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Sample records for plasmid encoded functions

  1. Comparative metagenomic analysis of plasmid encoded functions in the human gut microbiome

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    Marchesi Julian R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known regarding the pool of mobile genetic elements associated with the human gut microbiome. In this study we employed the culture independent TRACA system to isolate novel plasmids from the human gut microbiota, and a comparative metagenomic analysis to investigate the distribution and relative abundance of functions encoded by these plasmids in the human gut microbiome. Results Novel plasmids were acquired from the human gut microbiome, and homologous nucleotide sequences with high identity (>90% to two plasmids (pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were identified in the multiple human gut microbiomes analysed here. However, no homologous nucleotide sequences to these plasmids were identified in the murine gut or environmental metagenomes. Functions encoded by the plasmids pTRACA10 and pTRACA22 were found to be more prevalent in the human gut microbiome when compared to microbial communities from other environments. Among the most prevalent functions identified was a putative RelBE toxin-antitoxin (TA addiction module, and subsequent analysis revealed that this was most closely related to putative TA modules from gut associated bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes. A broad phylogenetic distribution of RelE toxin genes was observed in gut associated bacterial species (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria, but no RelE homologues were identified in gut associated archaeal species. We also provide indirect evidence for the horizontal transfer of these genes between bacterial species belonging to disparate phylogenetic divisions, namely Gram negative Proteobacteria and Gram positive species from the Firmicutes division. Conclusions The application of a culture independent system to capture novel plasmids from the human gut mobile metagenome, coupled with subsequent comparative metagenomic analysis, highlighted the unexpected prevalence of plasmid encoded functions in the gut microbial ecosystem. In

  2. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates.

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    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be "hotspots" for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp), multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to five different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9 Kbp) and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other pKPN3-like

  3. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

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    Ella eKaplan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp, multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to 5 different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7-9Kbp and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other p

  4. DNA-SEQUENCE DETERMINATION AND FUNCTIONAL-CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OCT-PLASMID-ENCODED ALKJKL GENES OF PSEUDOMONAS-OLEOVORANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.B.; EGGINK, G; ENEQUIST, H; Witholt, Bernard; Bos, R

    1992-01-01

    The alkBFGHJKL and alkST operons encode enzymes that allow Pseudomonas putida (oleovorans) to metabolize alkanes. In this paper we report the nucleotide sequence of a 4592 bp region of the alkBFGHJKL operon encoding the AlkJ, AlkK and AlkL polypeptides. The alkJ gene encodes a protein of 59 kilodalt

  5. Conjugative botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in Clostridium botulinum.

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    Kristin M Marshall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clostridium botulinum produces seven distinct serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs. The genes encoding different subtype neurotoxins of serotypes A, B, F and several dual neurotoxin-producing strains have been shown to reside on plasmids, suggesting that intra- and interspecies transfer of BoNT-encoding plasmids may occur. The objective of the present study was to determine whether these C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids are conjugative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids pBotCDC-A3 (strain CDC-A3, pCLJ (strain 657Ba and pCLL (strain Eklund 17B were tagged with the erythromycin resistance marker (Erm using the ClosTron mutagenesis system by inserting a group II intron into the neurotoxin genes carried on these plasmids. Transfer of the tagged plasmids from the donor strains CDC-A3, 657Ba and Eklund 17B to tetracycline-resistant recipient C. botulinum strains was evaluated in mating experiments. Erythromycin and tetracycline resistant transconjugants were isolated from donor:recipient mating pairs tested. Transfer of the plasmids to the transconjugants was confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and Southern hybridizations. Transfer required cell-to-cell contact and was DNase resistant. This indicates that transfer of these plasmids occurs via a conjugation mechanism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first evidence supporting conjugal transfer of native botulinum neurotoxin-encoding plasmids in C. botulinum, and provides a probable mechanism for the lateral distribution of BoNT-encoding plasmids to other C. botulinum strains. The potential transfer of C. botulinum BoNT-encoding plasmids to other bacterial hosts in the environment or within the human intestine is of great concern for human pathogenicity and necessitates further characterization of these plasmids.

  6. pTAR-encoded proteins in plasmid partitioning.

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    Kalnin, K; Stegalkina, S; Yarmolinsky, M

    2000-04-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465-478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream genes, parB and orf-84, of which only parB was found to be essential for partitioning in A. tumefaciens. Purified ParA exhibited a weak ATPase activity that was modestly increased by nonspecific DNA. ParB bound in vitro to repeated sequences present in a region, parS, that possesses centromere and operator functions and within which we identified the primary transcription start site by primer extension. In certain respects the Par proteins behave normally in the foreign host Escherichia coli. In E. coli, as in A. tumefaciens, ParB repressed the partition operon; ParA, inactive alone, augmented this repression. Functional similarities between the partition system of pTAR and those of other plasmids and bacteria are prominent, despite differences in size, organization, and amino acid sequence.

  7. Roles of internal cysteines in the function, localization, and reactivity of the TraV outer membrane lipoprotein encoded by the F plasmid.

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    Harris, Robin L; Silverman, Philip M

    2002-06-01

    We have examined the functional role of two internal cysteine residues of the F-plasmid TraV outer membrane lipoprotein. Each was mutated to a serine separately and together to yield three mutant traV genes: traV(C10S), traV(C18S), and traV(C10S/C18S). All three cysteine mutations complemented a traV mutant for DNA donor activity and for sensitivity to donor-specific bacteriophage; however, when measured by a transduction assay, the donor-specific DNA bacteriophage sensitivities of the traV(C18S) and, especially, traV(C10S/C18S) mutant strains were significantly less than those of the traV(+) and traV(C10S) strains. Thus, unlike the Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-plasmid-encoded VirB7 outer membrane lipoprotein, TraV does not require either internal cysteine to retain significant biological activity. By Western blot analysis, all three mutant TraV proteins were shown to accumulate in the outer membrane. However, by nonreducing gel electrophoresis, wild-type TraV and especially the TraV(C18S) mutant were shown to form mixed disulfides with numerous cell envelope proteins. This was not observed with the TraV(C10S) or TraV(C10S/C18S) proteins. Thus, it appears that TraV C10 is unusually reactive and that this reactivity is reduced by C18, perhaps by intramolecular oxidation. Finally, whereas the TraV(C10S) and TraV(C18S) proteins fractionated primarily with the outer membrane, as did the wild-type protein, the TraV(C10S/C18S) protein was found in osmotic shock fluid and inner membrane fractions as well as outer membrane fractions. Hence, at least one cysteine is required for the efficient localization of TraV to the outer membrane.

  8. pTAR-Encoded Proteins in Plasmid Partitioning

    OpenAIRE

    Kalnin, Kirill; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Yarmolinsky, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465–478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream g...

  9. Roles of Internal Cysteines in the Function, Localization, and Reactivity of the TraV Outer Membrane Lipoprotein Encoded by the F Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Robin L.; Silverman, Philip M.

    2002-01-01

    We have examined the functional role of two internal cysteine residues of the F-plasmid TraV outer membrane lipoprotein. Each was mutated to a serine separately and together to yield three mutant traV genes: traVC10S, traVC18S, and traVC10S/C18S. All three cysteine mutations complemented a traV mutant for DNA donor activity and for sensitivity to donor-specific bacteriophage; however, when measured by a transduction assay, the donor-specific DNA bacteriophage sensitivities of the traVC18S and...

  10. A Rebeccamycin Analog Provides Plasmid-Encoded Niche Defense.

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    Van Arnam, Ethan B; Ruzzini, Antonio C; Sit, Clarissa S; Currie, Cameron R; Clardy, Jon

    2015-11-18

    Bacterial symbionts of fungus-growing ants occupy a highly specialized ecological niche and face the constant existential threat of displacement by another strain of ant-adapted bacteria. As part of a systematic study of the small molecules underlying this fraternal competition, we discovered an analog of the antitumor agent rebeccamycin, a member of the increasingly important indolocarbazole family. While several gene clusters consistent with this molecule's newly reported modification had previously been identified in metagenomic studies, the metabolite itself has been cryptic. The biosynthetic gene cluster for 9-methoxyrebeccamycin is encoded on a plasmid in a manner reminiscent of plasmid-derived peptide antimicrobials that commonly mediate antagonism among closely related Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

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    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  12. Analysis of the multimer resolution system encoded by the parCBA operon of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

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    Eberl, Leo; Sternberg, Claus; Givskov, Michael Christian

    1994-01-01

    The broad-host-range plasmid RP4 encodes a highly efficient partitioning function, termed par, that is capable of stabilizing plasmids in a variety of Gram-negative bacteria independently of the nature of the replicon. The mechanism responsible for plasmid stabilization by this locus appears to b...

  13. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Secretes Plasmid Encoded Toxin

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    Rita C. Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid encoded toxin (Pet is a serine protease originally described in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC prototype strain 042 whose entire characterization was essentially obtained from studies performed with the purified toxin. Here we show that Pet is not exclusive to EAEC. Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains, isolated from diarrhea cases, express Pet and its detection in supernatants of infected HEp-2 cells coincides with the appearance of cell damage, which, in turn, were similar to those described with purified Pet. Pet secretion and the cytotoxic effects are time and culture medium dependent. In presence of DMEM supplemented with tryptone cell rounding and detachment were observed after just 5 h of incubation with the bacteria. In the absence of tryptone, the cytotoxic effects were detected only after 24 h of infection. We also show that, in addition to the prototype EAEC, other pet+ EAEC strains, also isolated from diarrhea cases, induce cellular damage in the same degree as the aEPEC. The cytotoxic effects of EAEC and aEPEC strains were significantly reduced in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor or anti-Pet IgG serum. Our results show a common aspect between the aEPEC and EAEC and provide the first evidence pointing to a role of Pet in aEPEC pathogenesis.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies on the parD-encoded protein Kid from Escherichia coli plasmid R1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hargreaves, D.; Giraldo, R.; Santos-Sierra, S.; Boelens, R.; Rice, D.W.; Díaz Orejas, R.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli and therefore bacterial proliferation relies upon the efficient functioning of the DnaB helicase. The toxin protein Kid from the plasmid-stability system parD encoded on plasmid R1 of E. coli is thought to target and block DnaB-dependent DNA replication. The

  15. Oligomerization mechanisms of an H-NS family protein, Pmr, encoded on the plasmid pCAR1 provide a molecular basis for functions of H-NS family members.

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    Suzuki, Chiho; Kawazuma, Kohei; Horita, Shoichiro; Terada, Tohru; Tanokura, Masaru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacterial H-NS-like proteins and Pseudomonas MvaT-like proteins share low homology at the amino acid sequence level, but both can function as xenogeneic silencers and are included in the H-NS family of proteins. H-NS family members have dimerization/oligomerization and DNA-binding domains connected by a flexible linker and form large nucleoprotein complexes using both domains. Pmr, an MvaT-like protein encoded on the IncP-7 carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1, is a key regulator of an interaction between pCAR1 and its host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. KT2440 has two transcribed genes that encode the MvaT-like proteins TurA and TurB. Our previous transcriptome analyses suggested that the functions of Pmr, TurA and TurB are non-equivalent, although the detailed underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the protein-protein interactions of Pmr, and assessed the homo-oligomerization capacity of various substituted and truncated Pmr derivatives by protein-protein cross-linking analysis. Six of the seven residues identified as important for homo-oligomerization in Pmr were located near the N-terminus, and the putative flexible linker or the region near that was not involved in homo-oligomerization, suggesting that Pmr homo-oligomerization is different from that of enterobacterial H-NS and that the functional mechanism differs between H-NS-like and MvaT-like proteins. In addition, we assessed homo- and hetero-oligomerization of Pmr by surface plasmon resonance analysis and found that the coupling ratio of TurB-Pmr oligomers is smaller than that of Pmr-Pmr or TurA-Pmr oligomers. These results raised the possibility that composition of the hetero-oligomers of Pmr, TurA, and TurB could explain why the different gene sets were affected by either pmr, turA, or turB disruption in our previous studies.

  16. Type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids are expressed from a unique promoter without affecting host motility, facilitating an exceptional phenotype that enhances conjugal plasmid transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold Piotr;

    2016-01-01

    of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded...

  17. Intramuscular electroporation of a P1A-encoding plasmid vaccine delays P815 mastocytoma growth.

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    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Uyttenhove, Catherine; De Plaen, Etienne; Van den Eynde, Benoît J; Préat, Véronique

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to construct DNA vaccines encoding the mouse P1A tumor antigen and to generate a protective immune response against the P815 mastocytoma, as a model for vaccines against human MAGE-type tumor antigens. DNA vaccines were constructed and delivered to mice by intramuscular electroporation before tumor challenge. Immunization with a plasmid coding for the full-length P1A significantly delayed tumor growth and mice survived at least 10 days longer than untreated controls. 10% of the mice completely rejected the P815 tumors while 50% of them showed a regression phase followed by tumor regrowth. Mice immunized by electroporation of a P1A(35-43) minigene-encoding plasmid failed to reject tumor and even delay tumor growth. The P1A(35-43)-encoding plasmid was modified and helper epitope sequences were inserted. However, these modified plasmids were not able to improve the response against P815 mastocytoma. Consistent with these results, a 12-fold higher CTL activity was observed when the plasmid coding for full-length P1A was delivered as compared to the plasmid encoding the P1A(35-43) epitope. Our results demonstrated that electroporation is an efficient method to deliver DNA vaccines against P815 and suggested the superiority of full-length as compared to minigene constructs for DNA vaccines.

  18. TEM-1-encoding small plasmids impose dissimilar fitness costs on Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

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    Søndergaard, Annette; Lund, Marianne; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Only two beta-lactamases, TEM-1 and ROB-1, have been observed in Haemophilus influenzae, while four different TEM but no ROB enzymes have been found in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the dissemination of small beta-lactamase-encoding plasmids in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae, we assessed the fitness cost of three TEM-1- (pPN223, pA1209, pA1606), one TEM-15- (pSF3) and one ROB-1-bearing (pB1000) plasmid when expressed in either bacterial species. All plasmids were stable in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae except pB1000, which showed on average (sample mean) 76% curing in H. parainfluenzae after 5  days of subculture. Competition assays between isogenic strains with and without plasmid showed no competitive disadvantage of pPN223 and pA1606 in H. influenzae, or of pA1209 in H. parainfluenzae. In contrast, pSF3 and pB1000 were associated with significant competitive disadvantages in both species. Some of the competitive disadvantages may be related to differences in plasmid copy number and mRNA expression of the beta-lactamase genes, as revealed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, plasmids encoding TEM beta-lactamases isolated from H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae can be stably transferred between species. The fast curing of pB1000 in H. parainfluenzae observed in this study correlates to the fact that ROB-1 has never been reported for this species. TEM-1-encoding plasmids are associated with the lowest level of fitness cost, but different TEM-1 plasmids confer different levels of fitness cost on the two hosts.

  19. The Plasmid-Encoded Regulator Activates Factors Conferring Lysozyme Resistance on Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains▿

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    Salinger, Nina; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced lysozyme resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the plasmid-encoded regulator, Per, and is mediated by factors outside the locus for enterocyte effacement. EspC, a Per-activated serine protease autotransporter protein, conferred enhanced resistance on nonpathogenic E. coli, and a second Per-regulated, espC-independent lysozyme resistance mechanism was identified. PMID:18997020

  20. The plasmid-encoded regulator activates factors conferring lysozyme resistance on enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

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    Salinger, Nina; Kokona, Bashkim; Fairman, Robert; Okeke, Iruka N

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced lysozyme resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli requires the plasmid-encoded regulator, Per, and is mediated by factors outside the locus for enterocyte effacement. EspC, a Per-activated serine protease autotransporter protein, conferred enhanced resistance on nonpathogenic E. coli, and a second Per-regulated, espC-independent lysozyme resistance mechanism was identified.

  1. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

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    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  2. Genetic and biochemical analyses of chromosome and plasmid gene homologues encoding ICL and ArCP domains in Vibrio anguillarum strain 775.

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    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel; Crosa, Jorge H

    2011-08-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775 is synthesized from 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), cysteine and hydroxyhistamine via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes encoding anguibactin biosynthetic proteins are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. In this work we report the identification of a homologue of the plasmid-encoded angB on the chromosome of strain 775. The product of both genes harbor an isochorismate lyase (ICL) domain that converts isochorismic acid to 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, one of the steps of DHBA synthesis. We show in this work that both ICL domains are functional in the production of DHBA in V. anguillarum as well as in E. coli. Substitution by alanine of the aspartic acid residue in the active site of both ICL domains completely abolishes their isochorismate lyase activity in vivo. The two proteins also carry an aryl carrier protein (ArCP) domain. In contrast with the ICL domains only the plasmid encoded ArCP can participate in anguibactin production as determined by complementation analyses and site-directed mutagenesis in the active site of the plasmid encoded protein, S248A. The site-directed mutants, D37A in the ICL domain and S248A in the ArCP domain of the plasmid encoded AngB were also tested in vitro and clearly show the importance of each residue for the domain function and that each domain operates independently.

  3. Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded by the IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1, is a key global regulator that alters host function.

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    Yun, Choong-Soo; Suzuki, Chiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Takeda, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yurika; Sai, Fumiya; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Shintani, Masaki; Nishida, Hiromi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family proteins are nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) conserved among many bacterial species. The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 is transmissible among various Pseudomonas strains and carries a gene encoding the H-NS family protein, Pmr. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a host of pCAR1, which harbors five genes encoding the H-NS family proteins PP_1366 (TurA), PP_3765 (TurB), PP_0017 (TurC), PP_3693 (TurD), and PP_2947 (TurE). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the presence of pCAR1 does not affect the transcription of these five genes and that only pmr, turA, and turB were primarily transcribed in KT2440(pCAR1). In vitro pull-down assays revealed that Pmr strongly interacted with itself and with TurA, TurB, and TurE. Transcriptome comparisons of the pmr disruptant, KT2440, and KT2440(pCAR1) strains indicated that pmr disruption had greater effects on the host transcriptome than did pCAR1 carriage. The transcriptional levels of some genes that increased with pCAR1 carriage, such as the mexEF-oprN efflux pump genes and parI, reverted with pmr disruption to levels in pCAR1-free KT2440. Transcriptional levels of putative horizontally acquired host genes were not altered by pCAR1 carriage but were altered by pmr disruption. Identification of genome-wide Pmr binding sites by ChAP-chip (chromatin affinity purification coupled with high-density tiling chip) analysis demonstrated that Pmr preferentially binds to horizontally acquired DNA regions. The Pmr binding sites overlapped well with the location of the genes differentially transcribed following pmr disruption on both the plasmid and the chromosome. Our findings indicate that Pmr is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on pCAR1 and the host chromosome.

  4. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China.

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    Sun, Fengjun; Yin, Zhe; Feng, Jiao; Qiu, Yefeng; Zhang, Defu; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, which harbor conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients, and their complete nucleotide sequences were determined. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for the carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of bla NDM in L. adecarboxylata and third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01, and p271A, whereas pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY bla NDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The bla NDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the NDM-1-encoding Tn125 prototype observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE) or its remnant indicates that MITE facilitates transposition and mobilization of bla NDM-1 gene contexts.

  5. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng eZhou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, harboring conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM with determination of complete nucleotide sequences, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of blaNDM in L. adecarboxylata and the third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01 and p271A, while pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY blaNDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The blaNDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the prototype NDM-1-encoding Tn125 as observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE or its remnant denotes MITE felicitates transposition and mobilization of blaNDM-1 gene contexts.

  6. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Iiyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage.

  7. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold; Basfeld, Alrun; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transmission of genetic material to a recipient that is not the progeny of the donor, is fundamental in bacterial evolution. HGT is often mediated by mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which may be in conflict with the chromosomal elements of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired an exceptional phenotype being able to both actively swim (planktonic behavior) and express biofilm associated fimbriae (sessile behavior). We show that this exceptional phenotype enhances the conjugal transfer of the plasmid. PMID:27627107

  8. Filamentous-haemagglutinin-like protein genes encoded on a plasmid of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Tsutomu; Sarataphan, Nopporn; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Takai, Shinji

    2006-11-26

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid, pMBO-1, from Moraxella bovis strain Epp63 was determined. We identified 30 open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by the 44,215bp molecule. Two large ORFs, flpA and flpB, encoding proteins with similarity to Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), were identified on the same plasmid. The gene for a specific accessory protein (Fap), which may play a role in the secretion of Flp protein, was also identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from M. bovis Epp63 indicated that the flpA, flpB, and fap genes are all transcribed. Southern blot analysis indicated that the flp and fap genes are present in other clinical isolates of geographically diverse M. bovis.

  9. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids

    OpenAIRE

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Jaana K.H. Bamford; Buckling, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple ant...

  10. A plasmid toolkit for cloning chimeric cDNAs encoding customized fusion proteins into any Gateway destination expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj, Raquel; Iglesias, Noa; Planas, Anna M; Santalucía, Tomàs

    2013-08-20

    Valuable clone collections encoding the complete ORFeomes for some model organisms have been constructed following the completion of their genome sequencing projects. These libraries are based on Gateway cloning technology, which facilitates the study of protein function by simplifying the subcloning of open reading frames (ORF) into any suitable destination vector. The expression of proteins of interest as fusions with functional modules is a frequent approach in their initial functional characterization. A limited number of Gateway destination expression vectors allow the construction of fusion proteins from ORFeome-derived sequences, but they are restricted to the possibilities offered by their inbuilt functional modules and their pre-defined model organism-specificity. Thus, the availability of cloning systems that overcome these limitations would be highly advantageous. We present a versatile cloning toolkit for constructing fully-customizable three-part fusion proteins based on the MultiSite Gateway cloning system. The fusion protein components are encoded in the three plasmids integral to the kit. These can recombine with any purposely-engineered destination vector that uses a heterologous promoter external to the Gateway cassette, leading to the in-frame cloning of an ORF of interest flanked by two functional modules. In contrast to previous systems, a third part becomes available for peptide-encoding as it no longer needs to contain a promoter, resulting in an increased number of possible fusion combinations. We have constructed the kit's component plasmids and demonstrate its functionality by providing proof-of-principle data on the expression of prototype fluorescent fusions in transiently-transfected cells. We have developed a toolkit for creating fusion proteins with customized N- and C-term modules from Gateway entry clones encoding ORFs of interest. Importantly, our method allows entry clones obtained from ORFeome collections to be used without prior

  11. Functional analysis of three plasmids from Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, R. van; Golic, N.; Bongers, R.; Leer, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Siezen, R.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 harbors three plasmids, pWCFS101, pWCFS102, and pWCFS103, with sizes of 1,917, 2,365, and 36,069 bp, respectively. The two smaller plasmids are of unknown function and contain replication genes that are likely to function via the rolling-circle replication mechanism. Th

  12. Evidence for plasmid-encoded virulence factors in the phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletzus, D; Bermphol, A; Dreier, J; Eichenlaub, R

    1993-01-01

    The tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382, which causes bacterial wilt, harbors two plasmids pCM1 (27.5 kb) and pCM2 (72 kb). After curing of the plasmids, bacterial derivatives were still proficient in the ability to colonize the host plant and in the production of exopolysaccharides but exhibited a reduced virulence. When one of the two plasmids is lost, there is a significant delay in the development of wilting symptoms after infection and a plasmid-free derivative is not able to induce disease symptoms. By cloning of restriction fragments of both plasmids in the plasmid-free strain CMM100, two DNA fragments which restored the virulent phenotype were identified. Further analysis suggested that a fragment of plasmid pCM1 encodes an endocellulase which is involved in the expression of the pathogenic phenotype. Images PMID:8458855

  13. Modulation of pPS10 Host Range by Plasmid-Encoded RepA Initiator Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M.; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Fernández-Tresguerres, Elena

    2003-01-01

    We report here the isolation and analysis of novel repA host range mutants of pPS10, a plasmid originally found in Pseudomonas savastanoi. Upon hydroxylamine treatment, five plasmid mutants were selected for their establishment in Escherichia coli at 37°C, a temperature at which the wild-type form cannot be established. The mutations were located in different functional regions of the plasmid RepA initiation protein, and the mutants differ in their stable maintenance, copy number, and ability to interact with sequences of the basic replicon. Four of them have broadened their host range, and one of them, unable to replicate in Pseudomonas, has therefore changed its host range. Moreover, the mutants also have increased their replication efficiency in strains other than E. coli such as Pseudomonas putida and Alcaligenes faecalis. None of these mutations drastically changed the structure or thermal stability of the wild-type RepA protein, but in all cases an enhanced interaction with host-encoded DnaA protein was detected by gel filtration chromatography. The effects of the mutations on the functionality of RepA protein are discussed in the framework of a three-dimensional model of the protein. We propose possible explanations for the host range effect of the different repA mutants, including the enhancement of limiting interactions of RepA with specific host replication factors such as DnaA. PMID:12562807

  14. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  15. Chromosomal and plasmid-encoded factors of Shigella flexneri induce secretogenic activity ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Faherty

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes millions of cases of watery or bloody diarrhea annually, resulting in significant global mortality. Watery diarrhea is thought to arise in the jejunum, and subsequent bloody diarrhea occurs as a result of invasion of the colonic epithelium. Previous literature has demonstrated that Shigella encodes enterotoxins, both chromosomally and on the 220 kilobase virulence plasmid. The ShigellaEnterotoxins 1 and 2 (ShET1 and ShET2 have been shown to increase water accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop model. In addition, these toxins increase the short circuit current in rabbit tissue mounted in Ussing chambers, which is a model for the ion exchange that occurs during watery diarrhea. In this study, we sought to validate the use of mouse jejunum in Ussing chamber as an alternative, more versatile model to study bacterial pathogenesis. In the process, we also identified enterotoxins in addition to ShET1 and ShET2 encoded by S. flexneri. Through analysis of proteins secreted from wildtype bacteria and various deletion mutants, we have identified four factors responsible for enterotoxin activity: ShET1 and Pic, which are encoded on the chromosome; ShET2 (encoded by sen or ospD3, which requires the type-III secretion system for secretion; and SepA, an additional factor encoded on the virulence plasmid. The use of mouse jejunum serves as a reliable and reproducible model to identify the enterotoxins elaborated by enteric bacteria. Moreover, the identification of all Shigella proteins responsible for enterotoxin activity is vital to our understanding of Shigella pathogenicity and to our success in developing safe and effective vaccine candidates.

  16. Vaccination with Trypomastigote Surface Antigen 1-Encoding Plasmid DNA Confers Protection against Lethal Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    DNA vaccination was evaluated with the experimental murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection as a means to induce antiparasite protective immunity, and the trypomastigote surface antigen 1 (TSA-1), a target of anti-T. cruzi antibody and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, was used as the model antigen. Following the intramuscular immunization of H-2b and H-2d mice with a plasmid DNA encoding an N-terminally truncated TSA-1 ...

  17. Molecular analysis of the F plasmid traVR region: traV encodes a lipoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Doran, T J; Loh, S M; Firth, N; Skurray, R A

    1994-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the conjugative F plasmid transfer region genes, traV and traR, have been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of TraV indicated that it may be a lipoprotein; this was confirmed by examining the effect of globomycin on traV-encoded polypeptides synthesized in minicells. An open reading frame that may represent a previously undetected transfer gene, now designated trbG, was identified immediately upstream of traV. The deduced product of traR was found to shar...

  18. Degradation of 4-nitrocatechol by Burkholderia cepacia: a plasmid-encoded novel pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A; Samanta, S K; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia RKJ200 (now described as Burkholderia cepacia) has been shown to utilize p-nitrophenol (PNP) as sole carbon and energy source. The present work demonstrates that RKJ200 utilizes 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, and is degraded with concomitant release of nitrite ions. Several lines of evidence, including thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, spectral analyses and quantification of intermediates by high performance liquid chromatography, have shown that NC is degraded via 1,2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) formation. Studies carried out on a PNP- derivative and a PNP+ transconjugant also demonstrate that the genes for the NC degradative pathway reside on the plasmid present in RKJ200; the same plasmid had earlier been shown to encode genes for PNP degradation, which is also degraded via HQ formation. It is likely, therefore, that the same sets of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in NC and PNP degradation.

  19. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  20. Characterization of the plasmid encoded virulence region pat-1 of phytopathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, J; Meletzus, D; Eichenlaub, R

    1997-03-01

    The tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382, causing bacterial wilt and canker, harbors two plasmids, pCM1 (27.5 kb) and pCM2 (72 kb), carrying genes involved in virulence. The region of plasmid pCM2 encoding the pathogenicity locus pat-1 was mapped by deletion analysis and complementation studies to a 1.5-kb Bg/II/SmaI DNA fragment. Introduction of the pat-1 region into endophytic, plasmid-free isolates of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis converted these bacteria into virulent pathogens. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the pat-1 region, an open reading frame (ORF1) can be predicted, coding for a protein of 280 amino acids and 29.7 kDa with homology to serine proteases. Introduction of a frame-shift mutation in ORF1 leads to a loss of the pathogenic phenotype. Northern (RNA) hybridizations identified an 1.5-knt transcript of the pat-1 structural gene. The site of transcription initiation was mapped by primer extension and a typical -10/-35 region was located with significant homology to the consensus Escherichia coli sigma 70 and Bacillus subtilis sigma 43 promoters. Downstream of the pat-1 structural gene, a peculiar repetitive sequence motif (pat-1rep) is located, consisting of 20 direct tandem repeats preceded by a run of 14 guanosine residues. DNA sequences homologous to pat-1rep were isolated and characterized from four virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains exhibiting a high extent of structural conservation. The deletion of this repetitive sequence reduced virulence significantly but did not lead to a complete loss of the virulence phenotype.

  1. Plasmid-encoded degradation of p-nitrophenol and 4-nitrocatechol by Arthrobacter protophormiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A; Chakraborti, A K; Jain, R K

    2000-04-21

    Arthrobacter protophormiae strain RKJ100 is capable of utilizing p-nitrophenol (PNP) as well as 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy. The degradation of PNP and NC by this microorganism takes place through an oxidative route, as stoichiometry of nitrite molecules was observed when the strain was grown on PNP or NC as sole carbon and energy sources. The degradative pathways of PNP and NC were elucidated on the basis of enzyme assays and chemical characterization of the intermediates by TLC, GC, (1)H NMR, GC-MS, UV spectroscopy, and HPLC analyses. Our studies clearly indicate that the degradation of PNP proceeds with the formation of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ) and is further degraded via the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Degradation of NC involved initial oxidation to generate 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) and 2-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone; the latter intermediate is then reductively dehydroxylated, forming BQ and HQ, and is further cleaved via beta-ketoadipate to TCA intermediates. It is likely, therefore, that the same set of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in PNP and NC degradation. A plasmid of approximately 65 kb was found to be responsible for harboring genes for PNP and NC degradation in this strain. This was based on the fact that PNP(-) NC(-) derivatives were devoid of the plasmid and had simultaneously lost their capability to grow at the expense of these nitroaromatic compounds.

  2. Plasmid-Encoded asp Operon Confers a Proton Motive Metabolic Cycle Catalyzed by an Aspartate-Alanine Exchange Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I.; Maloney, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of l-alanine and CO2. This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon i...

  3. Molecular analysis of the F plasmid traVR region: traV encodes a lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, T J; Loh, S M; Firth, N; Skurray, R A

    1994-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the conjugative F plasmid transfer region genes, traV and traR, have been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of TraV indicated that it may be a lipoprotein; this was confirmed by examining the effect of globomycin on traV-encoded polypeptides synthesized in minicells. An open reading frame that may represent a previously undetected transfer gene, now designated trbG, was identified immediately upstream of traV. The deduced product of traR was found to share amino acid similarity with proteins from the bacteriophages 186 and P2 and with the dosage-dependent dnaK suppressor DksA.

  4. Vaccination with trypomastigote surface antigen 1-encoding plasmid DNA confers protection against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizel, B; Garg, N; Tarleton, R L

    1998-11-01

    DNA vaccination was evaluated with the experimental murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection as a means to induce antiparasite protective immunity, and the trypomastigote surface antigen 1 (TSA-1), a target of anti-T. cruzi antibody and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses, was used as the model antigen. Following the intramuscular immunization of H-2(b) and H-2(d) mice with a plasmid DNA encoding an N-terminally truncated TSA-1 lacking or containing the C-terminal nonapeptide tandem repeats, the antibody level, CTL response, and protection against challenge with T. cruzi were assessed. In H-2(b) mice, antiparasite antibodies were induced only by immunization with the DNA construct encoding TSA-1 containing the C-terminal repeats. However, both DNA constructs were efficient in eliciting long-lasting CTL responses against the protective H-2Kb-restricted TSA-1515-522 epitope. In H-2(d) mice, inoculation with either of the two TSA-1-expressing vectors effectively generated antiparasite antibodies and primed CTLs that lysed T. cruzi-infected cells in an antigen-specific, MHC class I-restricted, and CD8(+)-T-cell-dependent manner. When TSA-1 DNA-vaccinated animals were challenged with T. cruzi, 14 of 22 (64%) H-2(b) and 16 of 18 (89%) H-2(d) mice survived the infection. The ability to induce significant murine anti-T. cruzi protective immunity by immunization with plasmid DNA expressing TSA-1 provides the basis for the application of this technology in the design of optimal DNA multicomponent anti-T. cruzi vaccines which may ultimately be used for the prevention or treatment of Chagas' disease.

  5. BHT-3009, a myelin basic protein-encoding plasmid for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Fiol, Marcela

    2009-08-01

    Even though the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains largely unknown, research data support the hypothesis that autoimmunity plays a major role in disease development. Several disease-modifying agents have been approved for the treatment of MS; however, there is still a need for antigen-specific treatments that combine efficacy and safety. DNA vaccination represents a new therapeutic alternative in this respect. Preclinical studies in different models of autoimmunity have demonstrated that injection of plasmid DNA encoding a self-antigen in mice restores self-tolerance, leaving immunity against infectious and tumor antigens intact. Based on this evidence, the first DNA vaccine for MS has been created. Bayhill Therapeutic Inc's BHT-3009 encodes full-length, human myelin basic protein (MBP), and has recently been evaluated in a phase I/II and a phase II clinical trial. BHT-3009 was safe and well tolerated in both trials, inducing immune tolerance that extended beyond MBP to other myelin antigens. In addition, a reduction in the number of active lesions was observed, which was accompanied by a decrease in clinical relapse rates, particularly in patients with high immunological activity at baseline. BHT-3009 appears to be a promising new approach for the treatment of MS, although further clinical trials are warranted to confirm the early findings.

  6. The Lcn972 Bacteriocin-Encoding Plasmid pBL1 Impairs Cellobiose Metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campelo, Ana B.; Gaspar, Paula; Roces, Clara; Rodriguez, Ana; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Neves, Ana Rute; Martinez, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    pBL1 is a Lactococcus lactis theta-replicating 10.9-kbp plasmid that encodes the synthetic machinery of the bacteriocin Lcn972. In this work, the transcriptomes of exponentially growing L. lactis strains with and without pBL1 were compared. A discrete response was observed, with a total of 10 genes

  7. Effects of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding human tumstatin gene on endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-pei; XU Chun-xiao; HOU Guo-sheng; XIN Jia-xuan; WANG Wei; LIU Xian-xi

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumstatin is a novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor which is widely studied using purified protein.The current study evaluates the antiangiogenic effects of tumstatin-overexpression plasmid in vitro, reveals the mechanism underlying the vascular endothelial cell growth inhibition and searches for a novel method administering tumstatin persistently.Methods The eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA-tumstatin encoding tumstatin gene was constructed and transfected to human umbilical vein endothelial cell ECV304 and human renal carcinoma cell ACHN.Expression of tumstatin in the two cell lines was determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Vascular endothelial cell proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry.To investigate the mechanism by which pcDNA-tumstatin inhibited vascular endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, cyclin D1 protein was detected by Western blotting.Results DNA sequence confirmed that pcDNA-tumstatin was successfully constructed.RT-PCR and Western blotting indicated that tumstatin could express in the two cell lines effectively.After tumstatin gene transfer, ECV304 cell growth was significantly inhibited and the cell cycle was arrested in G1 phase.And Western blotting showed that pcDNA-tumstatin decreased the level of cyclin D1 protein.Conclusions Overexpression of tumstatin mediated by pcDNA 3.1 (+) specially inhibited vascular endothelial cells by arresting vascular endothelial cell in G1 phase resulting from downregulation of cyclin D1 and administration of tumstatin using a gene therapy might be a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  8. Presence of Glycopeptide-Encoding Plasmids in Enterococcal Isolates from Food and Humans in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migura, Lourdes Garcia; Valenzuela, Antonio Jesus Sanchez; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2011-01-01

    developed techniques for classification of plasmids. Replicons associated with sex pheromone-inducible plasmids were detected in all GR E. faecalis, whereas GR Enterococcus faecium contained plasmids known to be widely distributed among enterococci. vanA resistance is common in E. faecium isolates from meat...... and animals in Europe and is rarely found in E. faecalis. This article describes the first characterization of MGE from vanA mediated E. faecalis, thus linking this resistance genotype to pheromone responding plasmids....

  9. Conservation of Plasmid-Encoded Traits among Bean-Nodulating Rhizobium Species

    OpenAIRE

    Brom, Susana; Girard, Lourdes; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Sanjuan-Pinilla, Julio M.; Olivares, José; Sanjuan, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Rhizobium etli type strain CFN42 contains six plasmids. We analyzed the distribution of genetic markers from some of these plasmids in bean-nodulating strains belonging to different species (Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium fredii). Our results indicate that independent of geographic origin, R. etli strains usually share not only the pSym plasmid but also other plasmids containing symbiosis-related genes, with a similar organi...

  10. Isolation of a minireplicon of the plasmid pG6303 of Lactobacillus plantarum G63 and characterization of the plasmid-encoded Rep replication protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Fan; Xuedong Xi; Yan Huang; Zhongli Cui

    2015-06-01

    A cryptic 10.0-kb plasmid pG6303 from a multiplasmid-containing Lactobacillus plantarum G63 was studied. The analysis of replicon was facilitated by the construction of shuttle vectors and electrotransformation into L. plantarum. The pG6303 replicon included (i) an open reading frame encoding the putative Rep replication initiation protein; and (ii) the putative origin of replication. The Rep protein was expressed as a fusion with the hexa-histidine (His) at its C-terminal end and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The electrophoretic mobility shift assays in pG6303 showed that the purified Rep protein specifically bound from 5582 to 5945 bp, differing from the putative origin of replication of pG6303. We speculate that pG6303 replication is a new mode of plasmid replication.

  11. pEVL: A Linear Plasmid for Generating mRNA IVT Templates With Extended Encoded Poly(A Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E Grier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for large-scale synthesis of in vitro transcribed (IVT mRNA is being driven by the increasing use of mRNA for transient gene expression in cell engineering and therapeutic applications. An important determinant of IVT mRNA potency is the 3′ polyadenosine (poly(A tail, the length of which correlates with translational efficiency. However, present methods for generation of IVT mRNA rely on templates derived from circular plasmids or PCR products, in which homopolymeric tracts are unstable, thus limiting encoded poly(A tail lengths to ≃120 base pairs (bp. Here, we have developed a novel method for generation of extended poly(A tracts using a previously described linear plasmid system, pJazz. We find that linear plasmids can successfully propagate poly(A tracts up to ≃500 bp in length for IVT mRNA production. We then modified pJazz by removing extraneous restriction sites, adding a T7 promoter sequence upstream from an extended multiple cloning site, and adding a unique type-IIS restriction site downstream from the encoded poly(A tract to facilitate generation of IVT mRNA with precisely defined encoded poly(A tracts and 3′ termini. The resulting plasmid, designated pEVL, can be used to generate IVT mRNA with consistent defined lengths and terminal residue(s.

  12. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (ptransfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy.

  13. A detailed kinetic study of Mox-1, a plasmid-encoded class C beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Jimena; Bauvois, Cedric; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Galleni, Moreno; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Ito, Masahiko; Frere, Jean-Marie; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2003-08-29

    Surveys of beta-lactamases in different parts of the world show an important increase in class C beta-lactamases, thus the study of these enzymes is becoming an important issue. We created an overproduction system for Mox-1, a plasmid class C beta-lactamase, by cloning the gene encoding this enzyme, and placing it under the control of a T7 promoter, using vector pET 28a. The enzyme, purified by ion exchange chromatography, was used to obtain the molecular mass (38246), the N-terminal sequence (GEASPVDPLRPVV), and pI (8.9), and to perform a detailed kinetic study. Cephalotin was used as reporter substrate in the case of poor substrates. The kinetic study showed that benzylpenicillin, cephalotin, cefcapene and moxalactam were good substrates for Mox-1 (k(cat)/K(m) values >2.5 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). On the other hand, ceftazidime and cefepime were poor substrates for this enzyme (K(m) values >200 microM). Clavulanic acid had no inhibitory effect on Mox-1 (K(m)=30.2 mM), however aztreonam behaved as an inhibitor of Mox-1 (K(i)=2.85 microM).

  14. Preparation and characterization of chitosan/β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles containing plasmid DNA encoding interleukin-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahaei, M; Valizadeh, H; Baradaran, B; Nahaei, M R; Asgari, D; Hallaj-Nezhadi, S; Dastmalchi, S; Lotfipour, F

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) as a cytokine has been proved to possess antitumor effects via stimulating the immune system. Non-viral gene delivery systems offer several advantages, including easiness in production, low cost, safety; low immunogenicity and can carry higher amounts of genetic material without limitation on their sizes.pUMVC3-hIL12 loaded Low Molecular Weight chitosan/β-cyclodextrin (LMW CS/CD) nanoparticles were prepared using ionotropic gelation method and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, morphology, loading efficiency and cytotoxicity against the CT-26 colon carcinoma cell line.All prepared particles were spherical in shape and nano-sized (171.3±2.165 nm, PdI: 0.231±0.014) and exhibited a positive zeta potential (34.3±1.55). The nanoparticles demonstrated good DNA encapsulation efficiencies (83.315%±2.067). Prepared pUMVC3-hIL12 loaded LMW CS/CD nanoparticles showed no cell toxicity in murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells. At the concentration of 0.1 µg/ml of nanoparticles, the transfection ability was obviously higher than that of the naked DNA.LMW CS/CD-plasmid DNA nanoparticles encoding IL-12 prepared using ionotropic gelation method with no toxic effect on the tested cells can be considered as a basis for further gene delivery studies both in vitro and in vivo to enhance the expression of IL-12.

  15. Antirestriction protein Ard (Type C) encoded by IncW plasmid pSa has a high similarity to the "protein transport" domain of TraC1 primase of promiscuous plasmid RP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogurov, A A; Delver, E P; Agafonova, O V; Belogurova, N G; Lee, L Y; Kado, C I

    2000-03-03

    The IncW plasmid pSa contains the gene ard encoding an antirestriction function that is specific for type I restriction and modification systems. The nucleotide sequence of ard was determined and an appropriate polypeptide of about 33 kDa was identified in Escherichia coli T7 expression system. Analysis of deduced amino acid sequence of Ard encoded by pSa revealed that this protein has no significant similarities with the known Ard proteins (ArdA and ArdB types) except the "antirestriction" motif (14 amino acid residues in length) conserved for all known Ard proteins. This finding suggests that pSa Ard may be classified as a new type of Ard proteins which we designated ArdC. The remarkable feature of ArdC is that it has a high degree of similarity (about 38 % identity) to the N-terminal region of RP4 TraC1 primase which includes about 300 amino acid residues and seems to be essential for binding to the single-stranded DNA and TraC1 protein transport to the recipient cells during the conjugal transfer of plasmid DNA. ArdC also binds to single-stranded DNA. In addition, this protein is able in vitro to protect the single-stranded but not double-stranded plasmid DNA against the activity of type II restriction endonuclease HhaI that cleaves both single and double-stranded DNA. We suggest that like TraC1, ArdC would be transported as a result of their interaction with the single-stranded DNA of transferred plasmid strand during conjugative passage through the cell envelope to the recipient bacterium. Such properties of ArdC protein might be useful to protect immediately the incoming single-stranded DNA from the host endonucleases.

  16. Characterization of plasmids that encode streptomycin-resistance in bacterial epiphytes of apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T C; Burr, T J

    1999-05-01

    Streptomycin resistance in strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, Pantoea agglomerans and a yellow-pigmented, non-fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. (Py), isolated from apple orchards in New York and Washington states, is predominantly associated with strA-strB genes carried on conjugal plasmids (R plasmids). None of 128 resistant Erwinia amylovora strains from the eastern and western USA hybridized with a strA-strB probe, SMP3. Resistant Py strains transfered R plasmids to Ps. syringae pv. papulans and to Py in vitro at frequencies of 10(-1)-10(-2) per recipient cell whereas Ps. syringae pv. papulans transferred its plasmids at frequencies of 10(-2) to below detectable levels. Transfer of R plasmids to P. agglomerans was not detected and resistant P. agglomerans did not transfer their R plasmids to any recipients. R plasmids were found to be highly diverse as measured by DNA fingerprint analysis. Transfer-deficient transposon mutants of R plasmid pCPP519 were generated, and 3.9 kb EcoRI and 3.0 kb SmaI fragments that hybridized with a Tn5 probe were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences of the 3.9 kb fragment were similar to proteins involved in replication, nicking at oriT, and piliation in other bacteria.

  17. Stability of the Encoding Plasmids and Surface Expression of CS6 Differs in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Encoding Different Heat-Stable (ST) Enterotoxins (STh and STp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Von Mentzer, Astrid; Loayza Frykberg, Patricia; Aslett, Martin; Page, Andrew J; Sjöling, Åsa; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), one of the most common reasons of diarrhea among infants and children in developing countries, causes disease by expression of either or both of the enterotoxins heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST; divided into human-type [STh] and porcine-type [STp] variants), and colonization factors (CFs) among which CS6 is one of the most prevalent ETEC CFs. In this study we show that ETEC isolates expressing CS6+STh have higher copy numbers of the cssABCD operon encoding CS6 than those expressing CS6+STp. Long term cultivation of up to ten over-night passages of ETEC isolates harboring CS6+STh (n = 10) or CS6+STp (n = 15) showed instability of phenotypic expression of CS6 in a majority of the CS6+STp isolates, whereas most of the CS6+STh isolates retained CS6 expression. The observed instability was a correlated with loss of genes cssA and cssD as examined by PCR. Mobilization of the CS6 plasmid from an unstable CS6+STp isolate into a laboratory E. coli strain resulted in loss of the plasmid after a single over-night passage whereas the plasmid from an CS6+STh strain was retained in the laboratory strain during 10 passages. A sequence comparison between the CS6 plasmids from a stable and an unstable ETEC isolate revealed that genes necessary for plasmid stabilization, for example pemI, pemK, stbA, stbB and parM, were not present in the unstable ETEC isolate. Our results indicate that stable retention of CS6 may in part be affected by the stability of the plasmid on which both CS6 and STp or STh are located.

  18. Synthesis of lactococcin 972, a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis IPLA 972, depends on the expression of a plasmid-encoded bicistronic operon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, B.; Fernández, M.; Suárez, J.E.; Rodríguez, A.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of lactococcin 972 is plasmid-encoded. An operon composed of two genes that encode pre-bacteriocin and a putative immunity protein has been identified. The first gene encodes a 91-residue polypeptide that is exported via a sec-dependent system to give the mature 66-aa bacteriocin. The immu

  19. Synthesis of lactococcin 972, a bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis IPLA 972, depends on the expression of a plasmid-encoded bicistronic operon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, B.; Fernández, M.; Suárez, J.E.; Rodríguez, A.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of lactococcin 972 is plasmid-encoded. An operon composed of two genes that encode pre-bacteriocin and a putative immunity protein has been identified. The first gene encodes a 91-residue polypeptide that is exported via a sec-dependent system to give the mature 66-aa bacteriocin. The immu

  20. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Xylella fastidiosa Is Dependent on tra and trb Operon Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Christopher R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative type IV secretion system, are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strain M23 (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) or Dixon (X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad-host-range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen worldwide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. The emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host switching of existing strains, is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time, compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT, adaptation, and disease emergence

  1. Conjugative plasmid transfer in Xylella fastidiosa is dependent on tra and trb operon functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Van Horn, Christopher R

    2017-08-14

    The insect-transmitted plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa is capable of efficient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination. Natural transformation occurs at high rates in X. fastidiosa, but there also is evidence that certain strains of X. fastidiosa carry native plasmids equipped with transfer and mobilization genes, suggesting conjugation as an additional mechanism of HGT in some instances. Two operons, tra and trb, putatively encoding a conjugative Type IV secretion system are found in some but not all X. fastidiosa isolates, often on native plasmids. X. fastidiosa strains that carry the conjugative transfer genes can belong to different subspecies, and frequently differ in host ranges. Using X. fastidiosa strains M23 (subspecies fastidiosa) or Dixon (subspecies multiplex) as the donor strain and Temecula (subspecies fastidiosa) as the recipient strain, plasmid transfer was characterized using the mobilizable broad host range vector pBBR5pemIK. Transfer of plasmid pBBR5pemIK was observed under in vitro conditions with both donor strains, and was dependent on both tra and trb operon functions. A conjugative mechanism likely contributes to gene transfer between diverse strains of X. fastidiosa, possibly facilitating adaptation to new environments or different hosts.IMPORTANCEXylella fastidiosa is an important plant pathogen world-wide, infecting a wide range of different plant species. Emergence of new diseases caused by X. fastidiosa, or host-switching of existing strains is thought to be primarily due to the high frequency of HGT and recombination in this pathogen. Transfer of plasmids by a conjugative mechanism enables movement of larger amounts of genetic material at one time compared with other routes of gene transfer such as natural transformation. Establishing the prevalence and functionality of this mechanism in X. fastidiosa contributes to a better understanding of HGT and adaptation, and disease emergence in this diverse pathogen. This is a work

  2. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hargrave

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (p<0.03, 40 Volts (p<0.05, and 90 Volts (p<0.05, but not with 60 Volts (p<0.09 while maintaining a pulse width of 20 milliseconds. The group with gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy.

  3. A mutational analysis of the ColE1-encoded cell cycle regulator Rcd confirms its role in plasmid stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balding, Claire; Blaby, Ian; Summers, David

    2006-07-01

    Multimers of multicopy plasmids cause instability. They arise by homologous recombination and accumulate by over-replication in a process known as the dimer catastrophe. Dimers are resolved to monomers by site-specific recombination systems such as Xer-cer of plasmid ColE1. In addition, the Rcd checkpoint hypothesis proposes that a short transcript (Rcd) coded within ColE1 cer delays the division of multimer-containing cells. The crucial observation underpinning the checkpoint hypothesis is that when the Rcd promoter (P(cer)) is inactivated by mutation of its invariant T, the plasmid becomes unstable. Recently, we discovered that this mutation also alters a potential Fis binding site in cer. ColE1-like plasmids are less stable in fis mutant hosts and it is conceivable that instability caused by the mutation is due to altered Fis binding, rather than the loss of Rcd expression per se. We have therefore undertaken an independent test of the role of P(cer)-Rcd in multicopy plasmid stability. We have generated a series of loss-of-function mutants of Rcd and detailed analysis of two of these shows that they cause a level of instability indistinguishable from P(cer) inactivation. This result is consistent with the predictions of the checkpoint hypothesis and confirms the role of Rcd in plasmid stability.

  4. Fasciation induction by the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians depends upon a linear plasmid encoding a cytokinin synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M; Messens, E; Caplan, A B; van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1992-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a nocardiform bacteria that induces leafy galls (fasciation) on dicotyledonous and several monocotyledonous plants. The wild-type strain D188 contained a conjugative, 200 kb linear extrachromosomal element, pFiD188. Linear plasmid-cured strains were avirulent and reintroduction of this linear element restored virulence. Pulsed field electrophoresis indicated that the chromosome might also be a linear molecule of 4 megabases. Three loci involved in phytopathogenicity have been identified by insertion mutagenesis of this Fi plasmid. Inactivation of the fas locus resulted in avirulent strains, whereas insertions in the two other loci affected the degree of virulence, yielding attenuated (att) and hypervirulent (hyp) bacteria. One of the genes within the fas locus encoded an isopentenyltranferase (IPT) with low homology to analogous proteins from Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. IPT activity was detected after expression of this protein in Escherichia coli cells. In R.fascians, ipt expression could only be detected in bacteria induced with extracts from fasciated tissue. R.fascians strains without the linear plasmid but containing this fas locus alone could not provoke any phenotype on plants, indicating additional genes from the linear plasmid were also essential for virulence. These studies, the first genetic analysis of the interaction of a Gram-positive bacterium with plants, suggest that a novel mechanism for plant tumour induction has evolved in R.fascians independently from the other branches of the eubacteria. Images PMID:1547783

  5. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells by simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lough John W

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lentiviruses to reprogram human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells could limit their therapeutic usefulness due to the integration of viral DNA sequences into the genome of the recipient cell. Recent work has demonstrated that human iPS cells can be generated using episomal plasmids, excisable transposons, adeno or sendai viruses, mRNA, or recombinant proteins. While these approaches offer an advance, the protocols have some drawbacks. Commonly the procedures require either subcloning to identify human iPS cells that are free of exogenous DNA, a knowledge of virology and safe handling procedures, or a detailed understanding of protein biochemistry. Results Here we report a simple approach that facilitates the reprogramming of human somatic cells using standard techniques to transfect expression plasmids that encode OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, and LIN28 without the need for episomal stability or selection. The resulting human iPS cells are free of DNA integration, express pluripotent markers, and form teratomas in immunodeficient animals. These iPS cells were also able to undergo directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like and cardiac myocyte-like cells in culture. Conclusions Simple transient transfection of plasmid DNA encoding reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate human iPS cells from primary fibroblasts that are free of exogenous DNA integrations. This approach is highly accessible and could expand the use of iPS cells in the study of human disease and development.

  6. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Singer, Randall S; Johnson, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2) gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2) plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  7. Hypersensitive Response of Plasmid-Encoded AHL Synthase Gene to Lifestyle and Nutrient by Ensifer adhaerens X097

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Zeng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that some bacteria, especially members of the family Rhizobiaceae, have multiple N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL synthase genes and produce multiple AHL signals. However, how bacteria selectively utilize these multiple genes and signals to cope with changing environments is poorly understood. Ensifer adhaerens is an important microorganism in terms of biotechnology, ecology and evolutionary. In this study, we investigated the AHL-based QS system of E. adhaerens X097 and its response to different lifestyles or nutrients. Draft genome sequence data indicated that X097 harbored three distinct AHL synthase genes (ensI1, 2, 3 and seven luxR homologs, which was different from other E. adhaerens strains. In vitro expression indicated that plasmid-encoded ensI1 and ensI2 directed production of multiple AHLs, while chromosome-encoded ensI3 only directed production of C14-HSL. Predicted three dimensional structure of EnsI3 was quite different from that of EnsI1 and EnsI2. X097 produced different AHL profiles in Luria-Bertani (LB and NFB medium, under biofilm and planktonic lifestyle, respectively. Notably, expression of ensI1 and ensI2 but not ensI3 is hypersensitive to different lifestyles and nutrients. The hypersensitive response of plasmid-encoded AHL synthase genes to different culture conditions may shed a light on the phylogenetic development of AHL synthase genes in Rhizobiaceae family.

