structural and maintenance stability to the otherwise instability-prone lentivirus-based recombinant plasmid, suggesting that this strain can be used for the faithful maintenance of similar stability-compromised plasmids in large-scale bacterial cultivations. In contrast to Stbl2, which is derived wholly from the wild type isolate E. coli K12, E. coli Stbl3 is a hybrid strain of mixed E. coli K12 and E. coli B parentage. Therefore, we speculate that genetic determinants for the benevolent properties of E. coli Stbl3 for safe plasmid propagation originate from its E. coli B ancestor.

  6. Addiction protein Phd of plasmid prophage P1 is a substrate of the ClpXP serine protease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnherr, H; Yarmolinsky, M B

    1995-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded addiction genes augment the apparent stability of various low copy number bacterial plasmids by selectively killing plasmid-free (cured) segregants or their progeny. The addiction module of plasmid prophage P1 consists of a pair of genes called phd and doc. Phd serves to prevent host death when the prophage is retained and, should retention mechanisms fail, Doc causes death on curing. Doc acts as a cell toxin to which Phd is an antidote. In this study we show that host mutants...

  7. Bacillus stearothermophilus contains a plasmid-borne gene for alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielenz, J R

    1983-01-01

    The gene for thermostable alpha-amylase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each alpha-amylase-producing colony contained at least a 9.7-kilobase-pair (kb) chimeric plasmid composed of the vector pBR322 and a common 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. B. stearothermophilus contains four plasmids with sizes from 12 kb to over 108 kb. Restriction endonuclease analysis of these naturally occurring plasmids showed they also contain a 5.4-kb HindIII fragment of DNA. Cloning experiments with the four plasmids yielded alpha-amylase-producing E. coli that contained the same 9.7-kb chimeric plasmid. Restriction endonuclease analysis and further recombinant DNA experiments identified a 26-kb plasmid that contains the gene for alpha-amylase. A spontaneous mutant of B. stearothermophilus unable to produce alpha-amylase was missing the 26-kb plasmid but contained a 20-kb plasmid. A 6-kb deletion within the region of the 5.4-kb HindIII fragment yielded the 20-kb plasmid unable to code for alpha-amylase. A nick-translated probe for the alpha-amylase coding region did not hybridize to either plasmid or total cellular DNA from this mutant strain of B. stearothermophilus. These results demonstrate the gene for alpha-amylase is located exclusively on a 26-kb plasmid in B. stearothermophilus with no genetic counterpart present on the chromosome. Images PMID:6193526

  8. Patterns of residential segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Louf, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain however unclear: there is no clear definition of what segregation is, no unambiguous definition of income classes, no clear way to identify neighborhoods, and no method to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique theoretical framework. We assume that households belonging to the same class tend to live close to each other, and households from different classes tend to avoid one another. Applied to the US 2000 Census Income data, 3 distinct classes emerge from the clustering of the original 16 income classes. Using these unambiguously defined classes, we cluster together contiguous similar areas and find that the number of clusters for each category scales with the city population, an effect that is more pronounced for rich households. Finally, using...

  9. Effect of low temperature on stability of theta-type plasmids in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaychuk, Valerie M; van Belkum, Marco J; Stiles, Michael E; McMullen, Lynn M

    2008-03-01

    The heterologous production of useful peptides such as bacteriocins by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been studied for use in the biopreservation of foods. Recombinant plasmids can suffer drawbacks such as segregational instability affecting the production of these peptides in certain environments such as absence of selective pressure or low temperature. The link between growth temperature characteristics of parental strains and stability of theta-type plasmids at a low temperature was investigated. The growth of four parental strains at 4 degrees C and stability of five derivative theta-type plasmids transformed into Carnobacterium maltaromaticum UAL26 at 25 and 4 degrees C were determined. Two plasmids (pCD11 and pCaT) derived from psychrotrophic LAB and plasmid, pHW800, from Enterococcus faecium 226 with unknown growth temperature characteristics, had excellent stability when strains were grown at 4 degrees C. Plasmids (pTRKH2 and pUCB820) derived from LAB that did not grow at refrigeration temperatures were not stable at 4 degrees C. When a DNA fragment from pCD11 containing 22-bp repeats, a putative replication initiation site, and the gene for the RepA protein was inserted into pTRKH2, the resulting derivative plasmid was 100% stable at 4 degrees C.

  10. Use of FabV-Triclosan Plasmid Selection System for Efficient Expression and Production of Recombinant Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A Ali

    Full Text Available Maintenance of recombinant plasmid vectors in host bacteria relies on the presence of selection antibiotics in the growth media to suppress plasmid -free segregants. However, presence of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics themselves is not acceptable in several applications of biotechnology. Previously, we have shown that FabV-Triclosan selection system can be used to select high and medium copy number plasmid vectors in E. coli. Here, we have extended our previous work and demonstrated that expression vectors containing FabV can be used efficiently to express heterologous recombinant proteins in similar or better amounts in E. coli host when compared with expression vectors containing β-lactamase. Use of small amount of non-antibiotic Triclosan as selection agent in growth medium, enhanced plasmid stability, applicability in various culture media, and compatibility with other selection systems for multiple plasmid maintenance are noteworthy features of FabV-Triclosan selection system.

  11. Regular cellular distribution of plasmids by oscillating and filament-forming ParA ATPase of plasmid pB171

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Ringgaard, Simon; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    with each other in a bacterial two-hybrid assay but do not interact with FtsZ, eight other essential cell division proteins or MreB actin. Based on these observations, we propose a simple model for how oscillating ParA filaments can mediate regular cellular distribution of plasmids. The model functions......Centromere-like loci from bacteria segregate plasmids to progeny cells before cell division. The ParA ATPase (a MinD homologue) of the par2 locus from plasmid pB171 forms oscillating helical structures over the nucleoid. Here we show that par2 distributes plasmid foci regularly along the length...... of the cell even in cells with many plasmids. In vitro, ParA binds ATP and ADP and has a cooperative ATPase activity. Moreover, ParA forms ATP-dependent filaments and cables, suggesting that ParA can provide the mechanical force for the observed regular distribution of plasmids. ParA and ParB interact...

  12. Regular Cellular Distribution of Plasmids by Oscillating and Filament-forming ParA ATPase of Plasmid pB171

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Ringgaard, Simon; Møller-Jensen, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    with each other in a bacterial two-hybrid assay but do not interact with FtsZ, eight other essential cell division proteins or MreB actin. Based on these observations, we propose a simple model for how oscillating ParA filaments can mediate regular cellular distribution of plasmids. The model functions......Centromere-like loci from bacteria segregate plasmids to progeny cells before cell division. The ParA ATPase (a MinD homologue) of the par2 locus from plasmid pB171 forms oscillating helical structures over the nucleoid. Here we show that par2 distributes plasmid foci regularly along the length...... of the cell even in cells with many plasmids. In vitro, ParA binds ATP and ADP and has a cooperative ATPase activity. Moreover, ParA forms ATP-dependent filaments and cables, suggesting that ParA can provide the mechanical force for the observed regular distribution of plasmids. ParA and ParB interact...

  13. Shaping Segregation: Convexity vs. concavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, S.; Windows-Yule, C.R.; Luding, S.; Parker, D.J.; Thornton, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. In this Letter we demonstrate a manner in which rotation-induced segregation may be controlled by altering the geometry of the rotating containers in which granular systems are housed. Using a novel drum design comprising conca

  14. Integration and segregation in auditory scene analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Elyse S.

    2005-03-01

    Assessment of the neural correlates of auditory scene analysis, using an index of sound change detection that does not require the listener to attend to the sounds [a component of event-related brain potentials called the mismatch negativity (MMN)], has previously demonstrated that segregation processes can occur without attention focused on the sounds and that within-stream contextual factors influence how sound elements are integrated and represented in auditory memory. The current study investigated the relationship between the segregation and integration processes when they were called upon to function together. The pattern of MMN results showed that the integration of sound elements within a sound stream occurred after the segregation of sounds into independent streams and, further, that the individual streams were subject to contextual effects. These results are consistent with a view of auditory processing that suggests that the auditory scene is rapidly organized into distinct streams and the integration of sequential elements to perceptual units takes place on the already formed streams. This would allow for the flexibility required to identify changing within-stream sound patterns, needed to appreciate music or comprehend speech..

  15. Phase Segregation in Polystyrene?Polylactide Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Bonnie; Hitchcock, Adam; Brash, John; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew

    2010-06-09

    Spun-cast films of polystyrene (PS) blended with polylactide (PLA) were visualized and characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The composition of the two polymers in these systems was determined by quantitative chemical analysis of near-edge X-ray absorption signals recorded with X-PEEM. The surface morphology depends on the ratio of the two components, the total polymer concentration, and the temperature of vacuum annealing. For most of the blends examined, PS is the continuous phase with PLA existing in discrete domains or segregated to the air?polymer interface. Phase segregation was improved with further annealing. A phase inversion occurred when films of a 40:60 PS:PLA blend (0.7 wt percent loading) were annealed above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PLA.

  16. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position.

  17. Source Segregation and Collection of Source-Segregated Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    of optimal handling of the waste. But in a few cases, the waste must also be separated at source, for example removing the protective plastic cover from a commercial advertisement received by mail, prior to putting the advertisement into the waste collection bin for recyclable paper. These issues are often......The Segregation of individual material fractions at the waste source and keeping the fractions separate for collection is one of the key issues in modern waste management. In most cases the waste is just kept segregated from other waste according to certain criteria that improve the possibility...... termed source separation or sorting at source. Here the word segregation has been chosen to indicate the importance of keeping the waste fractions apart by sorting waste and by separating waste into segregated materials as it is generated. The more waste that a physically defined source generates...

  18. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevallos Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The ori

  19. Dynamics of Transformation from Segregation to Mixed Wealth Cities

    CERN Document Server

    Sahasranaman, Anand

    2016-01-01

    We model the dynamics of the Schelling model for agents described simply by a continuously distributed variable - wealth. Agents move to neighborhoods where their wealth is not lesser than that of some proportion of their neighbors, the threshold level. As in the case of the classic Schelling model where segregation obtains between two races, we find here that wealth-based segregation occurs and persists. However, introducing uncertainty into the decision to move - that is, with some probability, if agents are allowed to move even though the threshold level condition is contravened - we find that even for small proportions of such disallowed moves, the dynamics no longer yield segregation but instead sharply transition into a persistent mixed wealth distribution. We investigate the nature of this sharp transformation between segregated and mixed states, and find that it is because of a non-linear relationship between allowed moves and disallowed moves. For small increases in disallowed moves, there is a rapid...

  20. The role of temporal coherence in auditory stream segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Simon Krogholt

    The ability to perceptually segregate concurrent sound sources and focus one’s attention on a single source at a time is essential for the ability to use acoustic information. While perceptual experiments have determined a range of acoustic cues that help facilitate auditory stream segregation......, it is not clear how the auditory system realizes the task. This thesis presents a study of the mechanisms involved in auditory stream segregation. Through a combination of psychoacoustic experiments, designed to characterize the influence of acoustic cues on auditory stream formation, and computational models...... of auditory processing, the role of auditory preprocessing and temporal coherence in auditory stream formation was evaluated. The computational model presented in this study assumes that auditory stream segregation occurs when sounds stimulate non-overlapping neural populations in a temporally incoherent...

  1. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  2. Segregation of prokaryotic magnetosomes organelles is driven by treadmilling of a dynamic actin-like MamK filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Nahuelpan, Mauricio; Müller, Frank D; Klumpp, Stefan; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Bramkamp, Marc; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-10-12

    The navigation of magnetotactic bacteria relies on specific intracellular organelles, the magnetosomes, which are membrane-enclosed crystals of magnetite aligned into a linear chain. The magnetosome chain acts as a cellular compass, aligning the cells in the geomagnetic field in order to search for suitable environmental conditions in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. During cytokinesis, magnetosome chains have to be properly positioned, cleaved and separated in order to be evenly passed into daughter cells. In Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, the assembly of the magnetosome chain is controlled by the actin-like MamK, which polymerizes into cytoskeletal filaments that are connected to magnetosomes through the acidic MamJ protein. MamK filaments were speculated to recruit the magnetosome chain to cellular division sites, thus ensuring equal organelle inheritance. However, the underlying mechanism of magnetic organelle segregation has remained largely unknown. Here, we performed in vivo time-lapse fluorescence imaging to directly track the intracellular movement and dynamics of magnetosome chains as well as photokinetic and ultrastructural analyses of the actin-like cytoskeletal MamK filament. We show that magnetosome chains undergo rapid intracellular repositioning from the new poles towards midcell into the newborn daughter cells, and the driving force for magnetosomes movement is likely provided by the pole-to-midcell treadmilling growth of MamK filaments. We further discovered that splitting and equipartitioning of magnetosome chains occurs with unexpectedly high accuracy, which depends directly on the dynamics of MamK filaments. We propose a novel mechanism for prokaryotic organelle segregation that, similar to the type-II bacterial partitioning system of plasmids, relies on the action of cytomotive actin-like filaments together with specific connectors, which transport the magnetosome cargo in a fashion reminiscent of eukaryotic actin

  3. Inherent Segregation in Granular Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Guzmán J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of the inherent segregation within granular media due to the relative size of the different particles is presented. A numerical model is used to simulate granular structures. For both simulation and granular structures evaluations, probability theory is widely used. Particles are idealized by disks (2D model and spheres (3D model. Strictly uniform grain size materials, bimodal (two particle sizes and continuous are simulated. Two variables representing segregation and allowing appreciating the grain-size parameters effects are considered. In uniform materials, the presence of spontaneous structuring is observed. In bimodal and continuous materials, inherent segregation mainly depends on the ratio between maximum and minimum diameters of particle. Some practical implications of inherent segregation in geotechnical problems and other disciplines are remarked.

  4. Can topology reshape segregation patterns?

    CERN Document Server

    Gandica, Yerali; Carletti, Timoteo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a metapopulation version of the Schelling model of segregation over several complex networks and lattice. We show that the segregation process is topology independent and hence it is intrinsic to the individual tolerance. The role of the topology is to fix the places where the segregation patterns emerge. In addition we address the question of the time evolution of the segregation clusters, resulting from different dynamical regimes of a coarsening process, as a function of the tolerance parameter. We show that the underlying topology may alter the early stage of the coarsening process, once large values of the tolerance are used, while for lower ones a different mechanism is at work and it results to be topology independent.

  5. Curing of plasmid pBMB28 from Bacillus thuringiensis YBT-020 using an unstable replication region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Qian; Shang, Hui; Zhu, Yiguang; Sun, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar finitimus strain YBT-020 is the well-studied spore-crystal association (SCA) phenotypic strain, whose parasporal crystals adhere to spore after lysis of the mother cell. Its endogenous plasmids pBMB26 and pBMB28 were proved essential for this SCA phenotype. In our previous study, using conventional methods, pBMB26 cured derivative and both pBMB26 and pBMB28 cured derivative of YBT-020 were obtained. However, YBT-020 solely cured of pBMB28 could not be obtained. In this study, an unstable replication region of pBMB28 was identified and was used to construct an incompatible plasmid pRep28B. This incompatible plasmid was successfully used to cure plasmid pBMB28 and was easily eliminated through segregational instability under the optimum growth temperature of YBT-020. Therefore, an endogenous plasmid was cured from the B. thuringiensis strain utilizing plasmid incompatibility. Moreover, using an unstable replication region instead of a temperature sensitive (Ts) replication region is better to cure the incompatible plasmid because it can avoid culturing at higher temperature. This method provides an efficient method for plasmid curing in B. thuringiensis and other bacteria.

  6. The effect of grain boundary segregation of boron in cast alloy 718 on HAZ microfissuring -- a SIMS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.; Chaturvedi, M.C. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Richards, N.L. [Bristol Aerospace Ltd., Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Jackman, J. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) has been used to examine grain boundary segregation in cast alloy 718. The relationship between the boron segregation and the microfissuring tendency in heat affected zones (HAZ) around electron beam welds is discussed in this study. It is concluded that two types of segregation, namely equilibrium and non-equilibrium segregation, occurred during the homogenization heat treatment of the base material. Water quenching after the homogenization treatment inhibited non-equilibrium segregation of boron and other trace elements owing to insufficient time for diffusion of solute-vacancy complexes to occur. Intermediate cooling rates such as air cooling enhanced both non-equilibrium and equilibrium segregation, since equilibrium segregation occurred during holding at the heat treatment temperature. The value of net segregation produced by a combination of equilibrium segregation and non-equilibrium segregation varied with temperature in a U-shape. The nature of the grain boundary in the cast alloy was examined by using an electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and it was found that 93% of the grain boundaries were of the random type ({Sigma} > 49). The weldability of this alloy was found to be closely related to the grain boundary segregation of boron, i.e., the variation of HAZ total crack length (TCL) with pre-welding heat treatment temperatures has a trend similar to that of boron segregation with temperature after air cooling. Mechanisms for the effect of boron on HAZ microfissuring have been proposed.

  7. Segregation phenomena at growing alumina/alloy interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.

    2005-03-30

    The chemistry and structure at the scale/alloy interface are important factors governing scale adhesion. The chemical changes can occur from segregation of impurities in the alloy, such as sulphur and carbon, or alloying elements such as chromium, aluminium and reactive elements. This paper reviews studies of the changes of interfacial composition with oxidation time for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on several model alumina-forming alloys, and tries to relate that to the interfacial strength. Results show that sulphur segregation to oxide/metal interfaces can indeed occur, but the type and amount of segregants at the interface depend on the alloy composition and the interface structure. Co-segregation of impurities with alloying elements can also occur, resulting in multi-layer segregants at the interface. Sulphur-containing interfaces are indeed weaker, but the major role of sulphur is to enhance interfacial void formation. Reactive elements in the alloy not only gather sulfur but also exert an additional positive effect on scale adhesion.

  8. Co-resident plasmids travel together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode genes that enable them to transfer, by conjugation, from a given host cell to another cell. Conjugative transfer, despite being an important feature of conjugative plasmids, is not constitutive for most plasmids, the reason being that genes involved in horizontal transfer are mostly repressed. Only upon their transient de-repression are plasmids able to transfer horizontally. If host cells harbour multiple plasmids, their simultaneous transfer depends on simultaneous transient de-repression of all plasmids. If de-repression of different plasmids was random and independent events, simultaneous de-repression should be a rare event because the probability of simultaneous de-repression would be the product of the probabilities of de-repression of each plasmid. Some previous observations support this hypothesis, while others show that co-transfer of plasmids is more frequent than this reasoning indicates. Here, we show that co-transfer of multiple plasmids mainly results from non-independent events: the probability that all plasmids within a cell become de-repressed is much higher than if de-repression of plasmids genes were independent. We found a simple model for the probability of co-transfer: the plasmid having the lowest conjugation rates is the one who limits co-transfer. In this sense, cells receiving the plasmid with the lower transfer rate also receive the other plasmid. If de-repression happens simultaneously on co-resident plasmids, common cues may stimulate de-repression of distinct plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Chlamydophila felis plasmid is highly conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Ross; Day, Sarinder; Di Rocco, Camillo; Helps, Chris

    2010-11-20

    The presence of a plasmid in the Chlamydiaceae is both species and strain specific. Knowledge of the prevalence of the plasmid in different Chlamydia species is important for future studies aiming to investigate the role of the plasmid in chlamydial biology and disease. Although strains of Chlamydophila felis with or without the plasmid have been identified, only a small number of laboratory-adapted strains have been analysed and the prevalence of the plasmid in field isolates has not been determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the plasmid in C. felis-positive conjunctival and oropharyngeal clinical samples submitted for routine diagnosis of C. felis by real-time (Q)PCR. DNA extracts from four laboratory-adapted strains were also analysed. QPCR assays targeting regions of C. felis plasmid genes pCF01, pCF02 and pCF03 were developed for the detection of plasmid DNA. QPCR analysis of DNA extracts from C. felis-positive clinical samples found evidence of plasmid DNA in 591 of 595 samples representing 561 of 564 (99.5%) clinical cases. Plasmid DNA was also detected by QPCR in laboratory-adapted strains 1497V, K2487 and K2490, but not strain 905. We conclude that the plasmid is highly conserved in C. felis, and plasmid-deficient strains represent a rare but important population for future studies of chlamydial plasmid function.

  10. Plasmids and rickettsial evolution: insight from Rickettsia felis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Gillespie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome sequence of Rickettsia felis revealed a number of rickettsial genetic anomalies that likely contribute not only to a large genome size relative to other rickettsiae, but also to phenotypic oddities that have confounded the categorization of R. felis as either typhus group (TG or spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae. Most intriguing was the first report from rickettsiae of a conjugative plasmid (pRF that contains 68 putative open reading frames, several of which are predicted to encode proteins with high similarity to conjugative machinery in other plasmid-containing bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using phylogeny estimation, we determined the mode of inheritance of pRF genes relative to conserved rickettsial chromosomal genes. Phylogenies of chromosomal genes were in agreement with other published rickettsial trees. However, phylogenies including pRF genes yielded different topologies and suggest a close relationship between pRF and ancestral group (AG rickettsiae, including the recently completed genome of R. bellii str. RML369-C. This relatedness is further supported by the distribution of pRF genes across other rickettsiae, as 10 pRF genes (or inactive derivatives also occur in AG (but not SFG rickettsiae, with five of these genes characteristic of typical plasmids. Detailed characterization of pRF genes resulted in two novel findings: the identification of oriV and replication termination regions, and the likelihood that a second proposed plasmid, pRFdelta, is an artifact of the original genome assembly. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, we propose a new rickettsial classification scheme with the addition of a fourth lineage, transitional group (TRG rickettsiae, that is unique from TG and SFG rickettsiae and harbors genes from possible exchanges with AG rickettsiae via conjugation. We offer insight into the evolution of a plastic plasmid system in rickettsiae, including the role plasmids may have played in

  11. Controlling segregation speed of entangled polymers by the shapes: A simple model for eukaryotic chromosome segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuji; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping polymers motivated by chromosome segregation in biological cells. We investigate the relationship between polymer shapes and segregation dynamics and show that elongation and compaction make entangled polymers segregate rapidly. This result suggests that eukaryotic chromosomes take such a characteristic rod-shaped structure, which is induced by condensins, to achieve rapid segregation.

  12. PLASMIDS FROM ANAEROCELLUM THERMOPHILUM AND USES THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention concerns the isolation of plasmids from extremely thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms and their use in genetic transformation of thermophilic and mesophilic microorganisms. More particular the invention concerns the use of thermostable plasmid vectors as tools for creating...

  13. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  14. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  15. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods.

  16. Heats of Segregation and Segregation Profiles of BCC Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian S.; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    The composition of metal alloy surfaces is often different from that of the bulk. Some alloys exhibit surface segregation, where one or more species reside preferentially at or near the surface. A detailed understanding of this behavior is necessary to correctly model such phenomena as adhesion or catalysis. Several phenomenological approaches to the problem have been put forward, falling into two broad categories: Thermodynamic approaches, where the equilibrium distribution of chemical species is computed. Atomistic approaches, where the tendency of a species to segregate is determined by computation of the energies of single atoms of that species in bulk and surface environments.

  17. Plasmid required for virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, B.; Currier, T.C.; Gordon, M.P.; Chilton, M.D.; Nester, E.W.

    1975-07-01

    The irreversible loss of crown gall-inducing ability of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C-58 during growth at 37/sup 0/C is shown to be due to loss of a large plasmid (1.2 x 10/sup 8/ daltons). The gene responsible for this high rate of plasmid loss at elevated temperatures seems to be located on the plasmid. In addition, another spontaneous avirulent variant, A. tumefaciens strain IIBNV6, is shown to lack the virulence plasmid which its virulent sibling strain, IIBV7, possesses. Deoxyribonucleic acid reassociation measurements prove that the plasmid is eliminated, not integrated into the chromosome, in both of the avirulent derivatives. Transfer of virulence from donor strain C-58 to avirulent recipient strain A136 results from the transfer of a plasmid, which appears identical to the donor plasmid by deoxyribonucleic acid reassociation measurements. The transfer of virulence in another cross, K27 x A136, was also shown to result from the transfer of a large plasmid. These findings establish unequivocally that the large plasmid determines virulence. Two additional genetic determinants have been located on the virulence plasmid of A. tumefaciens strain C-58: the ability to utilize nopaline and sensitivity to a bacteriocin produced by strain 84. The latter trait can be exploited for selection of avirulent plasmid-free derivatives of strain C-58. The trait of nopaline utilization appears to be on the virulence plasmid also in strains IIBV7 and K27.

  18. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via horizontal gene transfer as well as

  19. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free-surface flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodhouse, M.J.; Thornton, A.R.; Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, B.P.; Gray, J.M.N.T.

    2012-01-01

    Particle-size segregation can have a significant feedback on the bulk motion of granular avalanches when the larger grains experience greater resistance to motion than the fine grains. When such segregation-mobility feedback effects occur the flow may form digitate lobate fingers or spontaneously se

  20. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  1. Tailings philosophies : to segregate or not to segregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.S. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Traditional technologies for treating oil sands tailings include the segregation of of tailings when discharged into water-filled ponds. The coarser tailings form long beaches. However, the percentage of silts and clays that remain suspended within the water column pose significant challenges to oil sands operators, and contribute to water losses and increases in storage volume. This paper discussed new technologies developed to identify the tailings materials that contribute to the problem and methods designed to isolate and treat the materials. Treatment material balances, process water balances, and material handling requirements for the technologies were evaluated and compared. Three scenarios were considered: (1) a sub-aqueous beaching scenario where tailings were produced by extraction and pumped to a beach storage area for dewatering through self-drainage; (2) a non-segregated tailings (NST) scenario that used mature fine tailings (MFT) drying; (3) and a segregated stream scenario where MFT drying was used where tailings were deposited in traditional tailings ponds. Results of the study showed that the segregated stream tailings treatment system was preferred to NST treatment system. Options for sub-aerial NST deposition may overcome the volume discrepancies between treating fines as well as the required volumes of coarser materials. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  2. Chlamydophila felis: plasmid detection in Italian isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Antonietta; Donati, Manuela; Salvatore, Daniela; Cevenini, Roberto; Di Paolo, Maria; Baldelli, Raffaella

    2010-04-01

    Plasmids have been detected in the majority of strains in the genus Chlamydia and in many Chlamydophila species. Previous studies showed that FP Pring and FP Cello Chlamydophila felis strains have an extrachromosomial plasmid, whereas the FP Baker strain does not. Azuma et al. recently sequenced the entire genomic DNA sequence of the Japanese Cp. felis strain Fe/C-56 and described a 7,552 base pair circular plasmid. In the present study a highly conserved plasmid gene was detected in 11 Italian Cp. felis isolates, showing 100% nucleotide identity with the plasmid gene of Fe/C-56 Cp. felis strain.

  3. Hating the Neighbors: The Role of Hate Crime in the Perpetuation of Black Residential Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M. Lynch

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in group conflict theory and the defended neighborhoods thesis, this nationwide empirical study of cities and their residential segregation levels examines the occurrence of hate crime using data for all U.S. cities with populations over 95,000 and Uniform Crime Reporting data for hate crime, in conjunction with 2000 census data. Hate crime is any illegal act motivated by pre-formed bias against, in this case, a person’s real or perceived race. This research asks: Do hate crime levels predict white/black segregation levels? How does hate crime predict different measures of white/black segregation? I use the dissimilarity index measure of segregation operationalized as a continuous, binary, and ordinal variable, to explore whether hate crime predicts segrega- tion of blacks from whites. In cities with higher rates of hate crime there was higher dissimilarity between whites and blacks, controlling for other factors. The segregation level was more likely to be “high” in a city where hate crime occurred. Blacks are continually multiply disadvantaged and distinctly affected by hate crime and residential segregation. Prior studies of residential segregation have focused almost exclusively on individual choice, residents’ lack of finances, or discriminatory actions that prevent racial minorities from moving, to explore the correlates of segregation. Notably absent from these studies are measures reflecting the level of hate crime occurring in cities. This study demonstrates the importance of considering hate crime and neighborhood conflict when contemplating the causes of residential segregation.

  4. Sexual orientation, prejudice and segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, E.; Webbink, D.; Martin, N.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether gay and lesbian workers sort into tolerant occupations. With information on sexual orientation, prejudice, and occupational choice taken from Australian Twin Registers, we find that gays and lesbians shy away from prejudiced occupations. We show that our segregation res

  5. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of "ultra-fine DNA bridges" (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which...

  6. Nonequilibrium Segregation in Petroleum Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1999-01-01

    We analyse adsorption of a multicomponent mixture at high pressure on the basis of the potential theory of adsorption. The adsorbate is considered as a segregated mixture in the external field produced by a solid adsorbent. we derive an analytical equation for the thickness of a multicomponent fi...

  7. Sound source localization and segregation with internally coupled ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bee, Mark A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signaling plays key roles in mediating many of the reproductive and social behaviors of anurans (frogs and toads). Moreover, acoustic signaling often occurs at night, in structurally complex habitats, such as densely vegetated ponds, and in dense breeding choruses characterized by high...... to their correct sources (sound source segregation). Here, we review anatomical, biophysical, neurophysiological, and behavioral studies aimed at identifying how the internally coupled ears of frogs contribute to sound source localization and segregation. Our review focuses on treefrogs in the genus Hyla...

  8. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae.

  9. Persistence of a pKPN3-like CTX-M-15-encoding IncFIIK plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumonia ST17 host during two years of intestinal colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Høyland Löhr

    Full Text Available To characterize the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST17 strain, responsible for an outbreak at a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit and subsequent colonization of affected children for up to two years. To identify plasmid-mediated features relevant for the outbreak dynamics, and to investigate the plasmids capability of horizontal transfer, its segregational stability and plasmid-mediated fitness costs.Plasmid profiling was performed by S1-nuclease PFGE, PCR-based replicon typing and Southern blot-hybridization. The complete sequence of the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid was obtained by 454 sequencing. Plasmid self-transferability was investigated by broth- and filter mating, segregational stability was explored by serial passage, and plasmid-conferred fitness costs were examined in pairwise head-to-head competitions and by growth rate comparisons.CTX-M-15 was encoded by a ~180 kb IncFIIK plasmid in K. pneumoniae ST17. S1-nuclease PFGE profiles of the first and the last CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, recovered from the four children colonized the longest, suggested that the plasmid was stably maintained during intestinal carriage of up to two years. The DNA sequence of the pKPN3-like plasmid, pKp848CTX, uncovered a Tn3-like antibiotic resistance region and multiple heavy metal- and thermoresistance determinants. Plasmid pKp848CTX could not be transferred to Escherichia coli in vitro and we found no evidence to support horizontal plasmid transfer in vivo. Segregational plasmid loss ranging from 0.83% to 17.5% was demonstrated in evolved populations in vitro, but only minor fitness costs were associated with plasmid-carriage.Plasmid pKp848CTX encodes phenotypic traits, which may have had an impact on the fitness and survival of the K. pneumoniae ST17 strain in the outbreak setting. The antibiotic resistance plasmid pKp848CTX was stably maintained during two years of intestinal colonization, conferring negligible

  10. Characteristics of Sn segregation in Ge/GeSn heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Chang, C.; Chen, T. P.; Cheng, H. H., E-mail: hhcheng@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences and Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Shi, Z. W.; Chen, H. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-10-13

    We report an investigation of Sn segregation in Ge/GeSn heterostructures occurred during the growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The measured Sn profile in the Ge layer shows that: (a) the Sn concentration decreases rapidly near the Ge/GeSn interface, and (b) when moving away from the interface, the Sn concentration reduced with a much slower rate. The 1/e decay lengths of the present system are much longer than those of the conventional group IV system of Ge segregation in the Si overlayer because of the smaller kinetic potential as modeled by a self-limited two-state exchange scheme. The demonstration of the Sn segregation shows the material characteristics of the heterostructure, which are needed for the investigation of its optical properties.

  11. pTAR-encoded proteins in plasmid partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnin, K; Stegalkina, S; Yarmolinsky, M

    2000-04-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465-478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream genes, parB and orf-84, of which only parB was found to be essential for partitioning in A. tumefaciens. Purified ParA exhibited a weak ATPase activity that was modestly increased by nonspecific DNA. ParB bound in vitro to repeated sequences present in a region, parS, that possesses centromere and operator functions and within which we identified the primary transcription start site by primer extension. In certain respects the Par proteins behave normally in the foreign host Escherichia coli. In E. coli, as in A. tumefaciens, ParB repressed the partition operon; ParA, inactive alone, augmented this repression. Functional similarities between the partition system of pTAR and those of other plasmids and bacteria are prominent, despite differences in size, organization, and amino acid sequence.

  12. A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Michael A; Waldor, Matthew K

    2006-12-01

    The mechanisms that mediate chromosome segregation in bacteria are poorly understood. Despite evidence of dynamic movement of chromosome regions, to date, mitotic-like mechanisms that act on the bacterial chromosome have not been demonstrated. Here we provide evidence that the Vibrio cholerae ParAI and ParBI proteins are components of an apparatus that pulls the origin region of the large V. cholerae chromosome to the cell pole and anchors it there. ParBI interacts with a conserved origin-proximal, centromere-like site (parSI) that, following chromosome replication, segregates asymmetrically from one pole to the other. While segregating, parSI stretches far away from neighboring chromosomal loci. ParAI forms a dynamic band that extends from the pole to the segregating ParBI/parSI complex. Movement of ParBI/parSI across the cell occurs in concert with ParAI retraction. Deletion of parAI disrupts proper origin localization and segregation dynamics, and parSI no longer separates from nearby regions. These data suggest that ParAI forms a dynamic structure that pulls the ParBI-bound chromosome to the pole in a process analogous to anaphase of eukaryotic mitosis.

  13. Angle of repose and segregation in cohesive granular matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Azadeh; Kudrolli, A.

    2001-11-01

    We study the effect of fluids on the angle of repose and the segregation of granular matter poured into a silo. The experiments are conducted in two regimes where: (i) the volume fraction of the fluid (liquid) is small and it forms liquid bridges between particles thus giving rise to cohesive forces, and (ii) the particles are completely immersed in the fluid. The data is obtained by imaging the pile formed inside a quasi-two-dimensional silo through the transparent glass side walls and using color-coded particles. In the first series of experiments, the angle of repose is observed to increase sharply with the volume fraction of the fluid and then saturates at a value that depends on the size of the particles. We systematically study the effect of viscosity by using water-glycerol mixtures to vary it over at least three orders of magnitude while keeping the surface tension almost constant. Besides surface tension, the viscosity of the fluid is observed to have an effect on the angle of repose and the extent of segregation. In case of bidisperse particles, segregation is observed to decrease and finally saturate depending on the size ratio of the particles and the viscosity of the fluid. The sharp initial change and the subsequent saturation in the extent of segregation and angle of repose occurs over similar volume fraction of the fluid. Preferential clumping of small particles causes layering to occur when the size of the clumps of small particles exceeds the size of large particles. We calculate the azimuthal correlation function of particle density inside the pile to characterize the extent of layering. In the second series of experiments, particles are poured into a container filled with a fluid. Although the angle of repose is observed to be unchanged, segregation is observed to decrease with an increase in the viscosity of the fluid. The viscosity at which segregation decreases to zero depends on the size ratio of the particles.

  14. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any person...

  15. International perspectives on countering school segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.T.A.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Peters, T.J.M.; Walraven, G.

    2010-01-01

    School segregation is perceived as an unyielding problem worldwide, which is manifest along both ethnic and socio-economic lines. With this edited volume we aim to share information about school segregation and policies focused on countering school segregation from an international perspective. Many

  16. Tracking of chromosome dynamics in live Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals that transcription promotes chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is an essential part of the bacterial cell cycle but is poorly characterized in oval-shaped streptococci. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have tracked the dynamics of chromosome segregation in live cells of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our observations show that the chromosome segregation process last for two-thirds of the total cell cycle; the origin region segregates rapidly in the early stages of the cell cycle while nucleoid segregation finishes just before cell division. Previously we have demonstrated that the DNA-binding protein ParB and the condensin SMC promote efficient chromosome segregation, likely by an active mechanism. We now show that in the absence of SMC, cell division can occur over the unsegregated chromosomes. However, neither smc nor parB are essential in S. pneumoniae, suggesting the importance of additional mechanisms. Here we have identified the process of transcription as one of these mechanisms important for chromosome segregation in S. pneumoniae. Transcription inhibitors rifampicin and streptolydigin as well as mutants affected in transcription elongation cause chromosome segregation defects. Together, our results highlight the importance of passive (or indirect) processes such as transcription for chromosome segregation in oval-shaped bacteria.

  17. The Evolution of the Segregation Behavior of Alloying Elements in a Low-Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Papworth; D.B. Knorr; D.B. Williams

    2002-08-21

    The segregation of alloying and impurity elements to prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) in low-alloy steels controls temper-embrittlement although the precise microchemical and microstructural interactions are, as yet, unclear because of the many variables involved. Competing segregation and de-segregation phenomena are observed. For example, Auger analyses of fracture surfaces indicate that brittle fracture is caused by the segregation of P to the PAGB. The addition of small amounts ({approx} 0.5 wt%) of Mo appears to regard, but not stop, temper-embrittlement, possibly due to Mo{sub 2}C precipitates that form at elevated temperatures causing de-segregation of Mo from the PAGB. The relationship between segregation and temper embrittlement is further complicated in commercial alloys by both the number of segregating elements and the complex, multi-stage heat treatments. Auger analysis pre-selects the most embrittled boundaries and so the complete distribution of segregants across all PAGBs cannot be determined by this technique. Previous work has shown how X-ray mapping (XRM) in a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM) offers a more complete view of the distribution of segregants on both non-embrittled and embrittled PAGBs. XRM was used to observe the evolution of the segregation and desegregation of five elements during four successive heat-treatment stages of commercial low-alloy steel forging. In the last and crucial temper-embrittlement stage, increases in the degree and frequency of Ni segregation occur while other elements either segregate, remain constant or desegregate from the PAGBs.

  18. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  19. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    plasmids* in*populations*of* Gram > negative *bacteria*grown*in*biofilms*and*well>mixed*liquid*cultures.** * Task2:*Characterize*the*evolution*of*plasmid...R.! Edwards.! 2005.! Overview! of! nosocomial! infections! caused! by! gramP negative ! bacilli .!Clin.!Infect.!Dis.!41:848P854.! LoftiePEaton,!W.,!A... negative ! interaction!between!one!of! its!chromosomal!segments!and!the!plasmid! by!simply!deleting!the!appropriate!chromosomal!segment.!! 7. None

  20. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segrega...

  1. Plasmid profiles of Moraxella bovis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, T J; Pugh, G W

    1986-04-01

    Two-hundred isolates of Moraxella bovis were selected at random and examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by a rapid alkaline-detergent lysis method. All isolates contained from 1 to 6 plasmids, with varying agarose-gel electrophoretic migration patterns. Most (80%) isolates carried 2 to 4 plasmids, which ranged in molecular weight from 2.6 to 80 megadaltons. Seemingly, plasmid profiles can be used as a simple, reliable epizootiologic tool to establish a strain identification scheme for M bovis.

  2. Plasmid transfer systems in the rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Hynes, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Rhizobia are agriculturally important bacteria that can form nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Agricultural application of rhizobial inoculants can play an important role in increasing leguminous crop yields. In temperate rhizobia, genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation are usually located on one or more large plasmids (pSyms) or on symbiotic islands. In addition, other large plasmids of rhizobia carry genes that are beneficial for survival and competition of rhizobia in the rhizosphere. Conjugative transfer of these large plasmids thus plays an important role in the evolution of rhizobia. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of conjugative transfer of large rhizobial plasmids provides foundations for maintaining, monitoring, and predicting the behaviour of these plasmids during field release events. In this minireview, we summarize two types of known rhizobial conjugative plasmids, including quorum sensing regulated plasmids and RctA-repressed plasmids. We provide evidence for the existence of a third type of conjugative plasmid, including pRleVF39c in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain VF39SM, and we provide a comparison of the different types of conjugation genes found in members of the rhizobia that have had their genomes sequenced so far.

  3. Effect of chromosome homology an plasmid transformation and plasmid conjugal transfer in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-05-14

    The pairing between plasmid and the homologous part of the chromosome associated with plasmid establishment may differ from the pairing which results from integration of a homologous region of the plasmid into the chromosome. Thus the rate of novobiocin transformation decreases with duplication of the chromosomal portion in pMB2, but the rate of establishment of the plasmid increases with this duplication. A model to explain these data is given. 17 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Pettengill, James B; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Miller, John; Ayers, Sherry L; Zhao, Shaohua; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2017-01-01

    plasmids, advances in plasmid sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses, and important insights about how MDR evolution occurs across diverse serotypes from different animal sources, particularly in agricultural settings where antimicrobial drug use practices vary.

  5. New and Redesigned pRS Plasmid Shuttle Vectors for Genetic Manipulation of Saccharomycescerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Mark K; Haase, Steven B

    2012-05-01

    We have constructed a set of 42 plasmid shuttle vectors based on the widely used pRS series for use in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli. This set of pRSII plasmids includes new shuttle vectors that can be used with histidine and adenine auxotrophic laboratory yeast strains carrying mutations in the genes HIS2 and ADE1, respectively. Our pRSII plasmids also include updated versions of commonly used pRS plasmids from which common restriction sites that occur within their yeast-selectable biosynthetic marker genes have been removed to increase the availability of unique restriction sites within their polylinker regions. Hence, our pRSII plasmids are a complete set of integrating, centromere and 2μ episomal plasmids with the biosynthetic marker genes ADE2, HIS3, TRP1, LEU2, URA3, HIS2, and ADE1 and a standardized selection of at least 16 unique restriction sites in their polylinkers. Additionally, we have expanded the range of drug selection options that can be used for PCR-mediated homologous replacement using pRS plasmid templates by replacing the G418-resistance kanMX4 cassette of pRS400 with MX4 cassettes encoding resistance to phleomycin, hygromycin B, nourseothricin, and bialaphos. Finally, in the process of generating the new plasmids, we have determined several errors in existing publicly available sequences for several commonly used yeast plasmids. Using our updated sequences, we constructed pRS plasmid backbones with a unique restriction site for inserting new markers to facilitate future expansion of the pRS series.

  6. Plasmid profile analysis in identification of epidemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković-Selimović Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. As illness caused by Sallmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis occurs not only as sporadic cases but as outbreaks, to reveal the source and routes of spreading of infection it is necessary to identify epidemic strain by the use of some typing methods. To determine whether plasmid profile analysis, as genotyping method, could be applied for the investigation of epidemic strains, isolates of S. Enteritidis, recovered from patient's stools and food associated with outbreaks and those isolated from sporadic cases of diarrhea, were investigated. Methods. Investigation of antibiotic resistance was performed by Kirby - Bauer disc-diffusion method. Isolation of plasmid DNA was carried out by Birnboim and Dolly alkaline lysis method, modified by Ish-Horovitz. Results. Out of 276 izolates of S. Enteritidis 94 were isolated from patient's stools and food associated with outbreaks and 182 were isolated from sporadic cases of diarrhea. The presence of 12 plasmid profiles was established. An average correlation degree of plasmid profiles between the strains was 0.84, that implies high degree of similarity of plasmid profiles of epidemic and non- epidemic strains isolated at our geographic region for the given period of time. Conclusion. The strains of S. Enteritidis, isolated in outbreaks of enterocolitis as well as from spordic cases of diarrhea in the same period of time and at the same area, frequently exhibit the same plasmid profile characterized by a single plasmid of 38 MDa. Therefore, in most cases plasmid profile analysis is not valuable in the identification of epidemic strains of S. Enteritidis. However, for this purpose plasmid profile analysis could be used when drug-resistant strains of S. Enteritidis are isolated, as they often possess additional resistant plasmids what increases discrimination power of this method.

  7. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maayer, Pieter; Chan, Wai-Yin; Blom, Jochen; Venter, Stephanus N; Duffy, Brion; Smits, Theo H M; Coutinho, Teresa A

    2012-11-15

    Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1) of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS). A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS), conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse environments.

  8. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Maayer Pieter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of a large plasmid common to all sequenced Pantoea spp. Results and discussion The Large PantoeaPlasmids (LPP-1 of twenty strains encompassing seven different Pantoea species, including pathogens and endo-/epiphytes of a wide range of plant hosts as well as insect-associated strains, were compared. The LPP-1 plasmid sequences range in size from ~281 to 794 kb and carry between 238 and 750 protein coding sequences (CDS. A core set of 46 proteins, encompassing 2.2% of the total pan-plasmid (2,095 CDS, conserved among all LPP-1 plasmid sequences, includes those required for thiamine and pigment biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that these plasmids have arisen from an ancestral plasmid, which has undergone extensive diversification. Analysis of the proteins encoded on LPP-1 also showed that these plasmids contribute to a wide range of Pantoea phenotypes, including the transport and catabolism of various substrates, inorganic ion assimilation, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, colonization and persistence in the host and environment, pathogenesis and antibiosis. Conclusions LPP-1 is universal to all Pantoea spp. whose genomes have been sequenced to date and is derived from an ancestral plasmid. LPP-1 encodes a large array of proteins that have played a major role in the adaptation of the different Pantoea spp. to their various ecological niches and their specialization as pathogens, biocontrol agents or benign saprophytes found in many diverse

  9. The expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein causes structural plasmid instability in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, C.; Meima, R; Twiest, B; Kazemier, B; Venema, G; vanDijl, JM; Bron, S

    The rolling-circle plasmid pGP1 was used to study the effects of the expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein on structural plasmid stability in Bacillus subtilis. pGP1 contains a fusion between the Bacillus licheniformis penP gene, encoding a C-terminally truncated penicillinase, and the

  10. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans.

  11. Physical Model of Segregation of E.coli Chromosomes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnahhas, Faisal; Kharel, Savan

    2016-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is one of the most interesting physical processes during a bacterial cell cycle. We will use molecular dynamics simulations which will help us understand how strongly confined polymer segregates. In the presentation, we will discuss how segregation of initially overlapping circular chromosome occurs during a cell cycle. In particular, we will describe the role played by entropic mechanism in the demixing of overlapping circular polymer confined in a cylindrical boundary. We discuss how our polymer chains modeled as an E-coli chromosome experiences an effective repulsion, which ultimately leads to partition driven by the entropic forces. Also, we will also discuss how the segregation of circular chromosome in cylindrical confinement differs from a spherical confinement. Finally, we will discuss the role played by proteins and supercoiling in during the segregation process.

  12. Rapid Mitochondrial DNA Segregation in Primate Preimplantation Embryos Precedes Somatic and Germline Bottleneck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Sang Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The timing and mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA segregation and transmission in mammals are poorly understood. Genetic bottleneck in female germ cells has been proposed as the main phenomenon responsible for rapid intergenerational segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA. We demonstrate here that mtDNA segregation occurs during primate preimplantation embryogenesis resulting in partitioning of mtDNA variants between daughter blastomeres. A substantial shift toward homoplasmy occurred in fetuses and embryonic stem cells (ESCs derived from these heteroplasmic embryos. We also observed a wide range of heteroplasmic mtDNA variants distributed in individual oocytes recovered from these fetuses. Thus, we present here evidence for a previously unknown mtDNA segregation and bottleneck during preimplantation embryo development, suggesting that return to the homoplasmic condition can occur during development of an individual organism from the zygote to birth, without a passage through the germline.

  13. Rapid mitochondrial DNA segregation in primate preimplantation embryos precedes somatic and germline bottleneck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Sang; Ma, Hong; Juanes, Rita Cervera; Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Woodward, Joy; Ramsey, Cathy; Xu, Jing; Kang, Eun-Ju; Amato, Paula; Mair, Georg; Steinborn, Ralf; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2012-05-31

    The timing and mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) segregation and transmission in mammals are poorly understood. Genetic bottleneck in female germ cells has been proposed as the main phenomenon responsible for rapid intergenerational segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA. We demonstrate here that mtDNA segregation occurs during primate preimplantation embryogenesis resulting in partitioning of mtDNA variants between daughter blastomeres. A substantial shift toward homoplasmy occurred in fetuses and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from these heteroplasmic embryos. We also observed a wide range of heteroplasmic mtDNA variants distributed in individual oocytes recovered from these fetuses. Thus, we present here evidence for a previously unknown mtDNA segregation and bottleneck during preimplantation embryo development, suggesting that return to the homoplasmic condition can occur during development of an individual organism from the zygote to birth, without a passage through the germline.

  14. Chromosome segregation proteins of Vibrio cholerae as transcription regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong Hwan; Rajagopala, Seesandra V; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-05-06

    ABSTRACT Bacterial ParA and ParB proteins are best known for their contribution to plasmid and chromosome segregation, but they may also contribute to other cell functions. In segregation, ParA interacts with ParB, which binds to parS centromere-analogous sites. In transcription, plasmid Par proteins can serve as repressors by specifically binding to their own promoters and, additionally, in the case of ParB, by spreading from a parS site to nearby promoters. Here, we have asked whether chromosomal Par proteins can likewise control transcription. Analysis of genome-wide ParB1 binding in Vibrio cholerae revealed preferential binding to the three known parS1 sites and limited spreading of ParB1 beyond the parS1 sites. Comparison of wild-type transcriptomes with those of ΔparA1, ΔparB1, and ΔparAB1 mutants revealed that two out of 20 genes (VC0067 and VC0069) covered by ParB1 spreading are repressed by both ParB1 and ParA1. A third gene (VC0076) at the outskirts of the spreading area and a few genes further away were also repressed, particularly the gene for an outer membrane protein, ompU (VC0633). Since ParA1 or ParB1 binding was not evident near VC0076 and ompU genes, the repression may require participation of additional factors. Indeed, both ParA1 and ParB1 proteins were found to interact with several V. cholerae proteins in bacterial and yeast two-hybrid screens. These studies demonstrate that chromosomal Par proteins can repress genes unlinked to parS and can do so without direct binding to the cognate promoter DNA. IMPORTANCE Directed segregation of chromosomes is essential for their maintenance in dividing cells. Many bacteria have genes (par) that were thought to be dedicated to segregation based on analogy to their roles in plasmid maintenance. It is becoming clear that chromosomal par genes are pleiotropic and that they contribute to diverse processes such as DNA replication, cell division, cell growth, and motility. One way to explain the pleiotropy

  15. Sexual segregation in foraging giraffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mramba, Rosemary Peter; Mahenya, Obeid; Siyaya, Annetjie; Mathisen, Karen Marie; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Skarpe, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Sexual segregation in giraffe is known to vary between savannas. In this study, we compared sexual segregation in giraffe in one nutrient-rich savanna, the Serengeti National Park, one nutrient-poor, Mikumi National Park, and one medium rich savanna, Arusha National Park, (from here on referred to just by name) based on effects of sexual size dimorphism and related hypotheses. Data were collected in the wet and dry seasons, by driving road transects and making visual observations of browsing giraffe. Additional data were collected from literature (plant chemistry; mammal communities). There was a noticeable difference in browsing by females and males and in browsing between the three savannas. Females browsed a higher diversity of tree species in Serengeti whereas males browsed a higher diversity in Arusha, while the diversity of species browsed in Mikumi was high and about the same in both sexes. Females selected for high concentrations of nitrogen and low concentrations of tannins and phenolics compared to males in Serengeti but selection in Mikumi was more complex. Males browsed higher in the canopy than females in all sites, but the browsing height was generally higher in Serengeti than Mikumi and Arusha. Season had an effect on the browsing height independent of sex in Mikumi, where giraffes browsed higher in the dry season compared to the wet season. Males spent more time browsing per tree compared to females in all three sites; however, browsing time in Mikumi was also affected by season, where giraffes had longer browsing bouts in the wet season compared to the dry season. We suggest that sexual differences in forage requirement and in foraging interacts with differences in tree chemistry and in competing herbivore communities between nutrient rich and nutrient poor savanna in shaping the sexual segregation.

  16. Epsilon-toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens type D are conjugative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Meredith L; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Sayeed, Sameera; Saputo, Juliann; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2007-11-01

    Isolates of Clostridium perfringens type D produce the potent epsilon-toxin (a CDC/U.S. Department of Agriculture overlap class B select agent) and are responsible for several economically significant enterotoxemias of domestic livestock. It is well established that the epsilon-toxin structural gene, etx, occurs on large plasmids. We show here that at least two of these plasmids are conjugative. The etx gene on these plasmids was insertionally inactivated using a chloramphenicol resistance cassette to phenotypically tag the plasmid. High-frequency conjugative transfer of the tagged plasmids into the C. perfringens type A strain JIR325 was demonstrated, and the resultant transconjugants were shown to act as donors in subsequent mating experiments. We also demonstrated the transfer of "unmarked" native epsilon-toxin plasmids into strain JIR325 by exploiting the high transfer frequency. The transconjugants isolated in these experiments expressed functional epsilon-toxin since their supernatants had cytopathic effects on MDCK cells and were toxic in mice. Using the widely accepted multiplex PCR approach for toxin genotyping, these type A-derived transconjugants were genotypically type D. These findings have significant implications for the C. perfringens typing system since it is based on the toxin profile of each strain. Our study demonstrated the fluid nature of the toxinotypes and their dependence upon the presence or absence of toxin plasmids, some of which have for the first time been shown to be conjugative.

  17. Epsilon-Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens Type D Are Conjugative▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Meredith L.; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Sayeed, Sameera; Saputo, Juliann; Uzal, Francisco A.; McClane, Bruce A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2007-01-01

    Isolates of Clostridium perfringens type D produce the potent epsilon-toxin (a CDC/U.S. Department of Agriculture overlap class B select agent) and are responsible for several economically significant enterotoxemias of domestic livestock. It is well established that the epsilon-toxin structural gene, etx, occurs on large plasmids. We show here that at least two of these plasmids are conjugative. The etx gene on these plasmids was insertionally inactivated using a chloramphenicol resistance cassette to phenotypically tag the plasmid. High-frequency conjugative transfer of the tagged plasmids into the C. perfringens type A strain JIR325 was demonstrated, and the resultant transconjugants were shown to act as donors in subsequent mating experiments. We also demonstrated the transfer of “unmarked” native ɛ-toxin plasmids into strain JIR325 by exploiting the high transfer frequency. The transconjugants isolated in these experiments expressed functional ɛ-toxin since their supernatants had cytopathic effects on MDCK cells and were toxic in mice. Using the widely accepted multiplex PCR approach for toxin genotyping, these type A-derived transconjugants were genotypically type D. These findings have significant implications for the C. perfringens typing system since it is based on the toxin profile of each strain. Our study demonstrated the fluid nature of the toxinotypes and their dependence upon the presence or absence of toxin plasmids, some of which have for the first time been shown to be conjugative. PMID:17720791

  18. Plasmid as a measure of microbial degradation capacity for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Nyuk-Min; Chang, Hung-Wei

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to pursuit the quantification of microbial degradation capacity for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by detecting and quantifying a prominent 2,4-D degradation encoding plasmid. Batch reactor acclimation, de-acclimation, and re-acclimation tests were conducted during which periods the courses of 2,4-D dissipation and plasmid evolution were quantitatively measured. Pure cultures of bacterial strains were detected to give rise to a plasmid approximately the size of 90 kb after acclimation. The 90 kb plasmid content of Arthrobacter sp. increased when degradation occurred after acclimation, with a rate that corresponded closely to the degradation rate. During de-acclimation, plasmid content declined exponentially at a half-life of approximately 3.5 days. Re-acclimation saw a renewed induction of plasmid, but substrate consumption limited the rise of plasmid to a level much lower than after the first acclimation. This research recommends a method for measuring the microbial degradation capability for a xenobiotic.

  19. Melt-rich segregations in the Skaergaard Marginal Border Series: Tearing of a vertical silicate mush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, M. C. S.; Holness, M. B.

    2010-10-01

    The Marginal Border Series (MBS) of the Skaergaard Intrusion crystallised on the steeply dipping sidewalls of the magma chamber. Melt-rich segregations, previously described as the 'wavy pyroxene rock' are a key feature of the otherwise homogeneous outermost parts of the MBS. The lens-shaped segregations consistently strike parallel to the chamber wall and have a moderate dip towards it. The shape, size, grain size and mineralogy of the segregations evolve systematically away from the chamber wall. The segregations become bigger, more widely spaced, chemically more evolved and more irregular in shape with increasing distance from the margin. The segregations were previously interpreted as a nucleation effect parallel to the thermal gradient. However, they dip toward the margin, not parallel to it. We offer a new interpretation: that the segregations represent tearing of poorly consolidated crystal mush during localised sagging of the vertical solidification front. The tears form during a process analogous to 'hot tearing' of metal alloys, although the driving force for tearing is probably gravitational collapse of the vertical solidification front, or perhaps contemporaneous faulting during chamber filling. Small, regular tears formed in the thinner, more rapidly cooled outer parts of the MBS, while the larger, irregular tears formed in the coarser grained, inner parts. Movement of interstitial liquid fed the cracks after tearing, and the liquid crystallised as relatively evolved, coarse-grained segregations. The mineral chemistry and texture of the segregations suggest that the tearing occurs relatively early in the crystallisation history.

  20. Entropy as the driver of chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Suckjoon; Wright, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    We present a new physical biology approach to understanding the relationship between the organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. We posit that replicated Escherichia coli daughter strands will spontaneously demix as a result of entropic forces, despite their strong confinement within the cell; in other words, we propose that entropy can act as a primordial physical force which drives chromosome segregation under the right physical conditions. Furthermore, proteins implicated in the regulation of chromosome structure and segregation may in fact function primarily in supporting such an entropy-driven segregation mechanism by regulating the physical state of chromosomes. We conclude that bacterial chromosome segregation is best understood in terms of spontaneous demixing of daughter strands. Our concept may also have important implications for chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, in which spindle-dependent chromosome movement follows an extended period of sister chromatid demixing and compaction.

  1. Centromere binding specificity in assembly of the F plasmid partition complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The segregation of plasmid F of Escherichia coli is highly reliable. The Sop partition locus, responsible for this stable maintenance, is composed of two genes, sopA and sopB and a centromere, sopC, consisting of 12 direct repeats of 43 bp. Each repeat carries a 16-bp inverted repeat motif to which SopB binds to form a nucleoprotein assembly called the partition complex. A database search for sequences closely related to sopC revealed unexpected features that appeared highly conserved. We hav...

  2. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, N.Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    1986-04-01

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. ParAB Partition Dynamics in Firmicutes: Nucleoid Bound ParA Captures and Tethers ParB-Plasmid Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia S Lioy

    Full Text Available In Firmicutes, small homodimeric ParA-like (δ2 and ParB-like (ω2 proteins, in concert with cis-acting plasmid-borne parS and the host chromosome, secure stable plasmid inheritance in a growing bacterial population. This study shows that (ω:YFP2 binding to parS facilitates plasmid clustering in the cytosol. (δ:GFP2 requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis to localize onto the cell's nucleoid as a fluorescent cloud. The interaction of (δ:CFP2 or δ2 bound to the nucleoid with (ω:YFP2 foci facilitates plasmid capture, from a very broad distribution, towards the nucleoid and plasmid pairing. parS-bound ω2 promotes redistribution of (δ:GFP2, leading to the dynamic release of (δ:GFP2 from the nucleoid, in a process favored by ATP hydrolysis and protein-protein interaction. (δD60A:GFP2, which binds but cannot hydrolyze ATP, also forms unstable complexes on the nucleoid. In the presence of ω2, (δD60A:GFP2 accumulates foci or patched structures on the nucleoid. We propose that (δ:GFP2 binding to different nucleoid regions and to ω2-parS might generate (δ:GFP2 gradients that could direct plasmid movement. The iterative pairing and unpairing cycles may tether plasmids equidistantly on the nucleoid to ensure faithful plasmid segregation by a mechanism compatible with the diffusion-ratchet mechanism as proposed from in vitro reconstituted systems.

  4. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent ex...

  5. Toxin Kid uncouples DNA replication and cell division to enforce retention of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Belén; Nair, Radhika; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Preston, Mark A; Agu, Chukwuma A; Wang, Xindan; Bernal, Juan A; Sherratt, David J; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2014-02-18

    Worldwide dissemination of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is facilitated by plasmids that encode postsegregational killing (PSK) systems. These produce a stable toxin (T) and a labile antitoxin (A) conditioning cell survival to plasmid maintenance, because only this ensures neutralization of toxicity. Shortage of antibiotic alternatives and the link of TA pairs to PSK have stimulated the opinion that premature toxin activation could be used to kill these recalcitrant organisms in the clinic. However, validation of TA pairs as therapeutic targets requires unambiguous understanding of their mode of action, consequences for cell viability, and function in plasmids. Conflicting with widespread notions concerning these issues, we had proposed that the TA pair kis-kid (killing suppressor-killing determinant) might function as a plasmid rescue system and not as a PSK system, but this remained to be validated. Here, we aimed to clarify unsettled mechanistic aspects of Kid activation, and of the effects of this for kis-kid-bearing plasmids and their host cells. We confirm that activation of Kid occurs in cells that are about to lose the toxin-encoding plasmid, and we show that this provokes highly selective restriction of protein outputs that inhibits cell division temporarily, avoiding plasmid loss, and stimulates DNA replication, promoting plasmid rescue. Kis and Kid are conserved in plasmids encoding multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including extended spectrum β-lactamases, for which therapeutic options are scarce, and our findings advise against the activation of this TA pair to fight pathogens carrying these extrachromosomal DNAs.

  6. Acentrosomal Spindle Assembly & Chromosome Segregation During Oocyte Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Julien; Desai, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    The ability to reproduce relies in most eukaryotes on specialized cells called gametes. Gametes are formed by the process of meiosis in which, after a single round of replication, two successive cell divisions reduce the ploidy of the genome. Fusion of gametes at fertilization reconstitutes diploidy. In most animal species, chromosome segregation during female meiosis occurs on spindles assembled in the absence of the major microtubule-organizing center, the centrosome. In mammals, oocyte mei...

  7. Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii OP with a broad host range plasmid containing a cloned chromosomal nif-DNA marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingle, W H

    1988-05-01

    The non-nitrogen-fixing (Nif-) strain UW10 of Azotobacter vinelandii OP (UW) was naturally induced to competence and transformed with broad host range plasmid pKT210 containing the cloned wild-type nif-10 locus from A. vinelandii UW (Nif+); this marker was unable to complement the nif-10 mutation in trans, but could through recombination with the chromosome. The most frequent type of transformation event observed was recombination between the homologous regions of the plasmid and chromosome (producing Nif+ transformants) with loss of the plasmid vector. At a substantially lower frequency, transformants expressing the plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance determinants were isolated which were phenotypically Nif-. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that these transformants contained a plasmid migrating with the same mobility as the original donor plasmid. During culture these transformants acquired a Nif+ phenotype without the loss of the plasmid, as judged by the use of a hybridization probe specific for the cloned nif-DNA fragment. These data indicate that plasmids carrying sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences could be maintained in recombination-proficient A. vinelandii UW. The introduction of plasmids containing sequences homologous to chromosomal sequences was facilitated by prelinearization of the plasmid using a restriction endonuclease generating cohesive ends. Because the site of linearization could be chosen outside the region of shared homology, it was unlikely that the route of plasmid establishment occurred via a homology-facilitated transformation mechanism. The data also indicated that A. vinelandii UW could harbor broad host range cloning vectors based on plasmid RSF1010 without significant impairment of its nitrogen-fixation ability.

  8. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  9. Housing Systems and Ethnic Spatial Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter; Andersson, Roger; Wessel, Terje

    Residential spatial segregation is related to housing markets and housing policies. In this paper, ethnic segregation is compared across four Nordic capitals and explanations for the differences are examined by comparing the housing markets and housing policies of the countries. The housing markets...... of neighbourhoods. Ethnic segmentation of housing tenures thus contributes to segregation, but the effect is much dependent on how tenures are distributed across space. In one of the cities, the policy of neighbourhood tenure mix has resulted in a relatively low degree of segregation in spite of high concentrations...

  10. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Farshad; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2004-11-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent experiments show: (1) Attributes are registered over the temporal window defined by the perceptual persistence of segregation, resulting in asynchrony in binding, and (2) attention is necessary for correct registration of attributes in the presence of ambiguity.

  11. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiotte, R. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: rlambiot@ulb.ac.be; Salazar, J.M. [Universite De Bougogne-LRRS UMR-5613 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, 9 Av. Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jmarcos@u-bourgogne.fr; Brenig, L. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: lbrenig@ulb.ac.be

    2005-08-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations.

  12. Grain boundary structure and solute segregation in titanium-doped sapphire bicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Seth T.

    2002-05-17

    Solute segregation to ceramic grain boundaries governs material processing and microstructure evolution, and can strongly influence material properties critical to engineering performance. Understanding the evolution and implications of grain boundary chemistry is a vital component in the greater effort to engineer ceramics with controlled microstructures. This study examines solute segregation to engineered grain boundaries in titanium-doped sapphire (Al2O3) bicrystals, and explores relationships between grain boundary structure and chemistry at the nanometer scale using spectroscopic and imaging techniques in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results demonstrate dramatic changes in solute segregation stemming from small fluctuations in grain boundary plane and structure. Titanium and silicon solute species exhibit strong tendencies to segregate to non-basal and basal grain boundary planes, respectively. Evidence suggests that grain boundary faceting occurs in low-angle twis t boundaries to accommodate nonequilibrium solute segregation related to slow specimen cooling rates, while faceting of tilt grain boundaries often occurs to expose special planes of the coincidence site lattice (CSL). Moreover, quantitative analysis of grain boundary chemistry indicates preferential segregation of charged defects to grain boundary dislocations. These results offer direct proof that static dislocations in ionic materials can assume a net charge, and emphasize the importance of interactions between charged point, line, and planar defects in ionic materials. Efforts to understand grain boundary chemistry in terms of space charge theory, elastic misfit and nonequilibrium segregation are discussed for the Al2O3 system.

  13. Phase segregation through transient network formation in a binary particle suspension in simple shear: Application to dough

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opheusden, Joost H. J.; Molenaar, J.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we describe a viscoelastic type of phase separation in a simulated binary fluid with a sticky and an inert component, without any external gradients. Phase segregation under simple shear occurs due to transient network formation of the sticky component, expelling the inert particles from the network. When model parameters are adjusted to reduce network formation and rearrangement, the segregation effect is significantly smaller or absent. The behavior is independent of shear rate; segregation increases mainly with shear strain. The model is applied to wheat dough. Recent experiments have shown that prolonged shear flow of wheat dough can even give macroscopic segregation.

  14. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  15. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  16. Cell cycle coordination and regulation of bacterial chromosome segregation dynamics by polarly localized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Whitman B; Lim, Hoong Chuin; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2010-09-15

    What regulates chromosome segregation dynamics in bacteria is largely unknown. Here, we show in Caulobacter crescentus that the polarity factor TipN regulates the directional motion and overall translocation speed of the parS/ParB partition complex by interacting with ParA at the new pole. In the absence of TipN, ParA structures can regenerate behind the partition complex, leading to stalls and back-and-forth motions of parS/ParB, reminiscent of plasmid behaviour. This extrinsic regulation of the parS/ParB/ParA system directly affects not only division site selection, but also cell growth. Other mechanisms, including the pole-organizing protein PopZ, compensate for the defect in segregation regulation in ΔtipN cells. Accordingly, synthetic lethality of PopZ and TipN is caused by severe chromosome segregation and cell division defects. Our data suggest a mechanistic framework for adapting a self-organizing oscillator to create motion suitable for chromosome segregation.

  17. Segregation versus Integration: The Racial Policy of the Marine Corps from 1942-1962

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-21

    quickly diminished. “Paralleling the rise of Jim Crow and legalized segregation in much of America was the cutback in the number of Black sailors, who...intended more to appease the Negro press and other ‘interested’ In essence, these officers felt the social transformation of America should occur in the...abolished segregation, it still was far from being fully integrated. Racism was still prevalent and the Marine Corps continued to place restriction on the

  18. Plasmid construction using recombination activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Chino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Construction of plasmids is crucial in modern genetic manipulation. As of now, the common method for constructing plasmids is to digest specific DNA sequences with restriction enzymes and to ligate the resulting DNA fragments with DNA ligase. Another potent method to construct plasmids, known as gap-repair cloning (GRC, is commonly used in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GRC makes use of the homologous recombination activity that occurs within the yeast cells. Due to its flexible design and efficiency, GRC has been frequently used for constructing plasmids with complex structures as well as genome-wide plasmid collections. Although there have been reports indicating GRC feasibility in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, this species is not commonly used for GRC as systematic studies of reporting GRC efficiency in S. pombe have not been performed till date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated GRC efficiency in S. pombe in this study. We first showed that GRC was feasible in S. pombe by constructing a plasmid that contained the LEU2 auxotrophic marker gene in vivo and showed sufficient efficiency with short homology sequences (>25 bp. No preference was shown for the sequence length from the cut site in the vector plasmid. We next showed that plasmids could be constructed in a proper way using 3 DNA fragments with 70% efficiency without any specific selections being made. The GRC efficiency with 3 DNA fragments was dramatically increased >95% in lig4Delta mutant cell, where non-homologous end joining is deficient. Following this approach, we successfully constructed plasmid vectors with leu1+, ade6+, his5+, and lys1+ markers with the low-copy stable plasmid pDblet as a backbone by applying GRC in S. pombe. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that GRC was sufficiently feasible in S. pombe for genome-wide gene functional analysis as well as for regular plasmid construction. Plasmids with different

  19. Plasmid typing of Shigella sonnei epidemic strains and molecular relationship of their R-plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, M C; Gonzalez, A J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C

    1988-06-01

    We conducted a surveillance program on epidemic and/or endemic Shigella strains in Asturias (Spain), their frequency and dispersion in our community, and their R-plasmids. We analyzed initial isolates of Shigella sonnei from two epidemic outbreaks using antibiotic resistance patterns and plasmid profile analysis as epidemiological markers. We found that the 2 outbreaks were caused by different S. sonnei strains, which respectively carried one and two R-plasmids together with other plasmids. The molecular relationship among these and three other R-plasmids from two S. sonnei strains isolated during a previous outbreak, were studied by restriction enzyme analysis and DNA-DNA hybridizations. We were able to establish different levels of relationship among the six R-plasmids.

  20. Ising, Schelling and Self-Organising Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, D

    2007-01-01

    The similarities between phase separation in physics and residential segregation by preference in the Schelling model of 1971 are reviewed. Also, new computer simulations of asymmetric interactions different from the usual Ising model are presented, showing spontaneous magnetisation (= self-organising segregation) and in one case a sharp phase transition.

  1. Ising, Schelling and self-organising segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, D.; Solomon, S.

    2007-06-01

    The similarities between phase separation in physics and residential segregation by preference in the Schelling model of 1971 are reviewed. Also, new computer simulations of asymmetric interactions different from the usual Ising model are presented, showing spontaneous magnetisation (=self-organising segregation) and in one case a sharp phase transition.

  2. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  3. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David W S; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  4. Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachuestts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Greenberg, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    Though once a leader in school integration, Massachusetts has regressed over the last two decades as its students of color have experienced intensifying school segregation. This report investigates trends in school segregation in Massachusetts by examining concentration, exposure, and evenness measures by both race and class. First, the report…

  5. Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Francine D.; Hendricks, Wallace E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates postwar trends in occupational segregation. Finds segregation increased slightly between 1950-60 as predominantly female clerical/professional jobs increased. Occupation mix changes (1960-70) were neutral in impact, but male inflow into female professions and female inflow into male sales/clerical jobs produced modest segregation…

  6. Complete nucleotide sequences of 93-kb and 3.3-kb plasmids of an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 derived from Sakai outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, K; Ishii, K; Yasunaga, T; Hattori, M; Yokoyama, K; Yutsudo, C H; Kubota, Y; Yamaichi, Y; Iida, T; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T; Han, C G; Ohtsubo, E; Kasamatsu, M; Hayashi, T; Kuhara, S; Shinagawa, H

    1998-02-28

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7, derived from an outbreak in Sakai city, Japan in 1996, possesses two kinds of plasmids: a 93-kb plasmid termed pO157, found in clinical EHEC isolates world-wide and a 3.3-kb plasmid termed pOSAK1, prevalent in EHEC strains isolated in Japan. Complete nucleotide sequences of both plasmids have been determined, and the putative functions of the encoded proteins and the cis-acting DNA sequences have been analyzed. pO157 shares strikingly similar genes and DNA sequences with F-factor and the transmissible drug-resistant plasmid R100 for DNA replication, copy number control, plasmid segregation, conjugative functions and stable maintenance in the host, although it is defective in DNA transfer by conjugation due to the truncation and deletion of the required genes and DNA sequences. In addition, it encodes several proteins implicated in EHEC pathogenicity such as an EHEC hemolysin (HlyA), a catalase-peroxidase (KatP), a serine protease (EspP) and type II secretion system. pOSAK1 possesses a ColE1-like replication system, and the DNA sequence is extremely similar to that of a drug-resistant plasmid, NTP16, derived from Salmonella typhimurium except that it lacks drug resistance transposons.