  8. Plasmid-encoded asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle catalyzed by an aspartate-alanine exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Maloney, Peter C

    2002-06-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of L-alanine and CO(2). This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter --> aspD --> aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high.

  9. NahY, a Catabolic Plasmid-Encoded Receptor Required for Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida to the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Naphthalene

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida G7 exhibits chemotaxis to naphthalene, but the molecular basis for this was not known. A new gene, nahY, was found to be cotranscribed with meta cleavage pathway genes on the NAH7 catabolic plasmid for naphthalene degradation. The nahY gene encodes a 538-amino-acid protein with a membrane topology and a C-terminal region that resemble those of chemotaxis transducer proteins. A P. putida G7 nahY mutant grew on naphthalene but was not chemotactic to this aromatic hydrocarbon....

  10. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. bla KPC-2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-bla KPC-2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. bla KPC-2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core -35/-10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. bla CTX-M-55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-bla CTX-M-55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. bla CTX-M-55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core -35/-10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of bla KPC and bla CTX-M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids.

  11. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. blaKPC−2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-blaKPC−2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. blaKPC−2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core −35/−10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. blaCTX−M−55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-blaCTX−M−55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. blaCTX−M−55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core −35/−10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of blaKPC and blaCTX−M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids. PMID:26347725

  12. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM, respectively. blaKPC-2 is captured by a Tn1721-based unit transposon with a linear structure ΔTn3-ISKpn27-blaKPC-2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1721, and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. blaKPC-2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region, respectively, which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core -35/-10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT, respectively. blaCTX-M-55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. blaCTX-M-55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region, corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core -35/-10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of blaKPC and blaCTX-M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times, but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisted bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids.

  13. Identification of two vicinal operons for the degradation of 2-aminobenzenesulfonate encoded on plasmid pSAH in Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Jürgen; Smits, Theo H M; Cook, Alasdair M; Schleheck, David

    2010-05-30

    Alcaligenes sp. strain O-1 inducibly deaminates 2-aminobenzenesulfonate (ABS) via dioxygenation to 3-sulfocatechol, which is desulfonated during meta ring-cleavage to yield 2-hydroxymuconate. This intermediate is transformed through the oxalocrotonate-branch of the sulfocatechol meta-pathway (Scm). The complete pathway is encoded on the 180-kb plasmid pSAH, 20kb of which was sequenced. Twenty open reading frames (ORFs) were detected. Two clusters (abs and scm) with degradative genes were surrounded by several transposon-related ORFs. The six genes of the abs cluster were shown to be co-transcribed, and contained the genes for two characterised subunits of the oxygenase component of the ABS-dioxygenase system, and genes putatively encoding ABS-transport functions with similarities to (a) an ABC-type transporter system and (b) a putative major facilitator superfamily transporter. No gene encoding the reductase for the oxygenase system was present in the abs gene cluster, but a candidate gene was found in the scm cluster. The seven-gene scm cluster was also transcribed as single polycistronic message. Functions could be attributed to the gene products, but one enzyme, which was shown to be present, 2-hydroxymuconate isomerase, was not encoded in the scm cluster. No transcriptional regulator was found. This genetic information on the degradation of ABS in strain O-1 provides another example of both split operons and dispersed pathway genes.

  14. PROTECTION AGAINST LEPTOSPIROSIS BY IMMUNIZATION WITH PLASMID DNA ENCODING 33 kDa ENDOFLAGELLIN OF L.INTERROGANS SEROVAR LAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate how the efficacy of DNA inocutation affects the ability to raise protective immunity against Leptospira.Methods. A pair of oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify the endoflagellar gene of L. interrogans sensu stricto serovar lai. An approximately 840bp fragment was generated with PCR and inserted into VR1012, a plasmid DNA expression vector, after the fragment and VR1012 were digested respectively with EcoRV and Sal I. A recombinant plasmid designated as VR1012+flaB2 was obtained. The vector, VR1012 consits of a pUC18 backbone with the cytomegalovirus(CMV) IE1 enhancer, promoter, and intron A, transcription regulatory elements and the BGH polyadenylation sequences driving the expressing of leptospiral endoflagellar gene of L. interrogans sensu stricto serovar lai. Plasmid encoding leptospiral endoflagellin gene was injected into quadriceps of NZW rabbits.Results.This resulted in the generation of specific leptospiral antibody with high ELISA titer (1:32768) in the rabbits. Immuno/protection was performed in guinea pigs without adjuvant. The group"VR1012+flaB2" showed higher survival rate(90%,9/10 animals),compared with the group "VR1012 lack flaB2" and the group "normal saline".Conclusion.The technique of DNA vaccine has potential advantages over certain other vaccine preparation technologies. However whether DNA vaccine will be useful for vaccine development remains to be tested.

  15. THE ENDOGENOUS BACILLUS-SUBTILIS (NATTO) PLASMIDS PTA1015 AND PTA1040 CONTAIN SIGNAL PEPTIDASE-ENCODING GENES - IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW STRUCTURAL MODULE ON CRYPTIC PLASMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJER, WJJ; DEJONG, A; BEA, G; WISMAN, A; TJALSMA, H; VENEMA, G; BRON, S; MAARTEN, J; VANDIJL, JM

    Various strains of Bacillus subtilis (natto) contain small cryptic plasmids that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. Like plasmids from other Gram-positive bacteria, these plasmids are composed of several distinct structural modules. A new structural module was identified on the B. subtilis

  16. Transcriptome Reprogramming by Plasmid-Encoded Transcriptional Regulators Is Required for Host Niche Adaption of a Macrophage Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Wang, Xiaoguang; Oliver, Jenna; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, relying on the presence of a conjugative virulence plasmid harboring a 21-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) for growth in host macrophages. The PAI encodes a family of 6 virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) in addition to 20 other proteins. The contribution of these to virulence has remained unclear. We show that the presence of only 3 virulence plasmid genes (of 73 in total) is required and sufficient for intracellular growth. These include a single vap family member, vapA, and two PAI-located transcriptional regulators, virR and virS. Both transcriptional regulators are essential for wild-type-level expression of vapA, yet vapA expression alone is not sufficient to allow intracellular growth. A whole-genome microarray analysis revealed that VirR and VirS substantially integrate themselves into the chromosomal regulatory network, significantly altering the transcription of 18% of all chromosomal genes. This pathoadaptation involved significant enrichment of select gene ontologies, in particular, enrichment of genes involved in transport processes, energy production, and cellular metabolism, suggesting a major change in cell physiology allowing the bacterium to grow in the hostile environment of the host cell. The results suggest that following the acquisition of the virulence plasmid by an avirulent ancestor of R. equi, coevolution between the plasmid and the chromosome took place, allowing VirR and VirS to regulate the transcription of chromosomal genes in a process that ultimately promoted intracellular growth. Our findings suggest a mechanism for cooption of existing chromosomal traits during the evolution of a pathogenic bacterium from an avirulent saprophyte. PMID:26015480

  17. Construction of adiponectin-encoding plasmid DNA and gene therapy of non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Mei Hua; Park, Jeong-Sook; Myung, Chang-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin (ADN), an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, stimulates glucose uptake, inhibits gluconeogenesis, and plays an important role in improving insulin sensitivity. Since blood levels of ADN are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), this study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of increasing the ADN level through injection of plasmid DNA encoding ADN in type 2 DM. A non-obese type 2 DM mouse model was established via combined administration of streptozotocin with nicotinamide and exhibited significantly higher plasma glucose concentration and insulin resistance compared with normal controls according to oral glucose tolerance and insulin challenge tests. Plasmid DNA encoding mouse ADN from differentiated NIH3T3 adipocytes was constructed in pVAX1 (pVAX/ADN). Transfection of pVAX/ADN into various cell lines including HeLa, HT22, HEK293, HepG2, and SK-Hep1 cells, increased ADN mRNA expression levels in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of pVAX/ADN into non-obese type 2 DM mice via tail vein significantly increased the blood level of ADN and decreased the plasma glucose concentration. Moreover, the parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity (QUICKI) were significantly improved. These results suggest that ADN gene therapy could be a clinically effective tool for the treatment of type 2 DM.

  18. [Synthesis in E. coli cells of short RNA encoded in plasmids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsova, O A; Bogdanova, S L; Kopylov, A M

    1989-05-01

    The synthesis of 5S rRNA and 4.5S RNA in E. coli HB 101 cells harbouring plasmids pKK 5-1 and pKK 247-2 was studied. The plasmids were derived from pBK 322 and contained genes coding for 5S rRNA and 4.5S RNA with regulatory elements of an rRNA transcription operon rrn B. When the cells were grown on enriched or minimal media (2 and 0.3 duplications per hour), the synthesis of both 5S rRNA and 4.5S RNA was proportional to the gene dosage and was greater in the plasmid than in the host strain. Such RNA accumulation did not change the cell growth parameters and was thus not toxic for the cells. At high growth rates, the RNA synthesis in the cells became excessive, and the processing system was upset with the accumulation of RNA precursors. The fact confirms the hypothesis, according to which the whole rRNA operon is essential for its own feedback regulation.

  19. Sustaining protein synthesis in the absence of rapid cell division: an investigation of plasmid-encoded protein expression in Escherichia coli during very slow growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, M C; Rouse, M P

    1993-01-01

    The minimum growth rate capable of supporting plasmid-encoded gene expression is determined using continuous cultures of Escherichia coli MZ9387 at dilution rates (D) as low as 5% of the maximum specific growth rate. Expression from a low copy number plasmid, pMPR166, encoding cyanase under the control of P(lac) is investigated in order to study plasmid-encoded gene expression under conditions approaching starvation. Plasmid copy number was stabilized by selection in the presence of 500 micrograms/mL chloramphenicol by constitutive expression of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Plasmid retention was determined by dot-blot hybridization and chloramphenicol resistance. The contribution of plasmid maintenance and cyanase expression to the maximum cell yield (Y'x/s) and the maintenance coefficient (ms) was determined for MZ9387 and MZ9387:pMPR166 under uninduced and IPTG-induced conditions. The values of Y'x/s and ms for non-plasmid-bearing cultures were 0.56 g of cell dry mass (DCM)/g of glucose and 0.26 g of glucose/g of DCM.h, respectively. The cell yield for plasmid-bearing cultures under uninduced conditions (Y 0'x/s) was 0.28 g of DCM/g of glucose, with m0s = 0.08 g of glucose/g of DCM.h. These values decreased following induction of cyanase expression. Glucose consumption in the presence of IPTG was linearly related to the growth rate at D cyanase expression alters metabolism and glucose consumption. The fraction of plasmid-free cells decreased with decreasing Damköhler number (Da). These data confirm the usefulness of Da for predicting the relationship between plasmid-free and plasmid-bearing cells where plasmids are stabilized by concentrations of antibiotic greater than the minimum plasmid-free host cell growth inhibitory concentration. Specific cyanase expression increased as the dilution rate decreased to D = 0.15 h-1. Between D = 0.15 h-1 and D = 0.14 h-1, expression decreased 7-fold. At very low dilution rates (D < or = 0.06 h-1), nonseptated

  20. Novel plasmid-encoded class C beta-lactamase (MOX-2) in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskine, Laurent; Borrel, Isabelle; Barnaud, Guilène; Boyer, Sophie; Hanau-Berçot, Béatrice; Gravisse, Jérome; Labia, Roger; Arlet, Guillaume; Sanson-Le-Pors, Marie-José

    2002-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae KOL, a clinical strain resistant to various beta-lactams, was isolated from the stools of a patient from Greece. This strain harbored a new pI 9.1 plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase with unusually high levels of hydrolytic activity for cefoxitin and cefotetan that we named MOX-2. Sequencing of bla(MOX-2) revealed 93.2, 92.9, 92.7, and 73.1% identities with the deduced amino acid sequences of CMY-8, MOX-1, CMY-1, and the AmpC beta-lactamase of Aeromonas sobria, respectively.

  1. Novel Plasmid-Encoded Class C β-Lactamase (MOX-2) in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Raskine, Laurent; Borrel, Isabelle; Barnaud, Guilène; Boyer, Sophie; Hanau-Berçot, Béatrice; Gravisse, Jérome; Labia, Roger; Arlet, Guillaume; Sanson-Le-Pors, Marie-José

    2002-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae KOL, a clinical strain resistant to various β-lactams, was isolated from the stools of a patient from Greece. This strain harbored a new pI 9.1 plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase with unusually high levels of hydrolytic activity for cefoxitin and cefotetan that we named MOX-2. Sequencing of blaMOX-2 revealed 93.2, 92.9, 92.7, and 73.1% identities with the deduced amino acid sequences of CMY-8, MOX-1, CMY-1, and the AmpC β-lactamase of Aeromonas sobria, respectively.

  2. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppan Gokulan

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  3. Impact of plasmids, including those encodingVirB4/D4 type IV secretion systems, on Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg virulence in macrophages and epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Khare, Sangeeta; Rooney, Anthony W; Han, Jing; Lynne, Aaron M; Foley, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg) can cause foodborne illness in humans following the consumption of contaminated meat and poultry products. Recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that certain S. Heidelberg isolated from food-animal sources harbor multiple transmissible plasmids with genes that encode antimicrobial resistance, virulence and a VirB4/D4 type-IV secretion system. This study examines the potential role of these transmissible plasmids in bacterial uptake and survival in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages, and the molecular basis of host immune system modulation that may be associated with disease progression. A series of transconjugant and transformant strains were developed with different combinations of the plasmids to determine the roles of the individual and combinations of plasmids on virulence. Overall the Salmonella strains containing the VirB/D4 T4SS plasmids entered and survived in epithelial cells and macrophages to a greater degree than those without the plasmid, even though they carried other plasmid types. During entry in macrophages, the VirB/D4 T4SS encoding genes are up-regulated in a time-dependent fashion. When the potential mechanisms for increased virulence were examined using an antibacterial Response PCR Array, the strain containing the T4SS down regulated several host innate immune response genes which likely contributed to the increased uptake and survival within macrophages and epithelial cells.

  4. Large plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella encode highly diverse arrays of accessory genes on common replicon families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura E; Wireman, Joy; Hilliard, Valda C; Summers, Anne O

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are important in evolution and adaptation of host bacteria, yet we lack a comprehensive picture of their own natural variation. We used replicon typing and RFLP analysis to assess diversity and distribution of plasmids in the ECOR, SARA, SARB and SARC reference collections of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Plasmids, especially large (≥30 kb) plasmids, are abundant in these collections. Host species and genotype clearly impact plasmid prevalence; plasmids are more abundant in ECOR than SAR, but, within ECOR, subgroup B2 strains have the fewest large plasmids. The majority of large plasmids have unique RFLP patterns, suggesting high variation, even within dominant replicon families IncF and IncI1. We found only four conserved plasmid types within ECOR, none of which are widely distributed. Within SAR, conserved plasmid types are primarily serovar-specific, including a pSLT-like plasmid in 13 Typhimurium strains. Conservation of pSLT contrasts with variability of other plasmids, suggesting evolution of serovar-specific virulence plasmids is distinct from that of most enterobacterial plasmids. We sequenced a conserved serovar Heidelberg plasmid but did not detect virulence or antibiotic resistance genes. Our data illustrate the high degree of natural variation in large plasmids of E. coli and Salmonella, even among plasmids sharing backbone genes.

  5. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  6. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenlokke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold;

    2016-01-01

    on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed...... to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired...

  7. Enhanced Delivery of Plasmid Encoding Interleukin-12 Gene by Diethylene Triamine Penta-Acetic Acid (DTPA)-Conjugated PEI Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Keykhaee, Maryam; Khalvati, Bahman; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant therapeutic proteins have been considered as an efficient category of medications used for the treatment of various diseases. Despite their effectiveness, there are some reports on the systemic adverse effects of recombinant therapeutic proteins limiting their wide clinical applications. Among different cytokines used for cancer immunotherapy, interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown great ability as a powerful antitumor and antiangiogenic agent. However, significant toxic reactions following the systemic administration of IL-12 have led researchers to seek for alternative approaches such as the delivery and local expression of the IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissues. In order to transfer the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene, the most extensively investigated polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), was modified by diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) to modulate the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance of the polymer as well as its toxicity. DTPA-conjugated PEI derivatives were able to form complexes in the size range around 100-180 nm with great condensation ability and protection of the plasmid against enzymatic degradation. The highest gene transfer ability was achieved by the DTPA-conjugated PEI at the conjugation degree of 0.1 % where the level of IL-12 production increased up to twofold compared with that of the unmodified PEI. Results of the present study demonstrated that modulation of the surface positive charge of PEI along with the improvement of the polymer hydrophobic balance could be considered as a successful strategy to develop safe and powerful nanocarriers.

  8. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids.

  9. PLASMID VACCINE ENCODING HN GENE FROM NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS HAS MARKED ANTITUMORAL EFFECT IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛立娟; 金宁一; 龚伟; 王宏伟; 李萍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the antitumor effects of hemaagglutinin-neuraminase gene (HN gene) from Newcastle disease virus. Methods: Plasmid vaccine of pIRHN was constructed and transfected into HeLa cells. The expression of HN was analyzed by Western blot analysis, and the mode of cell death was detected by fluorescence microscope, gel electrophoresis and TUNEL assay and the expression of p53 and bcl-2 was also analyzed in transfected Hela cells. The effect of pIRHN on sialic acid contents in the Hela cell was examined. Results: pIRHN nucleic acid vaccines could be expressed in eukaryotic cell. pIRHN could induce apoptosis after HeLa cells were transfected. The effect of antitumor responses of pIRHN was correlated with the contents of sialic acid in tumor cells, and there was no prominent evidence for the relatedness of the antitumor effect with the expression of p53 and bcl-2. Conclusion: pIRHN may become a new antitumor biological agent.

  10. Nucleotide sequence and phylogeny of the tet (L) tetracycline resistance determinant encoded by the plasmid pSTE1 from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, S.; Cardoso, M.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the tetracycline resistance (tet) gene and its regulatory region, encoded by the plasmid pSTE1 from Staphylococcus hyicus, was determined. The tet gene was inducible by tetracycline and encoded a hydrophobic protein of 458 amino acids. Comparisons between the predicted...... amino acid sequences of the pSTE1-encoded Tet from S. hyicus and the previously sequenced Tet K variants from Staphylococcus aureus, Tet L variants from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus stearothermophilus, and Bacillus subtilis, Tet M variants from Steptococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus as well as Tet...... variants on one hand and the Tet K and Tet L variants on the other hand. The pSTE1-encoded Tet proved to be closely related to the Tet L proteins originally found on small Bacillus plasmids. The observed extensive similarities in the nucleotide sequences of the tet genes and in the deduced Tet amino acid...

  11. Protein sequences insight into heavy metal tolerance in Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 encoded by plasmid pESA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Kajsik, Michal; Forsythe, Stephen; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2015-12-01

    The recently annotated genome of the bacterium Cronobacter sakazakii BAA-894 suggests that the organism has the ability to bind heavy metals. This study demonstrates heavy metal tolerance in C. sakazakii, in which proteins with the heavy metal interaction were recognized by computational and experimental study. As the result, approximately one-fourth of proteins encoded on the plasmid pESA3 are proposed to have potential interaction with heavy metals. Interaction between heavy metals and predicted proteins was further corroborated using protein crystal structures from protein data bank database and comparison of metal-binding ligands. In addition, a phylogenetic study was undertaken for the toxic heavy metals, arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury, which generated relatedness clustering for lead, cadmium and arsenic. Laboratory studies confirmed the organism's tolerance to tellurite, copper and silver. These experimental and computational study data extend our understanding of the genes encoding for proteins of this important neonatal pathogen and provide further insights into the genotypes associated with features that can contribute to its persistence in the environment. The information will be of value for future environmental protection from heavy toxic metals.

  12. Genetic and biochemical analyses of chromosome and plasmid gene homologues encoding ICL and ArCP domains in Vibrioanguillarum strain 775

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Crosa, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775 is synthesized from 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), cysteine and hydroxyhistamine via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes encoding anguibactin biosynthetic proteins are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. I

  13. Centromere pairing by a plasmid-encoded type I ParB protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Simon; Löwe, Jan; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    over the nucleoid. ParB ribbon-helix-helix dimers bind cooperatively to direct repeats in parC1 and parC2. Using four different assays we obtain solid evidence that ParB can pair parC1- and parC2-encoding DNA fragments in vitro. Convincingly, electron microscopy revealed that ParB mediates binary...... pairing of parC fragments. In addition to binary complexes, ParB mediated the formation of higher order complexes consisting of several DNA fragments joined by ParB at centromere site parC. N-terminal truncated versions of ParB still possessing specific DNA binding activity were incompetent in pairing...

  14. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata gakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or {kappa}B (binding site for NF{kappa}B (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 {mu}m by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL{sup -1} dexamethasone, 10 ng mL{sup -1} forskolin, or 100 ng mL{sup -1} TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNF{kappa}B-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 10{sup 4} cells per well.

  15. Co-existence of Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinase among plasmid encoded CMY-2 harbouring isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in north India

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    S Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, AmpC β-lactamases are often responsible for high-level resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. The co-production of plasmid-mediated AmpC along with chromosomal Pseudomonas-derived cephalosporinases thus remain a serious clinical concern owing to high resistance spectrum towards antibiotics. Aim: The present study was performed to investigate the co-existence of both chromosomally-encoded and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase among clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Setting and Design: It is a cross-sectional study carried out in the Department of Microbiology in a tertiary referral hospital of northern India. Methods and Methods: A total of 329 consecutive, non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, were selected for the detection of AmpC β-lactamases and confirmed for AmpC production by modified three dimensional (M3D test. Ceftazidime -imipenem antagonism test was used to detect inducible AmpC producers. Molecular characterisation of chromosomally-encoded blaPDC and plasmid-mediated AmpC gene was studied by performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Result: A total of 214 (65% isolates were confirmed for AmpC production by M3D test. On performing multiplex PCR, 27 isolates were detected posessing blaCMY type of plasmid-mediated AmpC gene. While 48 isolates were found to harbour chromosomally-encoded blaPDC gene co-production of both chromosomal and plasmid-encoded AmpC was reported in eleven isolates. Conclusions: Although these chromosomally-encoded cephalosporinases might spread more slowly than mobilised AmpC, but it is likely that in the present scenario of intense antibiotic pressure, this will become an increasing problem and may further limit our antibiotic choices.

  16. Construction, expression and characterization of a plasmid-encoded Na(+)-specific ATPase hybrid consisting of Propionigenium modestum F0-ATPase and Escherichia coli F1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaim, G; Dimroth, P

    1994-06-01

    The Escherichia coli strain DK8, a deletion mutant lacking the complete unc operon, was transformed with a plasmid containing the genes encoding the a, b, c, delta and part of the alpha subunit of the Na(+)-dependent ATPase of Propionigenium modestum and the genes encoding the alpha, gamma, beta and epsilon subunits of the H(+)-dependent E. coli ATPase. The transformants showed Na(+)-dependent growth on succinate as non-fermentable carbon source. The functionally expressed hybrid ATPase was activated 13-fold at pH 7.5 by the addition of Na+ and inhibited by 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, azide and tributyltin chloride. At pH 7.5 and pH 9.0, the hybrid enzyme was protected from inhibition by 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the presence of 50 mM NaCl and 5 mM NaCl, respectively. The hybrid ATPase was reconstituted into proteoliposomes and catalyzed the transport of Na+ upon ATP addition. ATP-dependent fluorescence quenching of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine proved that the ATPase hybrid was able to pump protons in the absence of Na+. Furthermore, ATP synthesis could be measured under conditions where a valinomycin-mediated K+ diffusion potential (delta psi) and a Na+ concentration gradient (delta p Na+) were imposed.

  17. A novel plasmid-encoded serotype conversion mechanism through addition of phosphoethanolamine to the O-antigen of Shigella flexneri.

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    Qiangzheng Sun

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is the major pathogen causing bacillary dysentery in developing countries. S. flexneri is divided into at least 16 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. All the serotypes (except for serotype 6 share a basic O-unit containing one N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and three l-rhamnose residues, whereas differences between the serotypes are conferred by phage-encoded glucosylation and/or O-acetylation. Serotype Xv is a newly emerged and the most prevalent serotype in China, which can agglutinate with both MASF IV-1 and 7,8 monoclonal antibodies. The factor responsible for the presence of MASF IV-1 (E1037 epitope has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the LPS structure of serotype Xv strains and found that the MASF IV-1 positive phenotype depends on an O-antigen modification with a phosphoethanolamine (PEtN group attached at position 3 of one of the rhamnose residues. A plasmid carried gene, lpt-O (LPS phosphoethanolamine transferase for O-antigen, mediates the addition of PEtN for serotype Xv and other MASF IV-1 positive strains. These findings reveal a novel serotype conversion mechanism in S. flexneri and show the necessity of further extension of the serotype classification scheme recognizing the MASF IV-1 positive strains as distinctive subtypes.

  18. A novel plasmid-encoded serotype conversion mechanism through addition of phosphoethanolamine to the O-antigen of Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiangzheng; Knirel, Yuriy A; Lan, Ruiting; Wang, Jianping; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Jin, Dong; Shashkov, Alexander S; Xia, Shengli; Perepelov, Andrei V; Chen, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Haiyin; Xu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is the major pathogen causing bacillary dysentery in developing countries. S. flexneri is divided into at least 16 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. All the serotypes (except for serotype 6) share a basic O-unit containing one N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and three l-rhamnose residues, whereas differences between the serotypes are conferred by phage-encoded glucosylation and/or O-acetylation. Serotype Xv is a newly emerged and the most prevalent serotype in China, which can agglutinate with both MASF IV-1 and 7,8 monoclonal antibodies. The factor responsible for the presence of MASF IV-1 (E1037) epitope has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the LPS structure of serotype Xv strains and found that the MASF IV-1 positive phenotype depends on an O-antigen modification with a phosphoethanolamine (PEtN) group attached at position 3 of one of the rhamnose residues. A plasmid carried gene, lpt-O (LPS phosphoethanolamine transferase for O-antigen), mediates the addition of PEtN for serotype Xv and other MASF IV-1 positive strains. These findings reveal a novel serotype conversion mechanism in S. flexneri and show the necessity of further extension of the serotype classification scheme recognizing the MASF IV-1 positive strains as distinctive subtypes.

  19. Construction and Co-expression of Bicistronic Plasmid Encoding Human WEE1 and Stem Cell Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping LEI; Wen-Han LI; Wen-Jun LIAO; Bing YU; Hui-Fen ZHU; Jing-Fang SHAO; Guan-Xin SHEN

    2005-01-01

    To protect the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from apoptosis induced by chemotherapy and promote HSC proliferation, bi-functional gene delivery systems are increasingly investigated in gene therapy.In the present study, we constructed a bicistronic vector, pWISG, expressing the anti-apoptotic protein human WEE1 (WEE1Hu) and the fusion protein of the proliferation-stimulating stem cell factor (SCF) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) separately with internal ribosome entry site (IRES). We first examined the expression and location of WEE1Hu in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and showed that WEE1Hu was located in the nucleus, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. We determined the expression and receptor-binding ability of the SCF-EGFP fusion protein on CD34+ cells,which were proved by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry,respectively. Furthermore, inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis was observed in CD34+ cells transfected with pWISG, which implies that protection for CD34+ cells was achieved via WEE1Hu and SCF-EGFP. Our study suggests that the introduction of two functional genes via bicistronic vector is more powerful and efficient than single gene therapy.

  20. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-29

    render them non-susceptible to K: z plasmid-encoded enzymes. (3) Development of drugs which are selective inhibitor! 1 4, of plasmid DNA replication. (4... Development of drugs which inhibit phenotypic as expression of plasmid genes, and (5) Development of drugs which are inhibitors o, drug-inactivating...Barnes [2] them non-susceptible to plasmid-encoded enzymes, tabulated data on the incidence of Gram-negative 3) development of drugs which are

  1. CFE-1, a novel plasmid-encoded AmpC beta-lactamase with an ampR gene originating from Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yumiko; Kaneko, Kenichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Hosaka, Yoshio; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2004-04-01

    A clinical isolate of Escherichia coli from a patient in Japan, isolate KU6400, was found to produce a plasmid-encoded beta-lactamase that conferred resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and cephamycins. Resistance arising from production of a beta-lactamase could be transferred by either conjugation or transformation with plasmid pKU601 into E. coli ML4947. The substrate and inhibition profiles of this enzyme resembled those of the AmpC beta-lactamase. The resistance gene of pKU601, which was cloned and expressed in E. coli, proved to contain an open reading frame showing 99.8% DNA sequence identity with the ampC gene of Citrobacter freundii GC3. DNA sequence analysis also identified a gene upstream of ampC whose sequence was 99.0% identical to the ampR gene from C. freundii GC3. In addition, a fumarate operon (frdABCD) and an outer membrane lipoprotein (blc) surrounding the ampR-ampC genes in C. freundii were identified, and insertion sequence (IS26) elements were observed on both sides of the sequences identified (forming an IS26 composite transposon); these results confirm the evidence of the translocation of a beta-lactamase-associated gene region from the chromosome to a plasmid. Finally, we describe a novel plasmid-encoded AmpC beta-lactamase, CFE-1, with an ampR gene derived from C. freundii.

  2. CFE-1, a Novel Plasmid-Encoded AmpC β-Lactamase with an ampR Gene Originating from Citrobacter freundii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yumiko; Kaneko, Kenichi; Okitsu, Naohiro; Hosaka, Yoshio; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2004-01-01

    A clinical isolate of Escherichia coli from a patient in Japan, isolate KU6400, was found to produce a plasmid-encoded β-lactamase that conferred resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and cephamycins. Resistance arising from production of a β-lactamase could be transferred by either conjugation or transformation with plasmid pKU601 into E. coli ML4947. The substrate and inhibition profiles of this enzyme resembled those of the AmpC β-lactamase. The resistance gene of pKU601, which was cloned and expressed in E. coli, proved to contain an open reading frame showing 99.8% DNA sequence identity with the ampC gene of Citrobacter freundii GC3. DNA sequence analysis also identified a gene upstream of ampC whose sequence was 99.0% identical to the ampR gene from C. freundii GC3. In addition, a fumarate operon (frdABCD) and an outer membrane lipoprotein (blc) surrounding the ampR-ampC genes in C. freundii were identified, and insertion sequence (IS26) elements were observed on both sides of the sequences identified (forming an IS26 composite transposon); these results confirm the evidence of the translocation of a β-lactamase-associated gene region from the chromosome to a plasmid. Finally, we describe a novel plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamase, CFE-1, with an ampR gene derived from C. freundii. PMID:15047515

  3. In vitro analysis of the factors contributing to the antiviral state induced by a plasmid encoding the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glycoprotein G in transfected trout cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Villaizan, M; Chico, V; Martinez-Lopez, A; Falco, A; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2011-01-17

    We have found out that transfection of the RTG-2 cell line with the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein G (G(VHSV))-coding plasmid induces an anti-VHSV state, similar to that induced by poly I:C. Taking the advantage of the constitutive expression of toll-like receptor 9 gene (tlr9) in RTG-2 cells, we have investigated whether this antiviral state was induced by the cytosine-phosphodiester-guanine (CpG) motifs present in the plasmid DNA, by the endogenous expression of G(VHSV) protein or by both elements. For that, we have analysed the expression profile of the rainbow trout tlr9 and several genes related to TLR9-mediated immune response in the absence or presence of a lysosomotropic drug that specifically blocks TLR9-CpG DNA interaction. The results suggested that the high levels of cell protection conferred by a plasmid encoding G(VHSV) gene are due to G(VHSV) rather than to the CpG motifs within plasmid DNA. Therefore, plasmid DNA might not play a key role in the immune response elicited by DNA vaccines or perhaps other receptors instead TLR9 could be implicated in CpG motifs recognition and signalling. In addition, since RTG-2 cells express tlr9 gene, this cell line could be a good tool for screening TLR9 agonists, such as the immunomodulatory oligonucleotides (IMOs), as fish DNA vaccine adjuvants.

  4. Expression profile and subcellular location of the plasmid-encoded virulence (Spv) proteins in wild-type Salmonella dublin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gedaily, A; Paesold, G; Krause, M

    1997-08-01

    The plasmid-encoded virulence genes (spvABCD) in nontyphoid Salmonella strains mediate lethal infections in a variety of animals. Previous studies have shown that these genes are transcriptionally regulated by stationary-phase growth. We studied the expression profile and the subcellular locations of the SpvABCD proteins in wild-type S. dublin by using polyclonal antibodies against SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD. The cellular levels of the individual proteins were determined during growth by quantitative immunoblotting. As expected, SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD were not detectable before the late logarithmic growth phase and appeared in the sequence SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD. In contrast to the transcriptional regulation, however, SpvA and SpvB reached their maximal expression shortly after induction and declined during further growth whereas SpvC and SpvD expression remained high throughout the stationary phase, indicating that the Spv proteins are individually regulated at a posttranscriptional level. To localize SpvABCD within the bacteria, the cells were fractionated into the periplasmic, cytoplasmic, inner membrane, and outer membrane components. The cell fractions and the culture supernatant were analyzed by immunoblotting. SpvA was present in the outer membrane, SpvB was present in the cytoplasm and the inner membrane, and SpvC was present in the cytoplasm. SpvD was secreted into the supernatant; however, a substantial portion of this protein was also detected in the cytoplasm and membranes. The molecular weights of SpvD in the supernatant and in the cytoplasm appeared to be equal, suggesting that SpvD is not cleaved upon secretion.

  5. Plasmid-encoded proinsulin preserves C-peptide while specifically reducing proinsulin-specific CD8⁺ T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roep, Bart O; Solvason, Nanette; Gottlieb, Peter A; Abreu, Joana R F; Harrison, Leonard C; Eisenbarth, George S; Yu, Liping; Leviten, Michael; Hagopian, William A; Buse, John B; von Herrath, Matthias; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert S; Robinson, William H; Utz, Paul J; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence

    2013-06-26

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), there is an intense inflammatory response that destroys the β cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, the site where insulin is produced and released. A therapy for T1D that targets the specific autoimmune response in this disease while leaving the remainder of the immune system intact, has long been sought. Proinsulin is a major target of the adaptive immune response in T1D. We hypothesized that an engineered DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin (BHT-3021) would preserve β cell function in T1D patients through reduction of insulin-specific CD8⁺ T cells. We studied 80 subjects over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with T1D within the past 5 years. Subjects were randomized 2:1 to receive intramuscular injections of BHT-3021 or BHT-placebo, weekly for 12 weeks, and then monitored for safety and immune responses in a blinded fashion. Four dose levels of BHT-3021 were evaluated: 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 mg. C-peptide was used both as an exploratory efficacy measure and as a safety measure. Islet-specific CD8⁺ T cell frequencies were assessed with multimers of monomeric human leukocyte antigen class I molecules loaded with peptides from pancreatic and unrelated antigens. No serious adverse events related to BHT-3021 were observed. C-peptide levels improved relative to placebo at all doses, at 1 mg at the 15-week time point (+19.5% BHT-3021 versus -8.8% BHT-placebo, P BHT-3021 arm (P < 0.006). No significant changes were noted in interferon-γ, interleukin-4 (IL-4), or IL-10 production in CD4 T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that a plasmid encoding proinsulin reduces the frequency of CD8⁺ T cells reactive to proinsulin while preserving C-peptide over the course of dosing.

  6. Effect of naked eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding rat augmenter of liver regeneration on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Mei Zhang; Dian-Wu Liu; Jian-Bo Liu; Xiao-Lin Zhang; Xiao-Bo Wang; Long-Mei Tang; Li-Qin Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats. METHODS: The PCR-amplified ALR gene was recombined with pcDNA3 plasmid, and used to treat rats with acute hepatic injury. The rats with acute hepatic injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of 2 mL/kg 50% carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were randomly divided into saline control group and recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid treatment groups. Recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid DNA (50 or 200 μg/kg) was injected into the rats with acute hepatic injury intravenously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously and intraperitoneally in combination 4 h after CCl4 administration, respectively. The recombinant plasmid was injected once per 12 h into all treatment groups four times, and the rats were decapitated 12 h after the last injection. Hepatic histopathological alterations were observed after HE staining, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in liver tissue was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and the level of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was determined by biochemical method. The recombinant plasmid DNA (200 μg/kg) and saline were intraperitoneally injected into the rats with acute hepatic failure induced by intraperitoneal injection of 4 mL/kg 50% CCl4 after 4 h of CCl4 administration, respectively. Rats living over 96 h were considered as survivals.RESULTS: The sequence of ALR cDNA of recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid was accordant with the reported sequence of rat ALR cDNA. After the rats with acute hepatic injury were treated with recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid, the degree of liver histopathological injury markedly decreased. The pathologic liver tissues, in which hepatic degeneration and necrosis of a small amount of hepatocytes and a large amount of infiltrating inflammatory cells were observed, and they became basically normal in the

  7. The Proteome of Biologically Active Membrane Vesicles from Piscirickettsia salmonis LF-89 Type Strain Identifies Plasmid-Encoded Putative Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Piscirickettsia salmonis is the predominant bacterial pathogen affecting the Chilean salmonid industry. This bacterium is the etiological agent of piscirickettsiosis, a significant fish disease. Membrane vesicles (MVs released by P. salmonis deliver several virulence factors to host cells. To improve on existing knowledge for the pathogenicity-associated functions of P. salmonis MVs, we studied the proteome of purified MVs from the P. salmonis LF-89 type strain using multidimensional protein identification technology. Initially, the cytotoxicity of different MV concentration purified from P. salmonis LF-89 was confirmed in an in vivo adult zebrafish infection model. The cumulative mortality of zebrafish injected with MVs showed a dose-dependent pattern. Analyses identified 452 proteins of different subcellular origins; most of them were associated with the cytoplasmic compartment and were mainly related to key functions for pathogen survival. Interestingly, previously unidentified putative virulence-related proteins were identified in P. salmonis MVs, such as outer membrane porin F and hemolysin. Additionally, five amino acid sequences corresponding to the Bordetella pertussis toxin subunit 1 and two amino acid sequences corresponding to the heat-labile enterotoxin alpha chain of Escherichia coli were located in the P. salmonis MV proteome. Curiously, these putative toxins were located in a plasmid region of P. salmonis LF-89. Based on the identified proteins, we propose that the protein composition of P. salmonis LF-89 MVs could reflect total protein characteristics of this P. salmonis type strain.

  8. Extended Function of Plasmid Partition Genes: the Sop System of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15 Facilitates Late Gene Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V.; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-01-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage λ) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to λ, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3−-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3+ fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3+-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth. PMID:18359814

  9. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  10. Persistence of a pKPN3-like CTX-M-15-encoding IncFIIK plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumonia ST17 host during two years of intestinal colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Høyland Löhr

    Full Text Available To characterize the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid in a Klebsiella pneumoniae ST17 strain, responsible for an outbreak at a Norwegian neonatal intensive care unit and subsequent colonization of affected children for up to two years. To identify plasmid-mediated features relevant for the outbreak dynamics, and to investigate the plasmids capability of horizontal transfer, its segregational stability and plasmid-mediated fitness costs.Plasmid profiling was performed by S1-nuclease PFGE, PCR-based replicon typing and Southern blot-hybridization. The complete sequence of the CTX-M-15-encoding plasmid was obtained by 454 sequencing. Plasmid self-transferability was investigated by broth- and filter mating, segregational stability was explored by serial passage, and plasmid-conferred fitness costs were examined in pairwise head-to-head competitions and by growth rate comparisons.CTX-M-15 was encoded by a ~180 kb IncFIIK plasmid in K. pneumoniae ST17. S1-nuclease PFGE profiles of the first and the last CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, recovered from the four children colonized the longest, suggested that the plasmid was stably maintained during intestinal carriage of up to two years. The DNA sequence of the pKPN3-like plasmid, pKp848CTX, uncovered a Tn3-like antibiotic resistance region and multiple heavy metal- and thermoresistance determinants. Plasmid pKp848CTX could not be transferred to Escherichia coli in vitro and we found no evidence to support horizontal plasmid transfer in vivo. Segregational plasmid loss ranging from 0.83% to 17.5% was demonstrated in evolved populations in vitro, but only minor fitness costs were associated with plasmid-carriage.Plasmid pKp848CTX encodes phenotypic traits, which may have had an impact on the fitness and survival of the K. pneumoniae ST17 strain in the outbreak setting. The antibiotic resistance plasmid pKp848CTX was stably maintained during two years of intestinal colonization, conferring negligible

  11. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J. [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Fromme, Petra [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Physical Sciences BLDG D-102, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Torres-Larios, Alfredo [Instituto de Fisiología Celular UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises [Departamento de Salud Pública Facultad de Medicina UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Laboratorio de Patogenicidad Bacteriana, Unidad de Hemato Oncología e Investigación, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez 06720, D.F. (Mexico); Arreguin-Espinosa de los Monteros, Roberto A. [Instituto de Química UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacán 04510, D.F (Mexico); and others

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin at 2.3 Å. • Structural differences between Pet passenger domain and EspP protein are described. • High flexibility of the C-terminal beta helix is structurally assigned. - Abstract: Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181–190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  12. Limited Dissemination of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase- and Plasmid-Encoded AmpC-Producing Escherichia coli from Food and Farm Animals, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Stefan; Ny, Sofia; Egervärn, Maria; Bergström, Jakob; Rosengren, Åsa; Englund, Stina; Löfmark, Sonja; Byfors, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and plasmid-encoded ampC (pAmpC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae might spread from farm animals to humans through food. However, most studies have been limited in number of isolates tested and areas studied. We examined genetic relatedness of 716 isolates from 4,854 samples collected from humans, farm animals, and foods in Sweden to determine whether foods and farm animals might act as reservoirs and dissemination routes for ESBL/pAmpC-producing Escherichia coli. Results showed that clonal spread to humans appears unlikely. However, we found limited dissemination of genes encoding ESBL/pAmpC and plasmids carrying these genes from foods and farm animals to healthy humans and patients. Poultry and chicken meat might be a reservoir and dissemination route to humans. Although we found no evidence of clonal spread of ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli from farm animals or foods to humans, ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli with identical genes and plasmids were present in farm animals, foods, and humans.

  13. Large IncHI2-plasmids encode extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, and support ESBL-transfer to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, E; Haldorsen, B C; Sundsfjord, A; Simonsen, G S; Ingebretsen, A; Naseer, U; Samuelsen, O

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates from 19 hospital laboratories in Norway during 2011. A total of 62/230 (27%) isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and four (1.7%) were ESBL-positive; blaCTX -M-15 (n = 3) and blaSHV -12 (n = 1). This is comparable to the prevalence of ESBLs in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Norway during the same period. All ESBL-positive isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) and harboured plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Three isolates supported transfer of large IncHI2-plasmids harbouring ESBL- and MDR-encoding genes to E. coli recipients by in vitro conjugation.

  14. Control of carbon flux to glutamate excretion in Klebsiella pneumoniae: the role of the indigenous plasmid and its encoded isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mansi, Mansi; Trappey, Francois; Clark, Ewan; Campbell, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (NCTC, CL687/80) harbors a large indigenous plasmid (p(C3)), which in addition to encoding for citrate utilization, proline synthesis and glutamate excretion, it uniquely carries the structural gene (icd); encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). Flux analysis revealed that ICDH, despite its role in the generation of NADPH required for glutamate dehydrogenase, is not rate-limiting (controlling) in central metabolism as evidenced by a negative flux control coefficient and an adverse effect of overexpression (14-fold) on glutamate excretion. More significantly, however, this paper presents, for the first time, clear evidence that the accumulation of glutamate and its subsequent excretion is associated with the C3 plasmid-encoded regulatory elements, which trigger a shift-down in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, both in the K. pneumoniae parental strain as well as in the E. coli exconjugants strains. This finding opens the door for the exploitation of regulatory elements as a tool for manipulating flux in microbial cell factories.

  15. Heat Resistance Mediated by a New Plasmid Encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a Possible Novel Mechanism for Nosocomial Persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne;

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We have characterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  16. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne;

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We havecharacterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  17. Role of AmpR in the High Expression of the Plasmid-Encoded AmpC β-Lactamase CFE-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ryuichi; Nakano, Akiyo; Yano, Hisakazu; Okamoto, Ryoichi

    2017-01-01

    CFE-1 is a unique plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamase with the regulator gene ampR. It imparts high resistance to most cephalosporins with constitutive high-level β-lactamase activity. Here, the β-lactamase activities and expression levels of ampC with or without ampR were investigated. Results suggested that the resistance of CFE-1 to cephalosporins is caused by a substitution in AmpR, in which the Asp at position 135 is modified to Ala to allow the constitutive high-level expression (derepression) of ampC.

  18. Common findings of bla CTX-M-55-encoding 104-139 kbp plasmids harbored by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in pork meat, wholesale market workers, and patients with urinary tract infection in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, T A V; Nguyen, T N H; Ueda, S; Le, Q P; Tran, T T N; Nguyen, T N D; Dao, T V K; Tran, M T; Le, T T T; Le, T L; Nakayama, T; Hirai, I; Do, T H; Vien, Q M; Yamamoto, Y

    2017-02-01

    Extended-spectrum, β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E) harboring the bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmid (ESBL-E55) has been reported to be associated with urinary tract infection (UTI). The aims of this study were to clarify the prevalence of ESBL-E55 in pork meats and workers from the same wholesale market, as well as patients with UTI from a nearby hospital in Vietnam; we also investigated the plasmids encoding bla CTX-M-55. Sequencing analysis showed that 66.6% of the ESBL-E isolated from pork meats contained bla CTX-M-55, whereas the gene was present in 25.0% of workers and 12.5% of patients with UTI. Plasmid analysis showed that several sizes of plasmid encoded bla CTX-M-55 in ESBL-E55 isolated from pork meats, whereas ESBL-E55 isolated from workers and patients with UTI contained only 104-139 kbp of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids. This indicates that the 104-139 kbp sizes of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids were commonly disseminated in pork meats, wholesale market workers, and patients with UTI.

  19. Functional analysis of plastid-encoded genes

    OpenAIRE

    Swiatek, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Plastid chromosomes from the variety of plant species contain several conserved open reading frames of unknown function, which most probably represent functional genes. The primary aim of this thesis was the analysis of the role of two such ORFs, designated ycfs or hypothetical chloroplast reading frames, namely ycf9 (ORF62) and ycf10 (ORF229, cemA). Both were analyzed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) via their inactivation using biolistic plastid transformation. A new experiment...

  20. Design and evaluation of protein expression in a recombinant plasmid encoding epitope gp 350/220 of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmah, Karimatul; Dluha, Nurul; Anyndita, Nadya V. M.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin; Widodo

    2017-05-01

    The Epstein - Barr virus (EBV) causes severe infections that may lead to cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Development of effective EBV vaccines is necessary to prevent the virus spreading throughout the community. TheEBV has a surface protein gp 350/220, which serves as an antigen to help interact with host cells. Epitopes of the protein can potentially serve as bases for a vaccine. In a previous study, we have found a conserved epitope of gp 350/220 from all strains EBV through an in silico approach. The aim of this study is to design and overproduce a recombinant peptide of epitope gp 350/220 in E. coli. DNA encoding the conserved epitope was synthesized and cloned into plasmid pET-22b(+); the recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli strains DH5α and BL21. The transformed plasmid DNA was isolated and confirmed by restriction using XbaI and PstI enzymes followed by DNA sequencing. Protein expression was induced by isopropyl-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) with final concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 1, and 2 mM in consecutive times. An osmotic shock method was used to isolate protein from periplasmic fraction of E. coli DH5α and BL21. The SDS-PAGE analysis was carried out to detect peptide target (3.4 kDa). Based on this result, the induction process did not work properly, and thus needs further investigation.

  1. Coimmunization with IL-15 plasmid enhances the longevity of CD8 T cells induced by DNA encoding hepatitis B virus core antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Sheng-Fu Dong; Shu-Hui Sun; Yuan Wang; Guang-Di Li; Di Qu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the feasibility of delivering a plasmid encoding IL-15 as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for improving the immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.METHODS: We used RT-PCR based strategies to develop IL-15 expression constructs. We first confirmed that the gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli due to the poor expression of IL-15. Then the bioactivity of IL-15 plasmid expression product was identified by CTLL-2 proliferation assay. One hundred micrograms of DNA from each of the IL-15 eukaryotic expressed plasmid and the recombinant plasmid harboring DNA encoding the 144 amino acids of the N-terminus of HBV core gene (abbreviated pHBc144) was used to co-immunize C57 BL/6 mice. The titer of anti-HBcIgG was detected by ELISA and the antigen-specific CD8+T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells) were detected by intracellular cytokine staining at different time points.RESULTS: After co-immunization by pIL-15 and pHBc144 DNA vaccine the antigen-specific CD8+ cells of mice increased gradually, the first peak of immune response appeared 14 d later, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+ Ts cells decreased gradually and maintained at a steady level in 3 mo. After boosting, the number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells reached the second peak 10 d later with a double of the 1st peak, then the number of antigen-specific CD8+T cells decreased slowly. IL-15 as a gene adjuvant had no significant effect on humoral immune responses induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine, but increased the memory antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced by hepatitis B virus core gene DNA vaccine.CONCLUSION: DNA vaccine constructed by HBc Ag 1-144 amino acid induces effective cell immunity, and cytokine plasmid-delivered IL-15 enhances the longevity of CD8+ T cells.

  2. Recovery of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus from plasmids encoding EMCV IRES in stable cell lines expressing T7 polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Green, Kim Y; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V

    2015-06-01

    Reverse genetics systems constitute one of the most important and powerful tools to study the molecular biology of viruses. We developed a new strategy for the recovery of murine norovirus from a single plasmid in which a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7pol) promoter for transcription and an EMCV IRES for efficient translation were engineered immediately upstream of the viral genome. Infectious noroviruses were recovered following transfection of the newly designed plasmid into nonpermissive BHK-21 and HEK293T cell lines that were engineered to express T7pol constitutively. Recovery of the virus did not require the presence of a ribozyme at the 3'-end of the virus genome. The strategy worked also for the efficient recovery of feline calicivirus in these normally nonpermissive cell types. This simplified reverse genetics approach may be broadly applicable to other caliciviruses. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Additives and Protein-DNA Combinations Modulate the Humoral Immune Response Elicited by a Hepatitis C Virus Core-encoding Plasmid in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Lajonchere Liz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Humoral and cellular immune responses are currently induced against hepatitis C virus (HCV core following vaccination with core-encoding plasmids. However, the anti-core antibody response is frequently weak or transient. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of different additives and DNA-protein combinations on the anti-core antibody response. BALB/c mice were intramuscularly injected with an expression plasmid (pIDKCo, encoding a C-terminal truncated variant of the HCV core protein, alone or combined with CaCl2, PEG 6000, Freund's adjuvant, sonicated calf thymus DNA and a recombinant core protein (Co.120. Mixture of pIDKCo with PEG 6000 and Freund's adjuvant accelerated the development of the anti-core Ab response. Combination with PEG 6000 also induced a bias to IgG2a subclass predominance among anti-core antibodies. The kinetics, IgG2a/IgG1 ratio and epitope specificity of the anti-core antibody response elicited by Co.120 alone or combined with pIDKCo was different regarding that induced by the pIDKCo alone. Our data indicate that the antibody response induced following DNA immunization can be modified by formulation strategies.

  4. Neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 affects anxiety behaviour and expression of the hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor in adolescent rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Huitao Fan; Lina Wang; Feng Guo; Shi Wei; Ruqian Zhao

    2010-03-01

    Early-life endocrine intervention may programme hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and cause psychiatric disorders in later life. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been implicated in the regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioural responses, but it is yet to be determined whether and how neonatal GLP-1 overexpression may modify hippocampal GR expression and thus programme adolescent behaviour in rats. Two-dayold pups were injected intramuscularly with vacant plasmid (VP) or plasmid DNA encoding secretory GLP-1 (GP). Anxiety-related behaviour was assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test at 8 weeks of age. Plasma corticosterone levels were measured with enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Protein and mRNA levels were determined by western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The DNA methylation status of the GR exon 17 promoter was determined by bisulphate sequencing PCR (BSP). GP rats exhibited anxiolytic behaviour compared with their VP counterparts. Hippocampal GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and GR mRNA expression were significantly elevated in GP rats without a significant difference in plasma corticosterone. Significant reduction in DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) expression was observed in GP rats disconnected with alterations in DNA methylation of the GR exon 17 promoter. Nevertheless, mRNA expression of nerve growth factor-inducible protein A (NGFI-A) was significantly elevated in GP rats. These results suggest that neonatal intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA encoding GLP-1 affects anxiety behaviour in adolescent rats, probably through NGFI-A-activated upregulation of hippocampal GR expression.

  5. Co-administration of a plasmid DNA encoding IL-15 improves long-term protection of a genetic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunization of mice with the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TS gene using plasmid DNA, adenoviral vector, and CpG-adjuvanted protein delivery has proven highly immunogenic and provides protection against acute lethal challenge. However, long-term protection induced by TS DNA vaccines has not been reported. The goal of the present work was to test whether the co-administration of a plasmid encoding IL-15 (pIL-15 could improve the duration of protection achieved through genetic vaccination with plasmid encoding TS (pTS alone. METHODOLOGY: We immunized BALB/c mice with pTS in the presence or absence of pIL-15 and studied immune responses [with TS-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, serum IgG ELISAs, intracellular cytokine staining (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, tetramer staining, and CFSE dilution assays] and protection against lethal systemic challenge at 1 to 6 months post vaccination. Mice receiving pTS alone developed robust TS-specific IFN-γ responses and survived a lethal challenge given within the first 3 months following immunization. The addition of pIL-15 to pTS vaccination did not significantly alter T cell responses or protection during this early post-vaccination period. However, mice vaccinated with both pTS and pIL-15 challenged 6 months post-vaccination were significantly more protected against lethal T. cruzi challenges than mice vaccinated with pTS alone (P6 months post immunization. Also, these TS-specific T cells were better able to expand after in vitro re-stimulation. CONCLUSION: Addition of pIL-15 during genetic vaccination greatly improved long-term T cell survival, memory T cell expansion, and long-term protection against the important human parasite, T. cruzi.

  6. Discoveries and functions of virus-encoded MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou 730046, ChinaVirus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) are a new kind of miRNAs that regulate the expression of target gene in host cells or viruses through inducing cleavage of mRNA, repressing translation, etc., and change the processes of host cells or replicate viruses to escape or resist immune surveillance of host and protect viruses themselves. It has become a hot topic to discover viral genes encoding miRNAs and their target genes, and to identify their functions. This review provides background information on the history of virally encoded miRNAs including their genomic distribution, functions and mechanisms.In addition, we discuss the similarities and differences between virus- and host-encoded miRNAs, the future directions of researches in viral miRNAs and their applications in diseases control and therapy.

  7. Use of mchI Encoding Immunity to the Antimicrobial Peptide Microcin H47 as a Plasmid Selection Marker in Attenuated Bacterial Live Vectors▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chee-Mun; Wang, Jin Yuan; Chinchilla, Magaly; Levine, Myron M.; Blackwelder, William C.; Galen, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Live attenuated bacterial strains expressing heterologous antigens represent an attractive vaccine development strategy. However, the use of drug resistance genes for the selection of expression plasmids introduced into live vectors poses theoretical health risks. Therefore, we developed a novel approach for plasmid selection based on immunity to the antimicrobial peptide microcin H47 (MccH47). Two expression plasmids encoding the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) were constructed; selection markers comprised either mchI, conferring immunity to MccH47 (pGEN222I), or bla (encoding β-lactamase), conferring conventional resistance to ampicillin (pGEN222). GFPuv-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses were analyzed in mice immunized intranasally either with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CVD 908-htrA or Shigella flexneri 2a CVD 1208S live vector and were boosted parenterally with purified GFPuv. Similar IgG antibody responses were observed for both pGEN222 and pGEN222I when either CVD 1208S or CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222I) was used as the carrier. Interestingly, CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222I) elicited a significantly higher IgG response than CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222). We also compared the priming potential of homologous priming either with CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222I) or CVD 1208S(pGEN222I) to heterologous priming first with CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222I) and then with CVD 1208S(pGEN222I) and vice versa. Immunization with two unrelated live vectors significantly enhanced the IgG responses compared to responses engendered by homologous CVD 908-htrA(pGEN222I) but not to those of CVD 1208S(pGEN222I). MccH47 offers an alternate system for plasmid selection in bacterial live vectors that greatly improves their clinical acceptability. Furthermore, the success of the heterologous priming strategy supports the feasibility of the future development of multivalent live vector-based immunization strategies against multiple human pathogens. PMID:18663003

  8. The Expression of the Plasmid DNA Encoding TGF-β1 in Endothelium after Injection into the Anterior Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡燕华; 黄琼; 姜发纲; 陈宏

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The method of gene transfer into corneal endothelium was investigated to provide afoundation for the study of TGF-β1 gene transfer to inhibit corneal graft rejection. Two days afterdirect injection of pMAM TGF-β1 mediated by liposome into the anterior chamber of rabbits, onehalf of corneas were made into paraffin slides and the endothelial layer was carefully torn from theother half to make a single layer slide of endothelia. By means of immunohistochemical technique,the plasmid pMAM TGF-β1 expression product TGF-β1 in the endothelia was detected. SpecificTGF-β1 expression was positive in the endothelia on both the paraffin slide and the single layerslide. The results showed that by direct injection into the anterior chamber, foreign plasmid DNAcould be transferred into the endothelia and its expression was obtained. This may provide a foun-dation for further study on TGF-β1 participating in local induction of corneal immune tolerance.

  9. Characterization of a multiresistant mosaic plasmid from a fish farm Sediment Exiguobacterium sp. isolate reveals aggregation of functional clinic-associated antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Chao; Wu, Jinyu; Liu, Li; Zhang, Gang; Feng, Jie

    2014-02-01

    The genus Exiguobacterium can adapt readily to, and survive in, diverse environments. Our study demonstrated that Exiguobacterium sp. strain S3-2, isolated from marine sediment, is resistant to five antibiotics. The plasmid pMC1 in this strain carries seven putative resistance genes. We functionally characterized these resistance genes in Escherichia coli, and genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase and macrolide phosphotransferase were considered novel resistance genes based on their low similarities to known resistance genes. The plasmid G+C content distribution was highly heterogeneous. Only the G+C content of one block, which shared significant similarity with a plasmid from Exiguobacterium arabatum, fit well with the mean G+C content of the host. The remainder of the plasmid was composed of mobile elements with a markedly lower G+C ratio than the host. Interestingly, five mobile elements located on pMC1 showed significant similarities to sequences found in pathogens. Our data provided an example of the link between resistance genes in strains from the environment and the clinic and revealed the aggregation of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria isolated from fish farms.

  10. Functional neural networks underlying semantic encoding of associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Garcia, M; Cantero, J L; Pomyalov, A; Boccaletti, S; Atienza, M

    2010-04-15

    Evidence suggests that theta oscillations recruit distributed cortical representations to improve associative encoding under semantically congruent conditions. Here we show that positive effects of semantic context on encoding and retrieval of associations are mediated by changes in the coupling pattern between EEG theta sources. During successful encoding of semantically congruent face-location associations, the right superior parietal lobe showed enhanced theta phase synchronization with other regions within the lateral posterior parietal lobe (PPL) and left medial temporal lobe (MTL). However, functional coordination involving the inferior parietal lobe was higher in the incongruent condition. These results suggest a differential engagement of top-down and bottom-up mechanisms during encoding of semantically congruent and incongruent episodic associations, respectively. Although retrieval processes operated on a similar neural network, the main difference with the study phase was the larger amount of functional links shown by the lateral prefrontal cortex with regions of the MTL and PPL. All together, these results suggest that theta oscillations mediate, at least partially, the positive effect of semantic congruence on associative memory by (i) optimizing top-down attentional mechanisms through enhanced theta phase synchronization between dorsal regions of the PPL and MTL and (ii) by adjusting the control of automatic attention to sensory and contextual information reactivated in the MTL through functional connections with the inferior parietal lobe during both encoding and retrieval processes.

  11. Increased B and T Cell Responses in M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin Vaccinated Pigs Co-Immunized with Plasmid DNA Encoding a Prototype Tuberculosis Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bruffaerts

    Full Text Available The only tuberculosis vaccine currently available, bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG is a poor inducer of CD8(+ T cells, which are particularly important for the control of latent tuberculosis and protection against reactivation. As the induction of strong CD8(+ T cell responses is a hallmark of DNA vaccines, a combination of BCG with plasmid DNA encoding a prototype TB antigen (Ag85A was tested. As an alternative animal model, pigs were primed with BCG mixed with empty vector or codon-optimized pAg85A by the intradermal route and boosted with plasmid delivered by intramuscular electroporation. Control pigs received unformulated BCG. The BCG-pAg85A combination stimulated robust and sustained Ag85A specific antibody, lymphoproliferative, IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ responses. IgG1/IgG2 antibody isotype ratio reflected the Th1 helper type biased response. T lymphocyte responses against purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD were induced in all (BCG vaccinated animals, but responses were much stronger in BCG-pAg85A vaccinated pigs. Finally, Ag85A-specific IFN-γ producing CD8(+ T cells were detected by intracellular cytokine staining and a synthetic peptide, spanning Ag85A131-150 and encompassing two regions with strong predicted SLA-1*0401/SLA-1*0801 binding affinity, was promiscuously recognized by 6/6 animals vaccinated with the BCG-pAg85A combination. Our study provides a proof of concept in a large mammalian species, for a new Th1 and CD8(+ targeting tuberculosis vaccine, based on BCG-plasmid DNA co-administration.

  12. Complete sequence of pOZ176, a 500-kilobase IncP-2 plasmid encoding IMP-9-mediated carbapenem resistance, from outbreak isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jianhui; Alexander, David C; Ma, Jennifer H; Déraspe, Maxime; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Roy, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa 96 (PA96) was isolated during a multicenter surveillance study in Guangzhou, China, in 2000. Whole-genome sequencing of this outbreak strain facilitated analysis of its IncP-2 carbapenem-resistant plasmid, pOZ176. The plasmid had a length of 500,839 bp and an average percent G+C content of 57%. Of the 618 predicted open reading frames, 65% encode hypothetical proteins. The pOZ176 backbone is not closely related to any plasmids thus far sequenced, but some similarity to pQBR103 of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 was observed. Two multiresistant class 1 integrons and several insertion sequences were identified. The blaIMP-9-carrying integron contained aacA4 → bla(IMP-9) → aacA4, flanked upstream by Tn21 tnpMRA and downstream by a complete tni operon of Tn402 and a mer module, named Tn6016. The second integron carried aacA4 → catB8a → bla(OXA-10) and was flanked by Tn1403-like tnpRA and a sul1-type 3' conserved sequence (3'-CS), named Tn6217. Other features include three resistance genes similar to those of Tn5, a tellurite resistance operon, and two pil operons. The replication and maintenance systems exhibit similarity to a genomic island of Ralstonia solanacearum GM1000. Codon usage analysis suggests the recent acquisition of bla(IMP-9). The origins of the integrons on pOZ176 indicated separate horizontal gene transfer events driven by antibiotic selection. The novel mosaic structure of pOZ176 suggests that it is derived from environmental bacteria.

  13. The rainbow trout TLR9 gene and its role in the immune responses elicited by a plasmid encoding the glycoprotein G of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Villaizan, M; Chico, V; Falco, A; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the factors contributing to the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccines based on the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glycoprotein G gene, through identifying the rainbow trout Toll-like receptor 9 (Omtlr9) gene that curiously contains an insertion of an incomplete transposon at the 5'-end of the third intron. Concerning the role played by this receptor in the fish innate defence, in response to the injection of a plasmid (pAE6) encoding or not the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV) glycoprotein G gene (pAE6-G), the presence of Omtlr9 transcripts remained unchanged in the fish secondary lymphoid organs while was highly increased at the injection site (muscle). The level of Omtlr9 transcripts correlated with those of cluster of differentiation 83 (cd83) and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (cxcr4), suggesting the recruitment of dendritic-like cells into the muscle as the source of Omtlr9 expressing cells. Transcription of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (tnf alpha) and interleukin-6 (il6) genes, two cytokines directly related to TLR9 induction with unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), was solely observed in head kidney and spleen of the fish immunised with pAE6-G. Thus, the glycoprotein G of VHSV could be more implicated in triggering the pathways for TNF-alpha and IL6 production than the recognition of the unmethylated CpG motifs of the plasmid backbone by OmTLR9. Therefore, our results seem to indicate that OmTLR9-mediated recognition of plasmid DNA is not the key of the innate immune recognition of the adjuvant elements of fish DNA vaccines.

  14. Reduction of Intimal Hyperplasia in Injured Rat Arteries Promoted by Catheter Balloons Coated with Polyelectrolyte Multilayers that Contain Plasmid DNA Encoding PKCδ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechler, Shane L.; Si, Yi; Yu, Yan; Ren, Jun; Liu, Bo; Lynn, David M.

    2012-01-01

    New therapeutic approaches that eliminate or reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia following balloon angioplasty could improve the efficacy of vascular interventions and improve the quality of life of patients suffering from vascular diseases. Here, we report that treatment of arteries using catheter balloons coated with thin polyelectrolyte-based films (‘polyelectrolyte multilayers’, PEMs) can substantially reduce intimal hyperplasia in an in vivo rat model of vascular injury. We used a layer-by-layer (LbL) process to coat the surfaces of inflatable catheter balloons with PEMs composed of nanolayers of a cationic poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1) and plasmid DNA (pPKCδ) encoding the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ), a regulator of apoptosis and other cell processes that has been demonstrated to reduce intimal hyperplasia in injured arterial tissue when administered via perfusion using viral vectors. Insertion of balloons coated with polymer 1/pPKCδ multilayers into injured arteries for 20 min resulted in local transfer of DNA and elevated levels of PKCδ expression in the media of treated tissue 3 days after delivery. IFC and IHC analysis revealed these levels of expression to promote downstream cellular processes associated with up-regulation of apoptosis. Analysis of arterial tissue 14 days after treatment revealed polymer 1/pPKCδ-coated balloons to reduce the occurrence of intimal hyperplasia by ~60% compared to balloons coated with films containing empty plasmid vectors. Our results demonstrate the potential therapeutic value of this nanotechnology-based approach to local gene delivery in the clinically important context of balloon-mediated vascular interventions. These PEM-based methods could also prove useful for other in vivo applications that require short-term, surface-mediated transfer of plasmid DNA. PMID:23069712

  15. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Major Virulence Factors Dly, Plasmid-Encoded HlyA, and Chromosome-Encoded HlyA Are Secreted via the Type II Secretion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Amable J.; Vences, Ana; Husmann, Matthias; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is a marine bacterium that causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. Previously, we had determined a major role of pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded Dly (damselysin) and HlyA (HlyApl) and the chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch) hemolysins in virulence. However, the mechanisms by which these toxins are secreted remain unknown. In this study, we found that a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant in a plasmidless strain showing an impaired hemolytic phenotype contained an insertion in epsL, a component of a type II secretion system (T2SS). Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange confirmed the specific involvement of epsL in HlyAch secretion. In addition, mutation of epsL in a pPHDD1-harboring strain caused an almost complete abolition of hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, indicating that epsL plays a major role in secretion of the plasmid-encoded HlyApl and Dly. This was further demonstrated by analysis of different combinations of hemolysin gene mutants and by strain-strain complementation assays. We also found that mutation of the putative prepilin peptidase gene pilD severely affected hemolysis, which dropped at levels inferior to those of epsL mutants. Promoter expression analyses suggested that impairment of hemolysin secretion in epsL and pilD mutants might constitute a signal that affects hemolysin and T2SS gene expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, single epsL and pilD mutations caused a drastic decrease in virulence for mice, demonstrating a major role of T2SS and pilD in P. damselae subsp. damselae virulence. PMID:25583529

  16. Construction of Eukaryotic Expressing Plasmids Encoding HA and HA1 of Influenza A Virus and Their Transient Expression in HEK293 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Weidong; LI Mingyuan; CAO Kang; YANG Jing; SHI Qiaofa; WANG Baoning; JIANG Zhonghua; LI Hong

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the feasibility and protective efficiency of influenza DNA vaccine, we constructed eukaryotic expressing plasmids encoding HA and HA1 of influenza A virus (A/PR/8/34) and studied their expression in HEK293 cells. HA and HA1 genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into pcDNA3. 1 (+) to generate pcDNA3. 1 (+)/HA and pcDNA3.1 (+)/HA1, respectively. After verification of the cloning fidelity by restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR, and sequencing, pcDNA3.1 (+)/HA and pcDNA3.1 (+)/HA1 were transfected into HEK293 cells using PolyFect Transfection Reagent. Immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the transient expressing cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed strong expression of target gene in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with either pcDNA3. 1 (+)/HA or pcDNA3. 1 (+)/HA1. Therefore, the results confirm the successful construction of eukaryotic expressing plasmids capable of driving the eukaryotic expression of influenza virus antigen HA and HA1, which is likely to provide a basis for both further investigation of the mechanism of influenza viral infection and the development of influenza DNA vaccine.

  17. A Recombinant DNA Plasmid Encoding the sIL-4R-NAP Fusion Protein Suppress Airway Inflammation in an OVA-Induced Mouse Model of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Guo; Ji, Zhenyu; Huang, Xiabing; Ding, Cong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xiaolong; Du, Mingxuan; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. It was prevalently perceived that Th2 cells played the crucial role in asthma pathogenesis, which has been identified as the important target for anti-asthma therapy. The soluble IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R), which is the decoy receptor for Th2 cytokine IL-4, has been reported to be effective in treating asthma in phase I/II clinical trail. To develop more efficacious anti-asthma agent, we attempt to test whether the Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a novel TLR2 agonist, would enhance the efficacy of sIL-4R in anti-asthma therapy. In our work, we constructed a pcDNA3.1-sIL-4R-NAP plasmid, named PSN, encoding fusion protein of murine sIL-4R and HP-NAP. PSN significantly inhibited airway inflammation, decreased the serum OVA-specific IgE levels and remodeled the Th1/Th2 balance. Notably, PSN is more effective on anti-asthma therapy comparing with plasmid only expressing sIL-4R.

  18. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne;

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We have characterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... of Clp ATPases in acquired environmental fitness and highlights the challenges of mobile genetic elements in fighting nosocomial infections....... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...

  19. Identification and Function of MicroRNAs Encoded by Herpesviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qing Bai; Xiu-fen Lei; Lin-ding Wang; Shou-jiang Gao

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in eukaryotes,plants and some viruses.It is increasingly clear that miRNAs-encoded by viruses can affect the viral life cycle and host physiology.Viral miRNAs could repress the innate and adaptive host immunity,modulate cellular signaling pathways,and regulate the expression of cellular and viral genes.These functions facilitate viral acute and persistent infections,and have profound effects on the host cell survival and disease progression.Here,we discuss the miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses,and their regulatory roles involved in virus-host interactions.

  20. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  1. Chitosan-plasmid DNA nanoparticles encoding small hairpin RNA targeting MMP-3 and -13 to inhibit the expression of dedifferentiation related genes in expanded chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingxin; Fan, Xiangli; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Fangfei; Li, Xiaojian; Xiong, Chuan; Zhang, Chunli; Fan, Hongbin

    2014-02-01

    Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and -13 can lead to the dedifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes. After implanting dedifferentiated cells for cartilage defect repair, graft failure may occur. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) is a powerful genetic tool to reduce the expression of target genes. This study investigated the effects of chitosan-plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles encoding shRNA targeting MMP-3 and -13 on the dedifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes. The objective was to optimize the parameters of chitosan-pDNA formulation for achieving higher efficiency of pDNA delivery and gene silencing. The chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process. Then the characteristics including size, shape, stability, and transfection efficiency were compared in different groups. The results indicated that chitosan of 800 kDa at N/P ratio of 4 and pH 7.0 was optimal to prepare chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles. These nanoparticles showed high DNA loading efficiency (95.8 ± 1.5%) and high gene transfection efficiency (24.5 ± 1.6%). After the expanded chondrocytes were transfected by chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles, MMP-3-610 and MMP-13-2024 groups showed greater suppression in mRNA and protein levels. The results indicated that chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles encoding shRNA targeting MMP-3 and -13 had great potential in silencing the dedifferentiation-related genes for regenerating prolonged and endurable cartilage.

  2. Preparation of chitosan-plasmid DNA nanoparticles encoding interleukin-12 and their expression in CT-26 colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Valizadeh, Hadi; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Baradaran, Behzad; Jalali, Mohammad Barzegar; Dobakhti, Faramarz; Lotfipour, Farzaneh

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (Il-12) as a cytokine has been proved to possess antitumor effects via stimulating the immune system. Non-viral gene delivery systems exhibit low toxicity and are easier to prepare compared to their viral counterparts. In this study, we aimed to prepare plasmid DNA loaded chitosan nanoparticles for expression of Il-12 and to evaluate their physicochemical characteristics, cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in Murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells. Nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process at different N/P ratios and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, morphology, encapsulation efficiency and polyplex formation. The cytotoxicities and transfection efficiencies of the prepared polyplexes were evaluated by MTT assay and ELISA (for hIL-12, p70), respectively. Size and zeta potential varied from 76.73 to 867.03 nm and between 5.68 and 16.77 mV, respectively. Strong attachment of the DNA to chitosan was observed after polyplex preparation. Encapsulation efficiencies were high (72.97-94.87%). The transfection efficiencies of the prepared complexes were obviously higher than those of naked pDNA when N/P ratios were between 16 and 60. Maximum level of phIL-12 expression was obtained at (N/P = 16) with mean particle size of 381.83±82.77 nm (polydispersity index=0.44) indicating the improved transfection of pUMVC3-hIL12 about 2.80 times compared to that of the naked pUMVC3-hIL12. Prepared polyplexes were nontoxic to CT-26 cells. Chitosan-DNA nanoparticles at N/P = 16 with minimal cytotoxicity, can be used as suitable candidate for Il-12 delivery. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a novel, plasmid-encoded trimethoprim-resistant dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus MUR313.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, G E; Langen, H; Page, M G; Then, R L; Stüber, D

    1995-09-01

    In recent years resistance to the antibacterial agent trimethoprim (Tmp) has become more widespread, and several trimethoprim-resistant (Tmpr) dihydrofolate reductases (DHFRs) have been described from gram-negative bacteria. In staphylococci, only one Tmpr DHFR has been described, the type S1 DHFR, which is encoded by the dfrA gene found on transposon Tn4003. In order to investigate the coincidence of high-level Tmp resistance and the presence of dfrA, we analyzed the DNAs from various Tmpr staphylococci for the presence of dfrA sequences by PCR with primers specific for the thyE-dfrA genes from Tn4003. We found that 30 or 33 isolates highly resistant to Tmp (MICs, > or = 512 micrograms/ml) contained dfrA sequences, whereas among the Tmpr (MICs, amino acids, designated S2DHFR, encoded by the longer open reading frame was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. The molecular size of the recombinant S2DHFR was determined by ion spray mass spectrometry to be 19,821.2 +/- 2 Da, which is in agreement with the theoretical value of 19,822 Da. In addition, the recombinant S2DHFR was shown to exhibit DHFR activity and to be highly resistant to Tmp.

  4. Partition of the Linear Plasmid N15: Interactions of N15 Partition Functions with the sop Locus of the F Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    A locus close to one end of the linear N15 prophage closely resembles the sop operon which governs partition of the F plasmid; the promoter region contains similar operator sites, and the two putative gene products have extensive amino acid identity with the SopA and -B proteins of F. Our aim was to ascertain whether the N15 sop homologue functions in partition, to identify the centromere site, and to examine possible interchangeability of function with the F Sop system. When expressed at a m...

  5. Novel RepA-MCM proteins encoded in plasmids pTAU4, pORA1 and pTIK4 from Sulfolobus neozealandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bo Bjørn

    2005-01-01

    Three plasmids isolated from the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus neozealandicus were characterized. Plasmids pTAU4 (7,192 bp), pORA1 (9,689 bp) and pTIK4 (13,638 bp) show unusual properties that distinguish them from previously characterized cryptic plasmids of the genus Sulfolobus. Plas...

  6. Frequency of conjugative transfer of plasmid-encoded ISEcp1 - blaCTX-M-15 and aac(6'-lb-cr genes in Enterobacteriaceae at a tertiary care center in Lebanon - role of transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araj George F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of transfer of genes encoding resistance to antimicrobial agents was determined by conjugation in ESBL-producing and/or fluoroquinolone or aminoglycoside resistant Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates at a tertiary care center in Lebanon. In addition, the role of tra genes encoding transferases in mediating conjugation was assessed. Methods Conjugation experiments were done on 53 ESBL-producing and/or fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae and ESBL-producing S. sonnei isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on parent and transconjugant isolates, and PCR amplifications on plasmid extracts of the resistance-encoding genes: blaCTX-M-15 with the ISEcp1 insertion sequence, the aac(6'-lb-cr and qnrS genes, as well as tra encoding transferases genes were done. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed to demonstrate whether conjugative isolates are clonal and whether they are linked epidemiologically to a particular source. Results Antimicrobial susceptibility testing on transconjugants revealed that 26 out of 53 (49% ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to the recipients. Transfer of high-level resistance to the transconjugants encoded by the blaCTX-M-15 gene downstream the ISEcp1 insertion sequence against 3rd generation cephalosporins, and of low-level resistance against ciprofloxacin, and variable levels of resistance against aminoglycosides encoded by aac(6'-lb-cr gene, were observed in transconjugants. tra encoding transferase genes were detected exclusively in conjugative isolates. Conclusion In conclusion, the frequency of transfer of antimicrobial resistance in non clonal Enterobacteriaceae at the tertiary care center by conjugation was 49%. Conjugation occurred in isolates expressing the tra encoding transferase genes. Multiple conjugative strains harboring the plasmid encoded antimicrobial resistant genes were circulating in

  7. Vaccination of Plasmid DNA Encoding Somatostatin Gene Fused with GP5 Gene of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Induces Anti-GP5 Antibodies and Promotes Growth Performance in Immunized Pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Somatostatin (SS) is a hormone that inhibits the secretion of growth hormone. Immunization against SS can promote the growth of animals. This paper described the effects of DNA immunization on the growth and antibody response in mice and pigs immunized with a plasmid DNA encoding SS fused with GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A fragment of 180 bp encoding partial SS gene was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pigs, and cloned as a fusion gene with PRRSV GP5 in plasmid pISGRTK3. Three times of immunization with the resulting plasmid pISG-SS/GP5 induced anti-GP5 antibodies in BALB/c mice and pigs, as demonstrated by GP5-specific ELISA and immunoblotting. Compared with pigs immunized with empty vector pISGRTK3, the growth performance of pigs immunized with pISG-SS/GP5 was increased by 11.1% on the 13th week after the last vaccination. The results indicated the plasmid DNA encoding SS and PRRSV GP5 fusion gene elicited anti-GP5 antibodies and improved the growth performance of immunized pigs.

  8. Megaplasmids encode differing combinations of lantibiotics in Streptococcus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wescombe, Philip A; Burton, Jeremy P; Cadieux, Peter A; Klesse, Nikolai A; Hyink, Otto; Heng, Nicholas C K; Chilcott, Chris N; Reid, Gregor; Tagg, John R

    2006-10-01

    Streptococcus salivarius strains commonly produce bacteriocins as putative anti-competitor or signalling molecules. Here we report that bacteriocin production by the oral probiotic strain S. salivarius K12 is encoded by a large (ca. 190 kb) plasmid. Oral cavity transmission of the plasmid from strain K12 to a plasmid-negative variant of this bacterium was demonstrated in two subjects. Tests of additional S. salivarius strains showed large (up to ca. 220 kb) plasmids present in bacteriocin-producing isolates. Various combinations (up to 3 per plasmid) of loci encoding the known streptococcal lantibiotics salivaricin A, salivaricin B, streptin and SA-FF22 were localised to these plasmids. Since all bacteriocin-producing strains of S. salivarius tested to date appear to harbour plasmids, it appears that they may function as mobile repositories for bacteriocin loci, especially those of the lantibiotic class.

  9. An Improved Method for Including Upper Size Range Plasmids in Metamobilomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Riber, Leise; Luo, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    cloning vector (pBR322), and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10), to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose......, as gene functions associated with these plasmids, such as conjugation, was exclusively encoded in the data output generated through the modified protocol. Thus, with the suggested modification, access to a large uncharacterized pool of accessory elements that reside on medium-to-large plasmids has been...

  10. Detection and sequencing of plasmid encoded tetracycline resistance determinants (tetA andtetB) from food-borneBacillus cereus isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mudasir Ali Rather; Rabinder Singh Aulakh; Jatinder Paul Singh Gill; Abdul Qayoom Mir; Mir Nadeem Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the detection and sequencing of plasmid encoded tetracycline resistance genes(tetA andtetB) from food-borne and standard strains ofBacillus cereus(B. cereus).Methods:APCR was carried out to detect the tetracycline resistance genes(tetA and tetB) in food-borneB. cereus strains and the amplified products were sequenced.Results:The phenotypic resistance against tetracycline was observed in39 of the118 food-borne isolates and two reference strains(MTCC430 andMTCC1307) ofB. cereus.Among the phenotypically resistant isolates,tetA was detected in36 food-borne isolates and two reference strains(MTCC 430 andMTCC1307), whereas,tetB was detected in12 food-borne isolates andMTCC1307 strain. Conclusions:A close association was therefore found between phenotypic resistance against tetracycline and presence of tetracycline resistance genes.ThetetA andtetB gene fragments were amplified, purified and sequenced.The gene sequences of the isolates studied herein were found similar to tetA andtetB gene sequences of other bacteria available inNCBI.The occurrence oftetA and tetB genes inB. cereus indicate the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance determinants from other bacteria intoB. cereus.The transfer of these resistant determinants to other potentially pathogenic bacteria may be a matter of great concern.

  11. Heat resistance mediated by a new plasmid encoded Clp ATPase, ClpK, as a possible novel mechanism for nosocomial persistence of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojer, Martin Saxtorph; Struve, Carsten; Ingmer, Hanne;

    2010-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We have characterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably thermoto......Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. We have characterized a K. pneumoniae strain responsible for a series of critical infections in an intensive care unit over a two-year period. The strain was found to be remarkably...... resistant to lethal heat shock. Furthermore, one third of a collection of nosocomial K. pneumoniae isolates carry clpK and exhibit a heat resistant phenotype. The discovery of ClpK as a plasmid encoded factor and its profound impact on thermal stress survival sheds new light on the biological relevance...... of Clp ATPases in acquired environmental fitness and highlights the challenges of mobile genetic elements in fighting nosocomial infections....

  12. Genomic and functional characterization of qnr-encoding plasmids from municipal wastewater biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Ella eKaplan; Noa eSela; Adi eDoron-faigenboim; Shiri eNavon-Venezia; Edouard eJurkevitch; Eddie eCytryn

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be hotspots for antibiotic resistance since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is e...

  13. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be “hotspots” for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon i...

  14. Functional transcriptomics in the post-ENCODE era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Jonathan M; Frankish, Adam; Harrow, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous effort committed to the annotation of the human genome sequence, most notably perhaps in the form of the ENCODE project. One of the major findings of ENCODE, and other genome analysis projects, is that the human transcriptome is far larger and more complex than previously thought. This complexity manifests, for example, as alternative splicing within protein-coding genes, as well as in the discovery of thousands of long noncoding RNAs. It is also possible that significant numbers of human transcripts have not yet been described by annotation projects, while existing transcript models are frequently incomplete. The question as to what proportion of this complexity is truly functional remains open, however, and this ambiguity presents a serious challenge to genome scientists. In this article, we will discuss the current state of human transcriptome annotation, drawing on our experience gained in generating the GENCODE gene annotation set. We highlight the gaps in our knowledge of transcript functionality that remain, and consider the potential computational and experimental strategies that can be used to help close them. We propose that an understanding of the true overlap between transcriptional complexity and functionality will not be gained in the short term. However, significant steps toward obtaining this knowledge can now be taken by using an integrated strategy, combining all of the experimental resources at our disposal.

  15. Plasmid and chromosome partitioning: surprises from phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    Plasmids encode partitioning genes (par) that are required for faithful plasmid segregation at cell division. Initially, par loci were identified on plasmids, but more recently they were also found on bacterial chromosomes. We present here a phylogenetic analysis of par loci from plasmids and chr...

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp incFIIY plasmid encoding blaIMI-3-mediated carbapenem resistance, from river sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjun eDang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediment of Haihe River using E. coli CV601 (gfp-tagged as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to incFIIY group and harbors a backbone region shares high homology and gene synteny to several other incF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1 and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one blaIMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The blaIMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the blaIMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of blaIMI carbapenemase genes.

  17. Conjugation efficiency depends on intra and intercellular interactions between distinct plasmids: Plasmids promote the immigration of other plasmids but repress co-colonizing plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode the genes responsible for the synthesis of conjugative pili and plasmid transfer. Expression of the conjugative machinery (including conjugative pili) may be costly to bacteria, not only due to the energetic/metabolic cost associated with their expression but also because they serve as receptors for certain viruses. Consequently, the presence of two plasmids in the same cell may be disadvantageous to each plasmid, because they may impose a higher fitness cost on the host. Therefore, plasmids may encode mechanisms to cope with co-resident plasmids. Moreover, it is possible that the transfer rate of a plasmid is affected by the presence of a distinct plasmid in the recipient cell. In this work, we measured transfer rates of twelve natural plasmids belonging to seven incompatibility groups in three situations, namely when: (i) donor cells contain a plasmid and recipient cells are plasmid-free; (ii) donor cells contain two unrelated plasmids and recipient cells are plasmid-free; and (iii) half of the cells contain a given plasmid and the other half contain another, unrelated, plasmid. In the third situation, recipient cells of a plasmid are the donor cells of the other plasmid. We show that there are more negative interactions (reduction of a plasmid's conjugative efficiency) between plasmids if they reside in the same cell than if they reside in different cells. However, if plasmids interacted intercellularly, the transfer rate of one of the plasmids was often higher (when the unrelated conjugative plasmid was present in the recipient cell) than if the recipient cell was plasmid-free - a positive effect. Experimental data retrieved from the study of mutant plasmids not expressing conjugative pili on the cell surface suggest that positive effects result from a higher efficiency of mating pair formation. Overall, our results suggest that negative interactions are significantly more frequent when plasmids occupy the same cell. Such

  18. Oligomerization and DNA-binding capacity of Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded on IncP-7 carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chiho; Yun, Choong-Soo; Umeda, Takashi; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded on plasmid pCAR1, is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on both pCAR1 and the host chromosome. To clarify the mode of function of Pmr, we performed gel filtration chromatography analysis and protein-protein cross-linking, and found that Pmr forms homo-oligomers, consisting of its homodimers. We also found, by atomic force microscopy, that Pmr has DNA-bridging capacity. From these results, Pmr was deduced to have features common to H-NS family proteins. Additionally, evaluating protein-DNA affinity is important to clarify the mode of function of Pmr, and hence we performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Though Pmr formed high-order protein-DNA complexes and did not show preference for nucleic acid sequences, the C-terminal region of Pmr did, suggesting that the DNA-binding affinity of Pmr can be evaluated by using its C-terminal region.

  19. Structure and function of a cyanophage-encoded peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy A; Lorimer, Don; Youle, Merry; Witte, Pam; Craig, Tim; Abendroth, Jan; Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Robert A; Segall, Anca M; Burgin, Alex B

    2013-06-01

    Bacteriophages encode auxiliary metabolic genes that support more efficient phage replication. For example, cyanophages carry several genes to maintain host photosynthesis throughout infection, shuttling the energy and reducing power generated away from carbon fixation and into anabolic pathways. Photodamage to the D1/D2 proteins at the core of photosystem II necessitates their continual replacement. Synthesis of functional proteins in bacteria requires co-translational removal of the N-terminal formyl group by a peptide deformylase (PDF). Analysis of marine metagenomes to identify phage-encoded homologs of known metabolic genes found that marine phages carry PDF genes, suggesting that their expression during infection might benefit phage replication. We identified a PDF homolog in the genome of Synechococcus cyanophage S-SSM7. Sequence analysis confirmed that it possesses the three absolutely conserved motifs that form the active site in PDF metalloproteases. Phylogenetic analysis placed it within the Type 1B subclass, most closely related to the Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF, but lacking the C-terminal α-helix characteristic of that group. PDF proteins from this phage and from Synechococcus elongatus were expressed and characterized. The phage PDF is the more active enzyme and deformylates the N-terminal tetrapeptides from D1 proteins more efficiently than those from ribosomal proteins. Solution of the X-ray/crystal structures of those two PDFs to 1.95 Å resolution revealed active sites identical to that of the Type 1B Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF. Taken together, these findings show that many cyanophages encode a PDF with a D1 substrate preference that adds to the repertoire of genes used by phages to maintain photosynthetic activities.

  20. Molecular analysis of the bacteriocin-encoding plasmid pDGL1 from Enterococcus durans and genetic characterization of the durancin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterococci constitute a significant component of lactic acid bacteria normally present in the intestinal microflora and include strains that produce bacteriocins. The genetic determinants for durancin GL in Enterococcus durans 41D were identified on the 8,347 bp plasmid pDGL1 by plasmid curing exp...

  1. The secretome of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 type II secretion system reveals a novel plasmid encoded phospholipase that could be implicated in lung colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhosseiny, Noha M; El-Tayeb, Ossama M; Yassin, Aymen S; Lory, Stephen; Attia, Ahmed S

    2016-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections are compounded with a striking lack of treatment options. In many Gram-negative bacteria, secreted proteins play an important early role in avoiding host defences. Typically, these proteins are targeted to the external environment or into host cells using dedicated transport systems. Despite the fact that medically relevant species of Acinetobacter possess a type II secretion system (T2SS), only recently, its significance as an important pathway for delivering virulence factors has gained attention. Using in silico analysis to characterize the genetic determinants of the T2SS, which are found clustered in other organisms, in Acinetobacter species, they appear to have a unique genetic organization and are distributed throughout the genome. When compared to other T2SS orthologs, individual components of the T2SS apparatus showed the highest similarity to those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A mutant of Acinetobacter baumannii strain ATCC 17978 lacking the secretin component of the T2SS (ΔgspD), together with a trans-complemented mutant, were tested in a series of in vitro and in vivo assays to determine the role of T2SS in pathogenicity. The ΔgspD mutant displayed decreased lipolytic activity, associated with attenuated colonization ability in a murine pneumonia model. These phenotypes are linked to LipAN, a novel plasmid-encoded phospholipase, identified through mass spectroscopy as a T2SS substrate. Recombinant LipAN showed specific phospholipase activity in vitro. Proteomics on the T2-dependent secretome of ATCC 17978 strain revealed its potential dedication to the secretion of a number of lipolytic enzymes, among others which could contribute to its virulence. This study highlights the role of T2SS as an active contributor to the virulence of A. baumannii potentially through secretion of a newly identified phospholipase.

  2. Increasing versatility of the DNA vaccines through modification of the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Alicia; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizan, María Del Mar; Chico, Verónica; Medina-Gali, Regla María; Perez, Luis; Coll, Julio; Estepa, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    The route of administration of DNA vaccines can play a key role in the magnitude and quality of the immune response triggered after their administration. DNA vaccines containing the gene of the membrane-anchored glycoprotein (gpG) of the fish rhabdoviruses infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral haematopoietic septicaemia virus (VHSV), perhaps the most effective DNA vaccines generated so far, confer maximum protection when injected intramuscularly in contrast to their low efficacy when injected intraperitoneally. In this work, taking as a model the DNA vaccine against VHSV, we focused on developing a more versatile DNA vaccine capable of inducing protective immunity regardless of the administration route used. For that, we designed two alternative constructs to gpG₁₋₅₀₇ (the wild type membrane-anchored gpG of VHSV) encoding either a soluble (gpG₁₋₄₆₂) or a secreted soluble (gpG(LmPle20-462)) form of the VHSV-gpG. In vivo immunisation/challenge assays showed that only gpG(LmPle20-462) (the secreted soluble form) conferred protective immunity against VHSV lethal challenge via both intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection, being this the first description of a fish viral DNA vaccine that confers protection when administered intraperitoneally. Moreover, this new DNA vaccine construct also conferred protection when administered in the presence of an oil adjuvant suggesting that DNA vaccines against rhabdoviruses could be included in the formulation of current multicomponent-intaperitoneally injectable fish vaccines formulated with an oil adjuvant. On the other hand, a strong recruitment of membrane immunoglobulin expressing B cells, mainly membrane IgT, as well as t-bet expressing T cells, at early times post-immunisation, was specifically observed in the fish immunised with the secreted soluble form of the VHSV-gpG protein; this may indicate that the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo

  3. Increasing versatility of the DNA vaccines through modification of the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo transfected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Martinez-Lopez

    Full Text Available The route of administration of DNA vaccines can play a key role in the magnitude and quality of the immune response triggered after their administration. DNA vaccines containing the gene of the membrane-anchored glycoprotein (gpG of the fish rhabdoviruses infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV or viral haematopoietic septicaemia virus (VHSV, perhaps the most effective DNA vaccines generated so far, confer maximum protection when injected intramuscularly in contrast to their low efficacy when injected intraperitoneally. In this work, taking as a model the DNA vaccine against VHSV, we focused on developing a more versatile DNA vaccine capable of inducing protective immunity regardless of the administration route used. For that, we designed two alternative constructs to gpG₁₋₅₀₇ (the wild type membrane-anchored gpG of VHSV encoding either a soluble (gpG₁₋₄₆₂ or a secreted soluble (gpG(LmPle20-462 form of the VHSV-gpG. In vivo immunisation/challenge assays showed that only gpG(LmPle20-462 (the secreted soluble form conferred protective immunity against VHSV lethal challenge via both intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection, being this the first description of a fish viral DNA vaccine that confers protection when administered intraperitoneally. Moreover, this new DNA vaccine construct also conferred protection when administered in the presence of an oil adjuvant suggesting that DNA vaccines against rhabdoviruses could be included in the formulation of current multicomponent-intaperitoneally injectable fish vaccines formulated with an oil adjuvant. On the other hand, a strong recruitment of membrane immunoglobulin expressing B cells, mainly membrane IgT, as well as t-bet expressing T cells, at early times post-immunisation, was specifically observed in the fish immunised with the secreted soluble form of the VHSV-gpG protein; this may indicate that the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in

  4. Functional correlates of distractor suppression during spatial working memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toepper, M; Gebhardt, H; Beblo, T; Thomas, C; Driessen, M; Bischoff, M; Blecker, C R; Vaitl, D; Sammer, G

    2010-02-17

    Executive working memory operations are related to prefrontal regions in the healthy brain. Moreover, neuroimaging data provide evidence for a functional dissociation of ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Most authors either suggest a modality-specific or a function-specific prefrontal cortex organization. In the present study we particularly aimed at the identification of different prefrontal cerebral areas that are involved in executive inhibitory processes during spatial working memory encoding. In an fMRI study (functional magnetic resonance imaging) we examined the neural correlates of spatial working memory processing by varying the amount of executive demands of the task. Twenty healthy volunteers performed the Corsi Block-Tapping test (CBT) during fMRI. The CBT requires the storage and reproduction of spatial target sequences. In a second condition, we presented an adapted version of the Block-Suppression-Test (BST). The BST is based on the original CBT but additionally requires the active suppression of visual distraction within the target sequences. In comparison to the CBT performance, particularly the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9) showed more activity during the BST condition. Our results show that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role for executive controlled inhibition of spatial distraction. Furthermore, our findings are in line with the processing model of a functional dorsolateral-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex organization.

  5. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F; Suttle, Curtis A

    2016-06-14

    Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. Filamentous cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Nostoc are widespread and ecologically important in freshwater, yet little is known about the genomic content of their viruses. Here we report the first genomic analysis of cyanophages infecting

  6. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stimac

    Full Text Available Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET (TS plasmid, in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid, in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  7. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  8. KPC-mediated resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae in two hospitals in Padua, Italy, June 2009-December 2011: massive spreading of a KPC-3-encoding plasmid and involvement of non-intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Sara N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs producing bacteria have emerged as a cause of multidrug-resistant nosocomial infections worldwide. KPCs are plasmid-encoded enzymes capable of hydrolysing a broad spectrum of beta-lactams, including carbapenems and monobactams, therefore worryingly limiting antimicrobial treatment options. Analysis of circulating bacterial strains and KPC alleles may help understanding the route of KPC dissemination and therefore help containing the infection. Methods KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae dissemination in two 1580- and 300- bed hospitals in Padua, Italy, from initial outbreak in 2009 to late 2011 was analysed. Molecular and clinical epidemiology, including bacterial strains, KPC-encoding plasmid sequences and associated resistance genes, involved hospital wards and relocation of patients were described. Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing and MIC of carbapenems on clinical isolates were performed. Detection of resistance genes was obtained by PCR and sequencing. MLST, PFGE and ERIC were used for molecular genotyping. Plasmid analysis was obtained by digestion with restriction enzymes and deep sequencing. Results KPC-positive clinical samples were isolated from nearly 200 patients. In the initial outbreak intensive care units were almost exclusively involved, while medical, surgical and long-term wards were successively massively concerned. Analysis of KPC alleles, plasmids and bacterial sequence types (STs indicated that during the initial outbreak KPC-3 in ST258 and KPC-2 in ST147 were each confined in one of the two surveilled hospitals. While KPC-2 dissemination was effectively contained, KPC-3 in ST258 cross-spreading was observed. The simultaneous presence of two carbapenemases, VIM-1 and KPC-2, in the same isolate was also observed in three patients. Total sequencing of plasmid content of two KPC-3 strains showed novel association of resistance plasmids. Conclusions The

  9. Self-encoding Functional Resin Applying for Combinatorial Chemistry and High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lei; CHEN Tong-sheng

    2004-01-01

    A novel solid phase organic synthesis resin was synthesized for combinatorial high-throughput screening,which based on FTIR spectra self-encoding functional resin technology. A new deconvolution strategy termed position encoding deconvolution had illustrated and was compared with some popular combinatorial deconvolution strategies in efficiency and information content. The mimic high throughput screening of hexapeptide library successfully proved the applying of the self-encoding functional resin technology and the position encoding deconvolution strategy.

  10. Structural, functional and mutational analysis of the pfr gene encoding a ferritin from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereswill, S; Waidner, U; Odenbreit, S; Lichte, F; Fassbinder, F; Bode, G; Kist, M

    1998-09-01

    The function of the pfr gene encoding the ferritin from Helicobacter pylori was investigated using the Fur titration assay (FURTA) in Escherichia coli, and by characterization of a pfr-deficient mutant strain of H. pylori. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the pfr region is conserved among strains (> 95% nucleotide identity). Two transcriptional start sites, at least one of them preceded by a sigma 70-dependent promoter, were identified. Provision of the H. pylori pfr gene on a multicopy plasmid resulted in reversal of the Fur-mediated repression of the fhuF gene in E. coli, thus enabling the use of the FURTA for cloning of the ferritin gene. Inactivation of the pfr gene, either by insertion of a resistance cassette or by deletion of the up- and downstream segments, abolished this function. Immunoblot analysis with a Pfr-specific antiserum detected the Pfr protein in H. pylori and in E. coli carrying the pfr gene on a plasmid. Pfr-deficient mutants of H. pylori were generated by marker-exchange mutagenesis. These were more susceptible than the parental strain to killing by various metal ions including irons, copper and manganese, whereas conditions of oxidative stress or iron deprivation were not discriminative. Analysis by element-specific electron microscopy revealed that growth of H. pylori in the presence of iron induces the formation of two kinds of cytoplasmic aggregates: large vacuole-like bodies and smaller granules containing iron in association with oxygen or phosphorus. Neither of these structures was detected in the pfr-deficient mutant strain. Furthermore, the ferritin accumulated under iron overload and the pfr-deficient mutant strains lacked expression of a 12 kDa protein which was negatively regulated by iron in the parental strain. The results indicate that the nonhaem-iron ferritin is involved in the formation of iron-containing subcellular structures and contributes to metal resistance of H. pylori. Further evidence for an interaction of

  11. NDM-1 encoded by a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid p3SP-NDM in clinical Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenhong; Li, Hongxia; Feng, Jiao; Li, Yuxue; Chen, Xin; Guo, Xuemin; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Li; Lin, Lei; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Changting; Yin, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacter aerogenes strain named 3-SP was isolated from a human case of pneumonia in a Chinese teaching hospital. NDM-1 carbapenemase is produced by a pNDM-BJ01-like conjugative plasmid designated p3SP-NDM to account for carbapenem resistance of 3-SP. p3SP-NDM was fully sequenced and compared with all publically available pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids. The genetic differences between p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 include only 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 1 bp deletion and a 706 bp deletion. p3SP-NDM and pNDM-BJ01 harbor an identical Tn125 element organized as ISAba125, bla NDM-1, ble MBL, ΔtrpF, dsbC, cutA, ΔgroES, groEL, ISCR27, and ISAba125. The bla NDM-1 surrounding regions in these pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have a conserved linear organization ISAba14-aphA6-Tn125-unknown IS, with considerable genetic differences identified within or immediately downstream of Tn125. All reported pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids are exclusively found in Acinetobacter, whereas this is the first report of identification of a pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid in Enterobacteriaceae.

  12. Molecular cloning and functional expression analysis of a new gene encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from hazel (Corylus avellana L. Gasaway).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yechun; Miao, Zhiqi; Tang, Kexuan

    2010-10-01

    Geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) [EC 2.5.1.29] catalyzes the biosynthesis of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), which is a key precursor for diterpenes such as taxol. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding GGPPS (designated as CgGGPPS) was cloned and characterized from hazel (Corylus avellana L. Gasaway), a taxol-producing angiosperms. The full-length cDNA of CgGGPPS was 1515 bp with a 1122 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 373 amino acid polypeptide. The CgGGPPS genomic DNA sequence was also obtained, revealing CgGGPPS gene was not interrupted by an intron. Southern blot analysis indicated that CgGGPPS belonged to a small gene family. Tissue expression pattern analysis indicated that CgGGPPS expressed the highest in leaves. RT-PCR analysis indicated that CgGGPPS expression could be induced by exogenous methyl jasmonate acid. Furthermore, carotenoid accumulation was observed in Escherichia coli carrying pACCAR25ΔcrtE plasmid carrying CgGGPPS. The result revealed that cDNA encoded a functional GGPP synthase.

  13. Comparative Genomic Analysis of KPC-Encoding pKpQIL-Like Plasmids and Their Distribution in New Jersey and New York Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Melano, Roberto G.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Koll, Brian; Hong, Tao; Rojtman, Albert D.; Levi, Michael H.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) is predominately associated with K. pneumoniae strains genotyped as sequence type 258 (ST258). The first ST258-associated plasmid, pKpQIL, was described in Israel in 2006, but its history in the northeastern United States remains unknown. Six pKpQIL-like plasmids from four K. pneumoniae isolates (three ST258 and one ST234), one Escherichia coli isolate, and one Enterobacter aerogenes isolate, collected from 2003 to 2010 in New York (NY) and New Jersey (NJ) hospitals, were completely sequenced. The sequences and overall sizes of the six plasmids are highly similar to those of pKpQIL; the major difference is that five of six NJ/NY strains harbor blaKPC-2, while pKpQIL contains blaKPC-3. Moreover, a 26.7-kb fragment was inverted in pKpQIL-234 (from ST234 K. pneumoniae), while a 14.5-kb region was deleted in pKpQIL-Ec (from ST131 E. coli). PCR screening of 284 other clinical K. pneumoniae isolates identified 101 (35.6%) harboring pKpQIL-like plasmids from 9 of 10 surveyed hospitals, demonstrating the wide dissemination of pKpQIL in this region of endemicity. Among the positive isolates, 87.1% were typed as ST258 and 88.1% carried blaKPC-2. The finding of pKpQIL-like plasmid in this study from strains that predate the initial report of KPC in Israel provides evidence that pKpQIL may have originated in the United States. Our findings demonstrate that pKpQIL plasmids are both spreading clonally in ST258 strains and spreading horizontally to different sequence types and species, further highlighting the clinical and public health concerns associated with carbapenem resistance. PMID:24614371

  14. Self-Assembled Functional Nanostructure of Plasmid DNA with Ionic Liquid [Bmim][PF₆]: Enhanced Efficiency in Bacterial Gene Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Sarvesh K; Sarkar, Sampa; Mirzadeh, Nedaossadat; Selvakannan, P R; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged phosphate groups of plasmid DNA and the cationic part of hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Bmim][PF6]), initiates spontaneous self-assembly to form the functional nanostructures made up of DNA and ionic liquid (IL). These functional nanostructures were demonstrated as promising synthetic nonviral vectors for the efficient bacterial pGFP gene transformation in cells. In particular, the functional nanostructures that were made up of 1 μL of IL ([Bmim][PF6]) and 1 μg of plasmid DNA can increase the transformation efficiency by 300-400% in microbial systems, without showing any toxicity for E. coli DH5α cells. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopic analysis revealed that the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged phosphate oxygen and cationic Bmim(+) tends to initiate the self-assembly process. Thermogravimetric analysis of the DNA-IL functional nanostructures showed that these nanostructures consist of ∼16 wt % ionic liquid, which is considered to provide the stability to the plasmid DNA that eventually enhanced the transformation efficiency.

  15. The 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid encodes chloromethane utilization genes and redundant genes for vitamin B12- and tetrahydrofolate-dependent chloromethane metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4: a proteomic and bioinformatics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Roselli

    Full Text Available Chloromethane (CH3Cl is the most abundant volatile halocarbon in the atmosphere and contributes to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. The only known pathway for bacterial chloromethane utilization (cmu was characterized in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, a methylotrophic bacterium able to utilize compounds without carbon-carbon bonds such as methanol and chloromethane as the sole carbon source for growth. Previous work demonstrated that tetrahydrofolate and vitamin B12 are essential cofactors of cmuA- and cmuB-encoded methyltransferases of chloromethane dehalogenase, and that the pathway for chloromethane utilization is distinct from that for methanol. This work reports genomic and proteomic data demonstrating that cognate cmu genes are located on the 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid, which drives the previously defined pathway for tetrahydrofolate-mediated chloromethane dehalogenation. Comparison of complete genome sequences of strain CM4 and that of four other M. extorquens strains unable to grow with chloromethane showed that plasmid pCMU01 harbors unique genes without homologs in the compared genomes (bluB2, btuB, cobA, cbiD, as well as 13 duplicated genes with homologs of chromosome-borne genes involved in vitamin B12-associated biosynthesis and transport, or in tetrahydrofolate-dependent metabolism (folC2. In addition, the presence of both chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes for corrinoid salvaging pathways may ensure corrinoid coenzyme supply in challenging environments. Proteomes of M. extorquens CM4 grown with one-carbon substrates chloromethane and methanol were compared. Of the 49 proteins with differential abundance identified, only five (CmuA, CmuB, PurU, CobH2 and a PaaE-like uncharacterized putative oxidoreductase are encoded by the pCMU01 plasmid. The mainly chromosome-encoded response to chloromethane involves gene clusters associated with oxidative stress, production of reducing equivalents (PntAA, Nuo complex, conversion of

  16. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  17. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the conjugative plasmid pOLA52, enhance biofilm formation and transfer frequencies in Enterobacteriaceae strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Bahl, Martin Iain; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2008-01-01

    biofilm-deficient mutants, which all mapped within a putative operon with high homology to the mrkABCDF operon of Klebsiella pneumoniae, where these genes are responsible for type 3 fimbriae expression, attachment to surfaces and biofilm formation. Biofilm formation in microtitre plates and in urinary......, resulting in enhanced conjugation frequencies and biofilm formation of the plasmid-harbouring strain....

  18. Limited similarity between plasmids encoding CTX-M-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli from humans, pigs, cattle, organic poultry layers and horses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Bortolaia, Valeria; Bielak, Eliza Maria;

    2015-01-01

    in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. In total, 65 CTX-M-1-producing isolates from patients (n=22), pigs (n=21), cattle (n=4), organic poultry layers (n=3) and horses (n=15) were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Plasmids harbouring blaCTX-M-1 were characterised by S1 PFGE, PCR-based replicon...

  19. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Hammerum, A. M.; Hansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131. In addi...

  20. DENSE: Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes in Cardiac Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ding, Shujun; Balaban, Robert S.; Wen, Han

    1999-03-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) was developed for high-resolution myocardial displacement mapping. Pixel phase is modulated by myocardial displacement and data spatial resolution is limited only by pixel size. 2D displacement vector maps were generated for the systolic action in canines with 0.94 × 1.9 mm nominal in-plane resolution and 2.3 mm/π displacement encoding. A radial strain of 0.208 was measured across the free left ventricular wall over 105 ms during systole. DENSE displacement maps require small first-order gradient moments for encoding. DENSE magnitude images exhibit black-blood contrast which allows for better myocardial definition and reduced motion-related artifacts.

  1. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp. Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Chénard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages.