  7. Prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid- mediated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lactamase genes among nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus drug resistance isolates in Taiwan. .... Table 2: Plasmid profiles of the clinical antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Strain. Profile .... Madec J. Characterization of clinical canine methicillin-.

  8. antimicrobial susceptibility and plasmids from escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-10-10

    Oct 10, 2001 ... transmission to humans of E. coli containing antibiotic resistance plasmids ... resistant micro-organisms, which may in turn transfer resistance to .... cells were washed with sterile normal saline to remove leached. Я-lactamase ...

  9. The Spatial Context of Residential Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Scholars have engaged in a longstanding debate about how best to measure residential segregation, and scores of indexes have been developed in response. However, the methods commonly employed are aspatial -- they summarize the characteristics of segregation patterns, such as concentration or clustering, but ignore their spatial features, such as how neighborhoods are spatially arranged. As a consequence, many studies find the same level of segregation whether a city has a patchwork of racial and ethnic enclaves, or is divided into large areas with little or no diversity. New methods have been developed to capture the spatial proximity of neighborhoods and the geographic scale of clustering. However, they lack a realistic measure of distance and do not accurately represent how segregation varies within cities. In this paper, I introduce a new method for studying the spatial context of residential segregation. I measure the distance between locations along city roads rather than in a straight line. Road distanc...

  10. Curing of plasmid pXO1 from Bacillus anthracis using plasmid incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available The large plasmid pXO1 encoding the anthrax toxin is important for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. It is essential to cure pXO1 from B. anthracis to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of anthrax infection. Because conventional methods for curing plasmids (e.g., curing agents or growth at elevated temperatures can induce mutations in the host chromosomal DNA, we developed a specific and reliable method to eliminate pXO1 from B. anthracis using plasmid incompatibility. Three putative replication origins of pXO1 were inserted into a temperature-sensitive plasmid to generate three incompatible plasmids. One of the three plasmids successfully eliminated the large plasmid pXO1 from B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R and wild type strain A16. These findings provided additional information about the replication/partitioning of pXO1 and demonstrated that introducing a small incompatible plasmid can generate plasmid-cured strains of B. anthracis without inducing spontaneous mutations in the host chromosome.

  11. Multiple plasmid interference - Pledging allegiance to my enemy's enemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    As shown in the previous article, two distinct conjugative plasmids sometimes interact within bacterial cells, implicating changes of transfer rates. In most cases of interactions within bacteria, the transfer of one of the plasmids decreases. Less frequently, the transfer rate of one of the plasmids increases. Here we analyse what happens if three distinct conjugative plasmids colonize the same bacterial cell. Our aim is to understand how interactions between two plasmids affect the transfer rate of the third plasmid. After showing that plasmids interact in 59 out of 84 possible interactions we show that, with some exceptions, if the transfer rate of a plasmid decreases in the presence of a second plasmid, a decrease is also observed in the presence of a third plasmid. Moreover, if the conjugation rate of a plasmid increases in the presence of another, an increase is also observed if there is a third plasmid in the cell. Both types of interactions are mostly independent of the third plasmid's identity, even if sometimes the third plasmid quantitatively distorts the interaction of the other two plasmids. There is a bias towards negative intensifying interactions, which provide good news concerning the spread conjugative plasmids encoding antibiotic-resistance genes and virulence factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gravitational segregation of liquid slag in large ladle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of gravitational segregation makes liquid steel slag components occur differentiation. And it shows that the upper part slag in the slag ladle contains higher CaO; and the lower part slag contains higher SiO2. The content of MgO (5,48 % in the upper part slag is higher than that of the lower part (2,50 %, and only Al2O3 content of the upper and the lower part slag is close to each other. The difference of chemical compositions in the slag ladle shows that there is gravitational segregation during slow solidification of liquid steel slag, which will has some impact of the steel slag processing on the large slag ladle.

  13. Investigating mixing and segregation using discrete element modelling (DEM) in the Freeman FT4 rheometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zilin; Wilkinson, Sam K; Stitt, Edmund H; Marigo, Michele

    2016-11-20

    Mixing and segregation in a Freeman FT4 powder rheometer, using binary mixtures with varied particle size ratio and volume fraction, were studied using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). As the blade moves within the particle bed, size induced segregations can occur via a sifting mechanism. A larger particle size ratio and/or a larger volume fraction of large particles lead to a quicker segregation process. A higher particle velocity magnitude can promote the segregation process and the rate for the segregation index increases in the radial direction: from the centre towards the outer layer. In the current DEM simulations, it is shown that the change in flow energy associated with segregation and mixing depends on the choice of frictional input parameters. FT4 is proposed as a potential tool to compare and rank the segregation tendency for particulate materials with distinct differences in flow energy of each component. This is achieved by measuring the flow energy gradient after a number of test cycles for mixing powders with different flow properties. Employing the FT4 dynamic powder characterisation can be advantageous to establish blending performances in an industrial context.

  14. Sequential stream segregation of voiced and unvoiced speech sounds based on fundamental frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marion; Lavandier, Mathieu; Grimault, Nicolas; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    Differences in fundamental frequency (F0) between voiced sounds are known to be a strong cue for stream segregation. However, speech consists of both voiced and unvoiced sounds, and less is known about whether and how the unvoiced portions are segregated. This study measured listeners' ability to integrate or segregate sequences of consonant-vowel tokens, comprising a voiceless fricative and a vowel, as a function of the F0 difference between interleaved sequences of tokens. A performance-based measure was used, in which listeners detected the presence of a repeated token either within one sequence or between the two sequences (measures of voluntary and obligatory streaming, respectively). The results showed a systematic increase of voluntary stream segregation as the F0 difference between the two interleaved sequences increased from 0 to 13 semitones, suggesting that F0 differences allowed listeners to segregate speech sounds, including the unvoiced portions. In contrast to the consistent effects of voluntary streaming, the trend towards obligatory stream segregation at large F0 differences failed to reach significance. Listeners were no longer able to perform the voluntary-streaming task reliably when the unvoiced portions were removed from the stimuli, suggesting that the unvoiced portions were used and correctly segregated in the original task. The results demonstrate that streaming based on F0 differences occurs for natural speech sounds, and that the unvoiced portions are correctly assigned to the corresponding voiced portions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  16. Recombinogenic engineering of conjugative plasmids with fluorescent marker cassettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Molin, Søren; Zechner, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    functions using very short regions of homology. Initial manipulation of the IncFII target plasmids R1 and R1drd19 indicated that the linear targeting DNA should be devoid of all extraneous homologies to. the target molecule for optimal insertion specificity. Indeed, a simple recombination assay proved...... that in the presence of additional homologous regions in the targeting DNA, strand exchanges occurred exclusively within the longest regions of homology. A versatile panel of vectors was created to facilitate convenient PCR amplification of targeting DNAs containing various combinations of different antibiotic...

  17. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTICLES OF BULK-BLENDED FERTILIZERS ON SEGREGATION BY CONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva G.A. da

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bulk blending is a way to produce compound fertilizers in which the different nutrients are present in different particles. Due to the heterogeneous composition of bulk blends, particle segregation, when it occurs, is a serious problem to the fertilizer producer, as well as to the farmer. Free fall is one of the main types of particle movement to promote segregation. The physical properties of the particles that potentially affect the tendency to segregate the most are size, density and shape. The main objective of this work is to study the influence of size and density of particles and distance of fall on segregation due to free fall. It was found that particle size is the most important physical characteristic to affect segregation; the greater the difference in particle size, the greater the segregation. Free fall is an important mechanical factor affecting segregation; the greater the distance of fall, the greater the segregation. No evidence of the influence of particle density on segregation was found

  19. Veil: A Wall of Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Nowrouzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Moving behind the confines of the race has been the continuous efforts of African-Americans so as to reveal and confirm their true humanity and abilities to white race as well as their own race. African-Americans, Dubois posited, are shut out of the white America, inhabiting behind a vast veil which creates a deep division between the races. Veil is made of the fabric of racism interwoven thread by thread and imposed by white world. It is thrown discourteously and forcibly to the African-Americans whom their distorted images are imposed on them and their true humanity and identity are hidden behind the veil. This study overtakes to present how Loraine Hansberry, in her first and the most outstanding drama, A Raisin in the Sun examines the world within the veil. She demonstrated that Duboisian metaphoric veil is operating in the racist American society so that not only African-Americans are segregated physically and psychologically from the rest of the world but also are inflicted with obscurity of vision that are neither able to see themselves clearly nor be seen truly. On the other hand, it presents how the veil provides blacks with the second sight to observe and comprehend the racist nature of whites which is hidden and incomprehensible for them.

  20. Genes that bias Mendelian segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Grognet

    Full Text Available Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs, complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion.

  1. Genes that bias Mendelian segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognet, Pierre; Lalucque, Hervé; Malagnac, Fabienne; Silar, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs), complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion.

  2. A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian; van der Leij, Marco

    We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important for job search, then expected homophily in the contact network structure...... induces different career choices for individuals from different social groups. This further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria in the labor market. We derive the conditions for wage and unemployment inequality in the segregation equilibria and characterize first and second best...

  3. Segregation of Polymers in Confined Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ya

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the motion of two overlapping polymers with self-avoidance confined in a narrow 2d box. A statistical model is constructed using blob free-energy arguments. We find spontaneous segregation under the condition: $L > R_{//}$, and mixing under $L < R_{//}$, where L is the length of the box, and $R_{//}$ the polymer extension in an infinite slit. Segregation time scales are determined by solving a mean first-passage time problem, and by performing Monte Carlo simulations. Predictions of the two methods show good agreement. Our results may elucidate a driving force for chromosomes segregation in bacteria.

  4. Horizontal segregation of mono-layer granules coordinated by vertical motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S-Y; Chung, F F; Liaw, S-S

    2011-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the segregation of a binary mixture of spherical beads confined between two horizontal vertically vibrating plates. The two kinds of beads are of equal diameter and mass but have different restitution coefficients. Segregation occurs in particular ranges of vibration amplitude and frequency. We find that the collisions between beads at an angle to the horizontal plane induce an effective horizontal repulsive force. When one or both bead types bounce up and down in synchronization, the effective repulsive force between the two types of beads is likely to be larger than that found within a single bead type, resulting in the mixture segregating. Non-horizontal collisions also play a role in stabilizing the segregation state by transferring the horizontal kinetic energy back into vertical motion.

  5. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Jaana K.H. Bamford; Buckling, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple ant...

  6. Analysis of functions in plasmid pHZ1358 influencing its genetic and structural stability in Streptomyces lividans 1326.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhui; He, Xinyi; Liang, Jingdan; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin

    2009-02-01

    The complete DNA sequence of plasmid pHZ1358, a widely used vector for targeted gene disruption and replacement experiments in many Streptomyces hosts, has been determined. This has allowed a detailed analysis of the basis of its structural and segregational instability, compared to the high copy number plasmid pIJ101 of Streptomyces lividans 1326 from which it was derived. A 574-bp DNA region containing sti (strong incompatibility locus) was found to be a determinant for segregational instability in its original S. lividans 1326 host, while the structural instability was found to be related to the facile deletion of the entire Escherichia coli-derived part of pHZ1358, mediated by recombination between 36-bp direct repeats. A point mutation removing the BamHI site inside the rep gene encoding a replication protein (rep*) and/or a spontaneous deletion of the 694-bp region located between rep and sti including the uncharacterized ORF85 (orf85(-)) produced little or no effect on stability. A pHZ1358 derivative (pJTU412, sti(-), rep*, orf85(-)) was then constructed which additionally lacked one of the 36-bp direct repeats. pJTU412 was demonstrated to be structurally stable but segregationally unstable and, in contrast to sti(+) pHZ1358, allowed efficient targeted gene replacement in S. lividans 1326.

  7. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  8. Entropy as the driver of chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Suckjoon; Wright, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We present a new physical biology approach to understanding the relationship between the organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. We posit that replicated Escherichia coli daughter strands will spontaneously demix as a result of entropic forces, despite their strong confinement within the cell; in other words, we propose that entropy can act as a primordial physical force which drives chromosome segregation under the right physical conditions. Furthermore, proteins implicated in...

  9. Segregation behavior of phosphorus in the heat-affected zone of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after simulated thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing, E-mail: ziqing.zhai@rbm.qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Miyahara, Yuichi [Material Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Impacts of aging on P segregation in actual heat-affected zone were examined by 3D-APT. • Non-equilibrium segregation of P dominated in subsequent cooling after welding. • Equilibrium segregation of P prevailed in step-cooling heat treatment. • High enrichment of P at grain/packet boundaries occurred in CGHAZ and ICCGHAZ. • Level of P enrichment at precipitate/matrix interface seemed species-dependent. - Abstract: The segregation behavior of phosphorus (P) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after step cooling was investigated with atom probe tomography. At grain/packet boundaries, the final P segregation level consisted of non-equilibrium segregation that occurred during cooling after welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and equilibrium segregation that occurred during step cooling. In both processes, higher P coverage was observed in the coarse-grained and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ than in the fine-grained HAZ and base material. The cooling after welding and PWHT seemed to have a pronounced impact on P segregation in the subsequent aging process. In addition, P segregation also occurred at the precipitate/matrix interfaces of cementite, Mo{sub 2}C and Al–Si rich precipitates. The evolution of P coverage at these two types of sites suggested increasing risks of embrittlement with an increase in aging time.

  10. Evidence that plasmid-borne botulinum neurotoxin type B genes are widespread among Clostridium botulinum serotype B strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Franciosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmids that encode certain subtypes of the botulinum neurotoxin type B have recently been detected in some Clostridium botulinum strains. The objective of the present study was to investigate the frequency with which plasmid carriage of the botulinum neurotoxin type B gene (bont/B occurs in strains of C. botulinum type B, Ab, and A(B, and whether plasmid carriage is bont/B subtype-related. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism was employed to identify subtypes of the bont/B gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot hybridization with specific probes were performed to analyze the genomic location of the bont/B subtype genes. All five known bont/B subtype genes were detected among the strains; the most frequently detected subtype genes were bont/B1 and /B2. Surprisingly, the bont/B subtype gene was shown to be plasmid-borne in >50% of the total strains. The same bont/B subtype gene was associated with the chromosome in some strains, whereas it was associated with a plasmid in others. All five known bont/B subtype genes were in some cases found to reside on plasmids, though with varying frequency (e.g., most of the bont/B1 subtype genes were located on plasmids, whereas all but one of the bont/B2 subtypes were chromosomally-located. Three bivalent isolates carried both bont/A and /B genes on the same plasmid. The plasmids carrying the bont gene were five different sizes, ranging from approximately 55 kb to approximately 245 kb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unexpected finding of the widespread distribution of plasmids harboring the bont/B gene among C. botulinum serotype B strains provides a chance to examine their contribution to the dissemination of the bont genes among heterogeneous clostridia, with potential implications on issues related to pathogenesis and food safety.

  11. The Salmonella genomic island 1 is specifically mobilized in trans by the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douard, Gregory; Praud, Karine; Cloeckaert, Axel; Doublet, Benoît

    2010-12-20

    The Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is a Salmonella enterica-derived integrative mobilizable element (IME) containing various complex multiple resistance integrons identified in several S. enterica serovars and in Proteus mirabilis. Previous studies have shown that SGI1 transfers horizontally by in trans mobilization in the presence of the IncA/C conjugative helper plasmid pR55. Here, we report the ability of different prevalent multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) gene-carrying plasmids to mobilize the multidrug resistance genomic island SGI1. Through conjugation experiments, none of the 24 conjugative plasmids tested of the IncFI, FII, HI2, I1, L/M, N, P incompatibility groups were able to mobilize SGI1 at a detectable level (transfer frequency IncA/C incompatibility group. Several conjugative IncA/C MDR plasmids as well as the sequenced IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 of 143,963 bp were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1 from a S. enterica donor to the Escherichia coli recipient strain. Depending on the IncA/C plasmid used, the conjugative transfer of SGI1 occurred at frequencies ranging from 10(-3) to 10(-6) transconjugants per donor. Of particular concern, some large IncA/C MDR plasmids carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase bla(CMY-2) gene were shown to mobilize in trans SGI1. The ability of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family to mobilize SGI1 could contribute to its spread by horizontal transfer among enteric pathogens. Moreover, the increasing prevalence of IncA/C plasmids in MDR S. enterica isolates worldwide has potential implications for the epidemic success of the antibiotic resistance genomic island SGI1 and its close derivatives.

  12. Angle of repose and segregation in cohesive granular matter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    2002-03-01

    We study the effect of fluids on the angle of repose and the segregation of granular matter in two experimental systems. In the regime where the volume fraction of the introduced fluid (liquid) is small, liquid bridges between particles are formed thus giving rise to cohesive forces between particles. In the first series of experiments, we pour the mixture of granular matter and liquid from a reservoir into a silo and imaging the resulting pile through the transparent glass side walls [1]. The angle of repose is observed to increase sharply with the volume fraction of the fluid and then saturate at a value that depends on the size of the particles. The viscosity of the fluid is observed to have a significant effect on the angle of repose and the extent of segregation. Similar phenomena is observed in both the angle of repose and the maximum angle of stability, when the granular-fluid mixture is placed inside a horizontal cylindrical container and rotated. In case of bidisperse particles, segregation is observed to decrease and finally saturate depending on the size ratio of the particles and the viscosity of the fluid. Preferential clumping of small particles causes layering to occur when the size of the clumps of small particles exceeds the size of large particles. We also report experiments in which the particles are poured into a silo filled with a fluid to understand the limit of maximum volume fraction of the fluid. In this case the angle of repose is observed to be unchanged from the dry case. However, the segregation is observed to decrease with an increase in the viscosity of the fluid. * Work in collaboration with Azadeh Samadani, and funded by NSF under Grant No. DMR-9983659. [1]: A. Samadani and A. Kudrolli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5102 (2000); Phys. Rev. E 64, 051301 (2001).

  13. In-Situ Segregation of Ground Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, A.; Sizemore, H. G.; Rempel, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the presence of nearly pure, segregated ground ice in the martian high latitudes. In particular, shallow ice containing only 1-2% soil was excavated by Phoenix. One hypothesis for the excess ice is that it developed in situ, via a mechanism analogous to terrestrial ice lenses. Problematically, terrestrial soil-ice segregation is driven by freeze/thaw cycles, which have not occurred recently on Mars. Here we investigate ice lens formation at T rates of vertical H2O transport typically limit lens growth to exchange with the atmosphere would be expected to outstrip and prevent in situ segregated ice lens formation in a salt-free soil. (Earlier in Mars' history however, we find that warmer temperatures frequently lead to macroscopic lens development.) The soils measured by Phoenix of course were not salt-free; in particular the presence of per-chlorate argues that our model must be expanded. The inclusion of even a single salt has multiple complicating effects. For saturated Mg(ClO4)2 solutions, the eutectic temperature is as low as 206 K. The resulting decrease in pore ice at low T leads to higher hydraulic permeability which would enhance growth rates. Liquid phase density increases, which increases the buoyancy forces on soil grains. Conversely, dynamic viscosity also increases, inhibiting lens growth. Both the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the melt are also affected. At high concentrations, osmotic potentials begin to play a role in determining the movement of melt. Finally, all of these properties evolve continually with temperature, as the composition of the liquid phase changes. Understanding the ways in which these processes might affect in situ segregation of martian ground ice is a challenging and exciting undertaking.

  14. Distribution of small native plasmids in Streptococcus pyogenes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, René; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric

    2014-05-01

    Complete characterization of a Streptococcus pyogenes population from a defined geographic region comprises information on the plasmids that circulate in these bacteria. Therefore, we determined the distribution of small plasmids (pyogenes isolates from India, where diversity of strains and incidence rates of S. pyogenes infections are high. The collection comprised 77 emm-types. For plasmid detection and discrimination, we developed PCRs for different plasmid replication initiation protein genes, the putative repressor gene copG and bacteriocin genes dysA and scnM57. Plasmid distribution was limited to 13 emm-types. Co-detection analysis using aforementioned PCRs revealed four distinct plasmid sub-types, two of which were previously unknown. Representative plasmids pA852 and pA996 of the two uncharacterized plasmid sub-types were sequenced. These two plasmids could be assigned to the pMV158 and the pC194/pUB110 family of rolling-circle plasmids, respectively. The majority of small plasmids found in India belonged to the two newly characterized sub-types, with pA852- and pA996-like plasmids amounting to 42% and 22% of all detected plasmids, respectively. None of the detected plasmids coded for a known antibiotic resistance gene. Instead, all of the four plasmid sub-types carried known or potential bacteriocin genes. These genes may have influence on the evolutionary success of certain S. pyogenes genotypes. Notably, pA852-like plasmids were found in all isolates of the most prevalent emm-type 11.0. Together, a priori fitness of this genotype and increased fitness due to the acquired plasmids may have rendered type emm11.0 successful and caused the prevalence of pA852-like plasmids in India.

  15. Identification and cloning of the CHL4 gene controlling chromosome segregation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, N; Kirillov, A; Kroll, E; Koryabin, M; Shestopalov, B; Bannikov, V; Zakharyev, V; Larionov, V

    1993-10-01

    A collection of chl mutants characterized by decreased fidelity of chromosome transmission and by minichromosome nondisjunction in mitosis was examined for the ability to maintain nonessential dicentric plasmids. In one of the seven mutants analyzed, chl4, dicentric plasmids did not depress cell division. Moreover, nonessential dicentric plasmids were maintained stably without any rearrangements during many generations in the chl4 mutant. The rate of mitotic heteroallelic recombination in the chl4 mutant was not increased compared to that in an isogenic wild-type strain. Analysis of the segregation of a marked chromosome indicated that sister chromatid nondisjunction and sister chromatid loss contributed equally to chromosome malsegregation in the chl4 mutant. A genomic clone of CHL4 was isolated by complementation of the chl4-1 mutation and was physically mapped to the right arm of chromosome IV near the SUP2 gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of CHL4 clone revealed a 1.4-kb open reading frame coding for a 53-kD predicted protein which does not have homology to published proteins. A strain containing a null allele of CHL4 is viable under standard growth conditions but has a temperature-sensitive phenotype (conditional lethality at 36 degrees). We suggest that the CHL4 gene is required for kinetochore function in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  16. Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Coral; Alonso-Villar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study occupational segregation by gender in Spain, which is a country where occupational segregation explains a large part of the gender wage gap. As opposed to previous studies, this paper measures not only overall segregation, but also the segregation of several population subgroups. For this purpose, this paper uses…

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  18. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi MR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad R Alavi1,2, Vlado Antonic2, Adrien Ravizee1, Peter J Weina3, Mina Izadjoo1,2, Alexander Stojadinovic21Division of Wound Biology and Translational Research, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and American Registry of Pathology, Washington DC, 2Combat Wound Initiative Program, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, 3The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USABackground: Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors’ screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids.Methods: The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dye-terminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database.Results: Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid.Conclusion: Transposition of Tn1331 into

  19. Acentrosomal spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Julien; Desai, Arshad

    2012-05-01

    The ability to reproduce relies in most eukaryotes on specialized cells called gametes. Gametes are formed by the process of meiosis in which, after a single round of replication, two successive cell divisions reduce the ploidy of the genome. Fusion of gametes at fertilization reconstitutes diploidy. In most animal species, chromosome segregation during female meiosis occurs on spindles assembled in the absence of the major microtubule-organizing center, the centrosome. In mammals, oocyte meiosis is error prone and underlies most birth aneuploidies. Here, we review recent work on acentrosomal spindle formation and chromosome alignment/separation during oocyte meiosis in different animal models.

  20. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  1. Improved determination of plasmid copy number using quantitative real-time PCR for monitoring fermentation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štrukelj Borut

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli cells is a complex process, where among other parameters, plasmid copy number, structural and segregational stability of plasmid have an important impact on the success of productivity. It was recognised that a method for accurate and rapid quantification of plasmid copy number is necessary for optimization and better understanding of this process. Lately, qPCR is becoming the method of choice for this purpose. In the presented work, an improved qPCR method adopted for PCN determination in various fermentation processes was developed. Results To avoid experimental errors arising from irreproducible DNA isolation, whole cells, treated by heating at 95°C for 10 minutes prior to storage at -20°C, were used as a template source. Relative quantification, taking into account different amplification efficiencies of amplicons for chromosome and plasmid, was used in the PCN calculation. The best reproducibility was achieved when the efficiency estimated for specific amplicon, obtained within one run, was averaged. It was demonstrated that the quantification range of 2 log units (100 to 10000 bacteria per well enable quantification in each time point during fermentation. The method was applied to study PCN variation in fermentation at 25°C and the correlation between PCN and protein accumulation was established. Conclusion Using whole cells as a template source and relative quantification considering different PCR amplification efficiencies are significant improvements of the qPCR method for PCN determination. Due to the approaches used, the method is suitable for PCN determination in fermentation processes using various media and conditions.

  2. Construction of disarmed Ti plasmids transferable between Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sakuma, Kei; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2009-04-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been used widely, but there are plants that are recalcitrant to this type of transformation. This transformation method uses bacterial strains harboring a modified tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid that lacks the transfer DNA (T-DNA) region (disarmed Ti plasmid). It is desirable to develop strains that can broaden the host range. A large number of Agrobacterium strains have not been tested yet to determine whether they can be used in transformation. In order to improve the disarming method and to obtain strains disarmed and ready for the plant transformation test, we developed a simple scheme to make certain Ti plasmids disarmed and simultaneously maintainable in Escherichia coli and mobilizable between E. coli and Agrobacterium. To establish the scheme in nopaline-type Ti plasmids, a neighboring segment to the left of the left border sequence, a neighboring segment to the right of the right border sequence of pTi-SAKURA, a cassette harboring the pSC101 replication gene between these two segments, the broad-host-range IncP-type oriT, and the gentamicin resistance gene were inserted into a suicide-type sacB-containing vector. Replacement of T-DNA with the cassette in pTiC58 and pTi-SAKURA occurred at a high frequency and with high accuracy when the tool plasmid was used. We confirmed that there was stable maintenance of the modified Ti plasmids in E. coli strain S17-1lambdapir and conjugal transfer from E. coli to Ti-less Agrobacterium strains and that the reconstituted Agrobacterium strains were competent to transfer DNA into plant cells. As the modified plasmid delivery system was simple and efficient, conversion of strains to the disarmed type was easy and should be applicable in studies to screen for useful strains.

  3. Gene electrotransfer of plasmid antiangiogenic metargidin peptide (AMEP) in disseminated melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Snoj, Marko; Cavalcanti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    ). In each patient, two cutaneous lesions were identified (one treated and one control). At day 1 and day 8, plasmid AMEP was injected intratumorally followed by electrotransfer. Patients were monitored weekly until day 29, and at day 64. Local efficacy was assessed at day 29 by direct measurement...... in C-reactive protein. No related serious adverse events occurred. Plasmid AMEP was detected in plasma but not in urine. AMEP mRNA was found in three of five treated lesions and none of the control lesions. At day 29, all five treated lesions were stable in diameter, whereas four of five control...

  4. The acoustic and perceptual cues affecting melody segregation for listeners with a cochlear implant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy eMarozeau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to listen selectively to single sound sources in complex auditory environments is termed ‘auditory stream segregation.’ This ability is affected by peripheral disorders such as hearing loss, as well as plasticity in central processing such as occurs with musical training. Brain plasticity induced by musical training can enhance the ability to segregate sound, leading to improvements in a variety of auditory abilities. The melody segregation ability of 12 cochlear-implant recipients was tested using a new method to determine the perceptual distance needed to segregate a simple 4-note melody from a background of interleaved random-pitch distractor notes. In experiment 1, participants rated the difficulty of segregating the melody from distracter notes. Four physical properties of the distracter notes were changed. In experiment 2, listeners were asked to rate the dissimilarity between melody patterns whose notes differed on the four physical properties simultaneously. Multidimensional scaling analysis transformed the dissimilarity ratings into perceptual distances. Regression between physical and perceptual cues then derived the minimal perceptual distance needed to segregate the melody.The most efficient streaming cue for CI users was loudness. For the normal hearing listeners without musical backgrounds, a greater difference on the perceptual dimension correlated to the temporal envelope is needed for stream segregation in CI users. No differences in streaming efficiency were found between the perceptual dimensions linked to the F0 and the spectral envelope.Combined with our previous results in normally-hearing musicians and non-musicians, the results show that differences in training as well as differences in peripheral auditory processing (hearing impairment and the use of a hearing device influences the way that listeners use different acoustic cues for segregating interleaved musical streams.

  5. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  6. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  7. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  8. Plasmids spread very fast in heterogeneous bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Francisco; Matic, Ivan; Radman, Miroslav; Rodrigues, Olivia R; Taddei, François

    2002-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids can mediate gene transfer between bacterial taxa in diverse environments. The ability to donate the F-type conjugative plasmid R1 greatly varies among enteric bacteria due to the interaction of the system that represses sex-pili formations (products of finOP) of plasmids already harbored by a bacterial strain with those of the R1 plasmid. The presence of efficient donors in heterogeneous bacterial populations can accelerate plasmid transfer and can spread by several orders of magnitude. Such donors allow millions of other bacteria to acquire the plasmid in a matter of days whereas, in the absence of such strains, plasmid dissemination would take years. This "amplification effect" could have an impact on the evolution of bacterial pathogens that exist in heterogeneous bacterial communities because conjugative plasmids can carry virulence or antibiotic-resistance genes. PMID:12524329

  9. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  10. Conjugative transfer of an IncA/C plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene through genetic re-arrangements with an IncX1 plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Zavala-Alvarado, Crispín; Zaidi, Mussaret B; Calva, Edmundo; Silva, Claudia

    2013-11-21

    Our observation that in the Mexican Salmonella Typhimurium population none of the ST19 and ST213 strains harbored both the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV) and the prevalent IncA/C plasmid (pA/C) led us to hypothesize that restriction to horizontal transfer of these plasmids existed. We designed a conjugation scheme using ST213 strain YU39 as donor of the blaCMY-2 gene (conferring resistance to ceftriaxone; CRO) carried by pA/C, and two E. coli lab strains (DH5α and HB101) and two Typhimurium ST19 strains (SO1 and LT2) carrying pSTV as recipients. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the different recipient strains affected the transfer frequencies of pA/C. YU39 was able to transfer CRO resistance, via a novel conjugative mechanism, to all the recipient strains although at low frequencies (10-7 to 10-10). The presence of pSTV in the recipients had little effect on the conjugation frequency. The analysis of the transconjugants showed that three different phenomena were occurring associated to the transfer of blaCMY-2: 1) the co-integration of pA/C and pX1; 2) the transposition of the CMY region from pA/C to pX1; or 3) the rearrangement of pA/C. In addition, the co-lateral mobilization of a small (5 kb) ColE1-like plasmid was observed. The transconjugant plasmids involving pX1 re-arrangements (either via co-integration or ISEcp1-mediated transposition) obtained the capacity to conjugate at very high levels, similar to those found for pX1 (10-1). Two versions of the region containing blaCMY-2 were found to transpose to pX1: the large version was inserted into an intergenic region located where the "genetic load" operons are frequently inserted into pX1, while the short version was inserted into the stbDE operon involved in plasmid addiction system. This is the first study to report the acquisition of an extended spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistance gene by an IncX1 plasmid. We showed that the transfer of the YU39 blaCMY-2 gene

  11. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, Jacob S; Massey, Douglas S

    2010-10-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by regressing foreclosure actions in the top 100 U.S. metropolitan areas on measures of black, Hispanic, and Asian segregation while controlling for a variety of housing market conditions, including average creditworthiness, the extent of coverage under the Community Reinvestment Act, the degree of zoning regulation, and the overall rate of subprime lending. We find that black residential dissimilarity and spatial isolation are powerful predictors of foreclosures across U.S. metropolitan areas. In order to isolate subprime lending as the causal mechanism whereby segregation influences foreclosures, we estimate a two-stage least squares model that confirms the causal effect of black segregation on the number and rate of foreclosures across metropolitan areas. In the United States segregation was an important contributing cause of the foreclosure crisis, along with overbuilding, risky lending practices, lax regulation, and the bursting of the housing price bubble.

  12. Neurotransmitter segregation: functional and plastic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano, Cynthia; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2012-06-01

    Synaptic cotransmission is the ability of neurons to use more than one transmitter to convey synaptic signals. Cotransmission was originally described as the presence of a classic transmitter, which conveys main signal, along one or more cotransmitters that modulate transmission, later on, it was found cotransmission of classic transmitters. It has been generally accepted that neurons store and release the same set of transmitters in all their synaptic processes. However, some findings that show axon endings of individual neurons storing and releasing different sets of transmitters, are not in accordance with this assumption, and give support to the hypothesis that neurons can segregate transmitters to different synapses. Here, we review the studies showing segregation of transmitters in invertebrate and mammalian central nervous system neurons, and correlate them with our results obtained in sympathetic neurons. Our data show that these neurons segregate even classic transmitters to separated axons. Based on our data we suggest that segregation is a plastic phenomenon and responds to functional synaptic requirements, and to 'environmental' cues such as neurotrophins. We propose that neurons have the machinery to guide the different molecules required in synaptic transmission through axons and sort them to different axon endings. We believe that transmitter segregation improves neuron interactions during cotransmission and gives them selective and better control of synaptic plasticity.

  13. Plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in Haemophilus ducreyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Albritton, W L; Maclean, I W; Slaney, L A; Ronald, A. R.; Deneer, H G

    1984-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Haemophilus ducreyi were shown to be resistant to tetracycline. Resistance was associated in some strains with a 30-megadalton plasmid capable of transferring resistance in conjugative matings with other strains of H. ducreyi and other species of Haemophilus. Restriction endonuclease digestion patterns suggest a relationship between H. ducreyi plasmids and other tetracycline resistance plasmids in Haemophilus. The presence of plasmid-mediated resistance to the tetracyclin...

  14. Replication of plasmids in gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Replication of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is dependent on three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The first stage, initiation, depends on plasmid-encoded properties such as the replication origin and, in most cases, the replication initiation protein (Rep protein). In recent years the understanding of initiation and regulation of plasmid replication in Escherichia coli has increased considerably, but it is only for the ColE1-type plasmids that significant biochemical d...

  15. Physical structure and genetic expression of the sulfonamide-resistance plasmid pLS80 and its derivatives in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.; Lacks, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The 10-kb chromosomal fragment of Streptococcus pneumoniae cloned in pLS80 contains the sul-d allele of the pneumococcal gene for dihydropteroate synthase. As a single copy in the chromosome this allele confers resistance to sulfanilamide at 0.2 mg/ml; in the multicopy plasmid it confers resistance to 2.0 mg/ml. The sul-d mutation was mapped by restriction analysis to a 0.4-kb region. A spontaneous deletion beginning approx. 1.5 kb to the right of the sul-d mutation prevented gene function, possibly by removing a promoter. This region could be restored by chromosomal facilitation and be demonstrated in the plasmid by selection for sulfonamide resistance. Under selection for a vector marker, tetracycline resistance, only the deleted plasmid was detectable, apparently as a result of plasmid segregation and the advantageous growth rates of cells with smaller plasmids. When such cells were selected for sulfonamide resistance, the deleted region returned to the plasmid, presumably by equilibration between the chromosome and the plasmid pool, to give a low frequency (approx. 10/sup -3/) of cells resistant to sulfanilamide at 2.0 mg/ml. Models for the mechanisms of chromosomal facilitation and equilibration are proposed. Several derivatives of pLS80 could be transferred to Bacillus subtilis, where they conferred resistance to sulfanilamide at 2 mg/ml, thereby demonstrating cross-species expression of the pneumococcal gene. Transfer of the plasmids to B. subtilis gave rise to large deletions to the left of the sul-d marker, but these deletions did not interfere with the sul-d gene function. Restriction maps of pLS80 and its variously deleted derivatives are presented.

  16. Cloning of Two Bacteriocin Genes from a Lactococcal Bacteriocin Plasmid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belkum, Marco J. van; Hayema, Bert Jan; Geis, Arnold; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1989-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 9B4 plasmid p9B4-6 (60 kilobases [kb]), which specifies bacteriocin production and immunity, was analyzed with restriction endonucleases, and fragments of this plasmid were cloned into shuttle vectors based on the broad-host-range plasmid pWVO1. Two regions on p9B4

  17. Multilocus sequence typing of IncN plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Fernández, Aurora; Villa, Laura; Moodley, Arshnee

    2011-01-01

    categorization of IncN plasmids. METHODS: Twelve fully sequenced IncN plasmids available at GenBank were analysed in silico for selecting the loci for the IncN-specific pMLST. A total of 58 plasmids originating from different reservoirs (human, pig, poultry, cattle and horses) and geographic regions (Italy...

  18. Segregation of Niobium During Electroslag Remelting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yan-wu; JIANG Zhou-hua; LI Zheng-bang

    2009-01-01

    Experiment was carried out after the process parameters were calculated by the model previously established.The relationship between interdendritic spacing and local solidification time (LST) mainly determined by process parameters was exposed.Furthermore,the extent of segregation was studied.The results indicate that LST and interdendritic spacing are the largest and the amount of Laves phase as a result of the niobium segregation is the highest in the center of the ingot,whereas the opposite results are obtained at the edge of ingot.The extent of element segregation and the amount of Laves phase can be reduced when appropriate parameters are used.Therefore,the duration of subsequent homogenization treatments for 718 is shortened and the alloy quality is improved.

  19. School Segregation and Racial Academic Achievement Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F. Reardon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is clear that racial segregation is linked to academic achievement gaps, the mechanisms underlying this link have been debated since James Coleman published his eponymous 1966 report. In this paper, I examine sixteen distinct measures of segregation to determine which is most strongly associated with academic achievement gaps. I find clear evidence that one aspect of segregation in particular—the disparity in average school poverty rates between white and black students’ schools—is consistently the single most powerful correlate of achievement gaps, a pattern that holds in both bivariate and multivariate analyses. This implies that high-poverty schools are, on average, much less effective than lower-poverty schools and suggests that strategies that reduce the differential exposure of black, Hispanic, and white students to poor schoolmates may lead to meaningful reductions in academic achievement gaps.

  20. Segregating complex sound sources through temporal coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Krishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the segregation of monaural sound mixtures is presented based on the principle of temporal coherence and using auditory cortical representations. Temporal coherence is the notion that perceived sources emit coherently modulated features that evoke highly-coincident neural response patterns. By clustering the feature channels with coincident responses and reconstructing their input, one may segregate the underlying source from the simultaneously interfering signals that are uncorrelated with it. The proposed algorithm requires no prior information or training on the sources. It can, however, gracefully incorporate cognitive functions and influences such as memories of a target source or attention to a specific set of its attributes so as to segregate it from its background. Aside from its unusual structure and computational innovations, the proposed model provides testable hypotheses of the physiological mechanisms of this ubiquitous and remarkable perceptual ability, and of its psychophysical manifestations in navigating complex sensory environments.

  1. INFLUENCE OF PULSED MAGNETIC FIELD ON MICROSTRUC- TURES AND MACRO-SEGREGATION IN 2124 Al-ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Y. Ban; J.Z. Cui; Q.X. Ba; G.M. Lu; B.J. Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The structures and macro-segregation of 2124 Al-alloy were studied when a pulsedmagnetic field (PMF) was applied during solidification. It is found through experi-ments that a remarkable change occurs in the solidification structures of 2124 Al-alloyunder pulsed magnetic field. The eutectic phase at grain boundaries change from thickcontinuous eutectic network to thin discontinuous one, and the distribution of soluteelements was also homogenized. The typical negative segregation phenomenon of Cu incommon solidification condition was restrained, and the segregation of Mg decreased.

  2. Chemical segregation and self polarisation in ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard E. Watts

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical partitioning or segregation is commonly encountered in solid-state syntheses. It is driven by compositional, thermal and electric field gradients. These phenomena can be quite extreme in thin films and lead to notable effects on the electrical properties of ferroelectrics. The segregation in ferroelectric thin films will be illustrated and the mechanisms explained in terms of diffusion processes driven by a potential gradient of the oxygen. The hypothesis can also explain self polarisation and imprint in ferroelectric hysteresis.

  3. Housing Systems and Ethnic Spatial Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter; Andersson, Roger; Wessel, Terje

    in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are ethnically segmented with high concentrations of immigrants in some forms of tenures (especially social/public housing) and low concentrations in others. The paper shows that the spatial distribution of immigrants is strongly connected with the tenure composition...... of immigrants in social/public housing.......Residential spatial segregation is related to housing markets and housing policies. In this paper, ethnic segregation is compared across four Nordic capitals and explanations for the differences are examined by comparing the housing markets and housing policies of the countries. The housing markets...

  4. Flow and segregation in sheared granular slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barentin, C.; Azanza, E.; Pouligny, B.

    2004-04-01

    We study the behaviour of a granular slurry, i.e., a very concentrated suspension of heavy (denser than the fluid) and polydisperse particles sheared between two parallel-plane circular disks. For small gaps, the slurry behaves as a 2d system with a characteristic radial size segregation of particles. For large gaps, the slurry responds as a 3d system, with considerable vertical segregation and a concomitant 2-phase (fluid, solid) flow structure. The thickness ζ of the fluid phase is the 2d-3d gap crossover. Surprisingly, ζ is found to be nearly unaffected by very large changes in the particle size distribution.

  5. Bacteriophages limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ellie; Wood, A Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-02

    Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. Conjugative plasmids are infectious loops of DNA capable of transmitting DNA between bacterial cells and between species. Because plasmids often carry extra genes that allow bacteria to live in otherwise-inhospitable environments, their dynamics are central to understanding bacterial adaptive evolution. The plasmid-bacterium interaction has typically been studied in isolation, but in natural bacterial communities, bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, are ubiquitous. Using experiments, mathematical models, and computer simulations we show that bacteriophages drive plasmid dynamics through their ecological and evolutionary effects on bacteria and ultimately

  6. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  7. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET, a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val F Lanza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage, comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC, comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  8. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  9. Role of Plasmid in Production of Acetobacter Xylinum Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Rezaee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetobacter xylinum has the ability to produce cellulotic biofilms. Bacterial cellulose is expected to be used in many industrial or biomedical materials for its unique characteristics. A. xylinum contains a complex system of plasmid DNA molecules. A 44 kilobases (kb plasmid was isolated in wild type of A. xylinum. To improve the cellulose producing ability of A. xylinum, role of the plasmid in production of cellulose was studied. The comparisons between wild type and cured cells of A. xylinum showed that there is considerably difference in cellulose production. In order to study the relationship between plasmid and the rate of cellulose production, bacteria were screened for plasmid profile by a modified method for preparation of plasmid. This method yields high levels of pure plasmid DNA that can be used for common molecular techniques, such as digestion and transformation, with high efficiency.

  10. Permissiveness of soil microbial communities towards broad host range plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli

    at high frequencies from diverse donors, I showed plasmid or donor dependence of plasmid transfer to other species. Additionally, environmental factors like stress also impact the permissiveness of phylogenetic groups towards plasmids. The developed method and results increase our ability to predict......Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements facilitates adaptive and evolutionary processes in bacteria. Among the known mobile genetic elements, plasmids can confer their hosts with accessory adaptive traits, such as antibiotic or heavy metal resistances, or additional metabolic pathways...... and the extent of bacterial phyla permissive towards plasmid receipt are largely unknown. Historically, methods exploring the underlying genetic and environmental factors of plasmid transfer have been heavily reliant on cultivation and expression of plasmid encoded phenotypes. This has provided an incomplete...

  11. A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian; van der Leij, Marco

    We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important for job search, then expected homophily in the contact network structure...

  12. Field induced phase segregation in ferrofluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst S.; Galca, A.C.; Poelsema, Bene

    2008-01-01

    We study the phase segregation in magnetite ferrofluids under the influence of an external magnetic field. A phase with lower nanoparticle density and corresponding higher optical transmission is formed in the bottom of a glass cell in the presence of only a very modest magnetic field gradient (smal

  13. Size segregation in a granular bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A. N.; Vriend, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of particle-size segregation in an upslope propagating granular bore. A bidisperse mixture of particles, initially normally graded, flows down an inclined chute and impacts with a closed end. This impact causes the formation of a shock in flow thickness, known as a granular bore, to travel upslope, leaving behind a thick deposit. This deposit imprints the local segregated state featuring both pure and mixed regions of particles as a function of downstream position. The particle-size distribution through the depth is characterized by a thin purely small-particle layer at the base, a significant linear transition region, and a thick constant mixed-particle layer below the surface, in contrast to previously observed S-shaped steady-state concentration profiles. The experimental observations agree with recent progress that upward and downward segregation of large and small particles respectively is asymmetric. We incorporate the three-layer, experimentally observed, size-distribution profile into a depth-averaged segregation model to modify it accordingly. Numerical solutions of this model are able to match our experimental results and therefore motivate the use of a more general particle-size distribution profile.

  14. Chromosome Segregation: Organizing Overlap at the Midzone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, M.E.; Tran, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Sets of overlapping microtubules support the segregation of chromosomes by linking the poles of mitotic spindles. Recent work examines the effect of putting these linkages under pressure by the activation of dicentric chromosomes and sheds new light on the structural role of several well-known spind

  15. Why Are English Secondary Schools Socially Segregated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldron, John; Cripps, Caroline; Shipton, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks an explanation for the persistent social phenomenon of segregated schooling in England whereby children from families with broadly the same characteristics of wealth, education and social networks are more likely to be educated together and therefore separate from children from more socially distant groups. The paper outlines the…

  16. 17 CFR 31.12 - Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... convenience be commingled with other leverage customer funds and deposited in the same account or accounts....12 Segregation. (a) Any person that accepts leverage customer funds from a leverage customer to enter into or maintain a leverage contract shall treat and deal with such leverage customer funds...

  17. Segregation analysis of urothelial cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Baglietto, L.; Baffoe-Bonnie, A.B.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.; Trink, B.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A family history of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) confers an almost two-fold increased risk of developing UCC. It is unknown whether (part of) this aggregation of UCC has a Mendelian background. We performed complex segregation analyses on 1193 families ascertained through a proband with UCC of th

  18. Calcifying Sorting and Segregating: "Brown" at 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Cristina Santamaria; Kozleski, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The 2007 "Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1". Supreme Court 5:4 decision suggests that the Court is divided in its interpretation of "Brown" and its intent in addressing racial segregation. Although "Brown" intended equal educational opportunities through desegregation practices,…

  19. Segregation mechanisms in granular systems: role of gravity and velocity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Size segregation patterns are often observed in natural granular systems: dune fields, debris flow deposits, river beds, asteroids surface... Identifying the underlying mechanisms and dynamics would be a significant progress towards understanding the evolution of these systems: discrimationsbetween different processes, relevant time-scales, history of the mechanical solicitation. In the case of the surface of asteroids exhibiting a granular nature, such as Itokawa, the origin of sorting patterns following grain size may have different origins. It can occur as a result of periodic changes in the gravity field, or seismic-shaking due to impacts, or be the signature of re-deposition of ejected material after impacts. It may also be related to size-dependent thermal weathering or impact bouncing dynamics, rather than mechanical segregation. It is thus crucial to explore the different candidate mechanisms and address their likeliness in spatial context. In this contribution, we use a discrete simulation model to reproduce the collective behaviour of rigid, frictional grains exhibiting different sizes. Segregation dynamics is obtained during gravity-driven flows, allowing for the detailed investigation of the micro-mechanical signature of segregation. In particular, we evidence the asymetry of the stress state induced by the different grain sizes. Discriminating between contacts stresses and kinematic stresses, we are able to discuss the respective role of gravity and velocity fluctuations in the segregation process. References L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Stress partition and micro-structure in size-segregating granular flows, Phys. Rev. E 92 022210 (2015) L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Segregation time-scales in bi-disperse granular flows, Phys. Fluids 26 (3), 033302 (2014)

  20. Tri-directional anaphases as a novel chromosome segregation defect in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverfield, Jenna; Dean, Nicola L; Nöel, Diana; Rémillard-Labrosse, Gaudeline; Paradis, Veronique; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques; FitzHarris, Greg

    2017-06-01

    What are the chromosome segregation errors in human oocyte meiosis-I that may underlie oocyte aneuploidy? Multiple modes of chromosome segregation error were observed, including tri-directional anaphases, which we attribute to loss of bipolar spindle structure at anaphase-I. Oocyte aneuploidy is common and associated with infertility, but mechanistic information on the chromosome segregation errors underlying these defects is scarce. Lagging chromosomes were recently reported as a possible mechanism by which segregation errors occur. Long-term confocal imaging of chromosome dynamics in 50 human oocytes collected between January 2015 and May 2016. Germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes were collected from women undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles and also CD1 mice. Oocytes were microinjected with complementary RNAs to label chromosomes, and in a subset of oocytes, the meiotic spindle. Oocytes were imaged live through meiosis-I using confocal microscopy. 3D image reconstruction was used to classify chromosome segregation phenotypes at anaphase-I. Segregation phenotypes were related to spindle dynamics and cell cycle timings. Most (87%) mouse oocytes segregated chromosomes with no obvious defects. We found that 20% of human oocytes segregated chromosomes bi-directionally with no lagging chromosomes. The rest were categorised as bi-directional anaphase with lagging chromosomes (20%), bi-directional anaphase with chromatin mass separation (34%) or tri-directional anaphase (26%). Segregation errors correlated with chromosome misalignment prior to anaphase. Spindles were tripolar when tri-directional anaphases occurred. Anaphase phenotypes did not correlate with meiosis-I duration (P = 0.73). Not applicable. Oocytes were recovered at GV stage after gonadotrophin-stimulation, and the usual oocyte quality caveats apply. Whilst the possibility that imaging may affect oocyte physiology cannot be formally excluded, detailed controls and justifications are presented

  1. Modeling size segregation of granular materials: the roles of segregation, advection and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Predicting segregation of granular materials composed of different-sized particles is a challenging problem. In this paper, we develop and implement a theoretical model that captures the interplay between advection, segregation, and diffusion in size bidisperse granular materials. The fluxes associated with these three driving factors depend on the underlying kinematics, whose characteristics play key roles in determining particle segregation configurations. Unlike previous models for segregation, our model uses parameters based on kinematic measures from discrete element method simulations instead of arbitrarily adjustable fitting parameters, and it achieves excellent quantitative agreement with both experimental and simulation results when applied to quasi-two-dimensional bounded heaps. The model yields two dimensionless control parameters, both of which are only functions of physically control parameters (feed rate, particle sizes, and system size) and kinematic parameters (diffusion coefficient, flowing l...

  2. Agrobacterium tumefaciens pTAR parA promoter region involved in autoregulation, incompatibility and plasmid partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallie, D R; Kado, C I

    1987-02-05

    The locus responsible for directing proper plasmid partitioning of Agrobacterium tumefaciens pTAR is contained within a 1259 base-pair region. Insertions or deletions within this locus can result in the loss of the plasmid's ability to partition properly. One protein product (parA), approximately 25,000 Mr, is expressed from the par locus in Escherichia coli and A. tumefaciens protein analysis systems in vitro. DNA sequence analysis of the locus revealed a single 23,500 Mr open reading frame, confirming the protein data. A 248 base-pair region immediately upstream from the 23,500 Mr open reading frame, containing an array of 12 seven-base-pair palindromic repeats each of which are separated by exactly ten base-pairs of A + T-rich (75%) sequence, not only serves to provide the promoter but is also involved in parA autoregulation. In addition, this region containing a set of 12 seven-base-pair palindromic repeats, is responsible for plasmid-associated incompatibility within Inc Ag-1 and also functions as the cis-acting recognition site at which parA interacts to bring about partitioning. Transcriptional analysis indicated that only the DNA strand responsible for parA is actively transcribed, and that active transcription of the opposite strand of par can inhibit the production of parA, resulting in plasmid destabilization. The presence of the par locus in a plasmid results in stable inheritance within a wide range of members of Rhizobiaceae. Segregation rates of par-defective derivatives can be influenced by the host.

  3. Control on Housing Segregation:Housing Modes and Public Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>1. Housing segregation:advocating or controlling?The phenomenon of housing segregation has become more and more obvious in Chinese cities in recent years; however, there is no agreement on whether it should

  4. CARTOGRAPHIE DU PLASMIDE pSU100, PLASMIDE CRYPTIQUE DE LACTOBACILLUS CASEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F BENSALAH

    2003-06-01

    Ce plasmide appelé pSU100 a été cloné dans le vecteur de transformation pUC18 au site EcoRI chez E. coli JM103. Les profils électrophorétiques de restriction obtenus par des digestions simples, doubles et triples sous l’action de 33 endonucléases, ont contribué à l’élaboration d’une carte de restriction de ce plasmide. Cinq sites uniques ont été identifiés, ainsi que d’autres sites doubles et multiples. Une étude préliminaire du rôle physiologique de ce plasmide a permis de déceler une résistance à la kanamycine.

  5. Atomic intermixing and segregation at the interface of InAs/GaSb type II superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochao; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Dongwei; Guo, Fengyun; Wang, Dongbo; Zhao, Liancheng

    2017-04-01

    To determine the interfacial atomic intermixing of the InAs/GaSb T2SL, an innovative and straightforward method based on TEM techniques is proposed to analysize and investigate the interface stoichiometry of the InAs/GaSb T2SL. Using this method, the chemical components of the interfaces in InAs/GaSb T2SL can be quantitatively determined by fitting with the sigmoidal function and Muraki's segregation model. It is found that the intermixing at the cationic and anionic sublattice is different, and the interface GaSb-on-InAs is slightly sharper than the InAs-on-GaSb interface. Furthermore, we identified segregation of Sb and In atoms and quantitatively measured their incorporation in the lattice. It is also found that the In and Sb segregations mainly occur at the GaSb-on-InAs and InAs-on-GaSb interfaces, respectively and the Sb segregation is larger than the In segregation in the as-grown InAs/GaSb superlattice because of the different atomic exchanges energy.

  6. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Funnell

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs spread; that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding nonspecific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and nonspecific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites.

  7. Optimization of a lipitoid-based plasmid DNA transfection protocol for bovine trophectoderm CT-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmacher, Andrew T; Keefer, Carol L

    2012-08-01

    Embryo-derived cell lines are important in vitro models for investigating the molecular mechanisms directing embryonic tissue lineage segregation and maintenance. The bovine trophectoderm-derived CT-1 cell line has been widely used to identify regulatory mechanisms of interferon tau gene expression, and it possesses potential as a model for characterizing the gene regulatory network controlling trophoblast lineage differentiation and development. This functional potential, however, is severely limited as CT-1 cells are very recalcitrant to standard transfection methods. The focus of this study was to test the cationic lipitoid reagent as an effective transfection reagent for DNA plasmid delivery. Optimization of liptoid-based transfection of plasmid DNA resulted in 9% transfection efficiency averaged across entire CT-1 colonies, with many subregions of CT-1 colonies achieving transfection rates of 15%. These rates are a substantial improvement over near-zero efficiencies achieved using other standard transfection techniques. CT-1 cells were also successfully adapted to substrate-free culture for over 20 passages, eliminating the need to culture CT-1 colonies on feeder cells or matrix-coated cultureware. Together, these results increase the utility of the CT-1 cell line as an in vitro bovine trophoblast model and provide insight into overcoming DNA delivery difficulties in other cell lines not amenable to genetic manipulation.

  8. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  9. Segregating photoelastic particles in free-surface granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amalia L.; Vriend, Nathalie M.

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate bimodal avalanches of photoelastic discs between two narrow side-walls. We visualize the physical phenomena that occur during segregation and quantify the dynamic appearance of force chains within the bulk of the flow from fringe patterns using photoelastic theory. The photoelastic technique has been used in granular research for almost half a century and has been applied in a variety of quasi-steady systems. We have now adapted the technique to perform well within dynamic granular flows where collisions are short-lived and force chains are formed and broken continuously. Our photoelastic urethane discs are cast in-house to provide high-resolution fringe patterns and a high stress-optic coefficient. In addition we carried out stress relaxation tests to study the viscoelastic properties of the photoelastic material, and measured the speed of force transmission and dampening from a moving particle onto a static chain of particles. In our avalanche experiments, we also employ particle tracking and particle velocimetry techniques to measure the general flow field within the avalanche. The overall goal of our work is to investigate and quantify the influence of the distribution of forces on the fundamental processes that drive segregation.

  10. Particle segregation during explosive dispersal of binary particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David L.; Loiseau, Jason; Marr, Bradley J.; Goroshin, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles surrounding a spherical high explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. The shock-compacted particle layer typically fractures into discrete fragments which move radially outwards on ballistic trajectories. The fragments shed particles in their wakes forming jet-like structures. The tendency to form jets depends on the mass-ratio of the particles to explosive and the type of particles. Brittle or soft, ductile particles are more susceptible to forming jets during compaction and dispersal, whereas particles that are comprised of material with moderate hardness, high compressive strength and high toughness are much less prone to forming jets. Experiments have been carried out to determine the degree of particle segregation that occurs during the explosive dispersal of a uniform, binary mixture containing both "jetting" (silicon carbide) and "non-jetting" (steel) particles with various mass fractions of each particle type. During the dispersal of mixtures that contain predominantly non-jetting (steel) particles, the steel particles form a stable layer whereas the jetting (silicon carbide) particles rapidly segregate and form jets which are confined within the shell of steel particles. As the fraction of silicon carbide particles increases, the jet structures dominate the particle motion and the steel particles are entrained into the jet structures.

  11. Segregated growth kinetics of Escherichia coli DH5α-NH36 in exponential-fed perfusion culture for pDNA vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Soto, Rodolfo; García-Rendón, Aurora; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Guerrero-Germán, Patricia; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The clinical demand of plasmid DNA (pDNA) has been increasing constantly. An exponential-fed perfusion (EFP) culture is a new mode for plasmid production for clinical trials and commercialization. However, the culture conditions may lead to cell filamentation and growth cessation. In this study, the variation of the physiological state and the plasmid contents of Escherichia coli DH5α hosting pVAX1-NH36 in an EFP culture for application as a Leishmaniasis vaccine was investigated. The culture performance was monitored using flow cytometry (FC) and real-time quantitative PCR. The FC studies showed a high viability of cell population and a constant distribution of complexity and size. A high homogeneity of pDNA (>95 % of supercoiled) was obtained, which might be attributed to a better culture environment. The obtained plasmid specific and volumetric yields of 1.8 mg/g dcw and 36.5 mg/L represent typical values for laboratory-scale plasmid production in a defined medium. A segregated kinetic model of the perfusion system was developed and fitted to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.96). A practical conclusion of this work is that a space-time yield analysis of a bioprocess requires a viability evaluation. This new strategy of culture operation might help in the efficient production of pDNA for therapeutic use.

  12. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, K E; A. J. Weightman; Fry, J C

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 x 10(-8) to 4.5 x 10(-3) per recipient at 20 degrees C. The sizes of the mobil...

  13. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks. (a... symbols used in lines 1 and 2, in order, under the tank segregation column of Table 151.05....

  14. Residential segregation of socioeconomic variables and health indices in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Correlation of segregation of determinants of socioeconomic status with segregation of health indices is an indicator of existence of hot zones of health problems across some provinces. Further studies using multilevel modeling and individual data in health outcomes at individual level and segregation measures at appropriate geographic levels are required to confirm these relations.

  15. Within-School Segregation in an Urban School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan

    2005-01-01

    This article examines ethnic segregation, defined as segregation among racial groups as well as between native-born and immigrant students, across elementary school classrooms in New York City. Specifically, the study compares patterns in within-school segregation across ethnic groups, grades, boroughs, and years. Current levels of within-school…

  16. 41 CFR 60-1.8 - Segregated facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Segregated facilities. 60...; Compliance Reports § 60-1.8 Segregated facilities. To comply with its obligations under the Order, a contractor must ensure that facilities provided for employees are provided in such a manner that segregation...

  17. "E Pluribus"... Separation: Deepening Double Segregation for More Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Kucsera, John; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    This report shows segregation has increased dramatically across the country for Latino students, who are attending more intensely segregated and impoverished schools than they have for generations. The segregation increases have been the most dramatic in the West. The typical Latino student in the region attends a school where less than a quarter…

  18. Isolation of T—DNA flanking plant DNA from T—DNA insertional embryo—lethal mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana by plasmid rescue technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAOXIAOLI; JIANGESUN; 等

    1996-01-01

    Three T-DNA insertional embryonic lethal mutants from NASC(The Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Center) were first checked with their segregation ratio of abortive and normal seeds and the copy number of T-DNA insertion.The N4081 mutant has a segregation ratio of 1:3.04 in average and one T-DNA insertion site according to our assay.It was therefore chosen for further analysis.To isolate the joint fragment of T-DNA and plant DNA,the plasmid rescue technique was used.pEL-7,one of plasmids from left border of T-DNA,which contained pBR322 was selected from ampicillin plate.The T-DNA fragment of pEL-7 was checked by restriction enzyme analysis and Southern Blot.Restriction analysis confirmed the presence of known sites of EcoRI,PstI and PvuII on it.For confirming the presence of flanking plant DNA in this plasmid,pEL-7 DNA was labeled and hybridized with wild type and mutant plant DNA.The Southern Blot indicated the hybridization band in both of them.Furthermore,the junction of T-DNA/plant DNA was subcloned into bluescript SK+ and sequenced by Applied Biosystem 373A sequencer.The results showed the 822 bp fragment contained a 274 bp sequence,which is 99.6%homolog(273bp/274bp) to Ti plasmid pTi 15955,DNA.The bp of left 25 bp border repeat were also found in the juction of T-DNA and Plant DNA. Taken together,pEL-7 should coutain a joint fragment of T-DNA and flanking plant DNA.This plasmid DNA could be used for the isolation of plant gene,which will be helpful to elucidate the relationship between gene function and plant embryo development.

  19. Transfer of a gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid to conjugation-deficient Neisseria cinerea strains by transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, C A; Clark, V L

    1988-12-01

    We have previously shown that some strains of Neisseria cinerea can serve as recipients in conjugation (Con+) with Neisseria gonorrhoeae while others cannot (Con-). To determine if a replication defect contributes to the inability of certain strains of N. cinerea to serve as recipients in conjugation, we attempted to introduce a naturally occurring gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid into N. cinerea by transformation. Various methods were employed, and all proved unsuccessful. Since specific sequences are required for DNA uptake in transformation of N. gonorrhoeae, we constructed a number of hybrid plasmids containing N. cinerea chromosomal DNA inserted into the N. gonorrhoeae/Escherichia coli beta-lactamase shuttle vector, pLES2. When nine randomly selected plasmids with inserts were used to transform an N. cinerea strain which did not accept the gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid by conjugation, transformants were observed with four of the hybrid plasmids. The presence of one of the hybrid plasmids, pCAG9, in transformants was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern hybridization, and beta-lactamase production. When an N. gonorrhoeae donor strain containing pCAG9 was used in conjugation with several N. cinerea strains, only those strains that were previously shown to act as recipients could accept and maintain pCAG9. The ability of pCAG9 and the other three hybrid plasmids to transform Con- strains demonstrates that the beta-lactamase plasmid can replicate in Con- strains, and, therefore, the Con- phenotype is due to a block in some other stage of the conjugation process.

  20. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between the chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  1. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-09-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  2. From Schelling to Schools : A comparison of a model of residential segregation with a model of school segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoica, Victor; Flache, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We address theoretically whether and under what conditions Schelling's celebrated result of 'self-organized' unintended residential segregation may also apply to school segregation. We propose here a computational model of school segregation that is aligned with a corresponding Schelling-type model

  3. Phase diagram of a Schelling segregation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, L.; Vannimenus, J.; Nadal, J.-P.

    2009-07-01

    The collective behavior in a variant of Schelling’s segregation model is characterized with methods borrowed from statistical physics, in a context where their relevance was not conspicuous. A measure of segregation based on cluster geometry is defined and several quantities analogous to those used to describe physical lattice models at equilibrium are introduced. This physical approach allows to distinguish quantitatively several regimes and to characterize the transitions between them, leading to the building of a phase diagram. Some of the transitions evoke empirical sudden ethnic turnovers. We also establish links with ‘spin-1’ models in physics. Our approach provides generic tools to analyze the dynamics of other socio-economic systems.

  4. Sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic divisions (meiosis I and II) are specialized cell divisions to generate haploid gametes. The first meiotic division with the separation of chromosomes is named reductional division. The second division, which takes place immediately after meiosis I without intervening S-phase, is equational, with the separation of sister chromatids, similar to mitosis. This meiotic segregation pattern requires the two-step removal of the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together: cohesin is removed from chromosome arms that have been subjected to homologous recombination in meiosis I and from the centromere region in meiosis II. Cohesin in the centromere region is protected from removal in meiosis I, but this protection has to be removed—deprotected”—for sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II. Whereas the mechanisms of cohesin protection are quite well understood, the mechanisms of deprotection have been largely unknown until recently. In this review I summarize our current knowledge on cohesin deprotection. PMID:23574717

  5. Organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

    2013-03-01

    The bacterial chromosome must be compacted more than 1,000-fold to fit into the compartment in which it resides. How it is condensed, organized and ultimately segregated has been a puzzle for over half a century. Recent advances in live-cell imaging and genome-scale analyses have led to new insights into these problems. We argue that the key feature of compaction is the orderly folding of DNA along adjacent segments and that this organization provides easy and efficient access for protein-DNA transactions and has a central role in driving segregation. Similar principles and common proteins are used in eukaryotes to condense and to resolve sister chromatids at metaphase.

  6. Socio-Spatial Segregations in Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat SEIFY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with developments in communication technologies, life spaces of people also change and develop. What constitutes the most important building block of these new life spaces are digital communication resources. Digital communication resources form new spaces in social media by manipulating identities and cultures. These new spaces create socio-spatial segregations, whether consciously or unconsciously. Especially in recent years, grouping is observed intensely in social media and from time to time these groups play an important role in mass actions. In this study, closed and secret groups formed in social media were examined, with qualitative and quantitative research methods. Within this context, through in-depth interviews with group admins and survey study with group members, socio-spatial segregation in social media and grouping processes in social media were examined.

  7. Granular segregation driven by particle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A; Mullin, T

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C. All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  8. Isolation of clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa harboring different plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, R; Owlia, P; Saderi, H; Bameri, Z; Izadi, M; Jonaidi, N; Morovvati, S

    2007-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the presence of plasmids among the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinically diagnosed cases in Tehran in 2006. A total of 38 strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated. With the exception of one isolate, all P. aeruginosa strains harbored at least one plasmid band. The electrophoretic analysis of plasmid DNAs showed different number of plasmid bands among the strains tested. The DNA band of 1.4 kbp was evident in 84.2% of the strains. Approximately 71 and 21% of the isolates harbored concomitantly two and three plasmids, respectively. Isolation of strains with diverse types of plasmids suggests the different cluster of P. aeruginosa might be disseminated during the current study period.

  9. Transformation of Haemophilus influenzae by plasmid RSF0885

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.; McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.

    1981-12-01

    Plasmid RSF0885, which conferred ampicillin resistance, transformed competent Haemophilus influenzae cells with low efficiency (maximun, less than 0.01%). As judged by competition experiments and uptake of radioactivity, plasmid RSF0885 deoxyribonucleic acid was taken up into competent H. influenzae cells several orders of magnitude less efficiently than H. influenzae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid. Plasmid RSF0885 transformed cells with even lower efficiency than could be accounted for by the low uptake. Transformation was not affected by rec-1 and rec-2 mutations in the recipient, and strains cured of the plasmid did not show increased transformation. Plasmid molecules cut once with a restriction enzyme that made blunt ends did not transform. Transformation was favored by the closed circular form of the plasmid.

  10. Myasis occuring in a neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasa, Temitope O.; Sowunmi, Funmilola Olusola

    2012-01-01

    Myasis is the infestation of skin by larvae or maggots of a variety of flies. It is a condition that occurs more commonly in adults who are living and/or have visited tropical countries. It rarely occurs in neonates, and even when seen, only few larvae are extracted. This case report describes myasis occurring in an 11-day-old female who had 47 larvae in her skin. PMID:23355934

  11. Myasis occuring in a neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope O. Obasa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Myasis is the infestation of skin by larvae or maggots of a variety of flies. It is a condition that occurs more commonly in adults who are living and/or have visited tropical countries. It rarely occurs in neonates, and even when seen, only few larvae are extracted. This case report describes myasis occurring in an 11-day-old female who had 47 larvae in her skin.

  12. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  13. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of 0.2 low(z ≤ 0.6) and high (z > 0.6) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index (U - B)0 can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at MB > -19.5 for both samples, and red objects being dominant at MB low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with R low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99% c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70% c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95% c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples (˜3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from z ˜ 0.8 to z ˜ 0.4.

  14. Effects of container geometry on granular segregation pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Mao-Bin; Kong Xiang-Zhao; Wu Qing-Song; Wu Yong-Hong

    2005-01-01

    In a set of vibrating quasi-two-dimensional containers with the right-hand sidewall bent inward, three new segregation patterns have been identified experimentally including a Two-Side segregation Pattern, a Left-hand Side segregation Pattern and a pattern where big particles aggregate to the upper left part of the container. In a container with small bending degree, either the two-side segregation pattern or the left-hand side segregation pattern is stable, which is determined by the initial distribution of particles.

  15. Implementing spatial segregation measures in R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Yun Hong

    Full Text Available Reliable and accurate estimation of residential segregation between population groups is important for understanding the extent of social cohesion and integration in our society. Although there have been considerable methodological advances in the measurement of segregation over the last several decades, the recently developed measures have not been widely used in the literature, in part due to their complex calculation. To address this problem, we have implemented several newly proposed segregation indices in R, an open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics, as a package called seg. Although there are already a few standalone applications and add-on packages that provide access to similar methods, our implementation has a number of advantages over the existing tools. First, our implementation is flexible in the sense that it provides detailed control over the calculation process with a wide range of input parameters. Most of the parameters have carefully chosen defaults, which perform acceptably in many situations, so less experienced users can also use the implemented functions without too much difficulty. Second, there is no need to export results to other software programs for further analysis. We provide coercion methods that enable the transformation of our output classes into general R classes, so the user can use thousands of standard and modern statistical techniques, which are already available in R, for the post-processing of the results. Third, our implementation does not require commercial software to operate, so it is accessible to a wider group of people.

  16. Audiovisual segregation in cochlear implant users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Landry

    Full Text Available It has traditionally been assumed that cochlear implant users de facto perform atypically in audiovisual tasks. However, a recent study that combined an auditory task with visual distractors suggests that only those cochlear implant users that are not proficient at recognizing speech sounds might show abnormal audiovisual interactions. The present study aims at reinforcing this notion by investigating the audiovisual segregation abilities of cochlear implant users in a visual task with auditory distractors. Speechreading was assessed in two groups of cochlear implant users (proficient and non-proficient at sound recognition, as well as in normal controls. A visual speech recognition task (i.e. speechreading was administered either in silence or in combination with three types of auditory distractors: i noise ii reverse speech sound and iii non-altered speech sound. Cochlear implant users proficient at speech recognition performed like normal controls in all conditions, whereas non-proficient users showed significantly different audiovisual segregation patterns in both speech conditions. These results confirm that normal-like audiovisual segregation is possible in highly skilled cochlear implant users and, consequently, that proficient and non-proficient CI users cannot be lumped into a single group. This important feature must be taken into account in further studies of audiovisual interactions in cochlear implant users.

  17. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Raquel S; Lopes, Paulo A A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of $0.20.6$) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index ${(U-B)_0}$ can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at $M_{B}>-19.5$ for both samples, and red objects being dominant at $M_{B}<-19.5$ only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with $Rsegregation, at the 99%c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70%c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinc...