  2. Viruses Infecting a Freshwater Filamentous Cyanobacterium (Nostoc sp.) Encode a Functional CRISPR Array and a Proteobacterial DNA Polymerase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénard, Caroline; Wirth, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Here we present the first genomic characterization of viruses infecting Nostoc, a genus of ecologically important cyanobacteria that are widespread in freshwater. Cyanophages A-1 and N-1 were isolated in the 1970s and infect Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7210 but remained genomically uncharacterized. Their 68,304- and 64,960-bp genomes are strikingly different from those of other sequenced cyanophages. Many putative genes that code for proteins with known functions are similar to those found in filamentous cyanobacteria, showing a long evolutionary history in their host. Cyanophage N-1 encodes a CRISPR array that is transcribed during infection and is similar to the DR5 family of CRISPRs commonly found in cyanobacteria. The presence of a host-related CRISPR array in a cyanophage suggests that the phage can transfer the CRISPR among related cyanobacteria and thereby provide resistance to infection with competing phages. Both viruses also encode a distinct DNA polymerase B that is closely related to those found in plasmids of Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7424, Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, and Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. These polymerases form a distinct evolutionary group that is more closely related to DNA polymerases of proteobacteria than to those of other viruses. This suggests that the polymerase was acquired from a proteobacterium by an ancestral virus and transferred to the cyanobacterial plasmid. Many other open reading frames are similar to a prophage-like element in the genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7524. The Nostoc cyanophages reveal a history of gene transfers between filamentous cyanobacteria and their viruses that have helped to forge the evolutionary trajectory of this previously unrecognized group of phages. PMID:27302758

  3. Characterization of two novel plasmids from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Butaitė, Elena; Citavičius, Donaldas

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cryptic low molecular weight plasmids, pGTD7 (3279bp) and pGTG5 (1540bp), isolated from Geobacillus sp. 610 and 1121 strains, respectively. Homology analysis of the replication protein (Rep) sequences and detection of ssDNA indicate that both of them replicate via rolling circle mechanism. As revealed by sequence similarities of dso region and Rep protein, plasmid pGTD7 belongs to pC194/pUB110 plasmid family. The replicon of pGTD7 was proved to be functional in another Geobacillus host. For this purpose, a construct pUCK7, containing a replicon of the analyzed plasmid, was created and transferred to G. stearothermophilus NUB3621R strain by electroporation. Plasmid pGTG5, based on Rep protein sequence similarity, was found to be related mostly to some poorly characterized bacterial plasmids. Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids contain conservative motifs that are most similar to those of Microviridae phages. This feature suggests that pGTG5, together with other plasmids containing the same motifs, could constitute a new family of bacterial plasmids. To date, pGTG5 is the smallest plasmid identified in bacteria belonging to the genus Geobacillus. The two plasmids described in this study can be used for the construction of new vectors suitable for biotechnologically important bacteria of the genus Geobacillus.

  4. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  5. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA lig...

  6. Analysis of functions in plasmid pHZ1358 influencing its genetic and structural stability in Streptomyces lividans 1326.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhui; He, Xinyi; Liang, Jingdan; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin

    2009-02-01

    The complete DNA sequence of plasmid pHZ1358, a widely used vector for targeted gene disruption and replacement experiments in many Streptomyces hosts, has been determined. This has allowed a detailed analysis of the basis of its structural and segregational instability, compared to the high copy number plasmid pIJ101 of Streptomyces lividans 1326 from which it was derived. A 574-bp DNA region containing sti (strong incompatibility locus) was found to be a determinant for segregational instability in its original S. lividans 1326 host, while the structural instability was found to be related to the facile deletion of the entire Escherichia coli-derived part of pHZ1358, mediated by recombination between 36-bp direct repeats. A point mutation removing the BamHI site inside the rep gene encoding a replication protein (rep*) and/or a spontaneous deletion of the 694-bp region located between rep and sti including the uncharacterized ORF85 (orf85(-)) produced little or no effect on stability. A pHZ1358 derivative (pJTU412, sti(-), rep*, orf85(-)) was then constructed which additionally lacked one of the 36-bp direct repeats. pJTU412 was demonstrated to be structurally stable but segregationally unstable and, in contrast to sti(+) pHZ1358, allowed efficient targeted gene replacement in S. lividans 1326.

  7. Toxin Kid uncouples DNA replication and cell division to enforce retention of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Belén; Nair, Radhika; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Preston, Mark A; Agu, Chukwuma A; Wang, Xindan; Bernal, Juan A; Sherratt, David J; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2014-02-18

    Worldwide dissemination of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is facilitated by plasmids that encode postsegregational killing (PSK) systems. These produce a stable toxin (T) and a labile antitoxin (A) conditioning cell survival to plasmid maintenance, because only this ensures neutralization of toxicity. Shortage of antibiotic alternatives and the link of TA pairs to PSK have stimulated the opinion that premature toxin activation could be used to kill these recalcitrant organisms in the clinic. However, validation of TA pairs as therapeutic targets requires unambiguous understanding of their mode of action, consequences for cell viability, and function in plasmids. Conflicting with widespread notions concerning these issues, we had proposed that the TA pair kis-kid (killing suppressor-killing determinant) might function as a plasmid rescue system and not as a PSK system, but this remained to be validated. Here, we aimed to clarify unsettled mechanistic aspects of Kid activation, and of the effects of this for kis-kid-bearing plasmids and their host cells. We confirm that activation of Kid occurs in cells that are about to lose the toxin-encoding plasmid, and we show that this provokes highly selective restriction of protein outputs that inhibits cell division temporarily, avoiding plasmid loss, and stimulates DNA replication, promoting plasmid rescue. Kis and Kid are conserved in plasmids encoding multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including extended spectrum β-lactamases, for which therapeutic options are scarce, and our findings advise against the activation of this TA pair to fight pathogens carrying these extrachromosomal DNAs.

  8. [Nourseothricin (streptothricin) inactivated by plasmid pIE 636-encoded acetyltransferase: detection of N-acetyl-beta-lysine in the inactivated product].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, G

    1985-12-01

    Nourseothricin (streptothricin) can be inactivated by an acetyl transferase synthesized by E. coli strains containing plasmid pIE 636. Nourseothricin inactivated in the presence of 14C-acetyl-coenzyme A was purified and submitted to partial acidic hydrolysis. By electrophoresis of the hydrolysate a 14C-containing substance moving only slowly towards the cathode could be isolated. This substance after complete hydrolysis yields only unlabelled beta-lysine.

  9. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  10. Complex nature of enterococcal pheromone-responsive plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardal, Ewa; Sadowy, Ewa; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2010-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive plasmids constitute a unique group of approximately 20 plasmids identified, as yet, only among enterococcal species. Several of their representatives, e.g. pAD1, pCF10, pPD1 and pAM373 have been extensively studied. These plasmids possess a sophisticated conjugation mechanism based on response to sex pheromones--small peptides produced by plasmid-free recipient cells. Detailed analysis of regulation and function of the pheromone response process revealed its great complexity and dual role--in plasmid conjugation and modulation of enterococcal virulence. Among other functional modules identified in pheromone plasmids, the stabilization/partition systems play a crucial role in stable maintenance of the plasmid molecule in host bacteria. Among them, the par locus of pAD1 is one of the exceptional RNA addiction systems. Pheromone-responsive plasmids contribute also to enterococcal phenotype being an important vehicle of antibiotic resistance in this genus. Both types of acquired vancomycin resistance determinants, vanA and vanB, as well many other resistant phenotypes, were found to be located on these plasmids. They also encode two basic agents of enterococcal virulence, i.e. aggregation substance (AS) and cytolysin. AS participates in mating-pair formation during conjugation but can also facilitate the adherence ofenterococci to human tissues during infection. The second protein, cytolysin, displays hemolytic activity and helps to invade eukaryotic cells. There are still many aspects of the nature of pheromone plasmids that remain unclear and more detailed studies are needed to understand their uniqueness and complexity.

  11. Folate Functionalized PLGA Nanoparticles Loaded with Plasmid pVAX1-NH36: Mathematical Analysis of Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Alejandra Gutiérrez-Valenzuela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid DNA (pVAX1-NH36 was encapsulated in nanoparticles of poly-dl-lactic-co-glycolic (PLGA functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG and folic acid (PLGA-PEG-FA without losing integrity. PLGA-PEG-FA nanoparticles loaded with pVAX1-NH36 (pDNA-NPs were prepared by using a double emulsification-solvent evaporation technique. PLGA-PEG-FA synthesis was verified by FT-IR and spectrophotometry methods. pVAX1-NH36 was replicated in Escherichia coli (E. coli cell cultures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis confirmed pDNA-NPs size with an average diameter of 177–229 nm, depending on pVAX1-NH36 loading and zeta potentials were below −24 mV for all preparations. In vitro release studies confirmed a multiphase release profile for the duration of more than 30-days. Plasmid release kinetics were analyzed with a release model that considered simultaneous contributions of initial burst and degradation-relaxation of nanoparticles. Fitting of release model against experimental data presented excellent correlation. This mathematical analysis presents a novel approach to describe and predict the release of plasmid DNA from biodegradable nanoparticles.

  12. Postsymbiotic plasmid acquisition and evolution of the repA1-replicon in Buchnera aphidicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; González-Candelas, Fernando; Silva, Francisco J.; Sabater, Beatriz; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is an obligate, strictly vertically transmitted, bacterial symbiont of aphids. It supplies its host with essential amino acids, nutrients required by aphids but deficient in their diet of plant phloem sap. Several lineages of Buchnera show adaptation to their nutritional role in the form of plasmid-mediated amplification of key-genes involved in the biosynthesis of tryptophan (trpEG) and leucine (leuABCD). Phylogenetic analyses of these plasmid-encoded functions have thus far suggested the absence of horizontal plasmid exchange among lineages of Buchnera. Here, we describe three new Buchnera plasmids, obtained from species of the aphid host families Lachnidae and Pemphigidae. All three plasmids belong to the repA1 family of Buchnera plasmids, which is characterized by the presence of a repA1-replicon responsible for replication initiation. A comprehensive analysis of this family of plasmids unexpectedly revealed significantly incongruent phylogenies for different plasmid and chromosomally encoded loci. We infer from these incongruencies a case of horizontal plasmid transfer in Buchnera. This process may have been mediated by secondary endosymbionts, which occasionally undergo horizontal transmission in aphids. PMID:10984505

  13. Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Metal Resistance Genes in Plasmid Metagenomes from Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Dong eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer, they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge and digested sludge of two wastewater treatment plants. Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes and metal resistance genes (23 out of a total 23 types on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs than the activated sludge and the digested sludge metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in wastewater treatment plants could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  14. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes.

  15. Cloning vectors based on cryptic plasmids isolated from lactic acid bacteria: their characteristics and potential applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareck, Julie; Choi, Young; Lee, Byong; Miguez, Carlos B

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram positive bacteria, widely distributed in nature, and industrially important as they are used in a variety of industrial food fermentations. The use of genetic engineering techniques is an effective means of enhancing the industrial applicability of LAB. However, when using genetic engineering technology, safety becomes an essential factor for the application of improved LAB to the food industry. Cloning and expression systems should be derived preferably from LAB cryptic plasmids that generally encode genes for which functions can be proposed, but no phenotypes can be observed. However, some plasmid-encoded functions have been discovered in cryptic plasmids originating from Lactobacillus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Pediococcus spp. and can be used as selective marker systems in vector construction. This article presents information concerning LAB cryptic plasmids, and their structures, functions, and applications. A total of 134 cryptic plasmids collated are discussed.

  16. Enhancing functional production of a chaperone-dependent lipase in Escherichia coli using the dual expression cassette plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quyen Thi Dinh

    2012-03-01

    folded in vivo into the functional lipase in soluble form whereas the main fraction was still inactive in the form of inclusion bodies. Another controversial finding was that the dual expression cassette plasmid systems E. coli BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a and E. coli/pELipAB-LipB3a secreted the active lipase into the culture medium of 51 and 29 times as high as the single expression cassette plasmid system E. coli pELipABa did, respectively, which has never been reported before. Another interesting finding was that the lipase form LipA6xHis (mature lipase fused with 6× histidine tag expressed in the dual expression cassette plasmid systems (BL21/pELipA-LipB1a and BL21/pELipA-LipB3a showed no lipase activity although the expression level of the lipase and two chaperone forms LipB1 and LipB3 in these systems remained as high as that in E. coli BL21/pELipABa + pELipB1k, BL21/pELipABa + pELipB3k, BL21/pELipAB-LipB1a, and BL21/pELipAB-LipB3a. The addition of Neptune oil or detergents into the LB medium increased the lipase production and secretion by up to 94%. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that a dual expression cassette plasmid system E. coli could overproduce and secrete the active chaperone-dependent lipase (subfamilies I.1 and I.2 in vivo and an improved dual expression cassette plasmid system E. coli could be potentially applied for industrial-scale production of subfamily I.1 and I.2 lipases.

  17. A seven-year storage report of good manufacturing practice-grade naked plasmid DNA: stability, topology, and in vitro/in vivo functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Wolfgang; Schmeer, Marco; Kobelt, Dennis; Baier, Ruth; Harder, Alexander; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Aumann, Jutta; Fichtner, Iduna; Schleef, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The great interest for naked plasmid DNA in gene therapy studies is reflected by the fact that it is currently used in 18% of all gene therapy trials. Therefore, validation of topology and functionality of DNA resulting from its long-term stability is an essential requirement for safe and effective gene transfer. To this aim, we analyzed the stability of good manufacturing practice-grade pCMVβ reporter plasmid DNA by capillary gel electrophoresis, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy. The plasmid DNA was produced for a clinical gene transfer study started in 2005 and was stored for meanwhile 7 years under continuously monitored conditions at -20 °C. The stability of plasmid DNA was monitored by LacZ transgene expression functional assays performed in vitro and in vivo on the 7-year-old plasmid DNA samples compared with plasmid batches newly produced in similar experimental conditions and quality standards. The analyses revealed that during the overall storage time and conditions, the proportion of open circular and supercoiled or covalently closed circular forms is conserved without linearization or degradation of the plasmid. The in vitro transfection and the in vivo jet-injection of DNA showed unaltered functionality of the long-stored plasmid. In summary, the 7-year-old and the newly produced plasmid samples showed similar topology and expression performance. Therefore, our stable storage conditions are effective to preserve the integrity of the DNA to be used in clinical studies. This is an important prerequisite for the long-term performance of gene transfer materials used in trials of long duration as well as of the reference material used in standardization procedures and assays.

  18. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution.

  19. A Novel Plasmid, pSx1, Harboring a New Tn1696 Derivative from Extensively Drug-Resistant Shewanella xiamenensis Encoding OXA-416.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Khadidja; Touati, Abdelaziz; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Fournier, Éric; Côté, Jean-Charles; Soualhine, Hafid; Walker, Matthew; Bougdour, Djamila; Tremblay, Cécile; Bekal, Sadjia

    2017-06-01

    The whole genome sequencing of extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis T17 isolated from hospital effluents in Algeria revealed the presence of a novel 268.4 kb plasmid designated pSx1, which carries several antibiotic-resistance genes in the novel Tn1696 derivative (Tn6297), in addition to the chromosomal blaOXA-48-like gene (blaOXA-416). The presence of the plasmid was confirmed by nuclease S1-PFGE analysis and transformation by electroporation into Escherichia coli DH10B. Tn6297 contains an In27 class 1 integron harboring the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 array, msr(E) and mph(E) associated with IS26; a new efflux pump multidrug resistance composite transposon delimited by two ISEc29s; Tn-tet harboring tetR and tetA(C); a class 1 integron with the qacG gene cassette; qnrVC6 and dfrA23 associated with ISCR1; and a complex class 1 integron In4-like containing aacC1, aadA1, blaVEB-16, catA2, sul1Δ, cmlA9, tetR, tetA(G), aac(6')-II, and blaPSE-1. Its mer operon carries merB, but lacks merC, in contrast to Tn1696 and Tn21. This study represents the first characterization of a multidrug-resistant transposon and multidrug resistance plasmid in Shewanella and is the first report of blaOXA-416 in Algeria, providing evidence that Shewanella spp. could be an important reservoir and vehicle for drug resistance genes.

  20. Genomic comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolates from 2009 and 2011 reveals plasmid, and prophage heterogeneity, including shiga toxin encoding phage stx2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa A Ahmed

    Full Text Available In May of 2011, an enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4 strain that had acquired a Shiga toxin 2-converting phage caused a large outbreak of bloody diarrhea in Europe which was notable for its high prevalence of hemolytic uremic syndrome cases. Several studies have described the genomic inventory and phylogenies of strains associated with the outbreak and a collection of historical E. coli O104:H4 isolates using draft genome assemblies. We present the complete, closed genome sequences of an isolate from the 2011 outbreak (2011C-3493 and two isolates from cases of bloody diarrhea that occurred in the Republic of Georgia in 2009 (2009EL-2050 and 2009EL-2071. Comparative genome analysis indicates that, while the Georgian strains are the nearest neighbors to the 2011 outbreak isolates sequenced to date, structural and nucleotide-level differences are evident in the Stx2 phage genomes, the mer/tet antibiotic resistance island, and in the prophage and plasmid profiles of the strains, including a previously undescribed plasmid with homology to the pMT virulence plasmid of Yersinia pestis. In addition, multiphenotype analysis showed that 2009EL-2071 possessed higher resistance to polymyxin and membrane-disrupting agents. Finally, we show evidence by electron microscopy of the presence of a common phage morphotype among the European and Georgian strains and a second phage morphotype among the Georgian strains. The presence of at least two stx2 phage genotypes in host genetic backgrounds that may derive from a recent common ancestor of the 2011 outbreak isolates indicates that the emergence of stx2 phage-containing E. coli O104:H4 strains probably occurred more than once, or that the current outbreak isolates may be the result of a recent transfer of a new stx2 phage element into a pre-existing stx2-positive genetic background.

  1. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Globally Expanding Carbapenemase Finally Appears in Spain: Nosocomial Outbreak of Acinetobacter baumannii Producing Plasmid-Encoded OXA-23 in Barcelona, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueda, Noraida; Espinal, Paula; Cosgaya, Clara; Viota, Sergio; Plasensia, Virginia; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Montero, Milagro; Gómez, Julià; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Roca, Ignasi

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates to carbapenems is on the rise worldwide mainly in association with the production of OXA-23. Until recently, however, OXA-23 was absent in Spain. In this work, we report the molecular characterization of a hospital outbreak of OXA-23-producing A. baumannii in Barcelona caused by a multidrug-resistant (MDR) clone belonging to international clone IC-II/sequence type ST85 between October 2010 and May 2011. blaOXA-23 was carried in a plasmid of 90 kb and located within the composite transposon Tn2006. PMID:23877694

  3. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Henrik; Hammerum, Anette M; Hansen, Frank; Hendriksen, Rene S; Olesen, Bente; Agersø, Yvonne; Zankari, Ea; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Stegger, Marc; Kaas, Rolf S; Cavaco, Lina M; Hansen, Dennis S; Aarestrup, Frank M; Skov, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131. In addition to IncI2, an incX4 replicon was found to be linked to mcr-1. This report follows a recent detection of mcr-1 in E. coli from animals, food and humans in China.

  4. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium blaPER-1-Carrying Plasmid pSTI1 Encodes an Extended-Spectrum Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase of Type Ib

    OpenAIRE

    Casin, Isabelle; Hanau-Berçot, Beatrice; Podglajen, Isabelle; Vahaboglu, Haluk; Collatz, Ekkehard

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the aminoglycoside resistance gene, which confers high levels of resistance to both amikacin and gentamicin, that is carried by plasmid pSTI1 in the PER-1 β-lactamase-producing strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium previously isolated in Turkey. This gene, called aac(6′)-Ib11, was found in a class 1 integron and codes for a protein of 188 amino acids, a fusion product between the N-terminal moiety (8 amino acids) of the signal peptide of the β-lactamase OXA-1 and t...

  5. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs.

  6. The expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein causes structural plasmid instability in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, C.; Meima, R; Twiest, B; Kazemier, B; Venema, G; vanDijl, JM; Bron, S

    The rolling-circle plasmid pGP1 was used to study the effects of the expression of a plasmid-specified exported protein on structural plasmid stability in Bacillus subtilis. pGP1 contains a fusion between the Bacillus licheniformis penP gene, encoding a C-terminally truncated penicillinase, and the

  7. Induction of Th1-Type Immune Response by Chitosan Nanoparticles Containing Plasmid DNA Encoding House Dust Mite Allergen Der p 2 for Oral Vaccination in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping Li; Zhigang Liu; Bin Liao; Nanshan Zhong

    2009-01-01

    This study was to prepare the chitosan-pDer p 2 nanoparticles and to investigate the effect of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on immune response in mice by oral delivery of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized by complexing chitosan with plasmid DNA. The DNA was fully complexed into chitosan-DNA nanoparticles, suggesting a 100% encapsulation efficiency. Chitosan-DNA complex renders a significant protection of the plasmid. No effect on cell viability was observed in both cell types and average cell viability over 100% was obtained. Oral gene delivery with chitosan-DNA nanoparticles can generate a higher level expression of gene in vivo. Oral chitosan-pDer p 2 nanoparticles in BALB/c mice can induce IFN-γ in serum and prevent subsequent sensitization of Th2 cell-regulated specific IgE responses. The data indicate that the oral administration of chitosan-pDer p 2 nanoparticles results in the expression of Der p 2 in the epithelial cells of both stomach and small intestine and the induction of Th1-type immune response.

  8. Genes from plasmid pKM101 in Haemophilus influenzae: separation of functions of mucA and mucB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1985-11-01

    Haemophilus influenzae, normally not mutable by UV, became UV mutable with a recombinant plasmid insertion. A 7.8-kilobase-pair (kbp) fragment of the plasmid pKM101 containing the mucA and mucB genes was ligated to the shuttle vector pDM2, and a Rec- strain of H. influenzae was transformed with the ligated mixture. All of the transformants, unlike the parent Rec- strain, were resistant to UV, could carry out postreplication repair and Weigle reactivation, showed greatly increased spontaneous mutation, and contained a plasmid carrying an insert of only 1.2 rather than 7.8 kbp. This plasmid in a umuC mutant strain of Escherichia coli complemented a pKM101 derivative lacking mucA function but with an intact mucB gene, although there was no complementation with a mucA+ mucB- plasmid, suggesting that the newly constructed plasmid coded for the mucA protein; this is in accord with the restriction analysis and hybridization between the plasmid and a probe containing all of the mucA gene but only a small fraction of mucB. When one of the H. influenzae Rec- transformants lost the plasmid, the resistance to UV was retained but the high spontaneous mutation and UV mutability were not. The fact that there was hybridization between the chromosome of the cured strain and a probe containing both muc genes but none when almost no mucB was present suggested that at least part of the mucB gene had been integrated into the Rec- chromosome. Five different postreplication repair-proficient strains became UV mutable and had high spontaneous mutation rates caused by the putative mucA plasmid, indicating that these strains already possessed a chromosomal equivalent of the mucB gene.

  9. Functional properties of Virus-Encoded and Virus-Regulated 7TM Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have developed several survival strategies that involve exploitation of 7TM receptors. These include virus-encoded 7TM receptors and ligands and viral regulation of endogenous receptors. Many functional properties have been ascribed to virus-exploited 7......-herpesvirus-encoded BILF1 receptors, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded US28 receptor and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-regulated EBI2 (or GPR183), 2) the tissue tropism and virus-dissemination properties, exemplified by the murine CMV-encoded M33, and 3) the tumorigenic properties, exemplified...... by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-encoded ORF74, HCMV-US28 and EBV-BILF1. Given the general high “druggability” of 7TM receptors, and the recent progress in the understanding of in particular immune evasive functions of the virus-exploited 7TM receptors, we put a special emphasis on the progress of novel anti...

  10. Age-related alterations in functional connectivity patterns during working memory encoding of emotional items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Maryam; Salami, Alireza; Persson, Jonas

    2017-01-08

    Previous findings indicate age-related differences in frontal-amygdala connectivity during emotional processing. However, direct evidence for age differences in brain functional activation and connectivity during emotional processing and concomitant behavioral implications is lacking. In the present study, we examined the impact of aging on the neural signature of selective attention to emotional information during working memory (WM) encoding. Participants completed an emotional WM task in which they were asked to attend to emotional targets and ignore irrelevant distractors. Despite an overall reduction in accuracy for older relative to younger adults, no behavioral age effect was observed as a function of emotional valence. The functional connectivity patterns of left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex showed that younger adults recruited one network for encoding of both positive and negative emotional targets and this network contributed to higher memory accuracy in this cohort. Older adults, on the other hand, engaged two distinct networks for encoding of positive and negative targets. The functional connectivity analysis using left amygdala further demonstrated that older adults recruited one single network during encoding of positive as well as negative targets whereas younger adults recruited this network only for encoding of negative items. The engagement of amygdala functional network also contributed to higher memory performance and faster response times in older adults. Our findings provide novel insights into the differential roles of functional brain networks connected to the medial PFC and amygdala during encoding of emotionally-valenced items with advancing age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High-throughput screening of cellulase F mutants from multiplexed plasmid sets using an automated plate assay on a functional proteomic robotic workcell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Nasib

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The field of plasmid-based functional proteomics requires the rapid assay of proteins expressed from plasmid libraries. Automation is essential since large sets of mutant open reading frames are being cloned for evaluation. To date no integrated automated platform is available to carry out the entire process including production of plasmid libraries, expression of cloned genes, and functional testing of expressed proteins. Results We used a functional proteomic assay in a multiplexed setting on an integrated plasmid-based robotic workcell for high-throughput screening of mutants of cellulase F, an endoglucanase from the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces PC-2. This allowed us to identify plasmids containing optimized clones expressing mutants with improved activity at lower pH. A plasmid library of mutagenized clones of the celF gene with targeted variations in the last four codons was constructed by site-directed PCR mutagenesis and transformed into Escherichia coli. A robotic picker integrated into the workcell was used to inoculate medium in a 96-well deep well plate, combining the transformants into a multiplexed set in each well, and the plate was incubated on the workcell. Plasmids were prepared from the multiplexed culture on the liquid handler component of the workcell and used for in vitro transcription/translation. The multiplexed expressed recombinant proteins were screened for improved activity and stability in an azo-carboxymethylcellulose plate assay. The multiplexed wells containing mutants with improved activity were identified and linked back to the corresponding multiplexed cultures stored in glycerol. Spread plates were prepared from the glycerol stocks and the workcell was used to pick single colonies from the spread plates, prepare plasmid, produce recombinant protein, and assay for activity. The screening assay and subsequent deconvolution of the multiplexed wells resulted in identification of improved Cel

  12. Genetic diversity and composition of a plasmid metagenome from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Andreas; Krause, Lutz; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred

    2008-08-31

    Plasmid metagenome nucleotide sequence data were recently obtained from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bacteria with reduced susceptibility to selected antimicrobial drugs by applying the ultrafast 454-sequencing technology. The sequence dataset comprising 36,071,493 bases (346,427 reads with an average read length of 104 bases) was analysed for genetic diversity and composition by using a newly developed bioinformatic pipeline based on assignment of environmental gene tags (EGTs) to protein families stored in the Pfam database. Short amino acid sequences deduced from the plasmid metagenome sequence reads were compared to profile hidden Markov models underlying Pfam. Obtained matches evidenced that many reads represent genes having predicted functions in plasmid replication, stability and plasmid mobility which indicates that WWTP bacteria harbour genetically stabilised and mobile plasmids. Moreover, the data confirm a high diversity of plasmids residing in WWTP bacteria. The mobile organic peroxide resistance plasmid pMAC from Acinetobacter baumannii was identified as reference plasmid for the most abundant replication module type in the sequenced sample. Accessory plasmid modules encode different transposons, insertion sequences, integrons, resistance and virulence determinants. Most of the matches to Transposase protein families were identified for transposases similar to the one of the chromate resistance transposon Tn5719. Noticeable are hits to beta-lactamase protein families which suggests that plasmids from WWTP bacteria encode different enzymes possessing beta-lactam-hydrolysing activity. Some of the sequence reads correspond to antibiotic resistance genes that were only recently identified in clinical isolates of human pathogens. EGT analysis thus proofed to be a very valuable method to explore genetic diversity and composition of the present plasmid metagenome dataset.

  13. Microcalorimetric Studies on Gene Promoter Function of Cloned DNA Fragements from Halobacterium halobium J7 Plasmid pHH205 in Escherichia coli TG1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI,Ke-Lin; HOU,Han-Na; LIU,Yi; YE,Xue-Cheng; SHEN,Ping

    2007-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is a typical kind of extremely halophilic bacterium. Combined with the antibiotic resistance assay, the microcalorimetric method was used to study the promoter function of the cloned DNA fragments from Halobacterium halobium J7 plasmid pHH205 in Escherichia coli TG1. The promoter probe vector, plasmid pKK232-8, was used to form the recombinants. The DNA fragment, which is the promoter for the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene in plasmid pKK232-8, is about 800 bp, and the chloramphenicol resistance level presented by IC50 is about 200 μg·mL-1, which suggests a high promoter activity. The conclusions show that there probably exist double-function or trinary-function gene promoters in Halobacterium halobium, and Archaea may contain rich genetic resources.

  14. Gyrase-dependent stabilization of pSC101 plasmid inheritance by transcriptionally active promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, S L; Miller, C A; Cohen, S N

    1991-09-01

    The pSC101 plasmid encodes a cis-acting genetic locus termed par that ensures the stable inheritance of plasmids in a population of dividing cells. In the absence of selection, par-defective plasmids are lost rapidly from the bacterial population. We report here that the stability of par-deleted pSC101 derivatives is restored by introducing certain adventitious bacterial promoters onto the plasmid. Stabilization requires active transcription from the inserted promoter and is affected by the site and orientation of the insertion, the length of the nascent transcript and DNA gyrase activity. While a promotor-associated overall increase in negative superhelicity of plasmid DNA was observed, stabilized inheritance appeared to be dependent on localized rather than generalized supercoiling. Our demonstration that promoter-induced DNA supercoiling can mimic the effects of the pSC101 par locus provides evidence that the previously reported superhelicity-generating effects of par are intrinsic to its function.

  15. CRTC1 Function During Memory Encoding Is Disrupted in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Chen, Meng; Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Ortega, Laura; Acosta, Sara; Perna, Judith Camats; Fullana, M Neus; Aguilera, José; Rodríguez-Alvarez, José; Saura, Carlos A

    2017-01-15

    Associative memory impairment is an early clinical feature of dementia patients, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these deficits are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the functional regulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) by associative learning in physiological and neurodegenerative conditions. We evaluated the activation of CRTC1 in the hippocampus of control mice and mice lacking the Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin genes (presenilin conditional double knockout [PS cDKO]) after one-trial contextual fear conditioning by using biochemical, immunohistochemical, and gene expression analyses. PS cDKO mice display classical features of neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's disease including age-dependent cortical atrophy, neuron loss, dendritic degeneration, and memory deficits. Context-associative learning, but not single context or unconditioned stimuli, induces rapid dephosphorylation (Ser151) and translocation of CRTC1 from the cytosol/dendrites to the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in the mouse brain. Accordingly, context-associative learning induces differential CRTC1-dependent transcription of c-fos and the nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (Nr4a) genes Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus through a mechanism that involves CRTC1 recruitment to CRE promoters. Deregulation of CRTC1 dephosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and transcriptional function are associated with long-term contextual memory deficits in PS cDKO mice. Importantly, CRTC1 gene therapy in the hippocampus ameliorates context memory and transcriptional deficits and dendritic degeneration despite ongoing cortical degeneration in this neurodegeneration mouse model. These findings reveal a critical role of CRTC1 in the hippocampus during associative memory, and provide evidence that CRTC1 deregulation underlies memory deficits during neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016

  16. Co-resident plasmids travel together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    Conjugative plasmids encode genes that enable them to transfer, by conjugation, from a given host cell to another cell. Conjugative transfer, despite being an important feature of conjugative plasmids, is not constitutive for most plasmids, the reason being that genes involved in horizontal transfer are mostly repressed. Only upon their transient de-repression are plasmids able to transfer horizontally. If host cells harbour multiple plasmids, their simultaneous transfer depends on simultaneous transient de-repression of all plasmids. If de-repression of different plasmids was random and independent events, simultaneous de-repression should be a rare event because the probability of simultaneous de-repression would be the product of the probabilities of de-repression of each plasmid. Some previous observations support this hypothesis, while others show that co-transfer of plasmids is more frequent than this reasoning indicates. Here, we show that co-transfer of multiple plasmids mainly results from non-independent events: the probability that all plasmids within a cell become de-repressed is much higher than if de-repression of plasmids genes were independent. We found a simple model for the probability of co-transfer: the plasmid having the lowest conjugation rates is the one who limits co-transfer. In this sense, cells receiving the plasmid with the lower transfer rate also receive the other plasmid. If de-repression happens simultaneously on co-resident plasmids, common cues may stimulate de-repression of distinct plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study mapping the episodic memory encoding network in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sidhu, Meneka K; Stretton, Jason; Winston, Gavin P.; Bonelli, Silvia; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J; Koepp, Matthias J; Duncan, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated reorganization of memory encoding networks within the temporal lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy, but little is known of the extra-temporal networks in these patients. We investigated the temporal and extra-temporal reorganization of memory encoding networks in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and the neural correlates of successful subsequent memory formation. We studied 44 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sc...

  18. Complete Sequences of Four Plasmids of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 Reveal Extensive Adaptation to the Dairy Environment†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Renckens, Bernadet; van Swam, Iris; Peters, Sander; van Kranenburg, Richard; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M.

    2005-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains are known to carry plasmids encoding industrially important traits. L. lactis subsp. cremoris SK11 is widely used by the dairy industry in cheese making. Its complete plasmid complement was sequenced and found to contain the plasmids pSK11A (10,372 bp), pSK11B (13,332 bp), pSK11L (47,165 bp), and pSK11P (75,814 bp). Six highly homologous repB-containing replicons were found, all belonging to the family of lactococcal theta-type replicons. Twenty-three complete insertion sequence elements segment the plasmids into numerous modules, many of which can be identified as functional units or containing functionally related genes. Plasmid-encoded functions previously known to reside on L. lactis SK11 plasmids were now mapped in detail, e.g., lactose utilization (lacR-lacABCDFEGX), the proteolytic system (prtM-prtP, pepO, pepF), and the oligopeptide permease system (oppDFBCA). Newly identified plasmid-encoded functions could facilitate the uptake of various cations, while the pabA and pabB genes could be essential for folate biosynthesis. A competitive advantage could be obtained by using the putative flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase and oxalate:formate antiporter for enhanced ATP synthesis, while the activity of the predicted α-acetolactate decarboxylase may contribute to the formation of an additional electron sink. Various stress response proteins are plasmid encoded, which could enhance strain robustness. A substantial number of these “adaptation” genes have not been described before on L. lactis plasmids. Moreover, several genes were identified for the first time in L. lactis, possibly reflecting horizontal gene transfer. PMID:16332824

  19. Associative Encoding and Retrieval Are Predicted by Functional Connectivity in Distinct Hippocampal Area CA1 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Katherine; Tompary, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    Determining how the hippocampus supports the unique demands of memory encoding and retrieval is fundamental for understanding the biological basis of episodic memory. One possibility proposed by theoretical models is that the distinct computational demands of encoding and retrieval are accommodated by shifts in the functional interaction between the hippocampal CA1 subregion and its input structures. However, empirical tests of this hypothesis are lacking. To test this in humans, we used high-resolution fMRI to measure functional connectivity between hippocampal area CA1 and regions of the medial temporal lobe and midbrain during extended blocks of associative encoding and retrieval tasks. We found evidence for a double dissociation between the pathways supporting successful encoding and retrieval. Specifically, during the associative encoding task, but not the retrieval task, functional connectivity only between area CA1 and the ventral tegmental area predicted associative long-term memory. In contrast, connectivity between area CA1 and DG/CA3 was greater, on average, during the retrieval task compared with the encoding task, and, importantly, the strength of this connectivity significantly correlated with retrieval success. Together, these findings serve as an important first step toward understanding how the demands of fundamental memory processes may be met by changes in the relative strength of connectivity within hippocampal pathways. PMID:25143600

  20. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  1. A Site-Specific Integrative Plasmid Found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Clinical Isolate HS87 along with A Plasmid Carrying an Aminoglycoside-Resistant Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexi Bi

    Full Text Available Plasmids play critical roles in bacterial fitness and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here two plasmids found in a drug-resistant P. aeruginosa clinical isolate HS87 were completely sequenced. The pHS87b plasmid (11.2 kb carries phage-related genes and function-unknown genes. Notably, pHS87b encodes an integrase and has an adjacent tRNAThr-associated attachment site. A corresponding integrated form of pHS87b at the tRNAThr locus was identified on the chromosome of P. aeruginosa, showing that pHS87b is able to site-specifically integrate into the 3'-end of the tRNAThr gene. The pHS87a plasmid (26.8 kb displays a plastic structure containing a putative replication module, stability factors and a variable region. The RepA of pHS87a shows significant similarity to the replication proteins of pPT23A-family plasmids. pHS87a carries a transposon Tn6049, a truncated insertion sequence ΔIS1071 and a Tn402-like class 1 integron which contains an aacA4 cassette that may confer aminoglycoside resistance. Thus, pHS87b is a site-specific integrative plasmid whereas pHS87a is a plastic antibiotic resistance plasmid. The two native plasmids may promote the fitness and evolution of P. aeruginosa.

  2. The function of three indigenous plasmids in Mesorhizobium huakuii 2020 and its symbiotic inter-action with Sym pJB5JI of Rhizobium leguminosarum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A Mesorhizobium huakuii strain 2020, isolated from a rice-growing field in southern China, contains three indigenous plasmids named p2020a, p2020b and p2020c, respectively. The plasmids were deleted via Tn5-sacB insertion, and two cured derivatives were obtained. Interestingly, the mutant 2020D29 curing of p2020c could significantly enhance the capacity of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. But the mutant 2020D8 curing of p2020b lost the ability to nodulate Astragalus sinicus. Furthermore, the third plasmid p2020a could be hardly eliminated, suggesting that some house-keeping genes necessary for strain growth located on this plasmid. Then the Sym plasmid pJB5JI of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae was transferred into 2020 and its cured derivatives. The pot plant test showed that the ability of competition and symbiotic nitrogen fixation of transconjugant 2020-137 (pJB5JI) was increased evidently in con-trast to 2020. pJB5JI could not restore the ability of 2020D8 to nodulate Astragalus sinicus. 2020D8-8 (pJB5JI) could form ineffective nodules on peas, which implied that the symbiotic plasmid pJB5JI could express its function at the chromosomal background of Mesorhizobium huakuii 2020. The plas-mid stability was checked in transconjugants under free-living and during symbiosis. The results indi-cated that pJB5JI failed to be detected in some nodule isolates. That Km resistance gene could be am-plified from all transconjugants and nodule isolates suggested that pJB5JI was fully or partially inte-grated into the chromosome of recipients.

  3. Host-Specific Patterns of Genetic Diversity among IncI1-I gamma and IncK Plasmids Encoding CMY-2 beta-Lactamase in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Poultry Meat, Poultry, and Dogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Bortolaia, Valeria; Nielsen, Christine Ahl

    2016-01-01

    and commensal E. coli isolates collected from 2006 to 2012 from humans, retail poultry meat, broilers, and dogs. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and conjugation were performed in conjunction with plasmid replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing (p...

  4. Detection of an IncA/C plasmid encoding VIM-4 and CMY-4 β-lactamases in Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri from an inpatient in a cardiac rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltagirone, Mariasofia; Bitar, Ibrahim; Piazza, Aurora; Spalla, Melissa; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Navarra, Antonella; Migliavacca, Roberta

    2015-07-01

    A 62-year-old patient was transferred to the cardiac rehabilitation unit of the I.R.C.C.S. Fondazione S. Maugeri after undergoing a heart transplantation at the Acute Care Hospital I.R.C.C.S. S. Matteo of Pavia. On 1 August 2013 and during hospitalization in the rehabilitation unit, Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri clinical isolates were simultaneously recovered from the patient's preputial swab. Both the K. oxytoca and C. koseri strains were carbapenem- resistant by MicroScan System (Beckman Coulter). Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae had previously been reported in the same rehabilitation facility. The aim of the study was to identify the carbapenem resistance mechanisms among the enterobacterial species recovered. Phenotypic screening tests useful to detect the β-lactamases/carbapenemases were performed. Carbapenem MICs were obtained by Etest. AmpC and MBL encoding genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation assays and plasmid characterization were performed. Both of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri isolates were multi drug resistant, showing resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, three generation cephalosporins, ertapenem (K. oxytoca MIC, >32 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 4 mg/L), imipenem (K. oxytoca MIC, 4 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 12 mg/L), thrimethoprim sulphamethoxazole and gentamicin. Susceptibility was retained to fluoroquinolones, colistin and tigecycline. Molecular characterization confirmed the co-presence of blaCMY-4 and blaVIM-4 determinants in a 150 Kb transferable plasmid of IncA/C group. This case is the first detection in Italy of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri clinical isolates co-producing the CMY-4 and VIM-4 enzymes.

  5. A Plasmodium vivax plasmid DNA- and adenovirus-vectored malaria vaccine encoding blood stage antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a prime/boost heterologous immunization regimen partially protects Aotus monkeys against blood stage challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-02-08

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium that are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of P. falciparum it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside of Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against malaria. In this study we assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, AMA1 and MSP142 in a recombinant DNA plasmid prime/adenoviral vector (Ad) boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens of each antigen, prime/boost with both antigens, and empty vector controls, and then subjected to blood stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, based on their ability to induced the longest pre-patent period and time to peak parasitemia; the lowest peak and mean parasitemia; the smallest area under the parasitemia curve and the highest self-cured rate. Overall, pre-challenge MSP1 antibody titers strongly correlated with decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad5 vaccine encoding blood stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP142 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen, provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and regimen for further development.

  6. Influence of ultrasound microbubble-mediated MCD-microRNA interference plasmid on heart function in the rat with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-quan WU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the effect of the targeted inhibition of myocardial malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD by ultrasound microbubble mediated MCD-microRNA interference plasmids on cardiac function in rats with myocardial infarction (MI and its possible mechanism. Methods  The MCD expression plasmid and four MCD-microRNA interference plasmids to be screened were co-transfected into HEK293 cells. The levels of MCD mRNA were determined by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and interference sequence with the highest rate of suppression was selected. MI model was reproduced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. The 28 rats with myocardial infarction were randomly assigned into four experimental groups: MI + saline (group 1, MI + plasmid (group 2, MI + ultrasound + plasmid (group 3, MI + ultrasound + microbubble + plasmid (group 4, 7 rats in each group. An alternative group of sham-operated + saline served as control. The mixture of the selected interference plasmids and lipid microbubbles were co-transfected once every four days into rats with MI for 4 weeks mediated by ultrasound. After transfection for 28 days, the changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, short axis fractional shortening (FS, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVIDd were examined by echocardiography, and MCD and lactic acid levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively. Results  One MCD-microRNA interference plasmid with the highest inhibition rate, which was 82%, was selected according to the result of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. In animal experiments, the levels of LVEF and FS in the group 4 were both higher than those in other MI intervention groups (P 0.05, but it was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. Conclusion  That MCD-microRNA interference plasmids were targetedly transfected into infarcted myocardium as

  7. Novel RepA-MCM proteins encoded in plasmids pTAU4, pORA1 and pTIK4 from Sulfolobus neozealandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, B.; Jensen, S.; Phan, H.

    2005-01-01

    Three plasmids isolated from the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus neozealandicus were characterized. Plasmids pTAU4 (7,192 bp), pORA1 (9,689 bp) and pTIK4 (13,638 bp) show unusual properties that distinguish them from previously characterized cryptic plasmids of the genus Sulfolobus. Plas...

  8. Genetically encoded tools: bridging the gap between neuronal identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Ku

    2015-01-21

    Genetically encoded tools are positioned to serve a unique and critical role in bridging the gap between the genetic identity of neurons and their functional properties. However, the use of these tools is limited by our current understanding of cell-type identity. As we make technological advances that focus on capturing functional aspects of neurons such as connectivity, activity, and metabolic states, our understanding of neuronal identity will deepen and may enable the use of genetically encoded tools for modulating disease-specific circuits for therapeutic purposes.

  9. An Integrated Microfluidic Processor for DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Library Functional Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    DNA-encoded synthesis is rekindling interest in combinatorial compound libraries for drug discovery and in technology for automated and quantitative library screening. Here, we disclose a microfluidic circuit that enables functional screens of DNA-encoded compound beads. The device carries out library bead distribution into picoliter-scale assay reagent droplets, photochemical cleavage of compound from the bead, assay incubation, laser-induced fluorescence-based assay detection, and fluorescence-activated droplet sorting to isolate hits. DNA-encoded compound beads (10-μm diameter) displaying a photocleavable positive control inhibitor pepstatin A were mixed (1920 beads, 729 encoding sequences) with negative control beads (58 000 beads, 1728 encoding sequences) and screened for cathepsin D inhibition using a biochemical enzyme activity assay. The circuit sorted 1518 hit droplets for collection following 18 min incubation over a 240 min analysis. Visual inspection of a subset of droplets (1188 droplets) yielded a 24% false discovery rate (1166 pepstatin A beads; 366 negative control beads). Using template barcoding strategies, it was possible to count hit collection beads (1863) using next-generation sequencing data. Bead-specific barcodes enabled replicate counting, and the false discovery rate was reduced to 2.6% by only considering hit-encoding sequences that were observed on >2 beads. This work represents a complete distributable small molecule discovery platform, from microfluidic miniaturized automation to ultrahigh-throughput hit deconvolution by sequencing. PMID:28199790

  10. Functional brain networks during picture encoding and recognition in different odor contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, J L; Ninaus, M; Schuehly, W; Hirschmann, C; Bagga, D; Schöpf, V

    2017-08-30

    Contextual odors can serve as retrieval cues when applied during encoding and recall/recognition of information. To investigate the neuronal basis of these observations, we collected functional MRI data while participants (n=51) performed an encoding and recognition memory task during which odors (congruent: CO or incongruent: IO) were presented as contextual cues. Recognition performance was not influenced by odor, but there was increased activation in the piriform cortex during successful encoding in the CO group, possibly indicating enhanced retrieval of information previously integrated with an olfactory percept. Moreover, group-independent component analysis revealed a stronger task-modulation of subcortical networks for IO versus CO during the recognition task, pointing to differences in olfactory processing. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the involvement of functional neuronal networks in memory tasks and a basis for further evaluation of the impact of odor contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Streptococcal group B integrative and mobilizable element IMESag-rpsI encodes a functional relaxase involved in its transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Diaz, Fabian; Fernández-Lopez, Cris; Douarre, Pierre-Emmanuel; Baez-Ortega, Adrian; Flores, Carlos; Glaser, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae or Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are opportunistic bacteria that can cause lethal sepsis in children and immuno-compromised patients. Their genome is a reservoir of mobile genetic elements that can be horizontally transferred. Among them, integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and the smaller integrative and mobilizable elements (IMEs) primarily reside in the bacterial chromosome, yet have the ability to be transferred between cells by conjugation. ICEs and IMEs are therefore a source of genetic variability that participates in the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although IMEs seem to be the most prevalent class of elements transferable by conjugation, they are poorly known. Here, we have studied a GBS-IME, termed IMESag-rpsI, which is widely distributed in GBS despite not carrying any apparent virulence trait. Analyses of 240 whole genomes showed that IMESag-rpsI is present in approximately 47% of the genomes, has a roughly constant size (approx. 9 kb) and is always integrated at a single location, the 3′-end of the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S9 (rpsI). Based on their genetic variation, several IMESag-rpsI types were defined (A–J) and classified in clonal complexes (CCs). CC1 was the most populated by IMESag-rpsI (more than 95%), mostly of type-A (71%). One CC1 strain (S. agalactiae HRC) was deep-sequenced to understand the rationale underlying type-A IMESag-rpsI enrichment in GBS. Thirteen open reading frames were identified, one of them encoding a protein (MobSag) belonging to the broadly distributed family of relaxases MOBV1. Protein MobSag was purified and, by a newly developed method, shown to cleave DNA at a specific dinucleotide. The S. agalactiae HRC-IMESag-rpsI is able to excise from the chromosome, as shown by the presence of circular intermediates, and it harbours a fully functional mobilization module. Further, the mobSag gene encoded by this mobile element is able to promote plasmid transfer among pneumococcal

  12. Functional dissociation between regularity encoding and deviance detection along the auditory hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamolaei, Maryam; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Grimm, Sabine; Escera, Carles

    2016-02-01

    Auditory deviance detection based on regularity encoding appears as one of the basic functional properties of the auditory system. It has traditionally been assessed with the mismatch negativity (MMN) long-latency component of the auditory evoked potential (AEP). Recent studies have found earlier correlates of deviance detection based on regularity encoding. They occur in humans in the first 50 ms after sound onset, at the level of the middle-latency response of the AEP, and parallel findings of stimulus-specific adaptation observed in animal studies. However, the functional relationship between these different levels of regularity encoding and deviance detection along the auditory hierarchy has not yet been clarified. Here we addressed this issue by examining deviant-related responses at different levels of the auditory hierarchy to stimulus changes varying in their degree of deviation regarding the spatial location of a repeated standard stimulus. Auditory stimuli were presented randomly from five loudspeakers at azimuthal angles of 0°, 12°, 24°, 36° and 48° during oddball and reversed-oddball conditions. Middle-latency responses and MMN were measured. Our results revealed that middle-latency responses were sensitive to deviance but not the degree of deviation, whereas the MMN amplitude increased as a function of deviance magnitude. These findings indicated that acoustic regularity can be encoded at the level of the middle-latency response but that it takes a higher step in the auditory hierarchy for deviance magnitude to be encoded, thus providing a functional dissociation between regularity encoding and deviance detection along the auditory hierarchy. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Conjugative plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Pachulec

    Full Text Available Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233 or containing Dutch (pEP5289 or American (pEP5050 type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids

  14. Gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using non-viral vectors composed of bis guanidinium-tren-cholesterol and plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-2 and TIMP-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong-Lan; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Pericat, David; Dubois, Sylvie; Cazals, Dominique; Hervy, Martial; DeClerck, Yves A; Degott, Claude; Auclair, Christian

    2003-06-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) contribute to the regulation of tumor microenvironment. Their expressions are deregulated in almost all human cancers. We report a novel approach to gene therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using repeated injections of DNA plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) TIMP-2 or TIMP-3, and a novel competent formulation of gene transfer based on nontoxic cationic cholesterol derivatives. The new gene delivery system was efficient in demonstrating the antitumor efficiency of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 in inhibiting tumor growth of human HuH7 HCC cells xenografted into nude mice. We show, for the first time, an in vivo effect of TIMP-3 in delaying HCC tumor growth. No treatment-related toxicity was noted. An inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor necrosis accompanied the inhibitory effects of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 on tumor expansion and invasion. We also report a bystander effect produced by transfected HuH7 tumor cells mixed with untransfected cells in 1:1 ratio in culture that resulted in killing 98% of cells within 96 h. In addition, the soluble forms of TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expressed by transfected cells exerted a cytotoxic effect on untransfected HuH7 cell cultures. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential efficacy of repeated treatment of secreted TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 for the design of nonviral gene therapy for hepatocarcinoma.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF INFLUENCE OF ENCODING FUNCTION COMPLEXITY ON DISTRIBUTION OF ERROR MASKING PROBABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Levina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Error detection codes are mechanisms that enable robust delivery of data in unreliable communication channels and devices. Unreliable channels and devices are error-prone objects. Respectively, error detection codes allow detecting such errors. There are two classes of error detecting codes - classical codes and security-oriented codes. The classical codes have high percentage of detected errors; however, they have a high probability to miss an error in algebraic manipulation. In order, security-oriented codes are codes with a small Hamming distance and high protection to algebraic manipulation. The probability of error masking is a fundamental parameter of security-oriented codes. A detailed study of this parameter allows analyzing the behavior of the error-correcting code in the case of error injection in the encoding device. In order, the complexity of the encoding function plays an important role in the security-oriented codes. Encoding functions with less computational complexity and a low probability of masking are the best protection of encoding device against malicious acts. This paper investigates the influence of encoding function complexity on the error masking probability distribution. It will be shownthat the more complex encoding function reduces the maximum of error masking probability. It is also shown in the paper that increasing of the function complexity changes the error masking probability distribution. In particular, increasing of computational complexity decreases the difference between the maximum and average value of the error masking probability. Our resultshave shown that functions with greater complexity have smoothed maximums of error masking probability, which significantly complicates the analysis of error-correcting code by attacker. As a result, in case of complex encoding function the probability of the algebraic manipulation is reduced. The paper discusses an approach how to measure the error masking

  16. Genomic and functional characterization of the modular broad-host-range RA3 plasmid, the archetype of the IncU group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinska, Anna; Czeredys, Magdalena; Hayes, Finbarr; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2008-07-01

    IncU plasmids are a distinctive group of mobile elements with highly conserved backbone functions and variable antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The IncU archetype is conjugative plasmid RA3, whose sequence (45,909 bp) shows it to be a mosaic, modular replicon with a class I integron different from that of other IncU replicons. Functional analysis demonstrated that RA3 possesses a broad host range and can efficiently self-transfer, replicate, and be maintained stably in alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. RA3 contains 50 open reading frames clustered in distinct functional modules. The replication module encompasses the repA and repB genes embedded in long repetitive sequences. RepA, which is homologous to antitoxin proteins from alpha- and gammaproteobacteria, contains a Cro/cI-type DNA-binding domain present in the XRE family of transcriptional regulators. The repA promoter is repressed by RepA and RepB. The minireplicon encompasses repB and the downstream repetitive sequence r1/r2. RepB shows up to 80% similarity to putative replication initiation proteins from environmental plasmids of beta- and gammaproteobacteria, as well as similarity to replication proteins from alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Stable maintenance functions of RA3 are most like those of IncP-1 broad-host-range plasmids and comprise the active partitioning apparatus formed by IncC (ParA) and KorB (ParB), the antirestriction protein KlcA, and accessory stability components KfrA and KfrC. The RA3 origin of transfer was localized experimentally between the maintenance and conjugative-transfer operons. The putative conjugative-transfer module is highly similar in organization and in its products to transfer regions of certain broad-host-range environmental plasmids.