  18. Photonic plasmid stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium: A comparison of three unique plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Donald

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella Typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium (S. typh-lux using three different plasmids and characterize their respective photonic properties. Results In presence of ampicillin (AMP, S. typh-lux with pCGLS-1, pAK1-lux and pXEN-1 plasmids exhibited 100% photon-emitting colonies over a 10-d study period. Photon emitters of S. typh-lux with pCGLS-1, pAK1-lux and pXEN-1 without AMP selection decreased over time (P 7 to 1 × 109 CFU, P 0.05; although photonic emissions across a range of bacterial concentrations were not different (1 × 104 to 1 × 106 CFU, P > 0.05. For very low density bacterial concentrations imaged in 96 well plates photonic emissions were positively correlated with bacterial concentration (P 3 to 1 × 105 CFU low to high were different in the 96-well plate format (P Conclusion These data characterize photon stability properties for S. typh-lux transformed with three different photon generating plasmids that may facilitate real-time Salmonella tracking using in vivo or in situ biophotonic paradigms.

  19. Noc protein binds to specific DNA sequences to coordinate cell division with chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling Juan; Ishikawa, Shu; Kawai, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Errington, Jeff

    2009-07-08

    Coordination of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis is crucial for efficient cell proliferation. In Bacillus subtilis, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc protects the chromosomes by associating with the chromosome and preventing cell division in its vicinity. Using protein localization, ChAP-on-Chip and bioinformatics, we have identified a consensus Noc-binding DNA sequence (NBS), and have shown that Noc is targeted to about 70 discrete regions scattered around the chromosome, though absent from a large region around the replication terminus. Purified Noc bound specifically to an NBS in vitro. NBSs inserted near the replication terminus bound Noc-YFP and caused a delay in cell division. An autonomous plasmid carrying an NBS array recruited Noc-YFP and conferred a severe Noc-dependent inhibition of cell division. This shows that Noc is a potent inhibitor of division, but that its activity is strictly localized by the interaction with NBS sites in vivo. We propose that Noc serves not only as a spatial regulator of cell division to protect the nucleoid, but also as a timing device with an important role in the coordination of chromosome segregation and cell division.

  20. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  1. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-09-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production.

  2. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  3. [Isolation of the R'his plasmids of Vibrio cholerae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, O Iu; Tiganova, I G; Aleshkin, G I; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1987-06-01

    V. cholerae strain VT5104 capable of donor activity in conjugation has been constructed by the genetic technique based on plasmid RP4::Mucts62 integration into V. cholerae chromosome due to plasmid homology with Mucts62 inserted into the chromosome. The gene for histidine synthesis has been mobilized and transferred into the recipient cells from VT5104 donor. The conjugants obtained are able to efficiently transfer his+ gene included into the plasmid structure in conjugation with eltor recipient. Thus, the constructed strain VT5104 generates R' plasmids carrying V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  4. Analysis of Minor Component Segregation in Ternary Powder Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asachi, Maryam; Hassanpour, Ali; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Bayly, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    In many powder handling operations, inhomogeneity in powder mixtures caused by segregation could have significant adverse impact on the quality as well as economics of the production. Segregation of a minor component of a highly active substance could have serious deleterious effects, an example is the segregation of enzyme granules in detergent powders. In this study, the effects of particle properties and bulk cohesion on the segregation tendency of minor component are analysed. The minor component is made sticky while not adversely affecting the flowability of samples. The segregation extent is evaluated using image processing of the photographic records taken from the front face of the heap after the pouring process. The optimum average sieve cut size of components for which segregation could be reduced is reported. It is also shown that the extent of segregation is significantly reduced by applying a thin layer of liquid to the surfaces of minor component, promoting an ordered mixture.

  5. Analysis of Minor Component Segregation in Ternary Powder Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asachi Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many powder handling operations, inhomogeneity in powder mixtures caused by segregation could have significant adverse impact on the quality as well as economics of the production. Segregation of a minor component of a highly active substance could have serious deleterious effects, an example is the segregation of enzyme granules in detergent powders. In this study, the effects of particle properties and bulk cohesion on the segregation tendency of minor component are analysed. The minor component is made sticky while not adversely affecting the flowability of samples. The segregation extent is evaluated using image processing of the photographic records taken from the front face of the heap after the pouring process. The optimum average sieve cut size of components for which segregation could be reduced is reported. It is also shown that the extent of segregation is significantly reduced by applying a thin layer of liquid to the surfaces of minor component, promoting an ordered mixture.

  6. Evaluating segregation in granular filters for earth dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Grabinsky, M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presented some case studies to illustrate the relationship between seepage problems encountered with earth dams and segregation of the dams' granular filters during construction. A literature review of segregation mechanisms was presented along with a laboratory investigation. The case studies showed that the current understanding of the impact of a given degree of segregation is relatively poor. The literature reveals that although segregation mechanisms are identified and analyzed, very few are likely to be predominant during earth dam construction. Laboratory studies show that a mathematical relationship can be established between the filter's grain size distribution curve and the potential degree of segregation. Therefore, a mathematical relationship can also be established with the potential for adverse dam performance. The authors proposed a field procedure which allows for the monitoring of segregation during construction by contractors and engineers. It also helps in deciding whether any segregated zones require replacement. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Degradative Plasmid and Heavy Metal Resistance Plasmid Naturally Coexist in Phenol and Cyanide Assimilating Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahig E.  Deeb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Heavy metals are known to be powerful inhibitors of xenobiotics biodegradation activities. Alleviation the inhibitory effect of these metals on the phenol biodegradation activities in presence of heavy metals resistant plasmid was investigated. Approach: Combination of genetic systems of degradation of xenobiotic compound and heavy metal resistance was one of the approaches to the creation of polyfunctional strains for bioremediation of soil after co-contamination with organic pollutants and heavy metals. Results: A bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida PhCN (pPhCN1, pPhCN2 had been obtained. This bacterium contained two plasmids, a 120 Kb catabolic plasmid that encode for breakdown of phenol (pPhCN1 and pPhCN2 plasmid (100 Kb that code for cadmium and copper resistant. Cyanide assimilation by this bacterium was encoded by chromosomal genes. The inhibitory effect of cadmium (Cd2+ or copper (Cu2+ on the degradation of phenol and cyanide by P. putida strains PhCN and PhCN1 (contained pPhCN1 were investigated. The resistant strain PhCN showed high ability to degrade phenol and cyanide in presence of Cd2+ or Cu2+ comparing with the sensitive strain PhCN1. In addition, Cd2+ or Cu2+ was also found to exert a strong inhibitory effect on the C23O dioxygenase enzyme activity in the presence of cyanide as a nitrogen source. Conclusion: The presence of heavy metal resistance plasmid alleviated the inhibitory effect of metals on the phenol and cyanide assimilation by resistant strain.

  8. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  9. [A novel Salmonella Typhimurium plasmid, pAnkS: an example for plasmid evolution in antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fikret; Karasartova, Djursun; Gerçeker, Devran; Aysev, A Derya; Erdem, Birsel

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a plasmid, carrying ampicillin resistance (ampR) gene, isolated from a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium presenting ACSSuT (ampicilin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphonamide, tetracycline) resistance phenotype, was defined. The length of complete sequence of this plasmid was 8271 base pairs (bp), and it was named as pAnkS owing to its isolation place (plasmid-Ankara- Salmonella). The plasmid was analyzed for potential reading frames and structural features indicative of transposons and transposon relics. The Xmnl enzyme restriction fragments of pAnkS were cloned into E. coli plasmid vectors (pBSK), sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST programs. Plasmid pAnkS has contained a previously defined enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) plasmid p4821 as a core region and also contained a complete Tn3-like transposon of 4950 bp consisting of the left terminal repeat, Tn3-related tnpR and tnpA genes for transposition functions, ampicillin resistance gene bla(TEM), and the right terminal repeats, pAnkS showed strong homology with another Salmonella plasmid, pNTP16, for sequences that belong to p4821 and partial Tn3 segments. It was found that pNTP16 also carries kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) in addition to ampR gene. Plasmid pAnkS is one of the few completely sequenced plasmids from Salmonella Typhimurium and is in the middle of the pathway of evolution of plasmid from p4821 to pNTP16. The identification of pAnkS might help better understanding of plasmid evolution.

  10. A Stochastic Multiscale Model That Explains the Segregation of Axonal Microtubules and Neurofilaments in Neurological Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The organization of the axonal cytoskeleton is a key determinant of the normal function of an axon, which is a long thin projection of a neuron. Under normal conditions two axonal cytoskeletal polymers, microtubules and neurofilaments, align longitudinally in axons and are interspersed in axonal cross-sections. However, in many neurotoxic and neurodegenerative disorders, microtubules and neurofilaments segregate apart from each other, with microtubules and membranous organelles clustered centrally and neurofilaments displaced to the periphery. This striking segregation precedes the abnormal and excessive neurofilament accumulation in these diseases, which in turn leads to focal axonal swellings. While neurofilament accumulation suggests an impairment of neurofilament transport along axons, the underlying mechanism of their segregation from microtubules remains poorly understood for over 30 years. To address this question, we developed a stochastic multiscale model for the cross-sectional distribution of microtubules and neurofilaments in axons. The model describes microtubules, neurofilaments and organelles as interacting particles in a 2D cross-section, and is built upon molecular processes that occur on a time scale of seconds or shorter. It incorporates the longitudinal transport of neurofilaments and organelles through this domain by allowing stochastic arrival and departure of these cargoes, and integrates the dynamic interactions of these cargoes with microtubules mediated by molecular motors. Simulations of the model demonstrate that organelles can pull nearby microtubules together, and in the absence of neurofilament transport, this mechanism gradually segregates microtubules from neurofilaments on a time scale of hours, similar to that observed in toxic neuropathies. This suggests that the microtubule-neurofilament segregation can be a consequence of the selective impairment of neurofilament transport. The model generates the

  11. Effect of plasmid R391 and other IncJ plasmids on the survival of Escherichia coli after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pembroke, J.T.; Stevens, E. (University Coll., Galway (Ireland))

    1984-07-01

    The presence of the IncJ plasmids R391, R997, R705, R706, R748, and R749 was shown to sensitize Escherichia coli AB1157 and both its uvr A and lexA derivatives to UV irradiation. No alteration in post-irradiation survival was observed in a recA mutant containing these plasmids, compared with the non-plasmid-containing recA strain. Analysis of recombination frequency in Hfr crosses to recA/sup +/ cells containing plasmid R391 indicated a reduction in recombination frequency compared with that obtained in similar crosses to a non-plasmid-containing strain. This effect was not due to plasmid-encoded restriction or entry exclusion systems and therefore must be considered as a real block in recombination. When cells containing plasmid R391 were irradiated and allowed to photoreactivate, an increase in survival was observed which was comparable to that observed in the non-plasmid-containing derivative. This indicated that post-irradiation processing of UV-induced damage, or lack of such processing, by mechanisms other than photoreactivation was responsible for the UV sensitivity associated with plasmid R391.

  12. Racial segregation and maternal smoking during pregnancy: a multilevel analysis using the racial segregation interaction index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Shoff, Carla; Noah, Aggie J; Black, Nyesha; Sparks, Corey S

    2014-04-01

    Drawing from both the place stratification and ethnic enclave perspectives, we use multilevel modeling to investigate the relationships between women's race/ethnicity (i.e., non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Asian, and Hispanic) and maternal smoking during pregnancy, and examine if these relationships are moderated by racial segregation in the continental United States. The results show that increased interaction with whites is associated with increased probability of maternal smoking during pregnancy, and racial segregation moderates the relationships between race/ethnicity and maternal smoking. Specifically, living in a less racially segregated area is related to a lower probability of smoking during pregnancy for black women, but it could double and almost triple the probability of smoking for Asian women and Hispanic women, respectively. Our findings provide empirical evidence for both the place stratification and ethnic enclave perspectives.

  13. Dealing with the evolutionary downside of CRISPR immunity: bacteria and beneficial plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Jiang

    Full Text Available The immune systems that protect organisms from infectious agents invariably have a cost for the host. In bacteria and archaea CRISPR-Cas loci can serve as adaptive immune systems that protect these microbes from infectiously transmitted DNAs. When those DNAs are borne by lytic viruses (phages, this protection can provide a considerable advantage. CRISPR-Cas immunity can also prevent cells from acquiring plasmids and free DNA bearing genes that increase their fitness. Here, we use a combination of experiments and mathematical-computer simulation models to explore this downside of CRISPR-Cas immunity and its implications for the maintenance of CRISPR-Cas loci in microbial populations. We analyzed the conjugational transfer of the staphylococcal plasmid pG0400 into Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a recipients that bear a CRISPR-Cas locus targeting this plasmid. Contrary to what is anticipated for lytic phages, which evade CRISPR by mutations in the target region, the evasion of CRISPR immunity by plasmids occurs at the level of the host through loss of functional CRISPR-Cas immunity. The results of our experiments and models indicate that more than 10(-4 of the cells in CRISPR-Cas positive populations are defective or deleted for the CRISPR-Cas region and thereby able to receive and carry the plasmid. Most intriguingly, the loss of CRISPR function even by large deletions can have little or no fitness cost in vitro. These theoretical and experimental results can account for the considerable variation in the existence, number and function of CRISPR-Cas loci within and between bacterial species. We postulate that as a consequence of the opposing positive and negative selection for immunity, CRISPR-Cas systems are in a continuous state of flux. They are lost when they bear immunity to laterally transferred beneficial genes, re-acquired by horizontal gene transfer, and ascend in environments where phage are a major source of mortality.

  14. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strain M23 (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) or Dixon (X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen worldwide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. The emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host switching of existing strains, is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time, compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT, adaptation, and disease emergence

  15. Conjugative plasmid transfer in Xylella fastidiosa is dependent on tra and trb operon functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Van Horn, Christopher R

    2017-08-14

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative Type IV secretion system are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies, and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strains M23 (subspecies fastidiosa) or Dixon (subspecies multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (subspecies fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad host range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains, and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts.IMPORTANCEXylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen world-wide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. Emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host-switching of existing strains is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT and adaptation, and disease emergence in this diverse pathogen. This is a work

  16. Atomic scale investigation of non-equilibrium segregation of boron in a quenched Mo-free martensitic steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y J; Ponge, D; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-12-01

    B-added low carbon steels exhibit excellent hardenability. The reason has been frequently attributed to B segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries, which prevents the austenite to ferrite transformation and favors the formation of martensite. The segregation behavior of B at prior austenite grain boundaries is strongly influenced by processing conditions such as austenitization temperatures and cooling rates and by alloying elements such as Mo, Cr, and Nb. Here an local electrode atom probe was employed to investigate the segregation behavior of B and other alloying elements (C, Mn, Si, and Cr) in a Cr-added Mo-free martensitic steel. Similar to our previous results on a Mo-added steel, we found that in both steels B is segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries with similar excess values, whereas B is neither detected in the martensitic matrix nor at martensite-martensite boundaries at the given cooling rate of 30K/s. These results are in agreement with the literature reporting that Cr has the same effect on hardenability of steels as Mo in the case of high cooling rates. The absence of B at martensite-martensite boundaries suggests that B segregates to prior austenite grain boundaries via a non-equilibrium mechanism. Segregation of C at all boundaries such as prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite-martensite boundaries may occur by an equilibrium mechanism.

  17. Chromosomal targeting of replicating plasmids in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Swaving, Gert Jan; Faber, Folkert; Ab, Geert; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten; Haima, Pieter

    1992-01-01

    Using an optimized transformation protocol we have studied the possible interactions between transforming plasmid DNA and the Hansenula polymorpha genome. Plasmids consisting only of a pBR322 replicon, an antibiotic resistance marker for Escherichia coli and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene we

  18. Genomic comparison of archaeal conjugative plasmids from Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bo Bjørn

    2004-01-01

    All of the known self-transmissable plasmids of the Archaea have been found in the genus Sulfolobus. To gain more insight into archaeal conjugative processes, four newly isolated self-transmissable plasmids, pKEF9, pHVE14, pARN3 and pARN4, were sequenced and subjected to a comparative sequence...

  19. Linear plasmid in the genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susan E; Knudson, Dennis L; Ishimaru, Carol A

    2002-05-01

    Contour-clamped homogeneous electric field gel analysis of genomic DNA of the plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus revealed the presence of a previously unreported extrachromosomal element. This new element was demonstrated to be a linear plasmid. Of 11 strains evaluated, all contained either a 90-kb (pCSL1) or a 140-kb (pCSL2) linear plasmid.

  20. Homology of plasmids in strains of unicellular cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Keegstra, W.; Borrias, W.E.; Arkel, G.A. van

    1979-01-01

    Six strains of unicellular cyanobacteria were examined for the presence of plasmids. Analysis of lysates of these strains by CsCl-ethidium bromide density centrifugation yielded a major chromosomal DNA band and a minor band containing covalently closed circular plasmid DNA, as shown by electron micr

  1. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  2. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human papil

  3. Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, I.

    2013-01-01

    Research leading to the thesis ‘Production and pharmaceutical formulation of plasmid DNA vaccines‘ can be divided into two parts. The first part describes the development of a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant plasmid DNA production process of pDNA vaccines for the treatment of Human papil

  4. Plasmid cloning vehicle for Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Clayton, N.L.; Setlow, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A new plasmid cloning vehicle (pDM2) was used to introduce a library of Haemophilus influenzae chromosomal fragments into H. influenzae. Transformants of the higly recombination-defective rec-1 mutant were more likely to contain exclusively recombinant plasmids after exposure to ligated DNA mixtures than was the wild type. pDM2 could replicate in Escherichia coli K-12.

  5. Functional analysis of three plasmids from Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, R. van; Golic, N.; Bongers, R.; Leer, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Siezen, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 harbors three plasmids, pWCFS101, pWCFS102, and pWCFS103, with sizes of 1,917, 2,365, and 36,069 bp, respectively. The two smaller plasmids are of unknown function and contain replication genes that are likely to function via the rolling-circle replication mechanism. Th

  6. Successful Implementation of Soil Segregation Technology at the Painesville FUSRAP Site - 12281

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechi, Stephen P.; Andrews, Shawn M. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, Buffalo, New York (United States); Lombardo, Andrew J. [Safety and Ecology Corporation, Beaver, Pennsylvania (United States); Lively, Jeffrey W. [AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Typically the highest cost component of the radiological soils remediation of Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites is the cost to transport and dispose of the excavated soils, typically contaminated with naturally occurring isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium, at an appropriately permitted off-site disposal facility. The heterogeneous nature of the contamination encountered at these sites makes it difficult to accurately delineate the extent of contaminated soil using the limited, discrete sampling data collected during the investigation phases; and difficult to precisely excavate only the contaminated soil that is above the established cleanup limits using standard in-field scanning and guiding methodologies. This usually results in a conservative guided excavation to ensure cleanup criteria are met, with the attendant transportation and disposal costs for the larger volumes of soil excavated. To address this issue during the remediation of the Painesville FUSRAP Site, located in Painesville, Ohio, the Buffalo District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and its contractor, Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC), employed automatic soil segregation technology provided by MACTEC (now AMEC) to reduce the potential for transportation and disposal of soils that met the cleanup limits. This waste minimization technology utilized gamma spectroscopy of conveyor-fed soils to automatically segregate the material into above and below criteria discharge piles. Use of the soil segregation system resulted in cost savings through the significant reduction of the volume of excavated soil that required off-site transportation and disposal, and the reduction of the amount of imported clean backfill required via reuse of 'below criteria' segregated soil as place back material in restoring the excavations. Measurements taken by the soil segregation system, as well as results of quality control sampling of segregated soils, confirmed that soils

  7. Identification of IncA/C Plasmid Replication and Maintenance Genes and Development of a Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Steven J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) are becoming increasingly prevalent within pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae They are associated with the dissemination of multiple clinically relevant resistance genes, including blaCMY and blaNDM Current typing methods for IncA/C plasmids offer limited resolution. In this study, we present the complete sequence of a blaNDM-1-positive IncA/C plasmid, pMS6198A, isolated from a multidrug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain. Hypersaturated transposon mutagenesis, coupled with transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), was employed to identify conserved genetic elements required for replication and maintenance of pMS6198A. Our analysis of TraDIS data identified roles for the replicon, including repA, a toxin-antitoxin system; two putative partitioning genes, parAB; and a putative gene, 053 Construction of mini-IncA/C plasmids and examination of their stability within E. coli confirmed that the region encompassing 053 contributes to the stable maintenance of IncA/C plasmids. Subsequently, the four major maintenance genes (repA, parAB, and 053) were used to construct a new plasmid multilocus sequence typing (PMLST) scheme for IncA/C plasmids. Application of this scheme to a database of 82 IncA/C plasmids identified 11 unique sequence types (STs), with two dominant STs. The majority of blaNDM-positive plasmids examined (15/17; 88%) fall into ST1, suggesting acquisition and subsequent expansion of this blaNDM-containing plasmid lineage. The IncA/C PMLST scheme represents a standardized tool to identify, track, and analyze the dissemination of important IncA/C plasmid lineages, particularly in the context of epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Segregation of helicity in inertial wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.

    2017-03-01

    Inertial waves are known to exist in the Earth's rapidly rotating outer core and could be important for the dynamo generation. It is well known that a monochromatic inertial plane wave traveling parallel to the rotation axis (along positive z ) has negative helicity while the wave traveling antiparallel (negative z ) has positive helicity. Such a helicity segregation, north and south of the equator, is necessary for the α2-dynamo model based on inertial waves [Davidson, Geophys. J. Int. 198, 1832 (2014), 10.1093/gji/ggu220] to work. The core is likely to contain a myriad of inertial waves of different wave numbers and frequencies. In this study, we investigate whether this characteristic of helicity segregation also holds for an inertial wave packet comprising waves with the same sign of Cg ,z, the z component of group velocity. We first derive the polarization relations for inertial waves and subsequently derive the resultant helicity in wave packets forming as a result of superposition of two or more waves. We find that the helicity segregation does hold for an inertial wave packet unless the wave numbers of the constituent waves are widely separated. In the latter case, regions of opposite color helicity do appear, but the mean helicity retains the expected sign. An illustration of this observation is provided by (a) calculating the resultant helicity for a wave packet formed by superposition of four upward-propagating inertial waves with different wave vectors and (b) conducting the direct numerical simulation of a Gaussian eddy under rapid rotation. Last, the possible effects of other forces such as the viscous dissipation, the Lorentz force, buoyancy stratification, and nonlinearity on helicity are investigated and discussed. The helical structure of the wave packet is likely to remain unaffected by dissipation or the magnetic field, but can be modified by the presence of linearly stable stratification and nonlinearity.

  9. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Nicolas; Matteau, Dominick; Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  10. Deciphering conjugative plasmid permissiveness in wastewater microbiomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel; Milani, Stefan Morberg

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are designed to robustly treat polluted water. They are characterized by ceaseless flows of organic, chemical and microbial matter, followed by treatment steps before environmental release. WWTPs are hotspots of horizontal gene transfer between bacteria via...... still remains largely uncharted. Furthermore, current in vitro methods used to assess conjugation in complex microbiomes do not include in situ behaviours of recipient cells, resulting in partial understanding of transfers. We investigated the in vitro conjugation capacities of WWTP microbiomes from...... diversity of recipient bacterial phyla for the plasmid was observed, especially in WWTP outlets. We also identified permissive bacteria potentially able to cross WWTPs and engage in conjugation before and after water treatment. Bacterial activity and lifestyle seem to influence conjugation extent...

  11. Expansion of the IncX plasmid family for improved identification and typing of novel plasmids in drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bielak, Eliza Maria; Fortini, Daniela;

    2012-01-01

    and biofilm formation. Previous plasmid-based replicon typing procedures have indicated that the prevalence of IncX plasmids is low among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. However, examination of a number of IncX-like plasmid sequences and their occurrence in various organisms suggests that IncX plasmid...

  12. Computing the complexity for Schelling segregation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Stefan; Glebsky, Lev; Schneider, Carsten; Weiss, Howard; Zimmermann, Burkhard

    2008-12-01

    The Schelling segregation models are "agent based" population models, where individual members of the population (agents) interact directly with other agents and move in space and time. In this note we study one-dimensional Schelling population models as finite dynamical systems. We define a natural notion of entropy which measures the complexity of the family of these dynamical systems. The entropy counts the asymptotic growth rate of the number of limit states. We find formulas and deduce precise asymptotics for the number of limit states, which enable us to explicitly compute the entropy.

  13. Isothermal Gravitational Segregation: Algorithms and Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldórsson, Snorri; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    New algorithms for calculating the isothermal equilibrium state of reservoir fluids under the influence of gravity are presented. Two types of specifications are considered: the specification of pressure and composition at a reference depth; and the specification of the total overall content...... of the reservoir, along with the reservoir geometry. It is shown how both types of calculations can be performed in an efficient and robust manner using volume-based thermodynamics. The new method makes it possible to evaluate the influence of reservoir geometry and gravity segregation on the hydrocarbon reserves...

  14. Sample displacement chromatography of plasmid DNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černigoj, Urh; Martinuč, Urška; Cardoso, Sara; Sekirnik, Rok; Krajnc, Nika Lendero; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-10-02

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) is a chromatographic technique that utilises different relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture and has been widely studied in the context of peptide and protein purification. Here, we report a use of SDC to separate plasmid DNA (pDNA) isoforms under overloading conditions, where supercoiled (sc) isoform acts as a displacer of open circular (oc) or linear isoform. Since displacement is more efficient when mass transfer between stationary and mobile chromatographic phases is not limited by diffusion, we investigated convective interaction media (CIM) monoliths as stationary phases for pDNA isoform separation. CIM monoliths with different hydrophobicities and thus different binding affinities for pDNA (CIM C4 HLD, CIM-histamine and CIM-pyridine) were tested under hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) conditions. SD efficiency for pDNA isoform separation was shown to be dependent on column selectivity for individual isoform, column efficiency and on ammonium sulfate (AS) concentration in loading buffer (binding strength). SD and negative mode elution often operate in parallel, therefore negative mode elution additionally influences the efficiency of the overall purification process. Optimisation of chromatographic conditions achieved 98% sc pDNA homogeneity and a dynamic binding capacity of over 1mg/mL at a relatively low concentration of AS. SDC was successfully implemented for the enrichment of sc pDNA for plasmid vectors of different sizes, and for separation of linear and and sc isoforms, independently of oc:sc isoform ratio, and flow-rate used. This study therefore identifies SDC as a promising new approach to large-scale pDNA purification, which is compatible with continuous, multicolumn chromatography systems, and could therefore be used to increase productivity of pDNA production in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Se-Hee [McAllister Heart Institute, Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J. [McAllister Heart Institute, Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Yale Cardiovascular Research Center and Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Holland, Melinda B. [McAllister Heart Institute, Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Kim, Jun-Dae [Yale Cardiovascular Research Center and Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Jin, Suk-Won, E-mail: suk-won.jin@yale.edu [Yale Cardiovascular Research Center and Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  16. Permissiveness of soil microbial communities towards broad host range plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli

    larger than previously assumed. I was able to show abundant plasmid transfer from the Gram negative donor strains to a wide diversity of Gram positive soil bacteria, formerly thought to constitute distinct clusters of gene transfer. Moreover, among the observed transconjugants, I identified a core super...... environmental factors that modulate plasmid transfer in soil microbial communities. In order to attain these goals, I developed a high-throughput method that enabled me to evaluate the permissiveness of bacterial communities towards introduced plasmids. This new approach is based on the introduction...... fraction of soil the bacteria (up to 1 in 10,000) were able to take up any of these broad host range conjugal plasmids. The transconjugal pools comprised 11 bacterial phyla. This finding indicates that the realized transfer range of broad host range plasmids in environmental microbial communities is much...

  17. Melt Segregation & LPO in Anorthite-Basalt Deformed in Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. E.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    Deformation in the middle and lower crust is in large part controlled by the rheology of feldspar. Seismic studies have shown that the middle crust of orogenic belts is partially molten. Structural studies of mylonites and migmatites from these terrains record large strain deformation. Therefore, we performed torsional shear deformation experiments on fine grained (10 μ m) samples of Beaver Bay anorthite (An70) +/- 10 vol% basalt to shear strains γ = 2-6 to investigate the development of lattice preferred orientation (LPO) and melt segregation at large shear strains. We performed experiments in a gas medium apparatus equipped with an internal torque cell at T = 1450 K, P = 300 MPa, and constant twist rate. Melt segregated in the An70 + basalt samples into melt-rich bands oriented at ˜20° to the shear plane and antithetic to the shear direction. The spacing between bands is ˜0.5 mm. Distortion of the iron jacket demonstrates that strain localized in the melt-rich bands. We determined the LPO of An70 with scanning electron microscopy using electron back scatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD). In patterns from an An70+ basalt sample deformed to γ ≈ 2.5, (001) planes are aligned subparallel to the shear plane and [100] axes are concentrated close to the shear direction. Both the (001) and the [100] are rotated counter clockwise from the shear direction by 20-25° . The formation of melt-rich bands is consistent with results from simple shear experiments on olivine + chromite + basalt and olivine + FeS +/- basalt, as well as An70 + basalt and indicates that deformation can drive melt segregation. Deformation drives the self organization of melt-rich bands and decreases the effective viscosity of the rock. The LPO is consistent with results from experiments on albite in shear and anorthite in compression and compatible with slip dominantly on (001) with [100] as the slip direction. A similar back rotation, attributed to partitioning of the strain between melt-rich and

  18. Complex nature of enterococcal pheromone-responsive plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardal, Ewa; Sadowy, Ewa; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2010-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive plasmids constitute a unique group of approximately 20 plasmids identified, as yet, only among enterococcal species. Several of their representatives, e.g. pAD1, pCF10, pPD1 and pAM373 have been extensively studied. These plasmids possess a sophisticated conjugation mechanism based on response to sex pheromones--small peptides produced by plasmid-free recipient cells. Detailed analysis of regulation and function of the pheromone response process revealed its great complexity and dual role--in plasmid conjugation and modulation of enterococcal virulence. Among other functional modules identified in pheromone plasmids, the stabilization/partition systems play a crucial role in stable maintenance of the plasmid molecule in host bacteria. Among them, the par locus of pAD1 is one of the exceptional RNA addiction systems. Pheromone-responsive plasmids contribute also to enterococcal phenotype being an important vehicle of antibiotic resistance in this genus. Both types of acquired vancomycin resistance determinants, vanA and vanB, as well many other resistant phenotypes, were found to be located on these plasmids. They also encode two basic agents of enterococcal virulence, i.e. aggregation substance (AS) and cytolysin. AS participates in mating-pair formation during conjugation but can also facilitate the adherence ofenterococci to human tissues during infection. The second protein, cytolysin, displays hemolytic activity and helps to invade eukaryotic cells. There are still many aspects of the nature of pheromone plasmids that remain unclear and more detailed studies are needed to understand their uniqueness and complexity.

  19. The Segregation and Liquation Crackings in the HAZ of Multipass Laser-Welded Joints for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2017-08-01

    The segregation and liquation crackings in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) beside Inconel 52M overlays of multipass laser-welded joints are investigated for nuclear power plants. The results indicate that Nb-rich precipitates are distributed in chains and some aggregate together as coarse particles in the local regions at the interface. With increasing heat input, the transition width becomes widened and the fraction of the precipitates at the interface significantly increases. Closely associated to Nb segregation, liquation crackings occur along columnar dendrites in the HAZ beside Inconel 52M overlays. Due to no deformation coordination of the columnar dendrites with Nb-rich segregates in Inconel 52M overlays, liquation crackings occur in thermal cycle of multipass laser welding. The enrichment of Nb element in the interdendritic regions increases favorable factors of liquation crackings at grain boundaries.

  20. Segregation, choice based letting and social housing: How housing policy can affect the segregation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ham, M.; Manley, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate the process of ethnic minority segregation in English social housing. Successive governments have expressed a commitment to the con-tradictory aims of providing greater choice – through the introduction of choice based letting – for households accessing an increasingly

  1. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii.

  2. Angiodysplasia Occurring in Jejunal Diverticulosis

    OpenAIRE

    Edward A Jones; Hugh Chaun; Phillip Switzer; David J Clow; Ronald J Hancock

    1990-01-01

    The first case of angiodysplasia occurring in acquired jejunal diverticulosis is reported. The patient presented with occult gastrointestinal bleeding and chronic anemia, and was created successfully by resection of a 25 cm long segment of jejunum. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms for both angiodysplasia and jejunal diverticulosis are discussed.

  3. Comparison of Channel Segregation Formation in Model Alloys and Steels via Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Li, D. Z.; Liu, H. W.; Fu, P. X.

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the evolutions of channel segregations in several alloy systems, such as the typically used model alloys ( e.g., Ga-In, Sn-Pb, Sn-Bi, Al-Cu, and Ni-based superalloy) and some special steels, are numerically simulated in a cavity solidified unidirectionally. The simulations are based on a modified continuum macrosegregation model with an extension to the multicomponent systems. The results of model alloys and steels indicate that when the thermosolutal convection is strong enough, flow instability occurs, which in turn destabilizes the mushy zone. Subsequently, the channel segregation forms with the continuous interaction between solidification and flow. The formation behavior and severity of channel segregations in various systems are different owing to their distinct melt convection strengths and solidification natures. In the current simulations, channels are apparent for model alloys with high content of solutes, whereas they are slight in some special steels, such as 27SiMn steel, and totally disappear in carbon steels. These occurrence features of channel segregation in simulations of steels are consistent with the analyses by a modified Rayleigh number associated with alloying elements, and both outcomes are well supported by the fully sectioned steel ingots in experiments.

  4. Circulation of a multiresistant, conjugative, IncA/C plasmid within the nosocomial Providencia stuartii population in the Athens area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakkoupi, Panagiota; Tryfinopoulou, Kyriaki; Polemis, Michalis; Pappa, Olga; Miriagou, Vivi; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to report a multidrug-resistant outbreak of Providencia stuartii that occurred in inpatients in the Athens area in 2012 resulting from a very successful transmissible A/C multidrug-resistant plasmid. Thirteen multidrug-resistant P. stuartii clinical isolates from 5 hospitals were studied. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Antibiotic resistance genes and their genetic surround were detected by PCR and sequencing. Plasmid analysis included conjugation experiments using liquid cultures, sizing by S1 digestion, and incompatibility replicon typing by PCR. Isolates were grouped into 2 distinct clonal types A and B, exhibiting similarity less than 70%. Isolates of type A were recovered from patients hospitalized in 4 different hospitals with no obvious epidemiological linkage, while isolates of type B were recovered from patients treated in a single hospital. Both clonal types harbored a conjugative plasmid of 130 bp and IncA/C replicon type carrying 5 β-lactamase genes bla(SHV-5), bla(VEB-1), bla(VIM-1), bla(OXA-10), and bla(TEM-1) and aminoglycosides resistant determinants. All β-lactamase genes were included in stable structures as IS26, IS1999, and In-e541. The current plasmid seemed to have many common determinants with previously reported plasmids derived from P. stuartii and Proteus mirabilis clinical isolates and exhibited the ability to circulate in nosocomial bacterial populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth Conditions Regulate the Requirements for Caulobacter Chromosome Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shebelut, Conrad W.; Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Gitai, Zemer

    2009-01-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation...... determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated....

  6. Growth conditions regulate the requirements for Caulobacter chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Jensen, Rasmus B; Gitai, Zemer

    2009-02-01

    Growth environments are important metabolic and developmental regulators. Here we demonstrate a growth environment-dependent effect on Caulobacter chromosome segregation of a small-molecule inhibitor of the MreB bacterial actin cytoskeleton. Our results also implicate ParAB as important segregation determinants, suggesting that multiple distinct mechanisms can mediate Caulobacter chromosome segregation and that their relative contributions can be environmentally regulated.

  7. Highly Nonlinear Ising Model and Social Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Sumour, M A; Shabat, M M

    2011-01-01

    The usual interaction energy of the random field Ising model in statistical physics is modified by complementing the random field by added to the energy of the usual Ising model a nonlinear term S^n were S is the sum of the neighbor spins, and n=0,1,3,5,7,9,11. Within the Schelling model of urban segregation, this modification corresponds to housing prices depending on the immediate neighborhood. Simulations at different temperatures, lattice size, magnetic field, number of neighbors and different time intervals showed that results for all n are similar, expect for n=3 in violation of the universality principle and the law of corresponding states. In order to find the critical temperatures, for large n we no longer start with all spins parallel but instead with a random configuration, in order to facilitate spin flips. However, in all cases we have a Curie temperature with phase separation or long-range segregation only below this Curie temperature, and it is approximated by a simple formula: Tc is proportion...

  8. Theta oscillations accompanying concurrent auditory stream segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Brigitta; Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Urbán, Gábor; Winkler, István

    2016-08-01

    The ability to isolate a single sound source among concurrent sources is crucial for veridical auditory perception. The present study investigated the event-related oscillations evoked by complex tones, which could be perceived as a single sound and tonal complexes with cues promoting the perception of two concurrent sounds by inharmonicity, onset asynchrony, and/or perceived source location difference of the components tones. In separate task conditions, participants performed a visual change detection task (visual control), watched a silent movie (passive listening) or reported for each tone whether they perceived one or two concurrent sounds (active listening). In two time windows, the amplitude of theta oscillation was modulated by the presence vs. absence of the cues: 60-350ms/6-8Hz (early) and 350-450ms/4-8Hz (late). The early response appeared both in the passive and the active listening conditions; it did not closely match the task performance; and it had a fronto-central scalp distribution. The late response was only elicited in the active listening condition; it closely matched the task performance; and it had a centro-parietal scalp distribution. The neural processes reflected by these responses are probably involved in the processing of concurrent sound segregation cues, in sound categorization, and response preparation and monitoring. The current results are compatible with the notion that theta oscillations mediate some of the processes involved in concurrent sound segregation.

  9. SOCIAL POLARIZATION AND SEGREGATION IN BEIJING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The biggest change in Beijing during the last decade has been in its social structure. This transition is changing the existing situation of social "equality", and leads to polarization both in individual communities and in society as a whole. As a result, social variations and conflicting interest are growing, and some new social groups are emerging. In this paper we seek to explore a new urban phenomenon in post-1984 Beijing: social polarization and segregation. At first, we will discuss some elements explaining social polarization. The elements and the processes can be traced back to two main aspects of the economic reforms, namely the internal reforms unleashing a huge rural exodus and the open door policy. Special attention will be paid to the new lower end of the social ladder, which is made up largely by rural migrantsthat make up the so-called floating population.Finally we will explore how these social changes translate into urban segregation, with some consideration for future develop-ments.

  10. PLC based Segregation of Scrap Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh B. Nagapure

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describe segregation of scrap materials using automation system. With the growing population rate, the amount of waste being produced is also increasing at a very faster rate. It is also posing a very serious problem at the industrial and domestic level to manage the wastes being dumped everywhere as landfill waste. So, it is very crucial to have some system to manage waste automatically which is currently not there. Prime Minister Modi’s mission of Swaccha Bharat Abhiyan can also be successfully implemented by the proposed system. The paper proposes a novel method where the provision is given to separate out metal and nonmetal waste into respective bins by the sensing of different sensors incorporated along the conveyor belt. Pieces of glass, paper, wood and metallic materials are separated out from proposed work. Using the segregation, most of the metal and nonmetal components like paper, glass, plastic increases the economic value of the waste to its best. For every scrap separation system, a higher level of automation demands more and more accurate programming device. So, we are using programmable logic controller (PLC as main component

  11. Modelling density segregation in flowing bidisperse granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2016-07-01

    Preventing segregation in flowing granular mixtures is an ongoing challenge for industrial processes that involve the handling of bulk solids. A recent continuum-based modelling approach accurately predicts spatial concentration fields in a variety of flow geometries for mixtures varying in particle size. This approach captures the interplay between advection, diffusion and segregation using kinematic information obtained from experiments and/or discrete element method (DEM) simulations combined with an empirically determined relation for the segregation velocity. Here, we extend the model to include density-driven segregation, thereby validating the approach for the two important cases of practical interest. DEM simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-two-dimensional-bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density-driven segregation velocity on local shear rate and particle concentration. The model yields theoretical predictions of segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios and flow rates. Matching experiments reproduce the segregation patterns and quantitative segregation profiles obtained in both the simulations and the model, thereby demonstrating that the modelling approach captures the essential physics of density-driven segregation in granular heap flow.

  12. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  13. Improving putrescine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum by fine-tuning ornithine transcarbamoylase activity using a plasmid addiction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jens; Eberhardt, Dorit; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-07-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum shows a great potential for the production of the polyamide monomer putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane). Previously, we constructed the putrescine-producing strain PUT1 by deletion of argF, the gene for ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), and argR, encoding the L-arginine repressor, combined with heterologous expression of the Escherichia coli gene for L-ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. As a consequence of argF deletion, this strain requires supplementation of L-arginine and shows growth-decoupled putrescine production. To avoid costly supplementation with L-arginine and the strong feedback inhibition of the key enzyme N-acetylglutamate kinase (ArgB) by L-arginine, a plasmid addiction system for low-level argF expression was developed. By fine-tuning argF expression through modifications of the promoter, the translational start codon and/or the ribosome binding site, high productivity and titer could be obtained. OTC activity varied almost thousandfold between 960 and 1 mU mg⁻¹ resulting in putrescine yields on glucose from less than 0.001 up to 0.26 g g⁻¹, the highest yield in bacteria reported to date. The most promising strain, designated PUT21, was characterized comprehensively. PUT21 strain grew with a rate of 0.19 h⁻¹ in mineral salt medium without the need for L-arginine supplementation and produced putrescine with a yield of 0.16 g g⁻¹ glucose at a volumetric productivity of 0.57 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ and a specific productivity of 0.042 g g⁻¹ h⁻¹. The carbon balance suggested that no major unidentified by-product was produced. Compared to the first-generation strain PUT1, the putrescine yield observed with PUT21 was increased by 60%. In fed-batch cultivation with C. glutamicum PUT21, a putrescine titer of 19 g L⁻¹ at a volumetric productivity of 0.55 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ and a yield of 0.16 g g⁻¹ glucose could be achieved. Moreover, while plasmid segregation of the initial strain required antibiotic selection

  14. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  15. Plasmid DNA Manufacturing for Indirect and Direct Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Marco; Buchholz, Tatjana; Schleef, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Plasmid DNA is currently gaining increasing importance for clinical research applications in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. For direct gene transfer into humans, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade plasmid DNA is mandatory. The same holds true if the drug substance contains a genetically modified cell, for example chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, where these cells as well as the contained plasmids are used. According to the responsible regulatory agencies, they have to be produced under full GMP. On the other hand, for GMP production of, for example, mRNA or viral vectors (lentiviral vectors, adeno-associated virus vectors, etc.), in many cases, High Quality Grade plasmid DNA is accepted as a starting material. The manufacturing process passes through different production steps. To ensure the right conditions are used for the plasmid, a pilot run must be conducted at the beginning. In this step, a followed upscaling with respect to reproducibility and influences on product quality is performed. Subsequently, a cell bank of the transformed productions strain is established and characterized. This cell bank is used for the cultivation process. After cell harvesting and lysis, several chromatography steps are conducted to receive a pure plasmid product. Depending on the respective required quality grade, the plasmid product is subject to several quality controls. The last step consists of formulation and filling of the product.

  16. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. (Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  17. The double par locus of virulence factor pB171: DNA segregation is correlated with oscillation of ParA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, G; Gerdes, K; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2001-01-01

    Prokaryotic plasmids and chromosomes encode partitioning (par) loci that segregate DNA to daughter cells before cell division. Recent database analyses showed that almost all known par loci encode an ATPase and a DNA-binding protein, and one or more cis-acting regions where the proteins act. All...... par-encoded ATPases belong to one of two protein superfamilies, Walker-type and actin-like ATPases. This property was recently used to divide par loci into Types I and II loci. We show here that the Escherichia coli virulence factor pB171 encodes a double par locus that consists of one Type I and one...

  18. R-plasmid transfer in a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, P A; Grimes, D J

    1982-12-01

    Enteric bacteria have been examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance in a wastewater treatment plant. Resistant Salmonella enteritidis, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli were isolated from clinical specimens and primary sewage effluent. Resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfadiazine, and tetracycline was demonstrated by spread plate and tube dilution techniques. Plasmid mediation of resistance was shown by ethidium bromide curing, agarose gel electrophoresis, and direct cell transfer. Each donor was mated with susceptible E. coli and Shigella sonnei. Mating pairs (and recipient controls) were suspended in unchlorinated primary effluent that had been filtered and autoclaved. Suspensions were added to membrane diffusion chambers which were then placed in the primary and secondary setting tanks of the wastewater treatment plant. Resistant recombinants were detected by replica plating nutrient agar master plates onto xylose lysine desoxycholate agar plates that contained per milliliter of medium 10 micrograms of ampicillin, 30 micrograms of chloramphenicol, 10 micrograms of streptomycin, 100 micrograms of sulfadiazine, or 30 micrograms of tetracycline. Mean transfer frequencies for laboratory matings were 2.1 X 10(-3). In situ matings for primary and secondary settling resulted in frequencies of 4.9 X 10(-5) and 7.5 X 10(-5), respectively. These values suggest that a significant level of resistance transfer occurs in wastewater treatment plants in the absence of antibiotics as selective agents.

  19. Micro and Macro Segregation in Alloys Solidifying with Equiaxed Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Leon-Torres, Jose; Sen, Subhayu

    1996-01-01

    To understand macro segregation formation in Al-Cu alloys, experiments were run under terrestrial gravity (1g) and under low gravity during parabolic flights (10(exp -2) g). Alloys of two different compositions (2% and 5% Cu) were solidified at two different cooling rates. Systematic microscopic and SEM observations produced microstructural and segregation maps for all samples. These maps may be used as benchmark experiments for validation of microstructure evolution and segregation models. As expected, the macro segregation maps are very complex. When segregation was measured along the central axis of the sample, the highest macro segregation for samples solidified at 1g was obtained for the lowest cooling rate. This behavior is attributed to the longer time available for natural convection and shrinkage flow to affect solute redistribution. In samples solidified under low-g, the highest macro-segregation was obtained at the highest cooling rate. In general, low-gravity solidification resulted in less segregation. To explain the experimental findings, an analytical (Flemings-Nereo) and a numerical model were used. For the numerical model, the continuum formulation was employed to describe the macroscopic transports of mass, energy, and momentum, associated with the microscopic transport phenomena, for a two-phase system. The model proposed considers that liquid flow is driven by thermal and solutal buoyancy, and by solidification shrinkage. The Flemings-Nereo model explains well macro segregation in the initial stages of low-gravity segregation. The numerical model can describe the complex macro segregation pattern and the differences between low- and high-gravity solidification.

  20. Auditory stream segregation using amplitude modulated bandpass noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjiu eNie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of spectral overlap and amplitude modulation (AM rate for stream segregation for noise signals, as well as to test the build-up effect based on these two cues. Segregation ability was evaluated using an objective paradigm with listeners’ attention focused on stream segregation. Stimulus sequences consisted of two interleaved sets of bandpass noise bursts (A and B bursts. The A and B bursts differed in spectrum, AM-rate, or both. The amount of the difference between the two sets of noise bursts was varied. Long and short sequences were studied to investigate the build-up effect for segregation based on spectral and AM-rate differences. Results showed the following: 1. Stream segregation ability increased with greater spectral separation. 2. Larger AM-rate separations were associated with stronger segregation abilities. 3. Spectral separation was found to elicit the build-up effect for the range of spectral differences assessed in the current study. 4. AM-rate separation interacted with spectral separation suggesting an additive effect of spectral separation and AM-rate separation on segregation build-up. The findings suggest that, when normal-hearing listeners direct their attention toward segregation, they are able to segregate auditory streams based on reduced spectral contrast cues that vary by the amount of spectral overlap. Further, regardless of the spectral separation they were able to use AM-rate difference as a secondary/weaker cue. Based on the spectral differences, listeners can segregate auditory streams better as the listening duration is prolonged—i.e. sparse spectral cues elicit build-up segregation; however, AM-rate differences only appear to elicit build-up when in combination with spectral difference cues.

  1. Plasmid-determined resistance to fosfomycin in Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, C; Garcia, J M; Llaneza, J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C; Ortiz, J M

    1980-08-01

    Multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from hospitalized patients were examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Two different patterns of linked transferable resistance were found among the transconjugants. The first comprised resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin; the second, and more common, pattern included resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, and fosfomycin. The two types of transconjugant strains carried a single plasmid of either 57 or 97 megadaltons in size. Both of these plasmids are present in parental S. marcescens strains resistant to fosfomycin. The 57-megadalton plasmid was transformed into E. coli.

  2. [Epidemiologic study of 2 S. typhimurium outbreaks using plasmid fingerprints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, A; Breer, C; Schopfer, K

    1989-04-05

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in an old people's home is reported. The infectious agent, S. typhi-murium, was isolated not only from several inmates but also from sick cows of the farm belonging to the home, in animal feed, from employees of the local butcher's shop, and finally in sludge from the local sewage plant. Plasmid analysis provided evidence of a common origin for the isolated S. typhi-murium strains. The incriminated strains harboured, together with two low-molecular-weight plasmids, a plasmid of approximately 50 Mdal, which was also demonstrated in some other S. typhi-murium strains isolated from clinical cases in the area around St. Gallen.

  3. Effect of Plasmid Incompatibility on DNA Transfer to Streptococcus cremoris

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Venema, Gerard

    1988-01-01

    Several Streptococcus cremoris strains were used in protoplast transformation and interspecific protoplast fusion experiments with Streptococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis, with pGKV110, pGKV21, and ΔpAMβ1 as the marker plasmids. ΔpAMβ1 is a 15.9-kilobase nonconjugative, deletion derivative of pAMβ1, which is considerably larger than the pGKV plasmids (approximately 4.5 kilobases). In general, ΔpAMβ1 was transferred more efficiently than the pGKV plasmids. Using electroporation, we were abl...

  4. Separation of plasmid DNA topoisomers by multimodal chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, A Rita; Alves, Cláudia P A; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Azevedo, Ana M

    2016-06-15

    The ability to analyze the distribution of topoisomers in a plasmid DNA sample is important when evaluating the quality of preparations intended for gene therapy and DNA vaccination or when performing biochemical studies on the action of topoisomerases and gyrases. Here, we describe the separation of supercoiled (sc) and open circular (oc) topoisomers by multimodal chromatography. A medium modified with the ligand N-benzyl-N-methyl ethanolamine and an elution scheme with increasing NaCl concentration are used to accomplish the baseline separation of sc and oc plasmid. The utility of the method is demonstrated by quantitating topoisomers in a purified plasmid sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Present Two Distinct Modes of Nucleus and Kinetoplast Segregation during Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcelo Santos; Monteiro, Jomar Patrício; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Vasconcelos, Elton José; Perez, Arina Marina; Freitas-Júnior, Lúcio de Holanda; Elias, Maria Carolina; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Here, we show the morphological events associated with organelle segregation and their timing in the cell cycle of a reference strain of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis promastigotes, the main causative agent of Tegumentary leishmaniasis in the Americas. We show evidences that during the cell cycle, L. amazonensis promastigotes present two distinct modes of nucleus and kinetoplast segregation, which occur in different temporal order in different proportions of cells. We used DAPI-staining and EdU-labeling to monitor the segregation of DNA-containing organelles and DNA replication in wild-type parasites. The emergence of a new flagellum was observed using a specific monoclonal antibody. The results show that L. amazonensis cell cycle division is peculiar, with 65% of the dividing cells duplicating the kinetoplast before the nucleus, and the remaining 35% doing the opposite or duplicating both organelles concomitantly. In both cases, the new flagellum appeared during S to G2 phase in 1N1K cells and thus before the segregation of both DNA-containing organelles; however, we could not determine the exact timing of flagellar synthesis. Most of these results were confirmed by the synchronization of parasites using hydroxyurea. Altogether, our data show that during the cell cycle of L. amazonensis promastigotes, similarly to L. donovani, the segregation of nucleus and kinetoplast do not follow a specific order, especially when compared to other trypanosomatids, reinforcing the idea that this characteristic seems to be species-specific and may represent differences in cellular biology among members of the Leishmania genus. PMID:24278433

  6. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  7. Ethnic Segregation in Arizona Charter Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey D. Cobb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the criticisms of charter schools is their potential to further stratify schools along ethnic and class lines. This study addressed whether Arizona charter schools are more ethnically segregated than traditional public schools. In 1996-97, Arizona had nearly one in four of all charter schools in the United States. The analysis involved a series of comparisons between the ethnic compositions of adjacent charter and public schools in Arizona's most populated region and its rural towns. This methodology differed from the approach of many evaluations of charter schools and ethnic stratification in that it incorporated the use of geographic maps to compare schools' ethnic make-ups. The ethnic compositions of 55 urban and 57 rural charter schools were inspected relative to their traditional public school neighbors.

  8. Segregation and differential settling in flocculated tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinato, R.S.; Mahmoudkhani, A.; Fenderson, T.; Watson, P. [Kemira, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Untreated oil sands tailings have a high solids content, have poor dewaterability, and contain no aggregates. This PowerPoint presentation investigated segregation and differential settling in flocculated tailings. Tailings were treated with gypsum and various polymers. Cylinder settling, dynamic rheometry, particle size analysis, and microscopy techniques were used to characterize the composite tailings. The particles sizes of the samples were evaluated in relation to shear rate, bed depth, and treatment. The study showed that the gypsum-treated tailings had small aggregates, size stratification, a high solids content, and poor dewaterability. The polymer N-treated tailings had the lowest solids content, good dewaterability, and weak aggregates. The polymer A-treated tailings had a low solids content, very good dewaterability, and strong aggregates. The addition of a coagulant to the polymer-A treated tailings provided weaker aggregates and a higher solids content. tabs., figs.

  9. A computer model of auditory stream segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvois, M W; Meddis, R

    1991-08-01

    A computer model is described which simulates some aspects of auditory stream segregation. The model emphasizes the explanatory power of simple physiological principles operating at a peripheral rather than a central level. The model consists of a multi-channel bandpass-filter bank with a "noisy" output and an attentional mechanism that responds selectively to the channel with the greatest activity. A "leaky integration" principle allows channel excitation to accumulate and dissipate over time. The model produces similar results to two experimental demonstrations of streaming phenomena, which are presented in detail. These results are discussed in terms of the "emergent properties" of a system governed by simple physiological principles. As such the model is contrasted with higher-level Gestalt explanations of the same phenomena while accepting that they may constitute complementary kinds of explanation.

  10. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    in the cell by labeling specific parts of it. Later the dynamics of chromosome segregation was included. Investigating chromosome organization by labeling of specific loci was already a widely used technique when I started on this thesis, but the data acquisition and treatment was slow and generally poorly......, and it is obvious that structured cellular actions are required to unpack it, as required for its replication, and refold the two daughter chromosomes separately without getting them entangled in the process each generation. The intention of the study was initially to find out how the chromosome is organized....... Adding the results of the thesis together with known data results in the following description of the chromosome dynamics of slowly growing E.coli cells: The chromosome of slow growing cells is organized with the origin at the cell center when it is newborn. It has one chromosomal arm on one side...

  11. Heider balance, asymmetric ties, and gender segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J; Hernández-Ramirez, Eric; Naumis, Gerardo G; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    To remove a cognitive dissonance in interpersonal relations, people tend to divide our acquaintances into friendly and hostile parts, both groups internally friendly and mutually hostile. This process is modeled as an evolution towards the Heider balance. A set of differential equations have been proposed and validated (Kulakowski {\\it et al}, IJMPC 16 (2005) 707) to model the Heider dynamics of this social and psychological process. Here we generalize the model by including the initial asymmetry of the interprersonal relations and the direct reciprocity effect which removes this asymmetry. Our model is applied to the data on enmity and friendship in 37 school classes and 4 groups of teachers in M\\'exico. For each class, a stable balanced partition is obtained into two groups. The gender structure of the groups reveals stronger gender segregation in younger classes, i.e. of age below 12 years, a fact consistent with other general empirical results.

  12. Heider balance, asymmetric ties, and gender segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; del Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo; Hernández-Ramírez, Eric; Naumis, Gerardo G.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    To remove a cognitive dissonance in interpersonal relations, people tend to divide their acquaintances into friendly and hostile parts, both groups internally friendly and mutually hostile. This process is modeled as an evolution toward the Heider balance. A set of differential equations have been proposed and validated (Kułakowski et al., 2005) to model the Heider dynamics of this social and psychological process. Here we generalize the model by including the initial asymmetry of the interpersonal relations and the direct reciprocity effect which removes this asymmetry. Our model is applied to the data on enmity and friendship in 37 school classes and 4 groups of teachers in México. For each class, a stable balanced partition is obtained into two groups. The gender structure of the groups reveals stronger gender segregation in younger classes, i.e. of age below 12 years, a fact consistent with other general empirical results.

  13. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  14. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation proceeds normally following disruption of patterned spontaneous retinal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Colenso M; Sun, Chao; Liets, Lauren C; Stafford, Ben K; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2014-11-07

    pairs, RGC burst frequency, high frequency RGC firing during bursts, and the number of spikes per RGC burst are each uncorrelated with abnormalities in eye-specific segregation in the dLGN. An increase in the fraction of asynchronous spikes occurring outside of bursts and waves correlates with eye-specific segregation defects in studies reported to date. These findings highlight the relative importance of different features of SRA while providing additional constraints for computational models of Hebbian plasticity mechanisms in the developing visual system.

  15. Standardized Testing and School Segregation: Like Tinder for Fire?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoester, Matthew; Au, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high-stakes standardized testing has played a negative role in the segregation of children by race and class in schools. In this article we review research on the overall effects of segregation, the positive and negative aspects of how desegregation plans were carried out following the 1954 Supreme Court decision…

  16. Educational Justice and Socio-Economic Segregation in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighouse, Harry

    2007-01-01

    Sociologists exploring educational injustice often focus on socio-economic segregation as a central measure of injustice. The comprehensive ideal, furthermore, has the idea of socio-economic integration built into it. The current paper argues that socio-economic segregation is valuable only insofar as it serves other, more fundamental values. This…

  17. Using the minimum spanning tree to trace mass segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, Richard J; Parker, Richard J; Zwart, Simon F Portegies; de Grijs, Richard; Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to detect and quantify mass segregation in star clusters. It compares the minimum spanning tree (MST) of massive stars with that of random stars. If mass segregation is present, the MST length of the most massive stars will be shorter than that of random stars. This difference can be quantified (with an associated significance) to measure the degree of mass segregation. We test the method on simulated clusters in both 2D and 3D and show that the method works as expected. We apply the method to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and show that the method is able to detect the mass segregation in the Trapezium with a `mass segregation ratio' \\Lambda_{MSR}=8.0 \\pm 3.5 (where \\Lambda_{MSR}=1 is no mass segregation) down to 16 \\Msun, and also that the ONC is mass segregated at a lower level (~2.0 \\pm 0.5) down to 5 \\Msun. Below 5 \\Msun we find no evidence for any further mass segregation in the ONC.

  18. Effects of Network Segregation in Intergroup Conflict : An Experimental Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takács, Károly

    2006-01-01

    Dense in-group and scarce out-group relations (network segregation) often support the emergence of conflicts between groups. A key underlying mechanism is social control that helps to overcome the collective action problem within groups, but contributes to harmful conflicts among them in segregated

  19. Segregation and Rationality in Black Status Aspiration Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelter, Jon W.

    1982-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that school racial segregation affects the ability of Black students to set reasonable occupational goals. Questionnaire data collected from male high school seniors suggest that Whites develop the most rational occupational goals, and segregated Blacks the least. Desegregated education leads to increasingly rational…

  20. Sulfur segregation in titanium and selected titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Lee, W. S.; Hoekje, S. J.; Sankaran, S. N.

    1994-10-01

    The segregation of S in electrotransport-purified polycrystalline α-Ti and in several polycrystalline Ti alloys has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and ion scattering spectroscopy in the temperature range extending from 20 to 1000°C. The chemisorbed oxygen and carbon on Ti were observed to disappear at T ≈ 400°C after which the S signal increased to levels approaching 0.5 monolayer. At lower temperatures the presence of the surface oxygen and carbon appeared to inhibit the segregation, presumably because there were no available surfaces sites for the S emerging from the bulk. The activation energy for the S segregation in pure polycrystalline Ti was determined to be 16.7 kcal/mol, which, when compared to S segregation from single-crystal Ti, is quite small and suggest grain boundary or defect diffusion segregation kinetics. In the Ti-aluminide alloys, the presence of Al appeared to enhance the retention of surface oxygen which, in turn, substantially reduced the S segregation. The γ alloy, with its high Al content, exhibited the greatest retention of surface oxygen and the smallest quantity of S segregation ( T ≈ 1000°C). On the other hand, the β-21S alloy exhibited a greater segregation rate for the S than did α-Ti.

  1. Coleman Revisited: School Segregation, Peers, and Frog Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Pat Rubio

    2011-01-01

    Students from minority segregated schools tend to achieve and attain less than similar students from White segregated schools. This study examines whether peer effects can explain this relationship using normative models and frog-pond models. Normative models (where peers become alike) suggest that minority schoolmates are a liability. Frog-pond…

  2. 17 CFR 1.24 - Segregated funds; exclusions therefrom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregated funds; exclusions therefrom. 1.24 Section 1.24 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Customers' Money, Securities, and Property § 1.24 Segregated...

  3. 46 CFR 111.60-9 - Segregation of vital circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Segregation of vital circuits. 111.60-9 Section 111.60-9...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-9 Segregation of vital circuits. (a) General. A branch circuit that supplies equipment vital to the propulsion, control, or safety of the vessel must...

  4. "Brown" at 62: School Segregation by Race, Poverty and State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Ee, Jongyeon; Frankenberg, Erica; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    As the anniversary of "Brown v. Board of Education" decision arrives again without any major initiatives to mitigate spreading and deepening segregation in the nation's schools, the Civil Rights Project adds to a growing national discussion with a research brief drawn from a much broader study of school segregation to be published in…

  5. Figure-ground segregation in a recurrent network architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, V.A.F.; Roelfsema, P.R.; Spekreijse, H.; Bosch, H.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a model of how the visual brain segregate textured scenes into figures and background. During texture segregation, locations where the properties of texture elements change abruptly are assigned to boundaries, whereas image regions that are relatively homogeneous are grouped together bounda

  6. Compositional Segregation in Unidirectionally Solidified Solid Solution Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    A computer program was developed to model compositional segregation in unidrectionally solidified solid-solution-semiconducting crystals. The program takes into account the variations of the interface segregation constant and solidification rate with composition. Calculations are performed for the HgCdTe solid solution system that is compared with experimental data.

  7. Segregation at the surfaces of CuxPd1-x alloys in the presence of adsorbed S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James B.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2012-10-01

    The influence of adsorbed S on surface segregation in Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} alloys (S/Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x)} was characterized over a wide range of bulk alloy compositions (x = 0.05 to 0.95) using high-throughput Composition Spread Alloy Film (CSAF) sample libraries. Top-surface and near-surface compositions of the CSAFs were measured as functions of bulk Cu composition, x, and temperature using spatially resolved low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Preferential segregation of Cu to the top-surface of the S/Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} CSAF was observed at all bulk compositions, x, but the extent of Cu segregation to the S/Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} surface was lower than the Cu segregation to the surface of a clean Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} CSAF, clear evidence of an S-induced “segregation reversal.” The Langmuir–McLean formulation of the Gibbs isotherm was used to estimate the enthalpy and entropy of Cu segregation to the top-surface, ΔH{sub seg}(x) and ΔS{sub seg}(x), at saturation sulfur coverages. While Cu segregation to the top-surface of the clean Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} is exothermic (ΔH{sub seg} < 0) for all bulk Cu compositions, it is endothermic (ΔH{sub seg} > 0) for S/Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x}. Segregation to the S/Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} surface is driven by entropy. Changes in segregation patterns that occur upon adsorption of S onto Cu{sub x}Pd{sub 1 - x} appear to be related to formation of energetically favored Pd{single bond}S bonds at the surface, which counterbalance the enthalpic driving forces for Cu segregation to the clean surface.

  8. Transfer of the virulence-associated protein a-bearing plasmid between field strains of virulent and avirulent Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoughton, W; Poole, T; Kuskie, K; Liu, M; Bishop, K; Morrissey, A; Takai, S; Cohen, N

    2013-01-01

    Virulent and avirulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi coexist in equine feces and the environment and are a source of infection for foals. The extent to which plasmid transfer occurs among field strains is ill-defined and this information is important for understanding the epidemiology of R. equi infections of foals. To estimate the frequency of transfer of the virulence plasmid between virulent and avirulent strains of R. equi derived from foals and their environment. None. In vitro study; 5 rifampin-susceptible, virulent R. equi isolates obtained from clinically affected foals or air samples from a farm with a history of recurrent R. equi foal pneumonia were each mixed with 5 rifampin-resistant, avirulent isolates derived from soil samples, using solid medium, at a ratio of 10 donor cells (virulent) per recipient cell. Presumed transconjugates were detected by plating on media with rifampin and colony immunoblotting to detect the presence of the virulence-associated protein A. Three presumed transconjugates were detected among 2,037 recipient colonies, indicating an overall estimated transfer frequency of 0.15% (95% CI, 0.03–0.43%). All 3 transconjugates were associated with a single donor and 2 recipient strains. Genotyping and multiplex PCR of presumed transconjugates demonstrated transfer of the virulence-associated protein A-bearing plasmid between virulent and avirulent R. equi. Transfer of the virulence plasmid occurs with relatively high frequency. These findings could impact strategies to control or prevent R. equi through environmental management.

  9. Sexual segregation in vertebrates: proximate and ultimate causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckstuhl, K E

    2007-08-01

    Sexual segregation is very common in vertebrates that live in groups. In this article, I will review proximate and ultimate causes of sexual segregation in social species and in particular in ungulates in which the bulk of research on the topic has been carried out. In most social ungulate species, males and females live in separate groups outside the breeding season, sometimes using different home ranges and types of habitat. In most of these species, males are larger than females. Dimorphism in body size can lead to sexual differences in ecology and behavior making it difficult for the two sexes to stay in the same group. It is important for our better understanding of the evolution of sociality, sexual dimorphism and different mating systems to determine why sexual segregation is so widespread not only in ungulates but also in other vertebrates. In this article, I discuss the ecology of the two sexes by reviewing proximate and ultimate causes of sexual segregation. To do this, I compare a range of studies of ruminants and include explanations for social segregation as well as for habitat segregation by gender. This leads into a review and updates current knowledge of the phenomenon. Although I present a number of different hypotheses, I focus in particular on predation risk, forage selection and activity budget and discuss the social-factors hypothesis. I stress that the key in solving the enigma of sexual segregation lies in clearly separating hypotheses that try to explain social segregation and habitat segregation, as well as in including experiments or model systems. To that end, I present a preliminary study on a test of the activity-budget hypothesis in three-spine sticklebacks and explain why I believe that shoaling fish are useful for analysing the underlying processes and mechanisms that lead to sexual segregation in animals. Lastly, I argue that it is unlikely that a single factor can explain social segregation or habitat segregation but that a model

  10. Can comodulation masking release occur when frequency changes could promote perceptual segregation of the on-frequency and flanking bands?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhey, Jesko L; Epp, Bastian; Stasiak, Arkadiusz

    2013-01-01

    bands relative to the inhibitory areas (as seen in physiological recordings using stationary flanking bands). Preliminary physiological results in the cochlear nucleus of the Guinea pig show that a correlate of CMR can also be found at this level of the auditory pathway with sweeping flanking bands.......A common characteristic of natural sounds is that the level fluctuations in different frequency regions are coherent. The ability of the auditory system to use this comodulation is shown when a sinusoidal signal is masked by a masker centred at the signal frequency (on-frequency masker, OFM...... and comodulation could serve as cues to indicate which of the stimulus components originate from one source. If the common fate of frequency components is the stronger binding cue, the sweeping FBs and the OFM with a fixed centre frequency should no longer form one auditory object and the CMR should be abolished...

  11. Segregation behavior of phosphorus in the heat-affected zone of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after simulated thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Miyahara, Yuichi; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The segregation behavior of phosphorus (P) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of an A533B/A182 dissimilar weld joint before and after step cooling was investigated with atom probe tomography. At grain/packet boundaries, the final P segregation level consisted of non-equilibrium segregation that occurred during cooling after welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and equilibrium segregation that occurred during step cooling. In both processes, higher P coverage was observed in the coarse-grained and intercritically reheated coarse-grained HAZ than in the fine-grained HAZ and base material. The cooling after welding and PWHT seemed to have a pronounced impact on P segregation in the subsequent aging process. In addition, P segregation also occurred at the precipitate/matrix interfaces of cementite, Mo2C and Al-Si rich precipitates. The evolution of P coverage at these two types of sites suggested increasing risks of embrittlement with an increase in aging time.

  12. Complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-harbouring plasmids in Escherichia coli of different sequence types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingjing; Li, Zhencui; Lin, Jingxia; Wang, Xiuna; Deng, Xianbo; Feng, Youjun

    2016-12-13

    The emergence of the mobilized colistin resistance gene, representing a novel mechanism for bacterial drug resistance, challenges the last resort against the severe infections by Gram-negative bacteria with multi-drug resistances. Very recently, we showed the diversity in the mcr-1-carrying plasmid reservoirs from the gut microbiota. Here, we reported that a similar but more complex scenario is present in the healthy swine populations, Southern China, 2016. Amongst the 1026 pieces of Escherichia coli isolates from 3 different pig farms, 302 E. coli isolates were determined to be positive for the mcr-1 gene (30%, 302/1026). Multi-locus sequence typing assigned no less than 11 kinds of sequence types including one novel Sequence Type to these mcr-1-positive strains. PCR analyses combined with the direct DNA sequencing revealed unexpected complexity of the mcr-1-harbouring plasmids whose backbones are at least grouped into 6 types four of which are new. Transcriptional analyses showed that the mcr-1 promoter of different origins exhibits similar activity. It seems likely that complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmids occurs amongst the various ST E. coli inhabiting the healthy swine populations, in Southern China.

  13. Rapid recombination among transfected plasmids, chimeric episome formation and trans gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadekoppala, M; Cheresh, P; Catron, D; Ji, D D; Deitsch, K; Wellems, T E; Seifert, H S; Haldar, K

    2001-02-01

    Although recombination is known to be important to generating diversity in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum, the low efficiencies of transfection and the fact that integration of transfected DNA into chromosomes is observed only after long periods (typically 12 weeks or more) have made it difficult to genetically manipulate the blood stages of this major human pathogen. Here we show that co-transfection of a P. falciparum line with two plasmids, one expressing a green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter and the other expressing a drug resistance marker (Tgdhfr-ts M23), allowed selection of a population in which about approximately 30% of the parasites produce GFP. In these GFP-producing parasites, the transfected plasmids had recombined into chimeric episomes as large as 20 kb and could be maintained under drug pressure for at least 16 weeks. Our data suggest that chimera formation occurs early (detected by 7--14 days) and that it involves homologous recombination favored by presence of the same P. falciparum 5'hrp3 UTR promoting transcription from each plasmid. This indicates the presence of high levels of homologous recombination activity in blood stage parasites that can be used to drive rapid recombination of newly introduced DNA, study mechanisms of recombination, and introduce genes for trans expression in P. falciparum.

  14. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  15. Mass Segregation of Embedded Clusters in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Er, Xinyue; Fu, Yanning

    2012-01-01

    Embedded clusters are ideal laboratories to understand the early phase of the dynamical evolution of clusters as well as the massive star formation. An interesting observational phenomenon is that some of the embedded clusters show mass segregation, i.e., the most massive stars are preferentially found near the cluster center. In this paper, we develop a new approach to describe mass segregation. Using this approach and the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC), we analyze eighteen embedded clusters in the Galaxy. We find that eleven of them are mass-segregated and that the others are non-mass-segregated. No inversely mass-segregated cluster is found.

  16. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  17. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  18. Asphalt Mixture Segregation Detection: Digital Image Processing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadtaqi Baqersad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Segregation determination in the asphalt pavement is an issue causing many disputes between agencies and contractors. The visual inspection method has commonly been used to determine pavement texture and in-place core density test used for verification. Furthermore, laser-based devices, such as the Florida Texture Meter (FTM and the Circular Track Meter (CTM, have recently been developed to evaluate the asphalt mixture texture. In this study, an innovative digital image processing approach is used to determine pavement segregation. In this procedure, the standard deviation of the grayscale image frequency histogram is used to determine segregated regions. Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA is then implemented on the obtained standard deviations from image processing to classify pavements into the segregated and nonsegregated areas. The visual inspection method is utilized to verify this method. The results have demonstrated that this new method is a robust tool to determine segregated areas in newly paved FC9.5 pavement types.