  17. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  18. Functional analysis of the stability determinant AlfB of pBET131, a miniplasmid derivative of bacillus subtilis (natto) plasmid pLS32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Teruo

    2010-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 is a derivative of pLS32, which was isolated from a natto strain of Bacillus subtilis. The DNA region in pBET131 that confers segregational stability contains an operon consisting of three genes, of which alfA, encoding an actin-like ATPase, and alfB are essential for plasmid stability. In this work, the alfB gene product and its target DNA region were studied in detail. Transcription of the alf operon initiated from a sigma(A)-type promoter was repressed by the alfB gene product. Overproduction of AlfA was inhibitory to cell growth, suggesting that the repression of the alf operon by AlfB is important for maintaining appropriate levels of AlfA. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and footprinting analysis with purified His-tagged AlfB showed that it bound to a DNA region containing three tandem repeats of 8-bp AT-rich sequence (here designated parN), which partially overlaps the -35 sequence of the promoter. A sequence alteration in the first or third repeat did not affect the AlfB binding and plasmid stability, whereas that in the second repeat resulted in inhibition of these phenomena. The repression of alfA-lacZ expression was observed in the constructs carrying a mutation in either the first or third repeat, but not in the second repeat, indicating a correlation between plasmid stability, AlfB binding, and repression. It was also demonstrated by the yeast two-hybrid system that AlfA and AlfB interact with each other and among themselves. From these results, it was concluded that AlfB participates in partitioning pBET131 by forming a complex with AlfA and parN, the mode of which is typified by the type II partition mechanism.

  19. Functional clustering drives encoding improvement in a developing brain network during awake visual learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar Podgorski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory experience drives dramatic structural and functional plasticity in developing neurons. However, for single-neuron plasticity to optimally improve whole-network encoding of sensory information, changes must be coordinated between neurons to ensure a full range of stimuli is efficiently represented. Using two-photon calcium imaging to monitor evoked activity in over 100 neurons simultaneously, we investigate network-level changes in the developing Xenopus laevis tectum during visual training with motion stimuli. Training causes stimulus-specific changes in neuronal responses and interactions, resulting in improved population encoding. This plasticity is spatially structured, increasing tuning curve similarity and interactions among nearby neurons, and decreasing interactions among distant neurons. Training does not improve encoding by single clusters of similarly responding neurons, but improves encoding across clusters, indicating coordinated plasticity across the network. NMDA receptor blockade prevents coordinated plasticity, reduces clustering, and abolishes whole-network encoding improvement. We conclude that NMDA receptors support experience-dependent network self-organization, allowing efficient population coding of a diverse range of stimuli.

  20. Multiple plasmid interference - Pledging allegiance to my enemy's enemy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, João Alves; Zilhão, Rita; Dionisio, Francisco

    2017-08-24

    As shown in the previous article, two distinct conjugative plasmids sometimes interact within bacterial cells, implicating changes of transfer rates. In most cases of interactions within bacteria, the transfer of one of the plasmids decreases. Less frequently, the transfer rate of one of the plasmids increases. Here we analyse what happens if three distinct conjugative plasmids colonize the same bacterial cell. Our aim is to understand how interactions between two plasmids affect the transfer rate of the third plasmid. After showing that plasmids interact in 59 out of 84 possible interactions we show that, with some exceptions, if the transfer rate of a plasmid decreases in the presence of a second plasmid, a decrease is also observed in the presence of a third plasmid. Moreover, if the conjugation rate of a plasmid increases in the presence of another, an increase is also observed if there is a third plasmid in the cell. Both types of interactions are mostly independent of the third plasmid's identity, even if sometimes the third plasmid quantitatively distorts the interaction of the other two plasmids. There is a bias towards negative intensifying interactions, which provide good news concerning the spread conjugative plasmids encoding antibiotic-resistance genes and virulence factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Chlamydophila felis plasmid is highly conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Ross; Day, Sarinder; Di Rocco, Camillo; Helps, Chris

    2010-11-20

    The presence of a plasmid in the Chlamydiaceae is both species and strain specific. Knowledge of the prevalence of the plasmid in different Chlamydia species is important for future studies aiming to investigate the role of the plasmid in chlamydial biology and disease. Although strains of Chlamydophila felis with or without the plasmid have been identified, only a small number of laboratory-adapted strains have been analysed and the prevalence of the plasmid in field isolates has not been determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of the plasmid in C. felis-positive conjunctival and oropharyngeal clinical samples submitted for routine diagnosis of C. felis by real-time (Q)PCR. DNA extracts from four laboratory-adapted strains were also analysed. QPCR assays targeting regions of C. felis plasmid genes pCF01, pCF02 and pCF03 were developed for the detection of plasmid DNA. QPCR analysis of DNA extracts from C. felis-positive clinical samples found evidence of plasmid DNA in 591 of 595 samples representing 561 of 564 (99.5%) clinical cases. Plasmid DNA was also detected by QPCR in laboratory-adapted strains 1497V, K2487 and K2490, but not strain 905. We conclude that the plasmid is highly conserved in C. felis, and plasmid-deficient strains represent a rare but important population for future studies of chlamydial plasmid function.

  2. Replication of plasmids in gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Replication of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is dependent on three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The first stage, initiation, depends on plasmid-encoded properties such as the replication origin and, in most cases, the replication initiation protein (Rep protein). In recent years the understanding of initiation and regulation of plasmid replication in Escherichia coli has increased considerably, but it is only for the ColE1-type plasmids that significant biochemical d...

  3. Marek’s disease virus-encoded microRNAs: genomics, expression and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the recently discovered small non-coding RNA molecules that have post-transcriptional regulatory functions in many important biological processes. A large number of miRNAs have been found to be encoded by viral genomes, especially in herpesviruses. Previous research regarding miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses, including Marek’s disease virus (MDV), has demonstrated their involvement in lytic replication, latent infection, T-lymphocyte transformation and tumorigenesis. MDV is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, with the ability to induce tumors in natural hosts; however, formation of these tumors can be prevented by immunization with attenuated or nonpathogenic forms of the virus. Marek’s disease is considered to be a good biomedical model for investigating the biology, genetics, and immunology of tumorigenesis. In this paper, we review the discovery and identification of MDV-encoded miRNAs, along with their genomics, expression profiles, and currently known functions. We also discuss the prospects and techniques possibly applicable to the further investigation of the biological roles of MDV-encoded miRNAs.

  4. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  5. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  6. Molecular analysis of plasmid encoded multi-drug resistance (MDR) in Salmonella enterica animal isolates by PFGE, replicon typing, and DNA microarray screening followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The development of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella is of global concern. MDR Salmonella genes can be transmitted in a number of ways including transfer of plasmids. To understand how MDR plasmids develop and are transmitted, their genetics must be thoroughly described. To achieve t...

  7. Multiple Pathways of Plasmid DNA Transfer in Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Stefanie; Holsten, Lea; Weiss, Evelyn; Benghezal, Mohammed; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Many Helicobacter pylori (Hp) strains carry cryptic plasmids of different size and gene content, the function of which is not well understood. A subgroup of these plasmids (e.g. pHel4, pHel12), contain a mobilisation region, but no cognate type IV secretion system (T4SS) for conjugative transfer. Instead, certain H. pylori strains (e.g. strain P12 carrying plasmid pHel12) can harbour up to four T4SSs in their genome (cag-T4SS, comB, tfs3, tfs4). Here, we show that such indigenous plasmids can be efficiently transferred between H. pylori strains, even in the presence of extracellular DNaseI eliminating natural transformation. Knockout of a plasmid-encoded mobA relaxase gene significantly reduced plasmid DNA transfer in the presence of DNaseI, suggesting a DNA conjugation or mobilisation process. To identify the T4SS involved in this conjugative DNA transfer, each individual T4SS was consecutively deleted from the bacterial chromosome. Using a marker-free counterselectable gene deletion procedure (rpsL counterselection method), a P12 mutant strain was finally obtained with no single T4SS (P12ΔT4SS). Mating experiments using these mutants identified the comB T4SS in the recipient strain as the major mediator of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori strains, both in a DNaseI-sensitive (natural transformation) as well as a DNaseI-resistant manner (conjugative transfer). However, transfer of a pHel12::cat plasmid from a P12ΔT4SS donor strain into a P12ΔT4SS recipient strain provided evidence for the existence of a third, T4SS-independent mechanism of DNA transfer. This novel type of plasmid DNA transfer, designated as alternate DNaseI-Resistant (ADR) mechanism, is observed at a rather low frequency under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our study describes for the first time the existence of three distinct pathways of plasmid DNA transfer between H. pylori underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer for this species. PMID:23029142

  8. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  9. Streptomyces linear plasmids that contain a phage-like, centrally located, replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P C; Kim, E S; Cohen, S N

    1996-12-01

    Unlike previously studied linear replicons containing 5' DNA termini covalently bound to protein, pSLA2, a 17 kb linear plasmid of Streptomyces rochei, initiates replication internally rather than at the telomeres (Chang and Cohen, 1994). Here we identify and characterize the replication origin of pSLA2, showing that it contains a series of direct repeats (iterons) within a centrally located gene encoding an essential DNA-binding protein (Rep1); a second essential protein (Rep2), which resembles prokaryotic DNA helicases and has ATPase activity stimulated by single-stranded DNA, is expressed from the same transcript. A 430 bp locus separated by almost 2 kb from the iterons of the origin specifies an as yet undefined additional function required in cis for plasmid replication. pSCL, a 12 kb linear plasmid of Streptomyces clavuligerus, contains, near the centre of the plasmid, a region configured like the pSLA2 origin. The replication regions of pSLA2 and pSCL, which are capable of propagating plasmid DNA in either a circular or linear form (Shiffman and Cohen, 1992; Chang and Cohen, 1994) resemble those of temperate bacteriophages of the Enterobacteriacae and Bacillus. Our observations suggest that Streptomyces linear plasmids may occupy an evolutionarily intermediate position between circular plasmids and linear phage replicons.

  10. Contributions of local speech encoding and functional connectivity to audio-visual speech perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Bruno L; Ince, Robin A A; Gross, Joachim; Schyns, Philippe G; Panzeri, Stefano; Kayser, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Seeing a speaker’s face enhances speech intelligibility in adverse environments. We investigated the underlying network mechanisms by quantifying local speech representations and directed connectivity in MEG data obtained while human participants listened to speech of varying acoustic SNR and visual context. During high acoustic SNR speech encoding by temporally entrained brain activity was strong in temporal and inferior frontal cortex, while during low SNR strong entrainment emerged in premotor and superior frontal cortex. These changes in local encoding were accompanied by changes in directed connectivity along the ventral stream and the auditory-premotor axis. Importantly, the behavioral benefit arising from seeing the speaker’s face was not predicted by changes in local encoding but rather by enhanced functional connectivity between temporal and inferior frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate a role of auditory-frontal interactions in visual speech representations and suggest that functional connectivity along the ventral pathway facilitates speech comprehension in multisensory environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24763.001 PMID:28590903

  11. A recombinant plasmid of composite cysteine proteinase inhibitor/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of periodic Brugia malayi functions on DNA immunity in the host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Both cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH play important roles in the pathogenesis of parasites and their relationship with the hosts. We constructed a new eukaryotic recombinant expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH of periodic Brugia malayi for investigation of the DNA vaccine-elicited immune responses. Materials and Methods: We cloned a gene encoding the CPIs and GAPDH from periodic B. malayi into vector pcDNA3.1. The composited plasmid or the control was injected into the tibialis anterior muscle of the hind leg in BALB/c mice, respectively. The target genes were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in muscle tissues. The stimulation index (SI of T-lymphocyte proliferation and the levels of interferon-gamma (INF-g and interleukin-4 ( IL-4 in serum were detected by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: The pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH was amplified from muscle tissues of the mice after immunisation. The SI of the immunised group was significantly higher than that of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The levels of INF-g and IL-4 of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group were both higher than those of the two control groups (P < 0.05. The level of INF-g of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH group was significantly higher than that of pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/CpG group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: We conclude that the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-BmCPI/BmGAPDH could elicit specific humoural and cellular immune responses in mice.

  12. The promoter of the glucoamylase-encoding gene of Aspergillus niger functions in Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.L. (Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Gaskell, J.; Cullen, D. (Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States)); Berka, R.M.; Yang, M.; Henner, D.J. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Promoter sequences from the Aspergillus niger glucoamylase-encoding gene (glaA) were linked to the bacterial hygromycin (Hy) phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hph) and this chimeric marker was used to select Hy-resistant (Hy[sup R]) Ustilago maydis transformants. This is an example of an Ascomycete promoter functioning in a Basidiomycete. Hy[sup R] transformants varied with respect to copy number of integrated vector, mitotic stability, and tolerance to Hy. Only 216 bp of glaA promoter sequence is required for expression in U. maydis but this promoter is not induced by starch as it is in Aspergillus spp. The transcription start points are the same in U. maydis and A. niger.

  13. A conceptual basis to encode and detect organic functional groups in XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Krief, Alain; Vijayasarathi, Durairaj

    2013-06-01

    A conceptual basis to define and detect organic functional groups is developed. The basic model of a functional group is termed as a primary functional group and is characterized by a group center composed of one or more group center atoms bonded to terminal atoms and skeletal carbon atoms. The generic group center patterns are identified from the structures of known functional groups. Accordingly, a chemical ontology 'Font' is developed to organize the existing functional groups as well as the new ones to be defined by the chemists. The basic model is extended to accommodate various combinations of primary functional groups as functional group assemblies. A concept of skeletal group is proposed to define the characteristic groups composed of only carbon atoms to be regarded as equivalent to functional groups. The combination of primary functional groups with skeletal groups is categorized as skeletal group assembly. In order to make the model suitable for reaction modeling purpose, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) is developed to define the functional groups and to encode in XML format appropriate to detect them in chemical structures. The system is capable of detecting multiple instances of primary functional groups as well as the overlapping poly-functional groups as the respective assemblies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-DSB clustered DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are largely responsible for the loss of plasmid DNA functionality in the presence of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouass Sahbani, S; Rezaee, M; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L; Hunting, D J

    2014-06-25

    The combination of cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR) increases cell toxicity by both enhancing DNA damage and inhibiting repair mechanisms. Although the formation of cluster DNA lesions, particularly double-strand breaks (DSB) at the site of cisplatin-DNA-adducts has been reported to induce cell death, the contribution of DSB and non-DSB cluster lesions to the cellular toxicity is still unknown. Although both lesions are toxic, it is not always possible to measure their frequency and cell survival in the same model system. To overcome this problem, here, we investigate the effect of cisplatin-adducts on the induction of DSB and non-DSB cluster DNA lesions by IR and determine the impact of such lesions on plasmid functionality. Cluster lesions are two or more lesions on opposite DNA strands with a short distance such that error free repair is difficult or impossible. At a ratio of two cisplatin per plasmid, irradiation of platinated DNA in solution with (137)Cs γ-rays shows enhancements in the formation of DNA DSB and non-DSB cluster lesions by factors of 2.6 and 2.1, respectively, compared to unmodified DNA. However, in absolute terms, the yield for non-DSB cluster lesions is far larger than that for DSB, by a factor of 26. Unmodified and cisplatin-modified DNA were irradiated and subsequently transformed into Escherichia coli to give survival curves representing the functionality of the plasmid DNA as a function of radiation dose. Our results demonstrate that non-DSB cluster lesions are the only toxic lesions present at a sufficient frequency to account for the loss of DNA functionality. Our data also show that Frank-DSB lesions are simply too infrequent to account for the loss of DNA functionality. In conclusion, non-DSB cluster DNA damage is known to be difficult to repair and is probably the lesion responsible for the loss of functionality of DNA modified by cisplatin.

  15. Recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction allows rapid and seamless cloning of oligomeric genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jonathan R; Mackay, J Andrew; Quiroz, Felipe García; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-04-12

    This paper reports a new strategy, recursive directional ligation by plasmid reconstruction (PRe-RDL), to rapidly clone highly repetitive polypeptides of any sequence and specified length over a large range of molecular weights. In a single cycle of PRe-RDL, two halves of a parent plasmid, each containing a copy of an oligomer, are ligated together, thereby dimerizing the oligomer and reconstituting a functional plasmid. This process is carried out recursively to assemble an oligomeric gene with the desired number of repeats. PRe-RDL has several unique features that stem from the use of type IIs restriction endonucleases: first, PRe-RDL is a seamless cloning method that leaves no extraneous nucleotides at the ligation junction. Because it uses type IIs endonucleases to ligate the two halves of the plasmid, PRe-RDL also addresses the major limitation of RDL in that it abolishes any restriction on the gene sequence that can be oligomerized. The reconstitution of a functional plasmid only upon successful ligation in PRe-RDL also addresses two other limitations of RDL: the significant background from self-ligation of the vector observed in RDL, and the decreased efficiency of ligation due to nonproductive circularization of the insert. PRe-RDL can also be used to assemble genes that encode different sequences in a predetermined order to encode block copolymers or append leader and trailer peptide sequences to the oligomerized gene.

  16. Fungal phytopathogens encode functional homologues of plant rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thynne, Elisha; Saur, Isabel M L; Simbaqueba, Jaime; Ogilvie, Huw A; Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Mead, Oliver; Taranto, Adam; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; McDonald, Megan C; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Jones, David A; Rathjen, John P; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-06-13

    In this article, we describe the presence of genes encoding close homologues of an endogenous plant peptide, rapid alkalinization factor (RALF), within the genomes of 26 species of phytopathogenic fungi. Members of the RALF family are key growth factors in plants, and the sequence of the RALF active region is well conserved between plant and fungal proteins. RALF1-like sequences were observed in most cases; however, RALF27-like sequences were present in the Sphaerulina musiva and Septoria populicola genomes. These two species are pathogens of poplar and, interestingly, the closest relative to their respective RALF genes is a poplar RALF27-like sequence. RALF peptides control cellular expansion during plant development, but were originally defined on the basis of their ability to induce rapid alkalinization in tobacco cell cultures. To test whether the fungal RALF peptides were biologically active in plants, we synthesized RALF peptides corresponding to those encoded by two sequenced genomes of the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. One of these peptides inhibited the growth of tomato seedlings and elicited responses in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana typical of endogenous plant RALF peptides (reactive oxygen species burst, induced alkalinization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation). Gene expression analysis confirmed that a RALF-encoding gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici was expressed during infection on tomato. However, a subsequent reverse genetics approach revealed that the RALF peptide was not required by F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici for infection on tomato roots. This study has demonstrated the presence of functionally active RALF peptides encoded within phytopathogens that harbour an as yet undetermined role in plant-pathogen interactions.

  17. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Y; Goh, T K; Tani, Y

    1993-06-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as in monomeric forms in C. boidinii cells. The C. boidinii URA3 gene was overexpressed in C. boidinii on these CARS vectors. CARS1 and CARS2 were found to function as an autonomous replicating element in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well. Different portions of the CARS1 sequence were needed for autonomous replicating activity in C. boidinii and S. cerevisiae. C. boidinii could also be transformed with vectors harboring a CARS fragment and the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene.

  18. Formation of functional asialoglycoprotein receptor after transfection with cDNAs encoding the receptor proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McPhaul, M; Berg, P.

    1986-01-01

    The rat asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) has been expressed in cultured rat hepatoma cells (HTC cells) after transfection with cloned cDNAs. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of transfected cells was used to identify the functional cDNA clones and to isolate cells expressing the ASGP-R. Simultaneous or sequential transfections with two cloned cDNAs that encode related but distinctive polypeptide chains were needed to obtain ASGP-R activity; transfection with either cDNA alone failed to ...

  19. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...

  20. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  1. Cloning of an epoxide hydrolase encoding gene from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and functional expresion in Yarrowia lipolytica

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available -joining method with the Kimura two-parameter distance measure. Confidence values were estimated from bootstrap analysis of 1000 replicates. The bar length corresponds to 10% amino acid dissimilarity amino acid) and the HGXP motif that contains the oxyanion... the isolation and cloning of an EH-encoding gene and its cDNA from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and the functional expression of this gene in Y. lipolytica. Materials and methods Strains and culture conditions R. mucilaginosa (CBS 8596), Y. lipolytica strain...

  2. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+ Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liang

    Full Text Available The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed "barnacle cement". In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+ plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as "Trx-Balcp19k gel", and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany. Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials.

  3. Vaccination with a plasmid DNA encoding HER-2/neu together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma: a pilot clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutson Keith L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adjuvant trastuzumab (Herceptin treatment of breast cancer patients significantly improves their clinical outcome. Vaccination is an attractive alternative approach to provide HER-2/neu (Her2-specific antibodies and may in addition concomitantly stimulate Her2-reactive T-cells. Here we report the first administration of a Her2-plasmid DNA (pDNA vaccine in humans. Patients and Methods The vaccine, encoding a full-length signaling-deficient version of the oncogene Her2, was administered together with low doses of GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with metastatic Her2-expressing breast carcinoma who were also treated with trastuzumab. Six of eight enrolled patients completed all three vaccine cycles. In the remaining two patients treatment was discontinued after one vaccine cycle due to rapid tumor progression or disease-related complications. The primary objective was the evaluation of safety and tolerability of the vaccine regimen. As a secondary objective, treatment-induced Her2-specific immunity was monitored by measuring antibody production as well as T-cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to Her2-derived antigens. Results No clinical manifestations of acute toxicity, autoimmunity or cardiotoxicity were observed after administration of Her2-pDNA in combination with GM-CSF, IL-2 and trastuzumab. No specific T-cell proliferation following in vitro stimulation of freshly isolated PBMC with recombinant human Her2 protein was induced by the vaccination. Immediately after all three cycles of vaccination no or even decreased CD4+ T-cell responses towards Her2-derived peptide epitopes were observed, but a significant increase of MHC class II restricted T-cell responses to Her2 was detected at long term follow-up. Since concurrent trastuzumab therapy was permitted, λ-subclass specific ELISAs were performed to specifically measure endogenous antibody production without interference by trastuzumab. Her2-pDNA vaccination

  4. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L; Landolin, Jane M; Bristow, Christopher A; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W; Brooks, Angela N; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A; Duff, Michael O; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K; Riddle, Nicole C; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E; Schwartz, Yuri B; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E; Brent, Michael R; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C R; Gingeras, Thomas R; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J; Celniker, Susan E; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H; Lai, Eric C; MacAlpine, David M; Stein, Lincoln D; White, Kevin P; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-24

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation.

  5. Rice dwarf phytoreovirus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein has a cell-to-cell movement function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Bao, Yi M; Wei, Chun H; Kang, Zhen S; Zhong, Yong W; Mao, Peng; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhang L; Schiemann, Joachim; Nelson, Richard S

    2004-05-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, which is composed of viruses with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. Proteins that support the intercellular movement of these viruses in the host have not been identified. Microprojectile bombardment was used to determine which open reading frames (ORFs) support intercellular movement of a heterologous virus. A plasmid containing an infectious clone of Potato virus X (PVX) defective in cell-to-cell movement and expressing either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used for cobombardment with plasmids containing ORFs from RDV gene segments S1 through S12 onto leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX was restored by cobombardment with a plasmid containing S6. In the absence of S6, no other gene segment supported movement. Identical results were obtained with Nicotiana tabacum, a host that allows fewer viruses to infect and spread within its tissue. S6 supported the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX in sink and source leaves of N. benthamiana. A mutant S6 lacking the translation start codon did not complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX. An S6 protein product (Pns6)-enhanced GFP fusion was observed near or within cell walls of epidermal cells from N. tabacum. By immunocytochemistry, unfused Pns6 was localized to plasmodesmata in rice leaves infected with RDV. S6 thus encodes a protein with characteristics identical to those of other viral proteins required for the cell-to-cell movement of their genome and therefore is likely required for the cell-to-cell movement of RDV.

  6. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  7. In Silico Analysis of a Novel Plasmid from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus Reveals Two Potential “Ecological Islands”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Wachter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As virulence often correlates with the presence of plasmid replicons in several Vibrio spp., this study investigated whether non-chromosomal DNA could be found in the coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus BAA-450. A circular plasmid, 26,631 bp in size, was identified. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid contained 30 open reading frames, six tRNA genes, 12 inverted repeats, three direct repeats and presented no continuous sequence identity to other replicons within the database. Consequently, these findings indicate that this is a novel, previously unidentified, plasmid. Two putative “ecological islands” were also identified and are predicted to encode for various factors that would facilitate growth and survival under different ecological conditions. In addition, two open reading frames may encode proteins that contribute to the pathogenicity of the organism. Functional cooperativity is also indicated between several plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded proteins, which, in a single instance, would allow a fully functioning nutrient uptake system to be established.

  8. In Silico Analysis of a Novel Plasmid from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus Reveals Two Potential “Ecological Islands”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    As virulence often correlates with the presence of plasmid replicons in several Vibrio spp., this study investigated whether non-chromosomal DNA could be found in the coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus BAA-450. A circular plasmid, 26,631 bp in size, was identified. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid contained 30 open reading frames, six tRNA genes, 12 inverted repeats, three direct repeats and presented no continuous sequence identity to other replicons within the database. Consequently, these findings indicate that this is a novel, previously unidentified, plasmid. Two putative “ecological islands” were also identified and are predicted to encode for various factors that would facilitate growth and survival under different ecological conditions. In addition, two open reading frames may encode proteins that contribute to the pathogenicity of the organism. Functional cooperativity is also indicated between several plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded proteins, which, in a single instance, would allow a fully functioning nutrient uptake system to be established. PMID:27681896

  9. Dissociative effects of true and false recall as a function of different encoding strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Kerri A

    2007-01-01

    Goodwin, Meissner, and Ericsson (2001) proposed a path model in which elaborative encoding predicted the likelihood of verbalisation of critical, nonpresented words at encoding, which in turn predicted the likelihood of false recall. The present study tested this model of false recall experimentally with a manipulation of encoding strategy and the implementation of the process-tracing technique of protocol analysis. Findings indicated that elaborative encoding led to more verbalisations of critical items during encoding than rote rehearsal of list items, but false recall rates were reduced under elaboration conditions (Experiment 2). Interestingly, false recall was more likely to occur when items were verbalised during encoding than not verbalised (Experiment 1), and participants tended to reinstate their encoding strategies during recall, particularly after elaborative encoding (Experiment 1). Theoretical implications for the interplay of encoding and retrieval processes of false recall are discussed.

  10. Signal encoding in magnetic particle imaging: properties of the system function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleich Bernhard

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic particle imaging (MPI is a new tomographic imaging technique capable of imaging magnetic tracer material at high temporal and spatial resolution. Image reconstruction requires solving a system of linear equations, which is characterized by a "system function" that establishes the relation between spatial tracer position and frequency response. This paper for the first time reports on the structure and properties of the MPI system function. Methods An analytical derivation of the 1D MPI system function exhibits its explicit dependence on encoding field parameters and tracer properties. Simulations are used to derive properties of the 2D and 3D system function. Results It is found that for ideal tracer particles in a harmonic excitation field and constant selection field gradient, the 1D system function can be represented by Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind. Exact 1D image reconstruction can thus be performed using the Chebyshev transform. More realistic particle magnetization curves can be treated as a convolution of the derivative of the magnetization curve with the Chebyshev functions. For 2D and 3D imaging, it is found that Lissajous excitation trajectories lead to system functions that are closely related to tensor products of Chebyshev functions. Conclusion Since to date, the MPI system function has to be measured in time-consuming calibration scans, the additional information derived here can be used to reduce the amount of information to be acquired experimentally and can hence speed up system function acquisition. Furthermore, redundancies found in the system function can be removed to arrive at sparser representations that reduce memory load and allow faster image reconstruction.

  11. pKBuS13, a KPC-2-Encoding Plasmid from Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 833, Carrying Tn4401b Inserted into an Xer Site-Specific Recombination Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbari, Luigi; Busetti, Marina; Dolzani, Lucilla; Petix, Vincenzo; Knezevich, Anna; Bressan, Raffaela; Gionechetti, Fabrizia; Tonin, Enrico A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first detection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase 2 (KPC-2)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strain belonging to sequence type 833 (ST833), collected in an Italian hospital from a patient coming from South America. Its blaKPC determinant was carried by a ColE1 plasmid, pKBuS13, that showed the Tn4401b::blaKPC-2 transposon inserted into the regulatory region of an Xer site-specific recombination locus. This interfered with the correct resolution of plasmid multimers into monomers, lowering plasmid stability and leading to overestimation of the number of plasmids harbored by a single host cell. Sequencing of the fragments adjacent to Tn4401b detected a region that did not have significant matches in databases other than the genome of a carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli strain collected during the same year at a hospital in Boston. This is interesting in an epidemiologic context, as it suggests that despite the absence of tra genes and the instability under nonselective conditions, the circulation of pKBuS13 or of analogous plasmids might be wider than reported. PMID:26077252

  12. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  13. Characterization of Plasmid pPO1 from the Hyperacidophile Picrophilus oshimae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Angelov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Picrophilus oshimae and Picrophilus torridus are free-living, moderately thermophilic and acidophilic organisms from the lineage of Euryarchaeota. With a pH optimum of growth at pH 0.7 and the ability to even withstand molar concentrations of sulphuric acid, these organisms represent the most extreme acidophiles known. So far, nothing is known about plasmid biology in these hyperacidophiles. Also, there are no genetic tools available for this genus. We have mobilized the 7.6 Kbp plasmid from P. oshimae in E. coli by introducing origin-containing transposons and described the plasmid in terms of its nucleotide sequence, copy number in the native host, mode of replication, and transcriptional start sites of the encoded ORFs. Plasmid pPO1 may encode a restriction/modification system in addition to its replication functions. The information gained from the pPO1 plasmid may prove useful in developing a cloning system for this group of extreme acidophiles.

  14. Mechanism of DNA Segregation in Prokaryotes: Replicon Pairing by parC of Plasmid R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Lurz, Rudi; Gerdes, Kenn

    1998-07-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes and plasmids encode partitioning systems that are required for DNA segregation at cell division. The systems are thought to be functionally analogous to eukaryotic centromeres and to play a general role in DNA segregation. The parA system of plasmid R1 encodes two proteins ParM and ParR, and a cis-acting centromere-like site denoted parC. The ParR protein binds to parC in vivo and in vitro. The ParM protein is an ATPase that interacts with ParR specifically bound to parC. Using electron microscopy, we show here that parC mediates efficient pairing of plasmid molecules. The pairing requires binding of ParR to parC and is stimulated by the ParM ATPase. The ParM mediated stimulation of plasmid pairing is dependent on ATP hydrolysis by ParM. Using a ligation kinetics assay, we find that ParR stimulates ligation of parC-containing DNA fragments. The rate-of-ligation was increased by wild type ParM protein but not by mutant ParM protein deficient in the ATPase activity. Thus, two independent assays show that parC mediates pairing of plasmid molecules in vitro. These results are consistent with the proposal that replicon pairing is part of the mechanism of DNA segregation in prokaryotes.

  15. Reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging associative encoding memory paradigms in non-demented elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putcha, Deepti; O'Keefe, Kelly; LaViolette, Pete; O'Brien, Jackie; Greve, Doug; Rentz, Dorene M; Locascio, Joseph; Atri, Alireza; Sperling, Reisa

    2011-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) holds significant potential to aid in the development of early interventions to improve memory function, and to assess longitudinal change in memory systems in aging and early Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the test-retest reliability of hippocampal activation and of "beneficial" deactivation in the precuneus has yet to be fully established during memory encoding tasks in older subjects. Using a mixed block and event-related face-name associative encoding paradigm, we assessed the reliability of hippocampal activation and default network deactivation over a 4- to 6-week interscan interval in 27 older individuals who were cognitively normal [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale = 0; n = 18] or mildly impaired (CDR = 0.5; n = 9). Reliability was assessed in whole brain maps and regions of interest using both a full-task paradigm of six functional runs as well as an abbreviated paradigm of the first two functional runs, which would be advantageous for use in clinical trials. We found reliable hippocampal signal response across both block- and event-related designs in the right hippocampus. Comparable reliability in hippocampal activation was found in the full and the abbreviated paradigm. Similar reliability in hippocampal activation was observed across both CDR groups overall, but the CDR 0.5 group was more variable in left hippocampal activity. Task-related deactivation in the precuneus demonstrated much greater variability than hippocampal activation in all analyses. Overall, these results are encouraging for the utility of fMRI in "Proof of Concept" clinical trials investigating the efficacy of potentially therapeutic agents for treatment of age-related memory changes, cognitive impairment, and early AD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of genes encoding poly(A polymerases in plants: evidence for duplication and functional specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R Meeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(A polymerase is a key enzyme in the machinery that mediates mRNA 3' end formation in eukaryotes. In plants, poly(A polymerases are encoded by modest gene families. To better understand this multiplicity of genes, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes from several other plants, as well as from Selaginella, Physcomitrella, and Chlamydomonas, were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bioinformatics tools, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes were identified in the genomes of eight species in the plant lineage. Whereas Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to possess a single poly(A polymerase gene, other species possessed between two and six possible poly(A polymerase genes. With the exception of four intron-lacking genes, all of the plant poly(A polymerase genes (but not the C. reinhardtii gene possessed almost identical intron positions within the poly(A polymerase coding sequences, suggesting that all plant poly(A polymerase genes derive from a single ancestral gene. The four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerase genes were found to be essential, based on genetic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants. GFP fusion proteins containing three of the four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerases localized to the nucleus, while one such fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The fact that this latter protein is largely pollen-specific suggests that it has important roles in male gametogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that poly(A polymerase genes have expanded from a single ancestral gene by a series of duplication events during the evolution of higher plants, and that individual members have undergone sorts of functional specialization so as to render them essential for plant growth and development. Perhaps the most interesting of the plant poly(A polymerases is a novel cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase that is expressed in pollen in Arabidopsis; this is reminiscent of spermatocyte-specific cytoplasmic poly(A polymerases in

  17. Plasmid-Mediated Sulfamethoxazole Resistance Encoded by the sul2 Gene in the Multidrug-Resistant Shigella flexneri 2a Isolated from Patients with Acute Diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mohd S.; Rahman, Mostafizur; Islam, Rafiad; Banik, Atanu; Amin, M. Badrul; Akter, Fatema; Talukder, Kaisar Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mechanisms of plasmid-mediated sulfamethoxazole resistances in the clinical strains of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Shigella flexneri 2a were elucidated for the first time in Bangladesh. From 2006 to 2011, a total of 200 S. flexneri 2a strains were randomly selected from the stock of the Enteric and Food Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains showed 73%, 98%, 93%, 58%, 98%, 64% and 4% resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone respectively. Plasmid profiling revealed heterogeneous patterns and interestingly, all the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistant (SXTR) strains yielded a distinct 4.3 MDa plasmid compared to that of the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptible (SXTS) strains. Curing of this 4.3 MDa plasmid resulted in the susceptibility to sulfamethoxazole alone suggesting the involvement of this plasmid in the resistance of sulfamethoxazole. Moreover, PCR analysis showed the presence of sul2 gene in SXTR strains which is absent in SXTS strains as well as in the 4.3 MDa plasmid-cured derivatives, confirming the involvement of sul2 in the resistance of sulfamethoxazole. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis revealed that both the SXTR and SXTS strains were clonal. This study will significantly contributes to the knowledge on acquired drug resistance of the mostly prevalent S. flexneri 2a and further warrants continuous monitoring of the prevalence and correlation of this resistance determinants amongst the clinical isolates of Shigella and other enteric pathogens around the world to provide effective clinical management of the disease. PMID:24416393

  18. Plasmid-mediated sulfamethoxazole resistance encoded by the sul2 gene in the multidrug-resistant Shigella flexneri 2a isolated from patients with acute diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd S Iqbal

    Full Text Available In this study, mechanisms of plasmid-mediated sulfamethoxazole resistances in the clinical strains of multi-drug resistant (MDR Shigella flexneri 2a were elucidated for the first time in Bangladesh. From 2006 to 2011, a total of 200 S. flexneri 2a strains were randomly selected from the stock of the Enteric and Food Microbiology Laboratory of icddr,b. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains showed 73%, 98%, 93%, 58%, 98%, 64% and 4% resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nalidixic acid, ampicillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone respectively. Plasmid profiling revealed heterogeneous patterns and interestingly, all the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistant (SXT(R strains yielded a distinct 4.3 MDa plasmid compared to that of the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole susceptible (SXT(S strains. Curing of this 4.3 MDa plasmid resulted in the susceptibility to sulfamethoxazole alone suggesting the involvement of this plasmid in the resistance of sulfamethoxazole. Moreover, PCR analysis showed the presence of sul2 gene in SXT(R strains which is absent in SXT(S strains as well as in the 4.3 MDa plasmid-cured derivatives, confirming the involvement of sul2 in the resistance of sulfamethoxazole. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis revealed that both the SXT(R and SXT(S strains were clonal. This study will significantly contributes to the knowledge on acquired drug resistance of the mostly prevalent S. flexneri 2a and further warrants continuous monitoring of the prevalence and correlation of this resistance determinants amongst the clinical isolates of Shigella and other enteric pathogens around the world to provide effective clinical management of the disease.

  19. Complete nucleotide sequences of 93-kb and 3.3-kb plasmids of an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 derived from Sakai outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, K; Ishii, K; Yasunaga, T; Hattori, M; Yokoyama, K; Yutsudo, C H; Kubota, Y; Yamaichi, Y; Iida, T; Yamamoto, K; Honda, T; Han, C G; Ohtsubo, E; Kasamatsu, M; Hayashi, T; Kuhara, S; Shinagawa, H

    1998-02-28

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7, derived from an outbreak in Sakai city, Japan in 1996, possesses two kinds of plasmids: a 93-kb plasmid termed pO157, found in clinical EHEC isolates world-wide and a 3.3-kb plasmid termed pOSAK1, prevalent in EHEC strains isolated in Japan. Complete nucleotide sequences of both plasmids have been determined, and the putative functions of the encoded proteins and the cis-acting DNA sequences have been analyzed. pO157 shares strikingly similar genes and DNA sequences with F-factor and the transmissible drug-resistant plasmid R100 for DNA replication, copy number control, plasmid segregation, conjugative functions and stable maintenance in the host, although it is defective in DNA transfer by conjugation due to the truncation and deletion of the required genes and DNA sequences. In addition, it encodes several proteins implicated in EHEC pathogenicity such as an EHEC hemolysin (HlyA), a catalase-peroxidase (KatP), a serine protease (EspP) and type II secretion system. pOSAK1 possesses a ColE1-like replication system, and the DNA sequence is extremely similar to that of a drug-resistant plasmid, NTP16, derived from Salmonella typhimurium except that it lacks drug resistance transposons.

  20. Two paediatric cases of skin and soft-tissue infections due to clindamycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying a plasmid-encoded vga(A) allelic variant for a putative efflux pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xuan; Poon, Brian; Kwong, Justin; Niles, Denver; Schmidt, Byron Z; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Gantt, Soren

    2011-07-01

    Two clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates were investigated due to their unusual antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, i.e. erythromycin-susceptible but clindamycin-resistant. These isolates harboured identical copies of a plasmid-borne vga(A)(LC) gene not previously described in S. aureus. The native plasmids carrying vga(A)(LC) were transferable to a susceptible laboratory strain of S. aureus in vitro, in which they conferred resistance patterns similar to the parent isolates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. Curing of plasmid pXO1 from Bacillus anthracis using plasmid incompatibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiankai Liu

    Full Text Available The large plasmid pXO1 encoding the anthrax toxin is important for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. It is essential to cure pXO1 from B. anthracis to evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of anthrax infection. Because conventional methods for curing plasmids (e.g., curing agents or growth at elevated temperatures can induce mutations in the host chromosomal DNA, we developed a specific and reliable method to eliminate pXO1 from B. anthracis using plasmid incompatibility. Three putative replication origins of pXO1 were inserted into a temperature-sensitive plasmid to generate three incompatible plasmids. One of the three plasmids successfully eliminated the large plasmid pXO1 from B. anthracis vaccine strain A16R and wild type strain A16. These findings provided additional information about the replication/partitioning of pXO1 and demonstrated that introducing a small incompatible plasmid can generate plasmid-cured strains of B. anthracis without inducing spontaneous mutations in the host chromosome.

  2. Purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial cells with superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Li; Sung, Ching-Shan

    2006-07-01

    The functionalized magnetic nanobeads were used to develop a rapid protocol for extracting and purifying transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial culture. Nanosized superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3O 4) were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using Fe 2+, Fe 3+ salt, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. The surface of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles was modified by coating with the multivalent cationic agent, polyethylenimine (PEI). The PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads were employed to simplify the purification of plasmid DNA from bacterial cells. We demonstrated a useful plasmid, pRSETB-EGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein with T7 promoter, was amplified in DE3 strain of Escherichia coli. The loaded nanobeads are recovered by magnetically driven separation and regenerated by exposure to the elution buffer with optimal ionic strength (1.25 M) and pH (9.0). Up to approximately 819 μg of high-purity (A 260/A 280 ratio=1.86) plasmid DNA was isolated from 100 ml of overnight bacterial culture. The eluted plasmid DNA was used directly for restriction enzyme digestion, bacterial cell transformation and animal cell transfection applications with success. The PEI-modified magnetic nanobead delivers significant time-savings, overall higher yields and better transfection efficiencies compared to anion-exchange and other methods. The results presented in this report show that PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads are suitable for isolation and purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA.

  3. Functional activity of plasmid DNA after entry into the atmosphere of earth investigated by a new biomarker stability assay for ballistic spaceflight experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora S Thiel

    Full Text Available Sounding rockets represent an excellent platform for testing the influence of space conditions during the passage of Earth's atmosphere and re-entry on biological, physical and chemical experiments for astrobiological purposes. We designed a robust functionality biomarker assay to analyze the biological effects of suborbital spaceflights prevailing during ballistic rocket flights. During the TEXUS-49 rocket mission in March 2011, artificial plasmid DNA carrying a fluorescent marker (enhanced green fluorescent protein: EGFP and an antibiotic resistance cassette (kanamycin/neomycin was attached on different positions of rocket exterior; (i circular every 90 degree on the outer surface concentrical of the payload, (ii in the grooves of screw heads located in between the surface application sites, and (iii on the surface of the bottom side of the payload. Temperature measurements showed two major peaks at 118 and 130 °C during the 780 seconds lasting flight on the inside of the recovery module, while outer gas temperatures of more than 1000 °C were estimated on the sample application locations. Directly after retrieval and return transport of the payload, the plasmid DNA samples were recovered. Subsequent analyses showed that DNA could be recovered from all application sites with a maximum of 53% in the grooves of the screw heads. We could further show that up to 35% of DNA retained its full biological function, i.e., mediating antibiotic resistance in bacteria and fluorescent marker expression in eukaryotic cells. These experiments show that our plasmid DNA biomarker assay is suitable to characterize the environmental conditions affecting DNA during an atmospheric transit and the re-entry and constitute the first report of the stability of DNA during hypervelocity atmospheric transit indicating that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of organics-laden artificial meteorites.

  4. Dissecting protein function: an efficient protocol for identifying separation-of-function mutations that encode structurally stable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K; Wuttke, Deborah S; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-03-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3(-) mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations.

  5. Rational growth of branched nanowire heterostructures with synthetically encoded properties and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Tian, Bozhi; Xiang, Jie; Qian, Fang; Zheng, Gengfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Mai, Liqiang; Lieber, Charles M

    2011-07-26

    Branched nanostructures represent unique, 3D building blocks for the "bottom-up" paradigm of nanoscale science and technology. Here, we report a rational, multistep approach toward the general synthesis of 3D branched nanowire (NW) heterostructures. Single-crystalline semiconductor, including groups IV, III-V, and II-VI, and metal branches have been selectively grown on core or core/shell NW backbones, with the composition, morphology, and doping of core (core/shell) NWs and branch NWs well controlled during synthesis. Measurements made on the different composition branched NW structures demonstrate encoding of functional p-type/n-type diodes and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as well as field effect transistors with device function localized at the branch/backbone NW junctions. In addition, multibranch/backbone NW structures were synthesized and used to demonstrate capability to create addressable nanoscale LED arrays, logic circuits, and biological sensors. Our work demonstrates a previously undescribed level of structural and functional complexity in NW materials, and more generally, highlights the potential of bottom-up synthesis to yield increasingly complex functional systems in the future.

  6. Secretion of human parathyroid hormone from rat pituitary cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus encoding preproparathyroid hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerman, J G; Cone, R C; Potts, J. T.; Rich, A; Mulligan, R C; Kronenberg, H M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the functions of precursors to secreted proteins, we expressed cloned DNA encoding human preproparathyroid hormone (preproPTH) in rat pituitary cells. We first constructed a recombinant plasmid containing human preproPTH cDNA and retroviral control signals. This recombinant plasmid was transfected into psi-2 cells, a packaging cell line that produces Moloney murine leukemia viral particles containing no retroviral RNA. The transfected psi-2 cells generated helper-free recomb...

  7. Composition, structure and function of the Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island encoded type IV secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backert, Steffen; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Fischer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens harbor type IV secretion systems (T4SS) that translocate bacterial virulence factors into host cells to hijack cellular processes. The pathology of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori strongly depends on a T4SS encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. This T4SS forms a needle-like pilus, and its assembly is accomplished by multiple protein-protein interactions and various pilus-associated factors that bind to integrins followed by delivery of the CagA oncoprotein into gastric epithelial cells. Recent studies revealed the crystal structures of six T4SS proteins and pilus formation is modulated by iron and zinc availability. All these T4SS interactions are crucial for deregulating host signaling events and disease progression. New developments in T4SS functions and their importance for pathogenesis are discussed.

  8. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  9. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  10. Permissiveness of soil microbial communities towards broad host range plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli

    at high frequencies from diverse donors, I showed plasmid or donor dependence of plasmid transfer to other species. Additionally, environmental factors like stress also impact the permissiveness of phylogenetic groups towards plasmids. The developed method and results increase our ability to predict......Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements facilitates adaptive and evolutionary processes in bacteria. Among the known mobile genetic elements, plasmids can confer their hosts with accessory adaptive traits, such as antibiotic or heavy metal resistances, or additional metabolic pathways...... and the extent of bacterial phyla permissive towards plasmid receipt are largely unknown. Historically, methods exploring the underlying genetic and environmental factors of plasmid transfer have been heavily reliant on cultivation and expression of plasmid encoded phenotypes. This has provided an incomplete...

  11. Characterisation of multidrug-resistant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli cultured from pigs in China: co-occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase- and mcr-1-encoding genes on plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Hurley, Daniel; Li, Juan; Meng, Qiong; Wang, Juan; Fanning, Séamus; Xiong, Yanwen

    2016-10-01

    Identification of Enterobacteriaceae harbouring the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance gene mcr-1 presents a new challenge to public health. The aim of this study was to characterise multidrug-resistant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) harbouring the mcr-1 gene on plasmids cultured from pigs in China. Using CHROMagar™ ECC plates combined with stx gene detection by PCR, 93 STEC were recovered from 326 faecal, 351 small intestine content and 326 colon content samples taken from healthy pigs in 2011 and 2012 in China. This study, in which ten colistin-resistant isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 8-12 mg/L were identified and found to be positive by PCR for the mcr-1 gene, is a follow-up to an earlier investigation. Plasmid profiling by S1-nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) identified several high-molecular-weight plasmids and these were typed by PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Two of the ten isolates, namely STEC-CQ09 (O116:H11/CC23/ST88) and CQ10 (O2:H32/ST3628), were selected for further study as described in this report. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and Functional Characterisation of the Genes Encoding △8-Sphingolipid Desaturase from Brassica rapa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Li; Li-Ying Song; Wei-Bo Yin; Yu-Hong Chen; Liang Chen; Ji-Lin Li; Richard R.-C. Wang; Zan-Min Hu

    2012-01-01

    △8-Sphingolipid desaturase is the key enzyme that catalyses desaturation at the C8 position of the long-chain base of sphingolipids in higher plants.There have been no previous studies on the genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases in Brassica rapa.In this study,four genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases from B.rapa were isolated and characterised.Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these genes could be divided into two groups:BrD8A,BrD8C and BrD8D in group Ⅰ,and BrD8B in group Ⅱ.The two groups of genes diverged before the separation of Arabidopsis and Brassica.Though the four genes shared a high sequence similarity,and their coding desaturases all located in endoplasmic reticulum,they exhibited distinct expression patterns.Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that BrD8A/B/C/D were functionally diverse △8-sphingolipid desaturases that catalyse different ratios of the two products 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine.The aluminium tolerance of transgenic yeasts expressing BrD8A/B/C/D was enhanced compared with that of control cells.Expression of BrD8A in A rabidopsis changed the ratio of 8(Z):8(E)-C 18-phytosphingenine in transgenic plants.The information reported here provides new insights into the biochemical functional diversity and evolutionary relationship of △8-sphingolipid desaturase in plants and lays a foundation for further investigation of the mechanism of 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine biosynthesis.

  13. Functional analysis of N-linking oligosaccharyl transferase enzymes encoded by deep-sea vent proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Dominic C; Jervis, Adrian J; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Yates, Laura E; Cuccui, Jon; Linton, Dennis; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial N-linking oligosaccharyl transferases (OTase enzymes) transfer lipid-linked glycans to selected proteins in the periplasm and were first described in the intestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, a member of the ε-proteobacteria-subdivision of bacteria. More recently, orthologues from other ε-proteobacterial Campylobacter and Helicobacter species and a δ-proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, have been described, suggesting that these two subdivisions of bacteria may be a source of further N-linked protein glycosylation systems. Whole-genome sequencing of both ε- and δ-proteobacteria from deep-sea vent habitats, a rich source of species from these subdivisions, revealed putative ORFs encoding OTase enzymes and associated adjacent glycosyltransferases similar to the C. jejuni N-linked glycosylation locus. We expressed putative OTase ORFs from the deep-sea vent species Nitratiruptor tergarcus, Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Deferribacter desulfuricans in Escherichia coli and showed that they were able to functionally complement the C. jejuni OTase, CjPglB. The enzymes were shown to possess relaxed glycan specificity, transferring diverse glycan structures and demonstrated different glycosylation sequon specificities. Additionally, a permissive D. desulfuricans acceptor protein was identified, and we provide evidence that the N-linked glycan synthesized by N. tergarcus and S. lithotrophicum contains an acetylated sugar at the reducing end. This work demonstrates that deep-sea vent bacteria encode functional N-glycosylation machineries and are a potential source of biotechnologically important OTase enzymes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Functional expression in Lactobacillus plantarum of xylP encoding the isoprimeverose transporter of Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    The xylP gene of Lactobacillus pentosus, the first gene of the xylPQR operon, was recently found to be involved in isoprimeverose metabolism. By expression of xylP on a multicopy plasmid in Lactobacillus plantarum 80, a strain which lacks active isoprimeverose and D-xylose transport activities, it

  15. Functional expression in Lactobacillus plantarum of xylP encoding the isoprimeverose transporter of Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    The xylP gene of Lactobacillus pentosus, the first gene of the xylPQR operon, was recently found to be involved in isoprimeverose metabolism. By expression of xylP on a multicopy plasmid in Lactobacillus plantarum 80, a strain which lacks active isoprimeverose and D-xylose transport activities, it w

  16. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli by Plasmid Replicon Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Characterization of plasmids has particular clinical significance because genes encoding important traits such as antimicrobial resistance are frequently present in plasmids. Plasmid replicon typing is a multiplex PCR based method that can be used to classify 18 of the 26 known plasmid t...

  17. An α-helical core encodes the dual functions of the chlamydial protein IncA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Wesolowski, Jordan; Bauler, Laura D; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Hackstadt, Ted; Paumet, Fabienne

    2014-11-28

    Chlamydia is an intracellular bacterium that establishes residence within parasitophorous compartments (inclusions) inside host cells. Chlamydial inclusions are uncoupled from the endolysosomal pathway and undergo fusion with cellular organelles and with each other. To do so, Chlamydia expresses proteins on the surface of the inclusion using a Type III secretion system. These proteins, termed Incs, are located at the interface between host and pathogen and carry out the functions necessary for Chlamydia survival. Among these Incs, IncA plays a critical role in both protecting the inclusion from lysosomal fusion and inducing the homotypic fusion of inclusions. Within IncA are two regions homologous to eukaryotic SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor) domains referred to as SNARE-like domain 1 (SLD1) and SNARE-like domain 2 (SLD2). Using a multidisciplinary approach, we have discovered the functional core of IncA that retains the ability to both inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion and promote the homotypic fusion of Chlamydia inclusions. Circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments show that this core region is composed almost entirely of α-helices and assembles into stable homodimers in solution. Altogether, we propose that both IncA functions are encoded in a structured core domain that encompasses SLD1 and part of SLD2. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. An α-Helical Core Encodes the Dual Functions of the Chlamydial Protein IncA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Wesolowski, Jordan; Bauler, Laura D.; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Hackstadt, Ted; Paumet, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia is an intracellular bacterium that establishes residence within parasitophorous compartments (inclusions) inside host cells. Chlamydial inclusions are uncoupled from the endolysosomal pathway and undergo fusion with cellular organelles and with each other. To do so, Chlamydia expresses proteins on the surface of the inclusion using a Type III secretion system. These proteins, termed Incs, are located at the interface between host and pathogen and carry out the functions necessary for Chlamydia survival. Among these Incs, IncA plays a critical role in both protecting the inclusion from lysosomal fusion and inducing the homotypic fusion of inclusions. Within IncA are two regions homologous to eukaryotic SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor) domains referred to as SNARE-like domain 1 (SLD1) and SNARE-like domain 2 (SLD2). Using a multidisciplinary approach, we have discovered the functional core of IncA that retains the ability to both inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion and promote the homotypic fusion of Chlamydia inclusions. Circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments show that this core region is composed almost entirely of α-helices and assembles into stable homodimers in solution. Altogether, we propose that both IncA functions are encoded in a structured core domain that encompasses SLD1 and part of SLD2. PMID:25324548

  19. [Effect of plasmid pKM101 on the expression of bacterial genes not related to DNa metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skavronskaya, A G; Tiganova, I G; Andreeva, I V; Rusina, O Iu

    1999-02-01

    An experimental system ensuring fusion of bacterial genes to the lac operon of the Mu dl(Aplac) phage was used. Fusion operons in which the lac operon was under the control of promoters of the elt gene, responsible for synthesis of the LT toxin, of the tetracyclin-resistance tet gene, and sfiA gene encoding filament production, was studied. Using this experimental system, plasmid pKM101 was shown to be capable of activating the expression of the above Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium genes, which is manifested as the activation of beta-galactosidase synthesis. The activation of the elt gene expression by the pKM101 plasmid was also confirmed in experiments on detecting the LT toxin synthesized by bacteria carrying this plasmid. Effect of the plasmid on the activation of elt operon expression, unlike the effect of this plasmid on mutability, does not depend on the functioning of the lexA and recA genes, i.e., this is not a SOS-regulated process. The mutant plasmid pGW12, a derivative of pKM101, deficient in the mucAB genes responsible for mutagenesis, causes a more pronounced activation of the elt gene than plasmid pKM101.