  19. Plasmid Conjugation in E. coli and Drug Resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    respiratory infections etc) or prescribing the 'newest' antibiotics in the market when older “brands” may ..... influence an increase in mortality rate; high economic burden and longer hospital ... Conjugating plasmids into bacteria; Tri Parental.

  20. Construction and Identification of Plasmid pTA-TUB2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    An about 1.40 Kb target gene fragment was yielded by PCR amplification with the plasmid pRB 129,which was identified by restriction enzyme digestion that the PCR product was TU B2 gene.The gene was digested by the restriction enzyme and was linked with pTA plasmid to construct pTA-TU B2 plasmid.The plasmid was transformed into Chaetomium spp.by PEG method and the transformation rate was 27/(2×105) and it is nine times higher than that of pRB 129.The transformants can grow on the PDA containing 1 000 μg*mL-1 carbendazim,which is 1 000 times higher than the original Chaetomium spp.The resistance was stable after 10 times transfer on non-selective medium.

  1. Grain boundary segregation in FeCrNi model alloys; Korngrenzensegregation in FeCrNi-Modellegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, B.; Schneider, F.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Muraleedharan, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Div. of Metallurgy

    1998-12-31

    P and S segregate at the grain boundaries and thus increase susceptibility to intergranular corrosion at those sites. This could be proven by means of nitric acid-chromate tests and potentiostatic etching tests. There is a direct connection between loss in mass, mean depth of intergranular corrosion attacks, dissolution current density, and level of segregation-induced concentration of P and S at the grain boundaries. The segregation effect at these sites was found to be most evident in specimens of the examined Fe-Cr-Ni steel which had been heat-treated for 1000 hours at 550 C. However, segregation occurs also in materials that received a heat treatment of 400 C/5000 hours, while intergranular corrosion is observed only after heat treatment of 500 C/1000 hours. Apart from segregation of P, formation of Cr-rich phosphides is observed, which leads to depletion of Cr at the precipitates. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] P und S segregieren an die KG und erhoehen dort die IK-Anfaelligkeit. Dies konnte mit Hilfe von Salpetersaeure-Chromat- und Potentiostatischem Aetztest nachgewiesen werden. Es besteht ein direkter Zusammenhang zwischen Masseverlust, mittlerer IK-Angriffstiefe, Aufloesungsstromdichte und Hoehe der segregationsbedingten Anreicherungen von P und S an den KG. Der KG-Segregationseffekt am untersuchten Fe-Cr-Ni-Stahl ist im Waermebehandlungszustand 550 C/1000 h am deutlichsten ausgepraegt. Aber auch bereits bei 400 C/5000 h findet Segregation statt. IKSpRK tritt nur im Waermebehandlungszustand 550 C/1000 h auf. Neben der P-Segregation wird die Bildung Cr-reicher Phosphide beobachtet, die zur Abreicherung von Cr an den Ausscheidungen fuehrt. (orig.)

  2. No evidence for niche segregation in a North American Cattail (Typha) species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie-Gopsill, Andrew; Kirk, Heather; Drunen, Wendy Van; Freeland, Joanna R; Dorken, Marcel E

    2012-05-01

    Interspecific hybridization can lead to a breakdown of species boundaries, and is of particular concern in cases in which one of the parental species is invasive. Cattails (Typha spp.) have increased their abundance in the Great Lakes region of North America over the past 150 years. This increase in the distribution of cattails is associated with hybridization between broad-leaved (Typha latifolia) and narrow-leaved cattails (T. angustifolia). The resulting hybrids occur predominantly as F(1)s, which are known as T. × glauca, although later-generation hybrids have also been documented. It has been proposed that in sympatric populations, the parental species and hybrids are often spatially segregated according to growth in contrasting water depths, and that this should promote the maintenance of parental species. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the two species and their hybrids segregate along a water-depth gradient at sites where they are sympatric. We identified the two parental species and their hybrids using molecular genetic markers (SSR), and measured shoot elevations (a proxy for water depth) at 18 sites in Southern Ontario, Canada. We found no evidence for niche segregation among species based on elevation. Our data indicate that all three lineages compete for similar habitat where they co-occur suggesting that there is potential for an overall loss of biodiversity in the species complex, particularly if the hybrid lineage is more vigorous compared to the parental species, as has been suggested by other authors.

  3. Effect of weightlessness on colloidal particle transport and segregation in self-organising microtubule preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabony, James; Rigotti, Nathalie; Glade, Nicolas; Cortès, Sandra

    2007-05-01

    Weightlessness is known to effect cellular functions by as yet undetermined processes. Many experiments indicate a role of the cytoskeleton and microtubules. Under appropriate conditions in vitro microtubule preparations behave as a complex system that self-organises by a combination of reaction and diffusion. This process also results in the collective transport and organisation of any colloidal particles present. In large centimetre-sized samples, self-organisation does not occur when samples are exposed to a brief early period of weightlessness. Here, we report both space-flight and ground-based (clinorotation) experiments on the effect of weightlessness on the transport and segregation of colloidal particles and chromosomes. In centimetre-sized containers, both methods show that a brief initial period of weightlessness strongly inhibits particle transport. In miniature cell-sized containers under normal gravity conditions, the particle transport that self-organisation causes results in their accumulation into segregated regions of high and low particle density. The gravity dependence of this behaviour is strongly shape dependent. In square wells, neither self-organisation nor particle transport and segregation occur under conditions of weightlessness. On the contrary, in rectangular canals, both phenomena are largely unaffected by weightlessness. These observations suggest, depending on factors such as cell and embryo shape, that major biological functions associated with microtubule driven particle transport and organisation might be strongly perturbed by weightlessness.

  4. Coexisting orchid species have distinct mycorrhizal communities and display strong spatial segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Because orchids are dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and establishment of seedlings, differences in the mycorrhizal communities associating with orchids can be expected to mediate the abundance, spatial distribution and coexistence of terrestrial orchids in natural communities. We assessed the small-scale spatial distribution of seven orchid species co-occurring in 25 × 25 m plots in two Mediterranean grasslands. In order to characterize the mycorrhizal community associating with each orchid species, 454 pyrosequencing was used. The extent of spatial clustering was assessed using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis. The community of mycorrhizal fungi consisted mainly of members of the Tulasnellaceae, Thelephoraceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, although sporadically members of the Sebacinaceae, Russulaceae and Cortinariaceae were observed. Pronounced differences in mycorrhizal communities were observed between species, whereas strong clustering and significant segregation characterized the spatial distribution of orchid species. However, spatial segregation was not significantly related to phylogenetic dissimilarity of fungal communities. Our results indicate that co-occurring orchid species have distinctive mycorrhizal communities and show strong spatial segregation, suggesting that mycorrhizal fungi are important factors driving niche partitioning in terrestrial orchids and may therefore contribute to orchid coexistence.

  5. A survey of five broad-host-range plasmids in gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-qiang; Yao, Yi-hui; Yu, Xiao-lu; Niu, Jian-jun

    2014-07-01

    To learn the prevalence of the primary classical broad-host-range (BHR) IncA/C, IncN, IncP, IncQ, and IncW plasmids in dominant gram-negative bacilli from inpatients in a teaching hospital in southern China. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction based on the replicons of BHR IncA/C, IncN, IncP, IncQ, and IncW plasmids was developed and used to determine these BHR plasmids. The difference in prevalence rates among the different species from three specimens was evaluated by a binary logistic regression model and the differences between multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) and non-MDRO were assessed using a chi-square test. The average positive detection percentages of the replicons were 4.3%, 3.7%, 3.0%, 2.6%, and 1.9%, respectively, for IncN, IncP, IncQ, IncW, and IncA/C in descending order. The distribution of all five BHR plasmids did not differ significantly between specimens collected from wounds and urine, although both were significantly higher than those of sputum. The prevalence rates of all five BHR plasmids in MDROs were significantly higher than those in non-MDRO for Enterobacteriaceae; however, no significant difference was seen in non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB). BHR IncA/C, IncN, IncP, IncQ, and IncW plasmids, which occur more often in bacilli from wound and urine specimens than those of sputum, are widespread in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from inpatients. The prevalence rates in MDRO are higher than those in non-MDRO for Enterobacteriaceae but not significantly different for NFGNB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of pOENI-1 and Related Plasmids in Oenococcus oeni Strains Performing the Malolactic Fermentation in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Marion; Bilhère, Eric; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Moine, Virginie; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids in lactic acid bacteria occasionally confer adaptive advantages improving the growth and behaviour of their host cells. They are often associated to starter cultures used in the food industry and could be a signature of their superiority. Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacteria species encountered in wine. It performs the malolactic fermentation that occurs in most wines after alcoholic fermentation and contributes to their quality and stability. Industrial O. oeni starters may be used to better control malolactic fermentation. Starters are selected empirically by virtue of their fermentation kinetics and capacity to survive in wine. This study was initiated with the aim to determine whether O. oeni contains plasmids of technological interest. Screening of 11 starters and 33 laboratory strains revealed two closely related plasmids, named pOENI-1 (18.3-kb) and pOENI-1v2 (21.9-kb). Sequence analyses indicate that they use the theta mode of replication, carry genes of maintenance and replication and two genes possibly involved in wine adaptation encoding a predicted sulphite exporter (tauE) and a NADH:flavin oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme family (oye). Interestingly, pOENI-1 and pOENI-1v2 were detected only in four strains, but this included three industrial starters. PCR screenings also revealed that tauE is present in six of the 11 starters, being probably inserted in the chromosome of some strains. Microvinification assays performed using strains with and without plasmids did not disclose significant differences of survival in wine or fermentation kinetics. However, analyses of 95 wines at different phases of winemaking showed that strains carrying the plasmids or the genes tauE and oye were predominant during spontaneous malolactic fermentation. Taken together, the results revealed a family of related plasmids associated with industrial starters and indigenous strains performing spontaneous malolactic fermentation that possibly

  7. Identification of pOENI-1 and related plasmids in Oenococcus oeni strains performing the malolactic fermentation in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Marion; Bilhère, Eric; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Moine, Virginie; Lucas, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids in lactic acid bacteria occasionally confer adaptive advantages improving the growth and behaviour of their host cells. They are often associated to starter cultures used in the food industry and could be a signature of their superiority. Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacteria species encountered in wine. It performs the malolactic fermentation that occurs in most wines after alcoholic fermentation and contributes to their quality and stability. Industrial O. oeni starters may be used to better control malolactic fermentation. Starters are selected empirically by virtue of their fermentation kinetics and capacity to survive in wine. This study was initiated with the aim to determine whether O. oeni contains plasmids of technological interest. Screening of 11 starters and 33 laboratory strains revealed two closely related plasmids, named pOENI-1 (18.3-kb) and pOENI-1v2 (21.9-kb). Sequence analyses indicate that they use the theta mode of replication, carry genes of maintenance and replication and two genes possibly involved in wine adaptation encoding a predicted sulphite exporter (tauE) and a NADH:flavin oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme family (oye). Interestingly, pOENI-1 and pOENI-1v2 were detected only in four strains, but this included three industrial starters. PCR screenings also revealed that tauE is present in six of the 11 starters, being probably inserted in the chromosome of some strains. Microvinification assays performed using strains with and without plasmids did not disclose significant differences of survival in wine or fermentation kinetics. However, analyses of 95 wines at different phases of winemaking showed that strains carrying the plasmids or the genes tauE and oye were predominant during spontaneous malolactic fermentation. Taken together, the results revealed a family of related plasmids associated with industrial starters and indigenous strains performing spontaneous malolactic fermentation that possibly

  8. Microarray-based analysis of IncA/C plasmid-associated genes from multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2011-10-01

    In the family Enterobacteriaceae, plasmids have been classified according to 27 incompatibility (Inc) or replicon types that are based on the inability of different plasmids with the same replication mechanism to coexist in the same cell. Certain replicon types such as IncA/C are associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). We developed a microarray that contains 286 unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes based on sequences from five IncA/C plasmids: pYR1 (Yersinia ruckeri), pPIP1202 (Yersinia pestis), pP99-018 (Photobacterium damselae), pSN254 (Salmonella enterica serovar Newport), and pP91278 (Photobacterium damselae). DNA from 59 Salmonella enterica isolates was hybridized to the microarray and analyzed for the presence or absence of genes. These isolates represented 17 serovars from 14 different animal hosts and from different geographical regions in the United States. Qualitative cluster analysis was performed using CLUSTER 3.0 to group microarray hybridization results. We found that IncA/C plasmids occurred in two lineages distinguished by a major insertion-deletion (indel) region that contains genes encoding mostly hypothetical proteins. The most variable genes were represented by transposon-associated genes as well as four antimicrobial resistance genes (aphA, merP, merA, and aadA). Sixteen mercury resistance genes were identified and highly conserved, suggesting that mercury ion-related exposure is a stronger pressure than anticipated. We used these data to construct a core IncA/C genome and an accessory genome. The results of our studies suggest that the transfer of antimicrobial resistance determinants by transfer of IncA/C plasmids is somewhat less common than exchange within the plasmids orchestrated by transposable elements, such as transposons, integrating and conjugative elements (ICEs), and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs), and thus pose less opportunity for exchange of antimicrobial resistance.

  9. Identification of pOENI-1 and related plasmids in Oenococcus oeni strains performing the malolactic fermentation in wine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Favier

    Full Text Available Plasmids in lactic acid bacteria occasionally confer adaptive advantages improving the growth and behaviour of their host cells. They are often associated to starter cultures used in the food industry and could be a signature of their superiority. Oenococcus oeni is the main lactic acid bacteria species encountered in wine. It performs the malolactic fermentation that occurs in most wines after alcoholic fermentation and contributes to their quality and stability. Industrial O. oeni starters may be used to better control malolactic fermentation. Starters are selected empirically by virtue of their fermentation kinetics and capacity to survive in wine. This study was initiated with the aim to determine whether O. oeni contains plasmids of technological interest. Screening of 11 starters and 33 laboratory strains revealed two closely related plasmids, named pOENI-1 (18.3-kb and pOENI-1v2 (21.9-kb. Sequence analyses indicate that they use the theta mode of replication, carry genes of maintenance and replication and two genes possibly involved in wine adaptation encoding a predicted sulphite exporter (tauE and a NADH:flavin oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme family (oye. Interestingly, pOENI-1 and pOENI-1v2 were detected only in four strains, but this included three industrial starters. PCR screenings also revealed that tauE is present in six of the 11 starters, being probably inserted in the chromosome of some strains. Microvinification assays performed using strains with and without plasmids did not disclose significant differences of survival in wine or fermentation kinetics. However, analyses of 95 wines at different phases of winemaking showed that strains carrying the plasmids or the genes tauE and oye were predominant during spontaneous malolactic fermentation. Taken together, the results revealed a family of related plasmids associated with industrial starters and indigenous strains performing spontaneous malolactic fermentation that

  10. Transfer of conjugative plasmids among bacteria under environmentally relevant conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musovic, Sanin

    at spredningskapacitet af en konjugerbare plasmid, der koder for kviksølv resistens via merA genet, finder sted under substrat begrænsede forhold til syntetisk bakterielt samfund. Plasmid overførsel var meget forhøjet ved kontinuert udsættelse af mikrokosms for en høj koncentration af kviksølv. De forskellige vækstrater...

  11. Interleukin-12 plasmid DNA delivery using l-thyroxine-conjugated polyethylenimine nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Fadaei, Mahin; Sabahi, Zahra; Alhashemi, Samira Hossaini; Mohazabieh, Erfaneh

    2014-05-01

    In this study, l-thyroxine was covalently grafted on 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), and the ability of the nano-sized polyplexes for transferring plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene was evaluated. As there are several problems in systemic administration of recombinant IL-12 protein, local expression of the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissue has been considered as an effective alternative approach. The l-thyroxine-conjugated PEI polyplexes were prepared using pUMVC3-hIL12 plasmid, and their transfection activity was determined in HepG2 human liver carcinoma and Neuro2A neuroblastoma cell lines. The polyplexes characterized in terms of DNA condensation ability, particle size, zeta potential, and buffering capacity as well as cytotoxicity and resistance to enzyme digestion. The results revealed that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI increased gene transfer ability by up to two fold relative to unmodified 25 kDa PEI, the gold standard for non-viral gene delivery, with the highest increase occurring at degrees of conjugation around 10 %. pDNA condensation tests and dynamic light scattering measurements exhibited the ability of PEI conjugates to optimally condense the plasmid DNA into polyplexes in the size range around 200 nm. The modified polymers showed remarkable buffering capacity and protection against enzymatic degradation comparable to that of unmodified PEI. These results suggest that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI is a simple modification strategy for future investigations aimed at developing a targeting gene vehicle.

  12. Gender-segregated Education in Saudi Arabia: Its Impact on Social Norms the Saudi Labor Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roula Baki

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's gender-segregated higher education system and how it is used to transmit the Kingdom's traditional societal expectations to the employment sector. With Saudi Arabia's current need for economic change, the education system is retarding instead of accelerating reform. A background consisting of Saudi Arabian history, governing laws, religious beliefs and women's roles is examined. I then discuss the education system's preservation goal by considering segregation, women's mobility, videoconferencing courses, and the roles of professors. I attempt to explain how the current education system fails to prepare its students for the global economy: by limiting women's access to the labor market, and by not preparing men for the realities of the global market and therefore creating the need for migrant workers. In conclusion, conserving culture is significant, but for economic change to occur, the extent of cultural conservatism and its effect on the education system need to be re-evaluated.

  13. Scalar conservation laws with nonconstant coefficients with application to particle size segregation in granular flow

    CERN Document Server

    May, Lindsay B H; Daniels, Karen E

    2010-01-01

    Granular materials will segregate by particle size when subjected to shear, as occurs, for example, in avalanches. The evolution of a bidisperse mixture of particles can be modeled by a nonlinear first order partial differential equation, provided the shear (or velocity) is a known function of position. While avalanche-driven shear is approximately uniform in depth, boundary-driven shear typically creates a shear band with a nonlinear velocity profile. In this paper, we measure a velocity profile from experimental data and solve initial value problems that mimic the segregation observed in the experiment, thereby verifying the value of the continuum model. To simplify the analysis, we consider only one-dimensional configurations, in which a layer of small particles is placed above a layer of large particles within an annular shear cell and is sheared for arbitrarily long times. We fit the measured velocity profile to both an exponential function of depth and a piecewise linear function which separates the she...

  14. Acoustic profilometry of interphases in epoxy due to segregation and diffusion using Brillouin microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, U; Bactavatchalou, R; Baller, J; Philipp, M; Sanctuary, R; Zielinski, B; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A, Avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1115 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Alnot, P; Possart, W [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire Saarland-Lorraine (Germany)], E-mail: mail@tauron.de

    2008-02-15

    Reactive network forming polymer systems like epoxies are of huge technological interest because of their adhesive properties based on specific interactions with a large variety of materials. These specific interactions alter the morphology of the epoxy within areas determined by the correlation length of these interactions. The changed morphology leads to interphases with altered (mechanical) properties. Besides these surface-induced interphases, bulk interphases do occur due to segregation, crystallization, diffusion, etc. A new experimental technique to characterize such mechanical interphases is {mu}-Brillouin spectroscopy ({mu}-BS). With {mu}-BS, we studied interphases and their formation in epoxies due to segregation of the constituent components and due to selective diffusion of one component. In the latter case, we will demonstrate the influence of changing the boundary conditions of the diffusion process on the shape of the interphase.

  15. A New Shuttle Plasmid That Stably Replicates in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kwon, Min-A; Choi, Sunwha; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a new shuttle plasmid, designated as pLK1-MCS that can replicate in both Clostridium acetobutylicum and Escherichia coli, by combining the pUB110 and pUC19 plasmids. Plasmid pLK1-MCS replicated more stably than previously reported plasmids containing either the pIM13 or the pAMβ1 replicon in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The transfer frequency of pLK1-MCS into C. acetobutylicum was similar to the transfer frequency of other shuttle plasmids. We complemented C. acetobutylicum ML1 (that does not produce solvents such as acetone, butanol, and ethanol owing to loss of the megaplasmid pSOL1 harboring the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon) by introducing pLK1-MCS carrying the adhE1-ctfAB-adc operon into C. acetobutylicum ML1. The transformed cells were able to resume anaerobic solvent production, indicating that the new shuttle plasmid has the potential for practical use in microbial biotechnology.

  16. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  17. Construction and Use of Flow Cytometry Optimized Plasmid-Sensor Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Oregaard, Gunnar; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    stability of the plasmid is high. The method presented here relies on a phenotypic (green fluorescence protein) marker, which is switched on if the host bacteria loses the residing plasmid. The incorporation of flow cytometry for single-cell detection and discrimination between plasmid-free and plasmid...

  18. Allelopathy of plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms competing for two complementary resources in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Joydeb; Smith, Hal L; Pal, Samares

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model of competition between plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms for two complementary nutrients in a chemostat. We assume that the plasmid-bearing organism produces an allelopathic agent at the cost of its reproductive abilities which is lethal to plasmid-free organism. Our analysis leads to different thresholds in terms of the model parameters acting as conditions under which the organisms associated with the system cannot thrive even in the absence of competition. Local stability of the system is obtained in the absence of one or both the organisms. Also, global stability of the system is obtained in the presence of both the organisms. Computer simulations have been carried out to illustrate various analytical results.

  19. When Yawning Occurs in Elephants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Zoë T.; Hart, Benjamin L.; Greco, Brian J.; Young, Debbie; Padfield, Clare; Weidner, Lisa; Gates, Jennifer; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Yawning is a widely recognized behavior in mammalian species. One would expect that elephants yawn, although to our knowledge, no one has reported observations of yawning in any species of elephant. After confirming a behavioral pattern matching the criteria of yawning in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in a zoological setting, this study was pursued with nine captive African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at a private reserve in the Western Cape, South Africa, the Knysna Elephant Park. Observations were made in June–September and in December. In the daytime, handlers managed seven of the elephants for guided interactions with visitors. At night, all elephants were maintained in a large enclosure with six having limited outdoor access. With infrared illumination, the elephants were continuously recorded by video cameras. During the nights, the elephants typically had 1–3 recumbent sleeping/resting bouts, each lasting 1–2 h. Yawning was a regular occurrence upon arousal from a recumbency, especially in the final recumbency of the night. Yawning was significantly more frequent in some elephants. Yawning was rare during the daytime and during periods of standing around in the enclosure at night. In six occurrences of likely contagious yawning, one elephant yawned upon seeing another elephant yawning upon arousal from a final recumbency; we recorded the sex and age category of the participants. The generality of yawning in both African and Asian elephants in other environments was documented in video recordings from 39 zoological facilities. In summary, the study provides evidence that yawning does occur in both African and Asian elephants, and in African elephants, yawning was particularly associated with arousal from nighttime recumbencies. PMID:28293560

  20. Survival and evolution of a large multidrug resistance plasmid in new clinical bacterial hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schønning, Kristian; Munck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    of these plasmids within pathogenic hosts are poorly understood. Here we study plasmid-host adaptations following transfer of a 73 kb conjugative multidrug resistance plasmid to naïve clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli We use experimental evolution, mathematical modelling and population...... sequencing to show that the long-term persistence and molecular integrity of the plasmid is highly influenced by multiple factors within a 25 kb plasmid region constituting a host-dependent burden. In the E. coli hosts investigated here, improved plasmid stability readily evolves via IS26 mediated deletions...... of plasmid adaptation. While insertion sequences are well known to supply plasmids with adaptive traits, our findings suggest that they also play an important role in plasmid evolution by maintaining the plasticity necessary to alleviate plasmid-host constrains. Further, the observed evolutionary strategy...

  1. Multiple Pathways of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Stefanie; Holsten, Lea; Weiss, Evelyn; Benghezal, Mohammed; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Many Helicobacter pylori (Hp) strains carry cryptic plasmids of different size and gene content, the function of which is not well understood. A subgroup of these plasmids (e.g. pHel4, pHel12), contain a mobilisation region, but no cognate type IV secretion system (T4SS) for conjugative transfer. Instead, certain H. pylori strains (e.g. strain P12 carrying plasmid pHel12) can harbour up to four T4SSs in their genome (cag-T4SS, comB, tfs3, tfs4). Here, we show that such indigenous plasmids can be efficiently transferred between H. pylori strains, even in the presence of extracellular DNaseI eliminating natural transformation. Knockout of a plasmid-encoded mobA relaxase gene significantly reduced plasmid DNA transfer in the presence of DNaseI, suggesting a DNA conjugation or mobilisation process. To identify the T4SS involved in this conjugative DNA transfer, each individual T4SS was consecutively deleted from the bacterial chromosome. Using a marker-free counterselectable gene deletion procedure (rpsL counterselection method), a P12 mutant strain was finally obtained with no single T4SS (P12ΔT4SS). Mating experiments using these mutants identified the comB T4SS in the recipient strain as the major mediator of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, both in a DNaseI-sensitive (natural transformation) as well as a DNaseI-resistant manner (conjugative transfer). However, transfer of a pHel12::cat plasmid from a P12ΔT4SS donor strain into a P12ΔT4SS recipient strain provided evidence for the existence of a third, T4SS-independent mechanism of DNA transfer. This novel type of plasmid DNA transfer, designated as alternate DNaseI-Resistant (ADR) mechanism, is observed at a rather low frequency under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our study describes for the first time the existence of three distinct pathways of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer for this species. PMID:23029142

  2. More reliable inference for the dissimilarity index of segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rebecca; Burgess, Simon; Davidson, Russell; Windmeijer, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used measure of segregation is the so-called dissimilarity index. It is now well understood that this measure also reflects randomness in the allocation of individuals to units (i.e. it measures deviations from evenness, not deviations from randomness). This leads to potentially large values of the segregation index when unit sizes and/or minority proportions are small, even if there is no underlying systematic segregation. Our response to this is to produce adjustments to the index, based on an underlying statistical model. We specify the assignment problem in a very general way, with differences in conditional assignment probabilities underlying the resulting segregation. From this, we derive a likelihood ratio test for the presence of any systematic segregation, and bias adjustments to the dissimilarity index. We further develop the asymptotic distribution theory for testing hypotheses concerning the magnitude of the segregation index and show that the use of bootstrap methods can improve the size and power properties of test procedures considerably. We illustrate these methods by comparing dissimilarity indices across school districts in England to measure social segregation.

  3. Ionic Segregation on Grain Boundaries in Thermally Grown Alumina Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study first examined segregation behaviour in the alumina scale formed after 100 h at 1100 C on bare and MCrAlYHfSi-coated single-crystal superalloys with {approx}10 ppma La and Y. For the bare superalloy, Hf and Ti were detected on the grain boundaries of the inner columnar alumina layer. Increasing the oxidation temperature to 1200 C for 2 h did not change the segregation behavior. With the bond coating, both Y and Hf were segregated to the grain boundaries as expected. However, there was evidence of Ti-rich oxide particles near the gas interface suggesting that Ti diffused from the superalloy through the coating. To further understand these segregation observations with multiple dopants, other alumina-forming systems were examined. Alumina scale grain boundary co-segregation of Ti with Y is common for FeCrAl alloys. Co-segregation of Hf and Ti was observed in the scale formed on co-doped NiAl. No La segregation was detected in the scale formed on NiCrAl with only a 19 ppma La addition, however, the scale was adherent.

  4. Segregation stabilizes nanocrystalline bulk steel with near theoretical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujiao; Raabe, Dierk; Herbig, Michael; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Goto, Shoji; Kostka, Aleksander; Yarita, Hiroshi; Borchers, Christine; Kirchheim, Reiner

    2014-09-05

    Grain refinement through severe plastic deformation enables synthesis of ultrahigh-strength nanostructured materials. Two challenges exist in that context: First, deformation-driven grain refinement is limited by dynamic dislocation recovery and crystal coarsening due to capillary driving forces; second, grain boundary sliding and hence softening occur when the grain size approaches several nanometers. Here, both challenges have been overcome by severe drawing of a pearlitic steel wire (pearlite: lamellar structure of alternating iron and iron carbide layers). First, at large strains the carbide phase dissolves via mechanical alloying, rendering the initially two-phase pearlite structure into a carbon-supersaturated iron phase. This carbon-rich iron phase evolves into a columnar nanoscaled subgrain structure which topologically prevents grain boundary sliding. Second, Gibbs segregation of the supersaturated carbon to the iron subgrain boundaries reduces their interface energy, hence reducing the driving force for dynamic recovery and crystal coarsening. Thus, a stable cross-sectional subgrain size <10  nm is achieved. These two effects lead to a stable columnar nanosized grain structure that impedes dislocation motion and enables an extreme tensile strength of 7 GPa, making this alloy the strongest ductile bulk material known.

  5. Niche Segregation between Wild and Domestic Herbivores in Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Esperanza C.; Traba, Juan; Acebes, Pablo; González, Benito A.; Mata, Cristina; Estades, Cristián F.; Malo, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    Competition arises when two co-occuring species share a limiting resource. Potential for competition is higher when species have coexisted for a short time, as it is the case for herbivores and livestock introduced in natural systems. Sheep, introduced in the late 19th century in Patagonia, bear a great resemblance in size and diet to the guanaco, the main native herbivore in Patagonia. In such circumstances, it could be expected that the two species compete and one of them could be displaced. We investigated spatial overlap and habitat selection by coexisting sheep and guanaco in winter and in summer. Additionally, we studied habitat selection of the guanaco in a control situation free from sheep, both in summer and winter. We also determined overlap between species in areas with different intensity of use (named preferred and marginal areas) in order to further detect the potential level of competition in the case of overlapping. Guanaco and sheep showed significantly different habitat preferences through all seasons, in spite of their spatial overlap at landscape scale. Additionally, the habitat used by guanaco was similar regardless of the presence or absence of livestock, which further indicates that sheep is not displacing guanaco where they coexist. These results suggest that habitat segregation between guanaco and sheep is due to a differential habitat selection and not to a competitive displacement process. Therefore, the potential for competition is considered low, contrary to what has been previously observed, although this could be a density-dependent result. PMID:23555656

  6. The Detection and Sequencing of a Broad-Host-Range Conjugative IncP-1β Plasmid in an Epidemic Strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Carneiro, Adriana; Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Junior, James Daltro Lima; Lima, Karla Valéria; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Schneider, Horacio; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston; da Costa da Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Background An extended outbreak of mycobacterial surgical infections occurred in Brazil during 2004–2008. Most infections were caused by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, which was characterized by a specific rpoB sequevar and two highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns differentiated by the presence of a ∼50 kb band. The nature of this band was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic sequencing of the prototype outbreak isolate INCQS 00594 using the SOLiD platform demonstrated the presence of a 56,264-bp circular plasmid, designated pMAB01. Identity matrices, genetic distances and phylogeny analyses indicated that pMAB01 belongs to the broad-host-range plasmid subgroup IncP-1β and is highly related to BRA100, pJP4, pAKD33 and pB10. The presence of pMAB01-derived sequences in 41 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates was evaluated using PCR, PFGE and Southern blot hybridization. Sixteen of the 41 isolates showed the presence of the plasmid. The plasmid was visualized as a ∼50-kb band using PFGE and Southern blot hybridization in 12 isolates. The remaining 25 isolates did not exhibit any evidence of this plasmid. The plasmid was successfully transferred to Escherichia coli by conjugation and transformation. Lateral transfer of pMAB01 to the high efficient plasmid transformation strain Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 could not be demonstrated. Conclusions/Significance The occurrence of a broad-host-range IncP-1β plasmid in mycobacteria is reported for the first time. Thus, genetic exchange could result in the emergence of specific strains that might be better adapted to cause human disease. PMID:23565273

  7. Taylor revisited: Gender segregation and division of labour in the ICT - sector (information and communication technology)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Else

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technology, division of labour, gender segregation, working conditions......Information and communication technology, division of labour, gender segregation, working conditions...

  8. Altered Murine Tissue Colonization by Borrelia burgdorferi following Targeted Deletion of Linear Plasmid 17-Carried Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Casselli, Timothy; Tourand, Yvonne; Bankhead, Troy

    2012-01-01

    The causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses a segmented genome comprised of a single linear chromosome and upwards of 23 linear and circular plasmids. Much of what is known about plasmid-borne genes comes from studying laboratory clones that have spontaneously lost one or more plasmids during in vitro passage. Some plasmids, including the linear plasmid lp17, are never or rarely reported to be lost during routine culture; therefore, little is known about the requireme...

  9. Evaluation of Electrospun PCL-PIBMD Meshes Modified with Plasmid Complexes in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakai Feng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional artificial vascular meshes from biodegradable polymers have been widely explored for certain tissue engineered meshes. Still, the foreign body reaction and limitation in endothelialization are challenges for such devices. Here, degradable meshes from phase-segregated multiblock copolymers consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL and polydepsipeptide segments are successfully prepared by electrospinning and electrospraying techniques. The pEGFP-ZNF580 plasmid microparticles (MPs-pZNF580 were loaded into the electrospun meshes to enhance endothelialization. These functional meshes were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The adhesion and proliferation of endothelial cells on the meshes were enhanced in loaded mesh groups. Moreover, the hemocompatibility and the tissue response of the meshes were further tested. The complete tests showed that the vascular meshes modified with MPs-pZNF580 possessed satisfactory performance with an average fiber diameter of 550 ± 160 nm, tensile strength of 27 ± 3 MPa, Young’s modulus of 1. 9 ± 0.2 MPa, water contact angle of 95° ± 2°, relative cell number of 122% ± 1% after 7 days of culture, and low blood platelet adhesion as well as weak inflammatory reactions compared to control groups.

  10. Urban Segregation with Cheap and Expensive Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumour, M. A.; El-Astal, A. H.; Radwan, M. A.; Shabat, M. M.

    In this paper we study urban segregation of two different communities A and B, rich and poor, distributed randomly on finite samples, to check cheap and expensive residences. For this purpose we avoid the complications of the Schelling model which are not necessary and instead we use the Ising model on 500 × 500 square lattices, which gives similar results, with random magnetic field at lower and higher temperatures (kBT/J = 2.0, 99.0) in finite times equal to 40, 400, 4000 and 40 000. This random-field Ising magnet is a suitable model, where each site of the square lattice carries a magnetic field ±h which is randomly up (expensive) or down (cheap). The resulting addition to the energy prefers up-spins on the expensive and down-spins on the cheap sites. Our simulations were carried out using a 50-line FORTRAN program. We present at a lower temperature (2.0) a time series of pictures, separating growing from non-growing domains. A small random field (h = ±0.1) allows for large domains, while a large random field (h = ±0.9) allows only small clusters. At higher temperature (99.0) we could not obtain growing domains.

  11. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  12. Mass Segregation in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, Clovis

    2010-01-01

    Two-body energy exchange between stars orbiting massive black holes (MBHs) leads to the formation of a power-law density distribution n(r)~r^(-a) that diverges towards the MBH. For a single mass population, a=7/4 and the flow of stars is much less than N(segregation with the use of Fokker-Planck calculations, and show that steady state is reached in 0.2-0.3 t_r. Since the relaxation time in the Galactic centre (GC) is t_r ~2-3 * 10^(10) yr, a cusp should form in less than a Hubble time. The absence of a visible cusp of old stars in the GC poses a challenge to these models, ...

  13. Itokawa: a case for ballistic segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Sabawula, Tapan; Siu, Theo; Vivar Lazo, Miguel; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    Recent photographs of the asteroid Itokawa have revealed strong separation between regions populated almost entirely by small pebbles and other regions consisting only of larger boulders. This size separation has been attributed to the Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), however we point out here that the BNE depends on conditions such as isotropic gravity, parallel sidewalls and periodic vertical shaking that are wholly absent on asteroids. On the other hand, surface areas of boulders and pebbles appear to be comparable on Itokawa, and in this situation it follows that the asteroid must have suffered many orders of magnitude more collisions with pebbles than with boulders. We observe that a pebble will tend to bounce off of a boulder but will sink into a sea of similar pebbles, and so we predict that seas of pebbles must grow on such asteroids. We carry out experiments and simulations to evaluate this and related predictions, and we demonstrate that this new mechanism of segregation based on simple counting of grains can produce the strong separation of sizes reported. Support provided by NSF Grant 1404792.

  14. Charge segregation in weakly ionized microgels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, John S.; Douglas, Alison M.; Stanley, Chris; Do, Changwoo; Barker, Thomas H.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate microgels synthesized from N -isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) copolymerized with a large mol% of acrylic acid, finding that when the acid groups are partially ionized at high temperatures, competition between ion-induced swelling and hydrophobic deswelling of poly(NIPAM) chains results in microphase separation. In cross-linked microgels, this manifests as a dramatic decrease in the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius to ˜0.2 , indicating that almost all the mass of the microgel is concentrated near the particle center. We also observe a concurrent decrease of the polymer network length scale via small-angle neutron scattering, confirming the presence of a dense, deswollen core surrounded by a diffuse, charged periphery. We compare these results to those obtained for a system of charged ultralow-cross-linked microgels; the form factor shows a distinct peak at high q when the temperature exceeds a threshold value. We successfully fit the form factor to theory developed to describe scattering from weakly charged gels in poor solvents, and we tie this behavior to charge segregation in the case of the cross-linked microgels.

  15. Surface, segregation profile for Ni50Pd50(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    A recent dynamical LEED study [G.N. Derry, C.B. McVey, P.J. Rous, Surf. Sci. 326 (1995) 59] reported an oscillatory surface segregation profile in the Ni50Pd50(100) system with the surface layer enriched by Pd. We have performed ab-initio total-energy calculations for the surface of this alloy...... system using the coherent potential approximation and obtain an oscillatory segregation profile, in agreement with experiments. We discuss the energetic origin of the oscillatory segregation profile in terms of effective cluster interactions. We include relaxation effects by means of the semi...

  16. THE ENDOGENOUS BACILLUS-SUBTILIS (NATTO) PLASMIDS PTA1015 AND PTA1040 CONTAIN SIGNAL PEPTIDASE-ENCODING GENES - IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW STRUCTURAL MODULE ON CRYPTIC PLASMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJER, WJJ; DEJONG, A; BEA, G; WISMAN, A; TJALSMA, H; VENEMA, G; BRON, S; MAARTEN, J; VANDIJL, JM

    Various strains of Bacillus subtilis (natto) contain small cryptic plasmids that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. Like plasmids from other Gram-positive bacteria, these plasmids are composed of several distinct structural modules. A new structural module was identified on the B. subtilis

  17. Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance in isolated bacteria from burned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beige, Fahimeh; Baseri Salehi, Majid; Bahador, Nima; Mobasherzadeh, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the treatment of burned patients is difficult because of the high frequency of infection with antibiotic resistance bacteria. This study was conducted to evaluate the level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and its relation with the existence of plasmid. The samples were collected from two hundred twenty hospitalized burned patients in Isfahan burn hospital during a three-month period (March 2012 to June 2012). The samples were isolated and the Gram-negative bacteria were identified using phenotypic method and API 20E System. Antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profile were determined by standard Agar disc diffusion and plasmid spin column extraction methods. Totally 117 Gram-negative bacteria were isolated, the most common were Pseudomonas aerugionsa (37.6%), P. fluorescens (25.6%), Acinetobacter baumanii (20/5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.6%), respectively. The isolates showed high frequency of antibiotic resistance against ceftazidime and co-amoxiclave (100%) and low frequency of antibiotic resistance against amikacin with (70%).The results indicated that 60% of the isolates harboured plasmid. On the other hand, the patients infected with A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa were cured (with 60% frequency) whereas, those infected with P. fluorescens were not cured. Hence, probably antibiotic resistance markers of A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa are plasmid mediated; however, P. fluorescens is chromosomally mediated. Based on our findings, P. aerugionsa is a major causative agent of wound infections and amikacin could be considered as a more effective antibiotic for treatment of the burned patients.

  18. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  19. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Olson, Daniel G. [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Caiazza, Nicky [Mascoma Corporation; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. RESULTS: We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+ dcm+ E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAM205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. CONCLUSION: E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  20. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guss Adam M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. Results We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+dcm+E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAMG205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. Conclusions E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  1. Sudden stress relaxation in compound semiconductor thin films triggered by secondary phase segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainz, R.; Rodriguez-Alvarez, H.; Klaus, M.; Thomas, D.; Lauche, J.; Weber, A.; Heinemann, M. D.; Brunken, S.; Greiner, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Unold, T.; Schock, H.-W.; Genzel, C.

    2015-10-01

    In polycrystalline compound semiconductor thin films, structural defects such as grain boundaries as well as lateral stress can form during film growth, which may deteriorate their electronic performance and mechanical stability. In Cu-based chalcogenide semiconductors such as Cu (In ,Ga ) Se2 or Cu2ZnSn (S,Se ) 4 , temporary Cu excess during film growth leads to improved microstructure such as a reduced grain boundary density, a strategy that has been used for decades for high-efficiency chalcopyrite thin film solar cells. However, the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effect of Cu excess are yet not fully clarified. Here, we investigate the evolution of lateral stress, grain growth, and Cu-Se segregation during Cu-Se deposition onto Cu-poor CuInSe2. Real-time x-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis with a double-detector setup reveals that sudden stress relaxation occurs shortly prior to Cu-Se segregation at the surface and precisely coincides with domain growth and change of texture. Numerical reaction-diffusion modeling provides an explanation for the observed delay of Cu-Se segregation. Our results show that partial recrystallization of the film can be already reached without the necessity of an overall Cu-rich film composition and thus suggest a new synthesis route for the fabrication of high-quality chalcopyrite absorber films.

  2. Deformation of nanocrystalline binary aluminum alloys with segregation of Mg, Co and Ti at grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, A. V.; Bapanina, M. G.; Babicheva, R. I.; Enikeev, N. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Zhou, K.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the temperature and sort of alloying element on the deformation of the nanocrystalline (NC) binary Al alloys with segregation of 10.2 at % Ti, Co, or Mg over grain boundaries has been studied using the molecular dynamics. The deformation behavior of the materials has been studied in detail by the simulation of the shear deformation of various Al bicrystals with the grain-boundary segregation of impurity atoms, namely, Ti, Co, or Mg. The deformation of bicrystals with different grain orientation has been studied. It has been found that Co introduction into grain boundaries of NC Al has a strengthening effect due to the deceleration of the grain-boundary migration (GBM) and difficulty in the grain-boundary sliding (GBS). The Mg segregation at the boundaries greatly impedes the GBM, but stimulates the development of the GBS. In the NC alloy of Al-Ti, the GBM occurs actively, and the flow-stress values are close to the values characteristic of pure Al.

  3. The socioeconomic and ethnic segregation of living conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    2015-01-01

    . Differences in income have increased spatial segregation in Copenhagen in terms of housing and education. This segregation is most visible in relation to highly educated Danes and immigrants from non-Western countries. The article first examines poverty at household level and its spatial dimensions. Secondly......The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation......, it considers other living conditions (for example social networks). Thirdly, it explores immigrants’ experiences of, among other things, education, employment and citizenship. It concludes that social cohesion in Copenhagen may be threatened if this segregation continues....

  4. The Socioeconomic and Ethnic Segregation of Living Conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    2015-01-01

    . Differences in income have increased spatial segregation in Copenhagen in terms of housing and education. This segregation is most visible in relation to highly educated Danes and immigrants from non-Western countries. The article first examines poverty at household level and its spatial dimensions. Secondly......The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation......, it considers other living conditions (for example social networks). Thirdly, it explores immigrants’ experiences of, among other things, education, employment and citizenship. It concludes that social cohesion in Copenhagen may be threatened if this segregation continues....

  5. Schelling model of cell segregation based only on local information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alexander Valentin; Gade, Annika Lund; Juul, Jeppe; Strandkvist, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    While biological studies suggest that motility of cells is involved in cell segregation, few computational models have investigated this mechanism. We apply a simple Schelling model, modified to reflect biological conditions, demonstrating how differences in cell motility arising exclusively from differences in the composition of the local environment can be sufficient to drive segregation. The work presented here demonstrates that the segregation behavior observed in the original Schelling model is robust to a relaxation of the requirement for global information and that the Schelling model may yield insight in the context of biological systems. In the model, the time course of cell segregation follows a power law in accord with experimental observations and previous work.

  6. Auditory stream segregation in children with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepistö, T; Kuitunen, A; Sussman, E; Saalasti, S; Jansson-Verkasalo, E; Nieminen-von Wendt, T; Kujala, T

    2009-12-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) often have difficulties in perceiving speech in noisy environments. The present study investigated whether this might be explained by deficient auditory stream segregation ability, that is, by a more basic difficulty in separating simultaneous sound sources from each other. To this end, auditory event-related brain potentials were recorded from a group of school-aged children with AS and a group of age-matched controls using a paradigm specifically developed for studying stream segregation. Differences in the amplitudes of ERP components were found between groups only in the stream segregation conditions and not for simple feature discrimination. The results indicated that children with AS have difficulties in segregating concurrent sound streams, which ultimately may contribute to the difficulties in speech-in-noise perception.

  7. Organization of texture segregation processing in primate visual cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, V.A.F.; van Dijk, B.W.; Spekreijse, H.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated which cortical areas and layers are involved in global feature interactions underlying texture segregation in humans and monkeys. Visual stimulation was assessed with an electrostatic monitor, and scalp or intracortical recordings with electrodes were made. Signal processing and psychop

  8. CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION: NOVEL INSIGHTS INTO THE MECHANISM AND REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Pozgajova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A crucial feature of every healthy living organism is accurate segregation of chromosomes. Errors in this process may lead to aneuploidy, which is responsible for diverse genetic defects and diseases such as Down syndrome, miscarriages, cancer and others. Although, chromosome segregation has been studied intensively in the past, the exact mechanism of accurate chromosome segregation still remains unclear. Identification and characterization of proteins and protein complexes involved in this process is essential for understanding of processes that lead to chromosome missegregation. Basic molecular mechanism share common principles in animals, humans, plants and unicellular organisms; it is therefore possible to study these mechanisms in simple model organisms such as yeasts. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an excellent model organism to study the function and regulation of chromosome segregation in both mitosis and meiosis.

  9. Segregation of Molten Salt on Chromizing in Thermal Diffusion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongfu; WANG Junyuan; WANG Huachang

    2011-01-01

    The segregation of thermal diffusion salt bath chromizing process was analyzed.The experimental chromizing ingredients were prepared by the four groups A,B,C,and D.In order to study the segregation status of this case,the cooling molten salt in the crucible was removed by drilling from the heart core of molten salt.The core of molten salt was analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and XRD.Through the analysis,we can conclude that the Cr element deposited in the bottom was 4.51 times than the top.Chloride added to the molten salt will reduce segregation.Meantime we proposed some measures to overcome the segregation problem.

  10. The large universal Pantoea plasmid LPP-1 plays a major role in biological and ecological diversification

    OpenAIRE

    De Maayer Pieter; Chan Wai-Yin; Blom Jochen; Venter Stephanus N; Duffy Brion; Smits Theo H M; Coutinho Teresa A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pantoea spp. are frequently isolated from a wide range of ecological niches and have various biological roles, as plant epi- or endophytes, biocontrol agents, plant-growth promoters or as pathogens of both plant and animal hosts. This suggests that members of this genus have undergone extensive genotypic diversification. One means by which this occurs among bacteria is through the acquisition and maintenance of plasmids. Here, we have analyzed and compared the sequences of...

  11. LETTER: Statistical physics of the Schelling model of segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asta, L.; Castellano, C.; Marsili, M.

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the static and dynamic properties of a celebrated model of social segregation, providing a complete explanation of the mechanisms leading to segregation both in one- and two-dimensional systems. Standard statistical physics methods shed light on the rich phenomenology of this simple model, exhibiting static phase transitions typical of kinetic constrained models, non-trivial coarsening like in driven-particle systems and percolation-related phenomena.

  12. SMC complexes in bacterial chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunnikov, Alexander V

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial chromosomes segregate via a partition apparatus that employs a score of specialized proteins. The SMC complexes play a crucial role in the chromosome partitioning process by organizing bacterial chromosomes through their ATP-dependent chromatin-compacting activity. Recent progress in the composition of these complexes and elucidation of their structural and enzymatic properties has advanced our comprehension of chromosome condensation and segregation mechanics in bacteria.

  13. SMC complexes in bacterial chromosome condensation and segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Strunnikov, Alexander V.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes segregate via a partition apparatus that employs a score of specialized proteins. The SMC complexes play a crucial role in the chromosome partitioning process by organizing bacterial chromosomes through their ATP-dependent chromatin-compacting activity. Recent progress in the composition of these complexes and elucidation of their structural and enzymatic properties has advanced our comprehension of chromosome condensation and segregation mechanics in bacteria.

  14. Segregation of Whispered Speech Interleaved with Noise or Speech Maskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    registers,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 2101– 2107. [7] Scheffers, M.T.M., 1983. “Sifting vowels : auditory pitch analysis and sound segregation...signals provided by cochlear implants. Two studies investigated the segregation of simultaneously presented whispered vowels [7, 8] in a standard...double vowel identification paradigm. Both experiments found that pairs of concurrent whispered vowels were identified at the same rate as two vowels

  15. The cost of segregating GM canola: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Hatwell, Bronwyn; Pluske, Johanna M.

    2004-01-01

    The Gene Technology Regulator's approval of Bayer CropScience's genetically modified (GM) canola variety, InVigor, and Monsanto's Roundup Ready, means that the commercial planting of Australia's first GM food crop is imminent. Under such circumstances, for Australia to continue marketing non-GM canola and comply with worldwide labelling requirements segregation must be implemented. This study investigates the cost effectiveness of three possible segregation methods. In considering each of the...

  16. The socioeconomic and ethnic segregation of living conditions in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Iver Hornemann; Larsen, Jørgen Elm

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the discrepancies between certain aspects of living conditions of ethnic Danes and immigrants in Copenhagen. Copenhagen is quite prosperous and fares well in the globalized economy but is at the same time experiencing increasing poverty and ethnic segregation......, it considers other living conditions (for example social networks). Thirdly, it explores immigrants’ experiences of, among other things, education, employment and citizenship. It concludes that social cohesion in Copenhagen may be threatened if this segregation continues....

  17. Neural Dynamics of Feedforward and Feedback Processing in Figure-Ground Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Layton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining whether a region belongs to the interior or exterior of a shape (figure-ground segregation is a core competency of the primate brain, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Many models assume that figure-ground segregation occurs by assembling progressively more complex representations through feedforward connections, with feedback playing only a modulatory role. We present a dynamical model of figure-ground segregation in the primate ventral stream wherein feedback plays a crucial role in disambiguating a figure’s interior and exterior. We introduce a processing strategy whereby jitter in RF center locations and variation in RF sizes is exploited to enhance and suppress neural activity inside and outside of figures, respectively. Feedforward projections emanate from units that model cells in V4 known to respond to the curvature of boundary contours (curved contour cells, and feedback projections from units predicted to exist in IT that strategically group neurons with different RF sizes and RF center locations (teardrop cells. Neurons (convex cells that preferentially respond when centered on a figure dynamically balance feedforward (bottom-up information and feedback from higher visual areas. The activation is enhanced when an interior portion of a figure is in the RF via feedback from units that detect closure in the boundary contours of a figure. Our model produces maximal activity along the medial axis of well-known figures with and without concavities, and inside algorithmically generated shapes. Our results suggest that the dynamic balancing of feedforward signals with the specific feedback mechanisms proposed by the model is crucial for figure-ground segregation.

  18. Condensin II resolves chromosomal associations to enable anaphase I segregation in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Hartl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Several meiotic processes ensure faithful chromosome segregation to create haploid gametes. Errors to any one of these processes can lead to zygotic aneuploidy with the potential for developmental abnormalities. During prophase I of Drosophila male meiosis, each bivalent condenses and becomes sequestered into discrete chromosome territories. Here, we demonstrate that two predicted condensin II subunits, Cap-H2 and Cap-D3, are required to promote territory formation. In mutants of either subunit, territory formation fails and chromatin is dispersed throughout the nucleus. Anaphase I is also abnormal in Cap-H2 mutants as chromatin bridges are found between segregating heterologous and homologous chromosomes. Aneuploid sperm may be generated from these defects as they occur at an elevated frequency and are genotypically consistent with anaphase I segregation defects. We propose that condensin II-mediated prophase I territory formation prevents and/or resolves heterologous chromosomal associations to alleviate their potential interference in anaphase I segregation. Furthermore, condensin II-catalyzed prophase I chromosome condensation may be necessary to resolve associations between paired homologous chromosomes of each bivalent. These persistent chromosome associations likely consist of DNA entanglements, but may be more specific as anaphase I bridging was rescued by mutations in the homolog conjunction factor teflon. We propose that the consequence of condensin II mutations is a failure to resolve heterologous and homologous associations mediated by entangled DNA and/or homolog conjunction factors. Furthermore, persistence of homologous and heterologous interchromosomal associations lead to anaphase I chromatin bridging and the generation of aneuploid gametes.

  19. Particle-size segregation in dense granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John Mark Nicholas Timm; Gajjar, Parmesh; Kokelaar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Particles of differing sizes are notoriously prone to segregate, which is a chronic problem in the manufacture of a wide variety of products that are used by billions of people worldwide every day. Segregation is the single most important factor in product non-uniformity, which can lead to significant handling problems as well as complete batches being discarded at huge financial loss. It is generally regarded that the most important mechanism for segregation is the combination of kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion in shallow granular avalanches. These free-surface flows are more common than one might expect, often forming part of more complicated flows in drums, heaps and silos, where there is mass exchange with underlying regions of static or slowly moving grains. The combination of segregation and solid-fluid granular phase transitions creates incredibly complicated and beautiful patterns in the resulting deposits, but a full understanding of such effects lies beyond our capabilities at present. This paper reviews recent advances in our ability to model the basic segregation processes in a single avalanche (without mass exchange) and the subtle feedback effects that they can have on the bulk flow. This is particularly important for geophysical applications, where segregation can spontaneously self-channelize and lubricate the flow, significantly enhancing the run-out of debris-flows, pyroclastic flows, rock-falls and snow-slab avalanches.

  20. Caulobacter chromosome segregation is an ordered multistep process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebelut, Conrad W; Guberman, Jonathan M; van Teeffelen, Sven; Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-08-10

    Despite its fundamental nature, bacterial chromosome segregation remains poorly understood. Viewing segregation as a single process caused multiple proposed mechanisms to appear in conflict and failed to explain how asymmetrically dividing bacteria break symmetry to move only one of their chromosomes. Here, we demonstrate that the ParA ATPase extends from one cell pole and pulls the chromosome by retracting upon association with the ParB DNA-binding protein. Surprisingly, ParA disruption has a specific effect on chromosome segregation that only perturbs the latter stages of this process. Using quantitative high-resolution imaging, we demonstrate that this specificity results from the multistep nature of chromosome translocation. We propose that Caulobacter chromosome segregation follows an ordered pathway of events with distinct functions and mechanisms. Initiation releases polar tethering of the origin of replication, distinction spatially differentiates the two chromosomes, and commitment irreversibly translocates the distal centromeric locus. Thus, much as eukaryotic mitosis involves a sequence of distinct subprocesses, Caulobacter cells also segregate their chromosomes through an orchestrated series of steps. We discuss how the multistep view of bacterial chromosome segregation can help to explain and reconcile outstanding puzzles and frame future investigation.

  1. Evidence of variation in segregation patterns within a Cedrus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallour, D; Fady, B; Lefèvre, F

    2001-01-01

    We used horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis for a genetic analysis of isozymes within one French Cedrus atlantica stand. Eleven to 29 megagametophytes per tree from 186 trees were assayed. Among the 33 enzyme systems tested, 15 correctly resolved and 8 appeared variable in at least one zone of activity: ACP, GOT, IDH, LAP, MDH, MNR, PGI, and SKDH. They were coded by at least 12 polymorphic loci which were described and tested for Mendelian segregation and linkage. Segregation patterns and linkage relationships were variable in the population. We detected homogeneous segregation distortion for loci Idh, Acp-c, and Got-a over the whole set of segregating progeny. We also found segregation distortions in a significant proportion of progeny for loci Got-b, Mdh-c, Pgi-b, and SKDH: The Acp-c and Got-b loci were linked with an overall map distance of 17 cM, but distance varied drastically among progeny. Both segregation distortions and heterogeneity of recombination frequencies indicate the occurrence of a genetic load in this population.

  2. Evaluating segregation in HSLA steels using computational thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meire Guimarães Lage

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A low level of segregation in high strength steel plates used to manufacture large diameter pipes is important for the performance of these materials in sour environments. In this work, the level of segregation of different HSLA steels was assessed by computational thermodynamics to identify the most promising compositions. Equilibrium phase diagrams and mass fraction of solid phase diagrams were used to quantify the segregation at the end of solidification. It was verified from the results that S is the stronger segregating element, as expected, but that Nb, C and P also had a considerable segregation. The enrichment of liquid phase with S, P and Nb was related not only to concentration of these elements but also to carbon content. By using only two extreme models – Equilibrium and Scheil–Gulliver – the results will be useful to support the alloy design, especially concerning the evaluation of segregation of C, Mn, S, P, Nb and Ti, which are elements that have a significant influence on mechanical properties and hydrogen embrittlement resistance of HSLA steels used for large diameter pipe.

  3. The conjugative plasmid of a bean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii strain is assembled from sequences of two Rhizobium plasmids and the chromosome of a Sinorhizobium strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Susana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bean-nodulating Rhizobium etli originated in Mesoamerica, while soybean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii evolved in East Asia. S. fredii strains, such as GR64, have been isolated from bean nodules in Spain, suggesting the occurrence of conjugative transfer events between introduced and native strains. In R. etli CFN42, transfer of the symbiotic plasmid (pRet42d requires cointegration with the endogenous self-transmissible plasmid pRet42a. Aiming at further understanding the generation of diversity among bean nodulating strains, we analyzed the plasmids of S. fredii GR64: pSfr64a and pSfr64b (symbiotic plasmid. Results The conjugative transfer of the plasmids of strain GR64 was analyzed. Plasmid pSfr64a was self-transmissible, and required for transfer of the symbiotic plasmid. We sequenced pSfr64a, finding 166 ORFs. pSfr64a showed three large segments of different evolutionary origins; the first one presented 38 ORFs that were highly similar to genes located on the chromosome of Sinorhizobium strain NGR234; the second one harbored 51 ORFs with highest similarity to genes from pRet42d, including the replication, but not the symbiosis genes. Accordingly, pSfr64a was incompatible with the R. etli CFN42 symbiotic plasmid, but did not contribute to symbiosis. The third segment contained 36 ORFs with highest similarity to genes localized on pRet42a, 20 of them involved in conjugative transfer. Plasmid pRet42a was unable to substitute pSfr64a for induction of pSym transfer, and its own transfer was significantly diminished in GR64 background. The symbiotic plasmid pSfr64b was found to differ from typical R. etli symbiotic plasmids. Conclusions S. fredii GR64 contains a chimeric transmissible plasmid, with segments from two R. etli plasmids and a S. fredii chromosome, and a symbiotic plasmid different from the one usually found in R. etli bv phaseoli. We infer that these plasmids originated through the transfer of a symbiotic-conjugative-plasmid

  4. Conjugation of plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to other Neisseria species: potential reservoirs for the beta-lactamase plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, C A; Knapp, J S; Clark, V L

    1984-09-01

    The discovery that penicillinase production in Neisseria gonorrhoeae was plasmid mediated and the spread of the beta-lactamase encoding plasmids in gonococcal isolates since 1976, raise the possibility that a nonpathogenic indigenous bacterium could serve as a reservoir for these plasmids. We initiated studies to define the ability of commensal Neisseria species and Branhamella catarrhalis strains, as well as strains of the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, to serve as recipients in conjugation with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We found that with N. gonorrhoeae as the donor, 3 of 5 Neisseria cinerea, 2 of 5 Neisseria flava, 0 of 1 Neisseria flavescens, 1 of 3 Neisseria subflava, 0 of 6 B. catarrhalis, 0 of 7 Neisseria lactamica, 1 of 5 Neisseria mucosa, 1 of 7 Neisseria perflava/sicca, and 0 of 13 N. meningitidis strains gave detectable conjugation frequencies (greater than 10(-8). N. cinerea was the only species found to maintain the gonococcal conjugal plasmid (pLE2451). A N. cinerea transconjugant containing pLE2451 was observed to transfer both the beta-lactamase plasmid and pLE2451 to N. gonorrhoeae at high frequency.

  5. A novel plasmid pEA68 of Erwinia amylovora and the description of a new family of plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Emadeldeen; Blom, Jochen; Bultreys, Alain; Ivanović, Milan; Obradović, Aleksa; van Doorn, Joop; Bergsma-Vlami, Maria; Maes, Martine; Willems, Anne; Duffy, Brion; Stockwell, Virginia O; Smits, Theo H M; Puławska, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Recent genome analysis of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease on Rosaceae, has shown that the chromosome is highly conserved among strains and that plasmids are the principal source of genomic diversity. A new circular plasmid, pEA68, was found in E. amylovora strain 692 (LMG 28361), isolated in Poland from Sorbus (mountain ash) with fire blight symptoms. Annotation of the 68,763-bp IncFIIa-type plasmid revealed that it contains 79 predicted CDS, among which two operons (tra, pil) are associated with mobility. The plasmid is maintained stably in E. amylovora and does not possess genes associated with antibiotic resistance or known virulence genes. Curing E. amylovora strain 692 of pEA68 did not influence its virulence in apple shoots nor amylovoran synthesis. Of 488 strains of E. amylovora from seventeen countries, pEA68 was only found in two additional strains from Belgium. Although the spread of pEA68 is currently limited to Europe, pEA68 comprises, together with pEA72 and pEA78 both found in North America, a new plasmid family that spans two continents.

  6. Anion exchange purification of plasmid DNA using expanded bed adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G N; Cabral, J M; Prazeres, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in gene therapy with non-viral vectors and DNA vaccination have increased the demand for large amounts of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The high viscosity of process streams is of major concern in the purification of plasmids, since it can cause high back pressures in column operations, thus limiting the throughput. In order to avoid these high back pressures, expanded bed anion exchange chromatography was evaluated as an alternative to fixed bed chromatography. A Streamline 25 column filled with 100 ml of Streamline QXL media, was equilibrated with 0.5 M NaCl in TE (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH = 8.0) buffer at an upward flow of 300 cmh-1, E. coli lysates (obtained from up to 3 liters of fermentation broth) were injected in the column. After washing out the unbound material, the media was allowed to sediment and the plasmid was eluted with 1 M NaCl in TE buffer at a downward flow of 120 cmh-1. Purification factors of 36 +/- 1 fold, 26 +/- 0.4 plasmid purity, and close to 100% yields were obtained when less than one settled column volume of plasmid feed was injected. However, both recovery yield and purity abruptly decreased when larger amounts were processed-values of 35 +/- 2 and 5 +/- 0.7 were obtained for the recovery yield and purity, respectively, when 250 ml of feedstock were processed. In these cases, gel clogging and expansion collapse were observed. The processing of larger volumes, thus larger plasmid quantities, was only possible by performing an isopropanol precipitation step prior to the chromatographic step. This step led to an enhancement of the purification step.

  7. Cnr interferes with dimerization of the replication protein alpha in phage-plasmid P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, A; Serina, S; Oliva, I; Dehò, G; Ghisotti, D

    2001-01-15

    DNA replication of phage-plasmid P4 in its host Escherichia coli depends on its replication protein alpha. In the plasmid state, P4 copy number is controlled by the regulator protein Cnr (copy number regulation). Mutations in alpha (alpha(cr)) that prevent regulation by Cnr cause P4 over-replication and cell death. Using the two-hybrid system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a system based on lambda immunity in E.coli for in vivo detection of protein-protein interactions, we found that (i) alpha protein interacts with Cnr, whereas alpha(cr) proteins do not; (ii) both alpha-alpha and alpha(cr)-alpha(cr) interactions occur and the interaction domain is located within the C-terminal of alpha; (iii) Cnr-Cnr interaction also occurs. Using an in vivo competition assay, we found that Cnr interferes with both alpha-alpha and alpha(cr)-alpha(cr) dimerization. Our data suggest that Cnr and alpha interact in at least two ways, which may have different functional roles in P4 replication control.

  8. blaCMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are a distinct component of a larger lineage of plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas R; Singer, Randall S; Meng, Da; Broschat, Shira L; Orfe, Lisa H; Anderson, Janet M; Herndon, David R; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Daniels, Joshua B; Besser, Thomas E

    2010-02-01

    Large multidrug resistance plasmids of the A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) have been found in a diverse group of Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We present three completed sequences from IncA/C plasmids that originated from Escherichia coli (cattle) and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (human) and that carry the cephamycinase gene blaCMY-2. These large plasmids (148 to 166 kbp) share extensive sequence identity and synteny. The most divergent plasmid, peH4H, has lost several conjugation-related genes and has gained a kanamycin resistance region. Two of the plasmids (pAM04528 and peH4H) harbor two copies of blaCMY-2, while the third plasmid (pAR060302) harbors a single copy of the gene. The majority of single-nucleotide polymorphisms comprise nonsynonymous mutations in floR. A comparative analysis of these plasmids with five other published IncA/C plasmids showed that the blaCMY-2 plasmids from E. coli and S. enterica are genetically distinct from those originating from Yersinia pestis and Photobacterium damselae and distal to one originating from Yersinia ruckeri. While the overall similarity of these plasmids supports the likelihood of recent movements among E. coli and S. enterica hosts, their greater divergence from Y. pestis or Y. ruckeri suggests less recent plasmid transfer among these pathogen groups.

  9. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with t

  10. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Debets, A.J.M.; Slakhorst-Wandel, S.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  11. Mitochondrial pAL2-1 plasmid homologs are senescence factors in Podospora anserina independent of intrinsic senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diepeningen, Anne D; Debets, Alfons J M; Slakhorst, S Marijke; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    Since the first description of a linear mitochondrial plasmid in Podospora anserina, pAL2-1, and homologous plasmids have gone from being considered beneficial longevity plasmids, via neutral genetic elements, toward mutator plasmids causing senescence. The plasmid has an invertron structure, with

  12. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  13. SMV1 virus-induced CRISPR spacer acquisition from the conjugative plasmid pMGB1 in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2013-01-01

    complexity and diversity of the CRISPR immune systems that are found among the Sulfolobales. In the present article, we re-examine the first successful induction of archaeal spacer acquisition in our laboratory that occurred exclusively for the conjugative plasmid pMGB1 in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2...

  14. Grain boundary migration induced segregation in V-Cr-Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Univ. of Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Analytical electron microscopy results are reported for a series of vanadium alloys irradiated in the HFIR JP23 experiment at 500{degrees}C. Alloys were V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium which are expected to have transmuted to V-15Cr-5Ti and V-10Cr following irradiation. Analytical microscopy confirmed the expected transmutation occurred and showed redistribution of Cr and Ti resulting from grain boundary migration in V-5Cr-5Ti, but in pure V, segregation was reduced and no clear trends as a function of position near a boundary were identified.

  15. Reversible phosphorylation and regulation of mammalian oocyte meiotic chromatin remodeling and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Smith, G D

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian oocyte is notorious for high rates of chromosomal abnormalities. This results in subsequent embryonic aneuploidy, resulting in infertility and congenital defects. Therefore, understanding regulatory mechanisms involved in chromatin remodeling and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation is imperative to fully understand the complex process and establish potential therapies. This review will focus on major events occurring during oocyte meiosis, critical to ensure proper cellular ploidy. Mechanistic and cellular events such as chromosome condensation, meiotic spindle formation, as well as cohesion of homologues and sister chromatids will be discussed, focusing on the role of reversible phosphorylation in control of these processes.

  16. Polymer segregation under confinement: Free energy calculations and segregation dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, James M.; Montgomery, Logan G.

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the behavior of two polymers under confinement in a cylindrical tube. Each polymer is modeled as a chain of hard spheres. We measure the free energy of the system, F, as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of the polymers, λ, and examine the effects on the free energy functions of varying the channel diameter D and length L, as well as the polymer length N and bending rigidity κ. For infinitely long cylinders, F is a maximum at λ = 0, and decreases with λ until the polymers are no longer in contact. For flexible chains (κ = 0), the polymers overlap along the cylinder for low λ, while above some critical value of λ they are longitudinally compressed and non-overlapping while still in contact. We find that the free energy barrier height, ΔF ≡ F(0) - F(∞), scales as ΔF/kBT ˜ ND-1.93 ± 0.01, for N ⩽ 200 and D ⩽ 9σ, where σ is the monomer diameter. In addition, the overlap free energy appears to scale as F/kBT = Nf(λ/N; D) for sufficiently large N, where f is a function parameterized by the cylinder diameter D. For channels of finite length, the free energy barrier height increases with increasing confinement aspect ratio L/D at fixed volume fraction ϕ, and it decreases with increasing ϕ at fixed L/D. Increasing the polymer bending rigidity κ monotonically reduces the overlap free energy. For strongly confined systems, where the chain persistence length P satisfies D ≪ P, F varies linearly with λ with a slope that scales as F'(λ) ˜ -kBTD-βP-α, where β ≈ 2 and α ≈ 0.37 for N = 200 chains. These exponent values deviate slightly from those predicted using a simple model, possibly due to insufficiently satisfying the conditions defining the Odijk regime. Finally, we use Monte Carlo dynamics simulations to examine polymer segregation dynamics for fully flexible chains and observe segregation rates that decrease with decreasing entropic force magnitude, f ≡ |dF/dλ|. For both

  17. Polymer segregation under confinement: free energy calculations and segregation dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, James M; Montgomery, Logan G

    2014-10-28

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the behavior of two polymers under confinement in a cylindrical tube. Each polymer is modeled as a chain of hard spheres. We measure the free energy of the system, F, as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of the polymers, λ, and examine the effects on the free energy functions of varying the channel diameter D and length L, as well as the polymer length N and bending rigidity κ. For infinitely long cylinders, F is a maximum at λ = 0, and decreases with λ until the polymers are no longer in contact. For flexible chains (κ = 0), the polymers overlap along the cylinder for low λ, while above some critical value of λ they are longitudinally compressed and non-overlapping while still in contact. We find that the free energy barrier height, ΔF ≡ F(0) - F(∞), scales as ΔF/k(B)T ∼ ND(-1.93 ± 0.01), for N ⩽ 200 and D ⩽ 9σ, where σ is the monomer diameter. In addition, the overlap free energy appears to scale as F/k(B)T = Nf(λ/N; D) for sufficiently large N, where f is a function parameterized by the cylinder diameter D. For channels of finite length, the free energy barrier height increases with increasing confinement aspect ratio L/D at fixed volume fraction ϕ, and it decreases with increasing ϕ at fixed L/D. Increasing the polymer bending rigidity κ monotonically reduces the overlap free energy. For strongly confined systems, where the chain persistence length P satisfies D ≪ P, F varies linearly with λ with a slope that scales as F'(λ) ∼ -k(B)TD(-β)P(-α), where β ≈ 2 and α ≈ 0.37 for N = 200 chains. These exponent values deviate slightly from those predicted using a simple model, possibly due to insufficiently satisfying the conditions defining the Odijk regime. Finally, we use Monte Carlo dynamics simulations to examine polymer segregation dynamics for fully flexible chains and observe segregation rates that decrease with decreasing entropic force magnitude, f ≡ |d

  18. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R; Perez, Adam M; von Diezmann, Alexander R S; Eckart, Michael R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-05-13

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine.

  19. Conjugal transfer of group B streptococcal plasmids and comobilization of Escherichia coli-Streptococcus shuttle plasmids to Lactobacillus plantarum.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance group B streptococcal plasmids, pIP501 and pVA797, were conjugally transferred from Streptococcus faecalis to Lactobacillus plantarum. The Escherichia coli-Streptococcus shuttle plasmids, pVA838 and pSA3, were mobilized from S. sanguis to L. plantarum by pVA797 via cointegrate formation. pVA838 readily resolved from pVA797 and was present in L. plantarum as deletion derivatives. The pVA797::pSA3 cointegrate failed to resolve in L. plantarum.

  20. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.