  20. Development and application of automated systems for plasmid-based functional proteomics to improve syntheitc biology of engineered industrial microbes for high level expression of proteases for biofertilizer production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to microarray technology, which provides a robust method to study protein function in a rapid, economical, and proteome-wide fashion, plasmid-based functional proteomics is an important technology for rapidly obtaining large quantities of protein and determining protein function across a...

  1. Small, Enigmatic Plasmids of the Nosocomial Pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii: Good, Bad, Who Knows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Sum Lean

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative nosocomial pathogen that has become a serious healthcare concern within a span of two decades due to its ability to rapidly acquire resistance to all classes of antimicrobial compounds. One of the key features of the A. baumannii genome is an open pan genome with a plethora of plasmids, transposons, integrons, and genomic islands, all of which play important roles in the evolution and success of this clinical pathogen, particularly in the acquisition of multidrug resistance determinants. An interesting genetic feature seen in majority of A. baumannii genomes analyzed is the presence of small plasmids that usually ranged from 2 to 10 kb in size, some of which harbor antibiotic resistance genes and homologs of plasmid mobilization genes. These plasmids are often overlooked when compared to their larger, conjugative counterparts that harbor multiple antibiotic resistance genes and transposable elements. In this mini-review, we will examine our current knowledge of these small A. baumannii plasmids and look into their genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships. Some of these plasmids, such as the Rep-3 superfamily group and the pRAY-type, which has no recognizable replicase genes, are quite widespread among diverse A. baumannii clinical isolates worldwide, hinting at their usefulness to the lifestyle of this pathogen. Other small plasmids especially those from the Rep-1 superfamily are truly enigmatic, encoding only hypothetical proteins of unknown function, leading to the question of whether these small plasmids are “good” or “bad” to their host A. baumannii.

  2. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-08-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Novel Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Susceptibility Mutations in TNNC1- Encoded Troponin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstrom, Andrew P.; Parvatiyar, Michelle S.; Pinto, Jose R.; Marquardt, Michelle L.; Bos, J. Martijn; Tester, David J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Potter, James D.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary cardiac disorder defined by a hypertrophied left ventricle, is one of the main causes of sudden death in young athletes and has been associated with mutations in most sarcomeric proteins (tropomyosin, Troponin T and I, and actin, etc.). Many of these mutations appear to affect the functional properties of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), i.e., by increasing the Ca2+-sensitivity of contraction, a hallmark of HCM, and surprisingly, prior to this report, cTnC had not been classified as a HCM susceptibility gene. In this study, we show that mutations occurring in the human cTnC (HcTnC) gene (TNNC1) have the same prevalence (~0.4%) as well established HCM-susceptibility genes that encode other sarcomeric proteins. Comprehensive open reading frame/splice site mutation analysis of TNNC1 performed on 1025 unrelated HCM patients over the last 10 years revealed novel missense mutations in TNNC1: A8V, C84Y, E134D, and D145E. Functional studies with these recombinant HcTnC HCM mutations showed increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development (A8V, C84Y and D145E) and force recovery (A8V and D145E). These results are consistent with the HCM functional phenotypes seen with other sarcomeric HCM mutations (E134D showed no changes in these parameters). This is the largest cohort analysis of TNNC1 in HCM that details the discovery of at least three novel HCM-associated mutations and more strongly links TNNC1 to HCM along with functional evidence that supports a central role for its involvement in the disease. These types of studies may help to further define TNNC1 as an HCM-susceptibility gene that has already been established for the other members of the Troponin complex. PMID:18572189

  4. Identification of oriT and a recombination hot spot in the IncA/C plasmid backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Anna; Szabó, Mónika; Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2017-09-06

    Dissemination of multiresistance has been accelerating among pathogenic bacteria in recent decades. The broad host-range conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C family are effective vehicles of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. Although more than 150 family members have been sequenced to date, their conjugation system and other functions encoded by the conserved plasmid backbone have been poorly characterized. The key cis-acting locus, the origin of transfer (oriT), has not yet been unambiguously identified. We present evidence that IncA/C plasmids have a single oriT locus immediately upstream of the mobI gene encoding an indispensable transfer factor. The fully active oriT spans ca. 150-bp AT-rich region overlapping the promoters of mobI and contains multiple inverted and direct repeats. Within this region, the core domain of oriT with reduced but detectable transfer activity was confined to a 70-bp segment containing two inverted repeats and one copy of a 14-bp direct repeat. In addition to oriT, a second locus consisting of a 14-bp imperfect inverted repeat was also identified, which mimicked the function of oriT but which was found to be a recombination site. Recombination between two identical copies of these sites is RecA-independent, requires a plasmid-encoded recombinase and resembles the functioning of dimer-resolution systems.

  5. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-09-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production.

  6. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim: Plasmid characterization has particular clinical importance because genes encoding significant traits including antimicrobial resistance are frequently carried on plasmids. The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli in relation ...

  7. Naloxonazine, an Amastigote-Specific Compound, Affects Leishmania Parasites through Modulation of Host-Encoded Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Caljon, Guy; Wolfe, Alan R.; McKerrow, James; Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Host-directed therapies (HDTs) constitute promising alternatives to traditional therapy that directly targets the pathogen but is often hampered by pathogen resistance. HDT could represent a new treatment strategy for leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease caused by the obligate intracellular parasite Leishmania. This protozoan develops exclusively within phagocytic cells, where infection relies on a complex molecular interplay potentially exploitable for drug targets. We previously identified naloxonazine, a compound specifically active against intracellular but not axenic Leishmania donovani. We evaluated here whether this compound could present a host cell-dependent mechanism of action. Microarray profiling of THP-1 macrophages treated with naloxonazine showed upregulation of vATPases, which was further linked to an increased volume of intracellular acidic vacuoles. Treatment of Leishmania-infected macrophages with the vATPase inhibitor concanamycin A abolished naloxonazine effects, functionally demonstrating that naloxonazine affects Leishmania amastigotes indirectly, through host cell vacuolar remodeling. These results validate amastigote-specific screening approaches as a powerful way to identify alternative host-encoded targets. Although the therapeutic value of naloxonazine itself is unproven, our results further demonstrate the importance of intracellular acidic compartments for host defense against Leishmania, highlighting the possibility of targeting this host cell compartment for anti-leishmanial therapy. PMID:28036391

  8. Structural and functional diversity of metalloproteinases encoded by the Bacteroides fragilis pathogenicity island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaev, Sergey A; Aleshin, Alexander E; Muranaka, Norihito; Kukreja, Muskan; Routenberg, David A; Remacle, Albert G; Liddington, Robert C; Cieplak, Piotr; Kozlov, Igor A; Strongin, Alex Y

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis causes the majority of anaerobic infections in humans. The presence of a pathogenicity island in the genome discriminates pathogenic and commensal B. fragilis strains. The island encodes metalloproteinase II (MPII), a potential virulence protein, and one of three homologous fragilysin isozymes (FRA; also termed B. fragilis toxin or BFT). Here, we report biochemical data on the structural-functional characteristics of the B. fragilis pathogenicity island proteases by reporting the crystal structure of MPII at 2.13 Å resolution, combined with detailed characterization of the cleavage preferences of MPII and FRA3 (as a representative of the FRA isoforms), identified using a high-throughput peptide cleavage assay with 18 583 substrate peptides. We suggest that the evolution of the MPII catalytic domain can be traced to human and archaebacterial proteinases, whereas the prodomain fold is a feature specific to MPII and FRA. We conclude that the catalytic domain of both MPII and FRA3 evolved differently relative to the prodomain, and that the prodomain evolved specifically to fit the B. fragilis pathogenicity. Overall, our data provide insights into the evolution of cleavage specificity and activation mechanisms in the virulent metalloproteinases. © 2014 FEBS.

  9. Brain Activity and Functional Coupling Changes Associated with Self-Reference Effect during Both Encoding and Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Nastassja; Villain, Nicolas; Rauchs, Géraldine; Gaubert, Malo; Piolino, Pascale; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Chételat, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Information that is processed with reference to oneself, i.e. Self-Referential Processing (SRP), is generally associated with better remembering compared to information processed in a condition not related to oneself. This positive effect of the self on subsequent memory performance is called as Self-Reference Effect (SRE). The neural basis of SRE is still poorly understood. The main goal of the present work was thus to highlight brain changes associated with SRE in terms of activity and functional coupling and during both encoding and retrieval so as to assess the relative contribution of both processes to SRE. For this purpose, we used an fMRI event-related self-referential paradigm in 30 healthy young subjects and measured brain activity during both encoding and retrieval of self-relevant information compared to a semantic control condition. We found that SRE was associated with brain changes during the encoding phase only, including both greater activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and greater functional coupling between these brain regions and the posterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight the contribution of brain regions involved in both SRP and episodic memory and the relevance of the communication between these regions during the encoding process as the neural substrates of SRE. This is consistent with the idea that SRE reflects a positive effect of the reactivation of self-related memories on the encoding of new information in episodic memory. PMID:24608131

  10. NOGA-guided analysis of regional myocardial perfusion abnormalities treated with intramyocardial injections of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor A-165 in patients with chronic myocardial ischemia: subanalysis of the EUROINJECT-ONE multicenter double-blind randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyongyosi, Mariann; Khorsand, Aliasghar; Zamini, Sholeh;

    2005-01-01

    . The ROI was projected onto the baseline and follow-up rest and stress polar maps of the 99m-Tc-sestamibi/tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography scintigraphy calculating the extent and severity (expressed as the mean normalized tracer uptake) of the ROI automatically. The extents of the ROI....... CONCLUSIONS: Projection of the NOGA-guided injection area onto the single-photon emission computed tomography polar maps permits quantitative evaluation of myocardial perfusion in regions treated with angiogenic substances. Injections of phVEGF A165 plasmid improve, but do not normalize, the stress...

  11. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya

    2007-01-01

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses...

  12. Determination of grain-size distribution function using two-dimensional Fourier transforms of tone-pulse-encoded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1988-01-01

    Microstructural images may be tone pulse encoded and subsequently Fourier transformed to determine the two-dimensional density of frequency components. A theory is developed relating the density of frequency components to the density of length components. The density of length components corresponds directly to the actual grain-size distribution function from which the mean grain shape, size, and orientation can be obtained.

  13. Determination of grain size distribution function using two-dimensional Fourier transforms of tone pulse encoded images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural images may be tone pulse encoded and subsequently Fourier transformed to determine the two-dimensional density of frequency components. A theory is developed relating the density of frequency components to the density of length components. The density of length components corresponds directly to the actual grain size distribution function from which the mean grain shape, size, and orientation can be obtained.

  14. Cloning and functional expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding the di- and tripeptide transport protein of Lactobacillus helveticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, H.; Hagting, A; Kunji, E.R S; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the di- and tripeptide transport protein (DtpT) of Lactobacillus helveticus (DtpT(LH)) was cloned with the aid of the inverse PCR technique and used to complement the dipeptide transport-deficient and proline-auxotrophic Escherichia coil E1772. Functional expression of the peptide

  15. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  16. CPR1: a gene encoding a putative signal peptidase that functions in pathogenicity of Colletotrichum graminicola to maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, M R; Nuckles, E M; Takach, J E; Vaillancourt, L J

    2002-02-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola causes anthracnose leaf blight and stalk rot of maize. We used restriction-enzyme mediated insertional (REMI) mutagenesis to identify a gene in this fungus that is required for pathogenicity to both stalks and leaves. The predicted polypeptide encoded by this gene, which we have named CPR1, is similar to a family of proteins that comprise one subunit of the eukaryotic microsomal signal peptidase. The nonpathogenic CPR1 REMI mutant contains a plasmid integration in the 3' untranslated region of the gene, 19 bp downstream from the stop codon. The result is a significant reduction in transcript levels in comparison to the wild type, perhaps as a result of increased transcript instability. We were unable to knock out the CPR1 gene, and it may be essential for viability. Microscopic examination of the REMI mutant on maize leaves revealed that it is fully capable of penetrating and colonizing host cells during the initial, biotrophic phases of the disease interaction but, unlike the wild type, it appears to be unable to switch to a necrotrophic mode of growth. We suggest that the CPR1 REMI mutant may be unable to secrete sufficient quantities of degradative enzymes to support that transition. The CPR1 REMI mutant provides us with a useful tool for future studies of the role of fungal protein transport in this important stalk rot disease of maize.

  17. Calibration and functional analysis of three genetically encoded Cl−/pH sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMukhtarov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the intracellular concentrations of Cl− and H+ requires sensitive probes that allow reliable quantitative measurements without perturbation of cell functioning. For these purposes the most promising are genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, which have become powerful tools for non-invasive intracellular monitoring of ions, molecules and enzymatic activity. A ratiometric CFP/YFP-based construct with a relatively good sensitivity to Cl− has been developed (Markova et al., 2008; Waseem et al., 2010. Recently, a combined Cl−/pH sensor (ClopHensor opened the way for simultaneous ratiometric measurement of these two ions (Arosio et al., 2010. ClopHensor was obtained by fusion of a red-fluorescent protein (DsRed-monomer to the E2GFP variant that contains a specific Cl−-binding site. This construct possesses pKa = 6.8 for H+ and Kd in the 40-50 mM range for Cl− at physiological pH (~7.3 As in the majority of cell types the intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i is about 10 mM, the development of sensors with higher sensitivity is highly desirable. Here we report the intracellular calibration and functional characterization of ClopHensor and its two derivatives: the membrane targeting PalmPalm-ClopHensor and the H148G/V224L mutant with improved Cl− affinity, reduced pH dependence and pKa shifted to more alkaline values. For functional analysis, constructs were expressed in CHO cells and [Cl−]i was changed by using pipettes with different Cl− concentrations during whole-cell recordings. Kd values for Cl− measured at 33°C and pH ~ 7.3 were, respectively, 39 mM, 47 mM and 21 mM for ClopHensor, PalmPalm-ClopHensor and the H148G/V224L mutant. PalmPalm-ClopHensor resolved responses to activation of Cl−-selective glycine receptor channels better than did ClopHensor. Our observations indicate that these different ClopHensor constructs are promising tools for non-invasive measurement of [Cl−]i in various living

  18. Effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; van Hell, Hendrika H; Zuurman, Lineke; Jansma, J Martijn; Mehta, Mitul A; van Gerven, Joop M A; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-03-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing evidence but suggest that administration of cannabinoid substances affects encoding rather than recall of information. In this study, we examined the effects of perturbation of the eCB system on memory function during both encoding and recall. We performed a pharmacological MRI study with a placebo-controlled, crossover design, investigating the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhalation on associative memory-related brain function in 13 healthy volunteers. Performance and brain activation during associative memory were assessed using a pictorial memory task, consisting of separate encoding and recall conditions. Administration of THC caused reductions in activity during encoding in the right insula, the right inferior frontal gyrus, and the left middle occipital gyrus and a network-wide increase in activity during recall, which was most prominent in bilateral cuneus and precuneus. THC administration did not affect task performance, but while during placebo recall activity significantly explained variance in performance, this effect disappeared after THC. These findings suggest eCB involvement in encoding of pictorial information. Increased precuneus activity could reflect impaired recall function, but the absence of THC effects on task performance suggests a compensatory mechanism. These results further emphasize the eCB system as a potential novel target for treatment of memory disorders and a promising target for development of new therapies to reduce memory deficits in humans.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Plasmids Encoding CTX-M β-Lactamases and their Associated Addiction Systems Circulating Among Escherichia coli from Retail Chickens, Chicken Farms, and Slaughterhouses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Su-Jin; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2016-02-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), particularly those of the CTX-M types, are the predominant resistance determinants of Escherichia coli that are rapidly spreading worldwide. To determine CTX-M types, E. coli isolates were collected from retail chickens (n = 390) and environmental samples from chicken farms (n = 32) and slaughterhouses (n = 67) in Korea. Fifteen strains harboring blaCTX-M genes were isolated from 358 E. coli isolates. The most common CTX-M type was eight of CTX-M-15, followed by six of CTX-M-1 and one of CTX-M- 14. The blaCTX-M genes were identified in the isolates from retail chickens (n = 9), followed by feces, water pipes, floors, and walls. Conjugations confirmed the transferability of the plasmids carrying blaCTX-M genes to the recipient E. coli J53 strain. Furthermore, eight addiction systems carried by the replicons in CTX-M types were confirmed. The dominant system was identified as ccdAB, vagCD, and pndAC in donor strains and transconjugants. The clonal relationship between the two strains carrying blaCTX-M genes indicates that E. coli may transmit from the farm to retail chickens, suggesting a possible public health risk. Our findings demonstrate that the detection of CTX-M types in E. coli isolates is important for tracking ESBL production in animals, and suggest linkage of multiple addiction systems in plasmids bearing blaCTX-M genes.

  20. Role of the virulence plasmid pR99 and the metalloprotease Vvp in resistance of Vibrio vulnificus serovar E to eel innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, E; Lee, C T; Lamas, J; Hor, L; Amaro, C

    2008-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 serovar E (VSE) is a bacterial pathogen that produces a haemorrhagic septicaemia called vibriosis in eels. Its ability to grow in blood is conferred by a recently described virulence plasmid [Lee CT, Amaro C, Wu KM, Valiente E, Chang YF, Tsai SF, et al. A common virulence plasmid in biotype 2 Vibrio vulnificus and its dissemination aided by a conjugal plasmid. Journal of Bacteriology, submitted for publication.]. In this study, we analyzed the role of this plasmid together with the role played by the metalloprotease (Vvp) in the interaction between bacteria and eel innate immunity. To this end, we compared and statistically analyzed the differences in resistance to serum and mucus factors (complement, selected antimicrobial peptides, transferrin and lysozyme) and also to phagocytosis/opsonophagocytosis between one VSE strain and its derivatives: a plasmid-cured strain and a vvp-deficient mutant. The wild-type and the metalloprotease-deficient strains were resistant to both the bactericidal action of fresh serum and the phagocytosis and opsonophagocytosis by eel phagocytes, confirming that Vvp is not involved in resistance to eel innate immunity. In contrast, the cured strain was sensitive to both the bactericidal action of eel serum activated by the alternative pathway and phagocytosis/opsonophagocytosis. Since no plasmid-encoded ORF, with homology to known genes, is related to the resistance to innate immunity [Lee CT, Amaro C, Wu KM, Valiente E, Chang YF, Tsai SF, et al. A common virulence plasmid in biotype 2 Vibrio vulnificus and its dissemination aided by a conjugal plasmid. Journal of Bacteriology, submitted for publication.], this function could be codified by one or more new genes. Further studies are underway to characterize the plasmid-encoded system responsible for V. vulnificus resistance to the innate immune system of eels.

  1. Functional characterization of the ubiquitin variant encoded by the baculovirus Autographa californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A L; Katzung, D J; Reback, P M; Guarino, L A

    1996-04-30

    The marked evolutionary conservation of ubiquitin is assumed to arise from constraints imposed by folding, stability, and interaction of the polypeptide with various components of the ATP, ubiquitin-dependent degradative pathway. The present studies characterize the most divergent (75% identity) of the species-specific ubiquitin isoforms encoded as a late gene product of the baculovirus Autographa californica [Guarino, L. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 409-413]. Viral ubiquitin supports 40% of the rate of ATP-dependent degradation exhibited by eukaryotic ubiquitin. Inhibition of proteolysis correlated with a lower steady-state concentration of ubiquitin-conjugated degradative intermediates. Rate studies revealed that viral ubiquitin exerts its effect at the step of isopeptide ligase-catalyzed (E3) ubiquitin conjugation since viral and eukaryotic polypeptides are identical in their abilities to support ATP-coupled activation by E1 and transthiolation to E2 carrier proteins. Other studies demonstrated viral ubiquitin severely attenuated the rate of K48-linked multiubiquitin chain formation in E3-independent conjugation catalyzed by recombination yeast CDC34 or rabbit reticulocyte E232K but not chain elongation of alternate linkages formed by yeast RAD6 or human E2EPF. The latter observations suggest nonconserved positions on viral ubiquitin constitute recognition signals for K48-linked chain formation. Sequence comparison of species-specific ubiquitin isoforms indicates that nonconserved positions localized to a defined region on the polypeptide surface distinct from the basic face required for E1 binding. These results suggest this novel ubiquitin isoform may function in baculoviral replication to block destruction of a short-lived protein(s) by the host degradative pathway, targeted through either E2-catalyzed K48-linked multibiquitin chain formation or general E3-mediated conjugation.

  2. Mumps virus Enders strain is sensitive to interferon (IFN) despite encoding a functional IFN antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D F; Galiano, M C; Lemon, K; Chen, Y-H; Andrejeva, J; Duprex, W P; Rima, B K; Randall, R E

    2009-11-01

    Although the Enders strain of mumps virus (MuV) encodes a functional V protein that acts as an interferon (IFN) antagonist, in multi-cycle growth assays MuV Enders grew poorly in naïve ('IFN-competent' Hep2) cells but grew to high titres in 'IFN-compromised' Hep2 cells. Even so, the growth rate of MuV Enders was significantly slower in 'IFN-compromised' Hep2 cells when compared with its replication rate in Vero cells and with the replication rate of parainfluenza virus type 5 (a closely related paramyxovirus) in both naïve and 'IFN-compromised' Hep2 cells. This suggests that a consequence of slower growth is that the IFN system of naïve Hep2 cells can respond quickly enough to control the growth of MuV Enders. This is supported by the finding that rapidly growing variants of MuV Enders that were selected on 'IFN-compromised' Hep2 cells (i.e. in the absence of any selection pressure exerted by the IFN response) also grew to high titres on naïve Hep2 cells. Sequencing of the complete genome of one of these variants identified a single point mutation that resulted in a substitution of a conserved asparagine by histidine at position 498 of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein, although this mutation was not present in all rapidly growing variants. These results support the concept that there is a race between the ability of a cell to detect and respond to virus infection and the ability of a virus to block the IFN response. Importantly, this emphasizes that factors other than viral IFN antagonists influence the sensitivity of viruses to IFN.

  3. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S.F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K+ acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but it did not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K+ transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K+ transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:23848378

  4. Identification and functional characterization of K(+) transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Roy, Craig R; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the Escherichia coli K(+) transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K(+) acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but itdid not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K(+) transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K(+) transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions.

  5. The tra locus of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 mediates efficient transfer of a circular but not a linear version of the same replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pettis, Gregg S

    2010-09-01

    Conjugal transfer of circular plasmids in Streptomyces involves a unique mechanism employing few plasmid-encoded loci and the transfer of double-stranded DNA by an as yet uncharacterized intercellular route. Efficient transfer of the circular streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires only two plasmid loci: the pIJ101 tra gene, and as a cis-acting function known as clt. Here, we compared the ability of the pIJ101 transfer apparatus to promote conjugal transfer of circular versus linear versions of the same replicon. While the pIJ101 tra locus readily transferred the circular form of the replicon, the linear version was transferred orders of magnitude less efficiently and all plasmids isolated from the transconjugants were circular, regardless of their original configuration in the donor. Additionally, relatively rare circularization of linear plasmids was detectable in the donor cells, which is consistent with the notion that this event was a prerequisite for transfer by TraB(pIJ101). Linear versions of this same replicon did transfer efficiently, in that configuration, from strains containing the conjugative linear plasmid SLP2. Our data indicate that functions necessary and sufficient for transfer of circular DNA were insufficient for transfer of a related linear DNA molecule. The results here suggest that the conjugation mechanisms of linear versus circular DNA in Streptomyces spp. are inherently different and/or that efficient transfer of linear DNA requires additional components.

  6. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten.

  7. [Relationship between the UV-induction of exact exclusion of transposons and the function of umuDC, lexA, recA genes and plasmid pkM101].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, O Iu; Andreeva, I V; Tiganova, I G; Mirskaia, E E; Skavronskaia, A G

    1997-01-01

    A pair of isogenic strains-E. coli K-12 and E. coli B/r differing by the status of umuDC genes and presence of pKM101 plasmid-were constructed and the relationship between UV induction of transposons Tn5 and Tn 10 and the gene umuDC function shown. This relationship is not absolute, in contrast to that of point mutations. Induction of precise excision of these transposons can be inhibited by pKM101 plasmid. Induction of precise excision of Tn5 and Tn 10 from the sites under study is absolutely lexA- and recA- dependent.

  8. [Influence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis virulence for chickens. I. Occurrence of spv plasmid genes group in Salmonella Enteritidis large virulence plasmid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madajczak, Grzegorz; Binek, Marian

    2005-01-01

    Many Salmonella Enteritidis virulence factors are encoded by genes localized on plasmids, especially large virulence plasmid, in highly conserved fragment, they create spv plasmid gene group. The aims of realized researches were spv genes occurrence evaluation and composition analysis among Salmonella Enteritidis strains caused infection in chickens. Researches were realized on 107 isolates, where in every cases large virulence plasmid 59 kbp size were detected. Specific nucleotides sequences of spv genes (spvRABCD) were detected in 47.7% of isolates. In the rest of examined bacteria spv genes occurred variably. Most often extreme genes of spv group, like spvR and spvD were absent, what could indicate that factors encoded by them are not most important for Salmonella Enteritidis live and their expressed virulence.

  9. Isolation of a Pseudomonas Stutzeri strain that degrades1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene and characterization of its degradative plasmid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei SONG; Hui WANG; Hanchang SHI; Hongying HU

    2008-01-01

    The genetic information encoding metabolic pathways for xenobiotic compounds in bacteria often resides on catabolic plasmids. The aim of the present work was to know the location of the genes for degrading 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzen. In this paper a 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene-degrading strain THSL-1 was isolated from the soil of Tianjin Chemical Plant using 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene as the sole carbon source. The strain was identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri through morphologic survey and 16S rDNA sequence determination. A plasmid was discovered from strain THSL-1 by using the alkali lysis method. When the plasmid was transformed into E. coli. JM109 by the CaCl2 method, the transformant could grow using 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene as the sole carbon source and had the degradation function of 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene. Therefore, it could be deemed that the plasmid carried the degradative genes of 1, 2, 4-trichlorobenzene. The average size of the plasmid was finally determined to be 40.2 Kb using selectively three kinds of restricted inscribed enzymes (HindIII, BamHI, and XholI) for single cutting and double cutting the plasmid pTHSL-1, respectively.

  10. Antibiotic multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from a wastewater treatment plant is related to plasmids residing in phytopathogenic bacteria and carries eight different resistance determinants including a multidrug transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Krahn, Irene; Linke, Burkhard; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Ten different antibiotic resistance plasmids conferring high-level erythromycin resistance were isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant by applying a transformation-based approach. One of these plasmids, designated pRSB101, mediates resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, roxythromycin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, spectinomycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid and low concentrations of norfloxacin. Plasmid pRSB101 was completely sequenced and annotated. Its size is 47 829 bp. Conserved synteny exists between the pRSB101 replication/partition (rep/par) module and the pXAC33-replicon from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. The second pRSB101 backbone module encodes a three-Mob-protein type mobilization (mob) system with homology to that of IncQ-like plasmids. Plasmid pRSB101 is mobilizable with the help of the IncP-1alpha plasmid RP4 providing transfer functions in trans. A 20 kb resistance region on pRSB101 is located within an integron-containing Tn402-like transposon. The variable region of the class 1 integron carries the genes dhfr1 for a dihydrofolate reductase, aadA2 for a spectinomycin/streptomycin adenylyltransferase and bla(TLA-2) for a so far unknown Ambler class A extended spectrum beta-lactamase. The integron-specific 3'-segment (qacEDelta1-sul1-orf5Delta) is connected to a macrolide resistance operon consisting of the genes mph(A) (macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase I), mrx (hydrophobic protein of unknown function) and mphR(A) (regulatory protein). Finally, a putative mobile element with the tetracycline resistance genes tetA (tetracycline efflux pump) and tetR was identified upstream of the Tn402-specific transposase gene tniA. The second 'genetic load' region on pRSB101 harbours four distinct mobile genetic elements, another integron belonging to a new class and footprints of two more transposable elements. A tripartite multidrug (MDR) transporter consisting of an ATP

  11. [Localization of denitrification genes in plasmid DNA of bacteria Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, L P; Varshalomidze, O É; Shelud'ko, A V; Katsy, E I

    2010-07-01

    In 85-Mda plasmid (p85) of plant-associated bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 model strain, the genes encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase (nirK); heterodimeric NO-reductase (norCB); NorQ and NorD proteins affecting synthesis and (or) activation of NirK and (or) NO-reductase (norQD); catalytic subunit I ofcytochrom c oxidase (CccoN); presumable NO sensor carrying two hemeerythrine domains (orf181); and an enzyme required for synthesis of presumable NO antagonist, homocystein (metC) were identified. In the same region of p85, orf293 encoding transcriptional regulator of LysR type, orf208 whose protein product carries a formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase subunit E domain, and an orf164-encoding conservative secretory protein with unknown function were also found. Localization of a set of denitrification genes in the plasmid DNA A. brasilense Sp245 adjacent to IS elements ISAzba1 and ISAzba2 indicates potential mobility of these genes and high probability of their horizontal transfer among populations of rhizospheric bacteria. A site homologous to p85 nirK-orf208-orf181 genes was detected in the 115 kb plasmid of A. brasilense Sp7 type strain.

  12. To boost or to CRUNCH? Effect of effortful encoding on episodic memory in older adults is dependent on executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Maes, Joseph H R; Kessels, Roy P C; Daselaar, Sander M

    2017-01-01

    It is essential to develop effective interventions aimed at ameliorating age-related cognitive decline. Previous studies found that effortful encoding benefits episodic memory in older adults. However, to date it is unclear whether this benefit is different for individuals with strong versus weak executive functioning (EF). Fifty-one older adults were recruited and divided into low (N = 26) and high (N = 25) functioning groups, based on their EF capacity. All participants performed a semantic and a perceptual incidental encoding task. Each encoding task was performed under four difficulty levels to establish different effort levels. Encoding was followed by a recognition task. Results showed that the high EF group benefitted from increased effort in both tasks. However, the low EF group only showed a beneficial effect under low levels of effort. Results are consistent with the Compensation-Related Utilization of Neural Circuits Hypothesis (CRUNCH) and suggest that future research directed at developing efficient memory strategies to reduce negative cognitive aging effects should take individual cognitive differences among older adults into account, such as differences in EF.

  13. Odor Memory and Discrimination Covary as a Function of Delay between Encoding and Recall in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Chelsea; Choi, Christina; O'Brien, Brenna; Shin, Philip; Linster, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    Nonassociative odor learning paradigms are often used to assess memory, social recognition and neuromodulation of olfactory pathways. We here use a modified object recognition paradigm to investigate how an important task parameter, delay between encoding and recall trials, affects the properties of this memory. We show that both memory for a previously investigated odorant and discrimination of a novel odorant decay with delay time and that rats can remember an odorant for up to 45min after a single trial encoding event. The number of odorants that can be encoded, as well as the specificity of the encoded memory, decrease with increased delay and also depend on stimulus concentration. Memory for an odorant and discrimination of a novel odorant decay at approximately the same rate, whereas the specificity of the formed memory decays faster than the memory itself. These results have important implications for the interpretation of behavioral data obtained with this paradigm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Functional and Neuroanatomic Specificity of Episodic Memory Dysfunction in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Relational and Item-Specific Encoding Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, J Daniel; Ranganath, Charan; Harms, Michael P; Barch, Deanna M; Gold, James M; Layher, Evan; Lesh, Tyler A; MacDonald, Angus W; Niendam, Tara A; Phillips, Joshua; Silverstein, Steven M; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Carter, Cameron S

    2015-09-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia can encode item-specific information to support familiarity-based recognition but are disproportionately impaired encoding interitem relationships (relational encoding) and recollecting information. The Relational and Item-Specific Encoding (RiSE) paradigm has been used to disentangle these encoding and retrieval processes, which may depend on specific medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) subregions. Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging during RiSE task performance could help to specify dysfunctional neural circuits in schizophrenia that can be targeted for interventions to improve memory and functioning in the illness. To use fMRI to test the hypothesis that schizophrenia disproportionately affects MTL and PFC subregions during relational encoding and retrieval relative to item-specific memory processes, and to use fMRI results from healthy individuals serving as controls to establish neural construct validity for RiSE. This multisite, case-control, cross-sectional fMRI study was conducted between November 1, 2010, and May 30, 2012, at 5 Cognitive Neuroscience Test Reliability and Clinical Applications for Schizophrenia sites. The final sample included 52 outpatients with clinically stable schizophrenia and 57 demographically matched healthy control participants. Data analysis was performed between February 1, 2013, and May 30, 2014. Behavioral performance speed and accuracy (d') on item recognition and associative recognition tasks. Voxelwise statistical parametric maps for a priori MTL and PFC regions of interest to test activation differences between relational and item-specific memory during encoding and retrieval. Item recognition was disproportionately impaired in patients with schizophrenia relative to healthy control participants following relational encoding (F1,107 = 4.7; P = .03). The differential deficit was accompanied by reduced dorsolateral PFC activation during relational encoding in

  15. Analysis of a novel 8.9kb cryptic plasmid from Bacteroides uniformis, its long-term stability and spread within human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkoporov, Andrei N; Khokhlova, Ekaterina V; Kulagina, Elena V; Smeianov, Vladimir V; Kuchmiy, Anna A; Kafarskaya, Lyudmila I; Efimov, Boris A

    2013-03-01

    The analysis of plasmid content in dominant Bacteroidales order intestinal strains isolated from the same child at a 5 year interval identified a 8.9 kb plasmid in Bacteroides uniformis BUN24 strain isolated at age 6 and indistinguishably sized plasmids in the isolates of B. uniformis, B. vulgatus, B. intesinalis, and Parabacteroides distasonis at age 11. We sequenced a B. uniformis BUN24 plasmid, designated pBUN24, and using molecular surveys of diverse species we established that this 8944bp molecule (G+C content 43.5%) represents a novel family of small cryptic Bacteroidales plasmids. The replication region of pBUN24 was experimentally localized to a 1707-bp fragment that includes a putative repA gene, coding for a protein of Rep_3 superfamily of replication proteins of theta-type plasmids preceded by a putative iteron-containing origin of replication. The other open reading frames (ORFs) identified in pBUN24 sequence include a putative tad-ata-type toxin-antitoxin and mobA-mobB mobilization modules, as well as seven additional cryptic ORFs. The interaction of Tad and Ada components demonstrated by a pull-down assay and the toxicity of Tad in Escherichia coli host suggests the functionality of the plasmid addiction module. Re-sequencing of plasmids in two Bacteroides strains isolated at the age of 11 showed 100% nucleotide identity to pBUN24. This data supports the notion that this plasmid is transmissible to other Bacteroidales strains in the natural ecosystem. The possible roles of toxin-antitoxin system and other proteins encoded by pBUN24 in providing an apparent ecological advantage to the plasmid-harbouring strains of a bacterial symbiont in the human gut deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Y.; Goh, T K; Tani, Y.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as...

  17. Induction of neutralizing antibody in mice by plasmid DNA encoding envelope glycoprotein of Ebola virus%埃博拉病毒包膜蛋白DNA表达质粒对小鼠中和抗体的诱导作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何丽芳; 武雯俊; 王丽丽; 陈敏; 王馨; 杨宁; 黄镇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the induction of neutralizing antibody in mice by plasmid DNA encoding envelope glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus.Methods BALB/c mice were injected i.m.with plasmids pcDNA3.1,pcDNA3.1-GP (full length GP),pcDNA3.1-GP△TM (GP with transmembrane domain deleted) and pcDNA3.1-GP△Met (GP with original codon deleted) respectively,and determined for serum antibody titer against GP by ELISA,for specificity of antibody by Western blot,and for neutralizing efficiency by Ebola pseudovirus mock infection in 293E cells.Results Both full-length GP and the GP with transmembrane domain deleted induced effective immune response,and the induced GP antibody showed high specificity.GP antiserum inhibited the entry of Ebola pseudovirus into 293E cells.Conclusion Plasmid DNA encoding GP of Ebola virus induced high titer neutralizing antibody which neutralized Ebola pseudovirus effectively.%目的 探讨埃博拉病毒(Ebola virus)包膜蛋白GP DNA表达质粒对小鼠中和抗体的诱导作用.方法 将质粒pcDNA3.1、pcDNA3.1-GP(全长GP)、pcDNA3.1-GPATM(去跨膜段的GP)和pcDNA3.1-GP△Met(去起始密码子的GP)分别经肌肉注射免疫BALB/c小鼠,ELISA法检测血清GP抗体滴度;Western blot法检测抗体的特异性;利用埃博拉假病毒感染293E细胞模型观察中和抗体对埃博拉假病毒的中和作用.结果 全长的埃博拉病毒GP和去跨膜段的GP可诱导有效的免疫反应,且诱导生成的GP抗体特异性良好;GP抗血清可有效抑制埃博拉假病毒进入293E细胞.结论 埃博拉病毒GP DNA表达质粒可诱导高滴度的中和抗体,并可有效中和埃博拉假病毒.

  18. Effect of plasmid R391 and other IncJ plasmids on the survival of Escherichia coli after UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pembroke, J.T.; Stevens, E. (University Coll., Galway (Ireland))

    1984-07-01

    The presence of the IncJ plasmids R391, R997, R705, R706, R748, and R749 was shown to sensitize Escherichia coli AB1157 and both its uvr A and lexA derivatives to UV irradiation. No alteration in post-irradiation survival was observed in a recA mutant containing these plasmids, compared with the non-plasmid-containing recA strain. Analysis of recombination frequency in Hfr crosses to recA/sup +/ cells containing plasmid R391 indicated a reduction in recombination frequency compared with that obtained in similar crosses to a non-plasmid-containing strain. This effect was not due to plasmid-encoded restriction or entry exclusion systems and therefore must be considered as a real block in recombination. When cells containing plasmid R391 were irradiated and allowed to photoreactivate, an increase in survival was observed which was comparable to that observed in the non-plasmid-containing derivative. This indicated that post-irradiation processing of UV-induced damage, or lack of such processing, by mechanisms other than photoreactivation was responsible for the UV sensitivity associated with plasmid R391.

  19. Putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in Mitochondrial Plasmid of Paramecium caudatum Stock GT704

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Ekawati Tallei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria of Paramecium caudatum stock GT704 has a set of four kinds of linear plasmids with sizes of 8.2, 4.1, 2.8 and 1.4 kb. The plasmids of 8.2 and 2.8 kb exist as dimers consisting of 4.1- and 1.4-kb monomers, respectively. The plasmid 2.8 kb, designated as pGT704-2.8, contains an open reading frame encodes for putative DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP. This study reveals that this RNAP belongs to superfamily of DNA/RNA polymerase and family of T7/T3 single chain RNA polymerase and those of mitochondrial plasmid of fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. It is suggested that RNAP of pGT704-2.8 can perform transcription without transcription factor as promoter recognition. Given that only two motifs were found, it could not be ascertained whether this RNAP has a full function independently or integrated with mtDNA in carrying out its function.

  20. Toward understanding the functional role of Ss-RIOK-1, a RIO protein kinase-encoding gene of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs.The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5'-UTR, a 17 bp 3'-UTR and a 1,434 bp ORF encoding a protein of 477 amino acids containing a RIOK-1 signature motif. The genomic sequence of the Ss-riok-1 coding region is 1,636 bp in length and has three exons and two introns. The putative promoter region comprises 4,280 bp and contains conserved promoter elements, including four CAAT boxes, 12 GATA boxes, eight E-boxes (CANNTG and 38 TATA boxes. The Ss-riok-1 gene is transcribed throughout all developmental stages with the highest transcript abundance in the infective third-stage larva (iL3. Recombinant Ss-RIOK-1 is an active kinase, capable of both phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation. Patterns of transcriptional reporter expression in transgenic S. stercoralis larvae indicated that Ss-RIOK-1 is expressed in neurons of the head, body and tail as well as in pharynx and hypodermis.The characterization of the molecular and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the encoding gene provide first clues as to functions of RIOKs in the biological processes of parasitic nematodes.

  1. High-resolution genetic analysis of the requirements for horizontal transmission of the ESBL plasmid from Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Chao, Michael C; Sasabe, Jumpei; Clark, Lars; Davis, Brigid M; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Mori, Hiroshi; Kurokawa, Ken; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal dissemination of the genes encoding extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) via conjugative plasmids is facilitating the increasingly widespread resistance of pathogens to beta-lactam antibiotics. However, there is relatively little known about the regulatory factors and mechanisms that govern the spread of these plasmids. Here, we carried out a high-throughput, transposon insertion site sequencing analysis (TnSeq) to identify genes that enable the maintenance and transmission of pESBL, an R64 (IncI1)-related resistance plasmid that was isolated from Escherichia coli O104:H4 linked to a recent large outbreak of gastroenteritis. With a few exceptions, the majority of the genes identified as required for maintenance and transmission of pESBL matched those of their previously defined R64 counterparts. However, our analyses of the high-density transposon insertion library in pESBL also revealed two very short and linked regions that constitute a previously unrecognized regulatory system controlling spread of IncI1 plasmids. In addition, we investigated the function of the pESBL-encoded M.EcoGIX methyltransferase, which is also encoded by many other IncI1 and IncF plasmids. This enzyme proved to protect pESBL from restriction in new hosts, suggesting it aids in expanding the plasmid's host range. Collectively, our work illustrates the power of the TnSeq approach to enable rapid and comprehensive analyses of plasmid genes and sequences that facilitate the dissemination of determinants of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Changes in the reproductive function and developmental phenotypes in mice following intramuscular injection of an activin betaA-expressing plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Nyeu; Park, Moon Nyeo; Jung, Hoi Kyung; Cho, Chunghee; Mayo, Kelly E; Cho, Byung-Nam

    2008-12-16

    The TGF-beta family protein activin has numerous reported activities with some uncertainty in the reproductive axis and development. The precise roles of activin in in vivo system were investigated using a transient gain of function model. To this end, an expression plasmid, pCMV-rAct, with the activin betaA cDNA fused to the cytomegalovirus promoter, was introduced into muscle of the female adult mice by direct injection. Activin betaA mRNA was detected in the muscle by RT-PCR and subsequent Southern blot analysis. Activin betaA was also detected, and western blot analysis revealed a relatively high level of serum activin with correspondingly increased FSH. In the pCMV-rAct-injected female mice, estrus stage within the estrous cycle was extended. Moreover, increased numbers of corpora lutea and a thickened granulosa cell layer with a small antrum in tertiary follicles within the ovary were observed. When injected female mice were mated with males of proven fertility, a subset of embryos died in utero, and most of those that survived exhibited increased body weight. Taken together, our data reveal that activin betaA can directly influence the estrous cycle, an integral part of the reproduction in female mice and activin betaA can also influence the embryo development as an endocrine fashion.

  3. Changes in the reproductive function and developmental phenotypes in mice following intramuscular injection of an activin betaA-expressing plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayo Kelly E

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TGF-beta family protein activin has numerous reported activities with some uncertainty in the reproductive axis and development. The precise roles of activin in in vivo system were investigated using a transient gain of function model. Methods To this end, an expression plasmid, pCMV-rAct, with the activin betaA cDNA fused to the cytomegalovirus promoter, was introduced into muscle of the female adult mice by direct injection. Results Activin betaA mRNA was detected in the muscle by RT-PCR and subsequent Southern blot analysis. Activin betaA was also detected, and western blot analysis revealed a relatively high level of serum activin with correspondingly increased FSH. In the pCMV-rAct-injected female mice, estrus stage within the estrous cycle was extended. Moreover, increased numbers of corpora lutea and a thickened granulosa cell layer with a small antrum in tertiary follicles within the ovary were observed. When injected female mice were mated with males of proven fertility, a subset of embryos died in utero, and most of those that survived exhibited increased body weight. Conclusion Taken together, our data reveal that activin betaA can directly influence the estrous cycle, an integral part of the reproduction in female mice and activin betaA can also influence the embryo development as an endocrine fashion.

  4. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, K E; A. J. Weightman; Fry, J C

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 x 10(-8) to 4.5 x 10(-3) per recipient at 20 degrees C. The sizes of the mobil...

  5. Genetic and functional characterization of a yet-unclassified rhizobial Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region from a ubiquitous plasmid conjugal system present in Sinorhizobium meliloti, in Sinorhizobium medicae, and in other nonrhizobial Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio J; Tejerizo, Gonzalo A Torres; Salas, María Eugenia; Martini, María Carla; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Lagares, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that live in soils and associate with leguminous plants to establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The ability of these bacteria to undergo horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to be one of the main features to explain both the origin of their symbiotic life-style and the plasticity and dynamics of their genomes. In our laboratory we have previously characterized at the species level the non-pSym plasmid mobilome in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of Medicago spp., and have found a high incidence of conjugal activity in many plasmids (Pistorio et al., 2008). In this work we characterized the Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region of one of those plasmids, pSmeLPU88b. This mobilization region was found to represent a previously unclassified Dtr type in rhizobia (hereafter type-IV), highly ubiquitous in S. meliloti and found in other genera of Gram-negative bacteria as well; including Agrobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Chelativorans. The oriT of the type-IV Dtr described here could be located by function within a DNA fragment of 278 bp, between the divergent genes parA and mobC. The phylogenetic analysis of the cognate relaxase MobZ indicated that this protein groups close to the previously defined MOB(P3) and MOB(P4) type of enzymes, but is located in a separate and novel cluster that we have designated MOB(P0). Noteworthy, MOB(P0) and MOB(P4) relaxases were frequently associated with plasmids present in rhizospheric soil bacteria. A comparison of the nod-gene locations with the phylogenetic topology of the rhizobial relaxases revealed that the symbiotic genes are found on diverse plasmids bearing any of the four Dtr types, thus indicating that pSym plasmids are not specifically associated with any particular mobilization system. Finally, we demonstrated that the type-IV Dtr promoted the mobilization of plasmids from S. meliloti to Sinorhizobium medicae as well as from these rhizobia to other bacteria by means of their own

  6. Functional characterization of the proteolytic activity of the tomato black ring nepovirus RNA-1-encoded polyprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, O; Greif, C; Dufourcq, P; Reinbolt, J; Fritsch, C

    1995-01-10

    Translation of tomato black ring virus (TBRV) RNA-1 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate leads to the synthesis of a 250K polyprotein which cleaves itself into smaller proteins of 50, 60, 120, and 190K. Polypeptides synthesized from synthetic transcripts corresponding to different regions of TBRV RNA-1 are processed only when they encode the 23K protein delimited earlier by sequence homology with the cowpea mosaic virus 24K protease. The proteolytic activity of this protein is completely lost by mutating residues C170 (to I) or L188 (to H), residues which align with conserved residues of the viral serine-like proteases. The 120K protein is generated by cleavage of the dipeptide K/A localized in front of the VPg but is not further cleaved in vitro at the K/S site (at the C terminus of the VPg) or between the protease and polymerase domains. However, both the protein VPgProPol (120K) and the protein ProPol (117K) produced in vitro from synthetic transcripts can cleave in trans the RNA-2-encoded 150K polyprotein, but they cannot cleave in trans polypeptides containing a cleavage site expressed from RNA-1 transcripts in which the protease cistron is absent or modified.

  7. Targeting latent function: Encouraging effective encoding for successful memory training and transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Cindy; Flegal, Kristin E.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive training programs for older adults often result in improvements at the group level. However, there are typically large age and individual differences in the size of training benefits. These differences may be related to the degree to which participants implement the processes targeted by the training program. To test this possibility, we tested older adults in a memory-training procedure either under specific strategy instructions designed to encourage semantic, integrative encoding, or in a condition that encouraged time and attention to encoding but allowed participants to choose their own strategy. Both conditions improved the performance of old-old adults relative to an earlier study (Bissig & Lustig, 2007) and reduced self-reports of everyday memory errors. Performance in the strategy-instruction group was related to pre-existing ability, performance in the strategy-choice group was not. The strategy-choice group performed better on a laboratory transfer test of recognition memory, and training performance was correlated with reduced everyday memory errors. Training programs that target latent but inefficiently-used abilities while allowing flexibility in bringing those abilities to bear may best promote effective training and transfer. PMID:19140647

  8. Enhanced brain targeting efficiency of intranasally administered plasmid DNA: an alternative route for brain gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Kwon; Kim, Mi Young; Byun, Hyang-Min; Hwang, Tae Sun; Kim, Jung Mogg; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Park, Tae Gwan; Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Jeong, Gil-Jae; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2007-01-01

    Recently, nasal administration has been studied as a noninvasive route for delivery of plasmid DNA encoding therapeutic or antigenic genes. Here, we examined the brain targeting efficiency and transport pathways of intranasally administered plasmid DNA. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measurements of plasmid DNA in blood and brain tissues revealed that intranasally administered pCMVbeta (7.2 kb) and pN2/CMVbeta (14.1 kb) showed systemic absorption and brain distribution. Following intranasal administration, the beta-galactosidase protein encoded by these plasmids was significantly expressed in brain tissues. Kinetic studies showed that intranasally administered plasmid DNA reached the brain with a 2,595-fold higher efficiency than intravenously administered plasmid DNA did, 10 min post-dose. Over 1 h post-dose, the brain targeting efficiencies were consistently higher for intranasally administered plasmid DNA than for intravenously administered DNA. To examine how plasmid DNA enters the brain and moves to the various regions, we examined tissues from nine brain regions, at 5 and 10 min after intranasal or intravenous administration of plasmid DNA. Intravenously administered plasmid DNA displayed similar levels of plasmid DNA in the nine different regions, whereas, intranasally administered plasmid DNA exhibited different levels of distribution among the regions, with the highest plasmid DNA levels in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, plasmid DNA was mainly detected in the endothelial cells, but not in glial cells. Our results suggest that intranasally applied plasmid DNA may reach the brain through a direct route, possibly via the olfactory bulb, and that the nasal route might be an alternative method for efficiently delivering plasmid DNA to the brain.

  9. The integrated conjugative plasmid pSAM2 of Streptomyces ambofaciens is related to temperate bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccard, F; Smokvina, T; Pernodet, J L; Friedmann, A; Guérineau, M

    1989-03-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 and derivatives contain the 11-kb element pSAM2 present in an integrated state or as a free and integrated plasmid. This element, able to integrate site-specifically in the genome of different Streptomyces species, is conjugative and mobilizes chromosomal markers. Besides these plasmid functions, we have shown that the site-specific recombination system of pSAM2 presents strong similarities with that of several temperate phages. The integration event is promoted by a site-specific recombinase of the integrase family. The int gene encoding this integrase is closely linked to the plasmid attachment site (attP). A small open reading frame (ORF) overlaps the int gene and the predicted protein exhibits similarities with Xis proteins involved in phages excision. The integrated copy of pSAM2 in strain ATCC23877 is flanked by att sequences (attL and attR). Another att sequence (attX) is present in this strain and attX and attL are the boundaries of a 42-kb fragment (xSAM1) absent, as well as pSAM2, from S.ambofaciens DSM40697. Sequences partially similar to pSAM2 int gene are found near the chromosomal integration zone in both S.ambofaciens strains. The possible origin of pSAM2, an element carrying plasmid as well as phage features, is discussed.

  10. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

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    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  11. Characterization of the Lactobacillus plantarum plasmid pCD033 and generation of the plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum CD033, a strain isolated from grass silage in Austria, harbors a 7.9 kb plasmid designated pCD033. Sequence analysis identified 14 open reading frames and 8 of these were supposed to be putative coding sequences. Gene annotation revealed no putative essential genes being plasmid encoded, but a plasmid addiction system based on a PemI/PemK-like toxin-antitoxin system, able to stabilize plasmid maintenance. Absence of a replication initiation protein, a double strand origin as well as a single strand origin on plasmid pCD033 suggests replication via a new type of theta mechanism, whereby plasmid replication is potentially initiated and regulated by non-coding RNA. Detailed examination of segregational stability of plasmid vectors consisting of pCD033-fragments, combined with a selection marker, resulted in definition of a stably maintained minimal replicon. A gene encoding a RepB/OrfX-like protein was found to be not essential for plasmid replication. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of this protein with related proteins unveiled a highly conserved amino acid motif (LLDQQQ). L. plantarum CD033 was cured of pCD033 resulting in the novel plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH. Plasmid curing demonstrated that no essential features are provided by pCD033 under laboratory conditions.

  12. Cloning and functional characterization of the SUR2/SYR2 gene encoding sphinganine hydroxylase in Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Park, Chang-Seo; Rhee, Joon-Shick; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2004-04-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sphinganine C4-hydroxylase encoded by the SUR2 gene catalyses the conversion of sphinganine to phytosphingosine. We isolated the SUR2 gene from Pichia ciferrii using nucleotide sequence homology to S. cerevisiae SUR2 to study hydroxylation of sphinganine in the sphingoid base overproducing yeast P. ciferrii. A positive clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A syringomycin-E resistance phenotype of a S. cerevisiae sur2-null mutant was complemented by expression of the cloned P. ciferrii SUR2 gene. Restoration of phytosphingosine production in the complemented strain was also confirmed, indicating that the cloned gene is a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae SUR2. .

  13. Single-molecule sequencing to track plasmid diversity of hospital-associated carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlan, Sean; Thomas, Pamela J; Deming, Clayton; Park, Morgan; Lau, Anna F; Dekker, John P; Snitkin, Evan S; Clark, Tyson A; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Boitano, Matthew; Dayal, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y; Schmidt, Brian; Young, Alice C; Thomas, James W; Bouffard, Gerard G; Blakesley, Robert W; Mullikin, James C; Korlach, Jonas; Henderson, David K; Frank, Karen M; Palmore, Tara N; Segre, Julia A

    2014-09-17

    Public health officials have raised concerns that plasmid transfer between Enterobacteriaceae species may spread resistance to carbapenems, an antibiotic class of last resort, thereby rendering common health care-associated infections nearly impossible to treat. To determine the diversity of carbapenemase-encoding plasmids and assess their mobility among bacterial species, we performed comprehensive surveillance and genomic sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center patient population and hospital environment. We isolated a repertoire of carbapenemase-encoding Enterobacteriaceae, including multiple strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Pantoea species. Long-read genome sequencing with full end-to-end assembly revealed that these organisms carry the carbapenem resistance genes on a wide array of plasmids. K. pneumoniae and E. cloacae isolated simultaneously from a single patient harbored two different carbapenemase-encoding plasmids, indicating that plasmid transfer between organisms was unlikely within this patient. We did, however, find evidence of horizontal transfer of carbapenemase-encoding plasmids between K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, and C. freundii in the hospital environment. Our data, including full plasmid identification, challenge assumptions about horizontal gene transfer events within patients and identify possible connections between patients and the hospital environment. In addition, we identified a new carbapenemase-encoding plasmid of potentially high clinical impact carried by K. pneumoniae, E. coli, E. cloacae, and Pantoea species, in unrelated patients and in the hospital environment. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frances J D; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Evans, Alan T; Goudie, David R; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Arseculeratne, Gehan; Munro, Colin S; Sergeant, Ann; O'Regan, Gráinne; Bale, Sherri J; Compton, John G; DiGiovanna, John J; Presland, Richard B; Fleckman, Philip; McLean, W H Irwin

    2006-03-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (OMIM 146700) is the most common inherited disorder of keratinization and one of the most frequent single-gene disorders in humans. The most widely cited incidence figure is 1 in 250 based on a survey of 6,051 healthy English schoolchildren. We have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations R501X and 2282del4 in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) as the cause of moderate or severe ichthyosis vulgaris in 15 kindreds. In addition, these mutations are semidominant; heterozygotes show a very mild phenotype with incomplete penetrance. The mutations show a combined allele frequency of approximately 4% in populations of European ancestry, explaining the high incidence of ichthyosis vulgaris. Profilaggrin is the major protein of keratohyalin granules in the epidermis. During terminal differentiation, it is cleaved into multiple filaggrin peptides that aggregate keratin filaments. The resultant matrix is cross-linked to form a major component of the cornified cell envelope. We find that loss or reduction of this major structural protein leads to varying degrees of impaired keratinization.

  15. Isolation and functional analysis of a Brassica juncea gene encoding a component of auxin efflux carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; MIN; NI; XIAO; YA; CHEN; ZHI; HONG; XU; HONG; WEI; XUE

    2002-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a divergent role in plant growth and developmental processes including rootand embryo development, vascular pattern formation and cell elongation. Recently isolated Arabidopsispin gene family was believed to encode a component of auxin efflux carrier (Galweiler et al, 1998). Basedon the Arabidopsis pin1 sequence we have isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA (designated Bjpinl), whichencoded a 70-kDa putative auxin efflux carrier. Deduced BjPIN1 shared 65% identities at protein level withAtPIN1 and was highly homologous to other putative PIN proteins of Arabidopsis (with highest homologyto AtPIN3). Hydrophobic analysis showed similar structures between BjPIN1 and AtPIN proteins. Presenceof 6 exons (varying in size between 65 bp and 1229 bp) and 5 introns (sizes between 89 bp and 463 bp)in the genomic fragment was revealed by comparing the genomic and cDNA sequences. Northern blotanalysis indicated that Bjpinl was expressed in most of the tissues tested, with a relatively higher levelof transcript in flowers and a lower level in root tissues. Promoter-reporter gene fusion studies furtherrevealed the expression of Bjpinl in the mature pollen grains, young seeds, root tip, leaf vascular tissue andtrace bundle, stem epidermis, cortex and vascular cells. BjPIN1 was localized on the plasma membraneas demonstrated through fusion expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Auxin efflux carrier activitywas elevated in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BjPIN1.

  16. The ORF 113 of Heliocoverpa armigera Single Nucleopolyhedrovirus Encodes a Functional Fibroblast Growth Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang LI; Chang-yong LIANG; Jian-hua SONG; Xin-wen CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is a key regulator of developmental processes. A FGF homolog (vFGF) is found in all lepidopteran baculoviruses. Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV) vFGFs are chemotactic factors. Here we analyzed the vfgf of Helicoverpa armigera NPV (HearNPV), a group Ⅱ NPV. The HearNPV vfgftranscripts were detected from 18 to 96 h post-infection (hpi) of Hz-AMI cells with HearNPV and encoded a 36 kDa protein, which was secreted into the culture medium. HearNPV vFGF had strong affinity to heparin, a property important for FGF signaling via an FGF receptor. Unlike its AcMNPV homolog, HearNPV vFGF specially chemoattracted Hz-AM 1, but not other insect cells such as Sf9 and Se-UCR and not the mammalian cells 293 and HepG2. HearNPV vFGF is also associated with the envelope of BV but is absent in occlusion-derived virus, which coordinated to the chemotatic activity analysis.

  17. DNA sequence analysis of plasmids from multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg isolates.

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    Jing Han

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg is among the most detected serovars in swine and poultry, ranks among the top five serotypes associated with human salmonellosis and is disproportionately associated with invasive infections and mortality in humans. Salmonella are known to carry plasmids associated with antimicrobial resistance and virulence. To identify plasmid-associated genes in multidrug resistant S. enterica serovar Heidelberg, antimicrobial resistance plasmids from five isolates were sequenced using the 454 LifeSciences pyrosequencing technology. Four of the isolates contained incompatibility group (Inc A/C multidrug resistance plasmids harboring at least eight antimicrobial resistance genes. Each of these strains also carried a second resistance plasmid including two IncFIB, an IncHI2 and a plasmid lacking an identified Inc group. The fifth isolate contained an IncI1 plasmid, encoding resistance to gentamicin, streptomycin and sulfonamides. Some of the IncA/C plasmids lacked the full concert of transfer genes and yet were able to be conjugally transferred, likely due to the transfer genes carried on the companion plasmids in the strains. Several non-IncA/C resistance plasmids also carried putative virulence genes. When the sequences were compared to previously sequenced plasmids, it was found that while all plasmids demonstrated some similarity to other plasmids, they were unique, often due to differences in mobile genetic elements in the plasmids. Our study suggests that Salmonella Heidelberg isolates harbor plasmids that co-select for antimicrobial resistance and virulence, along with genes that can mediate the transfer of plasmids within and among other bacterial isolates. Prevalence of such plasmids can complicate efforts to control the spread of S. enterica serovar Heidelberg in food animal and human populations.

  18. Plasmid-to-plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    No recombination between plasmids was observed after conjugal transfer of a plasmid into a cell carrying another plasmid. Two types of such recombination took place after transformation, one type being Rec/sup +/ dependent and suggesting a preferred site of recombination. The other much rarer type was at least partially Rec/sup +/ independent.

  19. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  20. Temporal evolution of brain reorganization under cross-modal training: insights into the functional architecture of encoding and retrieval networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likova, Lora T.

    2015-03-01

    This study is based on the recent discovery of massive and well-structured cross-modal memory activation generated in the primary visual cortex (V1) of totally blind people as a result of novel training in drawing without any vision (Likova, 2012). This unexpected functional reorganization of primary visual cortex was obtained after undergoing only a week of training by the novel Cognitive-Kinesthetic Method, and was consistent across pilot groups of different categories of visual deprivation: congenitally blind, late-onset blind and blindfolded (Likova, 2014). These findings led us to implicate V1 as the implementation of the theoretical visuo-spatial 'sketchpad' for working memory in the human brain. Since neither the source nor the subsequent 'recipient' of this non-visual memory information in V1 is known, these results raise a number of important questions about the underlying functional organization of the respective encoding and retrieval networks in the brain. To address these questions, an individual totally blind from birth was given a week of Cognitive-Kinesthetic training, accompanied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) both before and just after training, and again after a two-month consolidation period. The results revealed a remarkable temporal sequence of training-based response reorganization in both the hippocampal complex and the temporal-lobe object processing hierarchy over the prolonged consolidation period. In particular, a pattern of profound learning-based transformations in the hippocampus was strongly reflected in V1, with the retrieval function showing massive growth as result of the Cognitive-Kinesthetic memory training and consolidation, while the initially strong hippocampal response during tactile exploration and encoding became non-existent. Furthermore, after training, an alternating patch structure in the form of a cascade of discrete ventral regions underwent radical transformations to reach complete functional

  1. Antibodies from women urogenitally infected with C. trachomatis predominantly recognized the plasmid protein pgp3 in a conformation-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yimou

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C. trachomatis organisms carry a cryptic plasmid that encodes 8 open reading frames designated as pORF1 to 8. It is not clear whether all 8 pORFs are expressed during C. trachomatis infection in humans and information on the functionality of the plasmid proteins is also very limited. Results When antibodies from women urogenitally infected with C. trachomatis were reacted with the plasmid proteins, all 8 pORFs were positively recognized by one or more human antibody samples with the recognition of pORF5 protein (known as pgp3 by most antibodies and with the highest titers. The antibody recognition of the pORFs was blocked by C. trachomatis-infected HeLa but not normal HeLa cell lysates. The pgp3 fusion protein-purified human IgG detected the endogenous pgp3 in the cytosol of C. trachomatis-infected cells with an intracellular distribution pattern similar to that of CPAF, a chlamydial genome-encoded protease factor. However, the human antibodies no longer recognized pgp3 but maintained recognition of CPAF when both antigens were linearized or heat-denatured. The pgp3 conformation is likely maintained by the C-terminal 75% amino acid sequence since further deletion blocked the binding by the human antibodies and two conformation-dependent mouse monoclonal antibodies. Conclusion The plasmid-encoded 8 proteins are both expressed and immunogenic with pgp3 as the most immunodominant antigen during chlamydial infection in humans. More importantly, the human anti-pgp3 antibodies are highly conformation-dependent. These observations have provided important information for further understanding the function of the plasmid-encoded proteins and exploring the utility of pgp3 in chlamydial diagnosis and vaccination.

  2. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  3. Modular genetic architecture of the toxigenic plasmid pIS56-63 harboring cry1Ab21 in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis strain IS5056.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Emilia; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. thuringiensis IS5056, a strain highly toxic to Trichoplusia ni larvae, produces the newly described Cry1Ab21 delta-endotoxin encoded by a gene located in the 63.8 kb pIS56-63 plasmid. In this report we present the structure and functional similarity of this plasmid to other B. thuringiensis large toxigenic plasmids with particular interest focused on its modular architecture. The 61 open reading frames (ORFs) of the plasmid made four functional modules: (i) M1-mic, the mobile insertion cassette harboring cry1Ab21; (ii) M2-tra, the putative conjugative element; (iii) M3-reg, regulation sequence; and (iv) M4-rep, the ori44 replicon. These modules display similarity to corresponding sequences in distinct B. thuringiensis plasmids, but, in general, not to plasmid of other Bacillus cereus sensu lato. The nucleotide sequence and organization of genes in pIS56-63 were highly similar (80-100%) to those in pHT73 of B. thuringiensis HT73, and in p03 of B. thuringiensis HD771, particularly within the M3-reg and M4-rep modules, and slightly less in M2-tra, the latter of which is composed of two segments exhibiting homology to sequences in pBMB28, pAH187_45, pCT83, and pIS56-85 or to pCT72, pBMB67, p04, and pIS56-68. The tetrapartite structure of the toxigenic pIS56-63 plasmid strongly suggests that its hybrid nature is a result of recombination of various genetic elements originating from different extrachromosomal and chromosomal sources in B. thuringiensis. The presence of cry1Ab21 in the mobile cassette suggests that its occurrence on pIS56-63 resulted from recombination and transposition events during the evolution of the plasmid.

  4. Functionally cloned pdrM from Streptococcus pneumoniae encodes a Na(+ coupled multidrug efflux pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Multidrug efflux pumps play an important role as a self-defense system in bacteria. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are classified into five families based on structure and coupling energy: resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND, small multidrug resistance (SMR, major facilitator (MF, ATP binding cassette (ABC, and multidrug and toxic compounds extrusion (MATE. We cloned a gene encoding a MATE-type multidrug efflux pump from Streptococcus pneumoniae R6, and designated it pdrM. PdrM showed sequence similarity with NorM from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, YdhE from Escherichia coli, and other bacterial MATE-type multidrug efflux pumps. Heterologous expression of PdrM let to elevated resistance to several antibacterial agents, norfloxacin, acriflavine, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI in E. coli KAM32 cells. PdrM effluxes acriflavine and DAPI in a Na(+- or Li(+-dependent manner. Moreover, Na(+ efflux via PdrM was observed when acriflavine was added to Na(+-loaded cells expressing pdrM. Therefore, we conclude that PdrM is a Na(+/drug antiporter in S. pneumoniae. In addition to pdrM, we found another two genes, spr1756 and spr1877,that met the criteria of MATE-type by searching the S. pneumoniae genome database. However, cloned spr1756 and spr1877 did not elevate the MIC of any of the investigated drugs. mRNA expression of spr1756, spr1877, and pdrM was detected in S. pneumoniae R6 under laboratory growth conditions. Therefore, spr1756 and spr1877 are supposed to play physiological roles in this growth condition, but they may be unrelated to drug resistance.

  5. Construction and identification of helper plasmids of newcastle disease virus Italien strain

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    Zhen REN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Newcastle disease virus (NDV is a naturally oncolytic virus that has been shown to be safe and effective for cancer therapy. NDV virions possess a non-segmented negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome which contains six genes encoding the nucleocapsid protein (NP, phosphoprotein (P, large polymerase protein (L, matrix protein, fusion protein, and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex consisting of the genomic RNA and the three proteins NP, P, and L are the active template for transcription and replication of the viral genome. The purpose of this study was to construct the expression plasmids of NP, P and L genes of NDV Italien strain in which phage T7 promoter was a transcription promoter for the aim of generation of recombinant NDV. Methods NP, P and L genes were cloned from the genome RNA of NDV Italien followed by introduction into the downstream of T7 promoter and internal ribosome entry sites to construct the expression plasmids of NP, P and L, respectively. Expression of exogenous gene in BSR-T7/5 cells which constitutively express phage T7 RNA polymerase and transfected with plasmids of NP and P was detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The function of NP, P and L proteins expressed by constructed plasmids to facilitate the genomic RNA to form RNP complex was tested using minigenome of NDV Italien carrying firefly luciferase as a reporter gene. Results The expression plasmids of NP, P and L genes were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Using the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we detected the expression of viral NP and P proteins in BSR-T7/5 cells. When the helper plasmids were co-transfected with NDV minigenome plasmid, the expression of firefly luciferase was more significant compared with the control group (P < 0.001. Conclusion The helper plasmids of NDV Italien strain using T7 promoter as a transcription promoter has been constructed successfully, and it provides a basis for the

  6. Characterization of the replicon from the lactococcal theta-replicating plasmid pJW563.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, A; Josephsen, J; von Wright, A; Vogensen, F K

    1995-09-01

    The replication region of the lactococcal plasmid pJW563 was localized to a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment. This DNA fragment was sequenced ans a 1155-bp open reading frame, repB563, encoding a putative protein RepB563 of 385 amino acids was found. An AT-rich noncoding region, repA563, was found upstream of repB563. This segment included several direct and inverted repeats. A downstream 591-bp open reading frame, ORF X, which was not necessary for replication, was putatively translationally coupled to repB563, RepB563 supplied in trans could support replication of a plasmid containing repA563 and a truncated repB563. This observation suggests that RepB563 is a trans-acting replication protein, and repA563 the cis-acting origin of replication, repA563, repB563, and the beginning of ORF X showed high homology to similar regions in a family of lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids. The repA DNA sequences and the RepB amino acid sequences of the plasmids were aligned and the consensus sequences generated. The comparison revealed highly conserved areas among this family of plasmids. In addition, variable domains emerged, presumably having a plasmid specific function, pVS40 and pC1305 were plasmids with replication proteins showing high homology to RepB563. Despite this homology, replication from repA563 could not be supported by the pVS40 or pC1305 replication protein supplied in trans. Likewise the pJW563 protein could not support replication from the pVS40 origin. pJW563 was found to be compatible with the pVS40 and pC1305 replicons. The results indicate that pJW563 belongs to the widespread family of lactococcal theta-replicating pladmids. Despite the high homology between their replicons, the interaction between the replication origin and the protein is highly specific in many cases rendering the plasmids compatible.

  7. Conjugal transfer of a virulence plasmid in the opportunistic intracellular actinomycete Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, V N; Harding, W C; Willingham-Lane, J M; Hondalus, M K

    2012-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular, Gram-positive, soilborne actinomycete which can cause severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia with abscessation in young horses (foals) and in immunocompromised people, such as persons with AIDS. All strains of R. equi isolated from foals and approximately a third isolated from humans contain a large, ~81-kb plasmid which is essential for the intramacrophage growth of the organism and for virulence in foals and murine in vivo model systems. We found that the entire virulence plasmid could be transferred from plasmid-containing strains of R. equi (donor) to plasmid-free R. equi strains (recipient) at a high frequency and that plasmid transmission reestablished the capacity for intracellular growth in macrophages. Plasmid transfer required living cells and cell-to-cell contact and was unaffected by the presence of DNase, factors pointing to conjugation as the major means of genetic transfer. Deletion of a putative relaxase-encoding gene, traA, located in the proposed conjugative region of the plasmid, abolished plasmid transfer. Reversion of the traA mutation restored plasmid transmissibility. Finally, plasmid transmission to other Rhodococcus species and some additional related organisms was demonstrated. This is the first study showing a virulence plasmid transfer in R. equi, and it establishes a mechanism by which the virulence plasmid can move among bacteria in the soil.

  8. 携带乙肝大包膜蛋白L基因与结核Esat6融合基因植物表达载体的构建及鉴定%Construction and Identification of the Expression Plasmid Containing Genes Encoding the Large Envelope Protein L of HBV and Esat-6 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李君武; 宫君原; 刘鑫; 叶秋萍; 黄清华

    2011-01-01

    To construction and identification of the expression plasmid containing genes encoding East6 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the large envelope protein L of HBV, and transform the recombinant vector into Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404. The L and East-6 gene were amplied from pPICgK-L and Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome by PCR,then the fusion DNA fragment of L and East6 were amplied by Splicing by Overlap Extension were cloned into the vector pEGG. The combine fragment of promoter globulin-I and the target gene L-East6 which get from doubled enzymes digestion of the recombined plasmid pEG-G-L-Esat6 was inserted into the plant expression vector pCAMBIA1300 which contain the gene bar for herbicide resistance. Then transformed recombinant plasimid pCAMG-L- Esat6 into Agrobacterium tumerfaciens LBA4404. We have successfully constructed eukaryotic expression recombinantplasmid pCAMG-L-Esat6 and it is showed that the cloned sequence of L and Esat6 is correct by sequencing. We have successfully constructed expression plasmid containing genes encoding L protein of HBV and Esat6 gene and transformed into LBA4404,and lays a foundation for construction combined gene vaccine against HBV and MTB.%构建包含编码结核杆菌Esat6基因和乙肝病毒大包膜蛋白(L蛋白)基因的植物双元表达载体,并转化根癌农杆菌LBA4404.分别以质粒pPIC9K-L和结核杆菌基因组为模板进行PCR扩增,获得L和Esat6基因,然后运用部分重叠聚合酶链式反应扩增出L-Esat6融合基因片段,连接到有玉米特异性启动子globulin-1的pEGG载体上,将G-L-Esat6融合基因片段酶切下,连接到含有抗除草剂基因bar的双元表达载体pCAMBIAI300上,电击法将重组质粒转化到农杆菌LBA4404中.构建了真核表达重组质粒pCAMG-L-Esat6,测序分析表明,克隆的L和Esat6序列与NCBI上公布序列一致.成功构建与转化了包含编码乙肝病毒大包膜蛋白L基因和结核杆菌Esat6基因的植物表达载

  9. Differences in the stability of the plasmids of Yersinia pestis cultures in vitro: impact on virulence

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    TC Leal-Balbino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmid and chromosomal genes encode determinants of virulence for Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. However, in vitro, Y. pestis genome is very plastic and several changes have been described. To evaluate the alterations in the plasmid content of the cultures in vitro and the impact of the alterations to their pathogenicity, three Y. pestis isolates were submitted to serial subculture, analysis of the plasmid content, and testing for the presence of characteristic genes in each plasmid of colonies selected after subculture. Different results were obtained with each strain. The plasmid content of one of them was shown to be stable; no apparent alteration was produced through 32 subcultures. In the other two strains, several alterations were observed. LD50 in mice of the parental strains and the derived cultures with different plasmid content were compared. No changes in the virulence plasmid content could be specifically correlated with changes in the LD50.

  10. Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Sherratt, David J; Gerdes, Kenn;

    2005-01-01

    Summary Bacterial plasmids and chromosomes encode centromere-like partition loci that actively segregate DNA before cell division. The molecular mechanism behind DNA segregation in bacteria is largely unknown. Here we analyse the mechanism of partition-associated incompatibility for plasmid pB171......-lived pairing of plasmids. Instead, pure R1 and F foci were positioned along the length of the cell, and in a random order. Thus, our results raise the possibility that partition-mediated plasmid incompatibility is not caused by pairing of heterologous plasmids but instead by random positioning of pure plasmid...... clusters along the long axis of the cell. The strength of the incompatibility was correlated with the capability of the plasmids to compete for the mid-cell position....

  11. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  12. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods.

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates of Emotional Word Encoding and Recognition in Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-Jose; Demenescu, Liliana R.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Kortekaas, Rudle; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Den Boer, J. A.; Renken, Remco J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Aleman, Andre; Veltman, Dick J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may be characterized by a common deficiency in processing of emotional information. Methods: We used functional magnet

  14. Genome analysis of a novel Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 carrying a symbiotic plasmid.

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    Shin Okazaki

    Full Text Available Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 isolated from the legume Aeschynomene americana exhibited a broad host range and divergent nodulation (nod genes compared with other members of the Bradyrhizobiaceae. Genome analysis of DOA9 revealed that its genome comprised a single chromosome of 7.1 Mbp and a plasmid of 0.7 Mbp. The chromosome showed highest similarity with that of the nod gene-harboring soybean symbiont B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the plasmid showed highest similarity with pBBta01 of the nod gene-lacking photosynthetic strain BTAi1, which nodulates Aeschynomene species. Unlike in other bradyrhizobia, the plasmid of DOA9 encodes genes related to symbiotic functions including nodulation, nitrogen fixation, and type III/IV protein secretion systems. The plasmid has also a lower GC content (60.1% than the chromosome (64.4%. These features suggest that the plasmid could be the origin of the symbiosis island that is found in the genome of other bradyrhizobia. The nod genes of DOA9 exhibited low similarity with those of other strains. The nif gene cluster of DOA9 showed greatest similarity to those of photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. The type III/IV protein secretion systems of DOA9 are similar to those of nod gene-harboring B. elkanii and photosynthetic BTAi1. The DOA9 genome exhibited intermediate characteristics between nod gene-harboring bradyrhizobia and nod gene-lacking photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, thus providing the evidence for the evolution of the Bradyrhizobiaceae during ecological adaptation. Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 isolated from the legume Aeschynomene americana exhibited a broad host range and divergent nodulation (nod genes compared with other members of the Bradyrhizobiaceae. Genome analysis of DOA9 revealed that its genome comprised a single chromosome of 7.1 Mbp and a plasmid of 0.7 Mbp. The chromosome showed highest similarity with that of the nod gene-harboring soybean symbiont B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the plasmid showed highest

  15. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. (Department of Agriculture, College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

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    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  17. Microsatellite-encoded domain in rodent Sry functions as a genetic capacitor to enable the rapid evolution of biological novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D; Sequeira, Paul W; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2013-08-13

    The male program of therian mammals is determined by Sry, a transcription factor encoded by the Y chromosome. Specific DNA binding is mediated by a high mobility group (HMG) box. Expression of Sry in the gonadal ridge activates a Sox9-dependent gene regulatory network leading to testis formation. A subset of Sry alleles in superfamily Muroidea (order Rodentia) is remarkable for insertion of an unstable DNA microsatellite, most commonly encoding (as in mice) a CAG repeat-associated glutamine-rich domain. We provide evidence, based on an embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, that this domain functions at a threshold length as a genetic capacitor to facilitate accumulation of variation elsewhere in the protein, including the HMG box. The glutamine-rich domain compensates for otherwise deleterious substitutions in the box and absence of nonbox phosphorylation sites to ensure occupancy of DNA target sites. Such compensation enables activation of a male transcriptional program despite perturbations to the box. Whereas human SRY requires nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and coupled phosphorylation, mouse Sry contains a defective nuclear export signal analogous to a variant human SRY associated with inherited sex reversal. We propose that the rodent glutamine-rich domain has (i) fostered accumulation of cryptic intragenic variation and (ii) enabled unmasking of such variation due to DNA replicative slippage. This model highlights genomic contingency as a source of protein novelty at the edge of developmental ambiguity and may underlie emergence of non-Sry-dependent sex determination in the radiation of Muroidea.

  18. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

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    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  19. Functional analysis of Rift Valley fever virus NSs encoding a partial truncation.

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    Jennifer A Head

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, belongs to genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in infected ruminants as well as causing neurological disorders, blindness, or lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. RVFV is classified as a category A priority pathogen and a select agent in the U.S., and currently there are no therapeutics available for RVF patients. NSs protein, a major virulence factor of RVFV, inhibits host transcription including interferon (IFN-β mRNA synthesis and promotes degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. NSs self-associates at the C-terminus 17 aa., while NSs at aa.210-230 binds to Sin3A-associated protein (SAP30 to inhibit the activation of IFN-β promoter. Thus, we hypothesize that NSs function(s can be abolished by truncation of specific domains, and co-expression of nonfunctional NSs with intact NSs will result in the attenuation of NSs function by dominant-negative effect. Unexpectedly, we found that RVFV NSs truncated at aa. 6-30, 31-55, 56-80, 81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230, 231-248 or 249-265 lack functions of IFN-β mRNA synthesis inhibition and degradation of PKR. Truncated NSs were less stable in infected cells, while nuclear localization was inhibited in NSs lacking either of aa.81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230 or 231-248. Furthermore, none of truncated NSs had exhibited significant dominant-negative functions for NSs-mediated IFN-β suppression or PKR degradation upon co-expression in cells infected with RVFV. We also found that any of truncated NSs except for intact NSs does not interact with RVFV NSs even in the presence of intact C-terminus self-association domain. Our results suggest that conformational integrity of NSs is important for the stability, cellular localization and biological functions of RVFV NSs, and the co-expression of truncated NSs does not exhibit dominant-negative phenotype.

  20. Adding to Yersinia enterocolitica Gene Pool Diversity: Two Cryptic Plasmids from a Biotype 1A Isolate

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    Daniela Lepka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the nucleotide sequence of two novel cryptic plasmids (4357 and 14 662 base pairs carried by a Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A strain isolated from pork. As distinguished from most biotype 1A strains, this isolate, designated 07-04449, exhibited adherence to eukaryotic cells. The smaller plasmid pYe4449-1 carries five attributable open reading frames (ORFs encoding the first CcdA/CcdB-like antitoxin/toxin system described for a Yersinia plasmid, a RepA-like replication initiation protein, and mobilizing factors MobA and MobC. The deduced amino acid sequences showed highest similarity to proteins described in Salmonella (CcdA/B, Klebsiella (RepA, and Plesiomonas (MobA/C indicating genomic fluidity among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. One additional ORF with unknown function, termed ORF5, was identified with an ancestry distinct from the rest of the plasmid. While the C+G content of ORF5 is 38.3%, the rest of pYe4449-1 shows a C+G content of 55.7%. The C+G content of the larger plasmid pYe4449-2 (54.9% was similar to that of pYe4449-1 (53.7% and differed from that of the Y. enterocolitica genome (47.3%. Of the 14 ORFs identified on pYe4449-2, only six ORFs showed significant similarity to database entries. For three of these ORFs likely functions could be ascribed: a TnpR-like resolvase and a phage replication protein, localized each on a low C+G island, and DNA primase TraC. Two ORFs of pYe4449-2, ORF3 and ORF7, seem to encode secretable proteins. Epitope-tagging of ORF3 revealed protein expression at 4°C but not at or above 27°C suggesting adaptation to a habitat outside swine. The hypothetical protein encoded by ORF7 is the member of a novel repeat protein family sharing the DxxGN(xnDxxGN motif. Our findings illustrate the exceptional gene pool diversity within the species Y. enterocolitica driven by horizontal gene transfer events.

  1. Novel plasmids and resistance phenotypes in Yersinia pestis: unique plasmid inventory of strain Java 9 mediates high levels of arsenic resistance.

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    Mark Eppinger

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that the plasmid repertoire of Yersinia pestis is not restricted to the three classical virulence plasmids. The Java 9 strain of Y. pestis is a biovar Orientalis isolate obtained from a rat in Indonesia. Although it lacks the Y. pestis-specific plasmid pMT, which encodes the F1 capsule, it retains virulence in mouse and non-human primate animal models. While comparing diverse Y. pestis strains using subtractive hybridization, we identified sequences in Java 9 that were homologous to a Y. enterocolitica strain carrying the transposon Tn2502, which is known to encode arsenic resistance. Here we demonstrate that Java 9 exhibits high levels of arsenic and arsenite resistance mediated by a novel promiscuous class II transposon, named Tn2503. Arsenic resistance was self-transmissible from Java 9 to other Y. pestis strains via conjugation. Genomic analysis of the atypical plasmid inventory of Java 9 identified pCD and pPCP plasmids of atypical size and two previously uncharacterized cryptic plasmids. Unlike the Tn2502-mediated arsenic resistance encoded on the Y. enterocolitica virulence plasmid; the resistance loci in Java 9 are found on all four indigenous plasmids, including the two novel cryptic plasmids. This unique mobilome introduces more than 105 genes into the species gene pool. The majority of these are encoded by the two entirely novel self-transmissible plasmids, which show partial homology and synteny to other enterics. In contrast to the reductive evolution in Y. pestis, this study underlines the major impact of a dynamic mobilome and lateral acquisition in the genome evolution of the plague bacterium.

  2. A structural study for the optimisation of functional motifs encoded in protein sequences

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    Helmer-Citterich Manuela

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of PROSITE patterns select false positives and/or miss known true positives. It is possible that – at least in some cases – the weak specificity and/or sensitivity of a pattern is due to the fact that one, or maybe more, functional and/or structural key residues are not represented in the pattern. Multiple sequence alignments are commonly used to build functional sequence patterns. If residues structurally conserved in proteins sharing a function cannot be aligned in a multiple sequence alignment, they are likely to be missed in a standard pattern construction procedure. Results Here we present a new procedure aimed at improving the sensitivity and/ or specificity of poorly-performing patterns. The procedure can be summarised as follows: 1. residues structurally conserved in different proteins, that are true positives for a pattern, are identified by means of a computational technique and by visual inspection. 2. the sequence positions of the structurally conserved residues falling outside the pattern are used to build extended sequence patterns. 3. the extended patterns are optimised on the SWISS-PROT database for their sensitivity and specificity. The method was applied to eight PROSITE patterns. Whenever structurally conserved residues are found in the surface region close to the pattern (seven out of eight cases, the addition of information inferred from structural analysis is shown to improve pattern selectivity and in some cases selectivity and sensitivity as well. In some of the cases considered the procedure allowed the identification of functionally interesting residues, whose biological role is also discussed. Conclusion Our method can be applied to any type of functional motif or pattern (not only PROSITE ones which is not able to select all and only the true positive hits and for which at least two true positive structures are available. The computational technique for the identification of

  3. Degradative Plasmid and Heavy Metal Resistance Plasmid Naturally Coexist in Phenol and Cyanide Assimilating Bacteria

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    Bahig E.  Deeb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Heavy metals are known to be powerful inhibitors of xenobiotics biodegradation activities. Alleviation the inhibitory effect of these metals on the phenol biodegradation activities in presence of heavy metals resistant plasmid was investigated. Approach: Combination of genetic systems of degradation of xenobiotic compound and heavy metal resistance was one of the approaches to the creation of polyfunctional strains for bioremediation of soil after co-contamination with organic pollutants and heavy metals. Results: A bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida PhCN (pPhCN1, pPhCN2 had been obtained. This bacterium contained two plasmids, a 120 Kb catabolic plasmid that encode for breakdown of phenol (pPhCN1 and pPhCN2 plasmid (100 Kb that code for cadmium and copper resistant. Cyanide assimilation by this bacterium was encoded by chromosomal genes. The inhibitory effect of cadmium (Cd2+ or copper (Cu2+ on the degradation of phenol and cyanide by P. putida strains PhCN and PhCN1 (contained pPhCN1 were investigated. The resistant strain PhCN showed high ability to degrade phenol and cyanide in presence of Cd2+ or Cu2+ comparing with the sensitive strain PhCN1. In addition, Cd2+ or Cu2+ was also found to exert a strong inhibitory effect on the C23O dioxygenase enzyme activity in the presence of cyanide as a nitrogen source. Conclusion: The presence of heavy metal resistance plasmid alleviated the inhibitory effect of metals on the phenol and cyanide assimilation by resistant strain.

  4. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding recombi

  5. Pharmaceutical development of the plasmid DNA vaccine pDERMATT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaak, S.G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of tumor specific antigens and self tolerance mechanisms against these antigens led to the assumption that antigens circulating at sufficient concentration levels could break this self tolerance mechanism and evoke immunological antitumor effects. pDERMATT (plasmid DNA encoding

  6. Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birney, Ewan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Dutta, Anindya; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Margulies, Elliott H; Weng, Zhiping; Snyder, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Thurman, Robert E; Kuehn, Michael S; Taylor, Christopher M; Neph, Shane; Koch, Christoph M; Asthana, Saurabh; Malhotra, Ankit; Adzhubei, Ivan; Greenbaum, Jason A; Andrews, Robert M; Flicek, Paul; Boyle, Patrick J; Cao, Hua; Carter, Nigel P; Clelland, Gayle K; Davis, Sean; Day, Nathan; Dhami, Pawandeep; Dillon, Shane C; Dorschner, Michael O; Fiegler, Heike; Giresi, Paul G; Goldy, Jeff; Hawrylycz, Michael; Haydock, Andrew; Humbert, Richard; James, Keith D; Johnson, Brett E; Johnson, Ericka M; Frum, Tristan T; Rosenzweig, Elizabeth R; Karnani, Neerja; Lee, Kirsten; Lefebvre, Gregory C; Navas, Patrick A; Neri, Fidencio; Parker, Stephen C J; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Shafer, Anthony; Vetrie, David; Weaver, Molly; Wilcox, Sarah; Yu, Man; Collins, Francis S; Dekker, Job; Lieb, Jason D; Tullius, Thomas D; Crawford, Gregory E; Sunyaev, Shamil; Noble, William S; Dunham, Ian; Denoeud, France; Reymond, Alexandre; Kapranov, Philipp; Rozowsky, Joel; Zheng, Deyou; Castelo, Robert; Frankish, Adam; Harrow, Jennifer; Ghosh, Srinka; Sandelin, Albin; Hofacker, Ivo L; Baertsch, Robert; Keefe, Damian; Dike, Sujit; Cheng, Jill; Hirsch, Heather A; Sekinger, Edward A; Lagarde, Julien; Abril, Josep F; Shahab, Atif; Flamm, Christoph; Fried, Claudia; Hackermüller, Jörg; Hertel, Jana; Lindemeyer, Manja; Missal, Kristin; Tanzer, Andrea; Washietl, Stefan; Korbel, Jan; Emanuelsson, Olof; Pedersen, Jakob S; Holroyd, Nancy; Taylor, Ruth; Swarbreck, David; Matthews, Nicholas; Dickson, Mark C; Thomas, Daryl J; Weirauch, Matthew T; Gilbert, James; Drenkow, Jorg; Bell, Ian; Zhao, XiaoDong; Srinivasan, K G; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ooi, Hong Sain; Chiu, Kuo Ping; Foissac, Sylvain; Alioto, Tyler; Brent, Michael; Pachter, Lior; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso; Choo, Siew Woh; Choo, Chiou Yu; Ucla, Catherine; Manzano, Caroline; Wyss, Carine; Cheung, Evelyn; Clark, Taane G; Brown, James B; Ganesh, Madhavan; Patel, Sandeep; Tammana, Hari; Chrast, Jacqueline; Henrichsen, Charlotte N; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Nagalakshmi, Ugrappa; Wu, Jiaqian; Lian, Zheng; Lian, Jin; Newburger, Peter; Zhang, Xueqing; Bickel, Peter; Mattick, John S; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Weissman, Sherman; Hubbard, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Rogers, Jane; Stadler, Peter F; Lowe, Todd M; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Struhl, Kevin; Gerstein, Mark; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Fu, Yutao; Green, Eric D; Karaöz, Ulaş; Siepel, Adam; Taylor, James; Liefer, Laura A; Wetterstrand, Kris A; Good, Peter J; Feingold, Elise A; Guyer, Mark S; Cooper, Gregory M; Asimenos, George; Dewey, Colin N; Hou, Minmei; Nikolaev, Sergey; Montoya-Burgos, Juan I; Löytynoja, Ari; Whelan, Simon; Pardi, Fabio; Massingham, Tim; Huang, Haiyan; Zhang, Nancy R; Holmes, Ian; Mullikin, James C; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Paten, Benedict; Seringhaus, Michael; Church, Deanna; Rosenbloom, Kate; Kent, W James; Stone, Eric A; Batzoglou, Serafim; Goldman, Nick; Hardison, Ross C; Haussler, David; Miller, Webb; Sidow, Arend; Trinklein, Nathan D; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Barrera, Leah; Stuart, Rhona; King, David C; Ameur, Adam; Enroth, Stefan; Bieda, Mark C; Kim, Jonghwan; Bhinge, Akshay A; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jun; Yao, Fei; Vega, Vinsensius B; Lee, Charlie W H; Ng, Patrick; Shahab, Atif; Yang, Annie; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Zhu, Zhou; Xu, Xiaoqin; Squazzo, Sharon; Oberley, Matthew J; Inman, David; Singer, Michael A; Richmond, Todd A; Munn, Kyle J; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Wallerman, Ola; Komorowski, Jan; Fowler, Joanna C; Couttet, Phillippe; Bruce, Alexander W; Dovey, Oliver M; Ellis, Peter D; Langford, Cordelia F; Nix, David A; Euskirchen, Ghia; Hartman, Stephen; Urban, Alexander E; Kraus, Peter; Van Calcar, Sara; Heintzman, Nate; Kim, Tae Hoon; Wang, Kun; Qu, Chunxu; Hon, Gary; Luna, Rosa; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, M Geoff; Aldred, Shelley Force; Cooper, Sara J; Halees, Anason; Lin, Jane M; Shulha, Hennady P; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Mousheng; Haidar, Jaafar N S; Yu, Yong; Ruan, Yijun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Green, Roland D; Wadelius, Claes; Farnham, Peggy J; Ren, Bing; Harte, Rachel A; Hinrichs, Angie S; Trumbower, Heather; Clawson, Hiram; Hillman-Jackson, Jennifer; Zweig, Ann S; Smith, Kayla; Thakkapallayil, Archana; Barber, Galt; Kuhn, Robert M; Karolchik, Donna; Armengol, Lluis; Bird, Christine P; de Bakker, Paul I W; Kern, Andrew D; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Martin, Joel D; Stranger, Barbara E; Woodroffe, Abigail; Davydov, Eugene; Dimas, Antigone; Eyras, Eduardo; Hallgrímsdóttir, Ingileif B; Huppert, Julian; Zody, Michael C; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Estivill, Xavier; Bouffard, Gerard G; Guan, Xiaobin; Hansen, Nancy F; Idol, Jacquelyn R; Maduro, Valerie V B; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jennifer C; Park, Morgan; Thomas, Pamela J; Young, Alice C; Blakesley, Robert W; Muzny, Donna M; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Jiang, Huaiyang; Weinstock, George M; Gibbs, Richard A; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Clamp, Michele; Cuff, James; Gnerre, Sante; Jaffe, David B; Chang, Jean L; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Lander, Eric S; Koriabine, Maxim; Nefedov, Mikhail; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Zhu, Baoli; de Jong, Pieter J

    2007-06-14

    We report the generation and analysis of functional data from multiple, diverse experiments performed on a targeted 1% of the human genome as part of the pilot phase of the ENCODE Project. These data have been further integrated and augmented by a number of evolutionary and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function in several major areas. First, our studies provide convincing evidence that the genome is pervasively transcribed, such that the majority of its bases can be found in primary transcripts, including non-protein-coding transcripts, and those that extensively overlap one another. Second, systematic examination of transcriptional regulation has yielded new understanding about transcription start sites, including their relationship to specific regulatory sequences and features of chromatin accessibility and histone modification. Third, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure has emerged, including its inter-relationship with DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. Finally, integration of these new sources of information, in particular with respect to mammalian evolution based on inter- and intra-species sequence comparisons, has yielded new mechanistic and evolutionary insights concerning the functional landscape of the human genome. Together, these studies are defining a path for pursuit of a more comprehensive characterization of human genome function.

  7. Isolation of Sporothrix schenckii GDA1 and functional characterization of the encoded guanosine diphosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Esparza, Adolfo; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Hernández-Cervantes, Arturo; Del Carmen Cano-Canchola, Ma; Flores-Carreón, Arturo

    2013-07-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is a fungal pathogen of humans and the etiological agent of sporotrichosis. In fungi, proper protein glycosylation is usually required for normal composition of cell wall and virulence. Upon addition of precursor oligosaccharides to nascent proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, glycans are further modified by Golgi-glycosyl transferases. In order to add sugar residues to precursor glycans, nucleotide diphosphate sugars are imported from the cytosol to the Golgi lumen, the sugar is transferred to glycans, and the resulting nucleoside diphosphate is dephosphorylated by the nucleoside diphosphatase Gda1 before returning to cytosol. Here, we isolated the open reading frame SsGDA1 from a S. schenckii genomic DNA library. In order to confirm the function of SsGda1, we performed complementation assays in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gda1∆ null mutant. Our results indicated that SsGDA1 restored the nucleotide diphosphatase activity to wild-type levels and therefore is a functional ortholog of S. cerevisiae GDA1.

  8. Cloning, characterization and functional expression of an endoglucanase-encoding gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-05-26

    An endoglucanase-encoding clone (egl2) was isolated from the phytopathogenic soilborne deuteromycete fungus Macrophomina phaseolina (Mp). Clones were obtained from a cDNA library by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The egl2 clone hybridized to a 1.3-kb mRNA. Expression is induced by carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and repressed by glucose. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence revealed strong similarity to the egl3 from Trichoderma reesei (Tr) (72% for identical residues and 81% with conservative substitution over a span of 324 aa). The Mp egl2 lacks the cellulose-binding domain and linker region found in the Tr egl3. Different codon usage between the two fungi resulted in a much shorter span of nucleotide homology. The Egl2 protein cleaves cellodextrins with continguous beta, 1-4 linkages of four and larger, and shows activity against CMC and birchwood xylan.

  9. Tau and β-Amyloid Are Associated with Medial Temporal Lobe Structure, Function, and Memory Encoding in Normal Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Shawn M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lockhart, Samuel N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Baker, Suzanne L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging; Jagust, William J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging

    2017-03-22

    Normal aging is associated with a decline in episodic memory and also with aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau proteins and atrophy of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures crucial to memory formation. Although some evidence suggests that Aβ is associated with aberrant neural activity, the relationships among these two aggregated proteins, neural function, and brain structure are poorly understood. Using in vivo human Aβ and tau imaging, we demonstrate that increased Aβ and tau are both associated with aberrant fMRI activity in the MTL during memory encoding in cognitively normal older adults. This pathological neural activity was in turn associated with worse memory performance and atrophy within the MTL. A mediation analysis revealed that the relationship with regional atrophy was explained by MTL tau. These findings broaden the concept of cognitive aging to include evidence of Alzheimer’s disease-related protein aggregation as an underlying mechanism of age-related memory impairment.

  10. Assessing T lymphocyte function and differentiation by genetically encoded reporter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Mirjam E; Dijkgraaf, Feline E; Schumacher, Ton N; Rohr, Jan C

    2015-07-01

    Upon infection, antigen-specific T lymphocytes become activated, proliferate, differentiate, and acquire various effector functions. Much of our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes derives from studies leveraging gene deletion, RNAi, and overexpression approaches. However, these perturbations do not inform on the regulation of gene activity under physiological conditions. Genetic reporter systems that couple biological events to detectable output signals are capable of providing this information. Here, we review the reporter approaches being currently used to investigate various aspects of T cell behavior, and discuss advantages and disadvantages inherent to different designs. We outline emerging applications based on recent advances in other fields, and highlight the potential of synthetic biology and genome engineering to address open questions in the field.

  11. [A novel Salmonella Typhimurium plasmid, pAnkS: an example for plasmid evolution in antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fikret; Karasartova, Djursun; Gerçeker, Devran; Aysev, A Derya; Erdem, Birsel

    2008-07-01

    In this study, a plasmid, carrying ampicillin resistance (ampR) gene, isolated from a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium presenting ACSSuT (ampicilin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulphonamide, tetracycline) resistance phenotype, was defined. The length of complete sequence of this plasmid was 8271 base pairs (bp), and it was named as pAnkS owing to its isolation place (plasmid-Ankara- Salmonella). The plasmid was analyzed for potential reading frames and structural features indicative of transposons and transposon relics. The Xmnl enzyme restriction fragments of pAnkS were cloned into E. coli plasmid vectors (pBSK), sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST programs. Plasmid pAnkS has contained a previously defined enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) plasmid p4821 as a core region and also contained a complete Tn3-like transposon of 4950 bp consisting of the left terminal repeat, Tn3-related tnpR and tnpA genes for transposition functions, ampicillin resistance gene bla(TEM), and the right terminal repeats, pAnkS showed strong homology with another Salmonella plasmid, pNTP16, for sequences that belong to p4821 and partial Tn3 segments. It was found that pNTP16 also carries kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) in addition to ampR gene. Plasmid pAnkS is one of the few completely sequenced plasmids from Salmonella Typhimurium and is in the middle of the pathway of evolution of plasmid from p4821 to pNTP16. The identification of pAnkS might help better understanding of plasmid evolution.

  12. Cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment encoding N37 apoptotic peptide derived from p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective It was reported that p53 apoptotic peptide (N37) could inhibit p73 gene through being bound with iASPP,which could induce tumor cell apoptosis. To further explore the function of N37,we constructed the cloning plasmid of DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apoptotic peptide by using DNA synthesis and molecular biology methods. Methods According to human p53 sequence from the GenBank database,the primer of p53(N37) gene was designed using Primer V7.0 software. The DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apopto...

  13. Characterization and comparative overview of complete sequences of the first plasmids of Pandoraea across clinical and non-clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delicia Yong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, information on plasmid analysis in Pandoraea spp. is scarce. To address the gap of knowledge on this, the complete sequences of eight plasmids from Pandoraea spp. namely Pandoraea faecigallinarum DSM 23572 (pPF72-1, pPF72-2, Pandoraea oxalativorans DSM 23570 (pPO70-1, pPO70-2, pPO70-3, pPO70-4, Pandoraea vervacti NS15 (pPV15 and Pandoraea apista DSM 16535 (pPA35 were studied for the first time in this study. The information on plasmid sequences in Pandoraea spp. is useful because these plasmid sequences did not match to any known plasmid sequence deposited in public databases. Replication genes were not identified in some plasmids, a situation that has led to the possibility of host interaction involvement. Some plasmids were also void of par genes and intriguingly, repA gene was also not discovered in these plasmids. This further leads to the hypothesis of host-plasmid interaction. Plasmid stabilization/stability protein-encoding genes were observed in some plasmids but were not established for participating in plasmid segregation. Toxin-antitoxin systems MazEF, VapBC, RelBE, YgiT-MqsR, HigBA and ParDE were identified across the plasmids and their presence would improve plasmid maintenance. Conjugation genes were identified portraying the conjugation ability amongst Pandoraea plasmids. Additionally, we found a shared region amongst some of the plasmids that consists of conjugation genes. The identification of genes involved in replication, segregation, toxin-antitoxin systems and conjugation, would aid the design of drugs to prevent the survival or transmission of plasmids carrying pathogenic properties. Additionally, genes conferring virulence and antibiotic resistance were identified among the plasmids. The observed features in the plasmids shed light on the Pandoraea spp. as opportunistic pathogens.

  14. Isolation and functional analysis of two Cistus creticus cDNAs encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irene; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-05-01

    Cistus creticus ssp. creticus is an indigenous shrub of the Mediterranean area. The glandular trichomes covering its leaf surfaces secrete a resin called "ladanum", which among others contains a number of specific labdane-type diterpenes that exhibit antibacterial and antifungal action as well as in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and cytostatic activity against human cancer cell lines. In view of the properties and possible future exploitation of these metabolites, it was deemed necessary to study the geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase enzyme (GGDPS, EC 2.5.1.30), a short chain prenyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of the precursor molecule of all diterpenes. In this work, we present the cloning, functional characterisation and expression profile at the gene and protein levels of two differentially expressed C. creticus full-length cDNAs, CcGGDPS1 and CcGGDPS2. Heterologous yeast cell expression system showed that these cDNAs exhibited GGDPS enzyme activity. Gene and protein expression analyses suggest that this enzyme is developmentally and tissue-regulated showing maximum expression in trichomes and smallest leaves (0.5-1.0cm). This work is the first attempt to study the terpenoid biosynthesis at the molecular level in C. creticus ssp. creticus.

  15. Dynamics of a Class 1 Integron Located on Plasmid or Chromosome in Two Aeromonas spp. Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Valdespino, Abigail; Lazarini-Martínez, Alfredo; Rivera-González, Alejandro X.; García-Hernández, Normand; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo

    2016-01-01

    Integrons are non-mobile bacterial genetic elements that carry different cassettes conferring antibiotic resistance. Cassettes can excise or integrate by action of an integron-encoded integrase, enabling bacteria to face environmental challenges. In this work, the functionality and dynamics of two integrons carrying the same cassette arrangement (dfrA12–orfF–aadA2), but located on plasmid or chromosome in two different strains were studied. In order to demonstrate the functionality of the Class 1 integrase, circular cassette integration intermediaries were PCR amplified by PCR using extrachromosomal DNA extracted from bacteria grown in the presence or absence of cassette-encoded antibiotics. Circular aadA2 and dfrA12–orfF–aadA2 cassettes were detected in cultures grown either in the presence or absence of antibiotics in both strains. No dfrA12–orfF circular intermediates could be detected under any culture conditions. These results show that both integrons are functional. However, these elements show different dynamics and functionality since the presence of streptomycin led to detectable gene rearrangements in the variable region only in the strain with the plasmid-born integron. In addition, complete integration products were demonstrated using a receptor molecule carrying an empty integron. In this case, integration products were observed in both strains even in the absence of antibiotics, but they were more evident in the strain with the plasmid-located integron when streptomycin was present in the culture medium. This suggests that integrons in the two strains respond differently to streptomycin even though DNA sequences upstream the intI1 gene, including the lexA boxes of both integrons are identical. PMID:27733851

  16. Dynamics of a Class 1 integron located on plasmid or chromosome in two Aeromonas spp. strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Perez-Valdespino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrons are non-mobile bacterial genetic elements that carry different cassettes conferring antibiotic resistance. Cassettes can excise or integrate by action of an integron-encoded integrase, enabling bacteria to face environmental challenges. In this work the functionality and dynamics of two integrons carrying the same cassette arrangement (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, but located on plasmid or chromosome in two different strains were studied. In order to demonstrate the functionality of the Class 1 integrase, circular cassette integration intermediaries were PCR amplified by PCR using extrachromosomal DNA extracted from bacteria grown in the presence or absence of cassette-encoded antibiotics. Circular aadA2 and dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 cassettes were detected in cultures grown either in the presence or absence of antibiotics in both strains. No dfrA12-orfF circular intermediates could be detected under any culture conditions. These results show that both integrons are functional. However, these elements show different dynamics and functionality since the presence of streptomycin led to detectable gene rearrangements in the variable region only in the strain with the plasmid-born integron. In addition, complete integration products were demonstrated using a receptor molecule carrying an empty integron. In this case integration products were observed in both strains even in the absence of antibiotics, but they were more evident in the strain with the plasmid-located integron when streptomycin was present in the culture medium. This suggests that integrons in the two strains respond differently to streptomycin even though DNA sequences upstream the intI1 gene, including the lexA boxes of both integrons are identical.

  17. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Ingmer, Hanne; Vandenberg, Olivier; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  18. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laid Douidah

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  19. Genetic Characterization of ExPEC-Like Virulence Plasmids among a Subset of NMEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon A Nicholson

    Full Text Available Neonatal Meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC is one of the most common causes of neonatal bacterial meningitis in the US and elsewhere resulting in mortality or neurologic deficits in survivors. Large plasmids have been shown experimentally to increase the virulence of NMEC in the rat model of neonatal meningitis. Here, 9 ExPEC-like plasmids were isolated from NMEC and sequenced to identify the core and accessory plasmid genes of ExPEC-like virulence plasmids in NMEC and create an expanded plasmid phylogeny. Results showed sequenced virulence plasmids carry a strongly conserved core of genes with predicted functions in five distinct categories including: virulence, metabolism, plasmid stability, mobile elements, and unknown genes. The major functions of virulence-associated and plasmid core genes serve to increase in vivo fitness by adding multiple iron uptake systems to the genetic repertoire to facilitate NMEC's survival in the host's low iron environment, and systems to enhance bacterial resistance to host innate immunity. Phylogenetic analysis based on these core plasmid genes showed that at least two lineages of ExPEC-like plasmids could be discerned. Further, virulence plasmids from Avian Pathogenic E. coli and NMEC plasmids could not be differentiated based solely on the genes of the core plasmid genome.

  20. Prefrontal cortex activation during story encoding/retrieval: a multi-channel functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Moro, Sara; Cutini, Simone; Ursini, Maria Laura; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Encoding, storage and retrieval constitute three fundamental stages in information processing and memory. They allow for the creation of new memory traces, the maintenance and the consolidation of these traces over time, and the access and recover of the stored information from short or long-term memory. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that measures concentration changes of oxygenated-hemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HHb) in cortical microcirculation blood vessels by means of the characteristic absorption spectra of hemoglobin in the near-infrared range. In the present study, we monitored, using a 16-channel fNIRS system, the hemodynamic response during the encoding and retrieval processes (EP and RP, respectively) over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of 13 healthy subjects (27.2 ± 2.6 years) while were performing the "Logical Memory Test" (LMT) of the Wechsler Memory Scale. A LMT-related PFC activation was expected; specifically, it was hypothesized a neural dissociation between EP and RP. The results showed a heterogeneous O2Hb/HHb response over the mapped area during the EP and the RP, with a O2Hb progressive and prominent increment in ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC) since the beginning of the EP. During the RP a broader activation, including the VLPFC, the dorsolateral PFC and the frontopolar cortex, was observed. This could be explained by the different contributions of the PFC regions in the EP and the RP. Considering the fNIRS applicability for the hemodynamic monitoring during the LMT performance, this study has demonstrated that fNIRS could be utilized as a valuable clinical diagnostic tool, and that it has the potential to be adopted in patients with cognitive disorders or slight working memory deficits.

  1. PREFRONTAL CORTEX ACTIVATION DURING STORY ENCODING/RETRIEVAL: A MULTI-CHANNEL FUNCTIONAL NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eBasso Moro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Encoding, storage and retrieval constitute three fundamental stages in information processing and memory. They allow for the creation of new memory traces, the maintenance and the consolidation of these traces over time, and the access and recover of the stored information from short or long-term memory. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that measures concentration changes of oxygenated-hemoglobin (O2Hb and deoxygenated-hemoglobin (HHb in cortical microcirculation blood vessels by means of the characteristic absorption spectra of hemoglobin in the near-infrared range. In the present study, we monitored, using a sixteen-channel fNIRS system, the hemodynamic response during the encoding and retrieval processes (EP and RP, respectively over the prefrontal cortex (PFC of thirteen healthy subjects (27.2±2.6 y. while were performing the Logical Memory Test (LMT of the Wechsler Memory Scale. A LMT-related PFC activation was expected; specifically, it was hypothesized a neural dissociation between EP and RP. The results showed a heterogeneous O2Hb/HHb response over the mapped area during the EP and the RP, with a O2Hb progressive and prominent increment in ventrolateral PFC since the beginning of the EP. During the RP a broader activation, including the ventrolateral PFC, the dorsolateral PFC and the frontopolar cortex, was observed. This could be explained by the different contributions of the PFC regions in the EP and the RP. Considering the fNIRS applicability for the hemodynamic monitoring during the LMT performance, this study has demonstrated that fNIRS could be utilized as a valuable clinical diagnostic tool, and that it has the potential to be adopted in patients with cognitive disorders or slight working memory deficits.

  2. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; Essen-Zandbergen, Van Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spect

  3. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spectrum

  4. Genetic structure and biological properties of the first ancient multiresistance plasmid pKLH80 isolated from a permafrost bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mayya; Kurakov, Anton; Shcherbatova, Natalya; Mindlin, Sofia

    2014-10-01

    A novel multidrug-resistance plasmid, pKLH80, previously isolated from Psychrobacter maritimus MR29-12 found in ancient permafrost, was completely sequenced and analysed. In our previous studies, we focused on the pKLH80 plasmid region containing streptomycin and tetracycline resistance genes, and their mobilization with an upstream-located ISPpy1 insertion sequence (IS) element. Here, we present the complete sequence of pKLH80 and analysis of its backbone genetic structure, including previously unknown features of the plasmid's accessory region, notably a novel variant of the β-lactamase gene blaRTG-6. Plasmid pKLH80 was found to be a circular 14 835 bp molecule that has an overall G+C content of 40.3 mol% and encodes 20 putative ORFs. There are two distinctive functional modules within the plasmid backbone sequence: (i) the replication module consisting of repB and the oriV region; and (ii) the mobilization module consisting of mobA, mobC and oriT. All of the aforementioned genes share sequence identities with corresponding genes of different species of Psychrobacter. The plasmid accessory region contains antibiotic resistance genes and IS elements (ISPsma1 of the IS982 family, and ISPpy1 and ISAba14 of the IS3 family) found in environmental and clinical bacterial strains of different taxa. We revealed that the sequences flanking blaRTG-6 and closely related genes from clinical bacteria are nearly identical. This fact suggests that blaRTG-6 from the environmental strain of Psychrobacter is a progenitor of blaRTG genes of clinical bacteria. We also showed that pKLH80 can replicate in different strains of Acinetobacter and Psychrobacter genera. The roles of IS elements in the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes are examined and discussed.

  5. Persistence Mechanisms of Conjugative Plasmids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Hansen, Lars H.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Are plasmids selfish parasitic DNA molecules or an integrated part of the bacterial genome? This chapter reviews the current understanding of the persistence mechanisms of conjugative plasmids harbored by bacterial cells and populations. The diversity and intricacy of mechanisms affecting...... the successful propagation and long-term continued existence of these extra-chromosomal elements is extensive. Apart from the accessory genetic elements that may provide plasmid-harboring cells a selective advantage, special focus is placed on the mechanisms conjugative plasmids employ to ensure their stable...... maintenance in the host cell. These importantly include the ability to self-mobilize in a process termed conjugative transfer, which may occur across species barriers. Other plasmid stabilizing mechanisms include the multimer resolution system, active partitioning, and post-segregational-killing of plasmid...

  6. Immunization of Mice with Two Modified Anti- caries Plasmids Encoding Different Styles of S. sobrinus GTF Catalytic Region.%两种GTF氨基催化区改良防龋质粒免疫小鼠的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙静华; 樊明文

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential of two different styles of S. sobrinus GTF catalytic region in an anti-caries DNA vaccine by evaluating the levels of the specific anti-PAc, anti-GLU, and anti-CAT antibodies in immunized mice. Methods: Two modified anti-caries DNA plasmids pGJGAC/VAX and pGJGA-5C/VAX by cloning different styles of the catalytic region of GTFs into the previous plasmid pGJA-P/VAX. The CHO cells were transfected and expression of fusion protein were detected using cell immunohistochemistry. Mice were immunized with pGJGAC/VAX, pGJGA-5C/VAX and pVAX1 via the intranasal route. Blood and saliva samples were collected every 2 weeks interval for assay of antibodies by ELISA. Results: The expressed protein of the two new recombinant plasmids could response to specific anti-PAc, anti-GLU and anti-CAT antibodies respectively. As for the antibody reactions, increase inthe serum IgG and saliva IgA anti-PAc, anti-GLU and anti-CAT antibodies responses were seen in the pGJGAC/VAX group and the pGJGA- 5C/VAX group after the second immunization (P<0. 05). After 10, 12 and 14 weeks, the anti-CAT lgG antibodies of pGJGAC/VAX group were higher than that of pGJGA-5C/VAX group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The two modified anti-caries plasmids encoding different styles of GTF CAT antigens could induce effective mucosal and systematic humoral responses. These two modified plasmids had different predominance.%目的:通过比较编码表兄链球菌葡糖基转移酶氨基催化区CAT不同形式基因序列的两种改良防龋质粒免疫BALB/c小鼠后激发的特异性抗体水平差异,初步评价不同形式CAT在DNA防龋疫苗中的应用潜力.方法:利用分子克隆技术构建两种改良防龋质粒,在靶向防龋DNA疫苗pGJA-P/VAX中插入表兄链球菌OMZ176GTF-I CAT全基因序列构建pGJGAC/VAX;将基因公司合成的共计165bp的串联重复5次的GTF-I氨基催化区核心保守序列克隆到pGJA-P/VAX中构建pGJGA-5C/VAX.转染CHO细胞系,

  7. Mobilization of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pTX14-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrup, L; Bendixen, H H; Jensen, G B

    1995-05-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) plasmid pTX14-3 has been reported to contain a gene, mob14-3, with considerable homology to genes encoding mobilization proteins from other gram-positive bacteria. We have used the aggregation-mediated conjugation system recently discovered in Bti to compare the mobilization kinetics of different derivatives of plasmid pTX14-3. Plasmid pTX14-3 has been found to replicate by the rolling-circle mechanism and to contain a locus suppressing the formation of high-molecular-weight DNA. We found that deleting a DNA fragment containing this locus increased the transfer frequency about twofold. The mobilization frequency of the plasmid containing the intact mob14-3 gene did not indicate a mobilization-enhancing activity of the encoded polypeptide. However, the presence of the mob14-3 gene seemed to increase the stability of the plasmid in exponential growth.

  8. Duplication and Loss of Function of Genes Encoding RNA Polymerase III Subunit C4 Causes Hybrid Incompatibility in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive barriers are commonly observed in both animals and plants, in which they maintain species integrity and contribute to speciation. This report shows that a combination of loss-of-function alleles at two duplicated loci, DUPLICATED GAMETOPHYTIC STERILITY 1 (DGS1 on chromosome 4 and DGS2 on chromosome 7, causes pollen sterility in hybrid progeny derived from an interspecific cross between cultivated rice, Oryza sativa, and an Asian annual wild rice, O. nivara. Male gametes carrying the DGS1 allele from O. nivara (DGS1-nivaras and the DGS2 allele from O. sativa (DGS2-T65s were sterile, but female gametes carrying the same genotype were fertile. We isolated the causal gene, which encodes a protein homologous to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP III subunit C4 (RPC4. RPC4 facilitates the transcription of 5S rRNAs and tRNAs. The loss-of-function alleles at DGS1-nivaras and DGS2-T65s were caused by weak or nonexpression of RPC4 and an absence of RPC4, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that gene duplication of RPC4 at DGS1 and DGS2 was a recent event that occurred after divergence of the ancestral population of Oryza from other Poaceae or during diversification of AA-genome species.

  9. Stress tolerances of nullmutants of function-unknown genes encoding menadione stress-responsive proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Éva; Bálint, Mihály; Miskei, Márton; Orosz, Erzsébet; Szabó, Zsuzsa; Pócsi, István

    2016-07-01

    A group of menadione stress-responsive function-unkown genes of Aspergillus nidulans (Locus IDs ANID_03987.1, ANID_06058.1, ANID_10219.1, and ANID_10260.1) was deleted and phenotypically characterized. Importantly, comparative and phylogenetic analyses of the tested A. nidulans genes and their orthologs shed light only on the presence of a TANGO2 domain with NRDE protein motif in the translated ANID_06058.1 gene but did not reveal any recognizable protein-encoding domains in other protein sequences. The gene deletion strains were subjected to oxidative, osmotic, and metal ion stress and, surprisingly, only the ΔANID_10219.1 mutant showed an increased sensitivity to 0.12 mmol l(-1) menadione sodium bisulfite. The gene deletions affected the stress sensitivities (tolerances) irregularly, for example, some strains grew more slowly when exposed to various oxidants and/or osmotic stress generating agents, meanwhile the ΔANID_10260.1 mutant possessed a wild-type tolerance to all stressors tested. Our results are in line with earlier studies demonstrating that the deletions of stress-responsive genes do not confer necessarily any stress-sensitivity phenotypes, which can be attributed to compensatory mechanisms based on other elements of the stress response system with overlapping functions.

  10. Trajectory recognition as the basis for object individuation: A functional model of object file instantiation and object token encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eFields

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The perception of persisting visual objects is mediated by transient intermediate representations, object files, that are instantiated in response to some, but not all, visual trajectories. The standard object file concept does not, however, provide a mechanism sufficient to account for all experimental data on visual object persistence, object tracking, and the ability to perceive spatially-disconnected stimuli as continuously-existing objects. Based on relevant anatomical, functional, and developmental data, a functional model is constructed that bases visual object individuation on the recognition of temporal sequences of apparent center-of-mass positions that are specifically identified as trajectories by dedicated trajectory recognition networks downstream of the medial-temporal motion detection area. This model is shown to account for a wide range of data, and to generate a variety of testable predictions. Individual differences in the recognition, abstraction and encoding of trajectory information are expected to generate distinct object persistence judgments and object recognition abilities. Dominance of trajectory information over feature information in stored object tokens during early infancy, in particular, is expected to disrupt the ability to re-identify human and other individuals across perceptual episodes, and lead to developmental outcomes with characteristics of autism spectrum disorders.

  11. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development.

  12. Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naïve controls: a combined behavioral and functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, S; Jahn, G; Sakreida, K; Domin, M; Lotze, M

    2013-01-01

    Long-term intensive sensorimotor training alters functional representation of the motor and sensory system and might even result in structural changes. However, there is not much knowledge about how previous training impacts learning transfer and functional representation. We tested 14 amateur pianists and 15 musically naïve participants in a short-term finger sequence training procedure, differing considerably from piano playing and measured associated functional representation with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The conditions consisted of encoding a finger sequence indicated by hand symbols ("sequence encoding") and subsequently replaying the sequence from memory, both with and without auditory feedback ("sequence retrieval"). Piano players activated motor areas and the mirror neuron system more strongly than musically naïve participants during encoding. When retrieving the sequence, musically naïve participants showed higher activation in similar brain areas. Thus, retrieval activations of naïve participants were comparable to encoding activations of piano players, who during retrieval performed the sequences more accurately despite lower motor activations. Interestingly, both groups showed primary auditory activation even during sequence retrieval without auditory feedback, supporting previous reports about coactivation of the auditory cortex after learned association with motor performance. When playing with auditory feedback, only pianists lateralized to the left auditory cortex. During encoding activation in left primary somatosensory cortex in the height of the finger representations had a predictive value for increased motor performance later on (error rates). Contrarily, decreased performance was associated with increased visual cortex activation during encoding. Our study extends previous reports about training transfer of motor knowledge resulting in superior training effects in musicians. Performance increase went along with activity in

  13. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna;

    2003-01-01

    ) reductases reported previously. Downstream of the butA gene of L. pseudomesenteroides, but coding in the opposite orientation, a putative DNA recombinase was identified. A two-step PCR approach was used to construct FPR02, a butA mutant of the wild-type strain, CHCC2114. FPR02 had significantly reduced...

  14. mcr-1.2, a New mcr Variant Carried on a Transferable Plasmid from a Colistin-Resistant KPC Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain of Sequence Type 512.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Arena, Fabio; Tascini, Carlo; Cannatelli, Antonio; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Fortunato, Simona; Giani, Tommaso; Menichetti, Francesco; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-09-01

    A novel mcr variant, named mcr-1.2, encoding a Gln3-to-Leu functional variant of MCR-1, was detected in a KPC-3-producing ST512 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate collected in Italy from a surveillance rectal swab from a leukemic child. The mcr-1.2 gene was carried on a transferable IncX4 plasmid whose structure was very similar to that of mcr-1-bearing plasmids previously found in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains from geographically distant sites (Estonia, China, and South Africa).

  15. DNA-Encoded Flagellin Activates Toll-Like Receptor 5 (TLR5, Nod-like Receptor Family CARD Domain-Containing Protein 4 (NRLC4, and Acts as an Epidermal, Systemic, and Mucosal-Adjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E. Applequist

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eliciting effective immune responses using non-living/replicating DNA vaccines is a significant challenge. We have previously shown that ballistic dermal plasmid DNA-encoded flagellin (FliC promotes humoral as well as cellular immunity to co-delivered antigens. Here, we observe that a plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly produces flagellin capable of activating two innate immune receptors known to detect flagellin; Toll-like Receptor 5 (TLR5 and Nod-like Receptor family CARD domain-containing protein 4 (NRLC4. To test the ability of pFliC(-gly to act as an adjuvant we immunized mice with plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly and plasmid encoding a model antigen (ovalbumin by three different immunization routes representative of dermal, systemic, and mucosal tissues. By all three routes we observed increases in antigen-specific antibodies in serum as well as MHC Class I-dependent cellular immune responses when pFliC(-gly adjuvant was added. Additionally, we were able to induce mucosal antibody responses and Class II-dependent cellular immune responses after mucosal vaccination with pFliC(-gly. Humoral immune responses elicited by heterologus prime-boost immunization with a plasmid encoding HIV-1 from gp160 followed by protein boosting could be enhanced by use of pFliC(-gly. We also observed enhancement of cross-clade reactive IgA as well as a broadening of B cell epitope reactivity. These observations indicate that plasmid-encoded secreted flagellin can activate multiple innate immune responses and function as an adjuvant to non-living/replicating DNA immunizations. Moreover, the capacity to elicit mucosal immune responses, in addition to dermal and systemic properties, demonstrates the potential of flagellin to be used with vaccines designed to be delivered by various routes.

  16. A Transmissible Plasmid-Borne Pathogenicity Island Confers Piscibactin Biosynthesis in the Fish Pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Fuentes-Monteverde, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Jaime; Jiménez, Carlos; Lemos, Manuel L.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    The fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida produces the siderophore piscibactin. A gene cluster that resembles the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI) encodes piscibactin biosynthesis. Here, we report that this HPI-like cluster is part of a hitherto-uncharacterized 68-kb plasmid dubbed pPHDP70. This plasmid lacks homologs of genes that mediate conjugation, but we found that it could be transferred at low frequencies from P. damselae subsp. piscicida to a mollusk pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain and to other Gram-negative bacteria, likely dependent on the conjugative functions of the coresident plasmid pPHDP60. Following its conjugative transfer, pPHDP70 restored the capacity of a vibrioferrin mutant of V. alginolyticus to grow under low-iron conditions, and piscibactin became detectable in its supernatant. Thus, pPHDP70 appears to harbor all the genes required for piscibactin biosynthesis and transport. P. damselae subsp. piscicida strains cured of pPHDP70 no longer produced piscibactin, had impaired growth under iron-limited conditions, and exhibited markedly decreased virulence in fish. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of pPHDP70, with its capacity for piscibactin-mediated iron acquisition, in the virulence of P. damselae subsp. piscicida. Horizontal transmission of this plasmid-borne piscibactin synthesis gene cluster in the marine environment may facilitate the emergence of new pathogens. PMID:26092457

  17. Mutation of the cytosolic ribosomal protein-encoding RPS10B gene affects shoot meristematic function in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirnberg Petra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytosolic ribosomal proteins are encoded by small gene families. Mutants affecting these genes are often viable, but show growth and developmental defects, suggesting incomplete functional redundancy within the families. Dormancy to growth transitions, such as the activation of axillary buds in the shoot, are characterised by co-ordinated upregulation of ribosomal protein genes. Results A recessive mutation in RPS10B, one of three Arabidopsis genes encoding the eukaryote-specific cytoplasmic ribosomal protein S10e, was found to suppress the excessive shoot branching mutant max2-1. rps10b-1 mildly affects the formation and separation of shoot lateral organs, including the shoot axillary meristems. Axillary meristem defects are enhanced when rps10b-1 is combined with mutations in REVOLUTA, AUXIN-RESISTANT1, PINOID or another suppressor of max2-1, FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3. In some of these double mutants, the maintenance of the primary shoot meristem is also affected. In contrast, mutation of ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAMME1 suppresses the rps10b-1axillary shoot defect. Defects in both axillary shoot formation and organ separation were enhanced by combining rps10b-1 with cuc3, a mutation affecting one of three Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor genes with partially redundant roles in these processes. To assess the effect of rps10b-1 on bud activation independently from bud formation, axillary bud outgrowth on excised cauline nodes was analysed. The outgrowth rate of untreated buds was reduced only slightly by rps10b-1 in both wild-type and max2-1 backgrounds. However, rps10b-1 strongly suppressed the auxin resistant outgrowth of max2-1 buds. A developmental phenotype of rps10b-1, reduced stamen number, was complemented by the cDNA of another family member, RPS10C, under the RPS10B promoter. Conclusions RPS10B promotes shoot branching mainly by promoting axillary shoot development. It contributes to organ boundary

  18. Bacterial clade with the ribosomal RNA operon on a small plasmid rather than the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Mizue; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Okubo, Takashi; Sugawara, Masayuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki

    2015-11-17

    rRNA is essential for life because of its functional importance in protein synthesis. The rRNA (rrn) operon encoding 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNAs is located on the "main" chromosome in all bacteria documented to date and is frequently used as a marker of chromosomes. Here, our genome analysis of a plant-associated alphaproteobacterium, Aureimonas sp. AU20, indicates that this strain has its sole rrn operon on a small (9.4 kb), high-copy-number replicon. We designated this unusual replicon carrying the rrn operon on the background of an rrn-lacking chromosome (RLC) as the rrn-plasmid. Four of 12 strains close to AU20 also had this RLC/rrn-plasmid organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that those strains having the RLC/rrn-plasmid organization represented one clade within the genus Aureimonas. Our finding introduces a previously unaddressed viewpoint into studies of genetics, genomics, and evolution in microbiology and biology in general.

  19. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  20. Characterization of the opposing roles of H-NS and TraJ in transcriptional regulation of the F-plasmid tra operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, William R; Frost, Laura S

    2006-01-01

    The transfer (tra) operon of the conjugative F plasmid of Escherichia coli is a polycistronic 33-kb operon which encodes most of the proteins necessary for F-plasmid transfer. Here, we report that transcription from PY, the tra operon promoter, is repressed by the host nucleoid-associated protein, H-NS. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that H-NS binds preferentially to the tra promoter region, while Northern blot and transcriptional fusion analyses indicate that transcription of traY, the first gene in the tra operon, is derepressed in an hns mutant throughout growth. The plasmid-encoded regulatory protein TraJ is essential for transcription of the tra operon in wild-type Escherichia coli; however, TraJ is not necessary for plasmid transfer or traY operon transcription in an hns mutant. This indicates that H-NS represses transcription from PY directly and not indirectly via its effects on TraJ levels. These results suggest that TraJ functions to disrupt H-NS silencing at PY, allowing transcription of the tra operon.

  1. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cigliola

    Full Text Available Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36, which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D. GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123 associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  2. Competing ParA structures space bacterial plasmids equally over the nucleoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ietswaart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Low copy number plasmids in bacteria require segregation for stable inheritance through cell division. This is often achieved by a parABC locus, comprising an ATPase ParA, DNA-binding protein ParB and a parC region, encoding ParB-binding sites. These minimal components space plasmids equally over the nucleoid, yet the underlying mechanism is not understood. Here we investigate a model where ParA-ATP can dynamically associate to the nucleoid and is hydrolyzed by plasmid-associated ParB, thereby creating nucleoid-bound, self-organizing ParA concentration gradients. We show mathematically that differences between competing ParA concentrations on either side of a plasmid can specify regular plasmid positioning. Such positioning can be achieved regardless of the exact mechanism of plasmid movement, including plasmid diffusion with ParA-mediated immobilization or directed plasmid motion induced by ParB/parC-stimulated ParA structure disassembly. However, we find experimentally that parABC from Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 increases plasmid mobility, inconsistent with diffusion/immobilization. Instead our observations favor directed plasmid motion. Our model predicts less oscillatory ParA dynamics than previously believed, a prediction we verify experimentally. We also show that ParA localization and plasmid positioning depend on the underlying nucleoid morphology, indicating that the chromosomal architecture constrains ParA structure formation. Our directed motion model unifies previously contradictory models for plasmid segregation and provides a robust mechanistic basis for self-organized plasmid spacing that may be widely applicable.

  3. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Zerbato

    Full Text Available Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  4. The brown algae Pl.LSU/2 group II intron-encoded protein has functional reverse transcriptase and maturase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbato, Madeleine; Holic, Nathalie; Moniot-Frin, Sophie; Ingrao, Dina; Galy, Anne; Perea, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing mobile elements found in prokaryotes and eukaryotic organelles. These introns propagate by homing into precise genomic locations, following assembly of a ribonucleoprotein complex containing the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the spliced intron RNA. Engineered group II introns are now commonly used tools for targeted genomic modifications in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. We speculate that the catalytic activation of currently known group II introns is limited in eukaryotic cells. The brown algae Pylaiella littoralis Pl.LSU/2 group II intron is uniquely capable of in vitro ribozyme activity at physiological level of magnesium but this intron remains poorly characterized. We purified and characterized recombinant Pl.LSU/2 IEP. Unlike most IEPs, Pl.LSU/2 IEP displayed a reverse transcriptase activity without intronic RNA. The Pl.LSU/2 intron could be engineered to splice accurately in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and splicing efficiency was increased by the maturase activity of the IEP. However, spliced transcripts were not expressed. Furthermore, intron splicing was not detected in human cells. While further tool development is needed, these data provide the first functional characterization of the PI.LSU/2 IEP and the first evidence that the Pl.LSU/2 group II intron splicing occurs in vivo in eukaryotes in an IEP-dependent manner.

  5. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mart Krupovic

    Full Text Available Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1, with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  6. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  7. Conservation of plasmids among Escherichia coli K1 isolates of diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A A; Morelli, G; Heuzenroeder, M; Kamke, M; Achtman, M

    1984-12-01

    Escherichia coli K1 isolates of various O types were previously assigned to different clonal groups. Members of the two clones defined by membrane pattern 9 (MP9) and serotypes O18:K1 and O1:K1 had been found to be very similar to each other. The plasmid contents of these bacteria confirmed this conclusion. Both groups carried a self-transmissible plasmid of the FI incompatibility group that coded for colicin production and a major outer membrane protein called the plasmid-coded protein (PCP). The size of this plasmid varied from 76 to 96 megadaltons, but restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA heteroduplex analysis revealed that these plasmids were highly related. O18:K1 bacteria of MP6 had previously been determined to represent a subclone, related to but different from O18:K1 MP9 bacteria. These MP6 bacteria carried a different, smaller IncFI plasmid which did not code for colicin production or the PCP protein. This smaller plasmid was primarily related to the larger plasmid within the regions of DNA encoding incompatibility, replication, and conjugation. O1:K1 bacteria of MP5 contained other unrelated plasmids in agreement with the previous conclusion that they are unrelated to O1:K1 bacteria of MP9. The bacteria examined had been isolated from two continents over a time span of 38 years, and the results attest to conservative inheritance of plasmids within bacteria of common descent.

  8. Conservation of plasmids among Escherichia coli K1 isolates of diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A A; Morelli, G; Heuzenroeder, M; Kamke, M; Achtman, M

    1984-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 isolates of various O types were previously assigned to different clonal groups. Members of the two clones defined by membrane pattern 9 (MP9) and serotypes O18:K1 and O1:K1 had been found to be very similar to each other. The plasmid contents of these bacteria confirmed this conclusion. Both groups carried a self-transmissible plasmid of the FI incompatibility group that coded for colicin production and a major outer membrane protein called the plasmid-coded protein (PCP). The size of this plasmid varied from 76 to 96 megadaltons, but restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA heteroduplex analysis revealed that these plasmids were highly related. O18:K1 bacteria of MP6 had previously been determined to represent a subclone, related to but different from O18:K1 MP9 bacteria. These MP6 bacteria carried a different, smaller IncFI plasmid which did not code for colicin production or the PCP protein. This smaller plasmid was primarily related to the larger plasmid within the regions of DNA encoding incompatibility, replication, and conjugation. O1:K1 bacteria of MP5 contained other unrelated plasmids in agreement with the previous conclusion that they are unrelated to O1:K1 bacteria of MP9. The bacteria examined had been isolated from two continents over a time span of 38 years, and the results attest to conservative inheritance of plasmids within bacteria of common descent. Images PMID:6094355

  9. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  10. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  11. Coexistence of evolving bacteria stabilized by a shared Black Queen function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J Jeffrey; Papoulis, Spiridon E; Lenski, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    The Black Queen Hypothesis (BQH) was originally proposed to explain the dependence of some marine bacteria on helper organisms for protection from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH). The BQH predicts that selection for the evolutionary loss of leaky functions from individuals can produce commensal or mutualistic interactions. We demonstrated the leakiness of HOOH detoxification by complementing a HOOH-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant with a plasmid-encoded HOOH-detoxifying enzyme, KatG, and then evolving populations founded by this strain in two environments. When HOOH was absent, plasmid-carrying cells were outcompeted by plasmid-free segregants, reflecting the high cost of KatG expression. However, plasmid-carrying and plasmid-free cells coexisted for at least 1200 generations in three replicate populations evolved in the presence of HOOH, although their relative proportions fluctuated as beneficial mutations arose in one type or the other. Evolved plasmid-bearing cells reduced the cost of plasmid carriage even as they increased the rate of HOOH removal relative to the ancestor. Meanwhile, plasmid-free cells remained dependent on HOOH detoxification by the plasmid-bearing cells. These results demonstrate that partitioning of a Black Queen function can enable the stable coexistence of very similar organisms, even in this most restrictive case where the two types are competing for a single resource.

  12. Sequence information encoded in DNA that may influence long-range chromatin structure correlates with human chromosome functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi E Takasuka

    Full Text Available Little is known about the possible function of the bulk of the human genome. We have recently shown that long-range regular oscillation in the motif non-T, A/T, G (VWG existing at ten-nucleotide multiples influences large-scale nucleosome array formation. In this work, we have determined the locations of all 100 kb regions that are predicted to form distinctive chromatin structures throughout each human chromosome (except Y. Using these data, we found that a significantly greater fraction of 300 kb sequences lacked annotated transcripts in genomic DNA regions > or = 300 kb that contained nearly continuous chromatin organizing signals than in control regions. We also found a relationship between the meiotic recombination frequency and the presence of strong VWG chromatin organizing signals. Large (> or = 300 kb genomic DNA regions having low average recombination frequency are enriched in chromatin organizing signals. As additional controls, we show using chromosome 1 that the VWG motif signals are not enriched in randomly selected DNA regions having the mean size of the recombination coldspots, and that non-VWG motif sets do not generate signals that are enriched in recombination coldspots. We also show that tandemly repeated alpha satellite DNA contains strong VWG signals for the formation of distinctive nucleosome arrays, consistent with the low recombination activity of centromeres. Our correlations cannot be explained simply by variations in the GC content. Our findings suggest that a specific set of periodic DNA motifs encoded in genomic DNA, which provide signals for chromatin organization, influence human chromosome function.

  13. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  14. Plasmid recombination in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.

    1982-01-01

    DNA recombination in exponential phase and competent Haemophilus influenzae was measured by an electron microscopic assay that relies on the conversion of plasmid RSF0885 monomers into multimeric forms. Dimer circles were present at a frequency of 2% in plasmid preparations from competent Rd (wild-type) cells; multimers were present at a frequency of 0.2% in preparations from exponential phase cells. Thus, plasmid recombination was stimulated in competent cells. Multimer formation occurred efficiently in cells of the transformation defective mutant rec2, implying that the rec2 gene product is not required for plasmid recombination. However, the absence of multimer plasmids in preparations from competent cells of the transformation defective mutant rec1 suggests that the rec1 gene product is required. Digestion of purified plasmids with restriction endonuclease PvuII, which makes a single cut in the monomer, revealed the presence of recombination intermediates composed of two linear plasmids joined to form two pairs of arms resembling the Greek letter chi. Length measurements of these arms taken from a population of recombination intermediates gave evidence that the plasmids were joined at sites of homology. The distributions of individual DNA strands, at the intersections of the four arms, could be resolved in some recombination intermediates and were of two types. The first type of junction appeared as a single-stranded arm appended to each corner. The second type of junction consisted of a single strand of DNA linking the two linear plasmids at a site of homology. The single-stranded linker was frequently situated at the edge of a short gap on one of the plasmids in the pair. The fine structures of the recombinational joints have been interpreted in terms of previously proposed models of recombination.

  15. Meta-analysis: a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding for activity of the serotonin transporter protein is not associated with the irritable bowel syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, L.A.S. van; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serotonin is associated with symptoms of the irritable bowel syndrome, its action is terminated by the serotonin transporter protein. AIM: To assess the association between a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding for activity of the serotonin transporter protein and the irritable

  16. Rapid identification of genes encoding DNA polymerases by function-based screening of metagenomic libraries derived from glacial ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carola; Herath, Judith; Rockstroh, Stephanie; Daniel, Rolf

    2009-05-01

    Small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries were constructed from glacial ice of the Northern Schneeferner, which is located on the Zugspitzplatt in Germany. Subsequently, these libraries were screened for the presence of DNA polymerase-encoding genes by complementation of an Escherichia coli polA mutant. Nine novel genes encoding complete DNA polymerase I proteins or domains typical of these proteins were recovered.

  17. Rapid Identification of Genes Encoding DNA Polymerases by Function-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries Derived from Glacial Ice▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries were constructed from glacial ice of the Northern Schneeferner, which is located on the Zugspitzplatt in Germany. Subsequently, these libraries were screened for the presence of DNA polymerase-encoding genes by complementation of an Escherichia coli polA mutant. Nine novel genes encoding complete DNA polymerase I proteins or domains typical of these proteins were recovered.

  18. 负载ERRα基因片段慢病毒构建及表达%Construction, expression and preliminary function of lentivirus gene encoding ERRα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海彬; 周驰; 刘锋; 曾展鹏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct a lentiviral vector encoding human estrogen related receptor alpha (hERRa) gene and to study the influence of lenti-ERRa on A549 cell prolifertation. Methods A fragment of the hERRa gene was amplified with PCR and was inserted into the plasmid pWPXLD. The three plasmids (pWPXLD-hERRa, psPAX2, and pMD2G) were cotransfected the virus packaging cell line 293T using the Ca3(PO4)2 method. Then the cell supernatant was harvested and the virus titration was determined after concentration. Also the expression of hERRa in human lung cancer cell line A549 cells infected by the lentivirus was determined with western blot. The effect of ERRa overexpression on the A549 cell growth was detected by Cell Titer Glo kit. Results DNA sequencing demonstrated that the recombinant plasmid pWPXLD-Herr was successfully constructed. The titration of the concentrated lentivirus was 1. 808 TU/Ml. Western blot assay proved positive for the hERRa. Cell-Titer Glo results revealed that overexpression of hERRa in A549 cells up-regulated the cell viability. Conclusion Lentivirus encoding hERRa was successfully constructed and hERRa could express in A549 cells. The overexpression of hERRa in A549 cells up-regulates the cell viability.%目的 构建编码人雌激素相关受体α(hERRα)的慢病毒载体,并测定其滴度,观察hERRα基因在体外的表达情况及其对人肺癌细胞A549增殖的影响.方法 采用PCR扩增hERRα基因片段,插入转移载体pW-PXLD,用磷酸钙法将pWPXLD- hERRα、psPAX2和pMD2.G共转染293T细胞包装慢病毒,浓缩后测定病毒滴度,再将病毒感染A549细胞,用蛋白印迹方法测定感染病毒的A549细胞中hERRα的表达.选择合适滴度的病毒感染A549细胞,采用cell-titer的方法检测感染病毒的A549细胞的活力.结果 测序结果显示成功构建了重组质粒pWPXLD- hERRα,测定浓缩后的病毒滴度为1.8×108 TU/mL,蛋白印迹方法检测到慢病毒感染的A549细胞中b

  19. Molecular characterization of encoding plasmid-mediated ESBLs and AmpC β-lactamases genes in Citrobacter freundii%质粒介导产ESBLs与AmpCβ-内酰胺酶基因弗氏柠檬酸杆菌的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈坚; 余方友

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the resistant mechanism of Citrobacter freundii which coexisted with ESBLs and AmpC genes. METHODS A multi-resistant Citrobacter freundii was isolated from hospital by VITEK-60 system. The detection of ESBLs was performed by the CLSI-recommended confirmatory test, Cefoxitin three-dimentional test was presented to identify AmpC β-lactamases, the mimimal inhibitative concentration (MIC) was determined by E-test. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and sequencing were carried out for analyzing the encoding genes of β-lactamases. Conjugation study was performed to determine whether resistant genes were likely transferred by plasmid. RESULTS The isolate was highly resistant to ceftazidime (MICs,96 jug/ml), cefotaxime (MlCs,96 μg/ml), cefoxitin(MICs.256 μg/ml) , aztreonam(MICs, 192 fig/ml) , ampicillin(MICs,>256 μg/ml) and sinomin compositea(MICs,>32 fig/ml). The clinical isolate produced AmpCs and ESBLs. The presence of blacrx-M-3 and blaCMY-2 of clinical isolate were identified by PCR and sequenced. Those genes of clinical isolate could be transferred to Escherichia coli J53 through conjugation. CONCLUSION Citrobacter freundii carries ESBLs and AmpC β-lactamases genes synchronously, which were mediated by plasmid.%目的 研究一株同时产ESBLs和AmpC β-内酰胺酶弗氏柠檬酸杆菌(CFR)的耐药机制.方法 2008年1月从临床尿液标本中分离出多药耐药弗氏柠檬酸杆菌1株,采用双纸片扩散法检测产ESBLs,头孢西丁三维试验检测AmpC酶,E-test法测定抗菌药物最低抑菌浓度(MIC),聚合酶链反应(PCR)检测产ESBss和AmpC酶基因,DNA测序决定基因型;接合试验测定耐药基因的转移性.结果 临床分离出一株同时产ESBLs和AmpCβ-内酰胺酶的多药耐药弗氏柠檬酸杆菌,对头孢他啶、头孢噻肟、头孢西丁、氨曲南、氨苄西林、磺胺甲噁唑/甲氧苄啶的MIC分别为96、96、256、192、>256、>32 μg/ml,PCR扩增及测序

  20. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  1. In Silico Detection and Typing of Plasmids using PlasmidFinder and Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Zankari, Ea; García-Fernández, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    In the work presented here, we designed and developed two easy-to-use Web tools for in silico detection and characterization of whole-genome sequence (WGS) and whole-plasmid sequence data from members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. These tools will facilitate bacterial typing based on draft...... genomes of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae species by the rapid detection of known plasmid types. Replicon sequences from 559 fully sequenced plasmids associated with the family Enterobacteriaceae in the NCBI nucleotide database were collected to build a consensus database for integration...... sequences identified in the 559 fully sequenced plasmids. For plasmid multilocus sequence typing (pMLST) analysis, a database that is updated weekly was generated from www.pubmlst.org and integrated into a Web tool called pMLST. Both databases were evaluated using draft genomes from a collection...

  2. Establishment of a novel anabolism-based addiction system with an artificially introduced mevalonate pathway: complete stabilization of plasmids as universal application in white biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jens; Steinle, Anna; Reichelt, Rudolf; Ewering, Christian; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    Plasmid stability in recombinant microorganisms is a very important requirement for highly efficient plasmid-based production processes in biotechnology. To stably maintain plasmids, we developed in this study an efficient and stringent novel anabolism-based addiction system, which can be widely used. This novel addiction system is based on two components: (i) an Escherichia coli HMS174(DE3) knockout mutant of the ispH gene coding for 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (EC 1.17.1.2) of the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway, impairing the synthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and (ii) a completely synthetic and episomal mevalonate (MVA) pathway as an alternative supplier of essential IPP. The latter is encoded by a plasmid that contains the genes for HMG-CoA reductases from Lactococcus lactis and Staphylococcus aureus plus HMG-CoA-synthase, MVA kinase, MVP kinase and MVPP decarboxylase from S. aureus. This plasmid should then also harbor the genes for the protein or for the pathway that will be produced or that will be utilized for production of a chemical. To demonstrate the functionality of this addiction system, a mutated cyanophycin synthetase gene (cphA(6308)C595S) was used. To determine plasmid stabilities, flasks experiments in media supplied or not supplied with antibiotics were carried out with the knockout mutant and two control strains, one harboring plasmid pCOLADuet-1::MVA1-5::cphA(6308) and the other harboring a conventional expression plasmid pET-23a::cphA(6308). As revealed by measuring the colony-forming units of aliquots spread on solid media with or without antibiotics, the knockout mutant revealed a plasmid stability of 100% whereas the control strains exhibited plasmid stabilities of only 64% and 2%, respectively. Radiometric enzyme activity measurements for CphA revealed only 95% and 12.5% of the activity in the control strains harboring pCOLADuet-1::MVA1-5::cphA(6308) and pET-23a::cphA(6308), respectively, in

  3. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, W Florian; Welch, Timothy J; McDermott, Patrick F; Mammel, Mark K; LeClerc, J Eugene; White, David G; Cebula, Thomas A; Ravel, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug-resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we present the complete plasmid sequences of the IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 (143,963 bp), isolated in 1971 from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and of the cryptic IncA/C plasmid pRAx (49,763 bp), isolated from Escherichia coli transconjugant D7-3, which was obtained through pRA1 transfer in 1980. Using comparative sequence analysis of pRA1 and pRAx with recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family, we show that both plasmids provide novel insights into the evolution of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family and the minimal machinery necessary for stable IncA/C plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family evolved from a common ancestor, similar in composition to pRA1, through stepwise integration of horizontally acquired resistance gene arrays into a conserved plasmid backbone. Phylogenetic comparisons predict type IV secretion-like conjugative transfer operons encoded on the shared plasmid backbones to be closely related to a group of integrating conjugative elements, which use conjugative transfer for horizontal propagation but stably integrate into the host chromosome during vegetative growth. A hipAB toxin-antitoxin gene cluster found on pRA1, which in Escherichia coli is involved in the formation of persister cell subpopulations, suggests persistence as an early broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance mechanism in the evolution of IncA/C resistance plasmids.

  4. Plasmids of the pRM/pRF family occur in diverse Rickettsia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Burkhardt, Nicole Y; Felsheim, Roderick F; Kurtti, Timothy J; Munderloh, Ulrike G

    2008-02-01

    The recent discoveries of the pRF and pRM plasmids of Rickettsia felis and R. monacensis have contravened the long-held dogma that plasmids are not present in the bacterial genus Rickettsia (Rickettsiales; Rickettsiaceae). We report the existence of plasmids in R. helvetica, R. peacockii, R. amblyommii, and R. massiliae isolates from ixodid ticks and in an R. hoogstraalii isolate from an argasid tick. R. peacockii and four isolates of R. amblyommii from widely separated geographic locations contained plasmids that comigrated with pRM during pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and larger plasmids with mobilities similar to that of pRF. The R. peacockii plasmids were lost during long-term serial passage in cultured cells. R. montanensis did not contain a plasmid. Southern blots showed that sequences similar to those of a DnaA-like replication initiator protein, a small heat shock protein 2, and the Sca12 cell surface antigen genes on pRM and pRF were present on all of the plasmids except for that of R. massiliae, which lacked the heat shock gene and was the smallest of the plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii plasmid was most similar to pRM and contained apparent homologs of proline/betaine transporter and SpoT stringent response genes on pRM and pRF that were absent from the other plasmids. The R. hoogstraalii, R. helvetica, and R. amblyommii plasmids contained homologs of a pRM-carried gene similar to a Nitrobacter sp. helicase RecD/TraA gene, but none of the plasmids hybridized with a probe derived from a pRM-encoded gene similar to a Burkholderia sp. transposon resolvase gene.

  5. Kinetic Properties of Four Plasmid-Mediated AmpC β-Lactamases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauvois, Cédric; Ibuka, Akiko Shimizu; Celso, Almeida; Alba, Jimena; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Frère, Jean-Marie; Galleni, Moreno

    2005-01-01

    The heterologous production in Escherichia coli, the purification, and the kinetic characterization of four plasmid-encoded class C β-lactamases (ACT-1, MIR-1, CMY-2, and CMY-1) were performed. Except for their instability, these enzymes are very similar to the known chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamases. Their kinetic parameters did not show major differences from those obtained for the corresponding chromosomal enzymes. However, the Km values of CMY-2 for cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and oxacillin were significantly decreased compared to those of the chromosomal AmpC enzymes. Finally, the susceptibility patterns of different E. coli hosts producing a plasmid- or a chromosome-encoded class C enzyme toward β-lactam antibiotics are mainly due to the overproduction of the β-lactamase in the periplasmic space of the bacteria rather than to a specific catalytic profile of the plasmid-encoded β-lactamases. PMID:16189104

  6. Expression and function of variants of human catecholamine transporters lacking the fifth transmembrane region encoded by exon 6.

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    Chiharu Sogawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transporters for dopamine (DAT and norepinephrine (NET are members of the Na+- and Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporter family SLC6. There is a line of evidence that alternative splicing results in several isoforms of neurotransmitter transporters including NET. However, its relevance to the physiology and pathology of the neurotransmitter reuptake system has not been fully elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found novel isoforms of human DAT and NET produced by alternative splicing in human blood cells (DAT and placenta (NET, both of which lacked the region encoded by exon 6. RT-PCR analyses showed a difference in expression between the full length (FL and truncated isoforms in the brain and peripheral tissues, suggesting tissue-specific alternative splicing. Heterologous expression of the FL but not truncated isoforms of DAT and NET in COS-7 cells revealed transport activity. However, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy and a cell surface biotinylation assay demonstrated that the truncated as well as FL isoform was expressed at least in part in the plasma membrane at the cell surface, although the truncated DAT was distributed to the cell surface slower than FL DAT. A specific antibody to the C-terminus of DAT labeled the variant but not FL DAT, when cells were not treated with Triton for permeabilization, suggesting the C-terminus of the variant to be located extracellulary. Co-expression of the FL isoform with the truncated isoform in COS-7 cells resulted in a reduced uptake of substrates, indicating a dominant negative effect of the variant. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation assay revealed physical interaction between the FL and truncated isoforms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unique expression and function and the proposed membrane topology of the variants suggest the importance of isoforms of catecholamine transporters in monoaminergic signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues.

  7. Distinct functional specificities are associated with protein isoforms encoded by the Drosophila dorsal-ventral patterning gene pipe.

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    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhu, Xianjun; Stevens, Leslie M; Stein, David

    2009-08-01

    Spatially regulated transcription of the pipe gene in ventral cells of the Drosophila ovary follicle cell epithelium is a key event that specifies progeny embryo dorsal-ventral (DV) polarity. pipe encodes ten putative protein isoforms, all of which exhibit similarity to vertebrate glycosaminoglycan-modifying enzymes. Expression of one of the isoforms, Pipe-ST2, in follicle cells has previously been shown to be essential for DV patterning. pipe is also expressed in the embryonic salivary gland and its expression there is required for normal viability. Here, we show that in addition to Pipe-ST2, seven of the other Pipe isoforms are expressed in the ovary, whereas all Pipe isoforms are abundantly expressed in the embryo. Of the ten isoforms, only Pipe-ST2 can restore ventral and lateral pattern elements to the progeny of otherwise pipe-null mutant females. By contrast, three Pipe isoforms, but not Pipe-ST2, support the production of a novel pipe-dependent epitope present in the embryonic salivary gland. These data indicate that differences in functional specificity, and presumably enzymatic specificity, are associated with several of the Pipe isoforms. In addition, we show that uniform expression of the Pipe-ST2 isoform in the follicle cell layer of females otherwise lacking pipe expression leads to the formation of embryos with a DV axis that is appropriately oriented with respect to the intrinsic polarity of the eggshell. This suggests the existence of a second mechanism that polarizes the Drosophila embryo, in addition to the ventrally restricted transcription of the pipe gene.

  8. Identification and functional analysis of the erh1(+ gene encoding enhancer of rudimentary homolog from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

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    Marek K Krzyzanowski

    Full Text Available The ERH gene encodes a highly conserved small nuclear protein with a unique amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure but unknown function. The gene is present in animals, plants, and protists but to date has only been found in few fungi. Here we report that ERH homologs are also present in all four species from the genus Schizosaccharomyces, S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus, which, however, are an exception in this respect among Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The ERH protein sequence is moderately conserved within the genus (58% identity between S. pombe and S.japonicus, but the intron-rich genes have almost identical intron-exon organizations in all four species. In S. pombe, erh1(+ is expressed at a roughly constant level during vegetative growth and adaptation to unfavorable conditions such as nutrient limitation and hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Erh1p localizes preferentially to the nucleus with the exception of the nucleolus, but is also present in the cytoplasm. Cells lacking erh1(+ have an aberrant cell morphology and a comma-like shape when cultured to the stationary phase, and exhibit a delayed recovery from this phase followed by slower growth. Loss of erh1(+ in an auxotrophic background results in enhanced arrest in the G1 phase following nutritional stress, and also leads to hypersensitivity to agents inducing hyperosmotic stress (sorbitol, inhibiting DNA replication (hydroxyurea, and destabilizing the plasma membrane (SDS; this hypersensitivity can be abolished by expression of S. pombe erh1(+ and, to a lesser extent, S. japonicus erh1(+ or human ERH. Erh1p fails to interact with the human Ciz1 and PDIP46/SKAR proteins, known molecular partners of human ERH. Our data suggest that in Schizosaccharomyces sp. erh1(+ is non-essential for normal growth and Erh1p could play a role in response to adverse environmental conditions and in cell cycle regulation.

  9. Transcriptional analysis of the Escherichia coli ColV-Ia plasmid pS88 during growth in human serum and urine

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    Lemaître Chloé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequenced O45:K1:H7 Escherichia coli meningitis strain S88 harbors a large virulence plasmid. To identify possible genetic determinants of pS88 virulence, we examined the transcriptomes of 88 plasmidic ORFs corresponding to known and putative virulence genes, and 35 ORFs of unknown function. Results Quantification of plasmidic transcripts was obtained by quantitative real-time reverse transcription of extracted RNA, normalized on three housekeeping genes. The transcriptome of E. coli strain S88 grown in human serum and urine ex vivo were compared to that obtained during growth in Luria Bertani broth, with and without iron depletion. We also analyzed the transcriptome of a pS88-like plasmid recovered from a neonate with urinary tract infection. The transcriptome obtained after ex vivo growth in serum and urine was very similar to those obtained in iron-depleted LB broth. Genes encoding iron acquisition systems were strongly upregulated. ShiF and ORF 123, two ORFs encoding protein with hypothetical function and physically linked to aerobactin and salmochelin loci, respectively, were also highly expressed in iron-depleted conditions and may correspond to ancillary iron acquisition genes. Four ORFs were induced ex vivo, independently of the iron concentration. Other putative virulence genes such as iss, etsC, ompTp and hlyF were not upregulated in any of the conditions studied. Transcriptome analysis of the pS88-like plasmid recovered in vivo showed a similar pattern of induction but at much higher levels. Conclusion We identify new pS88 genes potentially involved in the growth of E. coli meningitis strain S88 in human serum and urine.

  10. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria. PMID:24260361

  11. Bacterial mitosis: partitioning protein ParA oscillates in spiral-shaped structures and positions plasmids at mid-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2004-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes oscillating ATPase ParA, DNA binding protein ParB and two cis-acting DNA regions to which ParB binds (parC1 and parC2). Three independent techniques were used to investigate the subcellular localization of plasmids carrying par2. In cells w...

  12. Mobilization properties of small ColE1-like plasmids carrying kanamycin resistance gene isolated from Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Previously we isolated and characterized various groups of small kanamycin resistance (KanR) ColE1-like plasmids from different serotypes of Salmonella enterica isolates. These plasmids all carried the aph(3)-I gene encoding the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase responsible for the kanam...

  13. Plasmids and rickettsial evolution: insight from Rickettsia felis.

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    Joseph J Gillespie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome sequence of Rickettsia felis revealed a number of rickettsial genetic anomalies that likely contribute not only to a large genome size relative to other rickettsiae, but also to phenotypic oddities that have confounded the categorization of R. felis as either typhus group (TG or spotted fever group (SFG rickettsiae. Most intriguing was the first report from rickettsiae of a conjugative plasmid (pRF that contains 68 putative open reading frames, several of which are predicted to encode proteins with high similarity to conjugative machinery in other plasmid-containing bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using phylogeny estimation, we determined the mode of inheritance of pRF genes relative to conserved rickettsial chromosomal genes. Phylogenies of chromosomal genes were in agreement with other published rickettsial trees. However, phylogenies including pRF genes yielded different topologies and suggest a close relationship between pRF and ancestral group (AG rickettsiae, including the recently completed genome of R. bellii str. RML369-C. This relatedness is further supported by the distribution of pRF genes across other rickettsiae, as 10 pRF genes (or inactive derivatives also occur in AG (but not SFG rickettsiae, with five of these genes characteristic of typical plasmids. Detailed characterization of pRF genes resulted in two novel findings: the identification of oriV and replication termination regions, and the likelihood that a second proposed plasmid, pRFdelta, is an artifact of the original genome assembly. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, we propose a new rickettsial classification scheme with the addition of a fourth lineage, transitional group (TRG rickettsiae, that is unique from TG and SFG rickettsiae and harbors genes from possible exchanges with AG rickettsiae via conjugation. We offer insight into the evolution of a plastic plasmid system in rickettsiae, including the role plasmids may have played in

  14. Microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA coated on cationic PLGA nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Wonganan, Piyanuch; Sandoval, Michael A.; Li, Xinran; Zhu, Saijie; Cui, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA can potentially induce a stronger immune response than intramuscular injection of the same plasmid DNA. In the present study, we showed that the immune responses induced by transcutaneous immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a skin area pretreated with solid microneedles were significantly enhanced by coating the plasmid DNA on the surface of cationic nanoparticles. In addition, the net surface charge of the DNA-coated nanoparticles significantly affected their in vitro skin permeation and their ability to induce immune responses in vivo. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged anoparticles elicited a stronger immune response than with plasmid DNA-coated net negatively charged nanoparticles or by intramuscular immunization with plasmid DNA alone. Transcutaneous immunization with plasmid DNA-coated net positively charged nanoparticles induced comparable immune responses as intramuscular injection of them, but transcutaneous immunization was able to induce specific mucosal immunity and a more balanced T helper type 1 and type 2 response. The ability of the net positively charged DNA-coated nanoparticles to induce a strong immune response through microneedle-mediated transcutaneous immunization may be attributed to their ability to increase the expression of the antigen gene encoded by the plasmid and to more effectively stimulate the maturation of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:22921518

  15. A DNA polymerase mutation that suppresses the segregation bias of an ARS plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtteman, S W; Elder, R T

    1993-03-01

    Yeast autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids exhibit an unusual segregation pattern during mitosis. While the nucleus divides equally into mother and daughter cells, all copies of the ARS plasmid will often remain in the mother cell. A screen was designed to isolate mutations that suppress this segregation bias. A plasmid with a weak ARS (wARS) that displayed an extremely high segregation bias was constructed. When cells were grown under selection for the wARS plasmid, the resulting colonies grew slowly and had abnormal morphology. A spontaneous recessive mutation that restored normal colony morphology was identified. This mutation suppressed plasmid segregation bias, as indicated by the increased stability of the wARS plasmid in the mutant cells even though the plasmid was present at a lower copy number. An ARS1 plasmid was also more stable in mutant cells than in wild-type cells. The wild-type allele for this mutant gene was cloned and identified as POL delta (CDC2). This gene encodes DNA polymerase delta, which is essential for DNA replication. These results indicate that DNA polymerase delta plays some role in causing the segregation bias of ARS plasmids.

  16. Decoding the encoding of functional brain networks: An fMRI classification comparison of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), independent component analysis (ICA), and sparse coding algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianwen; Douglas, Pamela K; Wu, Ying Nian; Brody, Arthur L; Anderson, Ariana E

    2017-04-15

    Brain networks in fMRI are typically identified using spatial independent component analysis (ICA), yet other mathematical constraints provide alternate biologically-plausible frameworks for generating brain networks. Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) would suppress negative BOLD signal by enforcing positivity. Spatial sparse coding algorithms (L1 Regularized Learning and K-SVD) would impose local specialization and a discouragement of multitasking, where the total observed activity in a single voxel originates from a restricted number of possible brain networks. The assumptions of independence, positivity, and sparsity to encode task-related brain networks are compared; the resulting brain networks within scan for different constraints are used as basis functions to encode observed functional activity. These encodings are then decoded using machine learning, by using the time series weights to predict within scan whether a subject is viewing a video, listening to an audio cue, or at rest, in 304 fMRI scans from 51 subjects. The sparse coding algorithm of L1 Regularized Learning outperformed 4 variations of ICA (pcoding algorithms. Holding constant the effect of the extraction algorithm, encodings using sparser spatial networks (containing more zero-valued voxels) had higher classification accuracy (pcoding algorithms suggests that algorithms which enforce sparsity, discourage multitasking, and promote local specialization may capture better the underlying source processes than those which allow inexhaustible local processes such as ICA. Negative BOLD signal may capture task-related activations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Ups and Downs of the Posteromedial Cortex: Age- and Amyloid-Related Functional Alterations of the Encoding/Retrieval Flip in Cognitively Normal Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Patrizia; Hedden, Trey; Huijbers, Willem; Ward, Andrew; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Neural networks supporting memory function decline with increasing age. Accumulation of amyloid-β, a histopathological finding in Alzheimer's disease, is a likely contributor. Posteromedial cortices (PMCs) are particularly vulnerable to early amyloid pathology and play a role in both encoding and retrieval processes. The extent to which aging and amyloid influence the ability to modulate activity between these processes within the PMC was investigated by combining positron emission tomography-amyloid imaging with functi